Science.gov

Sample records for airborne gamma-ray spectra

  1. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  2. Monitoring radioactive plumes by airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Grasty, R.L.; Hovgaard, J.; Multala, J.

    1996-06-01

    Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer surveys using large volume sodium-iodide detectors are routinely flown throughout the world for mineral exploration and geological mapping. Techniques have now been developed to detect and map man-made sources of radiation. In Canada, airborne gamma-rays surveys have been flown around nuclear reactors to map {sup 41}Ar plumes from nuclear reactors and to calculate the dose rate at ground level. In May 1986, the Finnish Geological survey aircraft flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. As the aircraft flew through the plume, the aircraft became increasingly contaminated. By measuring the final aircraft contamination, the activity of the plume could be separated from the contamination due to the aircraft. Within 1 h of encountering the plume, the aircraft activity was comparable to the maximum levels found in the plume. From an analysis of the gamma-ray spectra, the concentration of {sup 131}I and {sup 140}La within the plume were calculated as a function of time.

  3. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  4. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239Pu Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  5. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    DOE PAGES

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-raymore » multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.« less

  6. Pulsar gamma-rays: Spectra luminosities and efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The general characteristics of pulsar gamma ray spectra are presented for a model where the gamma rays are produced by curvature radiation from energetic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production. The shape of the spectrum is found to depend on pulsar period, magnetic field strength, and primary particle energy. By a comparison of numerically calculated spectra with the observed spectra of the Crab and Vela pulsars, it is determined that primary particles must be accelerated to energies of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power mc sq. A genaral formula for pulsar gamma ray luminosity is determined and is found to depend on period and field strength.

  7. Resonant Compton scattering and gamma-ray burst continuum spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomson limit of resonant inverse Compton scattering in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars is considered as a mechanism for producing gamma-ray burst continuum spectra. Photon production spectra and electron cooling rates are presented using the full magnetic Thomson cross-section. Model emission spectra are obtained as self-consistent solutions of a set of photon and electron kinetic equations, displaying spectral breaks and other structure at gamma-ray energies.

  8. Frequency spectrum analysis for spectrum stabilization in airborne gamma-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guoqiang; Tan, Chengjun; Ge, Liangquan; Zhang, Qingxian; Gu, Yi

    2014-02-01

    Abnormal multi-crystal spectral drifts often can be observed when power on the airborne gamma-ray spectrometer. Currently, these spectral drifts of each crystal are generally eliminated through manual adjustment, which is time-consuming and labor-ineffective. To realize this quick automatic spectrum stabilization of multi-crystal, a frequency spectrum analysis method for natural gamma-ray background spectrum is put forward in this paper to replace traditional spectrum stabilization method used characteristic peak. Based on the polynomial fitting of high harmonics in frequency spectrum and gamma-ray spectral drift, it calculates overall spectral drift of natural gamma-ray spectrum and adjusts the gain of spectrometer by this spectral drift value, thus completing quick spectrum stabilization in the power on stage of spectrometer. This method requires no manual intervention and can obtain the overall spectral drift value automatically under no time-domain pre-processing to the natural gamma-ray spectra. The spectral drift value calculated by this method has an absolute error less than five channels (1024 resolution) and a relative error smaller than 0.80%, which can satisfy the quick automatic spectrum stabilization requirement when power on the airborne gamma-ray spectrometer instead of manual operation.

  9. A COMPARISON OF GADRAS SIMULATED AND MEASURED GAMMA RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-28

    Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

  10. Covariance analysis of gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-15

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  11. Covariance Analysis of Gamma Ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-01

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  12. A code to simulate nuclear reactor inventories and associated gamma-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A J; Allyson, J D; Sanderson, D C

    2001-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to simulate the gamma-ray spectra that would be measured by airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) systems from sources containing short-lived fission products. The code uses simple numerical methods to simulate the production and decay of fission products and generates spectra for sodium iodide (NaI) detectors using Monte Carlo codes. A new Monte Carlo code using a virtual array of detectors to reduce simulation times for airborne geometries is described. Spectra generated for a short irradiation and laboratory geometry have been compared with an experimental data set. The agreement is good. Spectra have also been generated for airborne geometries and longer irradiation periods. The application of this code to generate AGS spectra for accident scenarios and their uses in the development and evaluation of spectral analysis methods for such situations are discussed.

  13. Real-Time Airborne Gamma-Ray Background Estimation Using NASVD with MLE and Radiation Transport for Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Jordan, David V.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Kernan, Warnick J.

    2015-06-01

    Helicopter-mounted gamma-ray detectors can provide law enforcement officials the means to quickly and accurately detect, identify, and locate radiological threats over a wide geographical area. The ability to accurately distinguish radiological threat-generated gamma-ray signatures from background gamma radiation in real time is essential in order to realize this potential. This problem is non-trivial, especially in urban environments for which the background may change very rapidly during flight. This exacerbates the challenge of estimating background due to the poor counting statistics inherent in real-time airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. To address this, we have developed a new technique for real-time estimation of background gamma radiation from aerial measurements. This method is built upon on the noise-adjusted singular value decomposition (NASVD) technique that was previously developed for estimating the potassium (K), uranium (U), and thorium (T) concentrations in soil post-flight. The method can be calibrated using K, U, and T spectra determined from radiation transport simulations along with basis functions, which may be determined empirically by applying maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) to previously measured airborne gamma-ray spectra. The method was applied to both measured and simulated airborne gamma-ray spectra, with and without man-made radiological source injections. Compared to schemes based on simple averaging, this technique was less sensitive to background contamination from the injected man-made sources and may be particularly useful when the gamma-ray background frequently changes during the course of the flight.

  14. Cyclotron scattering lines in gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Preece, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    If cyclotron scattering, rather than absorption, is responsible for the line features observed recently in two gamma-ray burst spectra (Murakami et al., 1988), then the second and higher harmonics are due to resonant scattering events that excite the electron to Landau levels above the ground state. Here, relativistic Compton scattering cross sections are used to estimate the expected ratio of third to second harmonics in the presence of Doppler broadening. At the field strength (1.7 TG) required to give first and second harmonics at 19 keV and 38 keV, there should be no detectable third harmonic in the spectrum.

  15. The sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik J.; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Narayana Bhat, P.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the sharpness of the time-resolved prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Aims: We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. Methods: We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1113 spectra being analyzed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare them to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. Results: We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrotron function. The single temperature, single emission time, and location blackbody function is found to be sharper than all the spectra. No general evolutionary trend of the sharpness angle is observed, neither per burst nor for the whole population. It is found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to % of the peak flux. Conclusions: Our results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed GRB prompt spectra. Because any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically thin

  16. Gamma-ray spectra from neutron capture on /sup 87/Sr

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.E.; Becker, J.A.; Stelts, M.L.

    1981-07-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum following neutron capture on /sup 87/Sr was measured at 3 neutron energies: E/sub n/ = thermal, 2 keV, and 24 keV. Gamma rays were detected in a three-crystal Ge(Li)-NaI-NaI pair spectrometer. Gamma-ray intensities deduced from these spectra by spectral unfolding are presented.

  17. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  18. On the Energy Spectra of Individual Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailyan, B. G.; Briggs, M. S.; Cramer, E. S.; Connaughton, V.; Dwyer, J. R.; Fitzpatrick, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) receives enough photons from some TGFs that spectral fitting of individual TGFs is possible. Previous TGF spectral fits relied upon summing the data from many TGFs. However, this spectral analysis of individual GBM TGFs is difficult because the number of photons is only adequate and because the extreme intensity of TGFs requires the analysis to correct for spectral distortions caused by pulse pileup. For each TGF in the sample, we compare Monte Carlo simulated TGF spectra to the observed detector counts. For each comparison, the best fit intensity is found, including correcting the predicted spectrum for pulse pileup. Using likelihood, we determine which of the simulations are consistent with each TGF, thus constraining the properties (e.g., altitude, beam width, etc.) of the TGF.

  19. The low energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.; Lamb, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    The implications of observed gamma-ray burst spectra for the physical conditions and geometries of the sources are examined. It is noted that an explanation of the continua in terms of optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung requires a relatively large area but a fairly shallow depth. On the other hand, a spectrum similar to that observed could be produced by rapid flickering of sources with less extreme geometries if each flicker emits a Comptonized thermal spectrum. Either field inhomogeneities or plasma motions are required to interpret the low energy features as cyclotron extinction. An alternative explanation is photoelectric absorption by heavy atoms; this requires a field strength high enough to make one-photon electron positron annihilation possible. Observational tests of these possibilities are proposed

  20. Detection of Anomalous Gamma-Ray Spectra for On-Site Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Pfund, David M.

    2009-05-29

    This work aims to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges inherent in performing On Site Inspection activities under the authority of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Inspectors require equipment that can reliably identify the radionuclide signatures of nuclear test explosions amid a background of environmental contamination. Detection of these radiation anomalies by mobile search teams in the air or on the ground can narrow the search field and target specific areas for more detailed inspection or sampling. The need to protect confidential information of the inspected State Party, especially regarding past nuclear testing activities, suggests that full access to measured gamma-ray spectra should be limited. Spectral blinding techniques---in which only a fraction of the information derived from the spectra is displayed and stored---have the potential to meet the needs of both the OSI team and the State Party. In this paper, we describe one such algorithm that we have developed for identifying anomalous spectra from handheld, mobile, or aerial sensors. The algorithm avoids potential sensitivities by reducing the gamma-ray spectrum into a single number that is displayed and stored. A high value indicates that the spectrum is anomalous. The proposed technique does not rely on identifying specific radionuclides, operates well in the presence of high background variability, and can be configured to ignore specific spectral components. In previous work, the algorithm has proven very effective in classifying gamma-ray spectra as anomalous or not, even with poor statistical information. We performed a limited simulation of an airborne search scenario to demonstrate the potential algorithm for OSI missions. The technique successfully detected an injected source of interest whose count rate was an order of magnitude below background levels. We also configured the algorithm to ignore 137Cs as irrelevant to the mission. The resulting alarm metrics were

  1. Broadband turbulent spectra in gamma-ray burst light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Frontera, Filippo

    2014-05-10

    Broadband power density spectra offer a window to understanding turbulent behavior in the emission mechanism and, at the highest frequencies, in the putative inner engines powering long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We describe a chirp search method alongside Fourier analysis for signal detection in the Poisson noise-dominated, 2 kHz sampled, BeppoSAX light curves. An efficient numerical implementation is described in O(Nnlog n) operations, where N is the number of chirp templates and n is the length of the light-curve time series, suited for embarrassingly parallel processing. For the detection of individual chirps over a 1 s duration, the method is one order of magnitude more sensitive in signal-to-noise ratio than Fourier analysis. The Fourier-chirp spectra of GRB 010408 and GRB 970816 show a continuation of the spectral slope with up to 1 kHz of turbulence identified in low-frequency Fourier analysis. The same continuation is observed in an average spectrum of 42 bright, long GRBs. An outlook on a similar analysis of upcoming gravitational wave data is included.

  2. Experimental simulation of A-bomb gamma ray spectra: revisited.

    PubMed

    Pattison, John E; Payne, Lester C; Hugtenburg, Richard P; Beddoe, Alun H; Charles, Monty W

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported recently that the A-bomb gamma ray spectra received by the colon of the average Japanese survivor of Hiroshima and Nagasaki may be experimentally simulated using a hospital-based Philips SL15 linear accelerator. The simulated A-bomb gamma radiation may be used in radiobiology experiments to determine, amongst other things, the biological effectiveness of the A-bomb gamma radiation. However, in that study, the electron beams from the linear accelerator were poorly defined and photon contamination was ignored. In the study reported here, a Varian Clinac 2100C linear accelerator has been used for the same purpose but with photon contamination included in better defined output electron beams. It is found that the A-bomb gamma radiation can still be matched to an acceptable degree (<10%). The cause of the slightly poorer fit was due mainly to the different ranges of energies available from the linear accelerators used. The absorbed dose received by model breasts was also estimated in this study for the same situations as in the previous study. The ratio of the breast to colon doses was found to be only (3.9 +/- 4.0)% low compared with the expected values of 1.17 and 1.16 for Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively. These results provide further confirmation of the acceptability of the simple cylindrically symmetrical body models employed in these studies to represent the average Japanese survivor.

  3. Distribution of iron&titanium on the lunar surface from lunar prospector gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T. H.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Elphic, R. C.; Gasnault, O. M.; Maurice, S.; Moore, K. R.; Binder, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma ray pulse height spectra acquired by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) contain information on the abundance of major elements in the lunar surface, including O, Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, and Th. With the exception of Th and K, prompt gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with surface materials are used to determine elemental abundance. Most of these gamma rays are produced by inelastic scattering of fast neutrons and by neutron capture. The production of neutron-induced gamma rays reaches a maximum deep below the surface (e.g. {approx}140 g/cm{sup 2} for inelastic scattering and {approx}50 g/cm{sup 2} for capture). Consequently, gamma rays sense the bulk composition of lunar materials, in contrast to optical methods [e.g. Clementine Spectral Reflectance (CSR)], which only sample the top few microns. Because most of the gamma rays are produced deep beneath the surface, few escape unscattered and the continuum of scattered gamma rays dominates the spectrum. In addition, due to the resolution of the spectrometer, there are few well-isolated peaks and peak fitting algorithms must be used to deconvolve the spectrum in order to determine the contribution of individual elements.

  4. Distribution of iron and titanium on the lunar surface from lunar prospector gamma ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, T.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma ray pulse height spectra acquired by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) contain information on the abundance of major elements in the lunar surface, including O, Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, and Th. With the exception of Th and K, prompt gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with surface materials are used to determine elemental abundance. Most of these gamma rays are produced by inelastic scattering of fast neutrons and by neutrons and by neutron capture. The production of neutron-induced gamma rays reaches a maximum deep below the surface (e.g. approximately 140g/cm2 for inelastic scattering and approximately 50 g/cm2 for capture). Consequently, gamma rays sense the bulk composition of lunar materials, in contrast to optical methods (e.g. Clementine Spectral Reflectance (CSR)), which only sample the top few microns. Because most of the gamma rays are produced deep beneath the surface, few escape unscattered and the continuum of scattered gamma rays dominates the spectrum. In addition, due to the resolution of the spectrometer, there are few well-isolated peaks and peak fitting algorithms must be used to deconvolve the spectrum on order to determine the contribution of individual elements.

  5. Individual power density spectra of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Amati, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Timing analysis can be a powerful tool with which to shed light on the still obscure emission physics and geometry of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fourier power density spectra (PDS) characterise time series as stochastic processes and can be used to search for coherent pulsations and, more in general, to investigate the dominant variability timescales in astrophysical sources. Because of the limited duration and of the statistical properties involved, modelling the PDS of individual GRBs is challenging, and only average PDS of large samples have been discussed in the literature thus far. Aims: We aim at characterising the individual PDS of GRBs to describe their variability in terms of a stochastic process, to explore their variety, and to carry out for the first time a systematic search for periodic signals and for a link between PDS properties and other GRB observables. Methods: We present a Bayesian procedure that uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique and apply it to study the individual PDS of 215 bright long GRBs detected with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope in the 15-150 keV band from January 2005 to May 2015. The PDS are modelled with a power-law either with or without a break. Results: Two classes of GRBs emerge: with or without a unique dominant timescale. A comparison with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals similar distributions of PDS slopes. Unexpectedly, GRBs with subsecond-dominant timescales and duration longer than a few tens of seconds in the source frame appear to be either very rare or altogether absent. Three GRBs are found with possible evidence for a periodic signal at 3.0-3.2σ (Gaussian) significance, corresponding to a multi-trial chance probability of ~1%. Thus, we found no compelling evidence for periodic signal in GRBs. Conclusions: The analogy between the PDS of GRBs and of AGNs could tentatively indicate similar stochastic processes that rule BH accretion across different BH mass scales and objects

  6. Photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons - Comparison with gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    The model of gamma-ray-burst spectra proposed by Zdziarski and Lamb (1986, 1987) is reviewed and compared with observed spectra. In the model, the spectrum arises from multiple Compton scatterings in a nonthermal source with a deficit of soft photons. The steady-state electron distribution in such a source is a nonthermal power law that joins at low energies onto a thermal distribution that may be either optically thick or thin. Both cases lead naturally to a two-component spectrum with a photon-energy index in the X-ray spectrum which is much less than one and a photon-energy index in the gamma-ray spectrum which is larger than the X-ray photon-energy index. Fits to the observed gamma-ray-burst spectra (where data exist for both X-ray and gamma-ray energies) show good agreement with the model.

  7. Analysis of Phobos mission gamma ray spectra from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Floyd, S. R.; Squyres, S. W.; Whelan, J. T.; Bamford, G. J.; Coldwell, R. L.; Rester, A. C.; Surkov, Iu. A.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of the elemental composition of the surface of a planetary body can be achieved, in many cases, by remote-sensing gamma ray spectroscopy. A gamma ray spectrometer was carried on the Soviet spacecraft Phobos-2, and obtained data while in an elliptical orbit around Mars. Results of two independent approaches to data analysis, one by the Soviet group and one by an American group are reported. The results for five elements are given for two different orbits of Mars. Major geologic units that contribute to the signal for each orbit have been identified. The results from the two techniques are in general agreement and there appear to be no geologically significant differences between the results for each orbit.

  8. Gamma-ray burst spectra and time histories from 2 to 400keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenimore, E. E.

    1999-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray burst detector on Ginga consisted of a proportional counter to observe the x-rays and a scintillation counter to observe the gamma-rays. It was ideally suited to study the x-rays associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Ginga detected ~120 GRBs and 22 of them had sufficient statistics to determine spectra from 2 to 400keV. Although the Ginga and BATSE trigger criteria were very similar, the distribution of spectral parameters was different. Ginga observed bend energies in the spectra down to 2keV and had a larger fraction of bursts with low energy power law indexes greater than zero. The average ratio of energy in the x-ray band (2 to 10keV) compared to the gamma-ray band (50 to 300keV) was 24%. Some events had more energy in the x-ray band than in the gamma-ray band. One Ginga event had a period of time preceding the gamma rays that was effectively pure x-ray emission. This x-ray ``preactivity'' might be due to the penchant for the GRB time structure to be broader at lower energy rather than a different physical process. The x-rays tend to rise and fall slower than the gamma rays but they both tend to peak at about the same time. This argues against models involving the injection of relativistic electrons that cool by synchrotron radiation.

  9. On the spectra and pulse profiles of gamma-ray pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, Steven J.; Dermer, Charles D.

    1994-01-01

    We model spectra and pulse profiles of gamma-ray pulsars assuming that the pulsar's magnetic axis is nearly aligned with its rotation axis. In this model, the nonthermal energy of electrons flowing outward along field lines connected to the light cylinder is efficiently converted to gamma rays via magnetic Compton scattering of optical and soft X-ray photons. The hard photons initiate a pair cascade in the pulsar magnetosphere through magnetic pair production followed by synchrotron emission. The calculated spectra are used to fit gamma-ray pulsar observations. This model produces a hollow cone of emission which can reproduce both the broad single-peaked and narrow double-peaked pulse profiles observed from gamma-ray pulsars.

  10. ON WEAK REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander

    2012-05-20

    Line-of-sight interactions of cosmic rays provide a natural explanation of the hard gamma-ray spectra of distant blazars, which are believed to be capable of producing both gamma rays and cosmic rays. For sources with redshifts z {approx}> 0.1, secondary gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray interactions with background photons close to an observer can dominate over primary gamma rays originating at the source. The transition from one component to another is accompanied by a change in the spectral index depending on the source redshift. We present theoretical predictions and show that they agree with the data from Fermi Large Area Telescope. This agreement, combined with the spectral data from Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, provides evidence of cosmic-ray acceleration by active galactic nuclei and opens new opportunities for studying photon backgrounds and intergalactic magnetic fields.

  11. Portable microcomputer unit for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Camp, D.C.

    1981-10-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed for the IAEA to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, and a 20-character thermal printer for hardcopy output. Only the positions of the 148-keV Pu-241 and 208-keV U-237 peaks are required for spectral analysis. The unit was tested against gamma-ray spectra taken of NBS plutonium standards and IAEA spectra. Results obtained are presented.

  12. The gamma-ray spectra of halocarbons in positron-electron annihilation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. G.; Zhu, Y. H.; Liu, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The gamma-ray spectra of the positron annihilation process in methane CH4 and its fully substituent halocarbons CF4, CCl4, and CBr4 have been studied. The theoretical predictions of the inner valence electrons agree well with the experimental measurements for all these molecules. That the outermost s electrons in carbon or halogen atoms dominate the gamma-ray spectra has been confirmed for the first time. The positrophilic site has also been found in these molecules and understanding of annihilation processes in molecules has been enhanced.

  13. An MS-DOS-based program for analyzing plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Buckley, W.M.

    1989-09-07

    A plutonium gamma-ray analysis system that operates on MS-DOS-based computers has been developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopics. The program titled IAEAPU consists of three separate applications: a data-transfer application for transferring spectral data from a CICERO multichannel analyzer to a binary data file, a data-analysis application to analyze plutonium gamma-ray spectra, for plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percents of total plutonium, and a data-quality assurance application to check spectral data for proper data-acquisition setup and performance. Volume 3 contains the software listings for these applications.

  14. Effects of axion-photon mixing on gamma-ray spectra from magnetized astrophysical sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Sigl, Guenter

    2007-12-15

    Astrophysical {gamma}-ray sources come in a variety of sizes and magnetizations. We deduce general conditions under which {gamma}-ray spectra from such sources would be significantly affected by axion-photon mixing. We show that, depending on strength and coherence of the magnetic field, axion couplings down to {approx}(10{sup 13}GeV){sup -1} can give rise to significant axion-photon conversions in the environment of accreting massive black holes. Resonances can occur between the axion mass term and the plasma frequency term as well as between the plasma frequency term and the vacuum Cotton-Mouton shift. Both resonances and nonresonant transitions could induce detectable features or even strong suppressions in finite energy intervals of {gamma}-ray spectra from active galactic nuclei. Such effects can occur at keV to TeV energies for couplings that are currently allowed by all experimental constraints.

  15. Inclusive gamma-ray spectra from psi/3095/ and psi-prime/3684/ decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddick, C. J.; Burnett, T. H.; Masek, G. E.; Miller, E. S.; Smith, J. G.; Stronski, J. P.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vernon, W.; Badtke, D. H.; Barnett, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Inclusive gamma-ray experiments were carried out in a e(+)e(-) colliding-beam apparatus with NaI(Tl) arrays as detectors. The inclusive gamma-ray spectra, after cosmic-ray background subtraction, are shown as histograms for the decays of the psi(3095) and psi-prime(3684). The psi spectrum has no significant narrow structure, while the psi-prime spectrum shows at least four peaks. Three major radiative decays of the psi-prime(3684) are found, and their respective branching fractions are computed.

  16. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: north/south tieline. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted along the 99/sup 0/ longitude meridian from the Canadian border southward to the Mexican border. A total of 1555 line miles of geophysical data were acquired and, subsequently, compiled. The north-south tieline was flown as part of the National Uranium Resources Evaluation. NURE is a program of the US Department of Energy's Grand Junction, Colorado, office to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  17. Simulation of gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rester, A. C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL was designed to allow the operator to follow the path of a gamma-ray through a detector, shield and collimator whose dimensions are entered by the operator. It can also be used to simulate spectra that would be generated by a detector. Several improvements have been made to the program within the last few months. The detector, shield and collimator dimensions can now be entered through an interactive menu whose options are discussed below. In addition, spectra containing more than one gamma-ray energy can now be generated with the menu - for isotopes listed in the program. Adding isotopes to the main routine is also quite easy. Subroutines have been added to enable the operator to specify the material and dimensions of a collimator. This report details the progress made in simulating gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. In addition, a short discussion of work done in the related areas of pulse shape analysis and the spectral analysis is included. The pulse shape analysis and spectral analysis work is being performed pursuant to the requirements of contract F-94-C-0006, for the Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force.

  18. Consistency of time dilation in temporal profiles and spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noriss, J. P.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Bonnell, J. T.; Scargle, J. D.; Davis, S. P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1995-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances-a possibility suggested by their isotropic distribution and spatial inhomogeneity-then the temporal profiles and spectra of more distant sources will be time dilated compared to those of relatively nearby sources. Analyses of bright and dim Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) gamma-ray bursts yield a relative time-dilation factor of 2.3 on timescales of pulses and event durations. We redshift the spectra of time intervals near the intensity peaks of the bright sample on a trial grid and compare with spectra of the dim sample. A redshift factor of order two-with wide latitude permitted-brings the spectra of the two brightness groups into alignment. Thus there is coarse agreement with the time-dilation factor found in the temporal domain.

  19. Plutonium isotopic determination from gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Skourikhine, A.N.; Strittmatter, R.B.; Zardecki, A.

    1998-12-31

    The use of low- and medium-resolution room-temperature detectors for the nondestructive assay of nuclear materials has widespread applications to the safeguarding of nuclear materials. The challenge to using these detectors is the inherent difficulty of the spectral analysis to determine the amount of specific nuclear materials in the measured samples. This is especially true for extracting plutonium isotopic content from low- and medium-resolution spectral lines that are not well resolved. In this paper, neural networks trained by stochastic and singular value decomposition algorithms are applied to retrieve the plutonium isotopic content from a simulated NaI spectra. The simulated sample consists of isotopes {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. It is demonstrated that the neutral network optimized by singular value decomposition (SVD) and stochastic training algorithms is capable of estimating plutonium content consistently resulting in an average error much smaller than the error previously reported.

  20. Gamma ray Emission Spectra from Dark matter annihilation in dwarf galaxy Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duorah, Kalpana

    2015-08-01

    The gamma ray emission from Dark Matter annihilation in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has been studied. Dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are through to be the repository of dark matter due to their high mass to light ratio. Draco is believed to emit energy due to certain dark matter candidates. One of the most motivated dark matter appears to be the neutralino as predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard model(MSSM). The mass of the neutralino is constrained to be in the range 6GeV to 100TeV by the CMB measurements and accelerator searches. Gamma Ray Spectra and fluxes have been calculated for neutral no annihilation over a mass range (10-100) GeV. The gamma ray flux from the annihilation of 100GeVneutralino in the dSph galaxy Draco is found to be ~1.6x10^(-10) cm^(-2)s^(-1)GeV^(-1) . This is found to be agreeable with the observed flux as measured from a NFW density profile for dark matter distribution in Draco. The gamma ray distribution for neutral no annihilation shows a maximum value near the centre and found to falls off as radially.

  1. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  2. Distortion of pulse-height spectra of neutron capture gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, A.; Harada, H.; Nakamura, S.; Hori, J.; Igashira, M.; Ohsaki, T.; Ohgama, K.

    2006-03-13

    A distortion of pulse-height spectra of neutron capture {gamma}-rays caused by {gamma}-flash at neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurement using a pulse neutron source has been investigated. Pulses from C6D6 detectors accumulated by flash-ADC were processed with both traditional analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and flash-ADC operational modes. A correction factor of {gamma}-ray yields, due to baseline shift, was quantitatively obtained by comparing the pulse-height spectra of the two data-collecting modes. The magnitude of the correction factor depends on the time, which passed after {gamma}-flash, and has complicated time dependence with a changing sign.

  3. Relationships between ground and airborne gamma-ray spectrometric survey data, North Ras Millan, Southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Mohamed A S

    2016-02-01

    In the last decades of years, there was considerable growth in the use of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry. With this growth, there was an increasing need to standardize airborne measurements, so that they can be independent of survey parameters. Acceptable procedures were developed for converting airborne to ground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of total-count intensity as well as, potassium, equivalent uranium and equivalent thorium concentrations, due to natural sources of radiation. The present study aims mainly to establish relationships between ground and airborne gamma-ray spectrometric data, North Ras Millan, Southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. The relationships between airborne and ground gamma-ray spectrometric data were deduced for the original and separated rock units in the study area. Various rocks in the study area, represented by Quaternary Wadi sediments, Cambro-Ordovician sandstones, basic dykes and granites, are shown on the detailed geologic map. The structures are displayed, which located on the detailed geologic map, are compiled from the integration of previous geophysical and surface geological studies. PMID:26650828

  4. Calculated Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectra across the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Sterbentz

    2008-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra are calculated using the MCNP5 computer code and a one-sixth core model of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor based on the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor. Spectra are calculated in the five inner reflector graphite block rings, three annular active core fuel rings, three outer graphite reflector block rings, and the core barrel. The neutron spectra are block and fuel pin averages and are calculated as a function of temperature and burnup. Also provided are the total, fast, and thermal radial profile fluxes and core barrel dpa rates.

  5. BATSE Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra. Part 3; Low-Energy Behavior of Time-Averaged Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Matteson, J. L.; Band, D. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Meegan, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze time-averaged spectra from 86 bright gamma-ray bursts from the first 5 years of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to determine whether the lowest energy data are consistent with a standard spectra form fit to the data at all energies. The BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors have the capability to observe photons as low as 5 keV. Using the gamma-ray burst locations obtained with the BATSE Large Area Detectors, the Spectroscopy Detectors' low-energy response can be modeled accurately. This, together with a postlaunch calibration of the lowest energy Spectroscopy Detector discriminator channel, which can lie in the range 5-20 keV, allows spectral deconvolution over a broad energy range, approx. 5 keV to 2 MeV. The additional coverage allows us to search for evidence of excess emission, or for a deficit, below 20 keV. While no burst has a significant (greater than or equal to 3 sigma) deficit relative to a standard spectra model, we find that 12 bursts have excess low-energy emission, ranging between 1.2 and 5.8 times the model flux, that exceeds 5 sigma in significance. This is evidence for an additional low-energy spectral component in at least some bursts, or for deviations from the power-law spectral form typically used to model gamma-ray bursts at energies below 100 keV.

  6. The 3D inversion of airborne gamma-ray spectrometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minty, Brian; Brodie, Ross

    2016-07-01

    We present a new method for the inversion of airborne gamma-ray spectrometric line data to a regular grid of radioelement concentration estimates on the ground. The method incorporates the height of the aircraft, the 3D terrain within the field of view of the spectrometer, the directional sensitivity of rectangular detectors, and a source model comprising vertical rectangular prisms with the same horizontal dimensions as the required grid cell size. The top of each prism is a plane surface derived from a best-fit plane to the digital elevation model of the earth's surface within each grid cell area. The method is a significant improvement on current methods, and gives superior interpolation between flight lines. It also eliminates terrain effects that would normally remain in the data after the conventional processing of these data assuming a flat-earth model.

  7. The Imprint of the Extragalactic Background Light in the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Schady, P.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Guirec, S.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Perkins, J. S.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    The light emitted by stars and accreting compact objects through the history of the universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Knowledge of the EBL isimportant to understand the nature of star formation and galaxy evolution, but direct measurements of the EBL are limited by galactic and other foreground emissions. Here, we report an absorption feature seen in the combined spectra of a sample of gamma-ray blazars out to a redshift of z approx. 1.6. This feature is caused by attenuation of gamma rays by the EBL at optical to ultraviolet frequencies and allowed us to measure the EBL flux density in this frequency band.

  8. Expected gamma ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th, and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines are calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions are those of Reedy and Arnold (1972) and Lingenfelter et al. (1972). The areal resolution of the experiment is calculated to be around 70-140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method is described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  9. Expected gamma-ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines were calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions were those of Reedy and Arnold and Lingenfelter. The areal resolution of the experiment was calculated to be around 70 to 140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method was described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  10. Analysis of spectra from portable handheld gamma-ray spectrometry for terrain comparative assessment.

    PubMed

    Dias, Flávio; Lima, Marco; Sanjurjo-Sánchez, Jorge; Alves, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Geological characteristics can have impacts on societal development by, e.g., geotechnical issues and radiological hazard levels. Due to urban sprawl, there is an increasing need for detailed geological assessment. In this work are analysed data from portable handheld gamma-ray spectra (K, eU and eTh) obtained in granitic and Silurian metaclastic outcrops as well as in an profile, roughly N-S, on soil covered terrains transecting a mapped contact between these rock types (the profile's northern extremity is at locations mapped as granite). Estimations from gamma-ray spectra were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. K, eU and eTh values were higher on granite in relation to Silurian metaclastic rocks. The northern extremity of the profile showed clearly higher contents of eTh and this contrast was supported by univariate statistical tools (normality plot and Wilk-Shapiro test; boxplots). A ternary plot with the contribution of the elements to gamma-ray absorbed dose showed the separation of granite from Silurian metaclastic rocks with the former being nearer the eTh vertex. The points in the northern extremity of the profile are nearer the eTh vertex than the other points on the profile. These visual suggestions were supported by hierarchical cluster analysis, which was able to differentiate between granite and metaclastic outcrops and separate portions of the profile located on different terrains. Portable gamma-ray spectrometry showed, hence, the potential to distinguish granite and metaclastic terrains at a scale useful for engineering works. These results can also be useful for a first comparative zoning of radiological hazards (which are higher for granite). PMID:26867098

  11. Analysis of spectra from portable handheld gamma-ray spectrometry for terrain comparative assessment.

    PubMed

    Dias, Flávio; Lima, Marco; Sanjurjo-Sánchez, Jorge; Alves, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Geological characteristics can have impacts on societal development by, e.g., geotechnical issues and radiological hazard levels. Due to urban sprawl, there is an increasing need for detailed geological assessment. In this work are analysed data from portable handheld gamma-ray spectra (K, eU and eTh) obtained in granitic and Silurian metaclastic outcrops as well as in an profile, roughly N-S, on soil covered terrains transecting a mapped contact between these rock types (the profile's northern extremity is at locations mapped as granite). Estimations from gamma-ray spectra were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. K, eU and eTh values were higher on granite in relation to Silurian metaclastic rocks. The northern extremity of the profile showed clearly higher contents of eTh and this contrast was supported by univariate statistical tools (normality plot and Wilk-Shapiro test; boxplots). A ternary plot with the contribution of the elements to gamma-ray absorbed dose showed the separation of granite from Silurian metaclastic rocks with the former being nearer the eTh vertex. The points in the northern extremity of the profile are nearer the eTh vertex than the other points on the profile. These visual suggestions were supported by hierarchical cluster analysis, which was able to differentiate between granite and metaclastic outcrops and separate portions of the profile located on different terrains. Portable gamma-ray spectrometry showed, hence, the potential to distinguish granite and metaclastic terrains at a scale useful for engineering works. These results can also be useful for a first comparative zoning of radiological hazards (which are higher for granite).

  12. Development and calibration of a real-time airborne radioactivity monitor using direct gamma-ray spectrometry with two scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, R; Morant, J J; Salvadó, M

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry in an automatic real-time environmental radiation surveillance network can help to identify and characterize abnormal radioactivity increases quickly. For this reason, a Real-time Airborne Radioactivity Monitor using direct gamma-ray spectrometry with two scintillation detectors (RARM-D2) was developed. The two scintillation detectors in the RARM-D2 are strategically shielded with Pb to permit the separate measurement of the airborne isotopes with respect to the deposited isotopes.In this paper, we describe the main aspects of the development and calibration of the RARM-D2 when using NaI(Tl) or LaBr3(Ce) detectors. The calibration of the monitor was performed experimentally with the exception of the efficiency curve, which was set using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with the EGS5 code system. Prior to setting the efficiency curve, the effect of the radioactive source term size on the efficiency calculations was studied for the gamma-rays from (137)Cs. Finally, to study the measurement capabilities of the RARM-D2, the minimum detectable activity concentrations for (131)I and (137)Cs were calculated for typical spectra at different integration times. PMID:24607535

  13. Semi-automated structural analysis of high resolution magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry airborne surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debeglia, N.; Martelet, G.; Perrin, J.; Truffert, C.; Ledru, P.; Tourlière, B.

    2005-08-01

    A user-controlled procedure was implemented for the structural analysis of geophysical maps. Local edge segments are first extracted using a suitable edge detector function, then linked into straight discontinuities and, finally, organised in complex boundary lines best delineating geophysical features. Final boundary lines may be attributed by a geologist to lithological contacts and/or structural geological features. Tests of some edge detectors, (i) horizontal gradient magnitude (HGM), (ii) various orders of the analytic signal ( An), reduced to the pole or not, (iii) enhanced horizontal derivative (EHD), (iv) composite analytic signal (CAS), were performed on synthetic magnetic data (with and without noise). As a result of these comparisons, the horizontal gradient appears to remain the best operator for the analysis of magnetic data. Computation of gradients in the frequency domain, including filtering and upward continuation of noisy data, is well-suited to the extraction of magnetic gradients associated to deep sources, while space-domain smoothing and differentiation techniques is generally preferable in the case of shallow magnetic sources, or for gamma-ray spectrometry analysis. Algorithms for edge extraction, segment linking, and line following can be controlled by choosing adequate edge detector and processing parameters which allows adaptation to a desired scale of interpretation. Tests on synthetic and real case data demonstrate the adaptability of the procedure and its ability to produce basic layer for multi-data analysis. The method was applied to the interpretation of high-resolution airborne magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry data collected in northern Namibia. It allowed the delineation of dyke networks concealed by superficial weathering and demonstrated the presence of lithological variations in alluvial flows. The output from the structural analysis procedure are compatible with standard GIS softwares and enable the geologist to (i) compare

  14. Airborne gamma ray surveying in radon hazard evaluation: a case study from Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethurst, Mark A.; Liv Rudjord, Anne; Finne, Ingvild

    2010-05-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway and Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority have established an approach to mapping radon hazards in Norway based on direct measurements of radon in indoor air, bedrock and drift geology mapping, and the mapping of radium in the ground using helicopter- and aeroplane-borne gamma-ray surveys. Existing indoor radon measurements are used to establish hazard profiles for the other three data sets. The multiple indications of hazard, from all four data sets, are then combined into a single hazard prognosis map. We have looked closely at the efficiency of the mapping method in the municipality of Gran (north of Oslo). The uranium rich alum shale and superficial deposits associated with it are the principal sources of indoor radon in the area. Small isolated granite bodies and local high permeability glacio-fluvial deposits contribute to the hazard picture. The method produces a liberal hazard map that encloses most of the known areas of severe radon contamination in dwellings and identifies additional uninhabited areas where similar levels of contamination can be expected (without mitigating action). The hazard evaluation in the Gran area is 81% efficient at enclosing high indoor radon measurements in the high hazard zone when this zone occupies 50% of the total geographic area. The probability of this distribution happening by chance is 0.054%. Of course, indoor radon measurements are the most valuable data set for establishing radon hazard levels accurately, but only where these measurements are abundant. In Norway such areas are very limited in spatial extent. We find airborne measurements to be the most effective supplementary data, followed in usefulness by knowledge of the bedrock geology and drift geology (at the 1:50,000 mapping scale). A further opportunity to test and refine our approach to radon hazard evaluation presents itself now with a new airborne gamma-ray survey over the Kongsberg region southwest of Oslo. The survey is

  15. Predicted TeV Gamma-ray Spectra and Images of Shell Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, S. P.

    1999-04-01

    One supernova remnant, SN 1006, is now known to produce synchrotron X-rays (Koyama et al., 1995, Nature, 378, 255), requiring 100 TeV electrons. SN 1006 has also been seen in TeV gamma rays (Tanimori et al., 1998, ApJ, 497, L25), almost certainly due to cosmic-microwave-background photons being upscattered by those same electrons. Other young supernova remnants should also produce high-energy electrons, even if their X-ray synchrotron emission is swamped by conventional thermal X-ray emission. Upper limits to the maximum energy of shock-accelerated electrons can be found for those remnants by requiring that their synchrotron spectrum steepen enough to fall below observed thermal X-rays (Reynolds and Keohane 1999, ApJ, submitted). For those upper-limit spectra, I present predicted TeV inverse-Compton spectra and images for assumed values of the mean remnant magnetic field. Ground-based TeV gamma-ray observations of remnants may be able to put even more severe limits on the presence of highly energetic electrons in remnants, raising problems for conventional theories of galactic cosmic-ray production in supernova remnants. Detections will immediately confirm that SN 1006 is not alone, and will give mean remnant magnetic field strengths.

  16. Gamma-ray spectra of hexane (C6H14) in positron-electron annihilation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoguang; Wang, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical gamma-ray spectra of molecule hexane have been calculated and compared with the experimental results in both gas (Iwata et al., 1997a) and liquid (Kerr et al., 1965) phases. The present study reveals that in gas phase not all valence electrons of hexane contribute the same degree in the electron-positron annihilation of hexane. The electrons which dominate the positron-electron annihilation of molecules are called positrophilic electrons. The positrophilic electrons are predominately found to involve the electrons on the lowest occupied valence orbital (LOVO) of a free molecule in gas phase. When hexane is confined in liquid phase, however, the intermolecular interactions ultimately eliminate the free molecular orientation and selectivity for the positrophilic electrons in the gas phase. As a result, the gamma-ray spectra of hexane become an "averaged" contribution from all valence electrons, which is again in agreement with liquid phase measurement. The roles of valence electrons in annihilation process for gas and liquid phases of hexane have been recognized for the first time in the present study.

  17. Cyclotron resonant scattering in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Loredo, T. J.; Wasserman, I. M.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    Fits of theoretical spectra from Monte Carlo radiation-transfer calculations to dips at approximately 20 and 40 keV in a spectrum of the gamma-ray burst source GB 880 205 give best-fit values and 68 percent-confidence intervals for the magnetic field of (1.71 + or - 0.07) x 10 to the 12th G, the electron density of (1.2 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the 21st electrons/cm-squared, and the cosine of the viewing angle relative to the field of 0.31 + or - 0.05. The dips observed at approximately 20 keV in the spectra are interpreted as cyclotron resonant scattering, in which electrons undergo radiative 0 to 1 to 0 Landau transitions initiated by photons near the first harmonic. Physical self-consistency fixes the temperature, and the equilibrium temperature equals 5.3 + 0.3 or - 0.2 keV. These results suggest that this gamma-ray burst and many others which exhibit a low-energy dip originate from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin.

  18. Spectra of X-ray and Gamma-ray Bursts Produced by Stepping Lightning Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Xu, Wei; Pasko, Victor

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity. TGFs were serendipitously discovered by BATSE detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory originally launched to perform observations of celestial gamma-ray sources [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994]. These events have also been detected by the RHESSI satellite [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the AGILE satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010], and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010]. Moreover, measurements have correlated TGFs with initial development stages of normal polarity intra-cloud lightning that transports negative charge upward (+IC) [e.g, Lu et al., JGR, 116, A03316, 2011]. Photon spectra corresponding to well-established model of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. However, it has been suggested that high-potential +IC lightning leaders could produce a sufficient number of energetic electrons to explain TGFs [Celestin and Pasko, JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] and Xu et al. [GRL, 39, L08801, 2012] have shown that this mechanism could explain the TGF spectrum for lightning potentials higher than 100 MV. In addition to TGFs, X-ray bursts are produced by negative lightning leaders in association with stepping processes and are observed from the ground [Dwyer et al., GRL, 32, L01803, 2005]. However, the energy spectrum of X-ray bursts from lightning is still poorly known, mainly due to the low fluence detected from the ground. In this work, we use Monte Carlo models to study the acceleration of runaway electrons in the electric field produced around lightning leader tip and the associated bremsstrahlung photon spectra observed by low-orbit satellites in the case of high potential +IC discharges and from the ground in the

  19. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Susanville quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Susanville, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1642.8 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  20. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Ukiah quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Ukiah, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1517 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  1. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, New Rockford Quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the New Rockford map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1397 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  2. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Chico quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Chico, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 3026.4 line miles are in the quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  3. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Mitchell map area. The purpose of this program is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1479 line miles are in this quadrangle.

  4. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Huron quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Huron map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1459 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  5. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer survey data application in spatial methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bresnahan, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to develop a methodology that used geographic information system (GIS) tools to convert airborne gamma-ray spectrometer (AGRS) survey data to various spatial data formats for use in radiological hazard mapping and risk assessments. The importance of this conversion methodology results from the versatility and consistency of spatial interpolations using commercially supported software as opposed to previous methods. Maps of interpolated AGRS data provide potential radiological hazard boundaries, delineated by user-defined limits, to guide intense field surveys. Resulting GIS products may be combined with other risk assessment inputs to model and monitor hazardous environments. The AGRS data used in this research was collected during the 1991 sitewide survey at Savannah River site (SRS) as part of the comprehensive integrated remote sensing (CIRS) program conducted by EG&G for the SRS. The AGRS survey component of the program is designed to provide a database for studying the transport of manufactured radionuclides through the environment at the SRS and surrounding areas. The AGRS data have historically been presented only in hardcopy format as acetate overlays on aerial photography. Recently, digital files representing contoured isotopic response have been delivered to the SRS as GIS themes. Since AGRS data are often a collection of dense sample points, interpolation of the data has previously been conducted by connecting points in series along flight paths. To improve on the original algorithm used to contour AGRS data, a triangulated irregular network (TIN) was used as the data model for contour and raster generation.

  6. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Alturas quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Alturas, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1631.6 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  7. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Medford Quadrangle Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Medford, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 2925 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  8. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey Coos Bay, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    During the months of August, September, and October of 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Coos Bay, Oregon, map area. Line spacing was generally six miles for east/west traverses and eighteen miles for north/south tie lines over the northern one-half of the area. Traverses and tie lines were flown at three miles and twelve miles respectively over the southern one-half of the area. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 863.8 line miles are in this quadrangle.

  9. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Roseburg Quadrangle, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Roseburg, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1596 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  10. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Eureka quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Eureka/Crescent City, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were aquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 349.5 line miles are in this area. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  11. Enhancing the resolution of airborne gamma-ray data using horizontal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamish, David

    2016-09-01

    The spatial resolution characteristics of airborne gamma-ray data are largely controlled by survey elevation and line separation. In the UK, although low nominal surveys altitudes may be permitted, regulatory zones with elevations in excess of 180 m are required above conurbations. Since the data, typically in the form of grids, are evaluated alongside many other detailed geoscientific spatial datasets their absolute resolution limits, together with their spatial characteristics, become relevant. Here, using published software, we study the theoretical resolution characteristics of this form of survey data obtained with a line separation of 200 m. Of particular interest is the airborne response behaviour when non-uniform distributions of radioactivity are encountered. Although ultimately a function of the radioelement-concentration contrast encountered, the calculations reveal that such zones are most difficult to identify when their scale length decreases below the scale of the line separation. This limited resolution then further decreases with elevation. In order to increase our ability to resolve the edges of non-uniform source regions we calculate the horizontal gradient magnitude (HGM) of the observed data. While the data used can be the estimated radioelement concentrations (potassium, thorium and uranium) or their ratios, we demonstrate that the total count is particularly suited to this type of analysis. The theoretical calculations are supported by an examination of survey data across a series of isolated bodies (offshore islands). This empirical study indicates the practical limits to resolution when using the horizontal gradient and these are governed by the survey line separation. The HGM response provides an enhanced mapping of the edges of zones associated with a contrast in flux behaviour. The edges are detected using the maxima in the response and these can be additionally examined using grid curvature analysis. The technique is assessed using

  12. Numerical simulations of planetary gamma-ray spectra induced by galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C.

    1994-07-01

    The fluxes of cosmic-ray-produced gamma rays escaping from Mars were calculated using the LAHET Code System and basic nuclear data for {gamma}-ray production. Both surface water content and atmospheric thickness strongly affect the fluxes of {gamma}-ray lines escaping from Mars.

  13. Inter-pulse high-resolution gamma-ray spectra using a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, L.G.; Trombka, J.I.; Jensen, D.H.; Stephenson, W.A.; Hoover, R.A.; Mikesell, J.L.; Tanner, A.B.; Senftle, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    A neutron generator pulsed at 100 s-1 was suspended in an artificial borehole containing a 7.7 metric ton mixture of sand, aragonite, magnetite, sulfur, and salt. Two Ge(HP) gamma-ray detectors were used: one in a borehole sonde, and one at the outside wall of the sample tank opposite the neutron generator target. Gamma-ray spectra were collected by the outside detector during each of 10 discrete time windows during the 10 ms period following the onset of gamma-ray build-up after each neutron burst. The sample was measured first when dry and then when saturated with water. In the dry sample, gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering, neutron capture, and decay were counted during the first (150 ??s) time window. Subsequently only capture and decay gamma rays were observed. In the wet sample, only neutron capture and decay gamma rays were observed. Neutron capture gamma rays dominated the spectrum during the period from 150 to 400 ??s after the neutron burst in both samples, but decreased with time much more rapidly in the wet sample. A signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N) analysis indicates that optimum conditions for neutron capture analysis occurred in the 350-800 ??s window. A poor S/N in the first 100-150 ??s is due to a large background continuum during the first time interval. Time gating can be used to enhance gamma-ray spectra, depending on the nuclides in the target material and the reactions needed to produce them, and should improve the sensitivity of in situ well logging. ?? 1984.

  14. GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRA AND SPECTRAL CORRELATIONS FROM SUB-PHOTOSPHERIC COMPTONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chhotray, Atul; Lazzati, Davide

    2015-04-01

    One of the most important unresolved issues in gamma-ray burst (GRB) physics is the origin of the prompt gamma-ray spectrum. Its general non-thermal character and the softness in the X-ray band remain unexplained. We tackle these issues by performing Monte Carlo simulations of radiation–matter interactions in a scattering dominated photon–lepton plasma. The plasma—initially in equilibrium—is driven to non-equilibrium conditions by a sudden energy injection in the lepton population, mimicking the effect of a shock wave or the dissipation of magnetic energy. Equilibrium restoration occurs due to an energy exchange between the photons and leptons. While the initial and final equilibrium spectra are thermal, the transitional photon spectra are characterized by non-thermal features such as power-law tails, high energy bumps, and multiple components. Such non-thermal features are observed at infinity if the dissipation occurs at small to moderate optical depths, and the spectrum is released before thermalization is complete. We model the synthetic spectra with a Band function and show that the resulting spectral parameters are similar to observations for a frequency range of 2–3 orders of magnitude around the peak. In addition, our model predicts correlations between the low-frequency photon index and the peak frequency as well as between the low- and high-frequency indices. We explore baryon and pair-dominated fireballs and reach the conclusion that baryonic fireballs are a better model for explaining the observed features of GRB spectra.

  15. The spectra and light curves of two gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, F. K.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Observations made by the Hard X-ray and Low Energy Gamma-Ray Experiment on board HEAO-1 of the spectra and light curves of two gamma-ray bursts for which localized arrival directions will become available are presented. The burst of October 20, 1977 is found to exhibit a fluence of 0.000031 + or - 0.000005 erg/sq cm over the energy range 0.135-2.05 MeV and a duration of 38.7 sec, while that of November 10, 1977 is found to have a fluence of 0.000021 + or - 0.000008 erg/sq cm between 0.125 and 3 MeV over 2.8 sec. The light curves of both bursts exhibit time fluctuations down to the limiting time resolution of the detectors. The spectrum of the October burst can be fit by a power law of index -1.93 + or -0.16, which is harder than any other gamma-burst spectrum yet reported. The spectrum of the second burst is softer (index -2.4 + or - 0.7), and is consistent with the upper index in the double power law fit to the burst of April 27, 1972.

  16. Modeling of Gamma-ray Spectra to Direct Efficient Chemical Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, Matthew; Friese, Judah I.; Warren, Glen A.; Bachelor, Paula P.; Farmer, Orville T.; Choiniere, Andrea D.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Aalseth, Craig E.

    2008-06-15

    In an age of heightened national security regarding nuclear terrorist threats, reliable and rapid analytical methods for the quantification of radionuclides in fission product samples are needed to provide forensic information and sample characterization. Measurement of characteristic gamma-ray emissions by high-purity germanium spectrometers offers one means of analysis. Due to the high-activity and complex nature of samples, chemical separations are necessary to reduce background continuum levels and instances of spectral interference. A project has been initiated at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to model singles and coincident gamma-ray spectra that would result from various chemical separation strategies. The goal is to use these complementary counting techniques to tailor a series of efficient chemical separations that allow the rapid quantification of signature isotopes in samples. Modeling enables probable instances of spectral interference to be identified and aids in defining the temporal window of detection for radionuclides of interest following a given chemical separation. These data will help future analysts prioritize analytes of interest and separation strategies in the processing of real samples. A description of results to date is described here, demonstrating the utility of this approach for improved processing and analysis of fission product samples.

  17. Gamma-ray burst prompt emission light curves and power density spectra in the ICMART model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter σ in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high σ flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  18. Neutron-capture gamma-ray data for obtaining elemental abundances from planetary spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Robert; Frankle, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    Determination of elemental abundances is a top scientific priority of most planetary missions. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an excellent method to determine elemental abundances using gamma rays made by nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray particles and by the decay of radioactive nuclides [Re73,Re78]. Many important planetary gamma rays are made by neutron-capture reactions. However, much of the data for the energies and intensities of neutron-capture gamma rays in the existing literature [e.g. Lo81] are poor [RF99,RF00]. With gamma-ray spectrometers having recently returned data from Lunar Prospector and NEAR and soon to be launch to Mars, there is a need for good data for neutron-capture gamma rays.

  19. Real-time airborne gamma-ray background estimation using NASVD with MLE and radiation transport for calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulisek, J. A.; Schweppe, J. E.; Stave, S. C.; Bernacki, B. E.; Jordan, D. V.; Stewart, T. N.; Seifert, C. E.; Kernan, W. J.

    2015-06-01

    Helicopter-mounted gamma-ray detectors can provide law enforcement officials the means to quickly and accurately detect, identify, and locate radiological threats over a wide geographical area. The ability to accurately distinguish radiological threat-generated gamma-ray signatures from background gamma radiation in real time is essential in order to realize this potential. This problem is non-trivial, especially in urban environments for which the background may change very rapidly during flight. This exacerbates the challenge of estimating background due to the poor counting statistics inherent in real-time airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. To address this challenge, we have developed a new technique for real-time estimation of background gamma radiation from aerial measurements without the need for human analyst intervention. The method can be calibrated using radiation transport simulations along with data from previous flights over areas for which the isotopic composition need not be known. Over the examined measured and simulated data sets, the method generated accurate background estimates even in the presence of a strong, 60Co source. The potential to track large and abrupt changes in background spectral shape and magnitude was demonstrated. The method can be implemented fairly easily in most modern computing languages and environments.

  20. Gamma-ray spectra and doses from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Most radiation safety guidelines in the nuclear industry are based on the data concerning the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Crucial to determining these guidelines is the radiation from the explosions. We have measured gamma-ray pulse-height distributions from an accurate replica of the Little Boy device used at Hiroshima, operated at low power levels near critical. The device was placed outdoors on a stand 4 m from the ground to minimize environmental effects. The power levels were based on a monitor detector calibrated very carefully in independent experiments. High-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with a germanium detector to identify the lines and to obtain line intensities. The 7631 to 7645 keV doublet from neutron capture in the heavy steel case was dominant. Low-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with bismuth-germanate detectors. We calculated flux spectra from these distributions using accurately measured detector response functions and efficiency curves. We then calculated dose-rate spectra from the flux spectra using a flux-to-dose-rate conversion procedure. The integral of each dose-rate spectrum gave an integral dose rate. The integral doses at 2 m ranged from 0.46 to 1.03 mrem per 10/sup 13/ fissions. The output of the Little Boy replica can be calculated with Monte Carlo codes. Comparison of our experimental spectra, line intensities, and integral doses can be used to verify these calculations at low power levels and give increased confidence to the calculated values from the explosion at Hiroshima. These calculations then can be used to establish better radiation safety guidelines. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  1. The spectra program library: A PC based system for gamma-ray spectra analysis and INAA data reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Grossman, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    A PC based system has been developed for the analysis of gamma-ray spectra and for the complete reduction of data from INAA experiments, including software to average the results from mulitple lines and multiple countings and to produce a final report of analysis. Graphics algorithms may be called for the analysis of complex spectral features, to compare the data from alternate photopeaks and to evaluate detector performance during a given counting cycle. A database of results for control samples can be used to prepare quality control charts to evaluate long term precision and to search for systemic variations in data on reference samples as a function of time. The entire software library can be accessed through a user-friendly menu interface with internal help.

  2. Cyclotron resonant scattering in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, J. C. L.; Loredo, T. J.; Wasserman, I.; Fenimore, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    Data on the GB880205 gamma-ray bursts are presented that have implications for the nature of gamma-ray burst sources. It is shown that cyclotron resonant scattering and Raman scattering account well for the positions, strengths, and shapes of the relative strengths of the first and second harmonics and their narrow widths. These results imply the existence of a superstrong (B of about 2 x 10 to the 12th G) magnetic field in the vicinity of the X-ray emission region of GB880205. Such a superstrong magnetic field points to a strongly magnetic neutron star as the origin of gamma-ray bursts, and to the fact that the gamma-ray sources belong to the Galaxy.

  3. SPECTRA OF COSMIC RAY ELECTRONS AND DIFFUSE GAMMA RAYS WITH THE CONSTRAINTS OF AMS-02 AND HESS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ding; Jin, Hong-Bo; Huang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    Recently, AMS-02 reported their results of cosmic ray (CR) observations. In addition to the AMS-02 data, we add HESS data to estimate the spectra of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays above TeV. In the conventional diffusion model, a global analysis is performed on the spectral features of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays by the GALRPOP package. The results show that the spectrum structure of the primary component of CR electrons cannot be fully reproduced by a simple power law and that the relevant break is around 100 GeV. At the 99% confidence level (C.L.) the injection indices above the break decrease from 2.54 to 2.35, but the ones below the break are only in the range of 2.746–2.751. The spectrum of CR electrons does not need to add TeV cutoff to also match the features of the HESS data. Based on the difference between the fluxes of CR electrons and their primary components, the predicted excess of CR positrons is consistent with the interpretation that these positrons originate from a pulsar or dark matter. In the analysis of the Galactic diffuse gamma rays with the indirect constraint of AMS-02 and HESS data, it is found that the fluxes of Galactic diffuse gamma rays are consistent with the GeV data of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the high-latitude regions. The results indicate that inverse Compton scattering is the dominant component in the range of hundreds of GeV to tens of TeV, respectively from the high-latitude regions to the low ones, and in all of the regions of the Galaxy the flux of diffuse gamma rays is less than that of CR electrons at the energy scale of 20 TeV.

  4. Spectra of Cosmic Ray Electrons and Diffuse Gamma Rays with the Constraints of AMS-02 and HESS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ding; Huang, Jing; Jin, Hong-Bo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, AMS-02 reported their results of cosmic ray (CR) observations. In addition to the AMS-02 data, we add HESS data to estimate the spectra of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays above TeV. In the conventional diffusion model, a global analysis is performed on the spectral features of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays by the GALRPOP package. The results show that the spectrum structure of the primary component of CR electrons cannot be fully reproduced by a simple power law and that the relevant break is around 100 GeV. At the 99% confidence level (C.L.) the injection indices above the break decrease from 2.54 to 2.35, but the ones below the break are only in the range of 2.746–2.751. The spectrum of CR electrons does not need to add TeV cutoff to also match the features of the HESS data. Based on the difference between the fluxes of CR electrons and their primary components, the predicted excess of CR positrons is consistent with the interpretation that these positrons originate from a pulsar or dark matter. In the analysis of the Galactic diffuse gamma rays with the indirect constraint of AMS-02 and HESS data, it is found that the fluxes of Galactic diffuse gamma rays are consistent with the GeV data of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the high-latitude regions. The results indicate that inverse Compton scattering is the dominant component in the range of hundreds of GeV to tens of TeV, respectively from the high-latitude regions to the low ones, and in all of the regions of the Galaxy the flux of diffuse gamma rays is less than that of CR electrons at the energy scale of 20 TeV.

  5. Particle Acceleration Inside Thunderstorms and the Variation in Source Spectra of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Eric; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Briggs, Michael S.; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2016-03-01

    One of the unresolved questions in the atmospheric sciences is the origin of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs). These flashes are short but intense gamma ray bursts emanating from Earth's atmosphere. This phenomenon has been observed by gamma ray detectors on orbiting satellites, e.g. NASA Fermi, intended to study astrophysical phenomena such as Gamma-ray Bursts. TGFs are thought to originate inside thunderstorms where electrons can be accelerated and emit radiation in the multi MeV range due to bremsstrahlung interactions with air molecules. These so called ``runaway electrons'' are seeded from cosmic ray air showers hitting the Earth's atmosphere from (extra) galactic sources. In this work, we present a Monte Carlo model that simulates particle physics inside a thunderstorm region. The subsequent transport of high energy gamma rays through the Earth's atmosphere and up to satellite orbit is also included. We show that by varying both the potential difference and the ambient electric field inside the thundercloud, different electron and photon energy distributions are produced. This effect may be detectable by orbiting spacecraft, and therefore serves as a method to remote sense the electric fields that exist inside thunderstorms.

  6. Use of MCNP + GADRAS in Generating More Realistic Gamma-Ray Spectra for Plutonium and HEU Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Mattingly, John; Mitchell, Dean

    2012-08-07

    The ability to accurately simulate high-resolution gamma spectra from materials that emit both neutrons and gammas is very important to the analysis of special nuclear materials (SNM), e.g., uranium and plutonium. One approach under consideration has been to combine MCNP and GADRAS. This approach is expected to generate more accurate gamma ray spectra for complex three-dimensional geometries than can be obtained from one-dimensional deterministic transport simulations (e.g., ONEDANT). This presentation describes application of combining MCNP and GADRAS in simulating plutonium and uranium spectra.

  7. Insights into the Structure and Surface Geology of Isla Socorro, Mexico, from Airborne Magnetic and Gamma-Ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, V.; Gruber, S.; Varley, N.; D'Antonio, M.; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.

    2016-05-01

    The island of Socorro is located in the eastern Pacific Ocean, 650 km off the coast of Mexico. It is a rare example of an oceanic volcanic island whose above sea level volume is made up mostly of peralkaline trachytes and rhyolites, with subordinate mafic rocks. Subaerial volcanism started several hundred thousand years ago and continues until recent times. We present an investigation of surface and subsurface geology of the island, based on the first detailed extensive geophysical survey on the island. Acquired airborne magnetic and gamma-ray data were compared to existing geological information and supplemented with field investigations and satellite imagery. Magnetic data show a wide minimum in the central part of the island, possibly connected to a high-temperature zone in the deeper central portion of the volcano, likely to be due to a still hot magma body. The data also depict two parallel edges possibly suggesting the existence of a nested caldera. Analysis on upward continued magnetic data by recent imaging techniques highlighted two deep sources located around 5 km b.s.l., interpreted as feeding structures that are now filled with crystalline rocks. Gamma-ray data have been interpreted through integration with the geological survey results. Several previously known volcanic deposits have been identified based on radioelement distribution, and others have been redefined based on field evidence. A new succession of volcanic members is proposed, to be verified through more detailed geological mapping, geochemical analyses of rock samples and radiometric dating.

  8. Detailed parametrization of neutrino and gamma-ray energy spectra from high energy proton-proton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supanitsky, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma rays and neutrinos are produced as a result of proton-proton interactions that occur in different astrophysical contexts. The detection of these two types of messengers is of great importance for the study of different physical phenomena, related to nonthermal processes, taking place in different astrophysical scenarios. Therefore, the knowledge of the energy spectrum of these two types of particles, as a function of the incident proton energy, is essential for the interpretation of the observational data. In this paper, parametrizations of the energy spectra of gamma rays and neutrinos, originated in proton-proton collisions, are presented. The energy range of the incident protons considered extends from 102 to 108 GeV . The parametrizations are based on Monte Carlo simulations of proton-proton interactions performed with the hadronic interaction models QGSJET-II-04 and EPOS-LHC, which have recently been updated with the data taken by the Large Hadron Collider.

  9. Local electron spectrum above 100 MeV derived from gamma-ray emissivity spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Two new determinations of the local gamma-ray emmissivity spectrum are in good accord and were used to derive constraints on the local electron spectrum. The requirement for an electron intensity above 1 GeV larger than previously believed is confirmed and no low energy upturn is then needed.

  10. Inspecting absorption in the spectra of extra-galactic gamma-ray sources for insight into Lorentz invariance violation

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Uri; Piran, Tsvi

    2008-12-15

    We examine what the absorbed spectra of extra-galactic TeV gamma-ray sources, such as blazars, would look like in the presence of Lorentz invariance violation. Pair production with the extra-galactic background light modifies the observed spectra of such sources, and we show that a violation of Lorentz invariance would generically have a dramatic effect on this absorption feature. Inspecting this effect, an experimental task likely practical in the near future, can provide unique insight on the possibility of Lorentz invariance violation.

  11. Hints of the Existence of Axion-Like-Particles From the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Cosmological Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, M.A.; Paneque, D.; Bloom, E.; Prada, F.; Dominguez, A.; /IAA, Granada /Seville U.

    2009-06-23

    Axion Like Particles (ALPs) are predicted to couple with photons in the presence of magnetic fields. This effect may lead to a significant change in the observed spectra of gamma-ray sources such as AGNs. Here we carry out a detailed study that for the first time simultaneously considers in the same framework both the photon/axion mixing that takes place in the gamma-ray source and that one expected to occur in the intergalactic magnetic fields. An efficient photon/axion mixing in the source always means an attenuation in the photon flux, whereas the mixing in the intergalactic medium may result in a decrement and/or enhancement of the photon flux, depending on the distance of the source and the energy considered. Interestingly, we find that decreasing the value of the intergalactic magnetic field strength, which decreases the probability for photon/axion mixing, could result in an increase of the expected photon flux at Earth if the source is far enough. We also find a 30% attenuation in the intensity spectrum of distant sources, which occurs at an energy that only depends on the properties of the ALPs and the intensity of the intergalactic magnetic field, and thus independent of the AGN source being observed. Moreover, we show that this mechanism can easily explain recent puzzles in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources, like the possible detection of TeV photons from 3C 66A (a source located at z=0.444) by MAGIC and VERITAS, which should not happen according to conventional models of photon propagation over cosmological distances. Another puzzle is the recent published lower limit to the EBL intensity at 3.6 {micro}m (which is almost twice larger as the previous one), which implies very hard spectra for some detected TeV gamma-ray sources located at z=0.1-0.2. The consequences that come from this work are testable with the current generation of gamma-ray instruments, namely Fermi (formerly known as GLAST) and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes like

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma-ray spectra from natural radionuclides recorded by a NaI detector in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Vlastou, R; Ntziou, I Th; Kokkoris, M; Papadopoulos, C T; Tsabaris, C

    2006-01-01

    The GEANT4 Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate gamma-ray spectra of natural radionuclides collected by a NaI scintillation detector immersed in seawater. The gamma-rays emitted from the decay of (40)K, and the series of (232)Th and (238)U, were used to describe the radioactive water source around the NaI crystal. The simulated gamma-ray spectra were compared with real data recorded in situ by a newly constructed NaI spectrometer and were found to be in good agreement. The NaI spectrometer was calibrated in the laboratory in a water tank, before its deployment in seawater. Activity concentrations were deduced from the gamma-ray spectra and discussed in comparison with results from the literature. PMID:16150599

  13. Gamma-ray bursts from magnetospheric plasma oscillations. II - Model spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    1990-01-01

    Several mechanisms for the primary release of energy in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may result in the excitation of relativistic, magnetospheric plasma oscillations above the polar cap of a neutron star. This paper presents a survey of detailed calculations of the inverse Compton scattering interaction between the sinusoidally accelerated particles in relativistic, magnetospheric plasma oscillations and the self-consistently determined thermal radiation from the stellar surface. The upscattered photons are boosted to gamma-ray energies and a Monte Carlo simulation is used to obtain the spectrum for different viewing angles relative to the magnetic field in the oscillating region. It is shown that several GRB spectral characteristics may be understood in the context of a model wherein the overall spectrum changes with aspect angle as a result of the superposition of four components with different angular distributions.

  14. Airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly signatures of serpentinite in relation to soil geochemistry, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, A.E.; Van Gosen, B. S.

    2009-01-01

    Serpentinized ultramafic rocks and associated soils in northern California are characterized by high concentrations of Cr and Ni, low levels of radioelements (K, Th, and U) and high amounts of ferrimagnetic minerals (primarily magnetite). Geophysical attributes over ultramafic rocks, which include airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly data, are quantified and provide indirect measurements on the relative abundance of radioelements and magnetic minerals, respectively. Attributes are defined through a statistical modeling approach and the results are portrayed as probabilities in chart and map form. Two predictive models are presented, including one derived from the aeromagnetic anomaly data and one from a combination of the airborne K, Th and U gamma-ray data. Both models distinguish preferential values within the aerogeophysical data that coincide with mapped and potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks. The magnetic predictive model shows positive probabilities associated with magnetic anomaly highs and, to a lesser degree, anomaly lows, which accurately locate many known ultramafic outcrops, but more interestingly, locate potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks, possible extensions of ultramafic bodies that dip into the shallow subsurface, as well as prospective buried ultramafic rocks. The airborne radiometric model shows positive probabilities in association with anomalously low gamma radiation measurements over ultramafic rock, which is similar to that produced by gabbro, metavolcanic rock, and water bodies. All of these features share the characteristic of being depleted in K, Th and U. Gabbro is the only rock type in the study area that shares similar magnetic properties with the ultramafic rock. The aerogeophysical model results are compared to the distribution of ultramafic outcrops and to Cr, Ni, K, Th and U concentrations and magnetic susceptibility measurements from soil samples. Analysis of the soil data indicates high positive correlation between

  15. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Cho, Byoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1-10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  16. Topics in gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of gamma rays from solar flares, gamma ray bursts, the Galactic center, galactic nucleosynthesis, SS433, and Cygnus X-3, and their effects on astrophysical problems are discussed. It is observed that gamma ray spectra from solar flares are applicable to the study of particle acceleration and confinement and the determination of chemical abundances in the solar atmosphere. The gamma ray lines from the compact galactic object SS433 are utilized to examine the acceleration of jets, and analysis of the gamma ray lines of Cygnus X-3 reveal that particles can be accelerated in compact sources to ultrahigh energies.

  17. The VHE gamma-ray spectra of several hard-spectrum blazars from long-term observations with the VERITAS telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Arun

    2013-08-01

    Analysis is presented on VERITAS observations of the very high energy gamma-ray spectra of five high frequency peaked BL Lac objects over a range of redshifts. Each object has an unusually hard intrinsic GeV spectrum, and is expected to produce TeV gamma-ray emission into the optically- thick regime of the universe's diffuse extragalactic background light (EBL). Hard spectrum HBLs have recently emerged as an effective tool for measurement of the EBL spectrum, due to extinction of gamma-ray signals from blazars via the pair production interaction gamma-TeVgamma EBL → e+e -. The VERITAS collaboration has approved long term observations on several of these sources, with the specific intent of studying their spectra to probe for absorption features resulting from these interactions. An introduction to the field of particle astrophysics is presented, followed by an overview of the EBL and its relation to the evolution of the universe. The VERITAS gamma-ray telescope is described in detail, followed by a full overview of the analysis techniques used to derive gamma-ray spectra from VERITAS data. The analyses of the blazars themselves are presented, followed by a discussion of their application to further constraints of the EBL. Each blazar is de-absorbed with an assumed EBL spectrum. In each case the intrinsic TeV spectrum is consistent with lower-energy gamma-ray emission in the optically-thin regime of the EBL.

  18. Light curves and spectra from off-axis gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Nappo, F.

    2016-10-01

    If gamma-ray burst prompt emission originates at a typical radius, and if material producing the emission moves at relativistic speed, then the variability of the resulting light curve depends on the viewing angle. This is due to the fact that the pulse evolution time-scale is Doppler contracted, while the pulse separation is not. For off-axis viewing angles θview ≳ θjet + Γ-1, the pulse broadening significantly smears out the light-curve variability. This is largely independent of geometry and emission processes. To explore a specific case, we set up a simple model of a single pulse under the assumption that the pulse rise and decay are dominated by the shell curvature effect. We show that such a pulse observed off-axis is (i) broader, (ii) softer and (iii) displays a different hardness-intensity correlation with respect to the same pulse seen on-axis. For each of these effects, we provide an intuitive physical explanation. We then show how a synthetic light curve made by a superposition of pulses changes with increasing viewing angle. We find that a highly variable light curve (as seen on-axis) becomes smooth and apparently single-pulsed (when seen off-axis) because of pulse overlap. To test the relevance of this fact, we estimate the fraction of off-axis gamma-ray bursts detectable by Swift as a function of redshift, finding that a sizeable fraction (between 10 per cent and 80 per cent) of nearby (z < 0.1) bursts are observed with θview ≳ θjet + Γ-1. Based on these results, we argue that low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts are consistent with being ordinary bursts seen off-axis.

  19. Gamma-ray burst spectra from photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    Consideration is given to a model of gamma-ray burst sources based on repeated Compton scatterings of soft photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons. Relativistic electrons which are continuously produced in the source radiate the total power L supplied to them. Higher order Compton scatterings, which occur when L(soft) is much less than L make the model distinct. The spectrum having an X-ray energy index of about one results from the superposition of the spectral components from several orders of Compton scattering; the change of the slope at several hundred keV arises from the Klein-Nishina decline of the scattering cross section.

  20. Software tool for xenon gamma-ray spectrometer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, I. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Shustov, A. E.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Pyae Nyein, Sone; Petrenko, D.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2016-02-01

    Software tool "Acquisition and processing of gamma-ray spectra" for xenon gamma-ray spectrometers control was developed. It supports the multi-windows interface. Software tool has the possibilities for acquisition of gamma-ray spectra from xenon gamma-ray detector via USB or RS-485 interfaces, directly or via TCP-IP protocol, energy calibration of gamma-ray spectra, saving gamma-ray spectra on a disk.

  1. Recent re-measurement of neutron and gamma-ray spectra 1080 meters from the APRD (Army Pulse Radiation Division) critical facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, H. A.; Hoffarth, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Previously reported measurements of long-range air-transported neutron and gamma-ray spectra from the fast-critical facility at the US Army Aberdeen Proving Ground have been supplemented recently at the 1080-meter position. The results of these determinations are presented herein and compared to several recent calculations from other research establishments. In addition, a summary of all dosimetric measurements obtained in the period 1979-1982 are appended, as are new determinations of APRD soil composition. Integral quantities such as neutron and gamma-ray kermas are very well predicted by the latest calculations, however there still exist significant spectral differences. At short ranges calculated neutron spectra are somewhat softer than experimental measurements, but at the farthest range of 1080 meters agreement is surprisingly good. Gamma-ray spectra remain well-calculated at all ranges.

  2. ROLE OF LINE-OF-SIGHT COSMIC-RAY INTERACTIONS IN FORMING THE SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS IN TeV GAMMA RAYS AND HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander; Kalashev, Oleg; Beacom, John F.

    2011-04-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can produce both gamma rays and cosmic rays. The observed high-energy gamma-ray signals from distant blazars may be dominated by secondary gamma rays produced along the line of sight by the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons. This explains the surprisingly low attenuation observed for distant blazars, because the production of secondary gamma rays occurs, on average, much closer to Earth than the distance to the source. Thus, the observed spectrum in the TeV range does not depend on the intrinsic gamma-ray spectrum, while it depends on the output of the source in cosmic rays. We apply this hypothesis to a number of sources and, in every case, we obtain an excellent fit, strengthening the interpretation of the observed spectra as being due to secondary gamma rays. We explore the ramifications of this interpretation for limits on the extragalactic background light and for the production of cosmic rays in AGNs. We also make predictions for the neutrino signals, which can help probe the acceleration of cosmic rays in AGNs.

  3. ON THERMALIZATION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS AND THE PEAK ENERGIES OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Vurm, Indrek; Piran, Tsvi; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2013-02-20

    The low-energy spectral slopes of the prompt emission of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are difficult to reconcile with radiatively efficient optically thin emission models irrespective of the radiation mechanism. An alternative is to ascribe the radiation around the spectral peak to a thermalization process occurring well inside the Thomson photosphere. This quasi-thermal spectrum can evolve into the observed non-thermal shape by additional energy release at moderate to small Thomson optical depths, which can readily give rise to the hard spectral tail. The position of the spectral peak is determined by the temperature and Lorentz factor of the flow in the thermalization zone, where the total number of photons carried by the jet is established. To reach thermalization, dissipation alone is not sufficient and photon generation requires an efficient emission/absorption process in addition to scattering. We perform a systematic study of all relevant photon production mechanisms searching for possible conditions in which thermalization can take place. We find that a significant fraction of the available energy should be dissipated at intermediate radii, {approx}10{sup 10} to a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm, and the flow there should be relatively slow: the bulk Lorentz factor could not exceed a few tens for all but the most luminous bursts with the highest E {sub pk} values. The least restrictive constraint for successful thermalization, {Gamma} {approx}< 20, is obtained if synchrotron emission acts as the photon source. This requires, however, a non-thermal acceleration deep below the Thomson photosphere transferring a significant fraction of the flow energy to relativistic electrons with Lorentz factors between 10 and 100. Other processes require bulk flow Lorentz factors of order of a few for typical bursts. We examine the implications of these results to different GRB photospheric emission models.

  4. Radon potential mapping of the Tralee-Castleisland and Cavan areas (Ireland) based on airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and geology.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Doyle, E; Fenton, D; Organo, C

    2011-06-01

    The probability of homes in Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is estimated on the basis of known in-house radon measurements averaged over 10 km × 10 km grid squares. The scope for using airborne gamma-ray spectrometer data for the Tralee-Castleisland area of county Kerry and county Cavan to predict the radon potential (RP) in two distinct areas of Ireland is evaluated in this study. Airborne data are compared statistically with in-house radon measurements in conjunction with geological and ground permeability data to establish linear regression models and produce radon potential maps. The best agreement between the percentage of dwellings exceeding the reference level (RL) for radon concentrations in Ireland (% > RL), estimated from indoor radon data, and modelled RP in the Tralee-Castleisland area is produced using models based on airborne gamma-ray spectrometry equivalent uranium (eU) and ground permeability data. Good agreement was obtained between the % > RL from indoor radon data and RP estimated from eU data in the Cavan area using terrain specific models. In both areas, RP maps derived from eU data are spatially more detailed than the published 10 km grid map. The results show the potential for using airborne radiometric data for producing RP maps.

  5. Gamma-Ray Spectra and Variability of Cygnus Z-1 Observed by BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, J. C.; Wheaton, William A.; Wallyn, P.; Mahoney, W. .; Paciesas, W. S.; Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Zhang, S. N.; Hua, X. M.

    1998-01-01

    We present new BATSE earth occultation observations of the 25 keV-1.8 MeV spectrum and variability of Cygnus X-1 made between August 1993 and May 1994. We observed that the normal soft gamma ray spectrum (gamma2) of Cygnus X-1 has two components: a Comptonized part seen below 300 keV, and a high-energy tail in the 0.3 - 2 MeV range. We interpret it in terms of a two-layer region, consisting of a high-energy core (with an equivalent electron temperature of approximately 210-250 keV) near the event horizon, embedded in an about 50 keV corona. In this scenario, the observed 25-300 keV photons were produced by Compton scattering of soft photons (about 0.5 keV) by the hot electrons in the outer corona. These same hard x rays were further up-scattered by a population of energetic electrons in the inner core, producing the spectral tail above 300 keV. Cygnus X-1 went through an extended sequence of transitions between August 1993 and May 1994, when the 45-140 keV flux first decreased steadily from approximately gamma2 to roughly one-quarter of its intensity over a period of about 140 days. The flux remained at this low level for about 40 days before returning, swiftly (approximately 20 days) to approximately the initial gamma2 level. During the transition, the spectrum evolved to a shape consistent with either a power law with photon index of about 2.6 or a single temperature Compton model with electron temperature kT = 110 +/- 11 keV, and optical depth t = 0.40 +/- 0.06, and then returned essentially to the original gamma2 spectrum at the end of the active period. The overall cooling of the system during the low flux period may be due to an increase in the soft photon population which effectively quenched the hot electrons in these regions through Compton scattering.

  6. Effect of gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra on the empirical luminosity correlations and the GRB Hubble diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai-Nan; Li, Xin; Chang, Zhe

    2016-07-01

    The spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in a wide energy range can usually be well described by the Band function, which is a two smoothly jointed power laws cutting at a breaking energy. Below the breaking energy, the Band function reduces to a cut-off power law, while above the breaking energy it is a simple power law. However, for some detectors [such as the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT)] whose working energy is well below or just near the breaking energy, the observed spectra can be fitted to cut-off power law with enough precision. Besides, since the energy band of Swift-BAT is very narrow, the spectra of most GRBs can be fitted well even using a simple power law. In this paper, with the most up-to-date sample of Swift-BAT GRBs, we study the effect of different spectral models on the empirical luminosity correlations, and further investigate the effect on the reconstruction of GRB Hubble diagram. We mainly focus on two luminosity correlations, i.e. the Amati relation and Yonetoku relation. We calculate these two luminosity correlations in both cases that the GRB spectra are modelled by Band function and cut-off power law. It is found that both luminosity correlations only moderately depend on the choice of GRB spectra. Monte Carlo simulations show that Amati relation is insensitive to the high-energy power-law index of the Band function. As a result, the GRB Hubble diagram calibrated using luminosity correlations is almost independent on the GRB spectra.

  7. Derivation of a Relation for the Steepening of TeV Selected Blazar Gamma-Ray Spectra with Energy and Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F.

    2010-01-01

    We derive a relation for the steepening of blazar gamma-ray spectra between the multi-GeV Fermi energy range and the TeV energy range observed by atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes. The change in spectral index is produced by two effects: (1) an intrinsic steepening, independent of redshift, owing to the properties of emission and absorption in the source, and (2) a redshift-dependent steepening produced by intergalactic pair production interactions of blazar gamma-rays with low energy photons of the "intergalactic background light" (IBL). Given this relation, with good enough data on the mean gamma-ray SED of TeV Selected BL Lacs, the redshift evolution of the IBL can, in principle, be determined independently of stellar evolution models. We apply our relation to the results of new Fermi observations of TeV selected blazars.

  8. Evaluation of the Doppler-Broadening of Gamma-Ray Spectra from Neutron Inelastic Scattering on Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, Phillip C.; Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Howard, Joseph; Musser, Jason

    2009-03-10

    Neutron-induced gamma-ray reactions are extensively used in the nondestructive analysis of materials and other areas where the information about the chemical composition of a substance is crucial. The common technique to find the intensity of the gamma ray is to fit gamma-ray line shape with an analytical function, for example, a Gaussian. However, the Gaussian fitting may fail if the gamma-ray peak is Doppler-broadened since this leads to the miscalculation of the area of the peak and, therefore, to misidentification of the material. Due to momentum considerations, Doppler-broadening occurs primarily with gamma rays from neutron-induced inelastic scattering reactions with light nuclei. The recoiling nucleus of interest must have excited states whose lifetimes are much smaller than the time of flight in the material. We have examined various light nuclei bombarded by 14 MeV neutrons to predict when the peak shape of a neutron-induced gamma ray emitted from these nuclei will be Doppler-broadened. We have found that nearly all the gamma rays from neutron-induced gamma-ray reactions on light elements (A<20) are Doppler-broadened with only a few exceptions. This means that utilization of resolution curves derived from isotopic sources or thermal neutron capture reactions have little value in the analysis.

  9. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234 , 236 , 238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Krticka, M.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the neutron-capture cross section at low neutron energies (10 eV through 100's of keV) are very sensitive to the nuclear level density and radiative strength function. These quantities are often poorly known, especially for radioactive targets, and actual measurements of the capture cross section are usually required. An additional constraint on the calculation of the capture cross section is provided by measurements of the cascade gamma spectrum following neutron capture. Recent measurements of 234 , 236 , 238U(n, γ) emission spectra made using the DANCE 4 π BaF2 array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will be presented. Calculations of gamma-ray spectra made using the DICEBOX code and of the capture cross section made using the CoH3 code will also be presented. These techniques may be also useful for calculations of more unstable nuclides. This work was performed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734).

  10. Searching for narrow absorption and emission lines in XMM-Newton spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Braito, V.; D'Avanzo, P.; Ghirlanda, G.; Melandri, A.; Pescalli, A.; Salafia, O. S.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic search for narrow emission and absorption features in the X-ray spectra of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Using XMM-Newton data, both EPIC and RGS spectra, of six bright (fluence > 10-7 erg cm-2) and relatively nearby (z = 0.54-1.41) GRBs, we performed a blind search for emission or absorption lines that could be related to a high cloud density or metal-rich gas in the environ close to the GRBs. We detected five emission features in four of the six GRBs with an overall statistical significance, assessed through Monte Carlo simulations, of ≲ 3.0σ. Most of the lines are detected around the observed energy of the oxygen edge at ~ 0.5 keV, suggesting that they are not related to the GRB environment but are most likely of Galactic origin. No significant absorption features were detected. A spectral fitting with a free Galactic column density (NH) testing different models for the Galactic absorption confirms this origin because we found an indication of an excess of Galactic NH in these four GRBs with respect to the tabulated values.

  11. Soft X-ray absorption excess in gamma-ray burst afterglow spectra: Absorption by turbulent ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanga, M.; Schady, P.; Gatto, A.; Greiner, J.; Krause, M. G. H.; Diehl, R.; Savaglio, S.; Walch, S.

    2016-10-01

    Two-thirds of long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) show soft X-ray absorption in excess of the Milky Way. The column densities of metals inferred from UV and optical spectra differ from those derived from soft X-ray spectra, at times by an order of magnitude, with the latter being higher. The origin of the soft X-ray absorption excess observed in GRB X-ray afterglow spectra remains a heavily debated issue, which has resulted in numerous investigations on the effect of hot material both internal and external to the GRB host galaxy on our X-ray afterglow observations. Nevertheless, all models proposed so far have either only been able to account for a subset of our observations (i.e. at z> 2), or they have required fairly extreme conditions to be present within the absorbing material. In this paper, we investigate the absorption of the GRB afterglow by a collisionally ionised and turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). We find that a dense (3 cm-3) collisionally ionised ISM could produce UV/optical and soft X-ray absorbing column densities that differ by a factor of 10. However the UV/optical and soft X-ray absorbing column densities for such sightlines are 2-3 orders of magnitude lower in comparison to the GRB afterglow spectra. For those GRBs with a larger soft X-ray excess by up to an order of magnitude, the contribution in absorption from a turbulent ISM as considered here would ease the required conditions of additional absorbing components, such as the GRB circumburst medium and intergalactic medium.

  12. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L. (Editor); Ramaty, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical aspects of gamma ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics are discussed. Line spectra from solar, stellar, planetary, and cosmic gamma rays are examined as well as HEAO investigations, the prospects of a gamma ray observatory, and follow-on X-ray experiments in space.

  13. Nuclear gamma rays from energetic particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma ray line emission from nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle reactions is evaluated. The compiled nuclear data and the calculated gamma ray spectra and intensities can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which contain large fluxes of energetic protons and nuclei. A detailed evaluation of gamma ray line production in the interstellar medium is made.

  14. Analysis of gamma-ray spectra from foils activated in a range-thick lead target by 800-MeV protons. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Laird, C.E.; Mullins, D.H.

    1995-06-12

    Approximately 400 gamma-ray spectra have been analyzed to obtain the types and quantities of radioisotopes produced when 800-MeV protons interact with a range-thick lead target. These spectra were obtained from the radioactive decay of product isotopes in lead disks placed at various depths and radial positions within the target. These spectra were analyzed with the computer code HYPERMET and the photopeak areas were reduced to nuclei produced per incident proton per cubic centimeter of material. Product nuclei ranged from atomic mass 160 to mass 206 and over a range of half lives from a few minutes to several weeks. The results of this analysis have been outlined in this report and transmitted on computer disk to Los Alamos National Laboratory. The consistency of these analyses have been confirmed by a comparison of photopeak areas obtained at LANL with the computer code GAMANAL with those from HYPERMET for two gamma-ray spectra. Also, the nuclear production per proton per cm{sub 3} obtained from these two spectra analyzed both at LANL and at EKU have been found to agree to within the statistical accuracy of the peak-fitting programs. This analysis of these 400 gamma-ray spectra has determined the nuclear production per incident proton per cm{sub 3} at five regularly-spaced radial positions and depths up to 40 cm into a range-thick lead target.

  15. The Gamma Ray Spectra Measurement in Reactor Pressure Vessel Simulator in WWER-1000 Engineering Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ošmera, B.; Kyncl, J.; Mařík, M.; Cvachovec, F.; Smutný, V.; Králík, M.

    2003-06-01

    The space - energy distribution of the mixed neutron - photon radiation field has been measured over the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) simulator thickness in the WWER-1000 engineering benchmark assembly in the LR-0 experimental reactor (in Nuclear Research Institute Řež plc) with a scintillation spectrometer. The spectra have been measured before the RPV in one quarter, one half, and three quarters of its thickness and behind the RPV in the energy range 0.5 - 10 MeV. The evaluated integral fluxes above 1 MeV and their ratio are compared with the MCNP and DORT calculation, the measured spectra are presented graphically. The measurements are being performed in the frame of the project REDOS [1], 5th Framwork Programme of the European Community 1998 - 2002.

  16. The gamma-ray blazar quest: new optical spectra, state of art and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; Álvarez Crespo, N.; D'Abrusco, R.; Landoni, M.; Masetti, N.; Ricci, F.; Milisavljevic, D.; Paggi, A.; Chavushyan, V.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Strader, J.; Chomiuk, L.; La Franca, F.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2016-10-01

    We recently developed a procedure to recognize γ-ray blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty regions of the unidentified/unassociated γ-ray sources (UGSs). Such procedure was based on the discovery that Fermi blazars show peculiar infrared colors. However, to confirm the real nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic data are necessary. Thus, we performed an extensive archival search for spectra available in the literature in parallel with an optical spectroscopic campaign aimed to reveal and confirm the nature of the selected γ-ray blazar candidates. Here, we first search for optical spectra of a selected sample of γ-ray blazar candidates that can be potential counterparts of UGSs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR12). This search enables us to update the archival search carried out to date. We also describe the state-of-art and the future perspectives of our campaign to discover previously unknown γ-ray blazars.

  17. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume I. Data analysis methodology and hardware description

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and had dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

  18. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume II. Software description and listings. [IAEAPU

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and has dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

  19. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a final report for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program from 06/01/91-07/31/97. The topics include: 1) Solar Flare Neutron Spectra and Accelerated Ions; 2) Gamma Ray Lines From The Orion Complex; 3) Implications of Nuclear Line Emission From The Orion Complex; 4) Possible Sites of Nuclear Line Emission From Massive OB Associations; 5) Gamma-Ray Burst Repitition and BATSE Position Uncertainties; 6) Effects of Compton Scattering on BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra; and 7) Selection Biases on the Spectral and Temporal Distribution of Gamma Ray Bursts.

  20. Drift problems in the automatic analysis of gamma-ray spectra using associative memory algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Olmos, P.; Diaz, J.C.; Perez, J.M.; Aguayo, P. ); Gomez, P.; Rodellar, V. )

    1994-06-01

    Perturbations affecting nuclear radiation spectrometers during their operation frequently spoil the accuracy of automatic analysis methods. One of the problems usually found in practice refers to fluctuations in the spectrum gain and zero, produced by drifts in the detector and nuclear electronics. The pattern acquired in these conditions may be significantly different from that expected with stable instrumentation, thus complicating the identification and quantification of the radionuclides present in it. In this work, the performance of Associative Memory algorithms when dealing with spectra affected by drifts is explored considering a linear energy-calibration function. The formulation of the extended algorithm, constructed to quantify the possible presence of drifts in the spectrometer, is deduced and the results obtained from its application to several practical cases are commented.

  1. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Kawano, Toshihiko; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Haight, Robert Cameron; Jandel, Marian; Mosby, Shea Morgan; O'Donnell, John M.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen; Krticka, Milan

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  2. Application of airborne gamma spectrometric survey data to estimating terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates: an example in California.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, H A; Revzan, K L; Smith, A R

    1994-01-01

    We examined the applicability of radioelement data from the National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance, an element of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation, to estimate terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates, by comparing dose rates calculated from aeroradiometric surveys of uranium, thorium, and potassium concentrations with dose rates calculated from a radiogeologic data base and the distribution of lithologies in California. Gamma-ray dose rates increase generally from north to south following lithological trends, with low values of 25-30 nGy h-1 in the northernmost 1 x 2 degrees quadrangles between 41 and 42 degrees N to high values of 75-100 nGy h-1 in southeastern California. Lithologic-based estimates of mean dose rates in the quadrangles generally match those from aeroradiometric data, with statewide means of 63 and 60 nGy h-1, respectively. These are intermediate between a population-weighted global average of 51 nGy h-1 reported in 1982 by UNSCEAR and a weighted continental average of 70 nGy h-1, based on the global distribution of rock types. The concurrence of lithologically and aeroradiometrically determined dose rates in California, with its varied geology and topography encompassing settings representative of the continents, indicates that the National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance data are applicable to estimates of terrestrial absorbed dose rates from natural gamma emitters.

  3. Size Effect on Nuclear Gamma-Ray Energy Spectra Acquired by Different Sized CeBr3, LaBr3:Ce, and NaI:Tl Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Reed, Michael; Yuan, Ding; Beller, Denis; Cutler, Matthew; Contreras, Chris; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wilde, Scott UNLV

    2014-03-01

    Gamma-ray energy spectra were acquired for different sizes of cerium tribromide (CeBr3), cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), and thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI:Tl) detectors. A comparison was conducted of the energy resolution and detection efficiency of these scintillator detectors for different sizes of detectors. The results of this study are consistent with the observation that for each size detector, LaBr3:Ce offers better resolution than either a CeBr3 or NaI:Tl detector of the same size. In addition, CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce detectors could resolve some closely spaced peaks in the spectra of several radioisotopes that NaI:Tl could not. As the detector size increased, all three detector materials exhibited higher efficiency, albeit with slightly reduced resolution. Significantly, the very low intrinsic activity of CeBr3 is also demonstrated in this study, which, when combined with energy resolution characteristics for a range of detector sizes, could lead to an improved ability to detect special nuclear materials compared to the other detectors.

  4. Gamma ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  5. Measurement of the Multi-T{bold e}V Gamma-Ray Flare Spectra of Markarian 421 and Markarian 501

    SciTech Connect

    Krennrich, F.; Biller, S.D.; Bond, I.H.; Boyle, P.J.; Bradbury, S.M.; Breslin, A.C.; Buckley, J.H.; Burdett, A.M.; Gordo, J.B.; Carter-Lewis, D.A.; Catanese, M.; Cawley, M.F.; Fegan, D.J.; Finley, J.P.; Gaidos, J.A.; Hall, T.; Hillas, A.M.; Lamb, R.C.; Lessard, R.W.; Masterson, C.; McEnery, J.E.; Mohanty, G.; Moriarty, P. and others.

    1999-01-01

    The energy spectrum of Markarian 421 in flaring states has been measured from 0.3 to 10 TeV using both small and large zenith angle observations with the Whipple Observatory 10 m imaging telescope. The large zenith angle technique is useful for extending spectra to high energies, and the extraction of spectra with this technique is discussed. The resulting spectrum of Markarian 421 is fitted reasonably well by a simple power law: J(E)=E{sup {minus}2.54{plus_minus}0.03{plus_minus}0.10} photons m{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} TeV{sup {minus}1}, where the first set of errors is statistical and the second set is systematic. This is in contrast to our recently reported spectrum of Markarian 501, which over a similar energy range has substantial curvature. The differences in TeV energy spectra of gamma-ray blazars reflect both the physics of the gamma-ray production mechanism and possibly differential absorption effects at the source or in the intergalactic medium. Since Markarian 421 and Markarian 501 have almost the same redshift (0.031 and 0.033, respectively), the difference in their energy spectra must be intrinsic to the sources and not due to intergalactic absorption, assuming the intergalactic infrared background is uniform. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  6. Energetic neutron and gamma-ray spectra under the earth radiation belts according to "SALYUT-7" [correction of "SALUTE-7"]-"KOSMOS-1686" orbital complex and "CORONAS-I" satellite data.

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A V; Dmitriev, A V; Myagkova, I N; Ryumin, S P; Smirnova, O N; Sobolevsky, I M

    1998-01-01

    The spectra of neutrons >10 MeV and gamma-rays 1.5-100 MeV under the Earth Radiation Belts, restored from the data, obtained onboard orbital complex "SALYUT-7" [correction of "SALUTE-7"]-"KOSMOS-1686", are presented. The spectra shapes are similar to those for albedo neutrons and gamma-rays, but absolute values of their fluxes (0.2 cm-2 s-1 for neutrons, 0.8 cm-2 s-1 for gamma-rays at the equator and 1.2 cm-2 s-1, 1.9 cm-2 s-1, accordingly, at L=1.9) are several times as large. It is possibly explained by the fact that most of the detected particles were produced by the cosmic ray interactions with the orbital complex matter. Neutron and gamma-ray fluxes obtained from "CORONAS-1" data are near those for albedo particles. PMID:11542904

  7. Energetic neutron and gamma-ray spectra under the earth radiation belts according to "SALYUT-7" [correction of "SALUTE-7"]-"KOSMOS-1686" orbital complex and "CORONAS-I" satellite data.

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A V; Dmitriev, A V; Myagkova, I N; Ryumin, S P; Smirnova, O N; Sobolevsky, I M

    1998-01-01

    The spectra of neutrons >10 MeV and gamma-rays 1.5-100 MeV under the Earth Radiation Belts, restored from the data, obtained onboard orbital complex "SALYUT-7" [correction of "SALUTE-7"]-"KOSMOS-1686", are presented. The spectra shapes are similar to those for albedo neutrons and gamma-rays, but absolute values of their fluxes (0.2 cm-2 s-1 for neutrons, 0.8 cm-2 s-1 for gamma-rays at the equator and 1.2 cm-2 s-1, 1.9 cm-2 s-1, accordingly, at L=1.9) are several times as large. It is possibly explained by the fact that most of the detected particles were produced by the cosmic ray interactions with the orbital complex matter. Neutron and gamma-ray fluxes obtained from "CORONAS-1" data are near those for albedo particles.

  8. Understanding Doppler Broadening of Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Sullivan, John P.

    2014-07-03

    Doppler-broadened gamma ray peaks are observed routinely in the collection and analysis of gamma-ray spectra. If not recognized and understood, the appearance of Doppler broadening can complicate the interpretation of a spectrum and the correct identification of the gamma ray-emitting material. We have conducted a study using a simulation code to demonstrate how Doppler broadening arises and provide a real-world example in which Doppler broadening is found. This report describes that study and its results.

  9. VTEM airborne EM, aeromagnetic and gamma-ray spectrometric data over the Cerro Quema high sulphidation epithermal gold deposits, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Karl; Prikhodko, Alexander; Legault, Jean M. Plastow, Geoffrey C.; Kapetas, John; Druecker, Michael

    2016-03-01

    In March 2012, a helicopter-borne versatile time-domain electromagnetic (VTEM), magnetic and radiometric survey was flown over the Cerro Quema high sulphidation (HS) epithermal gold deposits and the surrounding area. The Cerro Quema deposits are located in the Azuero Peninsula, Panama, approximately 8 km east of Güerita. The gold mineralisation is associated with clay-pyrite alterations topped by an acid-leached resistive cap, and the principal ores are pyrite-rich sulphides located within mineralised vuggy silica rocks. The geophysical data over the Cerro Quema deposits have been analysed. The electromagnetic (EM) responses over the deposits are characterised by resistivity highs and chargeability lows, surrounded by resistivity lows and chargeability highs. Radiometric Th/K ratio highs and magnetic susceptibility lows are observed over the deposits. These geophysical signatures over the Cerro Quema deposits are characteristic responses from HS epithermal gold deposits. The success of the VTEM survey points to the applicability of the regional helicopter electromagnetic, magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry (EM-Mag-Spec) surveys for the exploration of similar HS epithermal gold deposits to depths < 500 m in weathered terrains.

  10. Utilization of airborne gamma ray spectrometric data for geological mapping, radioactive mineral exploration and environmental monitoring of southeastern Aswan city, South Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mohamed A. S.; Elkhodary, Shadia T.

    2013-12-01

    The present work utilizes airborne gamma ray spectrometric data in a trial to refine surface geology of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, detect any radioactive mineralization and monitor environment at southeastern Aswan city, South Eastern Desert, Egypt. This area is mainly covered with igneous rocks (younger granites, older granites, metasediments, metavolcanics, metagabbro, Tertiary basalt and ring complex), metamorphic rocks as well as sedimentary rocks (Um Barmil Formation, Timsah Formation, Abu Aggag Formation and wadi sediments). Airborne gamma ray spectrometry can be very helpful in mapping surface geology. This provides estimates of the apparent surface concentrations of the most common naturally occurring radioactive elements, such as potassium (K), equivalent uranium (eU) and equivalent thorium (eTh). This is based on the assumption that, the absolute and relative concentrations of these radioelements vary measurably and significantly with lithology. The composite image technique is used to display simultaneously three parameters of the three radioelement concentrations and their three binary ratios on one image. The technique offers much in terms of lithological discrimination, based on colour differences and showed efficiency in defining areas, where different lithofacies occur within areas mapped as one continuous lithology. The integration between surface geological information and geophysical data led to detailing the surface geology and the contacts between different rock units. Significant locations or favourable areas for uranium exploration are defined, where the measurements exceed (X + 2S), taking X as the arithmetic mean of eU, eU/eTh and eU/K measurements and S as the standard deviation corresponding to each variables. The study area shows the presence of four relatively high uraniferous zones. These zones cannot be ignored and need further ground follow-up. In addition, the trend analysis based on the three radioelement maps and

  11. Effects of overburden, biomass and atmospheric inversions on energy and angular distributions of gamma rays from U, K, Th, and airborne radon sources. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.M.; Leggett, D.; Wells, M.B.

    1980-12-01

    This report describes a set of radiation transport calculations that were run with the AHISN S/sub n/ discrete ordinates code and a point kernel code to determine the energy, polar angle and height in air distributions of the total and direct gamma-ray flux densities from: (1) uranium sources of 3.2, 200 and 800 ppM in a sandstone orebody covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (2) thorium sources of 12, 25 and 80 ppM in a sandstone ore body covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (3) potassium source (2.5 wt %) in a sandstone ore body covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (4) constant airborne source with height for no inversion and for inversion layer heights of 65.22, 260.32 and 458.43 m; (5) exponentially decreasing airborne source for no inversion and inversion layer heights of 65.22, 260.32 and 458.43 m; (6) 3.2 ppM uranium source in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm thick; (7) 12 ppM thorium source in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm; (8) 2.5 wt % of potassium in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm thick; and (9) 3.2 ppM, 200 ppM, and 800 ppM uranium source in sandstone orebody covered with overburden thicknesses of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm. Gamma-ray emission from the decay of natural uranium, thorium, radon, and potassium are given in a 45-energy group structure applicable to the energy windows used to map the potential uranium ore reserves.

  12. Instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, David L.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of gamma-ray-telescope technology for ground, airborne, and space observations is surveyed and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and graphs and tables of typical data. For the low- and medium-energy ranges, consideration is given to detectors and detector cooling systems, background-rejection methods, radiation damage, large-area detectors, gamma-ray imaging, data analysis, and the Compton-interaction region. Also discussed are the gamma-ray interaction process at high energies; multilevel automated spark-chamber gamma-ray telescopes; the Soviet Gamma-1 telescope; the EGRET instrument for the NASA Gamma-Ray Observatory; and Cerenkov, air-shower, and particle-detector instruments for the TeV and PeV ranges. Significant improvements in resolution and sensitivity are predicted for the near future.

  13. Gamma-ray Spectral Analysis Algorithm Library

    1997-09-25

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithm library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from GE semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  14. Gamma-ray spectral analysis algorithm library

    SciTech Connect

    Egger, A. E.

    2013-05-06

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithms library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  15. DS02 fluence spectra for neutrons and gamma rays at Hiroshima and Nagasaki with fluence-to-kerma coefficients and transmission factors for sample measurements.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D; Cullings, Harry M

    2007-11-01

    Fluence spectra at several ground distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are provided along with associated fluence-to-kerma coefficients from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). Also included are transmission factors for calculating expected responses of in situ sample measurements of neutron activation products such as (32)P,(36)Cl,(39)Ar,(41)Ca, (60)Co,(63)Ni,(152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The free-in-air (FIA) fluences calculated in 2002 are available for 240 angles, 69 energy groups, 101 ground distances, 5 heights, 4 radiation source components, 2 cities. The DS02 code uses these fluences partitioned to a prompt and delayed portion, collapsed to 58 energy groups and restricted to 97 ground distances. This is because the fluence spectra were required to be in the same format that was used in the older Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) computer code, of which the DS02 computer code is a modification. The 2002 calculation fluences and the collapsed DS02 code fluences are presented and briefly discussed. A report on DS02, which is available on the website at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, provides tables and figures of the A-bomb neutron and gamma-ray output used as the sources in the 2002 radiation transport calculations. While figures illustrating the fluence spectra at several ground ranges are presented in the DS02 Report, it does not include any tables of the calculated fluence spectra in the DS02 report. This paper provides, at several standard distances from the hypocenter, the numerical information which is required to translate the FIA neutron fluences given in DS02 to a neutron activation measurement or neutron and gamma-ray soft-tissue dose. PMID:17643260

  16. The use of the bulk properties of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra for the study of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Adam

    The study of bulk spectral properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is important to understanding the physics behind these powerful explosions and may even be an aide in studying cosmology. The prompt emission spectral properties have long been studied by a growing community of researchers, and many theories have been developed since the discovery of GRBs. Even though the exact physics of these phenomena is not completely understood, GRBs have been proposed to give insight on other astrophysical phenomena from dark matter to the expansion of the universe. Obviously, using GRBs to study cosmology requires a large sample size to adequately constrain results and provide confident conjectures. For this reason, BATSE and GBM results are paramount to the study of the prompt emission of GRBs. Using results from both instruments, I study the bulk spectral properties of GRBs and describe analysis techniques that can be used to study cosmology.

  17. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Forsyth quadrangle, Round Up quadrangle, Hardin quadrangle (Montana), Sheridan quadrangle, (Wyoming). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the area covered by the Forsyth, Hardin, and Sheridan, and Roundup, 1:250,000 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS), quadrangle maps. The survey was part of DOE's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer with a large crystal volume, and with a high sensitivity proton precession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration Pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test Range. Data quality was ensured during the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, plotted, and contoured to produce anomaly maps based on the radiometric response of individual geological units. The anomalies were interpreted and an interpretation map produced. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data collection procedures, the data processing procedures, the data presentation, the interpretation rationale, and the interpretation methodology. A separate Volume II for each quadrangle contains the data displays and the interpretation results.

  18. NEAR Gamma Ray Spectrometer Characterization and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Joel Lee; Vajda, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the work completed in the third year of the contract. The principle activities during this period were (1) the characterization of the NEAR 2 Gamma Ray Spectrometer using a neutron generator to generate complex gamma ray spectra and a large Ge Detecter to identify all the major peaks in the spectra; (2) the evaluation and repair of the Engineering Model Unit of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer for the NEAR mission; (3) the investigation of polycapillary x-ray optics for x-ray detection; and (4) technology transfer from NASA to forensic science.

  19. Characteristics of gamma-ray line flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Dennis, B.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of solar gamma rays by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) demonstrate that energetic protons and ions are rapidly accelerated during the impulsive phase. To understand the acceleration mechanisms for these particles, the characteristics of the gamma ray line flares observed by SMM were studied. Some very intense hard X-ray flares without detectable gamma ray lines were also investigated. Gamma ray line flares are distinguished from other flares by: (1) intense hard X-ray and microwave emissions; (2) delay of high energy hard X-rays; (3) emission of type 2 and/or type 4 radio bursts; and (4) flat hard X-ray spectra (average power law index: 3.1). The majority of the gamma ray line flares shared all these characteristics, and the remainder shared at least three of them. Positive correlations were found between durations of spike bursts and spatial sizes of flare loops as well as between delay times and durations of spike bursts.

  20. Gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

  1. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Paciesas, W.S. ); Fishman, G.J. )

    1992-01-01

    This proceedings represents the works presented at the Gamma-Ray Bursts Workshop -- 1991 which was held on the campus of theUniversity of Alabama in Huntsville, October 16-18. The emphasis ofthe Workshop was to present and discuss new observations of gamma-ray bursts made recently by experiments on the Compton Gamma-RayObservatory (CGRO), Granat, Ginga, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Prognozand Phobos. These presentations were complemented by some groundbased observations, reanalysis of older data, descriptions offuture gamma-ray burst experiments and a wide-ranging list oftheoretical discussions. Over seventy papers are included in theproceedings. Eleven of them are abstracted for the database. (AIP)

  2. Gamma ray astronomy from satellites and balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of gamma ray astronomy topics presented at the Cosmic Ray Conference. The major conclusions at the Cosmic Ray Conference in the field of gamma ray astronomy are given. (1) MeV-emission of gamma-ray bursts is a common feature. Variations in duration and energy spectra from burst to burst may explain the discrepancy between the measured log N - log S dependence and the observed isotropy of bursts. (2) The gamma-ray line at 1.809 MeV from Al(26) is the first detected line from a radioactive nucleosynthesis product. In order to understand its origin it will be necessary to measure its longitude distribution in the Milky Way. (3) The indications of a gamma-ray excess found from the direction of Loop I is consistent with the picture that the bulk of cosmic rays below 100 GeV is produced in galactic supernova remnants. (4) The interpretation of the large scale distribution of gamma rays in the Milky Way is controversial. At present an extragalactic origin of the cosmic ray nuclei in the GeV-range cannot be excluded from the gamma ray data. (5) The detection of MeV-emission from Cen A is a promising step towards the interesting field of extragalactic gamma ray astronomy.

  3. Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woosley, Stan

    2012-11-01

    Prologue C. Kouveliotou, R. A . M. J. Wijers and S. E. Woosley; 1. The discovery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon R. W. Klebesadel; 2. Instrumental principles E. E. Fenimore; 3. The BATSE era G. J. Fishman and C. A. Meegan; 4. The cosmological era L. Piro and K. Hurley; 5. The Swift era N. Gehrels and D. N. Burrows; 6. Discoveries enabled by multi-wavelength afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts J. Greiner; 7. Prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts T. Piran, R. Sari and R. Mochkovitch; 8. Basic gamma-ray burst afterglows P. Mészáros and R. A. M. J. Wijers; 9. The GRB-supernova connection J. Hjorth and J. S. Bloom; 10. Models for gamma-ray burst progenitors and central engines S. E. Woosley; 11. Jets and gamma-ray burst unification schemes J. Granot and E. Ramirez-Ruiz; 12. High-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos E. Waxman; 13. Long gamma-ray burst host galaxies and their environments J. P. U. Fynbo, D. Malesani and P. Jakobsson; 14. Gamma-ray burst cosmology V. Bromm and A. Loeb; 15. Epilogue R. D. Blandford; Index.

  4. Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the detection of over 80 gamma-ray pulsars. Several new populations have been discovered, including 24 radio quiet pulsars found through gamma-ray pulsations alone and about 20 millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The gamma-ray pulsations from millisecond pulsars were discovered by both folding at periods of known radio millisecond pulsars or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -35 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. The higher sensitivity and larger energy range of the Fermi Large Area Telescope has produced detailed energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectroscopy on brighter pulsars, that have ruled out polar cap models as the major source of the emission in favor of outer magnetosphere accelerators. The large number of gamma-ray pulsars now allows for the first time meaningful population and sub-population studies that are revealing surprising properties of these fascinating sources.

  5. Gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W. (Editor); Trombka, J. I. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

  6. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  7. Detecting axionlike particles with gamma ray telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2007-12-01

    We propose that axionlike particles (ALPs) with a two-photon vertex, consistent with all astrophysical and laboratory bounds, may lead to a detectable signature in the spectra of high-energy gamma-ray sources. This occurs as a result of gamma rays being converted into ALPs in the magnetic fields of efficient astrophysical accelerators according to the "Hillas criterion", such as jets of active galactic nuclei or hot spots of radio galaxies. The discovery of such an effect is possible by GLAST in the 1-100 GeV range and by ground-based gamma-ray telescopes in the TeV range.

  8. Detecting axionlike particles with gamma ray telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2007-12-01

    We propose that axionlike particles (ALPs) with a two-photon vertex, consistent with all astrophysical and laboratory bounds, may lead to a detectable signature in the spectra of high-energy gamma-ray sources. This occurs as a result of gamma rays being converted into ALPs in the magnetic fields of efficient astrophysical accelerators according to the "Hillas criterion", such as jets of active galactic nuclei or hot spots of radio galaxies. The discovery of such an effect is possible by GLAST in the 1-100 GeV range and by ground-based gamma-ray telescopes in the TeV range. PMID:18233353

  9. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Some basic observed properties of gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Although some properties were known 25 years ago, new and more detailed observations have been made by the Compton Observatory in the past three years. The new observation with the greatest impact has been the observed isotropic distribution of bursts along with a deficiency of weak bursts which would be expected from a homogeneous burst distribution. This is not compatible with any known Galactic population of objects. Gamma-ray bursts show an enormous variety of burst morphologies and a wide spread in burst durations. The spectra of gamma-ray bursts are characterized by rapid variations and peak power which is almost entirely in the gamma-ray energy range. Delayed gamma-ray burst photons extending to GeV energies have been detected for the first time. A time dilation effect has also been reported to be observed in gamma-ray, bursts. The observation of a gamma-ray burst counterpart in another wavelength region has yet to be made.

  10. Gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Cosmic gamma rays, the physical processes responsible for their production and the astrophysical sites from which they were seen are reported. The bulk of the observed gamma ray emission is in the photon energy range from about 0.1 MeV to 1 GeV, where observations are carried out above the atmosphere. There are also, however, gamma ray observations at higher energies obtained by detecting the Cerenkov light produced by the high energy photons in the atmosphere. Gamma ray emission was observed from sources as close as the Sun and the Moon and as distant as the quasar 3C273, as well as from various other galactic and extragalactic sites. The radiation processes also range from the well understood, e.g. energetic particle interactions with matter, to the still incompletely researched, such as radiation transfer in optically thick electron positron plasmas in intense neutron star magnetic fields.

  11. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1991-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to the development of the Bursts and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory and to analysis of archival data from balloon flight experiments were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  12. Gamma ray line astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1984-01-01

    The interpretations and implications of the astrophysical observations of gamma-ray lines are reviewed. At the Galactic Center e(+)-e(-) pairs from a compact object produce an annihilation line that shows no redshift, indicating an annihilation site far removed from this object. In the jets of SS433, gamma-ray lines are produced by inelastic excitations, probably in dust grains, although line emission from fusion reactions has also been considered. Observations of diffuse galactic line emission reveal recently synthesized radioactive aluminum in the interstellar medium. In gamma-ray bursts, redshifted pair annihilation lines are consistent with a neutron star origin for the bursts. In solar flares, gamma-ray line emission reveals the prompt acceleration of protons and nuclei, in close association with the flare energy release mechanism.

  13. Gamma ray camera

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, C.D.; Wang, S.

    1980-09-09

    An anger gamma ray camera is improved by the substitution of a gamma ray sensitive, proximity type image intensifier tube for the scintillator screen in the anger camera, the image intensifier tube having a negatively charged flat scintillator screen and a flat photocathode layer and a grounded, flat output phosphor display screen all of the same dimension (Unity image magnification) and all within a grounded metallic tube envelope and having a metallic, inwardly concaved input window between the scintillator screen and the collimator.

  14. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  15. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D. J.

    2008-02-27

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  16. Gamma ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschel, M.; Guenther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape {gamma} ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E{sup 2}, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E{sup 2} extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

  17. Intense Gamma-Ray Flashes Above Thunderstorms on the Earth and Other Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    Intense millisecond flashes of MeV photons have been observed with space-borne detectors in Earth orbit. They are expected to be present on other planets that exhibit lightning. The terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in the early 1990s. They are now being observed with several other instruments, including the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detectors on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Although Fermi- GBM was designed and optimized for the observation of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it has unprecedented capabilities for TGF observations. The TGFs usually have extremely hard continuous spectra, typical of highly- Comptonized bremsstrahlung radiation. These spectral are harder than those of GRBs, with photons extending to over 40 MeV. The most likely origin of these high-energy photons is bremsstrahlung radiation produced by a relativistic "runaway avalanche" electron beam. Such a beam is expected to be produced in an extended, intense electric field in or above thunderstorm regions. The altitude of origin and beaming characteristics of the radiation are quite uncertain. They have generated considerable observational and theoretical interest in recent years. This talk will give an overview of the all of the space-borne observations of TGFs that have been made thus far. Instruments are being designed specifically for TGF observations from new spacecraft as well as from airborne platforms

  18. Space-Borne Observations of Intense Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) Above Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    Intense millisecond flashes of MeV photons are being observed with space-borne detectors. These terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in the early 1990s. They are now being observed with several other instruments, including the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detectors on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Although Fermi-GBM was designed and optimized for the observation of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it has unprecedented capabilities for TGF observations. The TGFs usually have extremely hard continuous spectra, typical of highly-Comptonized bremsstrahlung radiation. These spectral are harder than those of GRBs, with photons extending to over 40 MeV. The most likely origin of these high-energy photons is bremsstrahlung radiation produced by a relativistic runaway avalanche electron beam. Such a beam is expected to be produced in an extended, intense electric field in or above thunderstorm regions. The altitude of origin and beaming characteristics of the radiation are quite uncertain. These TGFs may produce an appreciable radiation dose to passengers and crew in nearby aircraft. They have generated considerable observational and theoretical interest in recent years. Instruments are being designed specifically for TGF observations from new spacecraft as well as from airborne platforms.

  19. Prospects for gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission and the Gamma Ray Experiment aboard the SMM spacecraft are discussed. Mission plans for interplanetary probes are also discussed. The Gamma Ray observatory and its role in future gamma ray astronomy is highlighted. It is concluded that gamma ray astronomy will be of major importance in the development of astronomical models and in the development of comsological theory.

  20. The gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Detection of gamma rays and gamma ray sources, operations using the Space Shuttle, and instruments aboard the GRO, including the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) are among the topics surveyed.

  1. Galaxies and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The nature of the high-energy spectra of several types of active galaxies and their contribution to the measured diffuse gamma-ray emission between 1 and 150 MeV are considered, using X-ray spectra of active galaxies and SAS 2 data regarding the intensity upper limits to the gamma-ray emission above 35 MeV. It is found that a substantial increase in slope of the photon energy spectrum must occur in the low energy gamma-ray region for Seyfert galaxies, BL Lac objects, and emission line galaxies; the power-law spectra observed in the X-ray range must steepen substantially between 50 keV and 50 MeV. In addition, a cosmological integration shows that Seyfert galaxies, BL Lac objects, and quasars may account for most of the 1-150 MeV diffuse background, even without significant evolution.

  2. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  3. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  4. Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-06-14

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Since it is the only (almost) black spot in the gamma-ray sky, it provides a unique opportunity for calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo -rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

  5. Measurements of cross sections relevant to. gamma. -ray line astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, K.T.; Norman, E.B.; Larimer, R.M.; Crane, S.G.

    1986-06-01

    Gamma-ray production cross sections have been measured for the ..gamma..-ray lines which are mostly strongly excited in the proton bombardment of C, O, Mg, Si, and Fe targets of natural isotopic composition. High resolution germanium detectors were used to collect ..gamma..-ray spectra at proton bombarding energies of 20, 30, 33, 40 and 50 MeV. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow. PMID:22923573

  7. Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

  8. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1991-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to the development of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory and to collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from the MSFC Very Low Frequency transient monitoring program were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  9. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1992-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to mission operations and data analysis for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory, to collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from the Marshall Space Flight Center Very Low Frequency transient monitoring program, and to compilation and analysis of induced radioactivity data were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  10. Celestial gamma ray study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the research activities performed by Stanford University investigators as part of the data reduction effort and overall support of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. This report is arranged chronologically, with each subsection detailing activities during roughly a one year period of time, beginning in June 1991.

  11. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  12. Gamma Ray Astrophysics: New insight into the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Trombka, J. I.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma ray observations of the solar system, the galaxy and extragalactic radiation are reported. Topics include: planets, comets, and asteroids; solar observations; interstellar medium and galactic structure; compact objects; cosmology; and diffuse radiation. The instrumentation used in gamma ray astronomy in covered along with techniques for the analysis of observational spectra.

  13. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  14. Gamma ray astronomy in perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview of the development of gamma ray astronomy is presented. Gamma ray telescopes and other optical measuring instruments are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on findings that were unobtainable before gamma ray astronomy. Information on evolution of the solar system, the relationship of the solar system to the galaxy, and the composition of interstellar matter is discussed.

  15. Gamma ray astronomy and black hole astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.

    1990-01-01

    The study of soft gamma emissions from black-hole candidates is identified as an important element in understanding black-hole phenomena ranging from stellar-mass black holes to AGNs. The spectra of Cyg X-1 and observations of the Galactic Center are emphasized, since thermal origins and MeV gamma-ray bumps are evident and suggest a thermal-pair cloud picture. MeV gamma-ray observations are suggested for studying black hole astrophysics such as the theorized escaping pair wind, the anticorrelation between the MeV gamma bump and the soft continuum, and the relationship between source compactness and temperature.

  16. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat-spectrum radio quasars in the fast-cooling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-07-01

    In the external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of a very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution, N^' }_e({γ ^' })∝ {γ ^' }^{-p}, with spectral index p ˜ 1.3 is formed below the minimum energy of injection electrons when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e. inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat-spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum and can explain in reasonable fashion the very hard Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) spectrum of the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December.

  17. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1994-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) is one of four instruments on the Compton observatory which was launched by the space shuttle Atlantis on April 5, 1991. As of mid-March, 1994, BATSE detected more than 925 cosmic gamma-ray bursts and more than 725 solar flares. Pulsed gamma rays have been detected from at least 16 sources and emission from at least 28 sources (including most of the pulsed sources) has been detected by the earth occultation technique. UAH participation in BATSE is extensive but can be divided into two main areas, operations and data analysis. The daily BATSE operations tasks represent a substantial level of effort and involve a large team composed of MSFC personnel as well as contractors such as UAH. The scientific data reduction and analysis of BATSE data is also a substantial level of effort in which UAH personnel have made significant contributions.

  18. Gamma ray collimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casanova, Edgar J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A gamma ray collimator including a housing having first and second sections is disclosed. The first section encloses a first section of depleted uranium which is disposed for receiving and supporting a radiation emitting component such as cobalt 60. The second section encloses a depleted uranium member which is provided with a conical cut out focusing portion disposed in communication with the radiation emitting element for focusing the emitted radiation to the target.

  19. UNIDENTIFIED {gamma}-RAY SOURCES: HUNTING {gamma}-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Ajello, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Tosti, G.; Gasparrini, D.

    2012-06-10

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the major improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one-third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated with low-energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of active galactic nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated with the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray LAT catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart to each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated with {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  20. Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources: Hunting Gamma-Ray Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, A.Paggi.D.

    2012-04-02

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated to low energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of Active Galactic Nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated to the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated to {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  1. Gamma-Ray Localization of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Marisaldi, M.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Gianotti, F.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Trois, A.; Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Pacciani, L.; Rubini, A.; Sabatini, S.

    2010-09-17

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are very short bursts of high-energy photons and electrons originating in Earth's atmosphere. We present here a localization study of TGFs carried out at gamma-ray energies above 20 MeV based on an innovative event selection method. We use the AGILE satellite Silicon Tracker data that for the first time have been correlated with TGFs detected by the AGILE Mini-Calorimeter. We detect 8 TGFs with gamma-ray photons of energies above 20 MeV localized by the AGILE gamma-ray imager with an accuracy of {approx}5-10 deg. at 50 MeV. Remarkably, all TGF-associated gamma rays are compatible with a terrestrial production site closer to the subsatellite point than 400 km. Considering that our gamma rays reach the AGILE satellite at 540 km altitude with limited scattering or attenuation, our measurements provide the first precise direct localization of TGFs from space.

  2. Study of gamma-ray strength functions

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Dietrich, F.S.

    1980-08-07

    The use of gamma-ray strength function systematics to calculate neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra is discussed. The ratio of the average capture width, GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar, to the average level spacing, D/sub obs/, both at the neutron separation energy, can be derived from such systematics with much less uncertainty than from separate systematics for values of GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar and D/sub obs/. In particular, the E1 gamma-ray strength function is defined in terms of the giant dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR line shape is modeled with the usual Lorentzian function and also with a new energy-dependent, Breit-Wigner (EDBW) function. This latter form is further parameterized in terms of two overlapping resonances, even for nuclei where photonuclear measurements do not resolve two peaks. In the mass ranges studied, such modeling is successful for all nuclei away from the N = 50 closed neutron shell. Near the N = 50 shell, a one-peak EDBW appears to be more appropriate. Examples of calculated neutron capture excitation functions and capture gamma-ray spectra using the EDBW form are given for target nuclei in the mass-90 region and also in the Ta-Au mass region. 20 figures.

  3. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey. Volume I. Detail areas. Final report. Christmas Mountains, Solitario, Green Valley/O-2 Ranch, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer with a large crystal volume, and with a high sensitivity proton precession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test Range. Data quality was ensured during the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, gridded, and contoured to produce maps of the radiometric variables, uranium, potassium, and thorium; their ratios; and the residual magnetic field. These maps have been analyzed in order to produce a multi-variant analysis contour map based on the radiometric response of the individual geological units. A geochemical analysis has been performed; using the radiometric and magnetic contour maps, the multi-variant analysis map, and factor analysis techniques; to produce a geochemical analysis map for the area. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data collection procedures, the data processing procedures, the data presentation, the interpretation rationale, and the interpretation methodology. Separate Volumes II-A and II-B for each detail area contain the data displays and the interpretation results.

  4. SYNTH - Gamma Ray Spectrum Synthesizer

    2009-05-18

    SYNTH was designed to synthesize the results of typical gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. The code allows a user to specify the physical characteristics of a gamma-ray source, the quantity of radionuclides emitting gamma radiation, the source-to-detector distance and the presence and type of any intervening absorbers, the size and type of the gamma-ray detector, and the electronic set-up used to gather the data.

  5. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Pak-Hin T.; Hui, Chung Y.; Kong, Albert K. H.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs). Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC) emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  6. Gamma ray bursts: a 1983 overview

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, T.L.

    1983-10-01

    Gamma ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma-ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial, contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured, implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect. Energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape, implying, in effect, that no objective spectral resolution exists at all. Burst fluxes and temporal quantities, including the total event energy, are characterized very differently with differing instruments, implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective. Finally, the log N-log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts, while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy, implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

  7. Gamma Ray Bursts: a 1983 Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma-ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial, contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured, implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect; energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape, implying, in effect, that no objective spectral resolution exists at all; burst fluxes and temporal quantities, including the total event energy, are characterized very differently with differing instruments, implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective; finally, the log N-log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts, while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy, implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  9. The solar gamma ray and neutron capabilities of COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.; Lockwood, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging Compton telescope COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has unusual spectroscopic capabilities for measuring solar gamma-ray and neutron emission. The launch of the GRO is scheduled for June 1990 near the peak of the sunspot cycle. With a 30 to 40 percent probability for the Sun being in the COMPTEL field-of-view during the sunlit part of an orbit, a large number of flares will be observed above the 800 keV gamma-ray threshold of the telescope. The telescope energy range extends to 30 MeV with high time resolution burst spectra available from 0.1 to 10 MeV. Strong Compton tail suppression of instrumental gamma-ray interactions will facilitate improved spectral analysis of solar flare emissions. In addition, the high signal to noise ratio for neutron detection and measurement will provide new neutron spectroscopic capabilities. Specifically, a flare similar to that of 3 June 1982 will provide spectroscopic data on greater than 1500 individual neutrons, enough to construct an unambiguous spectrum in the energy range of 20 to 200 MeV. Details of the instrument and its response to solar gamma-rays and neutrons will be presented.

  10. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D.

    1994-06-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Compton) is the second in NASA's series of great Observatories. Launched on 1991 April 5, Compton represents a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made. We describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments, and the observing program of the first 2 years of the mission. Examples of early discoveries by Compton are enumerated, including the discovery that gamma-ray bursts are isotropic but spatially inhomogeneous in their distribution; the discovery of a new class of high-energy extragalacatic gamma-ray sources, the gamma-ray AGNs; the discovery of emission from SN 1987A in the nuclear line of Co-57; and the mapping of emission from Al-26 in the interstellar medium (ISM) near the Galactic center. Future observations will include deep surveys of selected regions of the sky, long-tem studies of individual objects, correlative studies of objects at gamma-ray and other energies, a Galactic plane survey at intermediate gamma-ray energies, and improved statistics on gamma-ray bursts to search for small anisotropies. After completion of the all-sky survey, a Guest Investigator program is in progress with guest observers' time share increasing from 30% upward for the late mission phases.

  11. Gamma-ray line astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.

    1986-01-01

    Recent observations of gamma-ray line emission from solar flares, gamma-ray bursts, the galactic center, the interstellar medium and the jets of SS433 are reviewed. The implications of these observations on high energy processes in these sources are discussed.

  12. Photon energy conversion efficiency in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Švec, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Photon energy conversion efficiency coefficient is presented as the ratio of total energy registered in the collected spectrum to the emitted photon energy. This parameter is calculated from the conventional gamma-ray histogram and in principle is not affected by coincidence phenomena. This feature makes it particularly useful for calibration and measurement of radionuclide samples at close geometries. It complements the number of efficiency parameters used in gamma-ray spectrometry and can partly change the view as to how the gamma-ray spectra are displayed and processed.

  13. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraveo, Patrizia A.

    2014-08-01

    Isolated neutron stars (INSs) were the first sources identified in the field of high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. In the 1970s, only two sources had been identified, the Crab and Vela pulsars. However, although few in number, these objects were crucial in establishing the very concept of a gamma-ray source. Moreover, they opened up significant discovery space in both the theoretical and phenomenological fronts. The need to explain the copious gamma-ray emission of these pulsars led to breakthrough developments in understanding the structure and physics of neutron star (NS) magnetospheres. In parallel, the 20-year-long chase to understand the nature of Geminga unveiled the existence of a radio-quiet, gamma-ray-emitting INS, adding a new dimension to the INS family. We are living through an extraordinary time of discovery. The current generation of gamma-ray detectors has vastly increased the population of known gamma-ray-emitting NSs. The 100 mark was crossed in 2011, and we are now over 150. The gamma-ray-emitting NS population exhibits roughly equal numbers of radio-loud and radio-quiet young INSs, plus an astonishing, and unexpected, group of isolated and binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). The number of MSPs is growing so rapidly that they are on their way to becoming the most numerous members of the family of gamma-ray-emitting NSs. Even as these findings have set the stage for a revolution in our understanding of gamma-ray-emitting NSs, long-term monitoring of the gamma-ray sky has revealed evidence of flux variability in the Crab Nebula as well as in the pulsed emission from PSR J2021+4026, challenging a four-decades-old, constant-emission paradigm. Now we know that both pulsars and their nebulae can, indeed, display variable emission.

  14. Bursts of gamma rays from Compton scattering at cosmological distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Svensson, Roland; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    Compton scattering of the microwave background photons by beams of ultrarelativistic electrons at large redshifts, z much greater than 1, is proposed as a source of some gamma-ray bursts. Such beams may be produced by cusps on superconducting cosmic strings. In the present model, a very narrow beam of ultrarelativistic electron-positron pairs scatters the microwave background photons into a very narrow beam of gamma rays. While the pairs lose energy, the beam of gamma rays opens up and sweeps the observer. The expected time variability and spectra of the resulting gamma-ray burst are calculated. The bursts have a rapid rise time, followed by a more gradual decline. The spectra are initially very hard and become softer during the decline.

  15. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  16. Effect of gamma ray irradiation on sodium borate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalidasan, M.; Asokan, K.; Baskar, K.; Dhanasekaran, R.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the effects of 5 kGy, 10 kGy and 20 kGy doses of gamma ray irradiation on sodium borate, Na2[B4O5(OH)4]·(H2O)8 single crystals have been studied. Initially these crystals were grown by solution growth technique and identified as monoclinic using X-ray diffraction analysis. X-ray rocking curves confirm the formation of crystalline defects due to gamma rays in sodium borate single crystals. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra have been recorded to identify the radicals created due to gamma ray irradiation in sodium borate single crystals. The thermoluminescence glow curves due to the defects created by gamma rays in this crystal have been observed and their kinetic parameters were calculated using Chen's peak shape method. The optical absorption increases and photoluminescence spectral intensity decreases for 5 kGy and 20 kGy doses gamma ray irradiated crystals compared to pristine and 10 kGy dose irradiated one. The effect of various doses of gamma rays on vibrational modes of the sodium borate single crystals was studied using FT-Raman and ATR-FTIR spectral analysis. The dielectric permittivity, conductance and dielectric loss versus frequency graphs of these crystals have been analyzed to know the effect of gamma ray irradiation on these parameters.

  17. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  18. The Gamma-Ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, I.V.; Porter, T.A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2008-03-25

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  19. CAN WE PROBE THE LORENTZ FACTOR OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM GeV-TeV SPECTRA INTEGRATED OVER INTERNAL SHOCKS?

    SciTech Connect

    Aoi, Junichi; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Murase, Kohta; Takahashi, Keitaro; Ioka, Kunihito

    2010-10-10

    We revisit the high-energy spectral cutoff originating from the electron-positron pair creation in the prompt phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with numerical and analytical calculations. We show that the conventional exponential and/or broken power-law cutoff should be drastically modified to a shallower broken power law in practical observations that integrate emissions from different internal shocks. Since the steepening is tiny for observations, this 'smearing' effect can generally reduce the previous estimates of the Lorentz factor of the GRB outflows. We apply our formulation to GRB 080916C, recently detected by the Large Area Telescope detector on the Fermi satellite, and find that the minimum Lorentz factor can be {approx}600 (or even smaller values), which is below but consistent with the previous result of {approx}900. Observing the steepening energy (the so-called 'pair-break energy') is crucial to diagnosing the Lorentz factor and/or the emission site in future observations, especially current and future Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC, VERITAS, and CTA.

  20. Formation of the 0.511.-MeV line in solar flares. [statistical mechanics of line spectra for gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Joyce, G.; Ramaty, R.; Werntz, C.

    1976-01-01

    The gamma-ray line produced at 0.51-MeV was studied and is shown to be the result of either of free annihilation of positrons with electrons or of the decay of positronium by 2-photon emission. Positron annihilation from the bound state of positronium may also proceed by 3-photon emission, resulting in a continuum with energies up to 0.51-MeV. Accurate calculations of the rates of free annihilation and positronium formation in a solar-flare plasma are presented. Estimates of the positronium-formulation rates by charge exchange and the rates of dissociation and quenching are also considered. The temperature and density dependence of the ratio of 3-photon to 2-photon emission was obtained. It is shown that when the ratio of free electrons to neutral atoms in the plasma is approximately unity or greater, the Doppler width of the 0.51-MeV line is a function of the temperature of the annihilation region. For the small ion densities characteristics of the photosphere, the width is predominantly a function of the density.

  1. Physics of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the accumulating evidence for the view that gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars, discussing the physical properties of the emission region and the radiation processes expected in strong magnetic fields, and emphasizing that the observed burst spectra require that the emission region be optically thin. This entails that the energy of the emitting plasma and/or the plasma itself be continuously replenished during a burst, and that the cooling time scale of the emitting plasma be much shorter than the observed duration of the bursts. This characteristic of the cooling time scale implies that the burst intensity and spectrum can vary on extremely short time scales, and that the burst duration must have a separate explanation. It is emphasized that synchrotron emission is favored as the gamma-ray production mechanism; it is the only mechanism capable of satisfying the optical thinness constraint while producing the observed luminosity.

  2. Research in cosmic and gamma ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Edward C.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Prince, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is research in cosmic ray and gamma ray astrophysics at the Space Radiation Laboratory (SRL) of the California Institute of Technology. The primary activities discussed involve the development of new instrumentation and techniques for future space flight. In many cases these instrumentation developments were tested in balloon flight instruments designed to conduct new investigations in cosmic ray and gamma ray astrophysics. The results of these investigations are briefly summarized. Specific topics include a quantitative investigation of the solar modulation of cosmic ray protons and helium nuclei, a study of cosmic ray positron and electron spectra in interplanetary and interstellar space, the solar modulation of cosmic rays, an investigation of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of cosmic ray isotopic abundances, and a balloon measurement of the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon, and nitrogen.

  3. Gamma-ray localization of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes.

    PubMed

    Marisaldi, M; Argan, A; Trois, A; Giuliani, A; Tavani, M; Labanti, C; Fuschino, F; Bulgarelli, A; Longo, F; Barbiellini, G; Del Monte, E; Moretti, E; Trifoglio, M; Costa, E; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A; D'Ammando, F; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Froysland, T; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mereghetti, S; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Piano, G; Pilia, M; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Antonelli, L A; Colafrancesco, S; Cutini, S; Giommi, P; Lucarelli, F; Pittori, C; Santolamazza, P; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L

    2010-09-17

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are very short bursts of high-energy photons and electrons originating in Earth's atmosphere. We present here a localization study of TGFs carried out at gamma-ray energies above 20 MeV based on an innovative event selection method. We use the AGILE satellite Silicon Tracker data that for the first time have been correlated with TGFs detected by the AGILE Mini-Calorimeter. We detect 8 TGFs with gamma-ray photons of energies above 20 MeV localized by the AGILE gamma-ray imager with an accuracy of ∼5-10° at 50 MeV. Remarkably, all TGF-associated gamma rays are compatible with a terrestrial production site closer to the subsatellite point than 400 km. Considering that our gamma rays reach the AGILE satellite at 540 km altitude with limited scattering or attenuation, our measurements provide the first precise direct localization of TGFs from space. PMID:20867680

  4. Gamma-ray burst cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G.; Liang, E. W.

    2015-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to 8.8 × 1054 erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it is possible to extract intergalactic medium (IGM) absorption features. We also present the capability of high-redshift GRBs to probe the pre-galactic metal enrichment and the first stars.

  5. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  6. Gamma-ray-selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giommi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    The gamma-ray band is the most energetic part of the electromagnetic spectrum. As such it is also where selection effects are most severe, as it can only be reached by the most extreme non-thermal AGN. Blazars, with their emission dominated by non-thermal blue-shifted radiation arising in a relativistic jet pointed in the direction of the observer, naturally satisfy this though requirement. For this reason, albeit these sources are intrisically very rare (orders of magnitude less abundant than radio quiet AGN of the same optical magnitude) they almost completely dominate the extragalactic gamma-ray and very high energy sky. I will discuss the emission of different types of blazars and the selection effects that are at play in the gamma-ray band based on recent results from the current generation of gamma-ray astronomy satellites, ground-based Cherenkov telescopes, and Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Gamma rays at airplane altitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J.; Koss, T.; Lord, J.; Strausz, S.; Wilkes, J.; Woosley, J. )

    1990-03-20

    An examination of the gamma ray flux above 1 TeV in the atmosphere is needed to better understand the anomalous showers from point sources. Suggestions are made for future experiments on board airplanes.

  8. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Durango A, B, C, and D, Colorado. Volume I. Detail area. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the Durango A, Durango B, Durango C, and Durango D Detail Areas of southwestern Colorado. The Durango A Detail Area is within the coverage of the Needle Mountains and Silverton 15' map sheets, and the Pole Creek Mountain, Rio Grande Pyramid, Emerald Lake, Granite Peak, Vallecito Reservoir, and Lemon Reservoir 7.5' map sheets of the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS). The Durango B Detail Area is within the coverage of the Silverton 15' map sheet and the Wetterhorn Peak, Uncompahgre Peak, Lake City, Redcloud Peak, Lake San Cristobal, Pole Creek Mountain, and Finger Mesa 7.5' map sheets of the NTMS. The Durango C Detail Area is within the coverage of the Platoro and Wolf Creek Pass 15' map sheets of the NTMS. The Durango D Detail Area is within the coverage of the Granite Lake, Cimarrona Peak, Bear Mountain, and Oakbrush Ridge 7.5' map sheets of the NTMS. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, gridded, and contoured to produce maps of the radiometric variables, uranium, potassium, and thorium; their ratios; and the residual magnetic field. These maps have been analyzed in order to produce a multi-variant analysis contour map based on the radiometric response of the individual geological units. A geochemical analysis has been performed, using the radiometric and magnetic contour maps, the multi-variant analysis map, and factor analysis techniques, to produce a geochemical analysis map for the area.

  9. Gamma-ray line astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy is a valuable source of information on solar activity, supernovae, and nucleosynthesis. Cosmic gamma-ray lines were first observed from solar flares and more recently from the galactic center and a transient event. The latter may give an important insight into nuclear reactions taking place near neutron stars and black holes and a measure of the gravitational redshifts of such objects.

  10. Directional detector of gamma rays

    DOEpatents

    Cox, Samson A.; Levert, Francis E.

    1979-01-01

    A directional detector of gamma rays comprises a strip of an electrical cuctor of high atomic number backed with a strip of a second electrical conductor of low atomic number. These elements are enclosed within an electrical conductor that establishes an electrical ground, maintains a vacuum enclosure and screens out low-energy gamma rays. The detector exhibits a directional sensitivity marked by an increased output in the favored direction by a factor of ten over the output in the unfavored direction.

  11. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Mystery Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Ann

    2007-01-01

    With the success of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer currently in orbit, this is quite an exciting time in the history of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The study of GRBs is a modern astronomical mystery story that began over 30 years ago with the serendipitous discovery of these astronomical events by military satellites in the late 1960's. Until the launch of BATSE on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, astronomers had no clue whether GRBs originated at the edge of our solar system, in our own Milky Way Galaxy or incredibly far away near the edge of the observable Universe. Data from BATSE proved that GRBs are distributed isotropically on the sky and thus could not be the related to objects in the disk of our Galaxy. Given the intensity of the gamma-ray emission, an extragalactic origin would require an astounding amount of energy. Without sufficient data to decide the issue, a great debate continued about whether GRBs were located in the halo of our own galaxy or were at extragalactic - even cosmological distances. This debate continued until 1997 when the BeppoSAX mission discovered a fading X-ray afterglow signal in the same location as a GRB. This discovery enabled other telescopes, to observe afterglow emission at optical and radio wavelengths and prove that GRBs were at cosmological distances by measuring large redshifts in the optical spectra. Like BeppoSAX Swift, slews to new GRB locations to measure afterglow emission. In addition to improved GRB sensitivity, a significant advantage of Swift over BeppoSAX and other missions is its ability to slew very quickly, allowing x-ray and optical follow-up measurements to be made as early as a minute after the gamma-ray burst trigger rather than the previous 6-8 hour delay. Swift afterglow measurements along with follow-up ground-based observations, and theoretical work have allowed astronomers to identify two plausible scenarios for the creation of a GRB: either through core collapse of super massive stars or

  12. Afterglow Radiation from Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, Hugh; /Leuven U. /SLAC

    2006-08-28

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are huge fluxes of gamma rays that appear randomly in the sky about once a day. It is now commonly accepted that GRBs are caused by a stellar object shooting off a powerful plasma jet along its rotation axis. After the initial outburst of gamma rays, a lower intensity radiation remains, called the afterglow. Using the data from a hydrodynamical numerical simulation that models the dynamics of the jet, we calculated the expected light curve of the afterglow radiation that would be observed on earth. We calculated the light curve and spectrum and compared them to the light curves and spectra predicted by two analytical models of the expansion of the jet (which are based on the Blandford and McKee solution of a relativistic isotropic expansion; see Sari's model [1] and Granot's model [2]). We found that the light curve did not decay as fast as predicted by Sari; the predictions by Granot were largely corroborated. Some results, however, did not match Granot's predictions, and more research is needed to explain these discrepancies.

  13. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    ScienceCinema

    Isabelle Grenier

    2016-07-12

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  14. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Grenier, Isabelle

    2009-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  15. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Isabelle Grenier

    2009-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  16. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) was launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on 5 April 1991. The spacecraft and instruments are in good health and returning exciting results. The mission provides nearly six orders of magnitude in spectral coverage, from 30 keV to 30 GeV, with sensitivity over the entire range an order of magnitude better than that of previous observations. The 16,000 kilogram observatory contains four instruments on a stabilized platform. The mission began normal operations on 16 May 1991 and is now over half-way through a full-sky survey. The mission duration is expected to be from six to ten years. A Science Support Center has been established at Goddard Space Flight Center for the purpose of supporting a vigorous Guest Investigator Program. New scientific results to date include: (1) the establishment of the isotropy, combined with spatial inhomogeneity, of the distribution of gamma-ray bursts in the sky; (2) the discovery of intense high energy (100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 3C 279 and other quasars and BL Lac objects, making these the most distant and luminous gamma-ray sources ever detected; (3) one of the first images of a gamma-ray burst; (4) the observation of intense nuclear and position-annihilation gamma-ray lines and neutrons from several large solar flares; and (5) the detection of a third gamma-ray pulsar, plus several other transient and pulsing hard X-ray sources.

  17. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory being released from the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-35 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered the Earth's atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, GRO's Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center, kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientist to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of star, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in BATSE's science program.

  18. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program.

  19. Elemental mapping of the moon using gamma rays : past, present, and future /

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    The energies and intensities of gamma rays From a planetary surface can be used to infer the elemental composition of an object with no or a thin atmosphere. The Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers in 1972 and 1973 produced many of the results for the distribution of elements in the Moon that are now generally well accepted. Lunar Prospector in 1998 and 1999 globally mapped the Moon with gamma rays and neutrons. Both missions used spectrometers with poor energy resolution ({approx}8-10%). The Japanese plan to send a high-resolution germanium gamma-ray spectrometer to the Moon in about 2004 on their SELENE mission. However, little has been done since the 1970s on the models used to unfold planetary gamma-ray spectra. More work needs to be done on understanding what to expect in future gamma-ray spectra and how to unfold such data.

  20. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Hunt, Alan W.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.

    2012-04-01

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is investigated as a non-destructive assay technique for the determination of plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel. This approach exploits the unique isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray emission spectra detected following active interrogation with an external neutron source. A high fidelity modeling approach is described that couples radiation transport, analytical decay/depletion, and a newly developed gamma-ray emission source reconstruction code. Initially simulated and analyzed was a “one-pass” delayed gamma-ray assay that focused on the long-lived signatures. Also presented are the results of an independent study that investigated “pulsed mode” measurements, to capture the more isotope-specific, short-lived signatures. Initial modeling results outlined in this paper suggest that delayed gamma-ray assay of spent nuclear fuel assemblies can be accomplished with a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available gamma-ray detectors.

  1. Neutrons and Gamma Rays from Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The theory of neutron and gamma-ray production in flares is reviewed and comparisons of the calculations with data are made. The principal conclusions pertain to the accelerated proton and electron numbers and spectra in flares and to the interaction site of these particles in the solar atmosphere. For the June 21, 1980 flare, from which high-energy neutrons and high-energy ( MeV) photons were seen, the electron-to-proton ratio is energy dependent and much smaller than unity at energies greater than 1 MeV. The interaction site of these particles appears to be the solar chromosphere.

  2. Understanding soft gamma-ray repeaters in the context of the extragalactic radio pulsar origin of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Fatuzzo, Marco

    1993-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) may be neutron stars undergoing structural adjustments that produce transient gamma-ray events. A unified scenario is proposed in which young radio pulsars are responsible for SGRs and classical GRB sources. The radiative emission associated with a pulsar 'glitch' is seen as a GRB or an SGR event depending on the direction of our line of sight. Burst spectra, energetics, and statistics of GRBs and SGRs are discussed. It is shown that classical GRB spectra arise from Compton upscattering by charges accelerated along the viewing direction and SGR burst spectra are due to the thermalization of Alfven wave energy away from this direction. If crustal adjustments occur within the first 50,000 years of a pulsar's lifetime, the model predicts two SGR sources within the galaxy, in agreement with current observations.

  3. Goddard Contributions to the La Jolla Workshop on Gamma Ray Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Six articles addressing cosmic and solar gamma ray transients are presented. The topics covered include: gamma ray lines from solar flares and cosmic transients including burst spectra; a review of the 1979 March 5 transient; time variation in the 511 KeV flux observed by the ISEE spectrometer; time variations of an absorption feature in the spectrum of the burst on 1980 April 19; and the theory of gamma ray amplification through stimulated annihilation radiation.

  4. Hard Gamma Ray Emission from the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, James M.; Marscher, Alan M.

    1996-01-01

    We have completed the study to search for hard gamma ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253. Since supernovae are thought to provide the hard gamma ray emission from the Milky Way, starburst galaxies, with their extraordinarily high supernova rates, are prime targets to search for hard gamma ray emission. We conducted a careful search for hard gamma ray emission from NGC 253 using the archival data from the EGRET experiment aboard the CGRO. Because this starburst galaxy happens to lie near the South Galactic Pole, the Galactic gamma ray background is minimal. We found no significant hard gamma ray signal toward NGC 253, although a marginal signal of about 1.5 sigma was found. Because of the low Galactic background, we obtained a very sensitive upper limit to the emission of greater than 100 MeV gamma-rays of 8 x 10(exp -8) photons/sq cm s. Since we expected to detect hard gamma ray emission, we investigated the theory of gamma ray production in a dense molecular medium. We used a leaky-box model to simulate diffusive transport in a starburst region. Since starburst galaxies have high infrared radiation fields, we included the effects of self-Compton scattering, which are usually ignored. By modelling the expected gamma-ray and synchrotron spectra from NGC 253, we find that roughly 5 - 15% of the energy from supernovae is transferred to cosmic rays in the starburst. This result is consistent with supernova acceleration models, and is somewhat larger than the value derived for the Galaxy (3 - 10%). Our calculations match the EGRET and radio data very well with a supernova rate of 0.08/ yr, a magnetic field B approx. greater than 5 x 10(exp -5) G, a density n approx. less than 100/sq cm, a photon density U(sub ph) approx. 200 eV/sq cm, and an escape time scale tau(sub 0) approx. less than 10 Myr. The models also suggest that NGC 253 should be detectable with only a factor of 2 - 3 improvement in sensitivity. Our results are consistent with the standard picture

  5. Gamma Ray Astronomy with LHAASO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernetto, S.; LHAASO Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The aim of LHAASO is the development of an air shower experiment able to monitor with unprecedented sensitivity the gamma ray sky at energies from ~200 GeV to 1 PeV, and at the same time be an instrument able to measure the cosmic ray spectrum, composition and anisotropy in a wide energy range (~1 TeV to 1 EeV). LHAASO, thanks to the large area and the high capability of background rejection, can reach sensitivities to gamma ray fluxes above 30 TeV that are about 100 times higher than that of current instruments, offering the possibility to monitor for the first time the gamma ray sky up to PeV energies and to discover the long sought “Pevatrons”.

  6. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  7. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  8. Towed seabed gamma ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.G. )

    1994-08-01

    For more than 50 years, the measurement of radioactivity has been used for onshore geological surveys and in laboratories. The British Geological Survey (BGS) has extended the use of this type of equipment to the marine environment with the development of seabed gamma ray spectrometer systems. The present seabed gamma ray spectrometer, known as the Eel, has been successfully used for sediment and solid rock mapping, mineral exploration, and radioactive pollution studies. The range of applications for the system continues to expand. This paper examines the technological aspects of the Eel and some of the applications for which it has been used.

  9. Lunar Elemental Abundances from Gamma-Ray and Neutron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Vaniman, D. T.

    1999-01-01

    -scattering and other nonelastic-scattering reactions can vary with the composition of the surface There are several key steps in preparing gamma-ray data into a form from which accurate elemental abundances can be determined. One needs to identify, quantify, and remove or correct for all backgrounds in the gamma-ray spectra. Among the more important of these backgrounds are features made by the decay of radioactivities made in the GRS by cosmic-ray particles and the prompt and decay gamma-rays emitted from the material surrounding the active elements of the LPGRS and from the LP spacecraft. Gamma-ray spectra obtained during the cruise to the Moon or those measured while LP was at various distances from the Moon can be used to distinguish features in the gamma-ray spectra that are from the Moon and those that are made on the LP spacecraft. Each background-corrected spectrum will be analyzed with existing gamma-ray spectral-unfolding codes to identify the energies and intensities of all peaks. These peaks will be examined when there are potential interferences in the analysis of a given gamma-ray line. Such interferences could be a problem for determining Mg and Al using some of their inelastic-scattering gamma-rays such as the 1.369-MeV gamma-ray from Mg that is also readily made from Al and Si. The key data needed to get elemental abundances from the fluxes of gamma-rays in the processed spectra are good values for the fluxes of gamma-rays that should be emitted from a given region for known or nominal elemental abundances. Such flux determinations were done for analysis of the Apollo gamma-ray data. The codes to do such calculations and the nuclear data used in such calculations have been improved much since then. Additional information contained in original.

  10. Observation of gamma-ray bursts with the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Share, G. H.; Strickman, M. S.; Kinzer, R. L.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Ryan, J. M.; Rieger, E.; Reppin, C.; Kanbach, G.

    1982-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrometer on SMM is sensitive to bursts within its field of view with intensities greater than 0.000005 erg/sq cm above 100 keV. It has detected 17 events between February 1980 and March 1981 with the characteristics of cosmic gamma-ray bursts. The most intense burst, on 19 April 1980, had a photon spectrum consistent with a power law with spectral index - 2.5 from 300 keV to approximately 7 MeV. It is not possible at present to exclude the sun as the source of this burst. Spectra of 11 of the bursts have been studied for line features with no clear evidence for line emission greater than 300 keV. The continuum radiation from about half of these events have hard emission extending to approximately equal to or greater than 2 MeV.

  11. Cosmological gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    The distribution in angle and flux of gamma-ray bursts indicates that the majority of gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances, i.e., at z of about 1. The rate is then about 10 exp -8/yr in a galaxy like the Milky Way, i.e., orders of magnitude lower than the estimated rate for collisions between neutron stars in close binary systems. The energy per burst is about 10 exp 51 ergs, assuming isotropic emission. The events appear to be less energetic and more frequent if their emission is strongly beamed. Some tests for the distance scale are discussed: a correlation between the burst's strength and its spectrum; the absorption by the Galactic gas below about 2 keV; the X-ray tails caused by forward scattering by the Galactic dust; about 1 month recurrence of some bursts caused by gravitational lensing by foreground galaxies; and a search for gamma-ray bursts in M31. The bursts appear to be a manifestation of something exotic, but conventional compact objects can provide an explanation. The best possibility is offered by a decay of a bindary composed of a spinning-stellar-mass black-hole primary and a neutron or a strange-quark star secondary. In the final phase the secondary is tidally disrupted, forms an accretion disk, and up to 10 exp 54 ergs are released. A very small fraction of this energy powers the gamma-ray burst.

  12. Quasars, blazars, and gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Dermer, C D; Schlickeiser, R

    1992-09-18

    Before the launch of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), the only source of >100-megaelectron volt (MeV) gamma radiation known outside our galaxy was the quasar 3C 273. After less than a year of observing, 13 other extragalactic sources have been discovered with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on CGRO, and it is expected that many more will be found before the full sky survey is complete. All 14 sources show evidence of blazar properties at other wavelengths; these properties include high optical polarization, extreme optical variability, flat-spectrum radio emission associated with a compact core, and apparent superluminal motion. Such properties are thought to be produced by those few, rare extragalactic radio galaxies and quasars that are favorably aligned to permit us to look almost directly down a relativistically outflowing jet of matter expelled from a supermassive black hole. Although the origin of the gamma rays from radio jets is a subject of much controversy, the gamma-ray window probed by CGRO is providing a wealth of knowledge about the central engines of active galactic nuclei and the most energetic processes occurring in nature.

  13. Quasars, blazars, and gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Dermer, C D; Schlickeiser, R

    1992-09-18

    Before the launch of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), the only source of >100-megaelectron volt (MeV) gamma radiation known outside our galaxy was the quasar 3C 273. After less than a year of observing, 13 other extragalactic sources have been discovered with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on CGRO, and it is expected that many more will be found before the full sky survey is complete. All 14 sources show evidence of blazar properties at other wavelengths; these properties include high optical polarization, extreme optical variability, flat-spectrum radio emission associated with a compact core, and apparent superluminal motion. Such properties are thought to be produced by those few, rare extragalactic radio galaxies and quasars that are favorably aligned to permit us to look almost directly down a relativistically outflowing jet of matter expelled from a supermassive black hole. Although the origin of the gamma rays from radio jets is a subject of much controversy, the gamma-ray window probed by CGRO is providing a wealth of knowledge about the central engines of active galactic nuclei and the most energetic processes occurring in nature. PMID:17841159

  14. Cosmological gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, E.; Epstein, R.; Ho, C.; Intzand, J.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Gamma-ray bursts are brief events that dominate the emission from all other gamma-ray objects in the sky, flicker for tens of seconds, and then turn off. Their nature remains uncertain despite years of efforts to understand them. One hypothesis is that the bursts arise within our galaxy albeit in an extended halo of neutron stars. Another hypothesis uses the isotropic distribution of gamma-ray bursts to argue that they come from nearly the edge of the universe. If gamma-ray bursts originate from cosmological distances, then the expansion of the universe should cause the dimmer (and presumably further) bursts to last longer. The authors have developed methods for measuring this time stretching, related the time stretching to the distance to the bursts, determined how the detailed physics causes temporal variations, and found the amount of total energy and peak luminosity that the events must be producing.

  15. Gamma-ray camera flyby

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Animation based on an actual classroom demonstration of the prototype CCI-2 gamma-ray camera's ability to image a hidden radioactive source, a cesium-137 line source, in three dimensions. For more information see http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/06/02/applied-nuclear-physics/.

  16. Gamma ray slush hydrogen monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Shen, Chih-Peng; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    Mass attenuation for 109Cd radiation have been measured in mixtures of phases and in single phases of five chemical compounds. As anticipated, the mass attenuation coefficients are independent of the phases of the test chemicals. It is recommended that a slush hydrogen monitoring system based on low energy gamma ray attenuation be developed for utilization aboard the NASP.

  17. Gamma ray slush hydrogen monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Shen, Chih-Peng; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1992-01-01

    Mass attenuation for 109Cd radiation have been measured in mixtures of phases and in single phases of five chemical compounds. As anticipated, the mass attenuation coefficients are independent of the phases of the test chemicals. It is recommended that a slush hydrogen monitoring system based on low energy gamma ray attenuation be developed for utilization aboard the NASP.

  18. TPASS: a gamma-ray spectrum analysis and isotope identification computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    The gamma-ray spectral data-reduction and analysis computer code TPASS is described. This computer code is used to analyze complex Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectra to obtain peak areas corrected for detector efficiencies, from which are determined gamma-ray yields. These yields are compared with an isotope gamma-ray data file to determine the contributions to the observed spectrum from decay of specific radionuclides. A complete FORTRAN listing of the code and a complex test case are given.

  19. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  20. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A.M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A.I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Picozza, P.; Rodin, V. G.; Runtso, M. F.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Vacchi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approx. 0.01 deg (E(sub gamma) > 100 GeV), the energy resolution approx. 1% (E(sub gamma) > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approx 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  1. Advances in gamma-ray line astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma ray line observations of solar flares, gamma ray transients, and the galactic center are reviewed and interpreted. Prospects of future line detections are discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N82-27200

  2. Swift's 500th Gamma Ray Burst

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 13, 2010, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer satellite discovered its 500th burst. Swift's main job is to quickly localize each gamma-ray burst (GRB), report its position so that others...

  3. The Gamma-ray Universe through Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, reveal extreme conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and its smaller cousin AGILE have been exploring the gamma-ray sky for several years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge ga.nuna-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  4. Cosmological Evolution of the FSRQ Gamma-ray Luminosity Function and Spectra and the Contribution to the Background Based on Fermi-LAT Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Jack; Petrosian, V.; Ko, A.

    2013-04-01

    The Fermi-LAT has accumulated a large sample of blazars with known flux and spectral index. However, since blazars with harder spectra can be detected to lower fluxes than ones with softer ones with the LAT, the observed bi-variate flux-index distribution is severely truncated at low fluxes and softer spectra. Previously we have used the non-parametric method developed by Efron and Petrosian (EP) to correct the Fermi data for this truncation and obtained the true mono-variate distributions of spectral index and flux (commonly called the logN-logS relation) from which we obtained the blazar contribution to EGB as a function of flux directly from the data (Singal et al. 2012). Extrapolating this to lowest possible fluxes we estimated the total contribution of blazars to the EGB. By now many of the FSRQ blazars are identified with active galactic nuclei and their redshifts measured or obtained from archives (M. Shaw et al., 2012). With the addition of the redshifts we can now calculate the FSRQ blazar luminosities and from the tri-variate luminosity-index-redshift distribution determine the luminosity function and index distribution and their evolutions with redshifts. The EP method can be generalized to this three dimensional case (as we done for SDSS quasars; Singal et al. 2013). In this talk we will present the results from this analysis, which will allow us to compare the density and luminosity evolution of FSRQ blazars with other AGNs. In addition, we can determine the redshift and luminosity (instead of flux) variation of the contribution to the EGB which may allow a more reliable estimate of the total contribution of FSRQ blazars to the EGB.

  5. Airborne microwave Doppler measurements of ocean wave directional spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Reeves, A. B.; Uliana, E. A.; Johnson, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is presented for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from aircraft using microwave Doppler radar. The technique involves backscattering coherent microwave radiation from a patch of sea surface which is small compared to dominant ocean wavelengths in the antenna look direction, and large compared to these lengths in the perpendicular (azimuthal) direction. The mean Doppler shift of the return signal measured over short time intervals is proportional to the mean sea surface velocity of the illuminated patch. Variable sea surface velocities induced by wave motion therefore produce time-varying Doppler shifts in the received signal. The large azimuthal dimension of the patch implies that these variations must be produced by surface waves traveling near the horizontal antenna look direction thus allowing determination of the direction of wave travel. Linear wave theory is used to convert the measured velocities into ocean wave spectral densities. Spectra measured simultaneously with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with a surface buoy, are presented. Applications and limitations of this airborne Doppler technique are discussed.

  6. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Oldaker, Mark E.

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  7. Constraining faint terrestrial gamma-ray flashes with stacking analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. M.; Buzbee, P.; Aron-Dine, S.; Kelley, N. A.; Holzworth, R. H., II; Hutchins, M. L.; Dwyer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We searched for gamma-ray emission from lightning using a satellite (the Reuven Ramaty Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)) and an instrument on an aircraft (the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE)). Both instruments have detected terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) via direct searches for statistically significant bursts of gamma-rays. In our new analysis, we instead identified times when the instruments were near known lightning discharges based on VLF radio data (from the Worldwide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) in the case of RHESSI and from three North American networks in the case of ADELE). We then stacked together the gamma-ray signals for each instrument, with times adjusted to be relative to the time of radio emission for each discharge (corrected for light propagation time to the spacecraft in the case of RHESSI). The resulting stacked gamma-ray time profile is sensitive to an average level of gamma-ray emission far lower than what can be recognized above background for a single TGF. The summed signal from small, untriggered TGFs is remarkably weak, and preliminary evidence suggests that it comes mostly from distant, bright TGFs observed outside the main bremsstrahlung beam, not from a population of subluminous TGFs near the spacecraft. Under the assumption of a broken power-law differential distribution of TGF intensities, we find that the index must break (harden or cut off) just below the current sensitivity limit of satellites like RHESSI and Fermi, and that less than 1% of lightning can produce a TGF that belongs to the same distribution as those that are observable.

  8. The very high energy gamma ray spectra of IES 1959+650 and Mrk 421 as measured with the Whipple 10 m telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, M.K.; Badran, H.M.; Bond, I.H.; Boyle, P.J.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J.H.; Byrum, K.; Carter-Lewis, D.A.; Celik, O.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Calle Perez, I. de la; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, D.J.; Fegan, S.J.; Finley, J.P.; Fortson, L.F.; Gammell, S.; Gibbs, K.

    2005-02-21

    In observations made with the Whipple 10 m telescope, 1ES 1959+650 (z 0.048) was caught in a high flaring state in May 2002, concurrent with a high X-ray state, and in June 2002, for which there was no corresponding X-ray flare. The spectra for both of those occasions are well fitted by a power law of differential spectral index {approx} -2.8. The relative stability of the spectral index for those flares argues strongly in favour of a two-component model as to the emission zones for the two radiation regimes.Markarian 421 (z = 0.031) was observed to be in a high flaring state, at levels of {>=} 3 Crab, during March and April 2004. The average spectrum over this time period shows evidence for a cut-off in the spectrum at {approx} 5 TeV, similar to a cut-off seen during an equivalently strong episode of flaring activity in 2001. The continued appearance of this feature indicates a long term stability, either in the physical conditions at the source, or in the intervening medium (such as attenuation on the extra-galactic infra-red background radiation)

  9. Gamma ray astrophysics. [emphasizing processes and absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    Gamma ray production processes are reviewed, including Compton scattering, synchrotron radiation, bremsstrahlung interactions, meson decay, nucleon-antinucleon annihilations, and pion production. Gamma ray absorption mechanisms through interactions with radiation and with matter are discussed, along with redshifts and gamma ray fluxes.

  10. High energy gamma ray balloon instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Baker, R. G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Chesney, J. R.; Derdeyn, S. M.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hunter, S. D.; Jacques, J. S.; Laubenthal, N. A.

    1985-01-01

    The High Energy Gamma Ray Balloon Instrument was built in part to verify certain subsystems' performance for the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument, the high energy telescope to be carried on the Gamma Ray Observatory. This paper describes the instrument, the performance of some subsystems, and some relevant results.

  11. THE ORIGIN OF GAMMA RAYS FROM GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K. S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2010-11-10

    Fermi has detected gamma-ray emission from eight globular clusters (GCs). It is commonly believed that the energy sources of these gamma rays are millisecond pulsars (MSPs) inside GCs. Also it has been standard to explain the spectra of most Fermi Large Area Telescope pulsars including MSPs resulting from the curvature radiation (CR) of relativistic electrons/positrons inside the pulsar magnetosphere. Therefore, gamma rays from GCs are expected to be the collection of CR from all MSPs inside the clusters. However, the angular resolution is not high enough to pinpoint the nature of the emission. In this paper, we calculate the gamma rays produced by the inverse Compton (IC) scattering between relativistic electrons/positrons in the pulsar wind of MSPs in the GCs and background soft photons including cosmic microwave/relic photons, background star lights in the clusters, the galactic infrared photons, and the galactic star lights. We show that the gamma-ray spectrum from 47 Tucanae can be explained equally well by upward scattering of either the relic photons, the galactic infrared photons, or the galactic star lights, whereas the gamma-ray spectra from the other seven GCs are best fitted by the upward scattering of either the galactic infrared photons or the galactic star lights. We also find that the observed gamma-ray luminosity is correlated better with the combined factor of the encounter rate and the background soft photon energy density. Therefore, the IC scattering may also contribute to the observed gamma-ray emission from GCs detected by Fermi in addition to the standard CR process. Furthermore, we find that the emission region of high-energy photons from GCs produced by the IC scattering is substantially larger than the cores of GCs with a radius >10 pc. The diffuse radio and X-rays emitted from GCs can also be produced by the synchrotron radiation and IC scattering, respectively. We suggest that future observations including radio, X-rays, and gamma rays

  12. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Analysis Method for Minicomputers.

    1984-01-24

    Version 00 SAMPO80 is a rapid and accurate analysis program for gamma-ray spectra measured with Ge(Li) or HPGe detectors. SAMPO80 consists of three separate parts, the shape calibration part SAMPOSHAPE, the peak search and fitting part SAMPOFIT, and the nuclide identification part SAMPOID.

  13. Thermal neutrons registration by xenon gamma-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, A. E.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Dukhvalov, A. G.; Krivova, K. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Petrenko, D. V.; Vlasik, K. F.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental results of thermal neutrons detection by high pressure xenon gamma- ray spectrometers are presented. The study was performed with two devices with sensitive volumes of 0.2 and 2 litters filled with compressed mixture of xenon and hydrogen without neutron-capture additives. Spectra from Pu-Be neutron source were acquired using both detectors. Count rates of the most intensive prompt neutron-capture gamma-ray lines of xenon isotopes were calculated in order to estimate thermal neutrons efficiency registration for each spectrometer.

  14. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Saveta; Zorko, Benjamin; Gregori, Beatriz; Knezević, Zeljka

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron+gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI), Croatia, JoZef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7LiF (TLD-700), CaF2:Mn and Al2O3:Mg,Y-all from RBI; CaF2:Mn from JSI and 7LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed. PMID:17369267

  15. Solar Gamma Rays Above 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Crannell, H.; Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    Processes which lead to the production of gamma rays with energy greater than 8 MeV in solar flares are reviewed and evaluated. Excited states produced by inelastic scattering, charge exchange, and spallation reactions in the abundant nuclear species are considered in order to identify nuclear lines which may contribute to the Gamma ray spectrum of solar flares. The flux of 15.11 MeV Gamma rays relative to the flux of 4.44 MeV Gamma rays from the de-excitation of the corresponding states in C12 is calculated for a number of assumed distributions of exciting particles. This flux ratio is a sensitive diagnostic of accelerated particle spectra. Other high energy nuclear levels are not so isolated as the 15.11 MeV state and are not expected to be so strong. The spectrum of Gamma rays from the decay of Pi dey is sensitive to the energy distribution of particles accelerated to energies greater than 100 MeV.

  16. A New Method for the Reconstruction of Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Spectra and Application to Galactic Cosmic-Ray Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Milton Virgílio

    2014-06-01

    In this thesis, high-energy (HE; E > 0.1 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E > 0.1 TeV) γ-ray data were investigated to probe Galactic stellar clusters (SCs) and star-forming regions (SFRs) as sites of hadronic Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) acceleration. In principle, massive SCs and SFRs could accelerate GCRs at the shock front of the collective SC wind fed by the individual high-mass stars. The subsequently produced VHE γ rays would be measured with imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). A couple of the Galactic VHE γ-ray sources, including those potentially produced by SCs, fill a large fraction of the field-of-view (FoV) and require additional observations of source-free regions to determine the dominant background for a spectral reconstruction. A new method of reconstructing spectra for such extended sources without the need of further observations is developed: the Template Background Spectrum (TBS). This methods is based on a method to generate skymaps, which determines background in parameter space. The idea is the creation of a look-up of the background normalisation in energy, zenith angle, and angular separation and to account for possible systematics. The results obtained with TBS and state-of-the-art background-estimation methods on H.E.S.S. data are in good agreement. With TBS even those sources could be reconstructed that normally would need further observations. Therefore, TBS is the third method to reconstruct VHE γ-ray spectra, but the first one to not need additional observations in the analysis of extended sources. The discovery of the largest VHE γ-ray source HESS J1646-458 (2.2° in size) towards the SC Westerlund 1 (Wd 1) can be plausibly explained by the SC-wind scenario. But owing to its size, other alternative counterparts to the TeV emission (pulsar, binary system, magnetar) were found in the FoV. Therefore, an association of HESS J1646-458 with the SC is favoured, but cannot be confirmed. The SC Pismis 22 is located in the centre of

  17. Solar gamma-ray lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite has observed emissions produced by nuclear reactions in over 20 separate solar flares. The observed intensity from different flares ranges over a factor of 100, and the time scale for their production ranges from 10-s pulses to complete events lasting over 1000 s. The emissions include narrow and broadened prompt gamma-ray lines from numerous isotopes from Li-7 to Fe-56 and cover the energy range from 0.431 MeV (Be-7) to 7.12 MeV (O-16). The instrument has also observed emissions at energies greater than 10 MeV from the decay of pi0 mesons, from electron bremsstrahlung, and from the direct observation of greater-than-100-MeV solar neutrons. The intensity, temporal and spectral properties of these emissions are reviewed from the point of view that solar flares represent an astrophysical particle-acceleration site.

  18. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observation of Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes (TGFs) by Gamma-Ray Telescopes. These were: (1) BATSE /Compton Observatory, (2) Solar Spectroscopic Imager, (3) AGILE Gamma-ray Telescope, and (4) Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It contains charts which display the counts over time, a map or the TGFs observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). and a map showing the latitude and longitude of 85 of the TGFs observed by the Fermi GBM.

  19. Gamma ray astronomy. [source mechanisms review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D.

    1974-01-01

    The various source mechanisms for celestial gamma rays are reviewed. The gamma-ray data are examined as a source of information about the processes and source locations for the production of charged particle cosmic rays, galactic structure, explosive nucleosynthesis in supernovae, regions of confinement for cosmic rays, regions where matter-antimatter annihilation occurs, and the general condition in cosmological space both in the past and present. Topics include gamma rays from pi mesons by nuclear interactions, nuclear and supernovae lines, diffuse emission and discrete sources, interstellar absorption and detection of gamma rays, and others. A brief view of the available gamma-ray detection systems and techniques is presented.

  20. Spectral feature of 31 December 1981 gamma-ray burst not confirmed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Share, G. H.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Matz, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of a gamma ray burst at 01:37 UT on December 31, 1981 using the SMM gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) are compared with those made by the Konus instruments on Veneras 11-14. Burst time profiles, photon spectra, and detector energy loss spectra for three time intervals are compared for the GRS and the Konus instruments. It is concluded that the SMM spectra exhibit no evidence for the presence of emission features reported by the Konus group.

  1. Fermi large area telescope measurements of the diffuse gamma-ray emission at intermediate galactic latitudes.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Dereli, H; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Di Bernardo, G; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gaggero, D; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stecker, F W; Striani, E; Strickman, M S; Strong, A W; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-12-18

    The diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess gamma-ray emission greater, > or approximately equal to 1 GeV relative to diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called "EGRET GeV excess"). The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has measured the diffuse gamma-ray emission with improved sensitivity and resolution compared to EGRET. We report on LAT measurements for energies 100 MeV to 10 GeV and galactic latitudes 10 degrees < or = |b| < or = 20 degrees. The LAT spectrum for this region of the sky is well reproduced by a diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission model that is consistent with local CR spectra and inconsistent with the EGRET GeV excess. PMID:20366246

  2. Fermi Large Area Telescope Measurements of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; /more authors..

    2012-04-11

    The diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess {gamma}-ray emission {ge}1 GeV relative to diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called 'EGRET GeV excess'). The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has measured the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission with improved sensitivity and resolution compared to EGRET. We report on LAT measurements for energies 100 MeV to 10 GeV and galactic latitudes 10{sup o} {le} |b| {le} 20{sup o}. The LAT spectrum for this region of the sky is well reproduced by a diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission model that is consistent with local CR spectra and inconsistent with the EGRET GeV excess.

  3. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Band, D. L.; Kippen, R. M.; Preece, R. D.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanParadijs, J.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Matz, S. M.; Connors, A.

    1999-01-01

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations and that the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fitted by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared with this function is observed below approx. 15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the vf (sub v), spectrum, E (sub p), reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 plus or minus 110 keV, and then falls to approx. 300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above approx. 1 MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment), clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power law. Using the redshift value of greater than or equal to 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray energy exceeds 10 (exp 54) ergs.

  4. Flare gamma ray continuum emission from neutral pion decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David; Mackinnon, Alec L.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate, in detail, the production of solar flare gamma ray emission above 100 MeV via the interaction of high energy protons with the ambient solar atmosphere. We restrict our considerations to the broadband gamma ray spectrum resulting from the decay of neutral pions produced in p-H reactions. Thick-target calculations are performed to determine the photon fluences. However, proton transport is not considered. Inferences about the form of the proton spectrum at 10-100 MeV have already been drawn from de-excitation gamma ray lines. Our aim is to constrain the proton spectrum at higher energies. Thus, the injected proton spectrum is assumed to have the form of a Bessel Function, characteristics of stochastic energy at higher energies. The detailed shape of the gamma ray spectra around 100 MeV is found to have a strong dependence on the spectral index of the power law and on the turnover energy (from Bessel function to power law). As would be expected, the harder the photon spectrum the wider the 100 MeV feature. The photon spectra are to be compared with observations and used to place limits upon the number of particles accelerated and to constrain acceleration models.

  5. High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

  6. Erratum: Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High Energy Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

    2007-01-01

    Table 1 in our paper had erroneous numbers for the coefficients fitting the parametric form for the optical depth of the universe to gamma-rays; tau. The correct values for these parameters as described in the original text are given in the table for various redshifts for the baseline model (upper row) and fast evolution (lower row) for each individual redshift.

  7. The Redshift Dependence of Gamma-Ray Absorption in the Environments of Strong-Line AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-12

    The case of {gamma}-ray absorption due to photon-photon pair production of jet photons in the external photon environments, such as the accretion disk and the broad-line region radiation fields, of {gamma}-ray--loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that exhibit strong emission lines is considered. I demonstrate that this 'local opacity,' if detected, will almost unavoidably be redshift-dependent in the sub-TeV range. This introduces nonnegligible biases and complicates approaches for studying the evolution of the extragalactic background light with contemporary GeV instruments such as the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST ), where the {gamma}-ray horizon is probed by means of statistical analysis of absorption features (e.g., the Fazio-Stecker relation) in AGN spectra at various redshifts. It particularly applies to strong-line quasars, where external photon fields are potentially involved in {gamma}-ray production.

  8. Development of {gamma}-ray detectors for {sup 16}O(p,p'{gamma}) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, T.; Izumi, T.; Ou, I.; Yano, T.; Sakuda, M.; Tamii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2012-11-12

    The {gamma} ray production in neutral-current (NC) neutrino-oxygen interaction is very important to the detection of neutrinos from supernova explosion in a neutrino experiment, since those {gamma} rays can become extra signals or unexpected background in the energy region from 5 MeV to 30 MeV. We propose the experiment to measure {gamma} rays in {sup 16}O(p,p') reaction at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP, Osaka) to provide good information on the {gamma}-ray emission spectra in neutrino-oxygen reactions. We present the design of {gamma}-ray detectors (NaI, CsI, HPGe), which will be used in proposed experiment.

  9. Monitoring the Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Using Earth Occultation with GLAST GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, G.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Cherry, M.; Kippen, M.; Ling, J.; Radocinski, R.; Wheaton, W.

    2007-01-01

    Long term all-sky monitoring of the 20 keV - 2 MeV gamma-ray sky using the Earth occultation technique was demonstrated by the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The principles and techniques used for the development of an end-to-end earth occultation data analysis system for BATSE can be extended to the GLAST Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), resulting in multiband light curves and time-resolved spectra in the energy range 8 keV to above 1 MeV for known gamma-ray sources and transient outbursts, as well as the discovery of new sources of gamma-ray emission. In this paper we describe the application of the technique to the GBM. We also present the expected sensitivity for the GBM.

  10. Fission Product Gamma-Ray Line Pairs Sensitive to Fissile Material and Neutron Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R E; Norman, E B; Burke, J T; Macri, R A; Shugart, H A; Browne, E; Smith, A R

    2007-11-15

    The beta-delayed gamma-ray spectra from the fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu by thermal and near-14-MeV neutrons have been measured for delay times ranging from 1 minute to 14 hours. Spectra at all delay times contain sets of prominent gamma-ray lines with intensity ratios that identify the fissile material and distinguish between fission induced by low-energy or high-energy neutrons.

  11. Telescope Would Image X And Gamma Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed telescope forms images of sources of gamma rays, hard x rays, and soft x rays. Contains reflecting, grazing-incidence reflectors. Multiple coaxial nested pairs used to form images simultaneously at multiple gamma-ray or hard x-ray energies or enhance collection area at single photon energy. Conceived for use in astrophysical studies in outer space. With modifications, used in terrestrial laboratory vaccum systems to image x or gamma rays from pulsed plasmas.

  12. Gamma-Ray Astronomy Technology Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades gamma-ray observations have become a valuable tool for studying the universe. Progress made in diverse 8re1lS such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nucleosynthesis, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has complimented and enriched our astrophysical understanding in many ways. We present an overview of current and future planned space y-ray missions and discussion technology needs for- the next generation of space gamma-ray instruments.

  13. Future prospects for gamma-ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C.

    1980-01-01

    Astrophysical phenomena discussed are: the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects; astrophysical nucleo-synthesis; solar particle acceleration; the chemical composition of the planets and other bodies of the solar system; the structure of our galaxy; the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays; the high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies, especially active ones; and the degree of matter antimater symmetry of the universe. The gamma ray results of GAMMA-I, the gamma ray observatory, the gamma ray burst network, solar polar, and very high energy gamma ray telescopes on the ground provide justification for more sophisticated telescopes.

  14. A Plasma Instability Theory of Gamma-Ray Burst Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, Jerome J.

    1999-01-01

    A plasma instability theory is presented for the prompt radiation from gamma-ray bursts. In the theory, a highly relativistic shell interacts with the interstellar medium through the filamentation and the two-stream instabilities to convert bulk kinetic energy into electron thermal energy and magnetic field energy. The processes are not efficient enough to satisfy the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions, so a shock cannot form through this mechanism. Instead, the interstellar medium passes through the shell, with the electrons radiating during this passage. Gamma-rays are produced by synchrotron self-Compton emission. Prompt optical emission is also produced through this mechanism, while prompt radio emission is produced through synchrotron emission. The model timescales are consistent with the shortest burst timescales. To emit gamma-rays, the shell's bulk Lorentz factor must be $\\simg 10(exp 3)$. For the radiative processes to be efficient, the interstellar medium density must satisfy a lower limit that is a function of the bulk Lorentz factor. Because the limits operate as selection effects, bursts that violate them constitute new classes. In particular, a class of optical and ultraviolet bursts with no gamma-ray emission should exist. The lower limit on the density of the interstellar medium is consistent with the requirements of the Compton attenuation theory, providing an explanation for why all burst spectra appear to be attenuated. Several tests of the theory are discussed, as are the next theoretical investigations that should be conducted.

  15. Proton Calorimetry and Gamma-Rays in Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova; Gallagher, John S.; Zweibel, Ellen Gould

    2014-08-01

    Until recently, it was thought that starburst galaxies were both electron and proton calorimeters, making them especially bright in gamma-rays. However, with detections of starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253 by Fermi, HESS, and VERITAS, we find that such galaxies are only partial proton calorimeters due to significant advection by galactic winds. Thus, to find cosmic-ray proton calorimeters, we must look for much denser systems. Previous models of the cosmic ray interactions in Arp 220 (e.g. Torres 2004) suggest it is a proton calorimeter and that it should already be detectable by Fermi. The Torres model suggests that if Arp 220 is a calorimeter, then it should have been detected in gamma-rays by Fermi at levels above current upper limits. We therefore must question. whether Arp 220 is a true proton calorimeter, and if so what other properties could be responsible for its low gamma ray flux. Here, we further explore the observed ranges on environmental properties and model the central nuclei to predict both the radio and gamma-ray spectra. We test the proton calorimetry hypothesis and estimate the observation time needed for a detection by Fermi for a range of assumptions about conditions in Arp 220.

  16. Experiment Signal for Gamma-Ray Research of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galper, Arkady; Arkhangelskaja, Irene; Arkhangelsky, Andrey; Shustov, Alexander; Ulin, Sergey; Novikov, Alexander; Grachev, Viktor; Uteshev, Ziyaetdin; Petrenko, Denis; Vlasik, Konstantin; Krivova, Kira; Dmitrenko, Valery; Chernysheva, Irina

    Description as well as physical and technical characteristics of Scientific Instrument (SI) “Signal” are presented. This equipment will be installed onboard the spacecraft (SC) “Interhelioprobe” for researching the Sun and Heliosphere at close distance. “Signal” will be developed for study cosmic gamma-rays. It consists of Xenon Gamma-Spectrometer (XeGS), the anticoincidence scintillation system and the digital electronic module. XeGS is based on cylindrical pulse ionization chamber with Frisch grid filled with high pressure xenon. Anticoincidence system will be made of polystyrene organic scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. Digital electronic module provides analyzing and data processing, collecting measured gamma-ray spectra and communication with onboard systems of SC “Interhelioprobe”. Main “Signal” scientific tasks are: begin{itemize} Research of X-ray and gamma emission in lines and continuum in energy range 30 keV - 5 MeV; begin{itemize} Study of gamma-ray bursts with Galactic and Metagalactic origin; begin{itemize} Analysis of gamma-ray lines near the Earth and Venus; begin{itemize} Charged particle fluxes registration along the spacecraft trajectory.

  17. A gamma-ray burst monitor for GLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kienlin, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G. J.; Georgii, R.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lichti, G. G.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Schönfelder, V.

    2001-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large-Area Space Telescope GLAST is the next NASA mission in the high-energy γ-ray regime (10 MeV to about 500 GeV), with launch anticipated in 2006 (Gehrels, 1999). Recently a design using silicon strips for the electron-positron pair tracking was selected for the main instrument. One of the key scientific objectives of the GLAST mission is to determine the high-energy behaviour of gamma-ray bursts and transients. The importance of studying bursts with GLAST has been emphasized by choosing a burst monitor as the secondary instrument on GLAST. A proposal to the NASA AO for such a burst monitor was submitted jointly by a collaboration between the Marshall Space-Flight Center/University of Alabama (both in Huntsville/Alabama) and the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik in Garching. This GLAST Burst Monitor will complement the main instrument information about bursts in the energy range between 5 keV and 30 MeV. It will provide real-time burst locations over a wide FOV with sufficient accuracy to repoint the GLAST spacecraft. Time-resolved spectra of many bursts recorded with GLAST and the burst monitor will cover unprecedented 6 decades of energy. This will help to advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which gamma-rays are generated in gamma-ray bursts. Mid of March 2000 this proposal for GLAST's burst monitor has been selected.

  18. The Most Remote Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-10-01

    years, the look-back time indicates that the explosion took place around the time our own galaxy, the Milky Way, was formed and at least 6,000 million years before the solar system was born. GRB 000131 and other gamma-ray bursts are believed to have taken place in remote galaxies. However, due to the huge distance, it has not yet been possible to see the galaxy in which the GRB 000131 event took place (the "host" galaxy). From the observed fading of the afterglow it is possible to estimate that the maximum brightness of this explosion was at least 10,000 times brighter than the host galaxy. Future studies of gamma-ray bursts The present team of astronomers has now embarked upon a detailed study of the surroundings of GRB 000131 with the VLT. A main goal is to observe the properties of the host galaxy. From the observations of about twenty optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts identified until now, it is becoming increasingly clear that these very rare events are somehow related to the death of massive, short-lived stars . But despite the accumulating amount of excellent data, the details of the mechanism that leads to such dramatic explosions still remain a puzzle to astrophysicists. The detection and present follow-up observations of GRB 000131 highlight the new possibilities for studies of the extremely distant (and very early) Universe, now possible by means of gamma-ray bursts. When observed with the powerful instruments at a large ground-based telescope like the VLT, this incredibly bright class of cosmological objects may throw light on the fundamental processes of star formation in the infant universe. Of no less interest is the opportunity to analyse the chemical composition of the gas clouds at the epoch galaxies formed, by means of the imprints of the corresponding absorption lines on the afterglow spectrum. Waiting for the opportunity In this context, it would be extremely desirable to obtain very detailed (high-dispersion) spectra of the afterglow of a

  19. The status of low-energy gamma-ray astronomy and the Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    A brief sketch of the objectives and status of the various subdisciplines in gamma-ray astronomy (below 10 GeV) are presented. The Gamma-Ray Observatory planned for launch in 1988 is described. This NASA observatory and several planned French-Soviet spacecraft are expected to elevate gamma-ray astronomy into a mature observational science for the Space Station era.

  20. The BATSE 5B Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Adam; Preece, Robert D.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Briggs, Michael S.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William S.; Burgess, J. Michael

    2013-10-01

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory during its entire nine years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 2145 GRBs, and fitted with five different spectral models resulting in a compendium of over 19,000 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedures and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the BATSE Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC).

  1. THE BATSE 5B GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Adam; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2013-10-01

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory during its entire nine years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 2145 GRBs, and fitted with five different spectral models resulting in a compendium of over 19,000 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedures and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the BATSE Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC)

  2. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGFs) Above Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are being observed with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detectors on Fermi about once every four weeks. These intense millisecond flashes of MeV photons have been observed with four space-borne experiments since their initial discovery by the BATSE-CGRO experiment in the early 1990s. TGFs have extremely hard spectra (harder than GRBs) and photons are seen to extend to over 30 MeV. The GBM-Fermi observations have the highest temporal resolution of any previous TGF observations and time-resolved coarse spectra can be derived. These features will be crucial for testing the leading current model of TGF production: relativistic run-away electron cascades formed in the intense electric fields within thunderstorms.

  3. Cloaked Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, David

    2014-06-01

    It is suggested that many gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are cloaked by an ultrarelativistic baryonic shell that has high optical depth when the photons are manufactured. Such a shell would not fully block photons reflected or emitted from its inner surface, because the radial velocity of the photons can be less than that of the shell. This avoids the standard problem associated with GRBs that the thermal component should be produced where the flow is still obscured by high optical depth. The radiation that escapes high optical depth obeys the Amati relation. Observational implications may include (1) anomalously high ratios of afterglow to prompt emission, such as may have been the case in the recently discovered PTF 11agg, and (2) ultrahigh-energy neutrino pulses that are non-coincident with detectable GRB. It is suggested that GRB 090510, a short, very hard GRB with very little afterglow, was an exposed GRB, in contrast to those cloaked by baryonic shells.

  4. CLOAKED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David

    2014-06-01

    It is suggested that many gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are cloaked by an ultrarelativistic baryonic shell that has high optical depth when the photons are manufactured. Such a shell would not fully block photons reflected or emitted from its inner surface, because the radial velocity of the photons can be less than that of the shell. This avoids the standard problem associated with GRBs that the thermal component should be produced where the flow is still obscured by high optical depth. The radiation that escapes high optical depth obeys the Amati relation. Observational implications may include (1) anomalously high ratios of afterglow to prompt emission, such as may have been the case in the recently discovered PTF 11agg, and (2) ultrahigh-energy neutrino pulses that are non-coincident with detectable GRB. It is suggested that GRB 090510, a short, very hard GRB with very little afterglow, was an exposed GRB, in contrast to those cloaked by baryonic shells.

  5. The interpretation of gamma-ray enhancements in thunderstorms with and without avalanche multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanches (RREAs) are the acceleration and subsequent multiplication of relativistic electrons inside by electric field. Inside thunderstorms, RREA are thought to be involved in the creation of extraordinarily bright bursts of gamma rays, called Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs), and long duration production of gamma rays (called gamma-ray glows or thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs)). However, Chilingarian has proposed that some electric fields inside thunderstorms may not be strong enough or have large enough spatial extent to result in significant avalanche multiplication by RREA to make a glow. High-energy electrons and gamma rays would still be present by a modification of the spectra (MOS) of cosmic-ray air showers. MOS and RREA glows have both been detected many times from the ground but distinguishing between the two is difficult since differing count rates can be the result of either these two distinct production models or attenuation due to various source distances. We will present GEANT4 models showing how these spectra differ as a function of source distance as well as discuss the differences in their gamma ray/electron signature in ground-based, gamma-ray detectors. These models will be compared to measurements made with instruments already in place in Mexico and Japan.

  6. ASTRONOMY: Neighborhood Gamma Ray Burst Boosts Theory.

    PubMed

    Schilling, G

    2000-07-01

    Titanic explosions that emit powerful flashes of energetic gamma rays are one of astronomy's hottest mysteries. Now an analysis of the nearest gamma ray burst yet detected has added weight to the popular theory that they are expelled during the death throes of supermassive stars.

  7. High energy gamma-rays and hadrons at Mount Fuji

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Konishi, E.; Hotta, N.; Mizutani, K.; Kasahara, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Mikumo, E.; Sato, K.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of high energy gamma-rays and hadrons were obtained by the emulsion chamber with 40 c.u. thickness at Mt. Fuji (3750 m). These results are compared with the Monte Carlo calculation based on the same model which is used in a family analysis. Our data are compatible with the model of heavy-enriched primary and scaling in the fragmentation region.

  8. Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Paula M

    2007-05-15

    Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized.

  9. Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far-IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High-Energy Gamma Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the intergalactic photon density as a function of both energy and redshift for 0Gamma-rays in intergalactic space owing to interactions with low-energy photons and the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation. We calculate the optical depth of the universe, Tau , for Gamma-rays having energies from 4 GeV to 100 TeV emitted by sources at redshifts from 0 to 5. We also give an analytic fit with numerical coefficients for approximating (E(Gamma), z). As an example of the application of our results, we calculate the absorbed spectrum of the blazar PKS 2155-304 at z=0.117 and compare it with the spectrum observed by the HESS air Cerenkov Gamma-ray telescope array.

  10. Future Missions for Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy has made great advances in recent years, due largely to the recently completed 9-year mission of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. In this talk I will give an overview of what advances we may expect in the near future, with particular emphasis on earth-orbiting missions scheduled for flight within the next 5 years. Two missions, the High Energy Transient Explorer and Swift, will provide important new information on the sources of gamma-ray bursts. The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope will investigate high energy emission from a wide variety of sources, including active galaxies and gamma-ray pulsars. The contributions of ground-based and multiwavelength observations will also be addressed.

  11. Gamma-Ray Astronomy from the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horns, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    The observation of cosmic gamma-rays from the ground is based upon the detection of gamma-ray initiated air showers. At energies between approximately 1011 eV and 1013 eV, the imaging air Cherenkov technique is a particularly successful approach to observe gamma-ray sources with energy fluxes as low as ≈ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1. The observations of gamma-rays in this energy band probe particle acceleration in astrophysical plasma conditions and are sensitive to high energy phenomena beyond the standard model of particle physics (e.g., self-annihilating or decaying dark matter, violation of Lorentz invariance, mixing of photons with light pseudoscalars). The current standing of the field and its major instruments are summarized briefly by presenting selected highlights. A new generation of ground based gamma-ray instruments is currently under development. The perspectives and opportunities of these future facilities will be discussed.

  12. Production spectrum of gamma rays in interstellar space through neutral pion decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.; Badhwar, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    A simple representation is obtained of the observed invariant cross section for the production of neutral pions in proton-proton collisions. Using this representation, the differential and integral production spectra of gamma rays in the galaxy are calculated from interactions of cosmic ray nuclei with interstellar gas. It is shown that the uncertainties in deducing interstellar proton spectrum by demodulating the observed spectrum have only a limited effect on the gamma ray spectrum. Also determined is the gamma ray production spectrum through bremsstrahlung process for a typical interstellar electron spectrum derived from the radio spectrum in the galaxy.

  13. Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Observations of Nova Lupus 2016 (ASASSN-16kt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Jean, P.; Shore, S. N.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope performed a ~6-day Target of Opportunity (ToO) observation of Nova Lupus 2016 (ATel #9538, #9539, CBET #4322) that commenced on September 28. Considering earlier all-sky survey Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations as well, preliminary analysis indicates gamma-ray emission at ~2 sigma was detected around 1 to 2 days after the optical peak on September 25th (pre-validated AAVSO visual lightcurve; ATel #9550, CBET #4322) when the optical spectra show opaque ejecta, similar to previous gamma-ray detected novae (Fermi-LAT collaboration, 2014 Science 345, 554; Cheung et al. 2016 ApJ 826, 142).

  14. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of gamma-ray scattering and production in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from Monte Carlo numerical simulations of atmospheric gamma-ray scattering and production. The basic physical principles involved in the construction of the models are reviewed, and results are presented in extensive graphs for low-energy gamma rays with the spectra of gamma-ray bursts, solar flares, the Crab pulsar, and 511-keV line radiation. It is shown that the model accurately reproduces the characteristics of atmospheric albedo radiation, including details of the angular distribution. The potential applicability of the Monte Carlo technique to studies of the near-earth radiation environment is indicated.

  15. Active galaxies and the diffuse gamma-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Active galaxies are shown to account for the observed gamma ray background radiation if a steepening of the spectra above about 100 keV is present. An analytical model is discussed in which protons undergo Fermi acceleration at a shock in a spherical accretion flow onto a massive black hole. Relativistic protons with power law spectra, nuclear interactions producing gamma rays from neutal pion decay and electrons from pion-mu meson-electron decay, with a power law spectrum above several hundred MeV, synchrotron and inverse Compton losses steepening the electron spectrum, a photon spectrum close to the pion gamma spectrum and a high-energy gamma ray spectrum steepened by photon-photon pair production interactions with X rays are covered in the model. Comparisons are made with HEAO 2 data on active galaxies, which have estimated luminosities and radii consistent with the compactness necessary for producing the steepening predicted by the model. The active galaxies spectra would be described by a spherical accretion-shock model.

  16. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  17. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Katsuaki

    2008-08-28

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are possible sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHE-CRs). To test the GRB origin of UHECRs, it is essential to search for characteristic, proton-induced signatures of secondary radiation. In this paper we present our recent results of Monte Carlo simulations that model the broadband prompt emission of GRBs including various processes associated with electrons and protons accelerated to high energies. The most notable effect of accelerated protons on the high-energy spectra is the synchrotron emission from secondary electron-positron pairs injected by photomeson interactions. Secondary photons tend to make the spectra flat, so a spectral flattening in the GeV-TeV bands may serve as a signature of UHECR acceleration. In some cases, the proton-induced photons overwhelm the photon field, resulting in a spectral peak due to inverse Compton emission from secondary pairs located around 10{sup 7} eV. We can expect to detect synchrotron photons from protons or muons. Observations with GLAST or with atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes can provide useful estimates of the bulk Lorents factor and can constrain the proton acceleration efficiency.

  18. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary

  19. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleaford, B. W.; Firestone, R. B.; Summers, N.; Escher, J.; Hurst, A.; Krticka, M.; Basunia, S.; Molnar, G.; Belgya, T.; Revay, Z.; Choi, H. D.

    2011-06-01

    The neutron capture reaction is useful in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown assembly as it gives unambiguous information on its composition. This can be done passively or actively where an external neutron source is used to probe an unknown assembly. There are known capture gamma-ray data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes for various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes that was developed as part of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. EGAF is being used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the quasi continuum contribution to the gamma cascades is not experimentally resolved. The continuum contains up to 90% of all the decay energy and is modeled here with the statistical nuclear structure code DICEBOX. This code also provides a consistency check of the level scheme nuclear structure evaluation. The calculated continuum is of sufficient accuracy to include in the ENDF libraries. This analysis also determines new total thermal capture cross sections and provides an improved RIPL database. For higher energy neutron capture there is less experimental data available making benchmarking of the modeling codes more difficult. We are investigating the capture spectra from higher energy neutrons experimentally using surrogate reactions and modeling this with Hauser-Feshbach codes. This can then be used to benchmark CASINO, a version of DICEBOX modified for neutron capture at higher energy. This can be used to simulate spectra from neutron capture at incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV to improve the gamma-ray spectrum in neutron data libraries used for transport modeling of unknown assemblies.

  20. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sleaford, B W; Firestone, R B; Summers, N; Escher, J; Hurst, A; Krticka, M; Basunia, S; Molnar, G; Belgya, T; Revay, Z; Choi, H D

    2010-11-04

    The neutron capture reaction is useful in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown assembly as it gives unambiguous information on its composition. this can be done passively or actively where an external neutron source is used to probe an unknown assembly. There are known capture gamma-ray data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes for various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes that was developed as part of an IAEA Coordinated Research project. EGAF is being used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the quasi continuum contribution to the gamma cascades is not experimentally resolved. The continuum contains up to 90% of all the decay energy and is modeled here with the statistical nuclear structure code DICEBOX. This code also provides a consistency check of the level scheme nuclear structure evaluation. The calculated continuum is of sufficient accuracy to include in the ENDF libraries. This analysis also determines new total thermal capture cross sections and provides an improved RIPL database. For higher energy neutron capture there is less experimental data available making benchmarking of the modeling codes more difficult. They are investigating the capture spectra from higher energy neutrons experimentally using surrogate reactions and modeling this with Hauser-Feshbach codes. This can then be used to benchmark CASINO, a version of DICEBOX modified for neutron capture at higher energy. This can be used to simulate spectra from neutron capture at incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV to improve the gamma-ray spectrum in neutron data libraries used for transport modeling of unknown assemblies.

  1. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sleaford, B. W.; Summers, N.; Escher, J.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, S.; Hurst, A.; Krticka, M.; Molnar, G.; Belgya, T.; Revay, Z.; Choi, H. D.

    2011-06-28

    The neutron capture reaction is useful in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown assembly as it gives unambiguous information on its composition. This can be done passively or actively where an external neutron source is used to probe an unknown assembly. There are known capture gamma-ray data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes for various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes that was developed as part of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. EGAF is being used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the quasi continuum contribution to the gamma cascades is not experimentally resolved. The continuum contains up to 90% of all the decay energy and is modeled here with the statistical nuclear structure code DICEBOX. This code also provides a consistency check of the level scheme nuclear structure evaluation. The calculated continuum is of sufficient accuracy to include in the ENDF libraries. This analysis also determines new total thermal capture cross sections and provides an improved RIPL database. For higher energy neutron capture there is less experimental data available making benchmarking of the modeling codes more difficult. We are investigating the capture spectra from higher energy neutrons experimentally using surrogate reactions and modeling this with Hauser-Feshbach codes. This can then be used to benchmark CASINO, a version of DICEBOX modified for neutron capture at higher energy. This can be used to simulate spectra from neutron capture at incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV to improve the gamma-ray spectrum in neutron data libraries used for transport modeling of unknown assemblies.

  2. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Observations with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) have now been detected with four different orbiting spacecraft. The latest observations are being made with the scintillation detectors of Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi). Although this experiment was designed and optimized for the observation of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it has unprecedented capabilities for TGF observations, surpassing those of the experiment that discovered TGFs, the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory. Launched in June 2008 from the Kennedy Space Center, the Fermi-GBM has been detecting about one TGF every four weeks. The thick bismuth germinate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM have now observed photon energies from TGFs at energies up to approx.40 MeV. Individual photons are detected with an absolute timing accuracy of 2 microsec. Unlike the BATSE instrument, the GBM data system allows higher counting rates to be recorded and deadtime characteristics are well-known and correctable; thus the saturation effects seen with BATSE are avoided. TGF pulses as narrow as approx.0.1ms have been observed with the GBM. Like BATSE (and unlike RHESSI) an on-board trigger is required to detect TGFs. The minimum time window for this trigger is 16ms. A trigger window this wide greatly reduces the number of detected TGFs, since they most often have a much shorter duration than this window, thus reducing the signal-to-background. New on-board trigger algorithms based on detected photon energies are about to be implemented; this should increase the number of TGF triggers. High-energy spectra from TGFs observed with Fermi-GBM will be described.

  3. Gamma-ray Astronomy and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray (30 MeV to 100 GeV) sky has been relatively poorly studied. Most of our current knowledge comes from observations made by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), which revealed that the GeV gamma-ray sky is rich and vibrant. Studies of astrophysical objects at GeV energies are interesting for several reasons: The high energy gamma-rays are often produced by a different physical process than the better studied X-ray and optical emission, thus providing a unique information for understanding these sources. Production of such high-energy photons requires that charged particles are accelerated to equally high energies, or much greater. Thus gamma-ray astronomy is the study of extreme environments, with natural and fundamental connections to cosmic-ray and neutrino astrophysics. The launch of GLAST in 2008 will herald a watershed in our understanding of the high energy gamma-ray sky, providing dramatic improvements in sensitivity, angular resolution and energy range. GLAST will open a new avenue to study our Universe as well as to answer scientific questions EGRET observations have raised. In this talk, I will describe the GLAST instruments and capabilities and highlight some of the science we expect to address.

  4. Gamma-Ray Burst Physics with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, N.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-10-06

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV, the upper end of which is one of the last poorly observed region of the celestial electromagnetic spectrum. The ancestor of the GLAST/LAT was the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector, which flew onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The amount of information and the step forward that the high energy astrophysics made thanks to its 9 years of observations are impressive. Nevertheless, EGRET uncovered the tip of the iceberg, raising many questions, and it is in the light of EGRET's results that the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) vastly more capable than instruments own previously, as well as a secondary instrument, the GLAST Bursts Monitor, or GBM, to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) science is one of the most exciting challenges for the GLAST mission, exploring the high energy emission of one of the most intense phenomena in the sky, shading light on various problems: from the acceleration of particles to the emission processes, to more exotic physics like Quantum Gravity effect. In this paper we report the work done so far in the simulation development as well as the study of the LAT sensitivity to GRB.

  5. Future prospects for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C.

    1981-01-01

    As gamma-ray astronomy moves from the discovery to the exploratory phase, the promise of gamma-ray astrophysics noted by theorists in the late 1940s and 1950s is beginning to be realized. In the future, satellites should carry instruments that will have over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far, and, for at least some portions of the gamma-ray energy range, these detectors will also have substantially improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance our knowledge of several astrophysical phenomena including the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects, astrophysical nucleosynthesis, solar particle acceleration, the chemical composition of the planets and other bodies of the solar system, the structure of our galaxy, the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays, high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies especially active ones, and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe. The gamma-ray results of the forthcoming programs such as Gamma-I, the Gamma Ray Observatory, the gamma-ray burst network, Solar Polar, and very high energy gamma-ray telescopes on the ground will almost certainly provide justification for more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the Space Platform currently under study by N.A.S.A.

  6. Python in gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deil, Christoph Deil

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy is a relatively new window on the cosmos. The first source detected from the ground was the Crab nebula, seen by the Whipple telescope in Arizona in 1989. Today, about 150 sources have been detected at TeV energies using gamma-ray telescopes from the ground such as H.E.S.S. in Namibia or VERITAS in Arizona, and about 3000 sources at GeV energies using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Soon construction will start for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), which will be the first ground-based gamma-ray telescope array operated as an open observatory, with a site in the southern and a second site in the northern hemisphere. In this presentation I will give a very brief introduction to gamma-ray astronomy and data analysis, as well as a short overview of the software used for the various missions. The main focus will be on recent attempts to build open-source gamma-ray software on the scientific Python stack and Astropy: ctapipe as a CTA Python pipeline prototype, Fermipy and the Fermi Science Tools for Fermi-LAT analysis, Gammapy as a community-developed gamma-ray Python package and naima as a non-thermal spectral modeling and fitting package.

  7. Gamma-ray Cosmology in the Pre-CTA Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biteau, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy at TeV energies has been envisioned as a powerful tool to probe the extragalactic background light (EBL) since the early '60s, three decades before the first extragalactic TeV sources were even detected. Gamma rays can indeed interact along the line of sight with the EBL, creating electron-positron pairs. This results in an energy- and redshift-dependent absorption of the emitted spectra which, when detected, would convey information on the broad-band density of the EBL and on its evolution across the billion-years journey of the gamma rays.The coarse structure of the energy dependence of the absorption, that softens the gamma-ray spectrum, has been used in the '90s and '00s to set indirect upper limits on the EBL density. The main limitation arose from accounting for the intrinsic spectral softening, related to the radiative processes and acceleration mechanisms at play in the emitters. The beginning of the '10s has seen the overcoming of this limitation, yielding the first indirect measurements of the EBL absorption by H.E.S.S, below z<0.2, and by Fermi-LAT, mostly above z>0.5.In this talk, I will discuss the method employed by H.E.S.S. and Fermi-LAT to detect the EBL absorption, by means of a scaling of the EBL density, and compare their results with direct limits in the UV, optical and near-infrared bands. I will propose an extension of this method to constrain the spectrum and evolution of the EBL, and/or to search for anomalies in gamma-ray spectra. An abnormal level of absorption could probe a large panel of physical processes, be they cosmic-ray acceleration and reprocessing along the line of sight, or physics beyond the standard model such as Lorentz invariance violation or photo-axion conversion. The golden age of gamma-ray cosmology is yet to come during the next decade, with the upgrade of current-generation instruments and the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA.

  8. Cosmic gamma-ray lines - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.

    1980-01-01

    The various processes that lead to gamma-ray line emission and the possible astrophysical sources of such emission are reviewed. The processes of nuclear excitation, radiative capture, positron annihilation, and cyclotron radiation, which may produce gamma-ray line emission from such diverse sources as the interstellar medium, novas, supernovas, pulsars, accreting compact objects, the galactic nucleus and the nuclei of active galaxies are considered. The significance of the relative intensities, widths, and frequency shifts of the lines are also discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding those gamma-ray lines that have already been observed from astrophysical sources.

  9. High-energy emission in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matz, S. M.; Forrest, D. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Rieger, E.

    1985-01-01

    Between February 1980 and August 1983 the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite (SMM) detected 72 events identified as being of cosmic origin. These events are an essentially unbiased subset of all gamma-ray bursts. The measured spectra of these events show that high energy (greater than 1 MeV) emission is a common and energetically important feature. There is no evidence for a general high-energy cut-off or a distribution of cut-offs below about 6 MeV. These observations imply a limit on the preferential beaming of high energy emission. This constraint, combined with the assumption of isotropic low energy emission, implies that the typical magnetic field strength at burst radiation sites is less than 1 x 10 to the 12th gauss.

  10. First results from gamma ray diagnostics in EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, R. J.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Cao, H. R.; Liu, G. Z.; Li, K.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, S. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Gamma ray diagnostics has been developed in the EAST tokamak recently. Six BGO scintillator detectors are arranged on the down-half cross-section and pointed at the up-half cross-section of plasma, with space resolution about 15 cm and energy range from 0.3 MeV to 6 MeV. Three main gamma ray peaks in the energy spectra have been observed and are identified as the results of nuclear reactions 207Pb(n, n')207mPb, H(n, γ) D, and D(p, γ)3He, respectively. Upgrading of the system is in progress by using LaBr3(Ce) scintillator, fast photo-multiplier tubes, and a fully digital data acquisition system based on high sample frequency digitizers with digital pulse processing algorithms.

  11. The ISEE-C gamma ray burst spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Porreca, G.; Stilwell, D.; Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.; Hovestadt, D.

    1978-01-01

    The technical properties, operation, and expected sensitivity are discussed for an experiment intended to search for narrow lines in the spectra of gamma ray bursts during the ISEE-C mission. At the heart of the experiment is a radiatively cooled germanium solid state photon detector. The instrumentation is capable of storing the entire spectrum of all but the largest bursts in the energy range 0.05-6.5 MeV. In addition, it analyzes the signals from two CsI detectors in two other experiments on the spacecraft and records event time histories from these to a few millisecond accuracy. A background mode permits spectral analysis during quiet times and will allow the determination of physically interesting upper limits for narrow lines in the diffuse gamma ray background radiation.

  12. Production of Gamma-Rays in the Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, W.; Bartosik, M.

    2004-10-01

    We construct the time dependent hadronic-leptonic radiation model for the high energy processes inside the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). This model is based on the hypothesis that heavy nuclei are effi- ciently accelerated in the vicinity of young pulsars. Different energy loss processes of nuclei and accel- erated by them leptons are considered in order to obtain the equilibrium spectra of these particles in- side the nebula at an arbitrary time after the pulsar formation. We calculate the multiwavelength spec- tra from specific PWNe expected from different lep- tonic and hadronic processes. From normalization of the calculated synchrotron spectrum to the observed spectrum at low energies, the expected TeV gamma- ray fluxes from a few PWNe are predicted and its possible detectability by the future TeV telescopes is discussed. Key words: Pulsars: nebulae - radiation mecha- nisms: gamma-rays.

  13. Neutron-induced gamma ray spectroscopy: Simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, J.; Wänke, H.; Reedy, R. C.

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma ray lines that can be measured by a gamma ray spectrometer on board an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which enables us to recognize individual geological units and provides clues to the bulk composition and in turn the origin and evolution of the body. To investigate the gamma ray fluxes induced by accelerator neutrons, experiments were carried out by irradiating thin targets with neutrons of energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. The neutron fluxes at target position were measured by foil activation techniques. The ratio of the epithermal to thermal neutron flux was determined to be 2.0, a value that is similar to that in the moon. Gamma rays in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were measured by a high-resolution germanium detector. Most of the gamma ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma ray Spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra. These spectra were unfolded, background was subtracted, and gamma ray attenuation corrections were made to obtain the corresponding gamma ray fluxes from the targets. The majority of gamma ray lines were narrow without noticeable Doppler broadening except for the very broad 4.4-MeV line of carbon and five asymmetric germanium lines produced by the detector itself. The agreement of measured gamma ray flux ratios with calculated flux ratios for neutron-capture reactions showed that thermal neutron data can be used for theoretical calculations of low-energy neutron-induced gamma ray fluxes. This study was a first step toward a more realistic simulation of cosmic-ray-induced gamma-ray production and it indicates the importance of accelerator

  14. Neutron-induced gamma ray spectroscopy: Simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, J.; Wänke, H.; Reedy, R. C.

    1987-09-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma ray lines that can be measured by a gamma ray spectrometer on board an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which enables us to recognize individual geological units and provides clues to the bulk composition and in turn the origin and evolution of the body. To investigate the gamma ray fluxes induced by accelerator neutrons, experiments were carried out by irradiating thin targets with neutrons of energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. The neutron fluxes at target position were measured by foil activation techniques. The ratio of the epithermal to thermal neutron flux was determined to be 2.0, a value that is similar to that in the moon. Gamma rays in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were measured by a high-resolution germanium detector. Most of the gamma ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra. These spectra were unfolded, background was subtracted, and gamma ray attenuation corrections were made to obtain the corresponding gamma ray fluxes from the targets. The majority of gamma ray lines were narrow without noticeable Doppler broadening except for the very broad 4.4-MeV line of carbon and five asymmetric germanium lines produced by the detector itself. The agreement of measured gamma ray flux ratios with calculated flux ratios for neutron-capture reactions showed that thermal neutron data can be used for theoretical calculations of low-energy neutron-induced gamma ray fluxes. This study was a first step toward a more realistic simulation of cosmic-ray-induced gamma-ray production and it indicates the importance of accelerator

  15. Gamma Ray Spectrum Catalogs from Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Heath, R. L.

    Gamma-ray spectrometry is widely applied as a tool for the assay of radioactive source material to identify the isotopes present and characterize radiation fields. Beginning with the startup of the world's first high-flux beam reactor, Materials Test Reactor (MTR), INL has pioneered the development of x-ray spectrometry for use in basic nuclear research and a variety of disciplines using radioisotopes and other radiation sources. Beginning in the early 1950s, a program was instituted to make the technique a precise laboratory tool. Standards were established for detectors and nuclear electronics to promote the production of commercial laboratory spectrometers. It was also necessary to produce a comprehensive collection of standard detector response functions for individual radio nuclides to permit the use of gamma-ray spectrometers for identification of radioisotopes present in radiation sources. This led to the publication of standard measurement methodology and a set of Gamma-Ray Spectrum Catalogues. These publications, which established standards for detector systems, experimental methods and reference spectra for both NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors and Ge(Li) - Si( Li) semiconductor devices, became standard reference works, distributed worldwide. Over 40,000 copies have been distributed by the Office of Science and Technical Information (OSTI). Unfortunately, although they are still very much in demand, they are all out of print at this time. The INL is converting this large volume of data to a format which is consistent with current information technology and meets the needs of the scientific community. Three are available online with the longest being more than 800 pages in length. Plotted spectra and decay data have been converted to digital formats and updated, including decay scheme graphics. These online catalogs are: • Ge(Li)-Si(Li) Gamma Spectrum Catalog (Published 3-29-1999) • NaI(Tl) Gamma Spectrum Catalog (Published 4-1-1997) • Gamma-ray

  16. Plutonium Isotopic Gamma-Ray Analysis

    1992-01-08

    The MGA8 (Multiple Group Analysis) program determines the relative abundances of plutonium and other actinide isotopes in different materials. The program analyzes spectra taken of such samples using a 4096-channel germanium (Ge) gamma-ray spectrometer. The code can be run in a one or two detector mode. The first spectrum, which is required and must be taken at a gain of 0.075 Kev/channel with a high resolution planar detector, contains the 0-300 Kev energy region. Themore » second spectrum, which is optional, must be taken at a gain of 0.25 Kev/channel; it becomes important when analyzing high burnup samples (concentration of Pu241 greater than one percent). Isotopic analysis precisions of one percent or better can be obtained, and no calibrations are required. The system also measures the abundances of U235, U238, Np237, and Am241. A special calibration option is available to perform a one-time peak-shape characterization when first using a new detector system.« less

  17. Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed Gamma-Rays From Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Asano, Katsuaki; Nagataki, Shigehiro; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-06

    Regenerated high energy emissions from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are studied in detail. If the primary emission spectrum extends to TeV range, these very high energy photons will be absorbed by the cosmic infrared background (CIB). The created high energy electron-positron pairs up-scatter not only cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons but also CIB photons, and secondary photons are generated in the GeV-TeV range. These secondary delayed photons may be observed in the near future, and useful for a consistency check for the primary spectra and GRB physical parameters. The up-scattered CIB photons cannot be neglected for low redshift bursts and/or GRBs with a relatively low maximum photon energy. The secondary gamma-rays also give us additional information on the CIB, which is uncertain in observations so far.

  18. Searching for Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates Among the Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; /Perugia U.

    2012-04-02

    The identification of low-energy counterparts for {gamma}-ray sources is one of the biggest challenge in modern {gamma}-ray astronomy. Recently, we developed and successfully applied a new association method to recognize {gamma}-ray blazar candidates that could be possible counterparts for the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources above 100 MeV in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog (2FGL). This method is based on the Infrared (IR) colors of the recent Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. In this letter we applied our new association method to the case of unidentified INTEGRAL sources (UISs) listed in the fourth soft gamma-ray source catalog (4IC). Only 86 UISs out of the 113 can be analyzed, due to the sky coverage of the WISE Preliminary data release. Among these 86 UISs, we found that 18 appear to have a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within their positional error region. Finally, we analyzed the Swift archival data available for 10 out these 18 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates, and we found that 7 out of 10 are clearly detected in soft X-rays and/or in the optical-ultraviolet band. We cannot confirm the associations between the UISs and the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates due to the discrepancies between the INTEGRAL and the soft X-ray spectra. However, the discovery of the soft X-ray counterparts for the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates adds an important clue to help understand their origin and to confirm their blazar nature.

  19. SEARCHING FOR {gamma}-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES AMONG THE UNIDENTIFIED INTEGRAL SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.

    2012-05-10

    The identification of low-energy counterparts for {gamma}-ray sources is one of the biggest challenges in modern {gamma}-ray astronomy. Recently, we developed and successfully applied a new association method to recognize {gamma}-ray blazar candidates that could be possible counterparts for the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources above 100 MeV in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog. This method is based on the infrared colors of the recent Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. In this Letter, we applied our new association method to the case of unidentified INTEGRAL sources (UISs) listed in the fourth soft gamma-ray source catalog. Only 86 UISs out of the 113 can be analyzed due to the sky coverage of the WISE Preliminary Data Release. Among these 86 UISs, we found that 18 appear to have a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within their positional error region. Finally, we analyzed Swift archival data available for 10 out of these 18 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates, and we found that 7 out of 10 are clearly detected in soft X-rays and/or in the optical-ultraviolet band. We cannot confirm the associations between the UISs and the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates due to the discrepancies between the INTEGRAL and the soft X-ray spectra. However, the discovery of the soft X-ray counterparts for the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates adds an important clue to help us understand their origin and to confirm their blazar nature.

  20. Orbital Normalization of MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. A.; Peplowski, P. N.; Evans, L. G.; Hamara, D. K.; Boynton, W. V.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    The MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) measures energy spectra of gamma rays emanating from the surface of Mercury. Analysis of these spectra provides elemental abundances of surface material. The MESSENGER mission necessarily provides some data normalization challenges for GRS analysis. So as to keep the spacecraft cool while orbiting the dayside of the planet, the orbits are highly eccentric, with altitudes varying from 200-500 km to ~ 15,000 km. A small fraction of time is spent at the low altitudes where gamma-ray signals are largest, requiring a large number of orbits to yield sufficient counting statistics for elemental analysis. Also, the sunshade must always shield the spacecraft from the Sun, which causes the orientation of the GRS often to be far from nadir-pointing, so the detector efficiency and attenuation of gamma rays from the planet must be known for a wide range of off-nadir orientations. An efficiency/attenuation map for the expected ranges of orientations and energies was constructed in a ground calibration experiment for a limited range of orientations using a nuclear reactor and radioisotope sources, and those results were extended to other orientations by radiation transport computations using as input a computer-aided design model of the spacecraft and its composition. This normalization has allowed abundance determinations of elements K, Th, and U from radioisotopes of these elements in the Mercury regolith during the first quarter of the year-long mission. These results provide constraints on models of Mercury's chemical and thermal evolution. The normalization of gamma-ray spectra for surface elements not having radioisotopes is considerably more complex; these gamma rays come from neutron inelastic-scatter and capture reactions in the regolith, where the neutrons are generated by cosmic ray impact onto the planet. A radiation transport computation was performed to generate the expected count rates in the neutron-generated gamma-ray

  1. Overview Animation of Gamma-ray Burst

    NASA Video Gallery

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the cosmos. Astronomers think most occur when the core of a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel, collapses under its own weight, and forms a b...

  2. Zapping Mars Rocks with Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    1999-12-01

    Because we do not know what deadly microorganisms might be lurking inside samples returned from Mars, the samples will either have to be sterilized before release or kept in isolation until biological studies declare them safe. One way to execute microorganisms is with radiation, such as gamma rays. Although quite effective in snuffing out bacteria and viruses, gamma rays might also affect the mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic compositions of the zapped rocks and soils. Carl Allen (Lockheed Martin Space Operations, Houston) and a team of 18 other analysts tested the effect of gamma rays on rock and mineral samples like those we expect on Mars. Except for some darkening of some minerals, high doses of gamma rays had no significant effect on the rocks, making gamma radiation a feasible option for sterilizing samples returned from Mars.

  3. POPULATION SYNTHESIS AND GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FREYER

    2000-12-11

    Population synthesis studies of binaries are always limited by a myriad of uncertainties from the poorly understood effects of binary mass transfer and common envelope evolution to the many uncertainties that still remain in stellar evolution. But the importance of these uncertainties depends both upon the objects being studied and the questions asked about these objects. Here I review the most critical uncertainties in the population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors. With a better understanding of these uncertainties, binary population synthesis can become a powerful tool in understanding, and constraining, gamma-ray burst models. In turn, as gamma-ray bursts become more important as cosmological probes, binary population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors becomes an important tool in cosmology.

  4. Aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer: real-time measurement of emission spectra of airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Nachman, Paul; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1995-10-01

    We have assembled an aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer (AFS), which can measure the fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering of airborne particles as they flow through a laser beam. The aerosols traverse a scattering cell where they are illuminated with intense (50 kW/cm 2) light inside the cavity of an argon-ion laser operating at 488 nm. This AFS can obtain fluorescence spectra of individual dye-doped polystyrene microspheres as small as 0.5 mu m in diameter. The spectra obtained from microspheres doped with pink and green-yellow dyes are clearly different. We have also detected the fluorescence spectra of airborne particles (although not single particles) made from various

  5. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-12-01

    I'll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ˜ 0.4% - 3%.

  6. Gamma-ray detected radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Volker; Soldi, Simona; De Jong, Sandra; Kretschmer, Karsten; Savchenko, Volodymyr

    2016-07-01

    So far 15 radio galaxies have been detected in the gamma-ray domain by CGRO/EGRET and Fermi/LAT, with a few detections also in the VHE range. We search for distinguishing parameters and estimate the total number of gamma-ray emitting radio galaxies that are potentially detectable by Fermi/LAT. We use Fermi/LAT data in comparison with X-ray and hard X-ray data in order to constrain basic parameters such as the total power of the inverse Compton branch and the position of its peak. We search for possible correlations between the radio, UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray domain and derive the number counts distribution. We then compare their properties with those of the radio galaxies in the 3CRR and SMS4 catalogues. The data show no correlation between the peak of the inverse Compton emission and its luminosity. For the gamma-ray detected radio galaxies the luminosities in the various bands are correlated, except for the UV band, but there is no indication of a correlation of peak frequency or luminosity with the spectral slopes in the X-ray or gamma-ray band. The comparison with other bright radio galaxies shows that the gamma-ray detected objects are among those that have the largest X-ray but rather moderate radio fluxes. Their UV and X-ray luminosities are similar, but gamma-ray detected radio galaxies are predominantly of type FR-I, while the 3CRR sample contains mainly FR-II objects. The number counts of the so far gamma-ray detected radio galaxies shows a very shallow slope, indicating that potentially a fraction of radio galaxies has been missed so far or has not been identified as such, although the predicted number of 22 ± 7 is consistent with the observed 15 objects.

  7. Gamma-ray constraints on supernova nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leising, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual supernova explosions via short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring current global Galactic supernova nucleosynthesis with longer-lived radioactivity. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both Co-56 and Co-57 were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions and nucleosynthesis. Live Al-26 in the Galaxy might come from Type II supernovae, and if it is eventually shown to be so, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, and the Galactic Type II supernova rate. Type Ia supernovae, thought to be thermonuclear explosions, have not yet been detected in gamma-rays. This is somewhat surprising given current models and recent Co-56 detection attempts. Ultimately, gamma-ray measurements can confirm their thermonuclear nature, probe the nuclear burning conditions, and help evaluate their contributions to Galactic nucleosynthesis. Type Ib/c supernovae are poorly understood. Whether they are core collapse or thermonuclear events might be ultimately settled by gamma-ray observations. Depending on details of the nuclear processing, any of these supernova types might contribute to a detectable diffuse glow of Fe-60 gamma-ray lines. Previous attempts at detection have come very close to expected emission levels. Remnants of any type of age less that a few centuries might be detectable as individual spots of Ti-44 gamma-ray line emission. It is in fact quite surprising that previous surveys have not discovered such spots, and the constraints on the combination of nucleosynthesis yields and supernova rates are very interesting. All of these interesting limits and possibilities mean that the next mission, International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), if it has sufficient sensitivity, is very likely to lead to the realization of much of the great potential

  8. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  9. Research in cosmic and gamma ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Davis, L., Jr.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Prince, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    Research activities in cosmic rays, gamma rays, and astrophysical plasmas are covered. The activities are divided into sections and described, followed by a bibliography. The astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays, gamma rays, and of the radiation and electromagnetic field environment of the Earth and other planets are investigated. These investigations are performed by means of energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons.

  10. Compton scattering gamma-ray source optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, Frederic; Wu, Sheldon; Albert, Félicie; Barty, Chris

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of a bright relativistic electron beam with an intense laser pulse via Compton scattering can generate tunable gamma-rays for precision nuclear photonics applications. The properties of the gamma-ray phase space will be outlined, in relation with the 6D electron bunch and 6D laser pulse phase space, along with collimation, nonlinear effects and other sources of spectral broadening. Optimization strategies will be outlines within the context of nuclear photonics applications.

  11. High energy gamma ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Michael Richard

    This thesis presents a design study into gamma ray collimation techniques for use in high energy radiation imaging devices for the nuclear industry. Such technology is required to provide information on the nature and location of isotopes within nuclear facilities that have reached the end of their useful life. The work has concentrated on the use of two different techniques, namely mechanical collimation using the Anger camera and electronic collimation using a Compton camera. The work has used computational models to evaluate the performance of such systems and thereby suggest optimal design parameters for use in prototype devices. Ray tracing models have been constructed to simulate both parallel hole and tapered bore diverging collimators. Investigations have been carried out to measure the effects on the spatial resolution of changing various design parameters of the collimators. The effects of varying the hole size, septal thickness and collimator length over a range of source to collimator distances likely to be encountered in an industrial scenario have been examined. Some new insight into the nature of the point spread function of mechanical collimators has been gained and the limitations of the conventional analytical approach to collimator evaluation have been highlighted. Modifications to the standard equations used in collimator design have subsequently been suggested. An analytical description of tapered bore collimators has been derived. Monte Carlo models have been developed to model a single scatter Compton camera. Germanium, silicon and sodium iodide have been investigated as candidates for the scattering detector in such a device. A model of a complete ring array Compton camera system has been used to evaluate performance. The data from the Monte Carlo model has been reconstructed to form images. The quality of the images generated have then been compared with images obtained from parallel hole and focusing mechanical collimators.

  12. The Redshift-Dependence of Gamma-Ray Absorption in the Environments of Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-21

    One of the key scientific objectives of the new generation high energy instruments is the quest for signatures from the extragalactic background light (EBL) at UV/optical/IR energies and its evolution by means of photon-photon absorption over extragalactic distances.I will discuss the various methods proposed, and biases that may be introduced when studying the evolution of the EBL with capable {gamma}-ray observatories like e.g. GLAST or CTA, where the {gamma}-ray horizon is probed by means of statistical analysis of absorption features in AGN spectra at various redshifts. In particular, the effect of the redshift-dependence of 'local opacity' in {gamma}-ray loud quasars due to possible {gamma}-ray absorption through photon-photon pair production of jet photons in the external photon environments (accretion disk, broad-line region radiation field) on evolutionary studies of the EBL is highlighted.

  13. The Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Model for GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, T.A.; Digel, S.W.; Grenier, I.A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Strong, A.W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2007-06-13

    Diffuse emission from the Milky Way dominates the gamma-ray sky. About 80% of the high-energy luminosity of the Milky Way comes from processes in the interstellar medium. The Galactic diffuse emission traces interactions of energetic particles, primarily protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field, thus delivering information about cosmic-ray spectra and interstellar mass in distant locations. Additionally, the Galactic diffuse emission is the celestial foreground for the study of gamma-ray point sources and the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. We will report on the latest developments in the modeling of the Galactic diffuse emission, which will be used for the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) investigations.

  14. An Overview of the XGAM Code and Related Software for Gamma-ray Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W.

    2014-11-13

    The XGAM spectrum-fitting code and associated software were developed specifically to analyze the complex gamma-ray spectra that can result from neutron-induced reactions. The XGAM code is designed to fit a spectrum over the entire available gamma-ray energy range as a single entity, in contrast to the more traditional piecewise approaches. This global-fit philosophy enforces background continuity as well as consistency between local and global behavior throughout the spectrum, and in a natural way. This report presents XGAM and the suite of programs built around it with an emphasis on how they fit into an overall analysis methodology for complex gamma-ray data. An application to the analysis of time-dependent delayed gamma-ray yields from 235U fission is shown in order to showcase the codes and how they interact.

  15. Evidence for Temporally-Extended, High-Energy Emission from Gamma Ray Burst 990104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wren, D. N.; Bertsch, D. L.; Ritz, S.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that high-energy emission (MeV - GeV) has been observed in several gamma ray bursts and temporally-extended emission from lower-energy gamma rays through radio wavelengths is well established. Observations of extended, high-energy emission are, however, scarce. Here we present evidence for a gamma ray burst emission that is both high-energy and extended, coincident with lower energy emissions. For the very bright and long burst, GRB 990104, we show light curves and spectra that confirm emission above 50 MeV, approximately 152 seconds after the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) trigger and initial burst emission. Between the initial output and the main peak, seen at both low and high energy, there was a period of approx. 100 s during which the burst was relatively quiet. This burst was found as part of an ongoing search for high-energy emission in gamma ray bursts.

  16. The blazar gamma-ray luminosity function and the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamon, M. H.; Stecker, F. W.

    1994-01-01

    We have used the data from the new EGRET catalog on 'grazars' (blazers which are observed to be high-energy gamma-ray sources), together with radio data, to construct a new relation between radio and gamma-ray luminosity for these sources. Using this relation to construct a grazar gamma-ray luminosity function, we then calculate the contribution of unresolved grazars to the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation. We derive the energy spectrum of this background component above 100 MeV and the angular fluctuations in this background implied by our model.

  17. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission from the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, David L.; Paglione, Timothy A. D.; Marscher, Alan P.; Jackson, James M.

    1995-01-01

    The starburst galaxy NGC 253 was observed with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite. We obtain a 2 sigma upper limit to the gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV of 8 x 10(exp -8) photons/sq cm/s. Because of their large gas column densities and supernova rates, nearby starburst galaxies were predicted to have gamma-ray fluxes detectable by EGRET. Our nondetection of gamma-rays from NGC 253 motivates us to reexamine in detail the premise of supernova acceleration of cosmic rays and the effect of enhanced cloud densities, photon densities, and magnetic fields on the high-energy spectra of galaxies. By modeling the expected gamma-ray and synchrotron spectra from NGC 253, we find that up to 20% of the energy from supernovae is transferred to cosmic rays in the starburst, which is consistent with supernova acceleration models. Our calculations match the EGRET and radio data well with a supernova rate of 0.08/yr, a magnetic field B greater than or approximately equal to 5 x 10(exp -5) G, a density n approximately 300/cu cm, a photon density U(sub ph) approximately 200 eV/cu cm, and an escape timescale tau(sub o) less than or approximately equal to 10 Myr.

  19. High resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy: The first 85 years

    SciTech Connect

    Deslattes, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    This opening review attempts to follow the main trends in crystal diffraction spectrometry of nuclear {gamma} rays from its 1914 beginning in Rutherford's laboratory to the ultra-high resolution instrumentation realized in the current generation of spectrometers at the Institute Laue Langeven (ILL). The authors perspective is that of an instrumentalist hoping to convey a sense of intellectual debt to a number of predecessors, each of whom realized a certain elegance in making the tools that have enabled much good science, including that to which the remainder of this workshop is dedicated. This overview follows some of the main ideas along a trajectory toward higher resolution at higher energies, thereby enabling not only the disentangling of dense spectra, but also allowing detailed study of aspects of spectral profiles sensitive to excited state lifetimes and interatomic potentials. The parallel evolution toward increasing efficiency while preserving needed resolution is also an interesting story of artful compromise that should not be neglected. Finally, it is the robustness of the measurement chain connecting {gamma}-ray wavelengths with optical wave-lengths associated with the Rydberg constant that only recently has allowed {gamma}-ray data to contribute to determine of particle masses and fundamental constants, as will be described in more detail in other papers from this workshop.

  20. Gamma Ray Bursts from a Quantum Critical Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G; Santiago, D I

    2002-11-20

    The logical inconsistency of quantum mechanics and general relativity can be avoided if the relativity principle fails for length scales smaller than the quantum coherence length for the vacuum state. Ordinarily this corresponds to energies near the Planck energy, but recently it has been pointed out that near to the event horizon of a black hole the coherence length can be much larger and Planck scale physics can take over at macroscopic distances from the event horizon. This has dramatic consequences for the phenomenology of black holes. If we assume that at the Planck scale elementary particles interact via a universal 4-point interaction and baryon number conservation is violated, then the rest mass of a star hitting the event horizon of a large black hole would be rapidly converted into a burst of gamma rays followed by a pulse of hard X-rays whose duration is on the order of the light transit time across the black hole. Predictions for the gamma ray spectra are strikingly similar to those observed for cosmic gamma ray bursts.

  1. Gamma-ray Burst Energetics an the Gamma-ray Burst Hubble Diagram: Promises and Limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, J. S.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present a complete sample of 29 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for which it has been possible to determine temporal breaks (or limits) from their afterglow light curves. We interpret these breaks within the framework of the uniform conical jet model, incorporating realistic estimates of the ambient density and propagating error estimates on the measured quantities. In agreement with our previous analysis of a smaller sample, the derived jet opening angles of those 16 bursts with redshifts result in a narrow clustering of geometrically corrected gamma-ray energies about 1.33 x 10(exp 51) ergs; the burst-to-burst variance about this value is 0.35 dex, a factor of 2.2. Despite this rather small scatter, we demonstrate in a series of GRB Hubble diagrams that the current sample cannot place meaningful constraints upon the fundamental parameters of the universe. Indeed, for GRBs to ever be useful in cosmographic measurements, we argue the necessity of two directions. First, GRB Hubble diagrams should be based upon fundamental physical quantities such as energy, rather than empirically derived and physically ill-understood distance indicators (such as those based upon prompt burst time-profiles and spectra). Second, a more homogeneous set should be constructed by culling subclasses from the larger sample. These subclasses, although now first recognizable by deviant energies, ultimately must be identifiable by properties other than those directly related to energy. We identify a new subclass of GRBs (" f-GRBs ") that appear both underluminous by factors of at least 10 and exhibit a rapid fading (f(sub nu is proportional to t(sup -2) at early times (t < or = 0.5 day). About 10%-20% of observed long-duration bursts appear to be f-GRBs.

  2. The measurement of gamma ray induced heating in a mixed neutron and gamma ray environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.K.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of measuring the gamma heating in a mixed DT neutron and gamma ray environment was explored. A new detector technique was developed to make this measurement. Gamma heating measurements were made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-Mev neutrons and (n, n{prime}) gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the lattice using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition mode. The neutron-induced signal was separated from the gamma-induced signal by exploiting the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different linear energy transfer coefficient, which are observable in a proportional counter. The operating limits of this measurement technique were explored by varying the counter position in the low-Z lattice, hence changing the irradiation spectrum observed. The experiment was modelled numerically to help interpret the measured results. The transport of neutrons and gamma rays in the assembly was modelled using the one- dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The cross-section set used for these calculations was derived from the ENDF/B-V library using the code MC{sup 2}-2 for the case of DT neutrons slowing down in a low-Z material. The calculated neutron and gamma spectra in the slab and the relevant mass-stopping powers were used to construct weighting factors which relate the energy deposition in the counter fill-gas to that in the counter wall and in the surrounding material. The gamma energy deposition at various positions in the lattice is estimated by applying these weighting factors to the measured gamma energy deposition in the counter at those locations.

  3. Modeling of Pulses in Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Celestin, Sebastien; Pasko, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are high-energy photon bursts originating from the Earth's atmosphere that are associated with lightning activities. After their discovery in 1994 by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994], this phenomenon has been further observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010] and the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010]. Photon spectra corresponding to the mechanism of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. On the other hand, Celestin and Pasko [JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] have shown theoretically that the large flux of thermal runaway electrons generated by streamers during the negative corona flash stage of stepping lightning leaders in intracloud lightning flashes could be responsible for TGFs. Recently, based on analysis of the temporal profiles of 278 TGF events observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, Foley et al. [JGR, 119, 5931, 2014] have suggested that 67% of TGF pulses detected are asymmetric and these asymmetric pulses are consistent with the production mechanism of TGFs by relativistic feedback discharges. In the present work, we employ a Monte Carlo model to study the temporal distribution of photons at low-orbit satellite altitudes during TGF events. Using the pulse fitting method described in [Foley et al., 2014], we further investigate the characteristics of TGF pulses. We mainly focus on the effects of Compton scattering on the symmetry properties and the rise and fall times of TGF pulses.

  4. The relativistic feedback discharge model of terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2012-02-01

    As thunderclouds charge, the large-scale fields may approach the relativistic feedback threshold, above which the production of relativistic runaway electron avalanches becomes self-sustaining through the generation of backward propagating runaway positrons and backscattered X-rays. Positive intracloud (IC) lightning may force the large-scale electric fields inside thunderclouds above the relativistic feedback threshold, causing the number of runaway electrons, and the resulting X-ray and gamma ray emission, to grow exponentially, producing very large fluxes of energetic radiation. As the flux of runaway electrons increases, ionization eventually causes the electric field to discharge, bringing the field below the relativistic feedback threshold again and reducing the flux of runaway electrons. These processes are investigated with a new model that includes the production, propagation, diffusion, and avalanche multiplication of runaway electrons; the production and propagation of X-rays and gamma rays; and the production, propagation, and annihilation of runaway positrons. In this model, referred to as the relativistic feedback discharge model, the large-scale electric fields are calculated self-consistently from the charge motion of the drifting low-energy electrons and ions, produced from the ionization of air by the runaway electrons, including two- and three-body attachment and recombination. Simulation results show that when relativistic feedback is considered, bright gamma ray flashes are a natural consequence of upward +IC lightning propagating in large-scale thundercloud fields. Furthermore, these flashes have the same time structures, including both single and multiple pulses, intensities, angular distributions, current moments, and energy spectra as terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and produce large current moments that should be observable in radio waves.

  5. Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sleaford, B.W.; Firestone, Richard B.; Summers, N.; Escher, J.; Hurst, A.; Krticka, M.; Basunia, S.; Molnar, G.; Belgya, T.; Revay, Z.; Choi, H.D.

    2010-05-01

    The neutron capture reaction is useful in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown assembly as it gives unambiguous information on its composition. This can be done passively or actively where an external neutron source is used to probe an unknown assembly. There are known capture gamma-ray data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes for various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes that was developed as part of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. EGAF has been used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the quasi continuum contribution to the gamma cascades is not experimentally resolved. The continuum contains up to 90percent of all the decay energy an is modeled here with the statistical nuclear structure code DICEBOX. This code also provides a consistency check of the level scheme nuclear structure evaluation. The calculated continuum is of sufficient accuracy to include in the ENDF libraries. This analysis also determines new total thermal capture cross sections and provides an improved RIPL database. For higher energy neutron capture there is less experimental data available making benchmarking of the modeling codes more difficult. We use CASINO, a version of DICEBOX that is modified for this purpose. This can be used to simulate the neutron capture at incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV to improve the gamma-ray spectrum in neutron data libraries used for transport modelling of unknown assemblies.

  6. Repeating sources of classical gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, V. C.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    From an analysis of the first catalog of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment (Fishman et al. 1993, 1994a) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), we find an excessive number of pairs of gamma-ray bursts which are clustered in both a space and time . The angular separation between the two bursts in each pair is less than their positional uncertainties, and the interval between their occurrence times is within several days. Optimizing the signal, we find that the probability of observing such a clustered excess froma Poisson ensemble is approximately 2 x 10(exp -5). We suggest that these bursts arise from repeating sources. A detailed study of the most prolific source, GBS 0855-00, is presented in a separate paper (Wang & Lingenfelter 1993a, b). Unlike most of the 'soft' gamma-ray repeaters, these repeating bursts have relatively hard spectra, complex light curves, and widely varying durations, that are indistinguishable from classical gamma-ray bursts. Although the significance of the clustered excess was optimized a posteriori, because it depends on temporal and spatial bin sized that could not be defined a priori, we can use the optimizations from the first catalog to test subsequent BATSE data sets. Unfortunately, the failure of the on-board tape recorders during the second catalog period seriously reduced the number of accurately positioned bursts (Fishman et al. 1994b), so that we can neither confirm, nor refute, the predicted repitition in that sample, and we must await the results of the third catalog.

  7. Gamma ray astrophysics to the year 2000. Report of the NASA Gamma Ray Program Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Important developments in gamma-ray astrophysics up to energies of 100 GeV during the last decade are reviewed. Also, the report seeks to define the major current scientific goals of the field and proposes a vigorous program to pursue them, extending to the year 2000. The goals of gamma-ray astronomy include the study of gamma rays which provide the most direct means of studying many important problems in high energy astrophysics including explosive nucleosynthesis, accelerated particle interactions and sources, and high-energy processes around compact objects. The current research program in gamma-ray astronomy in the U.S. including the space program, balloon program and foreign programs in gamma-ray astronomy is described. The high priority recommendations for future study include an Explorer-class high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy mission and a Get Away Special cannister (GAS-can) or Scout class multiwavelength experiment for the study of gamma-ray bursts. Continuing programs include an extended Gamma Ray Observatory mission, continuation of the vigorous program of balloon observations of the nearby Supernova 1987A, augmentation of the balloon program to provide for new instruments and rapid scientific results, and continuation of support for theoretical research. Long term recommendations include new space missions using advanced detectors to better study gamma-ray sources, the development of these detectors, continued study for the assembly of large detectors in space, collaboration with the gamma-ray astronomy missions initiated by other countries, and consideration of the Space Station attached payloads for gamma-ray experiments.

  8. Gamma-ray emission and electron acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe; Mctiernan, James M.; Marschhauser, Holger

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations have extended the spectra of the impulsive phase of flares to the GeV range. Such high-energy photons can be produced either by electron bremsstrahlung or by decay of pions produced by accelerated protons. In this paper we investigate the effects of processes which become important at high energies. We examine the effects of synchrotron losses during the transport of electrons as they travel from the acceleration region in the corona to the gamma-ray emission sites deep in the chromosphere and photosphere, and the effects of scattering and absorption of gamma rays on their way from the photosphere to space instruments. These results are compared with the spectra from so-called electron-dominated flares, observed by GRS on the Solar Maximum Mission, which show negligible or no detectable contribution from accelerated protons. The spectra of these flares show a distinct steepening at energies below 100 keV and a rapid falloff at energies above 50 MeV. Following our earlier results based on lower energy gamma-ray flare emission we have modeled these spectra. We show that neither the radiative transfer effects, which are expected to become important at higher energies, nor the transport effects (Coulomb collisions, synchrotron losses, or magnetic field convergence) can explain such sharp spectral deviations from a simple power law. These spectral deviations from a power law are therefore attributed to the acceleration process. In a stochastic acceleration model the low-energy steepening can be attributed to Coulomb collision and the rapid high-energy steepening can result from synchrotron losses during the acceleration process.

  9. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  10. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  11. Method of incident low-energy gamma-ray direction reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Zverev, V. G.; Galper, A. M.; Arkhangelskaya, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Dalkarov, O. D.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space-based telescope has as its main goals to measure cosmic γ-ray fluxes and the electron-positron cosmic-ray component produced, theoretically, in dark-matter-particles decay or annihilation processes, to search for discrete γ-ray sources and study them in detail, to examine the energy spectra of diffuse γ-rays — both galactic and extragalactic — and to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and γ-rays from the active Sun. Scientific goals of GAMMA-400 telescope require fine angular resolution. The telescope is of a pair-production type. In the converter-tracker, the incident gamma-ray photon converts into electron-positron pair in the tungsten layer and then the tracks are detected by silicon- strip position-sensitive detectors. Multiple scattering processes become a significant obstacle in the incident-gamma direction reconstruction for energies below several gigaelectronvolts. The method of utilising this process to improve the resolution is proposed in the presented work.

  12. On the suitability of ISO 16717-1 reference spectra for rating airborne sound insulation.

    PubMed

    Mašović, Draško B; Pavlović, Dragana S Šumarac; Mijić, Miomir M

    2013-11-01

    A standard proposal for rating airborne sound insulation in buildings [ISO 16717-1 (2012)] defines the reference noise spectra. Since their shapes influence the calculated values of single-number descriptors, reference spectra should approximate well typical noise spectra in buildings. There is, however, very little data in the existing literature on a typical noise spectrum in dwellings. A spectral analysis of common noise sources in dwellings is presented in this paper, as a result of an extensive monitoring of various noisy household activities. Apart from music with strong bass content, the proposed "living" reference spectrum overestimates noise levels at low frequencies. PMID:24181985

  13. The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope for precision gamma-ray emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gascon, D.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Martinez, M.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Ward, J. E.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The GAMMA-400 energy range is expected to be from ∼20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 10 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 1015 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For 100-GeV gamma rays, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution is ∼0.01° and energy resolution is ∼1% the proton rejection factor is ∼5x105. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.

  14. Gamma-Ray Peak Integration: Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Richard M. Lindstrom

    2000-11-12

    The accuracy of singlet gamma-ray peak areas obtained by a peak analysis program is immaterial. If the same algorithm is used for sample measurement as for calibration and if the peak shapes are similar, then biases in the integration method cancel. Reproducibility is the only important issue. Even the uncertainty of the areas computed by the program is trivial because the true standard uncertainty can be experimentally assessed by repeated measurements of the same source. Reproducible peak integration was important in a recent standard reference material certification task. The primary tool used for spectrum analysis was SUM, a National Institute of Standards and Technology interactive program to sum peaks and subtract a linear background, using the same channels to integrate all 20 spectra. For comparison, this work examines other peak integration programs. Unlike some published comparisons of peak performance in which synthetic spectra were used, this experiment used spectra collected for a real (though exacting) analytical project, analyzed by conventional software used in routine ways. Because both components of the 559- to 564-keV doublet are from {sup 76}As, they were integrated together with SUM. The other programs, however, deconvoluted the peaks. A sensitive test of the fitting algorithm is the ratio of reported peak areas. In almost all the cases, this ratio was much more variable than expected from the reported uncertainties reported by the program. Other comparisons to be reported indicate that peak integration is still an imperfect tool in the analysis of gamma-ray spectra.

  15. Blazar Gamma-Rays, Shock Acceleration, and the Extragalactic Background Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Baring, Matthew G.; Summerlin, Errol J.

    2007-01-01

    The observed spectra of blazars, their intrinsic emission, and the underlying populations of radiating particles are intimately related. The use of these sources as probes of the extragalactic infrared background, a prospect propelled by recent advances in TeV-band telescopes, soon to be augmented by observations by NASA's upcoming Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), has been a topic of great recent interest. Here, it is demonstrated that if particles in blazar jets are accelerated at relativistic shocks, then GAMMA-ray spectra with indices less than 1.5 can be produced. This, in turn, loosens the upper limits on the near infrared extragalactic background radiation previously proposed. We also show evidence hinting that TeV blazars with flatter spectra have higher intrinsic TeV GAMMA-ray luminosities and we indicate that there may be a correlation of flatness and luminosity with redshift.

  16. Inverse compton scattering gamma ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, S.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Ruelas, M.; Jovanovic, I.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.

    2009-09-01

    Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) (e.g. U-235, Pu-239) can be detected by active interrogation with gamma rays (>6 MeV) through photofission. For long-range detection (˜1 km), an intense beam of gamma rays (˜10 14 per second) is required in order to produce measurable number of neutrons. The production of such fluxes of gamma rays, and in the pulse formats useful for detection, presents many technical challenges, and requires novel approaches to the accelerator and laser technology. RadiaBeam is currently designing a gamma ray source based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) from a high-energy electron beam. To achieve this, improvements in photoinjector, linac, final focus, and laser system are planned. These enhanced sub-systems build on parallel work being performed at RadiaBeam, UCLA, and elsewhere. A high-repetition rate photoinjector, a high-gradient S-band linac, and a laser pulse recirculator will be used. The proposed system will be a transportable source of high-flux, high-energy quasi-monochromatic gamma rays for active interrogation of special nuclear materials.

  17. Gamma-ray burster recurrence timescales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, B. E.; Cline, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Three optical transients have been found which are associated with gamma-ray bursters (GRBs). The deduced recurrence timescale for these optical transients (tau sub opt) will depend on the minimum brightness for which a flash would be detected. A detailed analysis using all available data of tau sub opt as a function of E(gamma)/E(opt) is given. For flashes similar to those found in the Harvard archives, the best estimate of tau sub opt is 0.74 years, with a 99% confidence interval from 0.23 years to 4.7 years. It is currently unclear whether the optical transients from GRBs also give rise to gamma-ray events. One way to test this association is to measure the recurrence timescale of gamma-ray events tau sub gamma. A total of 210 gamma-ray error boxes were examined and it was found that the number of observed overlaps is not significantly different from the number expected from chance coincidence. This observation can be used to place limits on tau sub gamma for an assumed luminosity function. It was found that tau sub gamma is approx. 10 yr if bursts are monoenergetic. However, if GRBs have a power law luminosity function with a wide dynamic range, then the limit is tau sub gamma 0.5 yr. Hence, the gamma-ray data do not require tau sub gamma and tau sub opt to be different.

  18. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ < z < $6, using deep survey galaxy observations from Spitzer, Hubble and GALEX and have consequently predicted spectral absorption features for extragalactic gamma-ray sources. This procedure can also be reversed. Determining the cutoff energies of gamma-ray sources with known redshifts using the recently launched Fermi gamma-ray space telescope may enable a more precise determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  19. LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirotani, Kouichi

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the electrodynamic structure of a pulsar outer-magnetospheric particle accelerator and the resulting gamma-ray emission. By considering the condition for the accelerator to be self-sustained, we derive how the trans-magnetic-field thickness of the accelerator evolves with the pulsar age. It is found that the thickness is small but increases steadily if the neutron-star envelope is contaminated by sufficient light elements. For such a light element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity of the accelerator is kept approximately constant as a function of age in the initial 10,000 yr, forming the lower bound of the observed distribution of the gamma-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars. If the envelope consists of only heavy elements, on the other hand, the thickness is greater, but it increases less rapidly than a light element envelope. For such a heavy element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity decreases relatively rapidly, forming the upper bound of the observed distribution. The gamma-ray luminosity of a general pulsar resides between these two extreme cases, reflecting the envelope composition and the magnetic inclination angle with respect to the rotation axis. The cutoff energy of the primary curvature emission is regulated below several GeV even for young pulsars because the gap thickness, and hence the acceleration electric field, is suppressed by the polarization of the produced pairs.

  20. Detectability of early low-energy gamma rays from nearby novae by BATSE/GRO. [Burst and Transient Source Experiment/Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.; Wilson, R. B.; Meegan, C. A.; Brock, M. N.; Horack, J. M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Harmon, B. A.; Leising, M.

    1991-01-01

    The role of BATSE/GRO in detecting gamma ray spectra from nearby novae is briefly addressed. Important new information in the early hydrodynamics of novae as well as the abundances of several radioactive isotopes will be obtained using these instruments.

  1. [Study on influence of gamma-ray treatment on spectral characteristic of rapeseed].

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Wang, Zun-Yi; He, Yong

    2008-11-01

    After being treated by gamma-ray, the spectral characteristic of rapeseed would be changed. Based on the principle, a rapid and nondestructive method by using visible and near infrared spectroscopy was proposed to discriminate rapeseeds (Brassica nupus) treated by different dosages of gamma-ray. Partial least square (PLS) method and BP neural network (BPNN) were applied to establish the discrimination model, and the influences of different pretreatment methods of original spectra data, data transformation methods of PIS principal components and the.selection of node number of hidden layers of BP neural network model on prediction precision were compared and discussed. In the experiment, 184 samples were treated by gamma-ray with 5 different dosages (50, 100, 150, 200 Gy, and the samples without gamma-ray treatment). Then spectra tests were performed on the 184 samples using a spectrophotometer (325-1 075 nm). One hundred thiry five samples were selected randomly for model calibration and the left 49 samples were used for prediction. As a result, the optimal model was established and the parameters of the model were shown as follows. The original spectra data were pretreated by smoothing media filter, multiplicative scatter correction and Savitzky-Golay derivatives, then 6 PLS principal components were selected by using partial least square method. After being transformed by using natural logarithm transformation method, the 6 PLS principal components were used as the input layer factors to establish the BP neural network model and the node number of hidden layers was selected as 4 or 9. The prediction precision of the optimal model to distinguish the untreated samples from gamma-ray treated samples was 100%. The precision of predicting the dosages of gamma-ray treatment of all samples achieved 85.71%. It can be concluded that the proposed method for estimating the influence of different gamma-ray dosages on the spectral characteristic of treated rapeseeds was

  2. A search for optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hye-Sook

    1995-03-09

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBS) are mysterious flashes of gamma rays lasting several tens to hundreds of seconds that occur approximately once per day. NASA launched the orbiting Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to study GRBs and other gamma ray phenomena. CGRO carries the Burst and Transient Experiment (BATSE) specifically to study GRBS. Although BATSE has collected data on over 600 GRBS, and confirmed that GRBs are localized, high intensity point sources of MeV gamma rays distributed isotropically in the sky, the nature and origin of GRBs remains a fundamental problem in astrophysics. BATSE`s 8 gamma ray sensors located on the comers of the box shaped CGRO can detect the onset of GRBs and record their intensity and energy spectra as a function of time. The position of the burst on the sky can be determined to < {plus_minus}10{degrees} from the BATSE data stream. This position resolution is not sufficient to point a large, optical telescope at the exact position of a GRB which would determine its origin by associating it with a star. Because of their brief duration it is not known if GRBs are accompanied by visible radiation. Their seemingly large energy output suggests thatthis should be. Simply scaling the ratio of visible to gamma ray intensities of the Crab Nebula to the GRB output suggests that GRBs ought to be accompanied by visible flashes of magnitude 10 or so. A few photographs of areas containing a burst location that were coincidentally taken during the burst yield lower limits on visible output of magnitude 4. The detection of visible light during the GRB would provide information on burst physics, provide improved pointing coordinates for precise examination of the field by large telescope and provide the justification for larger dedicated optical counterpart instruments. The purpose of this experiment is to detect or set lower limits on optical counterpart radiation simultaneously accompanying the gamma rays from

  3. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  4. BATSE spectroscopy catalog of bright gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Fantasia, Stephan F.; Palmer, David; Cline, Thomas L.; Matteson, James L.; Band, David L.; Ford, Lyle A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegar, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents comprehensive results on the spectra of 30 bright gamma ray bursts (GRBs) as observed by the Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs) of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The data selection was strict in including only spectra that are of high reliability for continuum shape studies. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog presents fluences, model fits (for five spectral models for three energy ranges), and photon spectra in a standard manner for each burst. Complete information is provided to describe the data selection and analysis procedures. The catalog results are also presented in electronic format (from the Compton Observatory Science Support Center) and CD-ROM format (AAS CD-ROM series, Vol. 2). These electronic formats also present the count spectra and detector response matrices so as to allow for independent study and fitting by researchers outside the BATSE Team. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog complements the catalog from BATSE Large Area Detector (LAD) data by Fishman et al. (1994).

  5. MIRAX sensitivity for Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacahui, J. R.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro, M. A.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the detection capability of the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de RAios-X) experiment for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). MIRAX is an X-ray astronomy mission designed to perform a wide band hard X-ray (10-200 keV) survey of the sky, especially in the Galactic plane. With a total detection area of 169 cm2, large field of view (FoV, 20 ° × 20 °), angular resolution of 1°45‧ and good spectral and time resolution (∼8% at 60 keV, 10 μs), MIRAX will be optimized for the detection and study of transient sources, such as accreting neutron stars (NS), black holes (BH), Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and both short and long GRBs. This is especially important because MIRAX is expected to operate in an epoch when probably no other hard X-ray wide-field imager will be active. We have performed detailed simulations of MIRAX GRB observations using the GEANT4 package, including the background spectrum and images of GRB sources in order to provide accurate predictions of the sensitivity for the expected GRB rate to be observed. MIRAX will be capable of detecting ∼44 GRBs per year up to redshifts of ∼4.5. The MIRAX mission will be able to contribute significantly to GRB science by detecting a large number of GRBs per year with wide band spectral response. The observations will contribute mainly to the part of GRB spectra where a thermal emission is predicted by the Fireball model. We also discuss the possibility of detecting GRB afterglows in the X-ray band with MIRAX.

  6. A Strange Supernova with a Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-10-01

    ESO PR Photo 39b/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 987 pix - 432k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 3703 pix - 2.5Mb] PR Photo 39a/98 (left) shows a colour composite of three images obtained with the EMMI multi-mode instrument at the ESO 3.58-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at La Silla on May 4, 1998. The short exposures were obtained through V (green), R (red) and I (near-infrared) filtres. SN 1998bw is the very bright, bluish star at the center (indicated with an arrow), located on an arm of spiral galaxy ESO 184-G82 . There are several other galaxies in the field. Compare with Photo 39b/98 (right) that was obtained before the explosion (ESO 1-m Schmidt Telescope; 15 May 1985; 120-min exposure in red light). In both photos, the field of view measures 3.6 x 3.6 arcmin; North is up and East is left. Note that while the brighter objects are more prominent on the long-exposure Schmidt photo (39b/98), considerably more details can be seen on that obtained by the NTT (39a/98). The ESO astronomers at La Silla decided to continue observations of the new star-like object and set up a comprehensive programme with several telescopes at that observatory. During the subsequent weeks and months, they obtained images through various filtres to determine the brightness in different colours, as well as detailed spectra. These observations soon showed the object to be a supernova . This is a heavy star that explodes during a late and fatal evolutionary stage. The new supernova now received the official designation SN 1998bw . From a careful study based on these observations, it has been concluded that SN 1998bw underwent an exceptionally powerful explosion, more violent than most other supernovae observed so far. It was also unusual in the sense that very strong radio emission was observed within a few days after the explosion - normally this only happens after several weeks. In fact, at radio wavelengths, SN 1998bw was the brightest supernova ever observed. The origin of the Gamma-Ray Burst SN

  7. Solar gamma-ray physics comes of age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, Gerald H.; Murphy, Ronald J.

    2001-10-01

    The launch of NASA's HESSI satellite will provide solar scientists with >= 2arcsec imaging/>= 2 keV spectroscopy of solar flares from ~10 keV to 10 MeV for the first time. We summarize recent developments in our understanding of solar flares based primarily on gamma-ray line measurements made over the past twenty years with instruments having moderate spectral resolution. These measurements have provided information on solar ambient abundance, density and temperature; accelerated particle composition, spectra, and transport; and flare energetics. .

  8. Interaction of ultraviolet and X-ray radiation with gamma rays produced by a jet in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zbyszewska, Magda

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory give evidence for the existence of a type of blazar with strong gamma-ray emission. Data obtained by EGRET for the quasar 3C 279 show a spectrum between 100 MeV and 10 GeV. Photons of such energies should interact with the X-rays and produce positron/electron pairs. If the optical depth against pair production for the gamma rays is large (tau(gamma gamma) greater than 1), the gamma-ray spectrum should be affected. The importance of this process has been pointed out by, e.g., Maraschi, Ghisellini, & Celotti (1992). Several works (e.g., Dermer 1993; Zbyszewska 1993; Sikora, Begelman, & Rees 1993) concerning gamma-ray radiation from quasar 3C 279 have proposed a model in which the gamma rays are produced via interaction between a moving cloud of relativistic electrons and external soft photons. The presence of gamma rays in active galactic nuclei spectra gives constraints on the localization and the luminosity of the medium which produces ultraviolet/X-ray photons. We investigate what conditions should be fulfilled in the above model to avoid the absorption of the gamma rays due to pair production.

  9. Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

  10. Gamma-Ray Imaging for Explosives Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deNolfo, G. A.; Hunter, S. D.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a gamma-ray imaging camera (GIC) for active interrogation of explosives being developed by NASA/GSFC and NSWCICarderock. The GIC is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approx.0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of gamma rays, E, > 6 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the electron-positron pair resulting from interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The optimization of the 3-DTI technology for this specific application and the performance of the GIC from laboratory tests is presented.

  11. Gamma ray lines from buried supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Meyer, P.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the possibility that supernovae (SN), located in dense interstellar clouds, might become the sources of gamma ray lines. The SN progenitor, in such a case, has to be an O or B star so that its evolutionary lifetime is short, and an explosion inside the cloud is still possible. It is shown that, in principle, a measurement of the abundances in the ejecta is possible. Attention is given to the characteristics of a model, the expected luminosity of gamma-ray lines, and the study of specific numerical examples for testing the feasibility of the considered mechanism. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that gamma-ray line production by collisional excitation in confined supernovae remnants may be quite important.

  12. Solar gamma rays and neutron observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Suri, A. N.

    1972-01-01

    The present status of knowledge concerning the impulsive and the continuous emission of solar gamma rays and neutrons is reviewed in the light of the recent solar activity in early August 1972. The gamma ray spectrometer on OSO-7 has observed the sun continuously for most of the activity period except for occultation by the earth. In association with the 2B flare on 4 August 1972 and the 3B flare on 7 August 1972, the monitor provides evidence for solar gamma ray line emission in the energy range from 300 keV to 10 MeV. A summary of all the results available from preliminary analysis of the data will be given. Significant improvements in future experiments can be made with more sensitive instruments and more extensive time coverage of the sun.

  13. Gamma rays from pulsar wind shock acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1990-01-01

    A shock forming in the wind of relativistic electron-positron pairs from a pulsar, as a result of confinement by surrounding material, could convert part of the pulsar spin-down luminosity to high energy particles through first order Fermi acceleration. High energy protons could be produced by this mechanism both in supernova remnants and in binary systems containing pulsars. The pion-decay gamma-rays resulting from interaction of accelerated protons with surrounding target material in such sources might be observable above 70 MeV with EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) and above 100 GeV with ground-based detectors. Acceleration of protons and expected gamma-ray fluxes from SN1987A, Cyg X-3 type sources and binary pulsars are discussed.

  14. Gamma Rays at Very High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, Felix

    This chapter presents the elaborated lecture notes on Gamma Rays at Very High Energies given by Felix Aharonian at the 40th Saas-Fee Advanced Course on "Astrophysics at Very High Energies". Any coherent description and interpretation of phenomena related to gammarays requires deep knowledge of many disciplines of physics like nuclear and particle physics, quantum and classical electrodynamics, special and general relativity, plasma physics, magnetohydrodynamics, etc. After giving an introduction to gamma-ray astronomy the author discusses the astrophysical potential of ground-based detectors, radiation mechanisms, supernova remnants and origin of the galactic cosmic rays, TeV emission of young supernova remnants, gamma-emission from the Galactic center, pulsars, pulsar winds, pulsar wind nebulae, and gamma-ray loud binaries.

  15. Microsecond flares in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cohen, Justin; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Cline, Thomas L.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Matteson, James L.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that gamma-ray burst light curves may consist of many superposed flares with a duration shorter than 30/microsec. If true, the implications for the interpretation of burst data are enormous. With the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, four predictions of Mitrofanov's (1989) suggestion can be tested. Our results which contradict this suggestion are (1) the photon arrival times are not correlated between independent detectors, (2) the spectral hardness and intensity does not depend on the detector area, (3) the bursts seen by detectors which measure photon positions do not see microsecond flares, and (4) burst positions deduced from detectors with different projected areas are close to the positions deduced from time-of-flight differences between separated spacecraft. We conclude, therefore, that gamma-ray bursts are not composed of microsecond flares.

  16. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Nishitani, Takeo; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-12

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  17. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Nishitani, Takeo; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-01

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  18. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  19. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  20. Radioactivities and gamma-rays from supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the implications of several calculations relevant to the estimation of gamma-ray signals from various explosive astronomical phenomena. After discussing efforts to constrain the amounts of Ni-57 and Ti-44 produced in SN 1987A, attention is given to the production of Al-27 in massive stars and SNs. A 'delayed detonation' model of type Ia SNs is proposed, and the gamma-ray signal which may be expected when a bare white dwarf collapses directly into a neutron star is discussed.

  1. Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, Rebecca; Mclaughlin, Gail C; Hix, William Raphael

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts, while rare, may be important contributors to galactic nucleosynthesis. Here we consider the types of nucleosynthesis that can occur as material is ejected from a gamma-ray burst accretion disk. We calculate the composition of material within the disk as it dissociates into protons and neutrons and then use a parameterized outflow model to follow nuclear recombination in the wind. From the resulting nucleosynthesis we delineate the disk and outflow conditions in which iron peak, r-process, or light p-process nuclei may form. In all cases the neutrinos have an important impact on the final abundance distributions.

  2. Noiseless coding for the Gamma Ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R.; Lee, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The payload of several future unmanned space missions will include a sophisticated gamma ray spectrometer. Severely constrained data rates during certain portions of these missions could limit the possible science return from this instrument. This report investigates the application of universal noiseless coding techniques to represent gamma ray spectrometer data more efficiently without any loss in data integrity. Performance results demonstrate compression factors from 2.5:1 to 20:1 in comparison to a standard representation. Feasibility was also demonstrated by implementing a microprocessor breadboard coder/decoder using an Intel 8086 processor.

  3. Gamma-ray diagnostics of Type Ia supernovae. Predictions of observables from three-dimensional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summa, A.; Ulyanov, A.; Kromer, M.; Boyer, S.; Röpke, F. K.; Sim, S. A.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Fink, M.; Mannheim, K.; Pakmor, R.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Diehl, R.; Maeda, K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Although the question of progenitor systems and detailed explosion mechanisms still remains a matter of discussion, it is commonly believed that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are production sites of large amounts of radioactive nuclei. Even though the gamma-ray emission due to radioactive decays is responsible for powering the light curves of SNe Ia, gamma rays themselves are of particular interest as a diagnostic tool because they directly lead to deeper insight into the nucleosynthesis and the kinematics of these explosion events. Aims: We study the evolution of gamma-ray line and continuum emission of SNe Ia with the objective of analyzing the relevance of observations in this energy range. We seek to investigate the chances for the success of future MeV missions regarding their capabilities for constraining the intrinsic properties and the physical processes of SNe Ia. Methods: Focusing on two of the most broadly discussed SN Ia progenitor scenarios - a delayed detonation in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) and a violent merger of two WDs - we used three-dimensional explosion models and performed radiative transfer simulations to obtain synthetic gamma-ray spectra. Both chosen models produce the same mass of 56Ni and have similar optical properties that are in reasonable agreement with the recently observed supernova SN 2011fe. We examine the gamma-ray spectra with respect to their distinct features and draw connections to certain characteristics of the explosion models. Applying diagnostics, such as line and hardness ratios, the detection prospects for future gamma-ray missions with higher sensitivities in the MeV energy range are discussed. Results: In contrast to the optical regime, the gamma-ray emission of our two chosen models proves to be quite different. The almost direct connection of the emission of gamma rays to fundamental physical processes occurring in SNe Ia permits additional constraints concerning several explosion model properties

  4. Cadium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    William Quam

    2001-09-01

    This report describes CZT crystals and their use in large arrays for generation of gamma ray spectra. Laboratory spectra will be shown together with spectra accumulated by various battery powered portable instruments (see Appendix A). One of these portable instruments was specifically constructed to minimize power consumption and yet provide reasonable isotope identification capability. Detailed data will be presented covering gamma energy resolution, gamma peak shapes, system background, and detector efficiency. Nearly all data were taken with very small crystals of CZT; cubes 5 mm on a side. A few spectra will be presented from cylindrical crystals of about the same size (see Appendix A). The small crystal size leads to low counting rates and extended counting times for reliable isotope identification. We have addressed this problem by using arrays of CZT crystals, initially two crystals and, at present, arrays of eight crystals. Data will be shown relating spectral parameters for these two arrays. System MDA is one way of combining resolution, efficiency, and background that will enable direct comparison of various detector types for individual isotope identification. We have calculated the MDA for an early dual crystal array and the current eight crystal array. Data derived from each array will be presented. In addition, it is possible to extrapolate the MDA methodology to much larger arrays. A 32-crystal array is under construction and extrapolations to 256 and 1024 crystals are considered possible. Estimated MDA values for these larger arrays are also presented. Several 8-crystal arrays have been constructed and versions have been incorporated into portable instruments. Descriptions of these small instruments are given covering physical size, weight, and general configuration. These instruments have been tested for shock and temperature effects and data will be presented on the results of these tests. The MDA concept will also allow extrapolation to large

  5. Long-Lag, Wide-pulse Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.; Kazanas, D.; Scargle, . D.; Hakkila, J.; Giblin, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the best available probe of the early phase of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet attributes is the prompt gamma-ray emission, in which several intrinsic and extrinsic variables determine GRB pulse evolution. Bright, usually complex bursts have many narrow pulses that are difficult to model due to overlap. However, the relatively simple, long spectral lag, wide-pulse bursts may have simpler physics and are easier to model. In this work we analyze the temporal and spectral behavior of wide pulses in 24 long-lag bursts, using a pulse model with two shape parameters - width and asymmetry - and the Band spectral model with three shape parameters. We find that pulses in long-lag bursts are distinguished both temporally and spectrally from those in bright bursts: the pulses in long spectral lag bursts are few in number, and approximately 100 times wider (10s of seconds), have systematically lower peaks in vF(v), harder low-energy spectra and softer high-energy spectra. We find that these five pulse descriptors are essentially uncorrelated for our long-lag sample, suggesting that at least approximately 5 parameters are needed to model burst temporal and spectral behavior. However, pulse width is strongly correlated with spectral lag; hence these two parameters may be viewed as mutual surrogates. We infer that accurate formulations for estimating GRB luminosity and total energy will depend on several gamma-ray attributes, at least for long-lag bursts. The prevalence of long-lag bursts near the BATSE trigger threshold, their predominantly low vF(v) spectral peaks, and relatively steep upper power-law spectral indices indicate that Swift will detect many such bursts.

  6. Found: A Galaxy's Missing Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Recent reanalysis of data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has resulted in the first detection of high-energy gamma rays emitted from a nearby galaxy. This discovery reveals more about how supernovae interact with their environments.Colliding Supernova RemnantAfter a stellar explosion, the supernovas ejecta expand, eventually encountering the ambient interstellar medium. According to models, this generates a strong shock, and a fraction of the kinetic energy of the ejecta is transferred into cosmic rays high-energy radiation composed primarily of protons and atomic nuclei. Much is still unknown about this process, however. One open question is: what fraction of the supernovas explosion power goes into accelerating these cosmic rays?In theory, one way to answer this is by looking for gamma rays. In a starburst galaxy, the collision of the supernova-accelerated cosmic rays with the dense interstellar medium is predicted to produce high-energy gamma rays. That radiation should then escape the galaxy and be visible to us.Pass 8 to the RescueObservational tests of this model, however, have beenstumped by Arp 220. This nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy is the product of a galaxy merger ~700 million years ago that fueled a frenzy of starbirth. Due to its dusty interior and extreme levels of star formation, Arp 220 has long been predicted to emit the gamma rays produced by supernova-accelerated cosmic rays. But though weve looked, gamma-ray emission has never been detected from this galaxy until now.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Fang-Kun Peng (Nanjing University) reprocessed 7.5 years of Fermi observations using the new Pass 8 analysis software. The resulting increase in resolution revealed the first detection of GeV emission from Arp 220!Acceleration EfficiencyGamma-ray luminosity vs. total infrared luminosity for LAT-detected star-forming galaxies and Seyferts. Arp 220s luminosities are consistent with the scaling relation. [Peng et al. 2016

  7. Cosmic Connections:. from Cosmic Rays to Gamma Rays, Cosmic Backgrounds and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusenko, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Combined data from gamma-ray telescopes and cosmic-ray detectors have produced some new surprising insights regarding intergalactic and galactic magnetic fields, as well as extragalactic background light. We review some recent advances, including a theory explaining the hard spectra of distant blazars and the measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields based on the spectra of distant sources. Furthermore, we discuss the possible contribution of transient galactic sources, such as past gamma-ray bursts and hypernova explosions in the Milky Way, to the observed ux of ultrahigh-energy cosmicrays nuclei. The need for a holistic treatment of gamma rays, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields serves as a unifying theme for these seemingly unrelated phenomena.

  8. COMPTEL gamma-ray observations of the quasars CTA 102 and 3C 454.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, J. J.; Bloemen, H.; Bennett, K.; Collmar, W.; Hermsen, W.; Mcconnell, M.; Schoenfelder, V.; Stacy, J. G.; Steinle, H.; Strong, A.

    1994-01-01

    The blazar-type active galactic nuclei CTA 102 (QSO 2230+114) and 3C 454.3 (QSO 2251+158), located about 7 deg apart, were observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory at four epochs in 1992. Both were detected by Energy Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The combined Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) observations in the 10-30 MeV energy range clearly indicate a source of MeV emission, which is likely due to a contribution from both quasars. These observations strongly suggest that the power-law spectra measured by EGRET above approximately 50 MeV flatten at lower MeV energies. A comparison with observations at other wavelengths shows that the power spectra of CTA 102 and 3C 454.3 peak at MeV energies. This behavior appears to be a common feature of gamma-ray active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  9. Relativistic feedback models of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and gamma-ray glows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic feedback discharges, also known as dark lightning, are capable of explaining many of the observed properties of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) and gamma-ray glows, both created within thunderstorms. During relativistic feedback discharges, the generation of energetic electrons is self-sustained via the production of backward propagating positrons and back-scattered x-rays, resulting in very larges fluxes of energetic radiation. In addition, ionization produces large electric currents that generate LF/VLF radio emissions and eventually discharge the electric field, terminating the gamma-ray production. In this presentation, new relativistic feedback model results will be presented and compared to recent observations.

  10. Gamma-ray lines and neutrons from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The energy spectrum of accelerated protons and nuclei at the site of a limb flare was derived by a technique, using observations of the time dependent flux of high energy neutrons at the earth. This energy spectrum is very similar to the energy spectra of 7 disk flares for which the accelerated particle spectra was previously derived using observations of 4 to 7 MeV to 2.223 MeV fluence ratios. The implied spectra for all of these flares are too steep to produce any significant amount of radiation from pi meson decay. It is suggested that the observed 10 MeV gamma rays from the flare are bremsstrahlung of relativistic electrons. Previously announced in STAR as N83-19695

  11. Gamma-ray lines and neutrons from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The energy spectrum of accelerated protons and nuclei at the site of a limb flare was derived by a technique, using observations of the time dependent flux of high energy neutrons at the Earth. This energy spectrum is very similar to the energy spectra of 7 disk flares for which the accelerated particle spectra was previously derived using observations of 4 to 7 MeV to 2.223 MeV fluence ratios. The implied spectra for all of these flares are too steep to produce any significant amount of radiation from pi meson decay. It is suggested that the observed 10 MeV gamma rays from the flare are bremsstrahlung of relativistic electrons.

  12. Estimation method of planetary fast neutron flux by a Ge gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, M.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Karouji, Y.; Nagaoka, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Reedy, R. C.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; d'Uston, C.; Kim, K. J.; Hasebe, N.

    2016-08-01

    An intensity map of lunar fast neutrons (LFNs) and their temporal variation has been estimated by fitting "sawtooth" peaks in the energy spectra of lunar gamma rays observed by the Kaguya (SELENE) Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) consisting of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a BGO scintillator. While an ordinary peak in the spectrum is produced by only gamma ray lines, the sawtooth peak is produced by gamma ray lines and recoil nuclei in the detector by Ge(n ,n‧ γ) reaction. We develop a model for the shape of the sawtooth peak and apply it to fit sawtooth peaks together with ordinary peaks in actual observed spectra on the Moon. The temporal variation of LFNs is synchronous with that of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), and the global distribution of fast neutrons on the lunar surface agrees well with the past observation reported by the Neutron Spectrometer aboard Lunar Prospector. Based on these results, a new method is established to estimate the flux of fast neutrons by fitting sawtooth peaks on the gamma ray spectrum observed by the HPGe detector.

  13. Gamma ray observations of the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Two general categories are discussed concerning the evolution of the solar system: the dualistic view, the planetesimal approach; and the monistic view, the nebular hypothesis. The major points of each view are given and the models that are developed from these views are described. Possible applications of gamma ray astronomical observations to the question of the dynamic evolution of the solar system are discussed.

  14. Gamma ray observations of the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Two general categories are discussed concerning the evolution of the solar system: the dualistic view, the planetesimal approach and the monistic view, the nebular hypothesis. The major points of each view are given and the models that are developed from these views are described. Possible applications of gamma ray astronomical observations to the question of the dynamic evolution of the solar system are discussed.

  15. Gamma-ray Astrophysics with AGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Francesco |; Tavani, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Argan, A.; Basset, M.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P.; Chen, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M.

    2007-07-12

    AGILE will explore the gamma-ray Universe with a very innovative instrument combining for the first time a gamma-ray imager and a hard X-ray imager. AGILE will be operational in spring 2007 and it will provide crucial data for the study of Active Galactic Nuclei, Gamma-Ray Bursts, unidentified gamma-ray sources. Galactic compact objects, supernova remnants, TeV sources, and fundamental physics by microsecond timing. The AGILE instrument is designed to simultaneously detect and image photons in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV and 15 - 45 keV energy bands with excellent imaging and timing capabilities, and a large field of view covering {approx} 1/5 of the entire sky at energies above 30 MeV. A CsI calorimeter is capable of GRB triggering in the energy band 0.3-50 MeV AGILE is now (March 2007) undergoing launcher integration and testing. The PLSV launch is planned in spring 2007. AGILE is then foreseen to be fully operational during the summer of 2007.

  16. Gamma-Ray Telescope and Uncertainty Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle is one of the important basic principles of quantum mechanics. In most of the books on quantum mechanics, this uncertainty principle is generally illustrated with the help of a gamma ray microscope, wherein neither the image formation criterion nor the lens properties are taken into account. Thus a better…

  17. Gamma ray irradiated silicon nanowires: An effective model to investigate defects at the interface of Si/SiOx

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Kui; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Liangbin; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Shao, Mingwang E-mail: xuegi@nju.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoliang E-mail: xuegi@nju.edu.cn Xue, Gi E-mail: xuegi@nju.edu.cn

    2014-01-20

    The effect of gamma ray irradiation on silicon nanowires was investigated. Here, an additional defect emerged in the gamma-ray-irradiated silicon nanowires and was confirmed with electron spin resonance spectra. {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that irradiation doses had influence on the Q{sup 4} unit structure. This phenomenon indicated that the unique core/shell structure of silicon nanowires might contribute to induce metastable defects under gamma ray irradiation, which served as a satisfactory model to investigate defects at the interface of Si/SiOx.

  18. Investigating the X-ray and Gamma-ray Properties of Type Ia Mixed Morphology Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, Aytap; Slane, Patrick; Auchettl, Katie

    2016-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations revealed a recombining plasma (RP) in some core-collapse mixed-morphology Galactic supernova remnants (MM SNRs). We searched for evidence of RPs in the Type Ia MM SNRs using their Suzaku spectra. We found that the plasma of these SNRs is still ionizing. We investigated the possible reasons for the non-detection of RP in Type Ia MM SNRs and explored their X-ray properties. We also analyzed their gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to investigate a possible connection to the gamma-ray properties of these SNRs.

  19. Improved Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleaford, Brad; Firestone, Richard; Summers, Neil; Escher, Jutta

    2012-10-01

    The neutron capture reaction is of fundamental use in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown object as it gives unambiguous information on which isotopes are absorbing the neutrons. There are known data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes which are critical to various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes. This database is used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the unresolved quasi continuum part of the gamma cascades are not experimentally available. This continuum can contain up to 90% of all the decay energy, in this work it is modeled with the statistical nuclear structure code Dicebox. We plan to continue the Dicebox approach through the resolved resonance region where spin and parity information is partially known. At higher energies to 20 MeV we are applying Hauser Feshbach models to predict the cross sections of gamma spectra to improve the neutron data libraries used for transport modeling of unknown objects.

  20. A gamma-ray verification system for special nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, R.G.; Prindle, A.L.; Friensehner, A.V.; Buckley, W.M.

    1994-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a gamma-ray screening system for use by the Materials Management Section of the Engineering Sciences Division at LLNL for verifying the presence or absence of special nuclear material (SNM) in a sample. This system facilitates the measurements required under the ``5610`` series of US Department of Energy orders. MMGAM is an intelligent, menu driven software application that runs on a personal computer and requires a precalibrated multi-channel analyzer and HPGe detector. It provides a very quick and easy-to-use means of determining the presence of SNM in a sample. After guiding the operator through a menu driven set-up procedure, the system provides an on-screen GO/NO-GO indication after determining the system calibration status. This system represents advances over earlier used systems in the areas of ease-of use, operator training requirements, and quality assurance. The system records the gamma radiation from a sample using a sequence of measurements involving a background measurement followed immediately by a measurement of the unknown sample. Both spectra are stored and available for analysis or output. In the current application, the presence of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 208}Tl isotopes are indicated by extracting, from the stored spectra, four energy ``windows`` preset around gamma-ray lines characteristic of the radioactive decay of these nuclides. The system is easily extendible to more complicated problems.

  1. Gamma-rays from Type Ia Supernova SN2014J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.; Isern, J.; Bikmaev, I.; Bravo, E.; Chugai, N.; Grebenev, S.; Jean, P.; Knödlseder, J.; Lebrun, F.; Kuulkers, E.

    2015-10-01

    The whole set of INTEGRAL observations of Type Ia supernova SN 2014J, covering the period 19-162 days after the explosion, has been analyzed. For spectral fitting the data are split into early and late periods covering days 19-35 and 50-162, respectively, optimized for 56Ni and 56Co lines. As expected for the early period, much of the gamma-ray signal is confined to energies below ˜200 keV, while for the late period it is strongest above 400 keV. In particular, in the late period, 56Co lines at 847 and 1248 keV are detected at 4.7σ and 4.3σ, respectively. The light curves in several representative energy bands are calculated for the entire period. The resulting spectra and light curves are compared with a subset of models. We confirm our previous finding that the gamma-ray data are broadly consistent with the expectations for canonical one-dimensional models, such as delayed detonation or deflagration models for a near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf. Late optical spectra (day 136 after the explosion) show rather symmetric Co and Fe line profiles, suggesting that, unless the viewing angle is special, the distribution of radioactive elements is symmetric in the ejecta.

  2. GAMMA RAYS FROM TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA SN 2014J

    SciTech Connect

    Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.; Grebenev, S.; Bikmaev, I.; Bravo, E.; Chugai, N.; Jean, P.; Knödlseder, J.; Lebrun, F.

    2015-10-10

    The whole set of INTEGRAL observations of Type Ia supernova SN 2014J, covering the period 19–162 days after the explosion, has been analyzed. For spectral fitting the data are split into early and late periods covering days 19–35 and 50–162, respectively, optimized for {sup 56}Ni and {sup 56}Co lines. As expected for the early period, much of the gamma-ray signal is confined to energies below ∼200 keV, while for the late period it is strongest above 400 keV. In particular, in the late period, {sup 56}Co lines at 847 and 1248 keV are detected at 4.7σ and 4.3σ, respectively. The light curves in several representative energy bands are calculated for the entire period. The resulting spectra and light curves are compared with a subset of models. We confirm our previous finding that the gamma-ray data are broadly consistent with the expectations for canonical one-dimensional models, such as delayed detonation or deflagration models for a near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf. Late optical spectra (day 136 after the explosion) show rather symmetric Co and Fe line profiles, suggesting that, unless the viewing angle is special, the distribution of radioactive elements is symmetric in the ejecta.

  3. Correlation Analysis of Prompt Emission from Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothapragada, Sriharsha

    Prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) exhibits very rapid, complicated temporal and spectral evolution. This diverse variability in the light-curves reflects the complicated nature of the underlying physics, in which inter-penetrating relativistic shells in the outflow are believed to generate strong magnetic fields that vary over very small scales. We use the theory of jitter radiation to model the emission from such regions and the resulting overall prompt gamma ray emission from a series of relativistic collisionless shocks. We present simulated GRB light-curves developed as a series of "pulses" corresponding to instantaneously illuminated "thin-shell" regions emitting via the jitter radiation mechanism. The effects of various geometries, viewing angles, and bulk Lorentz factor profiles of the radiating outflow jets on the spectral features and evolution of these light-curves are explored. Our results demonstrate how an anisotropic jitter radiation pattern, in conjunction with relativistic shock kinematics, can produce certain features observed in the GRB prompt emission spectra, such as the occurrence of hard, synchrotron violating spectra, the "tracking" of observed flux with spectral parameters, and spectral softening below peak energy within individual episodes of the light curve. We highlight predictions in the light of recent advances in the observational sphere of GRBs.

  4. Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

  5. High-energy particle production in the 1997 November 6 flare as viewed from gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Suga, K.; Nakayama, S.; Ogawa, H.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.

    2001-08-01

    Yohkoh observed hard Xand gamma-rays from a X9.4 flare on November 6, 1997. Strong gamma-rays were emitted in 11:52-11:56 UT (peak phase). After that, weak and extended gamma-ray production lasted for 600s (extended phase). The OSSE aboard CGRO detected neutrons associated with this flare between 12:08 and 12:28 UT. The neutron count-rate time profile exhibit a gradually decrease with time. We derive the proton spectra and the timing of particle acceleration to explain the observed neutron time profile. The proton spectra of E-3.5 in the peak phase and of E-3.0 in the extended phase give a good fit to the observed neutron time profile. We present detailed calculations of the neutron arrival time profiles and discuss high-energy particle production processes from the gamma-ray neutron observations.

  6. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Solar gamma ray astronomy on solar maximum mission. [experimental design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SMM gamma ray experiment and the important scientific capabilities of the instrument are discussed. The flare size detectable as a function of spectrum integration time was studied. A preliminary estimate indicates that a solar gamma ray line at 4.4 MeV one-fifth the intensity of that believed to have been emitted on 4 August 1972 can be detected in approximately 1000 sec with a confidence level of 99%.

  7. Gamma-ray astronomy--A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-rays provide us with powerful insight into the highest energy processes occurring in the cosmos. This review highlights some of the progress in our understanding of gamma-ray astronomy that has been enabled by new data from GRANAT and the Compton Gamma-Ray Observaatory, and suggests requirements for future progress. In particular, the unique role of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission and concurrent multiwavelength observations is highlighted.

  8. Gamma ray constraints on the Galactic supernova rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, Donald D.; Leising, M.; Mathews, G.; Woosley, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the expected gamma ray signatures of Galactic supernovae of all types to estimate the significance of the lack of a gamma ray signal due to supernovae occurring during the last millenium. Using recent estimates of the nuclear yields, we determine mean Galactic supernova rates consistent with the historic supernova record and the gamma ray limits. Another objective of these calculations of Galactic supernova histories is their application to surveys of diffuse Galactic gamma ray line emission.

  9. The origin and implications of gamma rays from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1975-01-01

    Solar flares studied in the gamma ray region provide essential information on accelerated nuclei that can be obtained in no other way. A multitude of physical processes, such as particle acceleration, nuclear reactions, positron and neutron physics, and kinematical line broadening, come into consideration at gamma ray energies. Gamma ray observations are complementary to hard X ray observations, since both provide information on accelerated particles. It appears that only in the gamma ray region do these particles produce distinct spectral lines.

  10. Simultaneous optical/gamma-ray observations of GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, J.; Wenzel, W.; Hudec, R.; Moskalenko, E. I.; Metlov, V.; Chernych, N. S.; Getman, V. S.; Ziener, Rainer; Birkle, K.; Bade, N.

    1994-01-01

    Details on the project to search for serendipitous time correlated optical photographic observations of Gamma Ray Bursters (GRB's) are presented. The ongoing photographic observations at nine observatories are used to look for plates which were exposed simultaneously with a gamma ray burst detected by the gamma ray instrument team (BATSE) and contain the burst position. The results for the first two years of the gamma ray instrument team operation are presented.

  11. Monte Carlo calibration of the SMM gamma ray spectrometer for high energy gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Reppin, C.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was primarily designed and calibrated for nuclear gamma ray line measurements, but also has a high energy mode which allows the detection of gamma rays at energies above 10 MeV and solar neutrons above 20 MeV. The GRS response has been extrapolated until now for high energy gamma rays from an early design study employing Monte Carlo calculations. The response to 50 to 600 MeV solar neutrons was estimated from a simple model which did not consider secondary charged particles escaping into the veto shields. In view of numerous detections by the GRS of solar flares emitting high energy gamma rays, including at least two emitting directly detectable neutrons, the calibration of the high energy mode in the flight model has been recalculated by the use of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer codes. New results presented show that the GRS response to gamma rays above 20 MeV and to neutrons above 100 MeV is significantly lower than the earlier estimates.

  12. HESPERIA studies on the nature of high-energy solar gamma-ray events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, Pietro; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Share, Gerry; Vilmer, Nicole; Malandraki, Olga; Miteva, Rositsa; Heber, Bernd; Hamadache, Clarisse; Kiener, Juergen; Tatischeff, Vincent; Vainio, Rami

    2016-04-01

    The FERMI/LAT gamma-ray experiment, thanks to its large effective are, observed about 25 solar events with gamma-ray emission above photon energies of 100 MeV. The emission is attributed to pion-decay photons. This implies that the acceleration of protons in the solar corona to energies above 300 MeV is a frequent phenomenon, probably more so than previously thought. In some cases the emission persists over several hours. In the frame of the HESPERIA project, funded by the Horizon 2020 programme of the European Union, we conduct an extensive study on the relationship between these gamma-ray emissions and electromagnetic signatures of accelerated electrons in the corona on the one hand, solar energetic particles (SEPs) detected in space on the other hand. This contribution is to present first results on the sample of 25 gamma-ray events, mainly addressing two subjects: (1) We compare the durations of the gamma-ray emission with the durations of hard X-ray and microwave signatures of electrons in the solar atmosphere, in the attempt to see if long-duration gamma-ray events are accompanied by signatures of long-duration electron acceleration. (2) We show that in each gamma-ray event electrons had rapid access to interplanetary space since the impulsive flare phase. This suggests that particles accelerated during the flare could escape to interplanetary space. We compare the hardness of the proton spectra detected in interplanetary space with the prediction using the properties of the solar microwave bursts. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324.

  13. Software developments for gamma-ray data with high multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Crowell, B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Software capabilities for angle sort of data from the new powerful gamma detector arrays like Gammasphere and EUROGAM which were developed in preceding years, were enhanced and extended to read new data formats. In addition, we can now sort the data for directional correlation ratios (DCO). This version of the software was exported to a university group. For the analysis of, e.g., the quasi-continuum of gamma-rays it is necessary to angle sort the high multiplicity data and perform a careful background subtraction in order to extract the continuum of gamma rays from the feeding and decay of superdeformed bands. We need to angle sort in order to untangle the parts of the spectra which are of E1 nature from those of quadrupole or of M1/E2 nature. We further developed software running on new fast SUN workstations. We now have two such workstations, each equipped with a stacker and a secondary 8-mm tape drive. We enhanced the software to apply an energy-dependent time gate. We can enhance the events that are in true prompt coincidence, and reject random and signals in the germanium detectors coming from neutrons hitting the detector in coincidence with the gamma-ray burst. By applying energy-dependent time gates, in form of a {open_quotes}reduced time{close_quotes}, we can perform this rejection without the loss of efficiency at low energy. Effort has gone into developing low-level tape reader routines for data from the new EUROGAM array with cluster detectors as well as from the new flexible data format from Gammasphere phase II. In addition, we developed software to read data tapes from the local DAPHNE and MSU data-acquisition systems on the new fast UNIX platforms.

  14. Zinc oxide nanowire gamma ray detector with high spatiotemporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Daniel C.; Nolen, J. Ryan; Cook, Andrew; Mu, Richard R.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional scintillation detectors are typically single crystals of heavy-metal oxides or halides doped with rare-earth ions that record the recombination of electron-hole pairs by photon emission in the visible to ultraviolet. However, the light yields are typically low enough to require photomultiplier detection with the attendant instrumental complications. Here we report initial studies of gamma ray detection by zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, grown by vapor-solid deposition. The nanowires grow along the c-axis in a wurtzite structure; they are typically 80 nm in diameter and have lengths of 1- 2 μm. The nanowires are single crystals of high quality, with a photoluminescence (PL) yield from band-edge exciton emission in the ultraviolet that is typically one hundred times larger than the PL yield from defect centers in the visible. Nanowire ensembles were irradiated by 662 keV gamma rays from a Cs-137 source for periods of up to ten hours; gamma rays in this energy range interact by Compton scattering, which in ZnO creates F+ centers that relax to form singly-charged positive oxygen vacancies. Following irradiation, we fit the PL spectra of the visible emission with a sum of Gaussians at the energies of the known defects. We find highly efficient PL from the irradiated area, with a figure of merit approaching 106 photons/s/MeV of deposited energy. Over a period of days, the singly charged O+ vacancies relax to the more stable doubly charged O++ vacancies. However, the overall defect PL returns to pre-irradiation values after about a week, as the vacancies diffuse to the surface of these very thin nanowires, indicating that a self-healing process restores the nanowires to their original state.

  15. The SWIFT Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. E.; Burrows, D. N.; Nousek, J. A.; Wells, A.; Chincarini, G.; Abbey, A. F.; Angelini, L.; Beardmore, A.; Brauninger, H. W.; Chang, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer is designed to make prompt multi-wavelength observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts and GRB afterglows. The X-ray Telescope enables Swift to determine GRB positions with a few arcseconds accuracy within 100 seconds of the burst onset. The XRT utilizes a mirror set built for JET-X and an XMM-Newton/ EPIC MOS CCD detector to provide a sensitive broad-band (0.2-10 keV) X-ray imager with an effective area of more than 120 sq cm at 1.5 keV, a field of view of 23.6 x 23.6 arcminutes, and an angular resolution of 18 arcseconds (HPD). The detection sensitivity is 2x10(exp 14) erg/sq cm/s in 10(exp 4) seconds. The instrument provides automated source detection and position reporting within 5 seconds of target acquisition. It can also measure the redshifts of GRBs with Iron line emission or other spectral features. The XRT operates in an auto-exposure mode, adjusting the CCD readout mode automatically to optimize the science return as the source intensity fades. The XRT measures spectra and lightcurves of the GRB afterglow beginning about a minute after the burst and follows each burst for days or weeks. We provide an overview of the X-ray Telescope scientific background from which the systems engineering requirements were derived, with specific emphasis on the design and qualification aspects from conception through to launch. We describe the impact on cleanliness and vacuum requirements for the instrument low energy response and to maintain the high sensitivity to the fading signal of the Gamma-ray Bursts.

  16. Analysis of the Konus catalog of gamma-ray bursts with the thermal synchrotron model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P.; Jernigan, T. E.; Rodrigues, R.

    1983-01-01

    Approximately 150 reported gamma-ray burst spectra of the Konus catalog are analyzed using the thermal synchrotron model. An overwhelming majority of these spectra can be satisfactorily fitted by theoretical thermal synchrotron spectra of mildly relativistic electrons in strong magnetic fields, making the strong-field neutron star picture at least self-consistent. Valuable additional information is also extracted from various spectral features contained in many of the events.

  17. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  18. Gamma-Ray Telescopes: 400 Years of Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The last half-century has seen dramatic developments in gamma-ray telescopes, from their initial conception and development through to their blossoming into full maturity as a potent research tool in astronomy. Gamma-ray telescopes are leading research in diverse areas such as gamma-ray bursts, blazars, Galactic transients, and the Galactic distribution of Al-26.

  19. Common origin of the high energy astronomical gamma rays, neutrinos and cosmic ray positrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2016-03-01

    We show that the observed fluxes, spectra and sky distributions of the high energy astronomical neutrinos, gamma rays and cosmic ray positrons satisfy the simple relations expected from their common production in hadronic collisions in/near source of high energy cosmic rays with diffuse matter.

  20. The second FERMI large area telescope catalog of gamma-ray pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgay, M.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Espinoza, C. M.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hessels, J.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Janssen, G. H.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mignani, R. P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Pletsch, H. J.; Porter, T. A.; Possenti, A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renault, N.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Roy, J.; Ruan, J.; Sartori, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shannon, R.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Wang, N.; Weltevrede, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2013-09-19

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  1. Statistical Measurement of the Gamma-Ray Source-count Distribution as a Function of Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Statistical properties of photon count maps have recently been proven as a new tool to study the composition of the gamma-ray sky with high precision. We employ the 1-point probability distribution function of six years of Fermi-LAT data to measure the source-count distribution dN/dS and the diffuse components of the high-latitude gamma-ray sky as a function of energy. To that aim, we analyze the gamma-ray emission in five adjacent energy bands between 1 and 171 GeV. It is demonstrated that the source-count distribution as a function of flux is compatible with a broken power law up to energies of ˜50 GeV. The index below the break is between 1.95 and 2.0. For higher energies, a simple power-law fits the data, with an index of {2.2}-0.3+0.7 in the energy band between 50 and 171 GeV. Upper limits on further possible breaks as well as the angular power of unresolved sources are derived. We find that point-source populations probed by this method can explain {83}-13+7% ({81}-19+52%) of the extragalactic gamma-ray background between 1.04 and 1.99 GeV (50 and 171 GeV). The method has excellent capabilities for constraining the gamma-ray luminosity function and the spectra of unresolved blazars.

  2. AN ATTEMPT AT A UNIFIED MODEL FOR THE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Qiang; Bi Xiaojun; Liu Siming

    2012-12-20

    Shocks of supernova remnants (SNRs) are important (and perhaps the dominant) agents for the production of the Galactic cosmic rays. Recent {gamma}-ray observations of several SNRs have made this case more compelling. However, these broadband high-energy measurements also reveal a variety of spectral shapes demanding more comprehensive modeling of emissions from SNRs. According to the locally observed fluxes of cosmic-ray protons and electrons, the electron-to-proton number ratio is known to be about 1%. Assuming such a ratio is universal for all SNRs and identical spectral shape for all kinds of accelerated particles, we propose a unified model that ascribes the distinct {gamma}-ray spectra of different SNRs to variations of the medium density and the spectral difference between cosmic-ray electrons and protons observed from Earth to transport effects. For low-density environments, the {gamma}-ray emission is inverse-Compton dominated. For high-density environments like systems of high-energy particles interacting with molecular clouds, the {gamma}-ray emission is {pi}{sup 0}-decay dominated. The model predicts a hadronic origin of {gamma}-ray emission from very old remnants interacting mostly with molecular clouds and a leptonic origin for intermediate-age remnants whose shocks propagate in a low-density environment created by their progenitors via, e.g., strong stellar winds. These results can be regarded as evidence in support of the SNR origin of Galactic cosmic rays.

  3. THE SECOND FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE CATALOG OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; and others

    2013-10-01

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  4. A STATISTICAL MODEL FOR THE {gamma}-RAY VARIABILITY OF THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Qiang; Yin Pengfei; Bi Xiaojun; Wu Xuefeng; Zhang Bing; Liu Siming

    2011-04-01

    A statistical scenario is proposed to explain the {gamma}-ray variability and flares of the Crab Nebula, which were observed recently by the Fermi/LAT. In this scenario electrons are accelerated in a series of knots, whose sizes follow a power-law distribution. These knots presumably move outward from the pulsar and have a distribution in the Doppler boost factor. The maximal electron energy is assumed to be proportional to the size of the knot. Fluctuations at the highest energy end of the overall electron distribution will result in variable {gamma}-ray emission via the synchrotron process in the {approx}100 MeV range. Since highly boosted larger knots are rarer than smaller knots, the model predicts that the variability of the synchrotron emission increases with the photon energy. We realize such a scenario with a Monte Carlo simulation and find that the model can reproduce both the two {gamma}-ray flares over a period of {approx}1 year and the monthly scale {gamma}-ray flux fluctuations as observed by the Fermi/LAT. The observed {gamma}-ray spectra in both the steady and flaring states are also well reproduced.

  5. Radiation reaction in the interaction of ultraintense laser with matter and gamma ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, J. F.; Teo, W. R.; Moritaka, Toseo; Takabe, H.

    2016-05-01

    Radiation reaction (RR) force plays an important role in gamma ray production in the interaction of ultraintense laser with relativistic counterpropagating electron at intensity 1022 W/cm2 and beyond. The relationship between emission spectrum and initial kinetic energy of electron at such intensities is yet to be clear experimentally. On the other hand, the energy from both the relativistic electron beam and laser pulse may be converted into the gamma rays. Therefore, the conversion efficiency of energy purely from laser pulse into gamma rays is of great interest. We present simulation results of an electron dynamics in strong laser field by taking into account the RR effects. We investigated how the RR effects influence the emission spectrum and photon number distribution for different laser condition. We showed that the peaks of emission spectra are suppressed if higher initial kinetic energy of electron interacts with long laser pulse duration. We then list the conversion efficiencies of laser pulse energy into gamma ray. We note that an electron with energy of 40 MeV would convert up to 80% of the total of electromagnetic work and initial kinetic energy of electron when interacting with 10 fs laser pulse at intensity 2 ×1023 W/cm2. For a bunch of electron with charge 1 nC would emit around 0.1 J of energy into gamma ray emission.

  6. Gamma ray irradiated AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles with enhanced gas sensor properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiuhua; Shi, Zhijie; Yao, Shangwu; Liao, Fan; Ding, Juanjuan; Shao, Mingwang

    2014-11-15

    AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method and irradiated by various doses of gamma ray. The products were characterized with X-ray powder diffraction, UV–vis absorption spectrum and transmission electron microscope. The results revealed that the crystal structure, morphology and size of the samples remained unchanged after irradiation, while the intensity of UV–Vis spectra increased with irradiation dose increasing. In addition, gamma ray irradiation improved the performance of gas sensor based on the AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles including the optimum operating temperature and sensitivity, which might be ascribed to the generation of defects. - Graphical abstract: Gamma ray irradiation improved the performance of gas sensor based on the AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles including sensitivity and optimum operating temperature, which might be ascribed to the generation of defects. - Highlights: • AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized and irradiated with gamma ray. • AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles were employed to fabricate gas sensors to detect ethanol. • Gamma ray irradiation improved the sensitivity and optimum operating temperature.

  7. Gamma-Ray Library and Uncertainty Analysis: Passively Emitted Gamma Rays Used in Safeguards Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W

    2009-09-18

    Non-destructive gamma-ray analysis is a fundamental part of nuclear safeguards, including nuclear energy safeguards technology. Developing safeguards capabilities for nuclear energy will certainly benefit from the advanced use of gamma-ray spectroscopy as well as the ability to model various reactor scenarios. There is currently a wide variety of nuclear data that could be used in computer modeling and gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis. The data can be discrepant (with varying uncertainties), and it may difficult for a modeler or software developer to determine the best nuclear data set for a particular situation. To use gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the relative isotopic composition of nuclear materials, the gamma-ray energies and the branching ratios or intensities of the gamma-rays emitted from the nuclides in the material must be well known. A variety of computer simulation codes will be used during the development of the nuclear energy safeguards, and, to compare the results of various codes, it will be essential to have all the {gamma}-ray libraries agree. Assessing our nuclear data needs allows us to create a prioritized list of desired measurements, and provides uncertainties for energies and especially for branching intensities. Of interest are actinides, fission products, and activation products, and most particularly mixtures of all of these radioactive isotopes, including mixtures of actinides and other products. Recent work includes the development of new detectors with increased energy resolution, and studies of gamma-rays and their lines used in simulation codes. Because new detectors are being developed, there is an increased need for well known nuclear data for radioactive isotopes of some elements. Safeguards technology should take advantage of all types of gamma-ray detectors, including new super cooled detectors, germanium detectors and cadmium zinc telluride detectors. Mixed isotopes, particularly mixed actinides found in nuclear reactor

  8. Search for brief celestial X-ray bursts. [supernovae or gamma ray flare stars origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1974-01-01

    The occurrence of intense bursts of 0.1- to 1.5-MeV photons from space has been confirmed with observations from IMP-6. This is the first positive result of an extensive data comparison, in which a search was made of OGO and IMP records for time coincidences between brief X- or gamma-ray increases and a variety of other transient phenomena. The IMP-6 measurements provided the first differential energy spectra of these events, the shapes of which indicate that photons predominantly in the gamma-ray domain are released into space. Whether these bursts originate in distant supernovae or in some new class of relatively nearby gamma-ray flare stars, they reveal a process which is new to high-energy astrophysics, not only because of the unusual spectrum, but also because of the brief time scales involved and because of the intense fluxes observed.

  9. A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shoji, M; Hamajima, Y; Takatsuka, K; Honoki, H; Nakajima, T; Kondo, T; Nakanishi, T

    2001-08-01

    A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium reagent was developed by measuring and analyzing the gamma-ray spectra of some reagents with no standard source. The counting rates (R) of photoelectric peaks of gamma-rays from nuclides with the same radioactivity divided by their emission probability (B) are expressed as a function of gamma-ray energy. The radioactivities of 234Th and 234mPa and 21.72 times that of 235U are equal to the radioactivity of 235U in natural uranium. Therefore, the plot of 21.72-fold R/B for 235U should be on a curve fitted to the points for 234Th and 234mPa in natural uranium. Depleted uranium with a 235U isotopic composition of less than 0.68% could be discriminated from natural uranium in the case of a reagent containing 4.0 g of uranium.

  10. A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shoji, M; Hamajima, Y; Takatsuka, K; Honoki, H; Nakajima, T; Kondo, T; Nakanishi, T

    2001-08-01

    A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium reagent was developed by measuring and analyzing the gamma-ray spectra of some reagents with no standard source. The counting rates (R) of photoelectric peaks of gamma-rays from nuclides with the same radioactivity divided by their emission probability (B) are expressed as a function of gamma-ray energy. The radioactivities of 234Th and 234mPa and 21.72 times that of 235U are equal to the radioactivity of 235U in natural uranium. Therefore, the plot of 21.72-fold R/B for 235U should be on a curve fitted to the points for 234Th and 234mPa in natural uranium. Depleted uranium with a 235U isotopic composition of less than 0.68% could be discriminated from natural uranium in the case of a reagent containing 4.0 g of uranium. PMID:11393763

  11. Observations with the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer - The impulsive solar flares of 1980 March 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Reppin, C.; Rieger, E.; Pinkau, K.; Kanbach, G.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma-ray continuum emission from 0.3 to 1 MeV was observed with the gamma-ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite during two impulsive solar flares on 1980 March 29, from active region 2363 at 0918 UT and from active region 2357 at 0955 UT. Evidence is presented for a hardening of the spectrum during the impulsive phase of the flares. The photon intensity greater than 100 keV appears to decay at a slower rate than that at lower energies. Time-integrated photon spectra for both flares are incompatible with a single-temperature thermal-bremsstrahlung model. Upper limits for prompt and delayed gamma-ray lines are presented.

  12. Attosecond Gamma-Ray Pulses via Nonlinear Compton Scattering in the Radiation-Dominated Regime.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Galow, Benjamin J; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-11-13

    The feasibility of the generation of bright ultrashort gamma-ray pulses is demonstrated in the interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counterpropagating tightly focused superstrong laser beam in the radiation-dominated regime. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma radiation are investigated using a semiclassical description for the electron dynamics in the laser field and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emission. We demonstrate the feasibility of ultrashort gamma-ray bursts of hundreds of attoseconds and of dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. The tightly focused laser field structure and the radiation reaction are shown to be responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts, which are independent of the durations of the electron bunch and of the laser pulse. The results are measurable with the laser technology available in the near future. PMID:26613446

  13. Particle acceleration, X-rays, and gamma-rays from winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Richard L.; Chen, Wan

    1994-01-01

    The instability of the line-driven winds of hot stars leads to the formation of strong shocks. These shocks not only emit thermal X-rays, but also accelerate a small fraction of the thermal electrons and ions to relativistic energies. Synchrotron radiation from these energetic particles can account for the non-thermal radio emission observed from some hot stars, and can also explain the hard X-rays detected in the Einstein X-ray spectra. Our calculations indicate that the gamma-ray emission from non-thermal particles should be detectable by Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). The detection (or non-detection) of these emissions over a wide energy range, from the radio to gamma-rays, should provide a great deal of information on the structure of the unstable winds and the physics of particle acceleration by shocks.

  14. Plasma Instabilities in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, Robert C.

    2008-12-24

    Magnetic fields are important in a variety of astrophysical scenarios, ranging from possible creation mechanisms of cosmological magnetic fields through relativistic jets such as that from Active Galactic Nuclei and gamma-ray bursts to local phenomena in the solar system. Here, the outstanding importance of plasma instabilities to astrophysics is illustrated by applying the so-called neutral point method to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are assumed to have a homogeneous background magnetic field. It is shown how magnetic turbulence, which is a prerequisite for the creation of dissipation and, subsequently, radiation, is created by the highly relativistic particles in the GRB jet. Using the fact that different particle compositions lead to different instability conditions, conclusions can be drawn about the particle composition of the jet, showing that it is more likely of baryonic nature.

  15. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: mission status.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) is the second in NASA's series of Great Observatories. Compton has now been operating for over two and a half years, and has given a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made and continue to be made. The authors describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments and the observing programs for the first three years of the mission. During Phases 2 and 3 of the mission a Guest Investigator program has been in progress with the Guest Observers' time share increasing from 30% to over 50% for the later mission phases.

  16. Fissile interrogation using gamma rays from oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Donald; Micklich, Bradley J.; Fessler, Andreas

    2004-04-20

    The subject apparatus provides a means to identify the presence of fissionable material or other nuclear material contained within an item to be tested. The system employs a portable accelerator to accelerate and direct protons to a fluorine-compound target. The interaction of the protons with the fluorine-compound target produces gamma rays which are directed at the item to be tested. If the item to be tested contains either a fissionable material or other nuclear material the interaction of the gamma rays with the material contained within the test item with result in the production of neutrons. A system of neutron detectors is positioned to intercept any neutrons generated by the test item. The results from the neutron detectors are analyzed to determine the presence of a fissionable material or other nuclear material.

  17. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark; Gosnell, Tom B.; Ham, Cheryl; Perkins, Dwight; Wong, James

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  18. Nuclear isomer suitable for gamma ray laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jha, S.

    1979-01-01

    The operation of gamma ray lasers (gasers) are studied. It is assumed that the nuclear isomers mentioned in previously published papers have inherent limitations. It is further assumed that the judicious use of Bormann effect or the application of the total external reflection of low energy gamma radiation at grazing angle of incidence may permit the use of a gaser crystal sufficiently long to achieve observable stimulated emission. It is suggested that a long lived 0(+) isomer decaying by low energy gamma ray emission to a short lived 2(+) excited nuclear state would be an attractive gaser candidate. It is also suggested that the nuclear isomer be incorporated in a matrix of refractory material having an electrostatic field gradient whose principal axis lies along the length of the medium. This results in the preferential transmission of electric quadrupole radiation along the length of the medium.

  19. Spectral evolution in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Share, G. H.; Messina, D. C.; Matz, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) and the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission satellite have independently monitored cosmic gamma-ray bursts since launch in February 1980. Several bursts with relatively simple pulse structure and sufficient intensity have been analyzed for evidence of spectral variability on time scales shorter than the pulse durations. In many of these bursts pulse structures are found, ranging in duration from 1 to 10 seconds, which exhibit a trend of hard-to-soft spectral evolution. No significant evidence for soft-to-hard evolution has been found. The HXRBS data above 100 keV and the GRS data above 1 MeV indicate that the spectral evolution generally is not due to time-varying absorption features at energies below 100 keV.

  20. Current Topics in Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Grant J.; Maronetti, P.; Salmonson, Jay; Wilson, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on recent progress toward unraveling the origin of gamma-ray bursts. It is concluded that neutron-star binaries are one of the few remaining candidates. A model is proposed based upon general relativistic hydrodynamic studies which indicate a new physical process by which to power a gamma-ray burst. Relativistically driven compression, heating, and collapse of the individual neutron stars can occur many seconds before inspiral and merger. This compression may produce a neutrino burst of ∼1053 ergs lasting several seconds. The associated thermal neutrino emission produces an e+–e − pair plasma by vv¯ annihilation. We show first results of a simulated burst which produces ∼1051 erg in γ rays of the correct spectral and temporal properties. PMID:27551592

  1. Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

  2. Nucleosynthesis and astrophysical gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Allan S.

    1987-01-01

    The HEAO-3 gamma ray spectrometer has provided evidence in the quest for the understanding of complex element formation in the universe with the discovery of Al-26 in the interstellar medium. It has demonstrated that the synthesis of intermediate mass nuclei is currently going on in the galaxy. This discovery was confirmed by the Solar Maximum Mission. The flux is peaked near the galactic center and indicates about 3 solar masses of Al-26 in the interstellar medium, with an implied ratio of Al-26/Al-27 = .00001. Several possible distributions were studied but the data gathered thus far do not allow discrimination between them. It is felt that only the spaceflight of a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer with adequate sensitivity will ultimately resolve the issue of the source of this material.

  3. Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W. Neil; Luke, Paul N.; Kurfess, J.D.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Kroeger, R.A.; Phillips, G.W.

    1999-06-01

    The goal of this project is the development of field portable gamma-ray detectors that can both image gamma rays from radioactive emission and determine the isotopic composition by the emitted spectrum. Most instruments to date have had either very good imaging with no spectroscopy, or very good spectroscopy with no imaging. The only instruments with both imaging and spectroscopy have had rather poor quality imaging and spectroscopy (e.g. NaI Anger Cameras). The technology would have widespread applications, from laboratory nuclear physics, to breast cancer imaging, to astronomical research. For this project, we focus on the applications in the field of fissile materials, spent nuclear fuels and decontamination and decommissioning.

  4. The future of gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knödlseder, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy has experienced impressive progress over the last decade. Thanks to the advent of a new generation of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS) and thanks to the launch of the Fermi-LAT satellite, several thousand gamma-ray sources are known today, revealing an unexpected ubiquity of particle acceleration processes in the Universe. Major scientific challenges are still ahead, such as the identification of the nature of Dark Matter, the discovery and understanding of the sources of cosmic rays, or the comprehension of the particle acceleration processes that are at work in the various objects. This paper presents some of the instruments and mission concepts that will address these challenges over the next decades. xml:lang="fr"

  5. Gamma rays, cosmic rays, and galactic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of cosmic and gamma radiation by SAS-2 satellite are summarized and analyzed to determine processes responsible for producing observed galactic radiation. In addition to the production of gamma rays in discrete galactic objects such as pulsars, there are three main mechanisms by which high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) radiation is produced by high-energy interactions involving cosmic rays in interstellar space. These processes, which produce what may be called diffuse galactic gamma-rays, are: (1) the decay of pi mesons produced by interactions of cosmic ray nucleons with interstellar gas nuclei; (2) the bremsstrahlung radiation produced by cosmic ray electrons interacting in the Coulomb fields of nuclei of interstellar gas atoms; and (3) Compton interactions between cosmic ray electrons and low-energy photons in interstellar space.

  6. Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors: Merger Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffert, Maximilian

    2002-04-01

    The mergers of neutron stars and black holes remain a viable model for gamma-ray burst central engines, at least for the class of short bursts: their time scales, occurrence rates and energy output seem to be consistent with observations. We will present results of our latest simulations showing how the orbit of a neutron star around a black hole shrinks due to gravitational radiation, how the neutron star's matter gets accreted by the black hole, and how the tidal forces of the black hole finally shred the neutron star into a thick disk. In this process, huge amounts of energy are radiated away by gravitational waves and by neutrinos emitted from the hot disk. The neutrino luminosities are so large that an appreciable fraction (some few percent!) of neutrinos annihilate with antineutrinos creating the clean fireball necessary to power gamma-ray bursts.

  7. SuperAGILE and Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Pacciani, Luigi; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Frutti, Massimo; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Lapshov, Igor; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Tavani, Marco; Barbiellini, Guido; Mastropietro, Marcello; Morelli, Ennio; Rapisarda, Massimo

    2006-05-19

    The solid-state hard X-ray imager of AGILE gamma-ray mission -- SuperAGILE -- has a six arcmin on-axis angular resolution in the 15-45 keV range, a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. The instrument is very light: 5 kg only. It is equipped with an on-board self triggering logic, image deconvolution, and it is able to transmit the coordinates of a GRB to the ground in real-time through the ORBCOMM constellation of satellites. Photon by photon Scientific Data are sent to the Malindi ground station at every contact. In this paper we review the performance of the SuperAGILE experiment (scheduled for a launch in the middle of 2006), after its first onground calibrations, and show the perspectives for Gamma Ray Bursts.

  8. On the origin of gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Ryde, Felix

    2008-12-13

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, occurring at cosmological distances. The initial phase of the emission from these bursts is predominantly of gamma rays and stems from a highly relativistic outflow. The nature of this emission is still under debate. Here, I present the interpretation that the peak in the photon spectrum can be attributed to the black-body emission of the photosphere of the outflow, having a temperature of approximately 109K. An additional non-thermal spectral component can be attributed to additional dissipation of the kinetic energy in the outflow. This two-component model can be well fitted to most instantaneous spectra. Interestingly, the thermal component exhibits a recurring behaviour over emission pulse structures. Both the temperature and the energy flux vary as broken power laws. During the pre-break phase, the temperature is approximately constant while the energy flux rises. Furthermore, the ratio of the observed thermal flux to the emergent flux increases as a power law over the whole pulse. It is argued that these observations hold the key to our understanding of the prompt emission and the properties of the site from which it emanates.

  9. Gamma-ray bursts spectral correlations and their cosmological use.

    PubMed

    Ghirlanda, Giancarlo

    2007-05-15

    The correlations involving the long-gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) prompt emission energy represent a new key to understand the GRB physics. These correlations have been proved to be the tool that makes long-GRBs a new class of standard candles. Gamma Ray Bursts, being very powerful cosmological sources detected in the hard X-ray band, represent a new tool to investigate the Universe in a redshift range, which is complementary to that covered by other cosmological probes (SNIa and CMB). A review of the Ep-Eiso, Ep-Egamma, Ep-Eiso-tbreak and Liso-Ep-T0.45 correlations is presented. Open issues related to these correlations (e.g. presence of outliers and selection effects) and to their use for cosmographic purposes (e.g. dependence on model assumptions) are discussed. Finally, the relevance of thermal components in GRB spectra is discussed in the light of some of the models recently proposed for the interpretation of the spectral-energy correlations. PMID:17293334

  10. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated MTR fuel elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terremoto, L. A. A.; Zeituni, C. A.; Perrotta, J. A.; da Silva, J. E. R.

    2000-08-01

    The availability of burnup data is an important requirement in any systematic approach to the enhancement of safety, economics and performance of a nuclear research reactor. This work presents the theory and experimental techniques applied to determine, by means of nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the burnup of Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the IEA-R1 research reactor. Burnup measurements, based on analysis of spectra that result from collimation and detection of gamma-rays emitted in the decay of radioactive fission products, were performed at the reactor pool area. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector together with suitable fast electronics and an on-line microcomputer data acquisition module. In order to achieve absolute burnup values, the detection set (collimator tube+HPGe detector) was previously calibrated in efficiency. The obtained burnup values are compared with ones provided by reactor physics calculations, for three kinds of MTR fuel elements with different cooling times, initial enrichment grades and total number of fuel plates. Both values show good agreement within the experimental error limits.

  11. Predicting supernova associated to gamma-ray burst 130427a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Ruffini, R.; Kovacevic, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Enderli, M.; Muccino, M.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    Binary systems constituted by a neutron star and a massive star are not rare in the universe. The Induced Gravitational Gamma-ray Burst (IGC) paradigm interprets Gamma-ray bursts as the outcome of a neutron star that collapses into a black hole due to the accretion of the ejecta coming from its companion massive star that underwent a supernova event. GRB 130427A is one of the most luminous GRBs ever observed, of which isotropic energy exceeds 1054 erg. And it is within one of the few GRBs obtained optical, X-ray and GeV spectra simultaneously for hundreds of seconds, which provides an unique opportunity so far to understand the multi-wavelength observation within the IGC paradigm, our data analysis found low Lorentz factor blackbody emission in the Episode 3 and its X-ray light curve overlaps typical IGC Golden Sample, which comply to the IGC mechanisms. We consider these findings as clues of GRB 130427A belonging to the IGC GRBs. We predicted on GCN the emergence of a supernova on May 2, 2013, which was later successfully detected on May 13, 2013.

  12. Environmental Radioactivity: Gamma Ray Spectroscopy with Germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Gargi; Beausang, Cornelius; Hughes, Richard; Tarlow, Thomas; Gell, Kristen; University of Richmond Physics Team

    2013-10-01

    A CF-1000BRL series portable Air Particle Sampler with filter paper as filter media was placed in one indoor and one outdoor location at 100 LPM flow rate on six dates under alternating rainy and warm weather conditions over the course of sixteen days in May 2013. The machine running times spanned between 6 to 69 hours. Each filter paper was then put in a germanium gamma ray detector, and the counts ranged from 93000 to 250000 seconds. The spectra obtained were analyzed by the CANBERRA Genie 2000 software, corrected using a background spectrum, and calibrated using a 20.27 kBq activity multi-nuclide source. We graphed the corrected counts (from detector analysis time)/second (from air sampler running time)/liter (from the air sampler's flow rate) of sharp, significantly big peaks corresponding to a nuclide in every sample against the sample number along with error bars. The graphs were then used to compare the samples and they showed a similar trend. The slight differences were usually due to the different running times of the air sampler. The graphs of about 22 nuclides were analyzed. We also tried to recognize the nuclei to which several gamma rays belonged that were displayed but not recognized by the Genie 2000 software.

  13. Gamma rays from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1990-01-01

    The general properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and quasars are reviewed with emphasis on their continuum spectral emission. Two general classes of models for the continuum are outlined and critically reviewed in view of the impending GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory) launch and observations. The importance of GRO in distinguishing between these models and in general in furthering the understanding of AGN is discussed. The very broad terms the status of the current understanding of AGN are discussed.

  14. Gamma rays produce superior seedless citrus

    SciTech Connect

    Pyrah, D.

    1984-10-01

    Using gamma radiation, seedless forms of some varieties of oranges and grapefruit are being produced. Since it has long been known that radiation causes mutations in plants and animals, experiments were conducted to determine if seediness could be altered by exposing seeds or budwood to higher than natural doses of gamma radiation. Orange and grapefruit seeds and cuttings exposed to gamma rays in the early 1970's have produced trees that bear fruit superior to that now on the market.

  15. Radio Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Gomboc, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1-1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  16. The Most Remote Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-10-01

    ESO Telescopes Observe "Lightning" in the Young Universe Summary Observations with telescopes at the ESO La Silla and Paranal observatories (Chile) have enabled an international team of astronomers [1] to measure the distance of a "gamma-ray burst", an extremely violent, cosmic explosion of still unknown physical origin. It turns out to be the most remote gamma-ray burst ever observed . The exceedingly powerful flash of light from this event was emitted when the Universe was very young, less than about 1,500 million years old, or only 10% of its present age. Travelling with the speed of light (300,000 km/sec) during 11,000 million years or more, the signal finally reached the Earth on January 31, 2000. The brightness of the exploding object was enormous, at least 1,000,000,000,000 times that of our Sun, or thousands of times that of the explosion of a single, heavy star (a "supernova"). The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) was also involved in trail-blazing observations of another gamma-ray burst in May 1999, cf. ESO PR 08/99. PR Photo 28a/00 : Sky field near GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28b/00 : The fading optical counterpart of GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28c/00 : VLT spectrum of GRB 000131 . What are Gamma-Ray Bursts? One of the currently most active fields of astrophysics is the study of the mysterious events known as "gamma-ray bursts" . They were first detected in the late 1960's by instruments on orbiting satellites. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays last from less than a second to several minutes. Despite much effort, it is only within the last few years that it has become possible to locate the sites of some of these events (e.g. with the Beppo-Sax satellite ). Since the beginning of 1997, astronomers have identified about twenty optical sources in the sky that are associated with gamma-ray bursts. They have been found to be situated at extremely large (i.e., "cosmological") distances. This implies that the energy release during a gamma-ray burst within a few

  17. THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Lichti, Giselher; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Steinle, Helmut; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, Robert; Wilson, Robert B.; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; McBreen, Sheila

    2009-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data sets exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations onboard to allow re-orienting the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of 12 sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from {approx}8 keV to {approx}40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The onboard trigger threshold is {approx}0.7 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates onboard triggers for {approx}250 GRBs per year.

  18. Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Rodriguez, Mariangelly; Smith, M.; Tešic, G.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are known to be bright, irregular flashes of gamma rays that typically last just a few seconds, believed to be caused by stellar collapse or the merger of a pair of compact objects. Through previous work, it has been found that GRBs are distributed roughly uniformly over the entire sky, rather than being confined to the relatively narrow band of the Milky Way. Using the Python programming language, we generated a model of GRBs over cosmological distances, based on current empirical GRB distributions. The grbsim python module uses the acceptance-rejection Monte Carlo method to simulate the luminosity and redshift of a large population of GRBs, including cosmological effects such as dark energy and dark matter terms that modify the large-scale structure of space-time. The results of running grbsim are demonstrated to match the distribution of GRBs observed by the Burst Alert Telescope on NASA’s Swift satellite. The grbsim module will subsequently be used to simulate gamma ray and neutrino events for the Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network.

  19. Galactic diffuse gamma rays from galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateyama, N.; Nishimura, J.

    2001-08-01

    The dominant part of the diffuse gamma rays from the Galactic plane, with energy greater than 1TeV, has been thought as due to the inverse Compton scattering of the interstellar photons with the high-energy cosmic electrons. In these energy regions, the diffuse gamma-ray observation gives us unique infor-mation on the energy spectrum of the high-energy electrons in the interstellar space, since we cannot observe those electrons directly. This provides us information on the cosmicray source, production mechanism and propagation in the Galaxy. We discuss the implication of our results by comparing with the work of Porter and Protheroe, and also compare with the data observed by the most recent extensive air showers. It is also pointed out that the patchy structure of gammaray distribution will appear at high-energy side, if we observe the distribution with a higher angular resolution of a few arc degrees. This patchy structure will become clear beyond 10TeV of IC gamma rays, where the number of contributing sources of parent decrease and the diffusion distance of the electrons become smaller.

  20. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  1. Solar gamma rays. [in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of gamma ray production in solar flares is treated in detail. Both lines and continuum are produced. Results show that the strongest line predicted at 2.225 MeV with a width of less than 100 eV and detected at 2.24 + or - 2.02 MeV, is due to neutron capture by protons in the photosphere. Its intensity is dependent on the photospheric He-3 abundance. The neutrons are produced in nuclear reactions of flare accelerated particles which also produce positrons and prompt nuclear deexcitation lines. The strongest prompt lines are at 4.43 MeV from c-12 and at approximately 6.2 from 0-16 and N-15. The gamma ray continuum, produced by electron bremsstrahlung, allows the determination of the spectrum and number of accelerated electrons in the MeV region. From the comparison of the line and continuum intensities a proton-to-electron ratio of about 10 to 100 at the same energy for the 1972, August 4 flare. For the same flare the protons above 2.5 MeV which are responsible for the gamma ray emission produce a few percent of the heat generated by the electrons which make the hard X rays above 20 keV.

  2. Future Prospects for Space-Based Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The gamma-ray sky offers a unique view into broad range of astrophysical phenomena, from nearby solar flares, to galactic pulsars, to gamma-ray bursts at the furthest reaches of the Universe. The Fermi mission has dramatically demonstrated the broad range of topics that can be addressed by gamma-ray observations. The full range of gamma-ray energies is quite broad, covering the electromagnetic spectrum at energies above about 100 keV. The energy range below several hundred GeV is the domain of space-based gamma-ray observatories, a range that is not completely covered by the Fermi LAT instrument. The gamma ray community has recently embarked on an effort to define the next steps for space-based gamma ray astronomy. These discussions are being facilitated through the Gamma-ray Science Interest Group (GammaSIG), which exists to provide community input to NASA in regards to current and future needs of the gamma-ray astrophysics community. The GammaSIG, as a part of the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group, provides a forum open to all members of the gamma-ray community. The GammaSIG is currently working to bring the community together with a common vision that will be expressed in the form of a community roadmap. This talk will summarize some of the latest results from active gamma ray observatories, including both Fermi and INTEGRAL, and will summarize the status of the community roadmap effort.

  3. Young gamma-ray pulsar: from modeling the gamma-ray emission to the particle-in-cell simulations of the global magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Gabriele; Kalapotharakos, Constantions; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2016-04-01

    Accelerated charged particles flowing in the magnetosphere produce pulsar gamma-ray emission. Pair creation processes produce an electron-positron plasma that populates the magnetosphere, in which the plasma is very close to force-free. However, it is unknown how and where the plasma departs from the ideal force-free condition, which consequently inhibits the understanding of the emission generation. We found that a dissipative magnetosphere outside the light cylinder effectively reproduces many aspects of the young gamma-ray pulsar emission as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and through particle-in-cell simulations (PIC), we started explaining this configuration self-consistently. These findings show that, together, a magnetic field structure close to force-free and the assumption of gamma-ray curvature radiation as the emission mechanism are strongly compatible with the observations. Two main issues from the previously used models that our work addresses are the inability to explain luminosity, spectra, and light curve features at the same time and the inconsistency of the electrodynamics. Moreover, using the PIC simulations, we explore the effects of different pair multiplicities on the magnetosphere configurations and the locations of the accelerating regions. Our work aims for a self-consistent modeling of the magnetosphere, connecting the microphysics of the pair-plasma to the global magnetosphere macroscopic quantities. This direction will lead to a greater understanding of pulsar emission at all wavelengths, as well as to concrete insights into the physics of the magnetosphere.

  4. Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts and Hypernovae Conclusively Linked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    Clearest-Ever Evidence from VLT Spectra of Powerful Event Summary A very bright burst of gamma-rays was observed on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE-II) , in a sky region within the constellation Leo. Within 90 min, a new, very bright light source (the "optical afterglow") was detected in the same direction by means of a 40-inch telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory (Australia) and also in Japan. The gamma-ray burst was designated GRB 030329 , according to the date. And within 24 hours, a first, very detailed spectrum of this new object was obtained by the UVES high-dispersion spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). It allowed to determine the distance as about 2,650 million light-years (redshift 0.1685). Continued observations with the FORS1 and FORS2 multi-mode instruments on the VLT during the following month allowed an international team of astronomers [1] to document in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the optical afterglow of this gamma-ray burst . Their detailed report appears in the June 19 issue of the research journal "Nature". The spectra show the gradual and clear emergence of a supernova spectrum of the most energetic class known, a "hypernova" . This is caused by the explosion of a very heavy star - presumably over 25 times heavier than the Sun. The measured expansion velocity (in excess of 30,000 km/sec) and the total energy released were exceptionally high, even within the elect hypernova class. From a comparison with more nearby hypernovae, the astronomers are able to fix with good accuracy the moment of the stellar explosion. It turns out to be within an interval of plus/minus two days of the gamma-ray burst. This unique conclusion provides compelling evidence that the two events are directly connected. These observations therefore indicate a common physical process behind the hypernova explosion and the associated emission of strong gamma-ray

  5. Implications of Gamma-Ray Transparency Constraints in Blazars: Minimum Distances and Gamma-Ray Collimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Peter A.; Kafatos, Menas

    1995-01-01

    We develop a general expression for the gamma - gamma absorption coefficient, alpha(sub gamma(gamma)) for gamma-rays propagating in an arbitrary direction at an arbitrary point in space above an X-ray-emitting accretion disk. The X-ray intensity is assumed to vary as a power law in energy and radius between the outer disk radius, R(sub 0), and the inner radius, R(sub ms) which is the radius of marginal stability for a Schwarzschild black hole. We use our result for alpha(sub gamma(gamma)) to calculate the gamma - gamma optical depth, tau(sub gamma(gamma)) for gamma - rays created at height z and propagating at angle Phi relative to the disk axis, and we show that for Phi = 0 and z greater than or approx equal to R(sub 0), tau(sub gamma(gamma)) proportional to Epsilon(sup alpha)z(sup -2(alpha) - 3), where alpha is the X-ray spectral index and Epsilon is the gamma - ray energy. As an application, we use our formalism to compute the minimum distance between the central black hole and the site of production of the gamma-rays detected by EGRET during the 1991 June flare of 3C 279. In order to obtain an upper limit, we assume that all of the X-rays observed contemporaneously by Ginga were emitted by the disk. Our results suggest that the observed gamma - rays may have originated within less than or approx equal to 45 GM/sq c from a black hole of mass greater than or approx equal to 10(exp 9) solar mass, perhaps in active plasma located above the central funnel of the accretion disk. This raises the possibility of establishing a direct connection between the production of the observed gamma - rays and the accretion of material onto the black hole. We also consider the variation of the optical depth as a function of the angle of propagation Phi. Our results indicate that the "focusing" of the gamma - rays along the disk axis due to pair production is strong enough to explain the observed degree of alignment in blazar sources. If the gamma - rays are produced isotropically

  6. Development of Monte Carlo code for coincidence prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaogang

    Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) offers a non-destructive, relatively rapid on-line method for determination of elemental composition of bulk and other samples. However, PGNAA has an inherently large background. These backgrounds are primarily due to the presence of the neutron excitation source. It also includes neutron activation of the detector and the prompt gamma rays from the structure materials of PGNAA devices. These large backgrounds limit the sensitivity and accuracy of PGNAA. Since most of the prompt gamma rays from the same element are emitted in coincidence, a possible approach for further improvement is to change the traditional PGNAA measurement technique and introduce the gamma-gamma coincidence technique. It is well known that the coincidence techniques can eliminate most of the interference backgrounds and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. A new Monte Carlo code, CEARCPG has been developed at CEAR to simulate gamma-gamma coincidence spectra in PGNAA experiment. Compared to the other existing Monte Carlo code CEARPGA I and CEARPGA II, a new algorithm of sampling the prompt gamma rays produced from neutron capture reaction and neutron inelastic scattering reaction, is developed in this work. All the prompt gamma rays are taken into account by using this new algorithm. Before this work, the commonly used method is to interpolate the prompt gamma rays from the pre-calculated gamma-ray table. This technique works fine for the single spectrum. However it limits the capability to simulate the coincidence spectrum. The new algorithm samples the prompt gamma rays from the nucleus excitation scheme. The primary nuclear data library used to sample the prompt gamma rays comes from ENSDF library. Three cases are simulated and the simulated results are benchmarked with experiments. The first case is the prototype for ETI PGNAA application. This case is designed to check the capability of CEARCPG for single spectrum simulation. The second

  7. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie; Ritz, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) is a satellite-based observatory to study the high energy gamma-ray sky. The main instrument on GLAST, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-conversion telescope that will survey the sky from 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. With the GLAST launch in 2007, the LAT will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high energy phenomena, including supermassive black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and cosmic ray acceleration and dark matter. A second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), greatly enhances GLAST s capability to study GRB by providing important spectral and timing information in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We describe how the instruments, spacecraft and ground system work together to provide observations of gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV - 300 GeV and to provide rapid notification of bursts to the wider gamma-ray burst community.

  8. Preliminary observations of the SELENE Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forni, O.; Diez, B.; Gasnault, O.; Munoz, B.; D'Uston, C.; Reedy, R. C.; Hasebe, N.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction We analyze the spectra measured by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on board the SELENE satellite [1]. SELENE was inserted in lunar orbit on 4 Oct. 2007. After passing through a health check and a function check, the GRS was shifted to nominal observation on 21 Dec. 2007. The spectra consist in various lines of interest (O, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Ca, Fe, K, Th, U, and possibly H) superposed on a continuum. The energies of the gamma rays identify the nuclides responsible for the gamma ray emission and their intensities relate to their abundance. Data collected through 17 Feb. 2008 are studied here, corresponding to an accumulation time (Fig. 1) sufficiently good to allow preliminary mapping. Analysis of the global gamma ray spectrum In order to obtain spectra with counting statistics sufficient for peak analysis, we accumulate all observations. The identification of lines is performed on this global lunar spectrum (Fig 2). Fit of individual lines The gamma ray lines that arise from decay of longlived radioactive species are among the easiest to analyze. So far the abundance of two species is studied thanks to such lines: potassium (1461 keV) and thorium (2614 keV). Secondary neutrons from cosmic ray interactions also produce gamma ray when reacting with the planetary material, according to scattering or absorption reactions. However these lines need substantial corrections before an interpretation in terms of abundance can be performed. Lines have been examined with different techniques. The simplest method consists in summing the spectra in a window containing the line of interest. The continuum is adjusted with a polynomial and removed. Such a method was used for the gamma ray spectra collected by Lunar Prospector [2]. This method is especially robust for isolated lines, such as those of K and Th mentioned above, or with very low statistics. The second method consists in fitting the lines by summing a quadratic continuum with Gaussian lines and exponential

  9. Diagnosing ICF gamma-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W; Kim, Y H; Mc Evoy, A; Young, C S; Mack, J M; Hoffman, N; Wilson, D C; Langenbrunner, J R; Evans, S; Sedillo, T; Batha, S H; Dauffy, L; Stoeffl, W; Malone, R; Kaufman, M I; Cox, B C; Tunnel, T W; Miller, E K; Rubery, M

    2010-01-01

    Gamma rays produced in an ICF environment open up a host of physics opportunities we are just beginning to explore. A branch of the DT fusion reaction, with a branching ratio on the order of 2e-5 {gamma}/n, produces 16.7 MeV {gamma}-rays. These {gamma}-rays provide a direct measure of fusion reaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Reaction-rate history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental quantities that will be used to optimize ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Gas Cherenkov Detectors (GCD) that convert fusion {gamma}-rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. Demonstrated absolute timing calibrations allow bang time measurements with accuracy better than 30 ps. System impulse response better than 95 ps fwhm have been made possible by the combination of low temporal dispersion GCDs, ultra-fast microchannel-plate photomultiplier tubes (PMT), and high-bandwidth Mach Zehnder fiber optic data links and digitizers, resulting in burn width measurement accuracy better than 10ps. Inherent variable energy-thresholding capability allows use of GCDs as {gamma}-ray spectrometers to explore other interesting nuclear processes. Recent measurements of the 4.44 MeV {sup 12}C(n,n{prime}) {gamma}-rays produced as 14.1 MeV DT fusion neutrons pass through plastic capsules is paving the way for a new CH ablator areal density measurement. Insertion of various neutron target materials near target chamber center (TCC) producing secondary, neutron-induced {gamma}y-rays are being used to study other nuclear interactions and as in-situ sources to calibrate detector response and DT branching ratio. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics, based on the GCD concept, are now being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth

  10. Future Prospects for Space-Based Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The gamma-ray sky offers a unique view into broad range of high energy astrophysical phenomena, from nearby solar flares, to galactic pulsars, to gamma-ray bursts at the furthest reaches of the Universe. In recent years, results from the Fermi mission have further demonstrated the broad range of topics that can be addressed by gamma-ray observations. The full range of gamma-ray energies is quite broad, from about 100 keV up to about 100 TeV. The energy range below several hundred GeV is the domain of space-based gamma-ray observatories, a range that is not completely covered by the Fermi LAT instrument. The gamma ray community has embarked on an effort to define the next steps for space-based gamma ray astronomy. These discussions are being facilitated through the Gamma-ray Science Interest Group (GammaSIG), which exists to provide community input to NASA in regards to current and future needs of the gamma-ray astrophysics community. Through a series of workshops and symposia, the GammaSIG is working to bring the community together with one common vision, a vision that will be expressed in the form of a community roadmap. This talk will summarize some of the latest results from active gamma ray observatories and will summarize the status of the community roadmap effort.

  11. Implications of plasma beam instabilities for the statistics of the Fermi hard gamma-ray blazars and the origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E.; Pfrommer, Christoph; Puchwein, Ewald; Chang, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Fermi has been instrumental in constraining the luminosity function and redshift evolution of gamma-ray bright BL Lac objects, a subpopulation of blazars with almost featureless optical spectra. This includes limits on the spectrum and anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB), redshift distribution of nearby Fermi active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the construction of a logN-log S relation. Based on these, it has been argued that the evolution of the gamma-ray bright BL Lac population must be much less dramatic than that of other AGNs. However, critical to such claims is the assumption that inverse Compton cascades reprocess emission above a TeV into the Fermi energy range, substantially enhancing the strength of the observed limits. Here we demonstrate that in the absence of such a process, due, e.g., to the presence of virulent plasma beam instabilities that preempt the cascade, a population of TeV-bright BL Lac objects that evolve similarly to quasars is consistent with the population of hard gamma-ray BL Lac objects observed by Fermi. Specifically, we show that a simple model for the properties and luminosity function is simultaneously able to reproduce their logN-log S relation, local redshift distribution, and contribution to the EGRB and its anisotropy without any free parameters. Insofar as the naturalness of a picture in which the hard gamma-ray BL Lac population exhibits the strong redshift evolution observed in other tracers of the cosmological history of accretion onto halos is desirable, this lends support for the absence of the inverse Compton cascades and the existence of the beam plasma instabilities.

  12. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  13. Comparison of activation effects in {gamma}-ray detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Truscott, P.R.; Evans, H.E.; Dyer, C.S.; Peerless, C.L.; Flatman, J.C.; Cosby, M.; Knight, P.; Moss, C.E.

    1996-06-01

    Activation induced by cosmic and trapped radiation in {gamma}-ray detector materials represents a significant source of background for space-based detector systems. Selection of detector materials should therefore include consideration of this background source. Results are presented from measurements of induced radioactivity in different scintillators activated either as a result of irradiation by mono-energetic protons at accelerator facilities, or flight on board the Space Shuttle. Radiation transport computer codes are used to help compare the effects observed from the scintillators, by identifying and quantifying the influence on the background spectra from more than one hundred of the radionuclides produced by spallation. For the space experiment data, the simulation results also permit determination of the contributions to detector activation from the different sources of radiation in the Shuttle cabin.

  14. On the cosmological origin of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shude; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1992-01-01

    Statistical properties of gamma-ray bursts are analyzed assuming that the bursters are cosmological. The model adopted is the simplest possible - it has no adjustable parameters. All the bursts are assumed to be standard candles with identical power-law spectra. Their burst rate is assumed to be constant per unit comoving volume per unit comoving cosmological time in a Friedmann universe with Omega of 1 and Lambda of 0. The calculated distribution of burst intensities is consistent with that found by the BATSE experiment for the weak events and by the PVO for the strong events. The range of observations is estimated to be about 1.5 z sub BATSE and about 0.2 z sub PVO.

  15. Variable VHE gamma-ray emission from Markarian 501

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jordi

    2007-02-06

    The blazar Markarian 501 (Mrk 501) was observed at energies above 100 GeV with the MAGIC telescope from May through July 2005. The high sensitivity of the instrument enabled the determination of the flux and spectrum of the source on a night-by-night basis. Throughout our observational campaign, the flux from Mrk 501 was found to vary by an order of magnitude, and to be correlated with spectral changes. Intra-night flux variability with flux-doubling times down to 2 minutes was also observed. The strength of variability increased with the energy of the {gamma}-ray photons. The energy spectra were found to harden significantly with increasing flux, and a spectral peak clearly showed up during very active states. The position of the spectral peak seems to be correlated with the source luminosity.

  16. Flash Heating of Circumstellar Clouds by Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    PubMed

    Dermer; Böttcher

    2000-05-10

    The blast-wave model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has been called into question by observations of spectra from GRBs that are harder than can be produced through optically thin synchrotron emission. If GRBs originate from the collapse of massive stars, then circumstellar clouds near burst sources will be illuminated by intense gamma radiation, and the electrons in these clouds will be rapidly scattered to energies as large as several hundred keV. Low-energy photons that subsequently pass through the hot plasma will be scattered to higher energies, hardening the intrinsic spectrum. This effect resolves the "line-of-death" objection to the synchrotron shock model. Illuminated clouds near GRBs will form relativistic plasmas containing large numbers of electron-positron pairs that can be detected within approximately 1-2 days of the explosion before expanding and dissipating. Localized regions of pair annihilation radiation in the Galaxy would reveal past GRB explosions.

  17. Ultrahigh energy gamma rays: Carriers of cosmological information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonian, F. A.; Atoyan, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Observational data being the basis of contemporary cosmological models are not numerous: Hubble law of redshift for galaxies, element abundances, and observation of cosmic microwave background radiation (MBR). The significance of MBR discovery predicted in the Big-Band model is particularly stressed. Radio astronomical measurements give an information on MBR only near the Earth. Experimental confirmation of evolution of MBR, i.e., its probing in remote epochs, might obviously present a direct verification of the hypothesis of hot expanding Universe. The carriers of similar cosmological information should be particles which, firstly, effectively interact with MBR, and secondly, make it possible to identify unambiguously the epoch of interaction. A possibility to verify a number of cosmological hypotheses by searching the cutoffs in spectra of ultrahigh energy gamma-rays (UHEGR) from extragalactic sources is discussed.

  18. Pile-up recovery in gamma-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Vencelj, Matjaz; Likar, Andrej; Loeher, Bastian; Miklavec, Mojca; Novak, Roman; Pietralla, Norbert; Savran, Deniz

    2012-07-09

    Count rates in gamma-ray detectors are fundamentally limited at the high end by the physics of the detection process but should not be limited further by the design of read-out. Using intense stimuli, such as the ELI, it is desirable to extract the full wealth of information flow that sensors can deliver. We discuss the photon-statistical limitations of scintillation systems and charge-collection issues of solid-state detectors. With high-speed digitizing in particular, two promising approach architectures are those of posterior list mode corrections and of time-domain adaptive filters, introducing a 'rich list mode with uncertainties' and thus a somewhat different look at experimental spectra. Real-time performance is also considered.

  19. Linear combination reading program for capture gamma rays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Allan B.

    1971-01-01

    This program computes a weighting function, Qj, which gives a scalar output value of unity when applied to the spectrum of a desired element and a minimum value (considering statistics) when applied to spectra of materials not containing the desired element. Intermediate values are obtained for materials containing the desired element, in proportion to the amount of the element they contain. The program is written in the BASIC language in a format specific to the Hewlett-Packard 2000A Time-Sharing System, and is an adaptation of an earlier program for linear combination reading for X-ray fluorescence analysis (Tanner and Brinkerhoff, 1971). Following the program is a sample run from a study of the application of the linear combination technique to capture-gamma-ray analysis for calcium (report in preparation).

  20. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) Above Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2012-01-01

    Intense of gamma rays have been observed by five different space-borne detectors. The TGFs have hard spectra, with photons extending to over 50 MeV. Most of these flashes last less than a millisecond. Relativistic electrons and positrons associated with TGFs are also seen by orbiting instruments In a special mode of operation, the Fermi-GBM detectors are now detecting an average of about one TGF every two hours. The Fermi spacecraft has been performing special orientations this year which has allowed the Fermi-LAT instrument also detect TGFs. The most likely origin of these high energy photons is bremsstrahlung radiation from electrons, produced by relativistic runaway electrons in intense electric fields within or above thunderstorm regions; the altitude of origin is uncertain. These TGFs may produce an appreciable radiation dose to passengers and crew in nearby aircraft. The observational aspects of TGFs will be the main focus of this talk; theoretical aspects remain speculative.

  1. Radiation measurement above the lunar surface by Kaguya gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Kusano, Hiroki; Hareyama, Matoko; Ideguchi, Yusuke; Shimizu, Sota; Shibamura, Eido

    The lunar surface is filled with various ionizing radiations such as high energy galactic particles, albedo particles and secondary radiations of neutrons, gamma rays and other elementary particles. A high-resolution Kaguya Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (KGRS) was carried on the Japan’s lunar explorer SELENE (Kaguya), the largest lunar orbiter since the Apollo missions. The KGRS instrument employed, for the first time in lunar exploration, a high-purity Ge crystal to increase the identification capability of elemental gamma-ray lines. The Ge detector is surrounded by BGO and plastic counters as for anticoincidence shields. The KGRS measured gamma rays in the energy range from 200 keV to 13 MeV with high precision to determine the chemical composition of the lunar surface. It provided data on the abundance of major elements over the entire lunar surface. In addition to the gamma-ray observation by the KGRS, it successfully measured the global distribution of fast neutrons. In the energy spectra of gamma-rays observed by the KGRS, several saw-tooth- peaks of Ge are included, which are formed by the collision interaction of lunar fast neutrons with Ge atoms in the Ge crystal. With these saw-tooth-peaks analysis, global distribution of neutrons emitted from the lunara surface was successfully created, which was compared with the previous results obtained by Lunar Prospector neutron maps. Another anticoincidence counter, the plastic counter with 5 mm thickness, was used to veto radiation events mostly generated by charged particles. A single photomultiplier serves to count scintillation light from the plastic scintillation counter. The global map of counting rates observed by the plastic counter was also created, implying that the radiation counting rate implies the geological distribution, in spite that the plastic counter mostly measures high energy charged particles and energetic neutrons. These results are presented and discussed.

  2. The measurement and interpretation of the cosmic gamma-ray spectrum between 0.3 and 27 MeV as obtained during the Apollo mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, L. E.; Trombka, J. I.; Metzger, A. E.; Arnold, J. R.; Matteson, J. I.; Reedy, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The cosmic gamma ray background spectra measured by Apollo 15 between 0.3 and 27 MeV during transearth orbit are examined. Both discrete line spectra and diffuse sources were measured. Data are included on energy loss spectra, equivalent photon spectra, spallation corrections, and cosmic photon spectra.

  3. Models for Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, Stan

    Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts are the brightest stellar mass explosions in the universe. As such, they serve as cosmic beacons for probing cosmic structure and diagnosing the properties of stars and the universe when it was young. They also produce black holes and neutron stars, interesting in themselves as laboratories where exotic physics comes into play, and they make the elements from which life arises. Consequently, supernovae and gamma-ray bursts are subject to intense study by many NASA missions. We propose focused studies in five areas of supernova research that are directly relevant to NASA's missions, especially SWIFT, HST, JWST, and planning for WFIRST. Our specific topics are a) models for Type Ia supernovae; b) extreme supernovae and first supernovae; c) magnetar-powered supernovae; d) ultra-long duration gamma-ray bursts; and e) shock breakout in supernovae. These phenomena all have in common their importance to NASA missions and the fact that they can be studied using similar tools - computer codes that do radiation hydrodynamics. Our two principal codes, KEPLER (one-dimension) and CASTRO (one to three dimensions), have been honed to the task by years of supernova modeling, and have some unique capabilities. Type Ia supernovae have long been of interest to NASA, but their importance has increased lately because of their utility in determining cosmic distances and because a string of recent observational breakthroughs has severely limited their progenitors. Responding to these developments, we propose to focus on a class of model we have previously neglected, the merger of two white dwarfs. The mergers will be studied with KEPLER and CASTRO in one and two dimensions, and the spectra and light curves determined. The library of model results will be useful in interpreting the results of present NASA missions and planning new ones. A second important area of investigation will be the study of first generation stars and the supernovae that they produce

  4. Gamma ray burst outflows and afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian J.

    2008-08-01

    We carry out a theoretical investigation of jet propagation in Gamma Ray Bursts and examine the jitter radiation mechanism as a means of producing prompt and afterglow emission. We study the long-term evolution of relativistic jets in collapsars and examine the effects of viewing angle on the subsequent gamma ray bursts. Our simulations allow us to single out three phases in the jet evolution: a precursor phase in which relativistic material turbulently shed from the head of the jet first emerges from the star; a shocked jet phase where a fully shocked jet of material is emerging; and an unshocked jet phase where the jet consists of a free-streaming, unshocked core surrounded by a thin boundary layer of shocked jet material. We also carry out a series of simulations with central engines that vary on long time periods comparable to the breakout time of the jet, on short time periods (0.1s) much less than the breakout time, and finally that decay as a power law at late times. We conclude that rapid variability seen in prompt GRB emission, as well as shallow decays and flares seen in the X-ray afterglow, can be caused by central engine variability. Finally, we present a detailed computation of the jitter radiation spectrum, including self-absorption, for electrons inside Weibel-like shock- generated magnetic fields. We apply our results to the case of the prompt and afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts. We conclude that jitter and synchrotron afterglows can be distinguished from each other with good quality observations. However, it is unlikely that the difference can explain the peculiar behavior of several recent observations, such as flat X-ray slopes and uncorrelated optical and X-ray behavior.

  5. Enhanced Analysis Techniques for an Imaging Neutron and Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Amanda C.

    The presence of gamma rays and neutrons is a strong indicator of the presence of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The imaging Neutron and gamma ray SPECTrometer (NSPECT) developed by the University of New Hampshire and Michigan Aerospace corporation detects the fast neutrons and prompt gamma rays from fissile material, and the gamma rays from radioactive material. The instrument operates as a double scatter device, requiring a neutron or a gamma ray to interact twice in the instrument. While this detection requirement decreases the efficiency of the instrument, it offers superior background rejection and the ability to measure the energy and momentum of the incident particle. These measurements create energy spectra and images of the emitting source for source identification and localization. The dual species instrument provides superior detection than a single species alone. In realistic detection scenarios, few particles are detected from a potential threat due to source shielding, detection at a distance, high background, and weak sources. This contributes to a small signal to noise ratio, and threat detection becomes difficult. To address these difficulties, several enhanced data analysis tools were developed. A Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC) helps set instrumental alarm thresholds as well as to identify the presence of a source. Analysis of a dual-species ROC curve provides superior detection capabilities. Bayesian analysis helps to detect and identify the presence of a source through model comparisons, and helps create a background corrected count spectra for enhanced spectroscopy. Development of an instrument response using simulations and numerical analyses will help perform spectra and image deconvolution. This thesis will outline the principles of operation of the NSPECT instrument using the double scatter technology, traditional analysis techniques, and enhanced analysis techniques as applied to data from the NSPECT instrument, and an

  6. Gamma-ray Spectral Characteristics of Thermal and Non-thermal Emission from Three Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, James C.; Wheaton, William A.

    2004-01-01

    Cygnus X-1 and the gamma-ray transients GROJ0422+32 and GROJ1719-24 displayed similar spectral properties when they underwent transitions between the high and low gamma-ray (30 keV to few MeV) intensity states. When these sources were in the high (gamma)-ray intensity state ((gamma)2, for Cygnus X-l), their spectra featured two components: a Comptonized shape below 200-300 keV with a soft power-law tail (photon index >= 3) that extended to 1 MeV or beyond. When the sources were in the low-intensity state ((gamma)0, for Cygnus X-l), the Comptonized spectral shape below 200 keV typically vanished and the entire spectrum from 30 keV to 1 MeV can be characterized by a single power law with a relatively harder photon index 2-2.7. Consequently the high- and low-intensity gamma-ray spectra intersect, generally in the 400 KeV - 1 MeV range, in contrast to the spectral pivoting seen previously at lower (10 keV) energies. The presence of the power-law component in both the high- and low-intensity gammaray spectra strongly suggests that the non-thermal process is likely to be at work in both the high and the low-intensity situations. We have suggested a possible scenario (Ling & Wheaton, 2003), by combining the ADAF model of Esin et al. (1998) with a separate jet region that produces the non-thermal gamma-ray emission, and which explains the state transitions. Such a scenario will be discussed in the context of the observational evidence, summarized above, from the database produced by EBOP, JPL's BATSE earth occultation analysis system.

  7. Global Elemental Maps of the Moon Using Gamma Rays Measured by the Kaguya (SELENE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, Robert C.; Hasebe, N.; Yamashita, N.; Karouji, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Hareyama, M.; Hayatsu, K.; Okudaira, O.; Kobayashi, M.; d'Uston, C.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Diez, B.; Kim, K.

    2009-09-01

    The Kaguya spacecraft was in a circular polar lunar orbit from 17 October 2007 until 10 June 2009 as part of JAXA's SELENE lunar exploration program. Among the 13 instruments, an advanced gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) studied the distributions of many elements. The gamma rays were from the decay of the naturally-radioactive elements K, Th, and U and from cosmic-ray interactions with H, O, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and other elements. They are emitted from the top few tens of centimeters of the lunar surface. The main detector of the GRS was high-purity germanium, which was surrounded by bismuth germanate and plastic scintillators to reduce backgrounds. Gamma-ray spectra were sent to the Earth every 17 seconds (1 degree of the lunar surface) with energies from 0-12 MeV. These spectra were adjusted to a standard gain and then summed over many lunar regions. Background spectra were also determined. Over 200 gamma rays have been observed, with most being backgrounds but many being from the lunar surface, an order more gamma rays than from any previous lunar GRS missions. Elemental results have been determined for K, Th, and U. Results for K and Th are consistent with those from the GRS on Apollo and Lunar Prospector. The first lunar global maps for U have been determined. These 3 elements show strong correlations among themselves, which implies that the Moon is homogeneous in these elements over the entire Moon. Their elemental ratios agree well with those measured in lunar samples and meteorites. Preliminary maps for Fe are consistent with earlier maps. Other elements, including O, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, are being mapped, and their distributions vary over the lunar surface and appear consistent with previous lunar elemental results. This work was supported by JAXA, NASA, and CNRS, France.

  8. Gamma-ray burster counterparts - Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cline, Thomas L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barat, C.; Estulin, I. V.; Evans, W. D.; Fenimore, E. E.; Hurley, K.

    1989-01-01

    Many observers and theorists have suggested that gamma-ray bursters (GRBs) are related to highly magnetized rotating, neutron stars, in which case an analogy with pulsars implies that GRBs would be prodigious emitters of polarized radio emission during quiescence. The paper reports on a survey conducted with the Very Large Array radio telescope of 10 small GRB error regions for quiescent radio emission at wavelengths of 2, 6, and 20 cm. The sensitivity of the survey varied from 0.1 to 0.8 mJy. The observations did indeed reveal four radio sources inside the GRB error regions.

  9. THE ORTHOGONAL GAMMA-RAY BURST MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Pugliese, Daniela; Nathanail, Antonios

    2014-01-01

    We explore the analogy between a rotating magnetized black hole and an axisymmetric pulsar and derive the black hole's electromagnetic spindown after its formation in the core collapse of a supermassive star. The spindown shows two characteristic phases: an early Blandford-Znajek phase that lasts a few hundred seconds and a late pulsar-like afterglow phase that lasts much longer. During the first phase, the spindown luminosity decreases almost exponentially, whereas during the afterglow phase it decreases as t {sup –a} with 1 ≲ a ≲ 1.5. We associate our findings with long duration gamma-ray bursts and compare them with observations.

  10. Gamma-Ray Fuel Gauges for Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Mall, Gerald H.; Chegini, Hoshang

    1987-01-01

    Accurate system overcomes problems of capacitance gauges. Feasibility study conducted on use of attenuation of gamma rays to measure quantities of fuel in tanks. Studies with weak Am241 59.5-keV radiation source indicate it is possible to monitor continuously fuel quantity in tanks to accuracy of better than 1 percent. Measurements also indicate easily measurable differences in physical properties and resultant attenuation characteristics of JP-4, JP-5, and Jet A fuels. Am241-based densitometers currently in use aboard some aircraft . Estimated complete system, including microprocessor and associated display devices, assembled at cost of less than $10,000 per fuel tank.

  11. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Blumenthal, G.; Brock, M.

    1994-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic ad the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the bursts cannot be excluded.

  12. Gamma Ray Bursts: an Enigma Being Unraveled

    SciTech Connect

    De Rujula, Alvaro

    2003-05-14

    The best astrophysical accelerators are quasars and the 'progenitors' of GRBs which, after decades of observations and scores of theories, we still do not understand. But, I shall argue, we now know quite well where GRBs come from, and we understand how their 'beams' behave, as they make short pulses of gamma rays and long-duration X-ray, optical and radio 'afterglows'. I shall argue that our understanding of these phenomena, based on the 'Cannonball Model', is unusually simple, precise and successful. The 'sociology' of GRBs is interesting per se and, in this sense, the avatars of the Cannonball Model in confronting the generally accepted 'fireball models' are also quite revealing.

  13. Gamma ray lines from interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.

    1976-01-01

    The existence of very narrow (FWHM or approximately = 5 KeV) gamma ray line emission from interstellar grains is pointed out. The prime candidate for detection is the line at 6.129 Mev from O-16, but other very narrow lines could also be detected at 0.847, 1.369, 1.634, 1.779 and 2.313 Mev from Fe-56, Mg-24, Ne-20, Si-28 and N-14. Measurements of this line emission can provide information on the composition, size and spatial distribution of interstellar grains.

  14. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S.

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  15. Radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis by a linear combination technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.; Bhargava, R.C.; Senftle, F.E.; Brinkerhoff, J.M.

    1972-01-01

    The linear combination technique, when applied to a gamma-ray spectrum, gives a single number indicative of the extent to which the spectral lines of a sought element are present in a complex spectrum. Spectra are taken of the sought element and of various other substances whose spectra interfere with that of the sought element. A weighting function is then computed for application to spectra of unknown materials. The technique was used to determine calcium by radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis in the presence of interfering elements, notably titanium, and the results were compared with those for two popular methods of peak area integration. Although linearity of response was similar for the methods, the linear combination technique was much better at rejecting interferences. For analyses involving mixtures of unknown composition the technique consequently offers improved sensitivity. ?? 1972.

  16. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results. 2. Localized sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma-ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR1818-04 and PSR1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma-ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Since the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma-ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma-ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. Using distance estimates it is found that PSR1818-04 has a gamma-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, while the luminosities of PSR1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. This survey of SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations has also yielded upper limits to gamma-ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars.

  17. Fermi gamma-ray imaging of a radio galaxy.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Georganopoulos, M; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sambruna, R; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stawarz, Ł; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; Hardcastle, M J; Kazanas, D

    2010-05-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The gamma-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton-scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. These measurements provide gamma-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields.

  18. Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

  19. Fermi gamma-ray imaging of a radio galaxy.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Georganopoulos, M; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sambruna, R; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stawarz, Ł; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; Hardcastle, M J; Kazanas, D

    2010-05-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The gamma-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton-scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. These measurements provide gamma-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields. PMID:20360067

  20. A model of the diffuse galactic gamma ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreekumar, Parameswaran

    1990-01-01

    The galaxy was observed to be a source of high energy gamma rays as shown by the two successful satellite experiments, SAS-2 and COS-B. It is generally understood that these diffuse gamma rays result from interactions between energetic cosmic rays and interstellar gas. This work makes use of the most recent data on the distribution of atomic and molecular hydrogen in the galaxy along with new estimates of gamma ray production functions to model the diffuse galactic gamma ray emission. The model allows various spatial distributions for cosmic rays in the Galaxy including non-axisymmetric ones. In the light of the expected data from EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope), an improved model of cosmic ray-matter-gamma ray interaction will provide new insights into the distribution of cosmic rays and the strength of its coupling to matter.