Science.gov

Sample records for airborne gravity surveys

  1. The alpine Swiss-French airborne gravity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdun, Jérôme; Klingelé, Emile E.; Bayer, Roger; Cocard, Marc; Geiger, Alain; Kahle, Hans-Gert

    2003-01-01

    In February 1998, a regional-scale, airborne gravity survey was carried out over the French Occidental Alps within the framework of the GéoFrance 3-D research program.The survey consisted of 18 NS and 16 EW oriented lines with a spacing of 10 and 20 km respectively, covering the whole of the Western French Alps (total area: 50 000 km2; total distance of lines flown: 10 000 km). The equipment was mounted in a medium-size aircraft (DeHavilland Twin Otter) flowing at a constant altitude of 5100 m a.s.l, and at a mean ground speed of about 280 km h-1. Gravity was measured using a LaCoste & Romberg relative, air/sea gravimeter (type SA) mounted on a laser gyro stabilized platform. Data from 5 GPS antennae located on fuselage and wings and 7 ground-based GPS reference stations were used to determine position and aircraft induced accelerations.The gravimeter passband was derived by comparing the vertical accelerations provided by the gravimeter with those estimated from the GPS positions. This comparison showed that the gravimeter is not sensitive to very short wavelength aircraft accelerations, and therefore a simplified formulation for computing airborne gravity measurements was developed. The intermediate and short wavelength, non-gravitational accelerations were eliminated by means of digital, exponential low-pass filters (cut-off wavelength: 16 km). An important issue in airborne gravimetry is the reliability of the airborne gravity surveys when compared to ground surveys. In our studied area, the differences between the airborne-acquired Bouguer anomaly and the ground upward-continued Bouguer anomaly of the Alps shows a good agreement: the rms of these differences is equal to 7.68 mGal for a spatial resolution of 8 km. However, in some areas with rugged topography, the amplitudes of those differences have a striking correlation with the topography. We then argue that the choice of an appropriate density (reduction by a factor of 10 per cent) for computing the

  2. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  3. An integrated airborne gravity survey of an offshore area near the northern Noto Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komazawa, Masao; Okuma, Shigeo; Segawa, Jiro

    2010-02-01

    An airborne gravity survey using a helicopter was carried out in October 2008, offshore along the northern Noto Peninsula, to understand the shallow and regional underground structure. Eleven flight lines, including three tie lines, were arranged at 2km spacing within 20km of the coast. The total length of the flight lines was ~700km. The Bouguer anomalies computed from the airborne gravimetry are consistent with those computed from land and shipborne gravimetry, which gradually decrease in the offshore direction. So, the accuracy of the airborne system is considered to be adequate. A local gravity low in Wajima Bay, which was already known from seafloor gravimetry, was also observed. This suggests that the airborne system has a structural resolution of ~2km. Reduction of gravity data to a common datum was conducted by compiling the three kinds of gravity data, from airborne, shipborne, and land surveys. In the present study, we have used a solid angle numerical integration method and an iteration method. We finally calculated the gravity anomalies at 300m above sea level. We needed to add corrections of 2-5mGals in order to compile the airborne and shipborne gravity data smoothly, so the accuracy of the Bouguer anomaly map is considered to be nearly 2mGal on the whole, and 5mGals at worst in limited or local areas.

  4. Digital data from the Great Sand Dunes airborne gravity gradient survey, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drenth, B.J.; Abraham, J.D.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Labson, V.F.; Hodges, G.

    2013-01-01

    This report contains digital data and supporting explanatory files describing data types, data formats, and survey procedures for a high-resolution airborne gravity gradient (AGG) survey at Great Sand Dunes National Park, Alamosa and Saguache Counties, south-central Colorado. In the San Luis Valley, the Great Sand Dunes survey covers a large part of Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve. The data described were collected from a high-resolution AGG survey flown in February 2012, by Fugro Airborne Surveys Corp., on contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. Scientific objectives of the AGG survey are to investigate the subsurface structural framework that may influence groundwater hydrology and seismic hazards, and to investigate AGG methods and resolution using different flight specifications. Funding was provided by an airborne geophysics training program of the U.S. Department of Defense's Task Force for Business & Stability Operations.

  5. Geodetic and geophysical results from a Taiwan airborne gravity survey: Data reduction and accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Hsiao, Yu-Shen; Shih, Hsuan-Chang; Yang, Ming; Chen, Kwo-Hwa; Forsberg, Rene; Olesen, Arne V.

    2007-04-01

    An airborne gravity survey was conducted over Taiwan using a LaCoste and Romberg (LCR) System II air-sea gravimeter with gravity and global positioning system (GPS) data sampled at 1 Hz. The aircraft trajectories were determined using a GPS network kinematic adjustment relative to eight GPS tracking stations. Long-wavelength errors in position are reduced when doing numerical differentiations for velocity and acceleration. A procedure for computing resolvable wavelength of error-free airborne gravimetry is derived. The accuracy requirements of position, velocity, and accelerations for a 1-mgal accuracy in gravity anomaly are derived. GPS will fulfill these requirements except for vertical acceleration. An iterative Gaussian filter is used to reduce errors in vertical acceleration. A compromising filter width for noise reduction and gravity detail is 150 s. The airborne gravity anomalies are compared with surface values, and large differences are found over high mountains where the gravity field is rough and surface data density is low. The root mean square (RMS) crossover differences before and after a bias-only adjustment are 4.92 and 2.88 mgal, the latter corresponding to a 2-mgal standard error in gravity anomaly. Repeatability analyses at two survey lines suggest that GPS is the dominating factor affecting the repeatability. Fourier transform and least-squares collocation are used for downward continuation, and the latter produces a better result. Two geoid models are computed, one using airborne and surface gravity data and the other using surface data only, and the former yields a better agreement with the GPS-derived geoidal heights. Bouguer anomalies derived from airborne gravity by a rigorous numerical integration reveal important tectonic features.

  6. Error analysis of a new planar electrostatic gravity gradiometer for airborne surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douch, Karim; Panet, Isabelle; Pajot-Métivier, Gwendoline; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Lequentrec-Lalancette, Marie-Françoise; Diament, Michel

    2015-12-01

    Moving-base gravity gradiometry has proven to be a convenient method to determine the Earth's gravity field. The ESA mission GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) has enabled to map the Earth gravity field and its gradients with a resolution of 80 km, leading to significant advances in physical oceanography and solid Earth physics. At smaller scales, airborne gravity gradiometry has been increasingly used during the past decade in mineral and hydrocarbon exploration. In both cases the sensitivity of gradiometers to the short wavelengths of the gravity field is of crucial interest. Here, we quantify and characterize the error on the gravity gradients estimated from measurements performed with a new instrument concept, called GREMLIT, for typical airborne conditions. GREMLIT is an ultra-sensitive planar gravitational gradiometer which consists in a planar acceleration gradiometer together with 3 gyroscopes. To conduct this error analysis, a simulation of a realistic airborne survey with GREMLIT is carried out. We first simulate realistic GREMLIT synthetic data, taking into account the acceleration gradiometer and gyroscope noises and biases and the variation of orientation of the measurement reference frame. Then, we estimate the gravity gradients from these data. Special attention is paid to the processing of the gyroscopes measurements whose accuracy is not commensurate with the ultra-sensitive gradiometer. We propose a method to calibrate the gyroscopes biases with a precision of the order 10^{-8} rad/s. In order to transform the tensor from the measurement frame to the local geodetic frame, we estimate the error induced when replacing the non-measured elements of the gravity gradient tensor by an a priori model. With the appropriate smoothing, we show that it is possible to achieve a precision better than 2E for an along-track spatial resolution of 2 km.

  7. Airborne Gravity Survey and Ground Gravity in Afghanistan: A Website for Distribution of Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abraham, Jared D.; Anderson, Eric D.; Drenth, Benjamin J.; Finn, Carol A.; Kucks, Robert P.; Lindsay, Charles R.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Sweeney, Ronald E.

    2008-01-01

    Afghanistan?s geologic setting suggests significant natural resource potential. Although important mineral deposits and petroleum resources have been identified, much of the country?s potential remains unknown. Airborne geophysical surveys are a well- accepted and cost-effective method for remotely obtaining information of the geological setting of an area. A regional airborne geophysical survey was proposed due to the security situation and the large areas of Afghanistan that have not been covered using geophysical exploration methods. Acting upon the request of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Ministry of Mines, the U.S. Geological Survey contracted with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory to jointly conduct an airborne geophysical and remote sensing survey of Afghanistan. Data collected during this survey will provide basic information for mineral and petroleum exploration studies that are important for the economic development of Afghanistan. Additionally, use of these data is broadly applicable in the assessment of water resources and natural hazards, the inventory and planning of civil infrastructure and agricultural resources, and the construction of detailed maps. The U.S. Geological Survey is currently working in cooperation with the U.S. Agency of International Development to conduct resource assessments of the country of Afghanistan for mineral, energy, coal, and water resources, and to assess geologic hazards. These geophysical and remote sensing data will be used directly in the resource and hazard assessments.

  8. On the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolkas, Dimitrios; Fotopoulos, Georgia; Braun, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    In gravity field modeling, fused models that utilize satellite, airborne and terrestrial gravity observations are often employed to deal with erroneous terrestrially derived gravity datasets. These terrestrial datasets may suffer from long-wavelength systematic errors and inhomogeneous data coverage, which are not prevalent in airborne and satellite datasets. Airborne gravity acquisition plays an essential role in gravity field modeling, providing valuable information of the Earth's gravity field at medium and short wavelengths. Thus, assessing the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models is important for identifying problematic regions. Six study regions that represent different gravity field variability and terrestrial data point-density characteristics are investigated to quantify the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models. The numerical assessments of these representative regions resulted in predictions of airborne gravity impact for individual states and provinces in the USA and Canada, respectively. Prediction results indicate that, depending on the terrestrial data point-density and gravity field variability, the expected impact of airborne gravity can reach up to 3mGal (in terms of standard deviation) in Canada and Alaska (over areas of 1° × 1°). However, in the mainland US region, small changes are expected (0.2-0.4 mGal over areas of 1° × 1°) due to the availability of high spatial resolution terrestrial data. These results can serve as a guideline for setting airborne gravity data acquisition priorities and for improving future planning of airborne gravity surveys.

  9. On the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolkas, Dimitrios; Fotopoulos, Georgia; Braun, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    In gravity field modeling, fused models that utilize satellite, airborne and terrestrial gravity observations are often employed to deal with erroneous terrestrially derived gravity datasets. These terrestrial datasets may suffer from long-wavelength systematic errors and inhomogeneous data coverage, which are not prevalent in airborne and satellite datasets. Airborne gravity acquisition plays an essential role in gravity field modeling, providing valuable information of the Earth's gravity field at medium and short wavelengths. Thus, assessing the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models is important for identifying problematic regions. Six study regions that represent different gravity field variability and terrestrial data point-density characteristics are investigated to quantify the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models. The numerical assessments of these representative regions resulted in predictions of airborne gravity impact for individual states and provinces in the USA and Canada, respectively. Prediction results indicate that, depending on the terrestrial data point-density and gravity field variability, the expected impact of airborne gravity can reach up to 3mGal (in terms of standard deviation) in Canada and Alaska (over areas of 1° × 1°). However, in the mainland US region, small changes are expected (0.2-0.4 mGal over areas of 1° × 1°) due to the availability of high spatial resolution terrestrial data. These results can serve as a guideline for setting airborne gravity data acquisition priorities and for improving future planning of airborne gravity surveys.

  10. GTE: a new FFT based software to compute terrain correction on airborne gravity surveys in spherical approximation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, Martina; Sampietro, Daniele; Sansò, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The computation of the vertical attraction due to the topographic masses (Terrain Correction) is still a matter of study both in geodetic as well as in geophysical applications. In fact it is required in high precision geoid estimation by the remove-restore technique and it is used to isolate the gravitational effect of anomalous masses in geophysical exploration. This topographical effect can be evaluated from the knowledge of a Digital Terrain Model in different ways: e.g. by means of numerical integration, by prisms, tesseroids, polyedra or Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques. The increasing resolution of recently developed digital terrain models, the increasing number of observation points due to extensive use of airborne gravimetry and the increasing accuracy of gravity data represents nowadays major issues for the terrain correction computation. Classical methods such as prism or point masses approximations are indeed too slow while Fourier based techniques are usually too approximate for the required accuracy. In this work a new software, called Gravity Terrain Effects (GTE), developed in order to guarantee high accuracy and fast computation of terrain corrections is presented. GTE has been thought expressly for geophysical applications allowing the computation not only of the effect of topographic and bathymetric masses but also those due to sedimentary layers or to the Earth crust-mantle discontinuity (the so called Moho). In the present contribution we summarize the basic theory of the software and its practical implementation. Basically the GTE software is based on a new algorithm which, by exploiting the properties of the Fast Fourier Transform, allows to quickly compute the terrain correction, in spherical approximation, at ground or airborne level. Some tests to prove its performances are also described showing GTE capability to compute high accurate terrain corrections in a very short time. Results obtained for a real airborne survey with GTE

  11. Latest Advancement In Airborne Relative Gravity Instrumentation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, N.

    2011-12-01

    Airborne gravity surveying has been performed with widely varying degrees of success since early experimentation with the Lacoste and Romberg dynamic meter in the 1950s. There are a number of different survey systems currently in operation including relative gravity meters and gradiometers. Airborne gravity is ideally suited to rapid, wide coverage surveying and is not significantly more expensive in more remote and inhospitable terrain which makes airborne measurements one of the few viable options available for cost effective exploration. As improved instrumentation has become available, scientific applications have also been able to take advantage for use in determining sub surface geologic structures, for example under ice sheets in Antarctica, and more recently direct measurement of the geoid to improve the vertical datum in the United States. In 2004, Lacoste and Romberg (now Micro-g Lacoste) decided to build on their success with the newly developed AirSea II dynamic meter and use that system as the basis for a dedicated airborne gravity instrument. Advances in electronics, timing and positioning technology created the opportunity to refine both the hardware and software, and to develop a truly turnkey system that would work well for users with little or no airborne gravity experience as well as those with more extensive experience. The resulting Turnkey Airborne Gravity System (TAGS) was successfully introduced in 2007 and has since been flown in applications from oil, gas and mineral exploration surveys to regional gravity mapping and geoid mapping. The system has been mounted in a variety of airborne platforms including depending on the application of interest. The development experience with the TAGS enabled Micro-g Lacoste to embark on a new project in 2010 to completely redesign the mechanical and electronic components of the system rather than continuing incremental upgrades. Building on the capabilities of the original TAGS, the objectives for the

  12. Improved Airborne Gravity Results Using New Relative Gravity Sensor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, N.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne gravity data has contributed greatly to our knowledge of subsurface geophysics particularly in rugged and otherwise inaccessible areas such as Antarctica. Reliable high quality GPS data has renewed interest in improving the accuracy of airborne gravity systems and recent improvements in the electronic control of the sensor have increased the accuracy and ability of the classic Lacoste and Romberg zero length spring gravity meters to operate in turbulent air conditions. Lacoste and Romberg type gravity meters provide increased sensitivity over other relative gravity meters by utilizing a mass attached to a horizontal beam which is balanced by a ';zero length spring'. This type of dynamic gravity sensor is capable of measuring gravity changes on the order of 0.05 milliGals in laboratory conditions but more commonly 0.7 to 1 milliGal in survey use. The sensor may have errors induced by the electronics used to read the beam position as well as noise induced by unwanted accelerations, commonly turbulence, which moves the beam away from its ideal balance position otherwise known as the reading line. The sensor relies on a measuring screw controlled by a computer which attempts to bring the beam back to the reading line position. The beam is also heavily damped so that it does not react to most unwanted high frequency accelerations. However this heavily damped system is slow to react, particularly in turns where there are very high Eotvos effects. New sensor technology utilizes magnetic damping of the beam coupled with an active feedback system which acts to effectively keep the beam locked at the reading line position. The feedback system operates over the entire range of the system so there is now no requirement for a measuring screw. The feedback system operates at very high speed so that even large turbulent events have minimal impact on data quality and very little, if any, survey line data is lost because of large beam displacement errors. Airborne testing

  13. Airborne Gravity Gradiometry Resolves a Full Range of Gravity Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataragio, J.; Brewster, J.; Mims, J.

    2007-12-01

    Airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (Air\\-FTGR) was flown at high altitude coincident with Airborne Gravity (AG) flown in 2003 in West Arnhem Land, Australia. A preliminary analysis of two data sets indicates that the Air\\-FTGR system has the capability of resolving intermediate to long wavelengths features that may be associated with relatively deeper geological structures. A comparison of frequency filtered slices and power spectral density (PSD) for both data sets using the short (> 5 km), intermediate (10 km) and long (20 km) wavelengths reveals that high altitude Air\\-FTGR data show greater response in high frequency anomalies than a conventional Airborne Gravity and matches well with the AG even at the longest wavelengths anomalies. The effect of line spacing and target resolution was examined between the two data sets. Reprocessed gradient and AG data at 2, 4 and 6 km line spacing suggest that Air\\-FTGR could be effectively flown at a comparatively wider line spacing to resolve similar targets the AG would resolve with tighter line spacing. Introduction Airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (Air\\-FTGR) data have been available to the mining industry since 2002 and their use for geologic applications is well established. However, Air\\-FTGR data has been mostly considered and used in mapping and delineation of near surface geological targets. This is due to the fact that gravity gradiometer measurements are well suited to capture the high frequency signal associated with near\\-surface targets ( Li, 2001). This is possible because the gradiometer signal strength falls off with the cube of the distance to the target. Nonetheless, in recent years there has been an increasing demand from the mining, oil, and gas industry in utilizing Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometer as a mapping tool for both regional and prospect level surveys. Air\\-FTGR as a Regional Mapping Tool Several, relatively low altitude surveys have been successfully flown in Brazil, Canada and Australia

  14. Gravity field of the Western Weddell Sea: Comparison of airborne gravity and Geosat derived gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R. E.; Brozena, J. M.; Haxby, W. F.; Labrecque, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    Marine gravity surveying in polar regions was typically difficult and costly, requiring expensive long range research vessels and ice-breakers. Satellite altimetry can recover the gravity field in these regions where it is feasible to survey with a surface vessel. Unfortunately, the data collected by the first global altimetry mission, Seasat, was collected only during the austral winter, producing a very poor quality gravitational filed for the southern oceans, particularly in the circum-Antarctic regions. The advent of high quality airborne gravity (Brozena, 1984; Brozena and Peters, 1988; Bell, 1988) and the availability of satellite altimetry data during the austral summer (Sandwell and McAdoo, 1988) has allowed the recovery of a free air gravity field for most of the Weddell Sea. The derivation of the gravity field from both aircraft and satellite measurements are briefly reviewed, before presenting along track comparisons and shaded relief maps of the Weddell Sea gravity field based on these two data sets.

  15. Airborne Gravity Data Enhances NGS Experimental Gravimetric Geoid in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, S. A.; Childers, V. A.; Li, X.; Roman, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Geodetic Survey [NGS], through their Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum [GRAV-D] program, continues to update its gravimetry holdings by flying new airborne gravity surveys over a large fraction of the USA and its territories. By 2022, NGS intends that all orthometric heights in the USA will be determined in the field by using a reliable national gravimetric geoid model to transform from geodetic heights obtained from GPS. Several airborne campaigns have already been flown over Alaska and its coastline. Some of this Alaskan coastal data have been incorporated into a new NGS experimental geoid model - xGEOID14. The xGEOID14 model is the first in a series of annual experimental geoid models that will incorporate NGS GRAV-D airborne data. This series provides a useful benchmark for assessing and improving current techniques by which the airborne and land-survey data are filtered and cleaned, and then combined with satellite gravity models, elevation data (etc.) with the ultimate aim of computing a geoid model that can support a national physical height system by 2022. Here we will examine the NGS GRAV-D airborne data in Alaska, and assess its contribution to xGEOID14. Future prospects for xGEOID15 will also be considered.

  16. Three years of practical use of airborne gravity gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, E.

    2003-04-01

    BHP Billiton has successfully built and deployed three airborne gravity gradiometer (AGG) systems, (Newton, Einstein and Galileo) based upon the Bell Airspace (now Lockheed Martin) Gravity Gradient Instruments developed for the United States Department of Defense. A second-generation gradiometer (Feynman) is presently nearing completion. The GGI technology is based on groups of four (4) accelerometers where the accelerometers are equi-spaced on a circle. The configuration successfully rejects both common mode accelerations and rotations about the axis perpendicular to the plane of the complement. The GGI is mounted within an aircraft in a specially designed, inertially stabilized platform, which significantly reduces sensitivity to noise and turbulence. The BHP Billiton AGG Technology provides high quality gravity maps with a resolution and sensitivity to map gravity anomalies associated with both minerals and hydrocarbon deposits. To date the purpose built and designed hardware and data processing algorithms, in conjunction with several other geophysical survey instruments, have been deployed against a broad range of mineral and hydrocarbon targets, a total of over 300,000km of operational flights having been made. Data will also be presented on the in-flight sensitivity of a gravity gradiometer to the airborne environment. It will also outline some of the many unexpected problems that were encountered in the 18-month flight trials required to achieve satisfactory airborne operation.

  17. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

  18. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  19. The Role of Aircraft Motion in Airborne Gravity Data Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Damiani, T.; Weil, C.; Preaux, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many factors contribute to the quality of airborne gravity data measured with LaCoste and Romberg-type sensors, such as the Micro-g LaCoste Turnkey Airborne Gravity System used by the National Geodetic Survey's GRAV-D (Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum) Project. For example, it is well documented that turbulence is a big factor in the overall noise level of the measurement. Turbulence is best controlled by avoidance; thus flights in the GRAV-D Project are only undertaken when the predicted wind speeds at flight level are ≤ 40 kts. Tail winds are known to be particularly problematic. The GRAV-D survey operates on a number of aircraft in a variety of wind conditions and geographic locations, and an obvious conclusion from our work to date is that the aircraft itself plays an enormous role in the quality of the airborne gravity measurement. We have identified a number of features of the various aircraft which can be determined to play a role: the autopilot, the size and speed of the aircraft, inherent motion characteristics of the airframe, tip tanks and other modifications to the airframe to reduce motion, to name the most important. This study evaluates the motion of a number of the GRAV-D aircraft and looks at the correlation between this motion and the noise characteristics of the gravity data. The GRAV-D Project spans 7 years and 42 surveys, so we have a significant body of data for this evaluation. Throughout the project, the sensor suite has included an inertial measurement unit (IMU), first the Applanix POSAv, and then later the Honeywell MicroIRS IMU as a part of a NovAtel SPAN GPS/IMU system. We compare the noise characteristics of the data with measures of aircraft motion (via pitch, roll, and yaw captured by the IMU) using a variety of statistical tools. It is expected that this comparison will support the conclusion that certain aircraft tend to work well with this type of gravity sensor while others tend to be problematic in

  20. Sedimentary basin analysis using airborne gravity data: a case study from the Bohai Bay Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenyong; Liu, Yanxu; Zhou, Jianxin; Zhou, Xihua; Li, Bing

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the application of an airborne gravity survey to sedimentary basin analysis. Using high-precision airborne gravity data constrained by drilling and seismic data from the Bohai Bay Basin in eastern China, we interpreted faults, structural elements, sedimentary thickness, structural styles and local structures (belts) in the central area of the Basin by the wavelet transform method. Subsequently, these data were subtracted from the Bouguer gravity to calculate the residual gravity anomalies. On this basis, the faults were interpreted mainly by linear zones of high gravity gradients and contour distortion, while the sedimentary thicknesses were computed by the Euler deconvolution. The structural styles were identified by the combination of gravity anomalies and the local structures interpreted by the first vertical derivative of the residual gravity. The results showed evidence for seven faults, one sag and ten new local structure belts.

  1. On the spectral combination of satellite gravity model, terrestrial and airborne gravity data for local gravimetric geoid computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yan Ming

    2016-07-01

    One of the challenges for geoid determination is the combination of heterogeneous gravity data. Because of the distinctive spectral content of different data sets, spectral combination is a suitable candidate for its solution. The key to have a successful combination is to determine the proper spectral weights, or the error degree variances of each data set. In this paper, the error degree variances of terrestrial and airborne gravity data at low degrees are estimated by the aid of a satellite gravity model using harmonic analysis. For higher degrees, the error covariances are estimated from local gravity data first, and then used to compute the error degree variances. The white and colored noise models are also used to estimate the error degree variances of local gravity data for comparisons. Based on the error degree variances, the spectral weights of satellite gravity models, terrestrial and airborne gravity data are determined and applied for geoid computation in Texas area. The computed gravimetric geoid models are tested against an independent, highly accurate geoid profile of the Geoid Slope Validation Survey 2011 (GSVS11). The geoid computed by combining satellite gravity model GOCO03S and terrestrial (land and DTU13 altimetric) gravity data agrees with GSVS11 to ±1.1 cm in terms of standard deviation along a line of 325 km. After incorporating the airborne gravity data collected at 11 km altitude, the standard deviation is reduced to ±0.8 cm. Numerical tests demonstrate the feasibility of spectral combination in geoid computation and the contribution of airborne gravity in an area of high quality terrestrial gravity data. Using the GSVS11 data and the spectral combination, the degree of correctness of the error spectra and the quality of satellite gravity models can also be revealed.

  2. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  3. The DESIRE Airborne gravity project in the Dead Sea Basin and 3D numerical gravity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Goetze, H.; Meyer, U.; Group, D.

    2008-12-01

    This geo-scientific research focuses on the geological setting of the Dead Sea Transform (DST) and the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) and its resulting pull-apart basins. Since the late 1970s, crustal scale geophysical experiments have been carried out in this region. However, the nature of the crust underlying the eastern and western shoulders of the DSB and underneath the DST itself is still a hotly debated topic among researchers. To address one of the central questions of plate tectonics - How do large transform systems work and what are their typical features? - An international geoscientific Dead Sea Integrated Research project (DESIRE) is being conducted by colleagues from Germany, Israel, Palestine, and Jordan. In order to provide a high resolution gravity database that support 3D numerical modeling and hence a more comprehensive understanding of the nature and segmentation of the DST, an airborne gravity survey as a part of the DESIRE project has been carried out from February to March 2007. The airborne gravity survey covered the DST from Elat/Aqaba in the South to the northern rim of the Dead Sea. The low speed and terrain-following helicopter gravity flights were performed to acquire the highest possible data quality. In total, 32 north-south profiles and 16 west-east profiles crossing the DST have been measured. Most of the profiles concentrated in areas that lacked terrestrial gravity data coverage, e. g. over the shoulders of the DSB. The airborne gravity data are merged with existing conventional (terrestrial) data sets to provide a seamless gravity map of the area of interest. Using that combined gravity dataset and DESIRE wide angle refractions seismic interpretation we modified density structures in the DSB. As results we estimated that (1) the Moho depth varies from 26 km in the Israel side to 34 km in the Jordan side. (2) The maximum thickness of the Dead Sea sediment Basin is about 15 km. (3) The salt rock with an average thickness of about 5 km is

  4. National Geodetic Survey Gravity Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moose, R. E.

    1986-12-01

    In 1966, the U.S. National Gravity Base Network was established through the cooperative efforts of several government agencies and academic institutions involved in nationwide gravity observations. The network was reobserved between 1975 and 1979 by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) using field procedures designed to give high-quality gravity differences. The report discusses the adjustment and the areas where apparent gravity change was observed. NGS plans to densify and maintain this network and to improve the accuracy of the station values by additional high-quality relative ties and by making observations with a new, absolute gravity meter in each of the states.

  5. 3D unconstrained and geologically constrained stochastic inversion of airborne vertical gravity gradient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchikaya, Euloge Budet; Chouteau, Michel; Keating, Pierre; Shamsipour, Pejman

    2016-02-01

    We present an inversion tool for airborne gravity gradient data that yields a 3D density model using stochastic methods i.e. cokriging and conditional simulation. This method uses geostatistical properties of the measured gravity gradient to estimate a 3D density model whose gravity response fits the measured gravity gradient anomaly. Linearity between gravity gradient data and density allows estimation of the model (density) covariance using observed data, i.e. we adjust iteratively the density covariance matrix by fitting experimental and theoretical gravity gradient covariance matrices. Inversion can be constrained by including densities known at some locations. In addition we can explore various reasonable solutions that honour both the estimated density covariance model and the gravity gradient data using geostatistical simulation. The proposed method is first tested with two synthetic datasets generated from a sharp-boundary model and a smooth stochastic model respectively. The results show the method to be capable of retrieving models compatible with the true models; it also allows the integration of complex a priori information. The technique is then applied to gravity gradient survey data collected for the Geological Survey of Canada in the area of McFaulds Lake (Ontario, Canada) using the Falcon airborne gravity system. Unconstrained inversion returns a density model that is geologically plausible and the computed response exactly fits the observed gravity gradient anomaly.

  6. Environmental applications of gravity surveying

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, L.J. ); Nesbit, L.C. ); Khan, W.A. )

    1994-04-01

    The Allis Park Sanitary Landfill Company developed a new landfill near Onway, Michigan in an area which has glacial alluvium and glacial till overlying limestone. There are several solution karst features in the region and some critics had maintained that a new karst collapse could rupture the liner system and allow escape of leachate into the groundwater. The gravity survey was conducted to determine the extent of any karst development at the site. The first portion of the survey was two profiles over some karst features located about five miles southeast of the proposed landfill. These showed negative gravity anomalies. The survey of the proposed landfill site resulted in a 50 microGal contour map of the area and also showed a negative anomaly. This could be due to either elevation variations on the till to limestone bedrock surface or to karst development within the limestone. Because there was no evidence of historic development of new karst features in the region, the gravity anomaly was not further investigated. In another gravity survey, a large retail department store had been remodeled and extended over an area previously occupied by an auto service center. The removal of a waste oil storage tank (UST) had not been documented and the environmental consultant (KEMRON, Inc.) proposed that a gravity survey be used to find the tank location. This proposal was based on calculations of the gravity effects of a UST. The survey resulted in a four-microGal contour map which showed a couple of anomalies which could be due to a tank or a backfilled tank excavation. During the survey, a store employee identified the previous location of the tank and explained that she had personally witnessed its removal. Based on the employee's eye-witness account of the tank removal and the coincidence of her indicated tank location with one of the gravity anomalies the authors recommended the site be granted clean closure.

  7. New airborne-gravity and satellite gravity views of crustal structure in Antarctica (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraccioli, F.; Kusznir, N. J.; Scheinert, M.; Jordan, T. A.; Bell, R. E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.; Aitken, A.; Forsberg, R.; Anderson, L.; Jokat, W.; Mieth, M.; Armadillo, E.

    2013-12-01

    Gravity anomalies provide a tool to study crustal structure, effective elastic thickness, and isostatic and tectonic processes. Over the last 10 years major airborne gravity surveys were flown by the international community over several Antarctic frontiers. The longer-wavelength Antarctic gravity anomaly field is increasingly better resolved with satellite-gravity. These recent airborne and satellite gravity datasets provide novel perspectives on Antarctic crustal structure and geodynamic evolution. We review results from some of these surveys over the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains, Dronning Maud Land, the Wilkes Subglacial Basin, the Transantarctic Mountains and the West Antarctic Rift System and present gravity modelling outputs of crustal thickness for these regions. We contrast these gravity results with a seismically-derived estimation of Antarctic crustal thickness (Baranov and Morelli, 2013, Tectonophys). Anomalously thick East Antarctic crust lies beneath the Gamburtsev Mountains and parts of Dronning Maud Land (50-58 km). Crustal thickening may stem from the collision of a mosaic of East Antarctic crustal provinces in Meso to Neoproterozoic times (Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature), or during younger Edicaran to early Cambrian 'Pan-African age' orogenic events. The preservation of such thick crust provides significant support for the high bedrock topography in East Antarctica. Additional flexural uplift along the flanks of the Permian to Cretaceous East Antarctic Rift System helps explain the enigmatic Gamburtsev Mountains. Lithospheric flexure along the flank of the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) may explain the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM), the longest and highest non-compressional mountain range on Earth. Whether the Wilkes Subglacial Basin also developed in response to lithospheric flexure is debated. Our gravity models image thicker crust beneath the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) (ca 40 km thick), compared to the relatively thinner crust (30

  8. Fast 3D inversion of airborne gravity-gradiometry data using Lanczos bidiagonalization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaohai; Li, Fengting; Zhang, Dailei; Xu, Xuechun; Huang, Danian

    2016-09-01

    We developed a new fast inversion method for to process and interpret airborne gravity gradiometry data, which was based on Lanczos bidiagonalization algorithm. Here, we describe the application of this new 3D gravity gradiometry inversion method to recover a subsurface density distribution model from the airborne measured gravity gradiometry anomalies. For this purpose, the survey area is divided into a large number of rectangular cells with each cell possessing a constant unknown density. It is well known that the solution of large linear gravity gradiometry is an ill-posed problem since using the smoothest inversion method is considerably time consuming. We demonstrate that the Lanczos bidiagonalization method can be an appropriate algorithm to solve a Tikhonov solver time cost function for resolving the large equations within a short time. Lanczos bidiagonalization is designed to make the very large gravity gradiometry forward modeling matrices to become low-rank, which will considerably reduce the running time of the inversion method. We also use a weighted generalized cross validation method to choose the appropriate Tikhonov parameter to improve inversion results. The inversion incorporates a model norm that allows us to attain the smoothing and depth of the solution; in addition, the model norm counteracts the natural decay of the kernels, which concentrate at shallow depths. The method is applied on noise-contaminated synthetic gravity gradiometry data to demonstrate its suitability for large 3D gravity gradiometry data inversion. The airborne gravity gradiometry data from the Vinton Salt Dome, USE, were considered as a case study. The validity of the new method on real data is discussed with reference to the Vinton Dome inversion result. The intermediate density values in the constructed model coincide well with previous results and geological information. This demonstrates the validity of the gravity gradiometry inversion method.

  9. Preliminary geoid mapping results by Fugro's improved Micro-g LaCoste turnkey airborne gravity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, D.; Kingdon, R. W.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Micro-g LaCoste Turnkey Airborne Gravity System (TAGS) with Fugro's improved gravity processing and geoid modeling software package for regional gravity field mapping and geoid determination. Three test areas with different topographic characteristics under the Gravity for the Redefinition of the AmericanVertical Datum (GRAV-D) project of theUSNOAA National Geodetic Surveys (NGS) were used for case studies and determine the available accuracy of the system. The preliminary results of all these test cases show that the system with Fugro's improved gravity and geoid processing software package is able to achieve a comparable geoid mapping result to traditional terrestrial methods.

  10. From Mars to Greenland: Charting gravity with space and airborne instruments - Fields, tides, methods, results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    This symposium on space and airborne techniques for measuring gravity fields, and related theory, contains papers on gravity modeling of Mars and Venus at NASA/GSFC, an integrated laser Doppler method for measuring planetary gravity fields, observed temporal variations in the earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis, high-resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data, the effect of water vapor corrections for satellite altimeter measurements of the geoid, and laboratory demonstrations of superconducting gravity and inertial sensors for space and airborne gravity measurements. Other papers are on airborne gravity measurements over the Kelvin Seamount; the accuracy of GPS-derived acceleration from moving platform tests; airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors; controlling common mode stabilization errors in airborne gravity gradiometry, GPS/INS gravity measurements in space and on a balloon, and Walsh-Fourier series expansion of the earth's gravitational potential.

  11. From Mars to Greenland: Charting gravity with space and airborne instruments - Fields, tides, methods, results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This symposium on space and airborne techniques for measuring gravity fields, and related theory, contains papers on gravity modeling of Mars and Venus at NASA/GSFC, an integrated laser Doppler method for measuring planetary gravity fields, observed temporal variations in the earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis, high-resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data, the effect of water vapor corrections for satellite altimeter measurements of the geoid, and laboratory demonstrations of superconducting gravity and inertial sensors for space and airborne gravity measurements. Other papers are on airborne gravity measurements over the Kelvin Seamount; the accuracy of GPS-derived acceleration from moving platform tests; airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors; controlling common mode stabilization errors in airborne gravity gradiometry, GPS/INS gravity measurements in space and on a balloon, and Walsh-Fourier series expansion of the earth's gravitational potential.

  12. Airborne Geophysical Surveys Applied to Hydrocarbon Resource Development Environmental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Ball, L. B.; Finn, C.; Kass, A.; Thamke, J.

    2014-12-01

    Application of airborne geophysical surveys ranges in scale from detailed site scale such as locating abandoned well casing and saline water plumes to landscape scale for mapping hydrogeologic frameworks pertinent to ground water and tectonic settings relevant to studies of induced seismicity. These topics are important in understanding possible effects of hydrocarbon development on the environment. In addition airborne geophysical surveys can be used in establishing baseline "snapshots", to provide information in beneficial uses of produced waters, and in mapping ground water resources for use in well development. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has conducted airborne geophysical surveys over more than 20 years for applications in energy resource environmental studies. A majority of these surveys are airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys to map subsurface electrical conductivity related to plumes of saline waters and more recently to map hydrogeologic frameworks for ground water and plume migration. AEM surveys have been used in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to characterize the near surface geologic framework for siting produced water disposal ponds and for beneficial utilization in subsurface drip irrigation. A recent AEM survey at the Fort Peck Reservation, Montana, was used to map both shallow plumes from brine pits and surface infrastructure sources and a deeper concealed saline water plume from a failed injection well. Other reported applications have been to map areas geologically favorable for shallow gas that could influence drilling location and design. Airborne magnetic methods have been used to image the location of undocumented abandoned well casings which can serve as conduits to the near surface for coproduced waters. They have also been used in conjunction with geologic framework studies to understand the possible relationships between tectonic features and induced earthquakes in the Raton Basin. Airborne gravity as well as developing deeper

  13. Magnetic airborne survey - geophysical flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros Camara, Erick; Nei Pereira Guimarães, Suze

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a technical review process in the area of airborne acquisition of geophysical data, with emphasis for magnetometry. In summary, it addresses the calibration processes of geophysical equipment as well as the aircraft to minimize possible errors in measurements. The corrections used in data processing and filtering are demonstrated with the same results as well as the evolution of these techniques in Brazil and worldwide.

  14. Airborne detection of asperities: Linking aerogravimetry surveys and earthquake studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, U.; Boedecker, G.

    2003-04-01

    During the last decade, airborne gravimetric surveys have become a reliable and useful geophysical method to explore mid to large scale geologic settings. Ocean continent boundaries down to seamounts are detectable using conventional scalar, platform stabilized airborne gravimetry systems. New systems such as 3-D strap-down instruments promise a better spatial resolution recovering the gravity vector. Airborne gravimetric gradiometer systems are already able to detect small scale gradients in high spatial resolution. Following this trend in aerogravimetry, new research applications are emerging. One of the most challenging and interesting new aspects of airborne gravimetry is the systematic search for asperity structures. Asperities are patches of the oceanic or continental crust that are able to store more stress than the surrounding material. If due to stress overload or other mechanic forces the asperity breaks, up to mega-thrust earthquakes are triggered. The character of an asperity to carry more stress than the weaker environment must be related to its physical properties such as composition, thickness and density. Questions connected to define and detect an asperity are: How large is an asperity? Do asperities have sharp boundaries? Are asperities isolated structures? Do asperities have special gravimetric signatures? Wells et al. (2000) found that off southern Chile slip maxima from earthquakes coincide with forearc gravity lows. It is well accepted that in this region seismicity is a product of the subduction on the active continental margin. It is still debated whether subducted asperities from the oceanic plate are individual earthquake sources or if they i.e. trigger the break of asperities in the continental crust. Apart from this, very few investigations have been made trying to connect gravimetry and asperities. Therefore, the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam in collaboration with Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften in Munich , FU Berlin

  15. Requirements analysis of airborne gravity gradiometry on moving-based platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, L.; Li, Z.; Wu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne gravity and gravity gradient measurement are the most effective ways for the earth gravitational field measurement. Gravity gradient is a derivative of gravity acceleration, due to the high order feature of gravity gradient, it is more sensitive to short wave component, and can reflect the details of the source so that the gravity gradient measurement has wide applications in geophysical science, resource exploration, and inertial navigation. Airborne gravity gradient measurement uses the plane or ship as the platform, and it is efficient and high precision. In this paper, We compared the gravity and gravity gradient measurement, and analyzed the advantages of the gravity gradient measurement compared with gravity measurement. The airborne gravity gradient measurement system and the inertial stabilization platform were discussed. By setting a goal sensitivity of the gravity gradient measurement being 1 E/√Hz, the key factors of the stabilized platform, namely the pointing accuracy, pointing stability, and gyroscope random drift, are 0.5°, 0.01°/hr/√Hz, and 0.01°/hr respectively. Compared with the airborne gravity measurement whose goal sensitivity is 1mGal/√Hz, the requirements of moving-based gravity gradient measurement on the inertial stabilization platform is significantly lower and hence easy to realize, and the major reason is the differential measurement mode being used.

  16. Infrared airborne spectroradiometer survey results in the western Nevada area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W.; Chang, S. H.; Kuo, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark II airborne spectroradiometer system was flown over several geologic test sites in western Nevada. The infrared mineral absorption bands were observed and recorded for the first time using an airborne system with high spectral resolution in the 2.0 to 2.5 micron region. The data show that the hydrothermal alteration zone minerals, carbonates, and other minerals are clearly visible in the airborne survey mode. The finer spectral features that distinguish the various minerals with infrared bands are also clearly visible in the airborne survey data. Using specialized computer pattern recognition methods, it is possible to identify mineralogy and map alteration zones and lithologies by airborne spectroradiometer survey techniques.

  17. GREMLIT : an airborne gravity gradiometer inheriting from GOCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, B.; Douch, K.; Christophe, B.; Panet, I.; Boulanger, D.; Lebat, V.

    2012-04-01

    The knowledge of the gravity field of the Earth has been considerably improved thanks to global positioning satellites constellations and to space gravity measurements from recent GRACE and GOCE missions. But the spatial resolution of those gravity data essentially addresses the large and medium wavelengths of the field (down to a resolution of 90km) and it is therefore essential to complete them at the shorter wavelengths in particular in the areas where spatial distribution and quality of ground data remain quite uneven like in high mountain or coastal areas. To this aim, gravity gradiometry systems may be particularly suitable by covering the land/sea transition zone with a uniform precision, and a spatial resolution higher than from gravimetry. The GREMLIT instrument is taking advantage of technologies, formerly developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions. The gradiometer is built using a planar configuration for the gradiometer and is mounted on a dedicated stabilized platform which is controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself to achieve a sufficient rejection ratio of the perturbations/vibrations induced by the airborne environment. Such a planar configuration is especially well suited to sustain the proof-mass levitation in the Earth's gravity field. It also presents intrinsic linearity, which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth. The compactness of the design ensures excellent dimensional stability, good thermal homogeneity and makes the conception of the stabilized platform easier. The performance objective is between 0.1 and 1 Eötvös taking into account the difficulty of measurements onboard an aircraft by comparison to the particularly conducive satellite measurement environment.

  18. Resolving bathymetry from airborne gravity along Greenland fjords

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boghosian, Alexandra; Tinto, Kirsty; Cochran, James R.; Porter, David; Elieff, Stefan; Burton, Bethany; Bell, Robin E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent glacier mass loss in Greenland has been attributed to encroaching warming waters, but knowledge of fjord bathymetry is required to investigate this mechanism. The bathymetry in many Greenland fjords is unmapped and difficult to measure. From 2010 to 2012, National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Operation IceBridge collected a unique set of airborne gravity, magnetic, radar, and lidar data along the major outlet glaciers and fjords in Greenland. We applied a consistent technique using the IceBridge gravity data to create 90 bathymetric profiles along 54 Greenland fjords. We also used this technique to recover subice topography where warm or crevassed ice prevents the radar system from imaging the bed. Here we discuss our methodology, basic assumptions and error analysis. We present the new bathymetry data and discuss observations in six major regions of Greenland covered by IceBridge. The gravity models provide a total of 1950 line kilometers of bathymetry, 875 line kilometers of subice topography, and 12 new grounding line depths.

  19. Resolving bathymetry from airborne gravity along Greenland fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, Alexandra; Tinto, Kirsty; Cochran, James R.; Porter, David; Elieff, Stefan; Burton, Bethany L.; Bell, Robin E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent glacier mass loss in Greenland has been attributed to encroaching warming waters, but knowledge of fjord bathymetry is required to investigate this mechanism. The bathymetry in many Greenland fjords is unmapped and difficult to measure. From 2010 to 2012, National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Operation IceBridge collected a unique set of airborne gravity, magnetic, radar, and lidar data along the major outlet glaciers and fjords in Greenland. We applied a consistent technique using the IceBridge gravity data to create 90 bathymetric profiles along 54 Greenland fjords. We also used this technique to recover subice topography where warm or crevassed ice prevents the radar system from imaging the bed. Here we discuss our methodology, basic assumptions and error analysis. We present the new bathymetry data and discuss observations in six major regions of Greenland covered by IceBridge. The gravity models provide a total of 1950 line kilometers of bathymetry, 875 line kilometers of subice topography, and 12 new grounding line depths.

  20. High-resolution airborne gravity imaging over James Ross Island (West Antarctica)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, T.A.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jones, P.C.; Smellie, J.L.; Ghidella, M.; Corr, H. F. J.; Zakrajsek, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    James Ross Island (JRI) exposes a Miocene-Recent alkaline basaltic volcanic complex that developed in a back-arc, east of the northern Antarctic Peninsula. JRI has been the focus of several geological studies because it provides a window on Neogene magmatic processes and paleoenvironments. However, little is known about its internal structure. New airborne gravity data were collected as part of the first high-resolution aerogeophysical survey flown over the island and reveal a prominent negative Bouguer gravity anomaly over Mt Haddington. This is intriguing as basaltic volcanoes are typically associated with positive Bouguer anomalies, linked to underlying mafic intrusions. The negative Bouguer anomaly may be associated with a hitherto unrecognised low-density sub-surface body, such as a breccia-filled caldera, or a partially molten magma chamber.

  1. Final report. Electro-Seise, Inc., Airborne Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-06-01

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of an airborne microgravity and electric field sensing technology developed by Electro-Seise, Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas. The test involved the use of a single engine airplane to gather data over the Teapot Dome oil field along a tight grid spacing and along thirty (30) survey lines. The resultant gravity structure maps, based on the field data, were found to overlay the known structure of Teapot Dome. In addition, fault maps, based on the field data, were consistent with the known fault strike at Teapot Dome. Projected hydrocarbon thickness maps corresponded to some of the known production histories at RMOTC. Exceptions to the hydrocarbon thickness maps were also found to be true.

  2. Airborne radioactivity surveys for phosphate in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.

    1954-01-01

    Airborne radioactivity surveys totaling 5, 600 traverse miles were made in 10 areas in Florida, which were thought to be geologically favorable for deposits of uraniferous phosphate. Abnormal radioactivity was recorded in 8 of the 10 areas surveyed. The anomalies are located in Bradford, Clay, Columbia, DeSoto, Dixie, Lake, Marion, Orange, Sumter, Taylor, and Union Counties. Two of the anomalies were investigated briefly on the ground. One resulted from a deposit of river-pebble phosphate in the Peace River valley; the river-pebble samples contain an average of 0.013 percent equivalent uranium. The other anomaly resulted from outcrops of leached phosphatic rock containing as much as 0. 016 percent equivalent uranium. Several anomalies in other areas were recorded at or near localities where phosphate deposits have been reported.

  3. Airborne radioactivity surveys for phosphate in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.

    1953-01-01

    Airborne radioactivity surveys totalling 5,600 traverse miles were made in ten areas in Florida, which were thought to be geologically favorable for the occurrence of uraniferous phosphate deposits. Abnormal radioactivity was recorded in eight of the ten areas surveyed. The anomalies are located in Bradford, Clay, Columbia, DeSoto, Dixie, Lake, Marion, Orange, Sumter, Taylor, and Union Counties. Two of the anomalies were investigated briefly on the ground. One resulted from a deposit of river-pebble phosphate in the Peace River valley; samples of the river pebble contain an average of 0.013 percent equivalent uranium. The other anomaly resulted from outcrops of leached phosphate rock containing as much as 0.016 percent equivalent uranium. Several anomalies in other areas were recorded at or near localities where phosphate deposits have been reported to occur.

  4. An Improved Platform Levelling System for Airborne Gravity Meters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, N.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled Lacoste and Romberg type relative gravity meters to improve in accuracy to the point where other non-sensor related sources of error serve to limit the overall accuracy of the system. One of these sources of error is derived from the inability of the platform, in which the sensor is mounted, to keep the sensor perfectly level during survey flight. Off level errors occur when the aircraft is unable to maintain straight and level flight along a survey line. The levelling platform of a typical Lacoste and Romberg type dynamic gravity meter utilizes a complex feedback loop involving both accelerometers and gyroscopes with an output connected to torque motors mounted to the platform to sense an off level situation and correct for it. The current system is limited by an inability of the platform to distinguish between an acceleration of the platform due to a change in heading, altitude or speed of the aircraft and a true change in the local gravity vertical. Both of these situations cause the platform to tilt in reponse however the aircraft acceleration creates an error in the gravity measurement. These off level errors can be corrected for to a limited degree depending on the algorithm used and the size and duration of the causal acceleration. High precision GPS now provides accurate real time position information which can be used to determine if an accleration is a real level change or due to an anomalous acceleration. The correct implementation of the GPS position can significantly improve the accuracy of the platform levelling including keeping the platform level during course reversals or drape flying during a survey. This can typically improve the quality of the gravity data before any processing corrections. The enhanced platform also reduces the time taken to stabilize the platform at the beginning of a survey line therefore improving the efficiency of the data collection. This paper discusses the method and

  5. High-resolution gravity and geoid models in Tahiti obtained from new airborne and land gravity observations: data fusion by spectral combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsuan-Chang; Hwang, Cheinway; Barriot, Jean-Pierre; Mouyen, Maxime; Corréia, Pascal; Lequeux, Didier; Sichoix, Lydie

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, we carry out an airborne gravity survey and we collect new land gravity data over the islands of Tahiti and Moorea in French Polynesia located in the South Pacific Ocean. The new land gravity data are registered with GPS-derived coordinates, network-adjusted and outlier-edited, resulting in a mean standard error of 17 μGal. A crossover analysis of the airborne gravity data indicates a mean gravity accuracy of 1.7 mGal. New marine gravity around the two islands is derived from Geosat/GM, ERS-1/GM, Jason-1/GM, and Cryosat-2 altimeter data. A new 1-s digital topography model is constructed and is used to compute the topographic gravitational effects. To use EGM08 over Tahiti and Moorea, the optimal degree of spherical harmonic expansion is 1500. The fusion of the gravity datasets is made by the band-limited least-squares collocation, which best integrates datasets of different accuracies and spatial resolutions. The new high-resolution gravity and geoid grids are constructed on a 9-s grid. Assessments of the grids by measurements of ground gravity and geometric geoidal height result in RMS differences of 0.9 mGal and 0.4 cm, respectively. The geoid model allows 1-cm orthometric height determination by GPS and Lidar and yields a consistent height datum for Tahiti and Moorea. The new Bouguer anomalies show gravity highs and lows in the centers and land-sea zones of the two islands, allowing further studies of the density structure and volcanism in the region.

  6. Gravity for Detecting Caves: Airborne and Terrestrial Simulations Based on a Comprehensive Karstic Cave Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braitenberg, Carla; Sampietro, Daniele; Pivetta, Tommaso; Zuliani, David; Barbagallo, Alfio; Fabris, Paolo; Rossi, Lorenzo; Fabbri, Julius; Mansi, Ahmed Hamdi

    2016-04-01

    Underground caves bear a natural hazard due to their possible evolution into a sink hole. Mapping of all existing caves could be useful for general civil usages as natural deposits or tourism and sports. Natural caves exist globally and are typical in karst areas. We investigate the resolution power of modern gravity campaigns to systematically detect all void caves of a minimum size in a given area. Both aerogravity and terrestrial acquisitions are considered. Positioning of the gravity station is fastest with GNSS methods the performance of which is investigated. The estimates are based on a benchmark cave of which the geometry is known precisely through a laser-scan survey. The cave is the Grotta Gigante cave in NE Italy in the classic karst. The gravity acquisition is discussed, where heights have been acquired with dual-frequency geodetic GNSS receivers and Total Station. Height acquisitions with non-geodetic low-cost receivers are shown to be useful, although the error on the gravity field is larger. The cave produces a signal of -1.5 × 10-5 m/s2, with a clear elliptic geometry. We analyze feasibility of airborne gravity acquisitions for the purpose of systematically mapping void caves. It is found that observations from fixed wing aircraft cannot resolve the caves, but observations from slower and low-flying helicopters or drones do. In order to detect the presence of caves the size of the benchmark cave, systematic terrestrial acquisitions require a density of three stations on square 500 by 500 m2 tiles. The question has a large impact on civil and environmental purposes, since it will allow planning of urban development at a safe distance from subsurface caves. The survey shows that a systematic coverage of the karst would have the benefit to recover the position of all of the greater existing void caves.

  7. Relation of Topography to Airborne Gravity in Afghanistan and the Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, W.; Brozena, J. M.; Peters, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    As part of a multi-sensor, multi-disciplinary aerogeophysical survey, the US Naval Research Laboratory collected airborne gravity over most of Afghanistan in 2006 (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1089/Afghan_grv.html). The data were measured using a pair of ZLS Corporation air-sea gravimeters 7 km altitude above mean sea level aboard an NP-3D Orion aircraft operated by the US Navy's Scientific Development Squadron One (VXS-1). Aircraft positions were determined from kinematic GPS measurements in the aircraft relative to five base stations using differential interferometric techniques. Track spacing was set to 4 km over much of Afghanistan, but was increased to 8 km in the northern block of the survey area. Aircraft ground speed averaged between 300 and 380 knots, faster than ideal for high resolution gravity, but enabled approximately 113,000-km of data tracks to be flown in 220 flight hours, covering more than 330000 km2. In this presentation, we investigate the implications of the airborne gravity data for the tectonic development history of Afghanistan. Afghanistan is described as comprising three different platforms (Wheeler et al., 2005): 1) the north Afghanistan platform north of the Hari-Rud fault (HRF), a part of the Eurasian plate for 250-350 my; 2) the accreted terranes south of the HRF including low flats, formed as island arcs and fragments of continental and oceanic crust collided with the Eurasian plate during the closure of the Tethys Ocean in the past 250 my; and 3) the transpressional plate in the east, formed as the Indian plate moves northward since Cretaceous. The Bouguer anomaly map reveals elongated negative values along the east-west striking HRF, which seems to manifest different tectonic developmental histories across the boundary. Over the southern flats in the accreted terranes platform, the Bouguer anomaly map appears to show a continuation of alternating southwest-northeast trending highs and lows like those over the northern high

  8. The National Geodetic Survey absolute gravity program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, George; Moose, Robert E.; Wessells, Claude W.

    1989-03-01

    The National Geodetic Survey absolute gravity program will utilize the high precision afforded by the JILAG-4 instrument to support geodetic and geophysical research, which involves studies of vertical motions, identification and modeling of other temporal variations, and establishment of reference values. The scientific rationale of these objectives is given, the procedures used to collect gravity and environmental data in the field are defined, and the steps necessary to correct and remove unwanted environmental effects are stated. In addition, site selection criteria, methods of concomitant environmental data collection and relative gravity observations, and schedule and logistics are discussed.

  9. Designing surveys for tests of gravity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2011-12-28

    Modified gravity theories may provide an alternative to dark energy to explain cosmic acceleration. We argue that the observational programme developed to test dark energy needs to be augmented to capture new tests of gravity on astrophysical scales. Several distinct signatures of gravity theories exist outside the 'linear' regime, especially owing to the screening mechanism that operates inside halos such as the Milky Way to ensure that gravity tests in the solar system are satisfied. This opens up several decades in length scale and classes of galaxies at low redshift that can be exploited by surveys. While theoretical work on models of gravity is in the early stages, we can already identify new regimes that cosmological surveys could target to test gravity. These include: (i) a small-scale component that focuses on the interior and vicinity of galaxy and cluster halos, (ii) spectroscopy of low-redshift galaxies, especially galaxies smaller than the Milky Way, in environments that range from voids to clusters, and (iii) a programme of combining lensing and dynamical information, from imaging and spectroscopic surveys, respectively, on the same (or statistically identical) sample of galaxies. PMID:22084295

  10. Ultra-sensitive electrostatic planar acceleration gradiometer for airborne geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douch, Karim; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Panet, Isabelle; Pajot-Métivier, Gwendoline; Diament, Michel

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new concept of gravity gradiometer, GREMLIT, for the determination of the spatial derivatives of gravitational acceleration during airborne surveys. The core of this instrument is the acceleration gradiometer composed of four ultra-sensitive electrostatic planar accelerometers, inheriting from technologies developed for the GRACE and GOCE satellite gravity missions. Data from these missions have greatly improved our knowledge of the Earth’s gravity field and its time variations. However, resolving wavelengths of a few 10 km or less, beyond the reach of the satellite resolution, is of utmost importance to study a number of crustal geophysical processes and geological structures. We first present the benefits for a new gravity gradiometer, then we describe the planar acceleration gradiometer, which put together with three orthogonal gyroscopes, constitutes the gravity gradiometer GREMLIT. The acceleration gradiometer enables measurement at one point of the horizontal spatial derivatives of the acceleration horizontal components. We explain the measurement principle and describe the computation of the gravity gradients along with the necessary ancillary measurements. From a detailed error budget analysis of the accelerometers, an expected spectral sensitivity below \\text{1E/}\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}} is found in the [10-3, 0.2] Hz measurement bandwidth. To maintain such performance in flight, we finally discuss the adaptation of the acceleration gradiometer to the turbulent airborne environment. To limit the saturation of the accelerometers, we propose to cancel the common-mode output of the acceleration gradiometer by integrating the instrument on a double-gimbal platform controlled by the common-mode. We demonstrate on a real case study that with such a solution, it is technically possible to prevent the saturation of the accelerometers at least 95% of the time and it is not damaging to the airborne survey.

  11. Consequences of flight height and line spacing on airborne (helicopter) gravity gradient resolution in the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kass, M. Andy

    2013-01-01

    Line spacing and flight height are critical parameters in airborne gravity gradient surveys; the optimal trade-off between survey costs and desired resolution, however, is different for every situation. This article investigates the additional benefit of reducing the flight height and line spacing though a study of a survey conducted over the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, which is the highest-resolution public-domain airborne gravity gradient data set available, with overlapping high- and lower-resolution surveys. By using Fourier analysis and matched filtering, it is shown that while the lower-resolution survey delineates the target body, reducing the flight height from 80 m to 40 m and the line spacing from 100 m to 50 m improves the recoverable resolution even at basement depths.

  12. Television camera on RMS surveys insulation on Airborne Support Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The television camera on the end effector of the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) is seen surveying some of the insulation on the Airborne Support Equipment (ASE). Flight controllers called for the survey following the departure of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) and its Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS).

  13. Airborne gravity as a supporting tool for hydrocarbon exploration in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simbolon, B.; Anwar, Marwadi; Amrin, Sudarno

    1987-10-01

    This paper reports the results of using an airborne gravity system for hydrocarbon exploration in Indonesia. The measurements were conducted using a modified air gravimeter mounted on a fixed-wing aircraft which flew at 2500-ft height at 90-knot speed. The gravity measurements could be made at every second at any position along the flight line and be tied to known reference stations. Although this method is less accurate than the conventional land-gravity method, the airborne-gravity measurements demand shorter time than the conventional ones, can be used in inaccessible areas of regional scale. The measurements can be used to delineate structural highs and lows which represent sedimentary thickness, an important aspect in hydrocarbon exploration.

  14. Inversion of Airborne Gravity Data over Subglacial Lakes in East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenship, D.

    2003-12-01

    The team of the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) has been performing airborne geophysical surveys in Antarctica since 1991. Over 260,000 line-km have been surveyed during nine field seasons. The UTIG airborne platform is a contracted DeHavilland Twin Otter instrumented with ice-penetrating radar, laser altimeter, magnetometer, and a gravimeter. The gravimeter utilized is a Bell Aerospace BGM-3 marine system, modified for airborne use, which provides measurements of vertical accelerations at 1 Hz, with verticality of the sensor maintained by a gyro-stabilized platform. The aerogeophysical surveys over subglacial Lake Concordia and Lake Vostok in East Antarctica were conducted by a team from UTIG over the course of the Antarctic field seasons. The region surrounding Lake Concordia was sampled by 6 profiles with a 10 km separation whereas the Lake Vostok survey block was 165 x 330 km with a line spacing of 7.5 km with 11.25 km and 22.5 km ties. 2D gravity inversion was performed for both lakes. The forward problem was solved using Talwani's algorithm for a 2D body of irregular shape. It is described by a non-linear equation between the body's shape and it's density contrast with surrounding rocks. The assumption was that the density contrast between ice/water and rock along the profile is constant. The densities of ice and water are close enough, so the ice and water of the lake can be considered as one body. For Lake Vostok the gravity data were inverted for 2-layered model, consisting of ice/water and sediment lying over dense bedrock. Inversion was performed by a conjugate gradient algorithm for several fixed values of density contrasts. The coordinates of layers' corners were chosen as model parameters. The model was constrained by the lake's boundaries and sub-ice topography, determined from radar sounding. Also, several pre-existing seismic soundings were used as `a priori' information incorporated into the model. The best agreement with

  15. Wavelet Based Analysis of Airborne Gravity Data For Interpretation of Geological Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, George E.; Ferguson, Stephen

    Airborne gravimeters have only very recently been developed with the sensitivity necessary for useful exploration geophysics. In this study, an airborne gravimeter - an inertially-stabilized platform which converts accelerometer readings into gravity values - has been installed aboard the NRC's Convair 580 research aircraft and a survey performed over the Geological Survey of Canada's gravity test area. These data are used in a new wavelet transform methodology that quickly analyses and locates geological boundaries of various spatial extents within real aerogravity data. The raw aerogravity data were GPS corrected and then noise minimised - to reduce high frequency random noise - with a separate wavelet transform denoising algorithm. The multi-resolution nature of the wavelet transform was then used to investigate the presence of boundaries at various scales. Examination of each wavelet detail scale shows that there is a coherent and localizable signal that conforms to geological boundaries over the entire range of scales. However, the boundaries are more apparent in the lower wavelet scales (corresponding to higher frequencies). The location of the local maximum values of the wavelet coefficents on each wavelet level provides a means to quickly determine and evaluate regional and/or local boundaries. The boundaries that are determined as a function of wavelet scale are able to be well-localized with the wavelet transform, and provides a method to locate, in ground coordinates, the edges of the boundary. In this study it is clear that wavelet methodologies are very well suited to being used effectively with aerogravity data due to the non-stationary nature of these data. Using these same methods on the horizontal and vertical derivatives of the data can provide visually clearer boundary definition, however, thus far there has not been any new boundaries identified in the derivative data. It is also possible to draw potential structural information, such as general

  16. Windshear detection and avoidance - Airborne systems survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Roland L.

    1990-01-01

    Functional requirements for airborne windshear detection and warning systems are discussed in terms of the threat posed to civil aircraft operations. A preliminary set of performance criteria for predictive windshear detection and warning systems is defined. Candidate airborne remote sensor technologies based on microwave Doppler radar, Doppler laser radar (lidar), and infrared radiometric techniques are discussed in the context of overall system requirements, and the performance of each sensor is assessed for representative microburst environments and ground clutter conditions. Preliminary simulation results demonstrate that all three sensors show potential for detecting windshear, and provide adequate warning time to allow flight crews to avoid the affected area or escape from the encounter. Radar simulation and analysis show that by using bin-to-bin automatic gain control, clutter filtering, limited detection range, and suitable antenna tilt management, windshear from wet microbursts can be accurately detected. Although a performance improvement can be obtained at higher radar frequency, the baseline X-band system also detected the presence of windshear hazard for a dry microburst. Simulation results of end-to-end performance for competing coherent lidar systems are presented.

  17. AIRBORNE INERTIAL SURVEYING USING LASER TRACKING AND PROFILING TECHNIQUES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cyran, Edward J.

    1986-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey through a contract with the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory has developed the Aerial Profiling of Terrain System. This is an airborne inertial surveying system designed to use a laser tracker to provide position and velocity updates, and a laser profiler to measure terrain elevations. The performance characteristics of the system are discussed with emphasis placed on the performance of the laser devices. The results of testing the system are summarized for both performance evaluation and applications.

  18. Airborne bio-optics survey of the Galapagos Islands margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wayne Wright, C.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Berry, Richard E.; Mitchell, Richard

    Aircraft and ship surveys of the Galapagos Islands were conducted to address the hypothesized influence of "island-leached" iron upon phytoplankton production. This paper describes the airborne survey of the Galapagos Islands that composed the second phase of a two-part study of the influence of iron on phytoplankton production in high-nutrient/low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions. A single bio-optics airborne survey transect along 92°W from 1°N to 2°S was executed on 25 October 1993 in order to provide initial reconnaissance spatial and temporal sampling of the oceanic region west of the Galapagos Islands. A more extensive airborne bio-optics survey of the entire Galapagos Islands region was conducted on 3 November 1993. This expanded flight survey was made along all the ship cruise tracks of the R.V. Columbus Iselin originally planned for 15-27 November 1993. Analysis of the surface-layer airborne laser-induced and water-Raman normalized chlorophyll, phycoerythrin, and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence, SST, and AXBT (airborne expendable bathythermograph) data suggest that: (1) the regional distribution of phytoplankton and dissolved organic matter is dominated by the strong east-west thermal boundary located both east and west of the Galapagos Islands; (2) the source for the elevated phytoplankton patches west of the Galapagos Islands is from upwelling rather than aeolian sources or from the westward drift of iron and nutrients leached from the islands themselves or offshore shallow bottom sources; (3) the introduction of subsurface water to the surface may occur in episodic events rather than as a steady-state process; and (4) the chronic high chlorophyll west of the Galapagos Islands noted in processed Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) images may be due, at least in part, to the presence of elevated levels of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption.

  19. Airborne Gravity Measurements using a Helicopter with Special Emphases on Delineating Local Gravity Anomalies Mainly for Detecting Active Seismic Faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, J.

    2010-12-01

    The first aerial gravity measurement in Japan started in 1998 using a Japanese airborne gravimeter ‘ Segawa-TKeiki airborne gravimeter Model FGA-1’. We lay emphasis on the measurement of detailed gravity structures at the land-to-sea border areas and mountainous areas. This is the reason why we use a helicopter and make surveys at low altitude and low speed. We have so far made measurement at twelve sites and the total flight amounts to 20,000km. The accuracy of measurement is 1.5 mgal and half-wavelength resolution is 1.5 km. The Japanese type gravimeter consists of a servo-accelerometer type gravity sensor, a horizontal platform controlled by an optical fiber gyro, GPS positioning system, and a data processing system. Helicopter movement has to be precisely monitored three-dimensionally to calculate the vehicle’s acceleration noises. The necessary accuracy of positioning of the vehicle must be better than 10 cm in positioning error. Our helicopter gravity measurement has a special target in Japan to investigate active seismic faults located across land-to-sea borderlines. In Japan, it is generally thought that gravity over most of the country has already been measured by the governmental surveys, leaving the land-sea border lines and mountainous zones unsurveyed as difficult-to-access areas. In addition the use of airplane or helicopter in Japan appeared disadvantageous because of the narrowness of the Japanese Islands. Under such situations the author thought there still remained a particular as well as unique need for aerial gravity measurement in Japan, i.e. the need for detailed and seamless knowledge of gravity structures across land-to-sea border lines to elucidate complicated crustal structures of the Japanese Islands as well as distribution of active seismic faults for disaster prevention. The results of gravity measurements we have conducted so far include those of 12 sites. In the following the brief logs of our measurements are listed. 1)April

  20. Alternative analysis of airborne laser data collected within conventional multi-parameter airborne geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl, Andreas; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.; Schattauer, I.

    2010-05-01

    For the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry as well as airborne electromagnetics it is of great importance to determine the distance between the geophysical sensor and the ground surface. Since radar altimeters do not penetrate vegetation, laser altimeters became popular in airborne geophysics over the past years. Currently the airborne geophysical platform of the Geological Survey of Austria (GBA) is equipped with a Riegl LD90-3800VHS-FLP high resolution laser altimeter, measuring the distances according to the first and the last reflected pulse. The goal of the presented study was to explore the possibilities of deriving additional information about the survey area from the laser data and to determine the accuracy of such results. On one hand the difference between the arrival time of the first and the last reflected pulse can be used to determine the height of the vegetation. This parameter is for example important for the correction of damping effects on airborne gamma-ray measurements caused by vegetation. Moreover especially for groundwater studies at catchment scale, this parameter can also be applied to support the spatial assessment of evapotranspiration. In combination with the altitude above geoid, determined by a GPS receiver, a rough digital elevation model of the survey area can be derived from the laser altimetry. Based on a data set from a survey area in the northern part of Austria, close to the border with the Czech Republic, the reliability of such a digital elevation model and the calculated vegetation height was tested. In this study a mean deviation of -1.4m, with a standard deviation of ±3.4m, between the digital elevation model from Upper Austria (25m spatial resolution) and the determined elevation model was determined. We also found an obvious correlation between the calculated vegetation heights greater 15m and the mapped forest published by the ‘Department of Forest Inventory' of the ‘Federal Forest Office' of Austria

  1. The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Asner, David M.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Day, Anthony R.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Jordan, David V.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Morris, Scott J.; Mullen, O Dennis; Myers, Allan W.; Pitts, W. Karl; Rohrer, John S.; Runkle, Robert C.; Seifert, Allen; Shergur, Jason M.; Stave, Sean C.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Thompson, Robert C.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; Willett, Jesse A.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2013-01-11

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gama ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach, we found, is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. Moreover, the system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications, including airborne and maritime operations.

  2. Investigating subglacial landscapes and crustal structure of the Gamburtsev Province in East Antarctica with the aid of new airborne gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. A.; Ferraccioli, F.; Studinger, M.; Bell, R. E.; Damaske, D.; Elieff, S.; Finn, C.; Braaten, D. A.; Corr, H.

    2009-12-01

    The AGAP project was undertaken as part of the 2008\\09 field season and explored the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM) province in East Antarctica. AGAP collected >120, 000 line km of new airborne radar, aerogravity and aeromagnetic data. Here we focus on the airborne gravity part of the survey. The airborne gravity data were collected from two Twin Otters operating from remote field camps either side of Dome A. A high-resolution Sander Geophysics AIRGrav system was used for the first time in Antarctica and was mounted in the US plane. A more traditional L&R airborne gravity meter modified by ZLS was installed on the British Antarctic Survey aircraft. The AIRGrav system was flown in draped mode, which proved ideal for the simultaneous acquisition of radar and magnetic data, while the L&R system required flying along constant elevation survey blocks. The processed free-air gravity anomalies exhibit low cross-over errors of 1 mGal over the southern sector of the GSM, where the AIRGrav system was primarily used, and a spatial resolution of 3.5 km. Larger cross-over errors of 3.5 mGal and a coarser spatial resolution of 8 km characterise the northern part of the GSM and the adjacent Lambert Glacier, where the L&R meter was mainly flown. The merged free-air gravity anomaly grid primarily reflects the subglacial topography of the GSM province. The contrast between the Pensacola-Pole and Lambert Glacier basins and the rugged alpine-type relief of the GSM is clearly imaged. A dentritic system of subglacial valleys is mapped in the GSM, in good agreement with independent radar data. Inversion of the free-air gravity data assists in tracing the bedrock under several km-thick and fast-flowing crevassed ice of the Lambert Glacier. Using the ice thickness and bedrock topography data derived from airborne radar we compiled a new Bouguer anomaly map for the GSM province. The new gravity anomaly data can be used to estimate crustal thickness variations under the GSM and

  3. Low Gravity Guidance System for Airborne Microgravity Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, W. J.; Emery, E. F.; Boyer, E. O.; Hegedus, C.; ODonoghue, D. P.

    1996-01-01

    Microgravity research techniques have been established to achieve a greater understanding of the role of gravity in the fundamentals of a variety of physical phenomena and material processing. One technique in use at the NASA Lewis Research Center involves flying Keplarian trajectories with a modified Lear Jet and DC-9 aircraft to achieve a highly accurate Microgravity environment by neutralizing accelerations in all three axis of the aircraft. The Low Gravity Guidance System (LGGS) assists the pilot and copilot in flying the trajectories by displaying the aircraft acceleration data in a graphical display format. The Low Gravity Guidance System is a microprocessor based system that acquires and displays the aircraft acceleration information. This information is presented using an electroluminescent display mounted over the pilot's instrument panel. The pilot can select the Microgravity range that is required for a given research event. This paper describes the characteristics, design, calibration and testing of the Low Gravity Guidance System Phase 3, significant lessons from earlier systems and the developmental work on future systems.

  4. Spectral combination of land-based, airborne, shipborne and altimeter-derived gravity values: examples in Taiwan and Tahiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Cheinway

    2016-04-01

    Taiwan and Tahiti are bordered by seas and are islands with mountain ranges up to 4000 m height. The gravity fields here are rough due to the geodynamic processes that create the islands. On and around the two islands, gravity data have been collected by land gravimeters in relative gravity networks (point-wise), by airborne and shipborne (along-track) methods and by transformations from sea surface heights (altimeter-derived). Typically, network-adjusted land gravity values have accuracies of few tens of micro gals and contain the full gravity spectrum. Airborne gravity values are obtained by filtering original one-HZ along-track gravity values collected at varying flight altitudes that are affected by aircraft dynamics, GPS positioning error and gravimeter error. At a 5000-m flight height, along-track airborne gravity has a typical spatial resolution of 4 km and an accuracy of few mgal. Shipborne gravity is similar to airborne gravity, but with higher spatial resolutions because of ship's lower speed. Altimeter-derived gravity has varying spatial resolutions and accuracies, depending on altimeter data, processing method and extent of waveform interference. Using the latest versions of Geosat/GM, ERS-1/GM, ENVISAT, Jason-1/GM, Cryosat-2 and SARAL altimeter data, one can achieve accuracies at few mgal. The synergy of the four kinds of gravity datasets is made by the band-limited least-squares collocation, which best integrates datasets of different accuracies and spatial resolutions. The method uses the best contributions from a DEM, a global gravity model, available gravity datasets to form an optimal gravity grid. We experiment with different optimal spherical harmonic degrees of EGM08 for use around the two islands. For Tahiti, the optimal degree is 1500. New high-resolution gravity and geoid grids are constructed for the two islands and can be used in future geophysical and geodetic studies.

  5. Gravity of the Arctic Ocean from satellite data with validations using airborne gravimetry: Oceanographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdoo, David C.; Farrell, Sinead Louise; Laxon, Seymour; Ridout, Andy; Zwally, H. J.; Yi, Donghui

    2013-02-01

    Precise mappings of sea surface topography, slope, and gravity of the Arctic Ocean are derived from altimeter data collected by Envisat and ICESat. Both altimeters measured instantaneous sea surface height at leads in the sea ice. To reduce contamination by ice-freeboard signal and tracker noise in Envisat height data, a retracking of the waveform data was performed. Analogous reprocessing of ICESat data was also done. Arctic mean sea surfaces (MSSs) were computed from Envisat data spanning 2002-2008 and ICESat data spanning 2003-2009. Farrell et al. (2012) used these "ICEn" MSSs to estimate mean dynamic topography (MDT). These same Envisat and ICESat data are used, in sea-surface-slope form, to compute the ARCtic Satellite-only (ARCS-2) altimetric marine gravity field. ARCS-2 extends north to 86°N and uses GRACE/GOCE gravity data (GOCO02S) for its long-wavelength (>260 km) components. Use of Envisat data improves the spatial resolution over that of existing Arctic marine gravity fields in many areas. ARCS-2's spatial resolution aids in tracing tectonic fabric—e.g., extinct plate boundaries—over broad areas of the Arctic basin whose tectonic origin remains a mystery. ARCS-2's precision is validated using NASA 2010/2011 Operation IceBridge (OIB) airborne gravimetry. ARCS-2 and OIB gravity along with ICEn-MSS results are employed to locate short-wavelength errors approaching 1 m in current Arctic marine geoids (EGM2008). Precise OIB airborne gravity corroborates that such errors in current geoid/gravity models are widespread in Arctic areas lacking accurate surface gravity data. These geoid errors limit the spatial resolution at which MDT can be mapped.

  6. Airborne gravity measurement over sea-ice: The western Weddel Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Brozena, J.; Peters, M. ); LaBrecque, J.; Bell, R.; Raymond, C. )

    1990-10-01

    An airborne gravity study of the western Weddel Sea, east of the Antarctic Peninsula, has shown that floating pack-ice provides a useful radar altimetric reference surface for altitude and vertical acceleration corrections surface for alititude and vertical acceleration corrections to airborne gravimetry. Airborne gravimetry provides an important alternative to satellite altimetry for the sea-ice covered regions of the world since satellite alimeters are not designed or intended to provide accurate geoidal heights in areas where significant sea-ice is present within the radar footprint. Errors in radar corrected airborne gravimetry are primarily sensitive to the variations in the second derivative of the sea-ice reference surface in the frequency pass-band of interest. With the exception of imbedded icebergs the second derivative of the pack-ice surface closely approximates that of the mean sea-level surface at wavelengths > 10-20 km. With the airborne method the percentage of ice coverage, the mixture of first and multi-year ice and the existence of leads and pressure ridges prove to be unimportant in determining gravity anomalies at scales of geophysical and geodetic interest, provided that the ice is floating and not grounded. In the Weddell study an analysis of 85 crosstrack miss-ties distributed over 25 data tracks yields an rms error of 2.2 mGals. Significant structural anomalies including the continental shelf and offsets and lineations interpreted as fracture zones recording the early spreading directions within the Weddell Sea are observed in the gravity map.

  7. Airborne-biogeochemical survey test-case results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, William E.; Chang, Sheng-Huei; Raines, Gary L.; Canney, Frank C.; Ashley, Roger

    1980-01-01

    Airborne spectroradiometer surveys over several forest-covered sulfide bodies indicate that mineralization has affected the overlying vegetation; anomalous spectral reflectivity properties can be detected in the vegetation using appropriate remote-sensing interments and data-reduction techniques. Mineralization induces subtle changes in the shape of the chlorophyll a and b absorption spectrum between 550 and 750 nm. The observed spectral variations appear specifically to be on the wings of the broad red chlorophyll bars, centered at about 680 nm.

  8. Airborne infrared mineral mapping survey of Marysvale, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W.; Chang, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared spectroradiometer survey results from flights over the Marysvale, Utah district show that hydrothermal alteration mineralogy can be mapped using very rapid and effective airborne techniques. The system detects alteration mineral absorption band intensities in the infrared spectral region with high sensitivity. The higher resolution spectral features and high spectral differences characteristic of the various clay and carbonate minerals are also readily identified by the instrument allowing the mineralogy to be mapped as well as the mineralization intensity.

  9. Salinity surveys using an airborne microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.; Droppleman, J. D.; Evans, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Barnes PRT-5 infrared radiometer and L-band channel of the multifrequency microwave radiometer are used to survey the distribution of surface water temperature and salinity. These remote sensors were flown repetitively in November 1971 over the outflow of the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico. Data reduction parameters were determined through the use of flight data obtained over a known water area. With these parameters, the measured infrared and microwave radiances were analyzed in terms of the surface temperature and salinity.

  10. Inversion of Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Data, Styx River Area, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, A.; Minsley, B. J.; Smith, B. D.; Burns, L.; Emond, A.

    2014-12-01

    A joint effort by the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) aims to add value to public domain airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data, collected in Alaska, through the application of newly developed advanced inversion methods to produce resistivity depth sections along flight lines. Derivative products are new geophysical data maps, interpretative profiles and displays. An important task of the new processing is to facilitate calibration or leveling between adjacent surveys flown with different systems in different years. The new approach will facilitate integration of the geophysical data in the interpretation and construction of geologic framework, resource evaluations and to geotechnical studies. Four helicopter airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys have been flown in the Styx River area by the DGGS; Styx River, Middle Styx, East Styx, and Farewell. The Styx River flown in 2008 and Middle Styx in flown 2013, cover an area of 2300 square kilometers. These data consist of frequency-domain DIGHEM V surveys which have been numerically processed and interpreted to yield a three-dimensional model of electrical resistivity. We describe the numerical interpretation methodology (inversion) in detail, from quality assessment to interpretation. We show two methods of inversion used in these datasets, deterministic and stochastic, and describe how we use these results to define calibration parameters and assess the quality of the datasets. We also describe the difficulties and procedures for combining datasets acquired at different times.

  11. Airborne multispectral detecting system for marine mammals survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobna, Yuliya; Sofianos, James; Schoonmaker, Jon; Medeiros, Dustin; Boucher, Cynthia; Oakley, Daniel; Saggese, Steve

    2010-04-01

    This work presents an electro-optical multispectral capability that detects and monitors marine mammals. It is a continuance of Whale Search Radar SBIR program funded by PMA-264 through NAVAIR. A lightweight, multispectral, turreted imaging system is designed for airborne and ship based platforms to detect and monitor marine mammals. The system tests were conducted over the Humpback whale breeding and calving area in Maui, Hawaii. The results of the tests and the system description are presented. The development of an automatic whale detection algorithm is discussed as well as methodology used to turn raw survey data into quantifiable data products.

  12. Gravity Survey of the Carson Sink - Data and Maps

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    A detailed gravity survey was carried out for the entire Carson Sink in western Nevada (Figure 1) through a subcontract to Zonge Engineering, Inc. The Carson Sink is a large composite basin containing three known, blind high‐temperature geothermal systems (Fallon Airbase, Stillwater, and Soda Lake). This area was chosen for a detailed gravity survey in order to characterize the gravity signature of the known geothermal systems and to identify other potential blind systems based on the structural setting indicated by the gravity data. Data: Data were acquired at approximately 400, 800, and 1600 meter intervals for a total of 1,243 stations. The project location and station location points are presented in Figure 14. The station distribution for this survey was designed to complete regional gravity coverage in the Carson Sink area without duplication of available public and private gravity coverage. Gravity data were acquired using a Scintrex CG‐5 gravimeter and a LaCoste and Romberg (L&R) Model‐G gravimeter. The CG‐5 gravity meter has a reading resolution of 0.001 milligals and a typical repeatability of less than 0.005 milligals. The L&R gravity meter has a reading resolution of 0.01 milligals and a typical repeatability of 0.02 milligals. The basic processing of gravimeter readings to calculate through to the Complete Bouguer Anomaly was made using the Gravity and Terrain Correction software version 7.1 for Oasis Montaj by Geosoft LTD. Results: The gravity survey of the Carson Sink yielded the following products. Project location and station location map (Figure 14). Complete Bouguer Anomaly @ 2.67 gm/cc reduction density. Gravity Complete Bouguer Anomaly at 2.50 g/cc Contour Map (Figure 15). Gravity Horizontal Gradient Magnitude Shaded Color Contour Map. Gravity 1st Vertical Derivative Color Contour Map. Interpreted Depth to Mesozoic Basement (Figure 16), incorporating drill‐hole intercept values. Preliminary Interpretation of Results: The Carson Sink

  13. Automatic Searching Radioactive Sources by Airborne Radioactive Survey Using Multicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, H.; Eun, S. B.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Jung, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to prepare emergency situation lost a dangerous radioelement source in advance and to search a radioactive source automatically, we develop airborne radioelement survey system by multicopter. This multicopter radioelement survey system consists of a small portable customized BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) detector, video recording part, wireless connecting part to ground pilot, GPS, and several equipments for automatic flight. This system is possible to search flight by preprogramed lines. This radioactive detecting system are tested to find intentional hidden source, The performance of detecting a source is well proved with very low flight altitude in spite of depending on the magnitude of radioelement sources. The advantage of multicopter system, one of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle), is to avoid the potential of close access to a dangerous radioactive source by using fully automatic searching capability. In this paper, we introduce our multicopter system for detecting radioactive source and synthetic case history for demonstrating this system.

  14. A regional gravity survey of the Cuyuna Iron Range, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durfee, George Austin

    1957-01-01

    A regional gravity survey of the Cuyuna Iron Range, Minnesota, was conducted during the summer of 1955 by the U. S. Geological Survey. It was believed that gravity data would aid in the understanding of the major structures of the range. It was found that synclinal and steeply dipping structures produced positive gravity anomalies while anilclinal structures produced negative anomalies. This principle was noted in areas of well known geology and then applied to outlying areas of the district. The outstanding gravity feature is a narrow positive anomaly extending from south of Brainerd eastward through Aitkin, the axis of the anomaly being somewhat south of the South Range. This gives support to the theory that the Biwabik formation passes under the stratigraphically higher South Range member as a synclinal structure. However, this anomaly is also explained using one main iron formation and assuming an anticlinal structure between the North and South Ranges and a syncline between the South Range and Bay Lake. A large magnitude negative gravity anomaly north of Mille Lacs is postulated to result from an intrusive mass extending to the erosion surface. Aeromagnetics are used to strengthen the gravity interpretation. The need is realized for additional regional gravity coverage to the east of the area Included in this survey and a detailed gravity study of the area between the North and South Ranges.

  15. Hybrid gravity survey to search for submarine ore deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, A.; Kanazawa, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Shinohara, M.; Yamada, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Iizasa, K.; Ishihara, T.; Omika, S.

    2011-12-01

    Along with seismic surveys, gravity survey is a useful method to profile the underground density structure. We propose a hybrid gravity survey using gravimeters and gravity gradiometers to detect submarine ore deposits as density anomalies by towing the instruments using an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) or an ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle). Gravimeters measure the regional density structure below the seafloor, whereas gravity gradiometers are sensitive to localized mass distribution. A gravity gradiometer comprises two accelerometers arranged with a vertical separation, and a gravity gradient can be obtained from the acceleration difference. Compared to gravimeters, gravity gradiometers are insensitive to common disturbances such as parallel acceleration, thermal drift, and apparent gravity effect (Eötvös effect). We made two accelerometers using astatic pendulums, and obtained common acceleration reduction more than two orders of magnitude. With these pendulums of 500-mm separation, resolution of 7E (=7x10^{-9}(1/s^2)), enough to detect a typical ore deposit buried 50m below the seafloor, was evaluated. During measurements using a submersible mobile object, instrument orientation is required to be controlled to keep verticality and to reduce centrifugal force associated with rotation of the instrument. Using a gyro and a tiltmeter, angular rotation was shown to be controlled within 0.001deg/s which corresponds to 0.3E in effective gravity gradient due to the centrifugal force. In this paper, target of this research, details of the instruments and their performance, and development for the submarine gravity survey using an AUV will be presented.

  16. Airborne laser altimetry survey of Glaciar Tyndall, Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Kristian; Casassa, Gino; Rivera, Andrés; Forsberg, Rene; Gundestrup, Niels

    2007-10-01

    The first airborne laser altimetry measurements of a glacier in South America are presented. Data were collected in November of 2001 over Glaciar Tyndall, Torres del Paine National Park, Chilean Patagonia, onboard a Twin Otter airplane of the Chilean Air Force. A laser scanner with a rotating polygon-mirror system together with an Inertial Navigation System (INS) were fixed to the floor of the aircraft, and used in combination with two dual-frequency GPS receivers. Together, the laser-INS-GPS system had a nominal accuracy of 30 cm after data processing. On November 23rd, a total of 235 km were flown over the ablation area of Glaciar Tyndall, with 5 longitudinal tracks with a mean swath width of 300 m, which results in a point spacing of approximately 2 m both along and across track. A digital elevation model (DEM) generated using the laser altimetry data was compared with a DEM produced from a 1975 map (1:50,000 scale — Instituto Geográfico Militar (IGM), Chile). A mean thinning of - 3.1 ± 1.0 m a - 1 was calculated for the ablation area of Glaciar Tyndall, with a maximum value of - 7.7 ± 1.0 m a - 1 at the calving front at 50 m a.s.l. and minimum values of between - 1.0 and - 2.0 ± 1.0 m a - 1 at altitudes close to the equilibrium line altitude (900 m a.s.l.). The thinning rates derived from the airborne survey were similar to the results obtained by means of ground survey carried out at ˜ 600 m of altitude on Glaciar Tyndall between 1975 and 2002, yielding a mean thinning of - 3.2 m a - 1 [Raymond, C., Neumann, T.A., Rignot, E., Echelmeyer, K.A., Rivera, A., Casassa, G., 2005. Retreat of Tyndall Glacier, Patagonia, over the last half century. Journal of Glaciology 173 (51), 239-247.]. A good agreement was also found between ice elevation changes measured with laser data and previous results obtained with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data. We conclude that airborne laser altimetry is an effective means for accurately detecting glacier elevation

  17. Application of airborne thermal imagery to surveys of Pacific walrus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burn, D.M.; Webber, M.A.; Udevitz, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted tests of airborne thermal imagery of Pacific walrus to determine if this technology can be used to detect walrus groups on sea ice and estimate the number of walruses present in each group. In April 2002 we collected thermal imagery of 37 walrus groups in the Bering Sea at spatial resolutions ranging from 1-4 m. We also collected high-resolution digital aerial photographs of the same groups. Walruses were considerably warmer than the background environment of ice, snow, and seawater and were easily detected in thermal imagery. We found a significant linear relation between walrus group size and the amount of heat measured by the thermal sensor at all 4 spatial resolutions tested. This relation can be used in a double-sampling framework to estimate total walrus numbers from a thermal survey of a sample of units within an area and photographs from a subsample of the thermally detected groups. Previous methods used in visual aerial surveys of Pacific walrus have sampled only a small percentage of available habitat, resulting in population estimates with low precision. Results of this study indicate that an aerial survey using a thermal sensor can cover as much as 4 times the area per hour of flight time with greater reliability than visual observation.

  18. Modeling Airborne Gravity Data with Local Functions for Regional Geoid Enhancement ---- A Case Study in Puerto Rico Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    Airborne gravimetry has been used as the primary method to quickly and economically obtain updated gravity field information over a region, targeted specifically. Thus, unlike the satellite missions that provide global or near global data coverage, the observables from airborne campaigns are apparently space limited. Moreover, they are also band limited in the frequency domain, considering that various filter banks and/or de-noising techniques have to be applied to overcome the low signal to noise ratio problem that are presented in the airborne systems due to mechanical and mathematical limitations in computing the accelerations, both the kinematic one and the dynamic one. As a result, in this study, a band-limited local function system based on the point mass model is used to process these airborne gravity data that have both a limited frequency domain and a limited space domain in the target area: Puerto Rico Island and its nearby ocean areas. The resulting geoid model show obvious middle to short wavelength geoid changes due to airborne gravity data contribution. In the land area, these changes improved the geoid precision from 3.27cm to 2.09cm at the local GNSS/Leveling bench marks. More importantly, the error trend in the geoid models is largely reduced if not completely removed. Various oceanographic models will be used to validate the geoid changes in the nearby open sea areas.

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site gravity survey and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, L.J.; Fett, J.D.

    1983-04-01

    A portion of the WIPP site has been extensively surveyed with high-precision gravity. The main survey (in T22S, R31E) covered a rectangular area 2 by 4-1/3 mi encompassing all of WIPP site Zone II and part of the disturbed zone to the north of the site. Stations were at 293-ft intervals along 13 north-south lines 880 ft apart. The data are considered accurate to within a few hundredths of a milligal. Long-wavelength gravity anomalies correlate well with seismic time structures on horizons below the Castile Formation. Both the gravity anomalies and the seismic time structures are interpreted as resulting from related density and velocity variations within the Ochoan Series. Shorter wavelength negative gravity anomalies are interpreted as resulting from bulk density alteration in the vicinity of karst conduits. The WIPP gravity survey was unable to resolve low-amplitude, long-wavelength anomalies that should result from the geologic structures within the disturbed zone. It did indicate the degree and character of karst development within the surveyed area.

  20. Unveiling subglacial geology and crustal architecture in the Recovery frontier of East Antarctica with recent aeromagnetic and airborne gravity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraccioli, F.; Forsberg, R.; Jordan, T. A.; Matsuoka, K.; Olsen, A.; King, O.; Ghidella, M.

    2014-12-01

    East Antarctica is the least known continent, despite being a keystone in the Gondwana, Rodinia and Columbia supercontinents. Significant progress has been made in recent years in exploring East Antarctica using aeromagnetic and airborne gravity together with radar. Major aerogeophysical campaigns over the Wilkes Subglacial Basin (Ferraccioli et al., 2009 Tectonophysics), the Aurora Subglacial Basin (Aitken et al., 2014 GRL) and the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature) provide new glimpses into the crustal architecture of East Antarctica. However, a major sector of the continent that includes key piercing points for reconstructing linkages between East Antarctica and Laurentia within Rodinia, and also the inferred remnants of a major suture zone active during Gondwana amalgamation in Pan-African times (ca 500 Ma), has remained largely terra incognita. Here we present the results of a major aerogeophysical survey flown over this sector of East Antarctica, named the Recovery Frontier, from the major ice stream flowing in the region. The survey was flown during the IceGRAV 2012-13 field season, as part of a Danish-Norwegian-UK and Argentine collaboration and led to the collection of 29,000 line km of radar, laser altimetry, gravity and magnetic data. We present the new aeromagnetic anomaly, Bouguer and residual and enhanced anomaly maps for the region. Using these images we trace the extent of major subglacial faults and interpret these to delineate the tectonic boundaries separating the Coast block, the Shackleton Range and the Dronning Maud Land crustal provinces. Forward magnetic and gravity modelling enables us to examine the inferred Pan-African age suture zone in the Shackleton Range and address its tectonic relationships with older terranes of the Mawson Craton and Grenvillian-age terranes of Dronning Maud Land and interior East Antarctica. Finally, we present new models to test our hypothesis that Paleozoic to Mesozoic rift basins

  1. SURVEY OF CULTURABLE AIRBORNE BACTERIA AT FOUR DIVERSE LOCATIONS IN OREGON: URBAN, RURAL, FOREST, AND COASTAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the risks of microbial air pollution from microorganisms used for pesticides and bioremediation, or emanating from composting, fermentation tanks, or other agricultural and urban sources, airborne microbial levels must be evaluated. This study surveyed the atmospheri...

  2. The contribution of the GRAV-D airborne gravity to geoid determination in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Crowley, John W.; Holmes, Simon A.; Wang, Yan-Ming

    2016-05-01

    The current official North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) and the International Great Lakes Datum of 1985 (IGLD 85) will be replaced by a new geoid-based vertical datum in 2022. The Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project collects high-quality airborne gravity data to improve the quality of the gravitational model that underpins the geoid model. This paper validates the contribution of GRAV-D data in the Great Lakes region. Using the lake surface height measured by satellite altimetry as an independent data set, Global Gravity Models (GGMs) with/without the GRAV-D data are compared. The comparisons show that the improvement reaches decimeters over Lake Michigan where the historic gravity data have significant errors. Over all lakes, except Lake Erie, the GRAV-D data improve the accuracy of the gravitational model to 1-3 cm.

  3. Airborne radioactivity Survey of part of Saratoga NW quadrangle, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 133 square miles of Saratoga NW quadrangle, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  4. Gravity survey of the Mt. Toondina impact structure, South Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Shoemaker, C. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Mt. Toondina impact structure is located in northern South Australia, about 45 km south of the town of Oodnadatta. Only the central uplift is exposed. The outcrops at Mt. Toondina reveal a remarkable structural anomaly surrounded by a broad expanse of nearly flat-lying beds of the Bulldog Shale of Early Cretaceous age. A gravity survey was undertaken in 1989 to determine the diameter of the impact structure, define the form of the central uplift, and understand the local crustal structure. Data were collected along two orthogonal lines across the structure. In addition to the profiles, a significant number of measurements were made on and around the central uplift. The 1989 gravity data combined with 1963 gravity data and the seismic reflection data provide an excellent data base to interpret the subsurface structure of the Mt. Toondina feature.

  5. Detailed Gravity and Magnetic Survey of the Taylorsville Triassic Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Leftwich, John; Nowroozi, Ali, A.

    1999-10-01

    This work reports the progress on collecting existing gravity data in a rectangular area covering the Richmond and Taylorsville Basins and its vicinity. The area covers one-degree latitude and one degree longitude, starting at 37 North, 77 West and ending at 38 North, 78 West. Dr. David Daniels of the United State Geological Survey supplied us with more than 4900 Bouguer gravity anomalies in this area. The purpose of this report is to present the data in form of several maps and discuss its relation to the geology of the Triassic Basins and its vicinity. Johnson and others (1985) also presented a map of the Bouguer gravity anomaly of this area. However, their map covers a smaller area, and it is based on smaller number of observations.

  6. Gravity Survey of the Rye Patch KGRA, Rye Patch, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcdonald, M. R.; Gosnold, W. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Rye Patch Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) is located in Pershing County Nevada on the west side of the Humboldt Range and east of the Rye Patch Reservoir approximately 200 km northeast of Reno, Nevada. Previous studies include an earlier gravity survey, 3-D seismic reflection, vertical seismic profiling (VSP) on a single well, 3-D seismic imaging, and a report of the integrated seismic studies. Recently, Presco Energy conducted an aeromagnetic survey and is currently in the process of applying 2-D VSP methods to target exploration and production wells at the site. These studies have indicated that geothermal fluid flow primarily occurs along faults and fractures and that two potential aquifers include a sandstone/siltstone member of the Triassic Natchez Pass Formation and a karst zone that occurs at the interface between Mesozoic limestone and Tertiary volcanics. We hypothesized that addition of a high-resolution gravity survey would better define the locations, trends, lengths, and dip angles of faults and possible solution cavity features. The gravity survey encompassed an area of approximately 78 km2 (30 mi2) within the boundary of the KGRA along with portions of 8 sections directly to the west and 8 sections directly to the east. The survey included 203 stations that were spaced at 400 m intervals. The simple Bouguer anomaly patterns were coincident with elevation, and those patterns remained after terrain corrections were performed. To remove this signal, the data were further processed using wave-length (bandpass) filtering techniques. The results of the filtering and comparison with the recent aeromagnetic survey indicate that the location and trend of major fault systems can be identified using this technique. Dip angles can be inferred by the anomaly contour gradients. By further reductions in the bandpass window, other features such as possible karst solution channels may also be recognizable. Drilling or other geophysical methods such as a

  7. Testing model independent modified gravity with future large scale surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Contaldi, Carlo R. E-mail: c.contaldi@ic.ac.uk

    2011-12-01

    Model-independent parametrisations of modified gravity have attracted a lot of attention over the past few years and numerous combinations of experiments and observables have been suggested to constrain the parameters used in these models. Galaxy clusters have been mentioned, but not looked at as extensively in the literature as some other probes. Here we look at adding galaxy clusters into the mix of observables and examine how they could improve the constraints on the modified gravity parameters. In particular, we forecast the constraints from combining Planck satellite Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) cluster catalogue with a DES-like Weak Lensing (WL) survey. We find that cluster counts significantly improve the constraints over those derived using CMB and WL. We then look at surveys further into the future, to see how much better it may be feasible to make the constraints.

  8. Detailed Gravity and Magnetic Survey of the Taylorsville Triassic Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ali A. Nowroozi; John Leftwich

    1997-12-31

    Our research to date has involved the Interpretation of the Bouguer Gravity Anomaly Associated with the Richmond and Taylorsville Triassic Basins and its Vicinity. Continental rift basins around the world contain about 5% of the earth's sedimentary layers and produce about 20% of the total hydrocarbon production of the world (Ziegler (1983). Nearly 30 large basins of this type are reported by Manspeizer and Cousminer (1988) in eastern North America and northwestern Africa. There are eleven exposed basins of this type in the state of Virginia, from which nine are totally and two partially within the state's border. The number of unexposed basin's is not known. Exploration and drilling have been hampered largely because surface data are insufficient for even evaluation of those basins which are partly or completely exposed in the Piedmont Province. Generation of data through random exploratory drilling and seismic exploration is much too expensive and, therefore, these methods have not been widely used. In order to remedy this situation, we have used a geophysical method and completed a detailed and dense ground gravity surveys of the Richmond (Nowroozi and Wong, 1989, Daniels and Nowroozi, 1987). In this work we report our progress on collecting existing gravity data in a rectangular area covering the Richmond and Taylorsville Basins and its vicinity. The area covers one degree latitude and one degree longitude, starting at 37 North, 77 West and ending at 38 North, 78 West. Dr. David Daniels of the United State Geological Survey supplied us with more than 4900 Bouguer gravity anomalies in this area. The purpose of this progress report is to present the data in form of several maps and discuss its relation to the geology of the Triassic Basins and its vicinity. Johnson and others (1985) also presented a map of the Bouguer gravity anomaly of this area. However, their map covers a smaller area, and it is based on smaller number of observations.

  9. Crustal structure beneath the Paleozoic Parnaíba Basin revealed by airborne gravity and magnetic data, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de Castroa, David L.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.; Phillips, Jeffrey D. Phillips; Vidotti, Roberta M.; Bezerra, Francisco H.R.; Dantas, Elton L.

    2014-01-01

    The Parnaíba Basin is a large Paleozoic syneclise in northeastern Brazil underlain by Precambrian crystalline basement, which comprises a complex lithostructural and tectonic framework formed during the Neoproterozoic–Eopaleozoic Brasiliano–Pan African orogenic collage. A sag basin up to 3.5 km thick and 1000 km long formed after the collage. The lithologic composition, structure, and role in the basin evolution of the underlying basement are the focus of this study. Airborne gravity and magnetic data were modeled to reveal the general crustal structure underneath the Parnaíba Basin. Results indicate that gravity and magnetic signatures delineate the main boundaries and structural trends of three cratonic areas and surrounding Neoproterozoic fold belts in the basement. Triangular-shaped basement inliers are geophysically defined in the central region of this continental-scale Neoproterozoic convergence zone. A 3-D gravity inversion constrained by seismological data reveals that basement inliers exhibit a 36–40.5 km deep crustal root, with borders defined by a high-density and thinner crust. Forward modeling of gravity and magnetic data indicates that lateral boundaries between crustal units are limited by Brasiliano shear zones, representing lithospheric sutures of the Amazonian and São Francisco Cratons, Tocantins Province and Parnaíba Block. In addition, coincident residual gravity, residual magnetic, and pseudo-gravity lows indicate two complex systems of Eopaleozoic rifts related to the initial phase of the sag deposition, which follow basement trends in several directions.

  10. Gravity survey of the southwestern part of the sourthern Utah geothermal belt

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.T.; Cook, K.L.

    1981-03-01

    A gravity survey covering an area of 6200 km/sup 2/ was made over the southwestern part of the southern Utah geothermal belt. The objective of the gravity survey is to delineate the geologic structures and assist in the understanding of the geothermal potential of the area. A total of 726 new gravity stations together with 205 existing gravity stations, are reduced to give: (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map, and (2) a fourth-order residual gravity anomaly map; both maps have a 2-mgal contour interval. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map shows an east-trending regional gravity belt with a total relief of about 70 mgal which crosses the central portion of the survey area. The gravity belt is attributed to a crustal lateral density variation of 0.1 gm/cc from a depth of 5 to 15 km.

  11. Integrating stations from the North America Gravity Database into a local GPS-based land gravity survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoberg, Thomas G.; Stoddard, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to augment local gravity surveys with additional gravity stations from easily accessible national databases can greatly increase the areal coverage and spatial resolution of a survey. It is, however, necessary to integrate such data seamlessly with the local survey. One challenge to overcome in integrating data from national databases is that these data are typically of unknown quality. This study presents a procedure for the evaluation and seamless integration of gravity data of unknown quality from a national database with data from a local Global Positioning System (GPS)-based survey. The starting components include the latitude, longitude, elevation and observed gravity at each station location. Interpolated surfaces of the complete Bouguer anomaly are used as a means of quality control and comparison. The result is an integrated dataset of varying quality with many stations having GPS accuracy and other reliable stations of unknown origin, yielding a wider coverage and greater spatial resolution than either survey alone.

  12. Airborne radioactivity surveys of parts of Savery SW and Savery SE quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 222 square miles of Savery SW and Savery SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  13. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Savery NW and Savery NE quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 266 square miles of Savery NW and Savery NE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  14. Alternative Gravity Rotation Curves for the LITTLE THINGS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stulge, Modestas; Stefanski, Brian; Dentico, Jeremy; O'Brien, James; Gay, Joseph; Moss, Robert; Young, Bryan; Smith, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Galactic rotation curves have proven to be the testing ground for dark matter bounds in spiral galaxies of all morphologies. Dwarf Galaxies serve as an increasingly interesting testing ground of rotation curve dynamics due to their increased stellar formation and typically rising rotation curve. These galaxies usually are not dominated by typical stellar structure and mostly terminate at small radial distances. This, coupled with the fact that Cold Dark Matter theories such as NFW (ΛCDM) struggle with the universality of galactic rotation curves, allow for exclusive features of alternative gravitational models to be analyzed. Recently, the THINGS (The HI Nearby Galactic Survey) has been extended to include a sample of 25 dwarf galaxies now known as the LITTLE THINGS Survey. Here, we present a thorough application of alternative gravitational models to the LITTLE THINGS survey, specifically focusing on MOND and Conformal Gravity. An analysis and discussion of the results of the fitting procedure of the two alternative gravitational models are explored. We posit here that both the Conformal Gravity and MOND can provide an accurate description of the galactic dynamics without the need for copious dark matter.

  15. Airborne electromagnetic and magnetic survey data of the Paradox and San Luis Valleys, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Bloss, Benjamin R.; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Smith, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    In October 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracted airborne magnetic and electromagnetic surveys of the Paradox and San Luis Valleys in southern Colorado, United States. These airborne geophysical surveys provide high-resolution and spatially comprehensive datasets characterizing the resistivity structure of the shallow subsurface of each survey region, accompanied by magnetic-field information over matching areas. These data were collected to provide insight into the distribution of groundwater brine in the Paradox Valley, the extent of clay aquitards in the San Luis Valley, and to improve our understanding of the geologic framework for both regions. This report describes these contracted surveys and releases digital data supplied under contract to the USGS.

  16. Survey of subsurface geophysical exploration technologies adaptable to an airborne platform

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.A.

    1992-12-01

    This report has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a Research Development Demonstration Testing and Evaluation (RDDT E) project by EG G Energy Measurement's (EG G/EM) Remote Sensing Laboratory. It examines geophysical detection techniques which may be used in Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) surveys to locate buried waste, waste containers, potential waste migratory paths, and aquifer depths. Because of the Remote Sensing Laboratory's unique survey capabilities, only those technologies which have been adapted or are capable of being adapted to an airborne platform were studied. This survey describes several of the available subsurface survey technologies and discusses the basic capabilities of each: the target detectability, required geologic conditions, and associated survey methods. Because the airborne capabilities of these survey techniques have not been fully developed, the chapters deal mostly with the ground-based capabilities of each of the technologies, with reference made to the airborne capabilities where applicable. The information about each survey technique came from various contractors whose companies employ these specific technologies. EG G/EM cannot guarantee or verify the accuracy of the contractor information; however, the data given is an indication of the technologies that are available.

  17. Survey of subsurface geophysical exploration technologies adaptable to an airborne platform

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.A.

    1992-12-01

    This report has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a Research Development Demonstration Testing and Evaluation (RDDT&E) project by EG&G Energy Measurement`s (EG&G/EM) Remote Sensing Laboratory. It examines geophysical detection techniques which may be used in Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) surveys to locate buried waste, waste containers, potential waste migratory paths, and aquifer depths. Because of the Remote Sensing Laboratory`s unique survey capabilities, only those technologies which have been adapted or are capable of being adapted to an airborne platform were studied. This survey describes several of the available subsurface survey technologies and discusses the basic capabilities of each: the target detectability, required geologic conditions, and associated survey methods. Because the airborne capabilities of these survey techniques have not been fully developed, the chapters deal mostly with the ground-based capabilities of each of the technologies, with reference made to the airborne capabilities where applicable. The information about each survey technique came from various contractors whose companies employ these specific technologies. EG&G/EM cannot guarantee or verify the accuracy of the contractor information; however, the data given is an indication of the technologies that are available.

  18. Parachuting injuries among Army Rangers: a prospective survey of an elite airborne battalion.

    PubMed

    Kragh, J F; Jones, B H; Amaroso, P J; Heekin, R D

    1996-07-01

    Injuries are common in sports and military parachuting. This paper presents results of a prospective survey of parachuting injuries in an airborne Ranger battalion. The Ranger regiment is the U.S Army's most elite airborne infantry, prepared for worldwide deployment without advanced notice. Average unit size was 556 Rangers for the 18 months of follow-up. Other variables examined were type of landing area and time of day. During the follow-up period, all injuries occurring in the battalion were documented, as were all airborne operations. During the survey period, 65 airborne operations were conducted (7,948 static-line and free-fall jumps), which caused 163 injuries to Rangers. Fifty-five percent of the operations and jumps were made at night, and 63, 23, and 14% of operations were onto fields, airports, and unimproved airplane landing strips, respectively. All operations were performed in a tactical environment with equipment. The "static-line" injury rate was 2.2%. The types of injuries were similar to those found in previous reports. Dirt landing strips (4.7% injured) and airports (2.3%) appeared to be more hazardous landing areas than fields (1.6%) and water (0%), and more injuries occurred during night operations (2.7%) than during the day (1.4%). Two and one-half times as many severe injuries occurred at night versus day. This type of information is important for combat airborne operations. PMID:8754716

  19. Airborne radioactivity survey in the vicinity of Grants, McKinley and Valencia Counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stead, Frank W.

    1951-01-01

    An airborne radioactivity survey in the vicinity of Grants, New Mexico, was made on May 28. 1951; aeromagnetic measurements were made concurrently with the radioactivity measurements. Several radioactivity anomalies were noted in conjunction with negative magnetic anomalies; this association is unusual and may reflect a genetic relationship between the uranium mineralization and the geologic structure causing the negative magnetic effect. Further investigation of the vicinity of the anomalies near the Haystack area, including ground magnetometer survey, seems warranted.

  20. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS). Topical report, October 1993--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a geophysical sensor system based on a remotely operated model helicopter (ROH) and to evaluate the efficacy of the system for characterization of hazardous environmental sites. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is a geophysical survey system that uses a ROH as the survey vehicle. We have selected the ROH because of its advantages over fixed wing and ground based vehicles. Lower air speed and superior maneuverability of the ROH make it better suited for geophysical surveys than a fixed wing model aircraft. The ROH can fly close to the ground, allowing detection of weak or subtle anomalies. Unlike ground based vehicles, the ROH can traverse difficult terrain while providing a stable sensor platform. ROH does not touch the ground during the course of a survey and is capable of functioning over water and surf zones. The ROH has been successfully used in the motion picture industry and by geology companies for payload bearing applications. The only constraint to use of the airborne system is that the ROH must remain visible to the pilot. Obstructed areas within a site can be characterized by relocating the base station to alternate positions. GAUSS consists of a ROH with radio controller, a data acquisition and processing (DAP) system, and lightweight digital sensor systems. The objective of our Phase I research was to develop a DAP and sensors suitable for ROH operation. We have constructed these subsystems and integrated them to produce an automated, hand-held geophysical surveying system, referred to as the ``pre-prototype``. We have performed test surveys with the pre-prototype to determine the functionality of the and DAP and sensor subsystems and their suitability for airborne application. The objective of the Phase II effort will be to modify the existing subsystems and integrate them into an airborne prototype. Efficacy of the prototype for geophysical survey of hazardous sites will then be determined.

  1. Grounded electrical-source airborne transient electromagnetics (GREATEM) survey of Aso Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Mogi, Toru; Jomori, Akira; Yuuki, Youichi

    2014-05-01

    Grounded electrical-source airborne transient electromagnetics (GREATEM), a type of semi-airborne electromagnetics, was used to examine Aso Volcano in south-west Japan, to verify its applicability to surveying deep subsurface resistivity structures. Comparison of the GREATEM resistivity values with those of ground-based transient electromagnetics (TEM) data, repeated GREATEM survey results at the same and different flight heights, and lithologic descriptions indicated that GREATEM can successfully identify underground structures as deep as ~800 m in rugged mountainous areas. An active volcanic region (Naka-Dake crater) was mapped as a low-resistivity zone from the surface to a depth of 100 m. This low-resistivity zone extended to the west-north-west, implying future volcanic activity in this area. Therefore, the GREATEM method is useful for surveying deep structures in large, inaccessible areas, such as volcanic provinces, in a quick, cost-effective way.

  2. An interpretation of the 1997 airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey, Fort Huachuca vicinity, Cochise County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bultman, M.W.; Gettings, M.E.; Wynn, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    Executive Summary -- In March of 1997, an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey of the Fort Huachuca Military Reservation and immediate surrounds (location map, http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of99-007-b/index.jpg) was conducted. This survey was sponsored by the U.S. Army and contracted through the Geologic Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Data were gathered by Geoterrex-Dighem Ltd. of Ottawa, Canada. The survey aircraft is surrounded by a coil through which a large current pulse is passed. This pulse induces currents in the Earth which are recorded by a set of three mutually perpendicular coils towed in a 'bird' about 100 m behind and below the aircraft. The bird also records the Earth's magnetic field. The system samples the Earth response to the electromagnetic pulse about every 16 m along the aircraft flight path. For this survey, the bulk of the flightpaths were spaced about 400 m apart and oriented in a northeast-southwest direction extending from bedrock over the Huachuca Mountains to bedrock over the Tombstone Hills. A preliminary report on the unprocessed data collected in the field was delivered to the U.S. Army by USGS in July 1997 (USGS Open-File Report 97?457). The final data were delivered in March, 1998 by the contractor to USGS and thence to the U.S. Army. The present report represents the final interpretive report from USGS. The objectives of the survey were to: 1) define the structure of the San Pedro basin in the Sierra Vista-Fort Huachuca-Huachuca City area, including the depth and shape of the basin, and to delineate large faults that may be active within the basin fill and therefore important in the hydrologic regime; 2) define near surface and subsurface areas that contain a large volume fraction of silt and clay in the basin fill and which both reduce the volume of available storage for water and reduce the permeability of the aquifer; and 3) to evaluate the use of the time domain electromagnetic method in the southwest

  3. Inference of lithologic distributions in an alluvial aquifer using airborne transient electromagnetic surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Pool, D.R.; Groom, R.W.; Davis, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    An airborne transient electromagnetic (TEM) survey was completed in the Upper San Pedro Basin in southeastern Arizona to map resistivity distributions within the alluvial aquifer. This investigation evaluated the utility of 1D vertical resistivity models of the TEM data to infer lithologic distributions in an alluvial aquifer. Comparisons of the resistivity values and layers in the 1D resistivity models of airborne TEM data to 1D resistivity models of ground TEM data, borehole resistivity logs, and lithologic descriptions in drill logs indicated that the airborne TEM identified thick conductive fine-grained sediments that result in semiconfined groundwater conditions. One-dimensional models of ground-based TEM surveys and subsurface lithology at three sites were used to determine starting models and constraints to invert airborne TEM data using a constrained Marquardt-styleunderparameterized method. A maximum structural resolution of six layers underlain by a half-space was determined from the resistivity structure of the 1D models of the ground TEM data. The 1D resistivity models of the airborne TEM data compared well with the control data to depths of approximately 100 m in areas of thick conductive silt and clay and to depths of 200 m in areas of resistive sand and gravel. Comparison of a 3D interpolation of the 1D resistivity models to drill logs indicated resistive (mean of 65 ohm-m ) coarse-grained sediments along basin margins and conductive (mean of 8 ohm-m ) fine-grained sediments at the basin center. Extents of hydrologically significant thick silt and clay were well mapped by the 1D resistivity models of airborne TEM data. Areas of uncertain lithology remain below conductive fine-grained sediments where the 1D resistivity structure is not resolved: in areas where multiple lithologies have similar resistivity values and in areas of high salinity.

  4. Investigation of coastal areas in Northern Germany using airborne geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miensopust, Marion; Siemon, Bernhard; Wiederhold, Helga; Steuer, Annika; Ibs-von Seht, Malte; Voß, Wolfgang; Meyer, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Since 2000, the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) carried out several airborne geophysical surveys in Northern Germany to investigate the coastal areas of the North Sea and some of the North and East Frisian Islands. Several of those surveys were conducted in cooperation with the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG). Two helicopter-borne geophysical systems were used, namely the BGR system, which collects simultaneously frequency-domain electromagnetic, magnetic and radiometric data, and the SkyTEM system, a time-domain electromagnetic system developed by the University of Aarhus. Airborne geophysical surveys enable to investigate huge areas almost completely with high lateral resolution in a relatively short time at economic cost. In general, the results can support geological and hydrogeological mapping. Of particular importance are the airborne electromagnetic results, as the surveyed parameter - the electrical conductivity - depends on both lithology and groundwater status. Therefore, they can reveal buried valleys and the distribution of sandy and clayey sediments as well as salinization zones and fresh-water occurrences. The often simultaneously recorded magnetic and radiometric data support the electromagnetic results. Lateral changes of Quaternary and Tertiary sediments (shallow source - several tens of metres) as well as evidences of the North German Basin (deep source - several kilometres) are revealed by the magnetic results. The radiometric data indicate the various mineral compositions of the soil sediments. This BGR/LIAG project aims to build up a geophysics data base (http://geophysics-database.de/) which contains all airborne geophysical data sets. However, the more significant effort is to create a reference data set as basis for monitoring climate or man-made induced changes of the salt-water/fresh-water interface at the German North Sea coast. The significance of problems for groundwater extraction

  5. Basis and methods of NASA airborne topographic mapper lidar surveys for coastal studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Krabill, William B.; Swift, Robert N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the basic principles of airborne laser altimetry for surveys of coastal topography, and describes the methods used in the acquisition and processing of NASA Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) surveys that cover much of the conterminous US coastline. This form of remote sensing, also known as "topographic lidar", has undergone extremely rapid development during the last two decades, and has the potential to contribute within a wide range of coastal scientific investigations. Various airborne laser surveying (ALS) applications that are relevant to coastal studies are being pursued by researchers in a range of Earth science disciplines. Examples include the mapping of "bald earth" land surfaces below even moderately dense vegetation in studies of geologic framework and hydrology, and determination of the vegetation canopy structure, a key variable in mapping wildlife habitats. ALS has also proven to be an excellent method for the regional mapping of geomorphic change along barrier island beaches and other sandy coasts due to storms or long-term sedimentary processes. Coastal scientists are adopting ALS as a basic method in the study of an array of additional coastal topics. ALS can provide useful information in the analysis of shoreline change, the prediction and assessment of landslides along seacliffs and headlands, examination of subsidence causing coastal land loss, and in predicting storm surge and tsunami inundation.

  6. Airborne geophysical surveys conducted in western Nebraska, 2010: contractor reports and data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S.Geological Survey Crustal Geophysical and Geochemical Science Center

    2014-01-01

    This report contains three contractor reports and data files for an airborne electromagnetic survey flown from June 28 to July 7, 2010. The first report; “SkyTEM Survey: Nebraska, USA, Data” describes data aquisition and processing from a time-domain electromagnetic and magnetic survey performed by SkyTEM Canada, Inc. (the North American SkyTEM subsidiary), in western Nebraska, USA. Digital data for this report are given in Appendix 1. The airborne geophysical data from the SkyTEM survey subsequently were processed and inverted by Aarhus Geophysics ApS, Aarhus, Denmark, to produce resistivity depth sections along each flight line. The result of that processing is described in two reports presented in Appendix 2, “Processing and inversion of SkyTEM data from USGS Area UTM–13” and “Processing and inversion of SkyTEM data from USGS Area UTM–14.” Funding for these surveys was provided by the North Platte Natural Resources District, the South Platte Natural Resources District, and the Twin Platte Natural Resources District, in Scottsbluff, Sidney, and North Platte, Nebraska, respectively. Any additional information concerning the geophysical data may be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, Denver Colorado.

  7. A survey of respirators usage for airborne chemicals in Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Don-Hee; Kang, Min-Sun

    2009-10-01

    A questionnaire survey was undertaken to identify the current status of respirator usage in manufacturing work environments subject to gas/vapor chemicals exposure in Korea and to suggest improvements to enhance the effectiveness of respirator usage. The number of target companies included 17 big companies, 110 small & mid-size companies, and 5 foreign companies, and the number of respondents included 601 workers and 69 persons in charge of respirators (PCR). The results explained clearly that respirator programs in practice were extremely poor in small & mid-sized companies. The findings indicated that the selection of respirators was not appropriate. Quarter mask including filtering facepiece was the most common facepiece form for respirator and was worn by sixty-four percent. Not a little proportion of respondents (33%) complained about the fit: faceseal leakage between the face and facepiece. A filtering facepiece with carbon fiber filter was used as a substitution for a gas/vapor respirator. Another result was that the PCR respondents' perception of the administration of respirators was very low. The results of this survey suggest that regal enforcement of respiratory protection programs should be established in Korea. On the basis of these findings, respiratory protection programs should include respirator selection, maintenance, training, and fit testing. PMID:19834267

  8. A comparison of the use of sodium iodide and lanthanum bromide scintillation crystals for airborne surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Derek M.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Aerial Spectral Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) program performs aerial radiological and chemical characterization of geographical regions of interest. Airborne surveys are performed to characterize environmental radionuclide content, for mineral exploration, as well as for emergency scenarios such as major releases or lost sources. Two radiological detection systems are used by the ASPECT team for gamma-ray detection and characterization: lanthanum bromide [LaBr 3(Ce)] and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation systems. An aerial survey of a uranium mine in the western United States was performed using both NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) detection systems. Analyses of the survey data were performed with RadAssist software and applying International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) airborne gamma ray mapping guidelines. The data for the survey were corrected for cross-over, which is spectral interference from higher energy photons as a result of Compton scattering, height attenuation, cosmic ray contribution to signal, and Radon contribution to signal. Two radiation survey contours were generated from each discrete data set. Based on analysis of the uranium mine survey results, LaBr3(Ce) produced a product comparable to that of NaI(Tl). The LaBr3(Ce) detection system contained 1/16th the scintillating volume and had a total system weight that was 1/4th that of the NaI(Tl) system. LaBr3(Ce) demonstrated a clear advantage over NaI(Tl) detectors in system mobility, and weight factors in airborne gamma ray spectroscopy.

  9. An interactive lake survey program. [airborne multispectral sensor image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development and operation of the interactive lake survey program developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Environmental Protection Agency. The program makes it possible to locate, isolate, and store any number of water bodies on the basis of a given digital image. The stored information may be used to generate statistical analyses of each body of water including the lake surface area and the shoreline perimeter. The hardware includes a 360/65 host computer, a Ramtek G100B display controller, and a trackball cursor. The system is illustrated by the LAKELOC operation as it would be applied to a Landsat scene, noting the FARINA and STATUS programs. The water detection algorithm, which increases the accuracy with which water and land data may be separated, is discussed.

  10. Augmentation the Great Lakes Basin's Geoid by Harmonic Downward Continuing of Newly Acquired Scalar Airborne Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Daniel R.; Li, Xiaopeng

    2014-05-01

    Roughly 10% U.S. population and more than 30% of the Canadian population are living around the Great Lakes Basin (Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario as well as the associated watersheds and connecting channels)[1]. The Great Lakes system contains 84% of the North America's surface fresh water and 21% world widely [2,3]. Only the polar ice caps contain more fresh water [1]. Thus, a high resolution accurate geoid will definitely help us to better understand the Great Lakes system and its influences to local and global environmental changes. Over the years, both U.S. and Canada had developed regional geoid models that cover the Great Lakes area. By incorporating the up-to-date satellite information from GRACE and GOCE, the long wavelength component of the geoid is better defined. The newly acquired scalar airborne gravity data in this area is used to augment the middle to short wavelength. A recent study [4] showed that when compared with EGM2008, the airborne data detects the same new features as the satellite model does, but with more detailed information. As a continuation of the previous study, the airborne data will be harmonicly downward continued onto the surface with some predefined bands. Various weighting schemes between surface data and the downward continued airborne data will be carried out to find the most accurate geoid in terms of directly fitting on surface observations from both GPS/Leveling benchmarks and tidal benchmarks on both the U.S. side and the Canadian side. References: 1. "Great Lakes - U.S. EPA". Epa.gov. 2006-06-28. Retrieved 2011-02-19. 2. Waples, James T. (2008). "The Laurentian Great Lakes" (PDF). North American Continental Margins (Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory): 73-81. 3 Grady, Wayne (2007). The Great Lakes. Vancouver: Greystone Books and David Suzuki Foundation. pp. 13, 21-26, 42-43. ISBN 978-1-55365-197-0. 4. Daniel R. Roman; Xiaopeng Li; Simon A. Holmes (2013) Regional geoid height models developed using

  11. Detailed Analysis of Marine Gravity Survey Data from Panama Canal Transits: Improving Error Models and Signal Processing for BGM-3 Marine Gravimeter Survey Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailor, R. V.; Medler, C. L.; Kinsey, J. C.; Zettergren, E. W.; Insanic, E.

    2015-12-01

    Our prior work (Sailor et al., 2015) showed that the Panama Canal locking operations impart a peak vertical acceleration of about 60 mGal (6 x 10-4 m/sec2) to ships as the individual lock chambers are filled or emptied. During a period of 8 to 12 minutes the ship's elevation changes by over 8 meters. This motion is very repeatable, since it is driven by gravity-fed hydraulics backed up by a huge mass of water. The novelty of the prior work was to demonstrate that the lock-driven vertical acceleration is significant, of relatively long duration, easily observed by the BGM-3 accelerometer/gravimeter, and is equivalent tothe gravity anomaly caused by a moderately-sized seamount. Thus, the lock-induced vertical acceleration is a known external acceleration input that falls within the amplitude and time duration band of interest for marine gravity as well as airborne gravity survey systems. Here we report an extension to the prior work, using BGM-3 gravimeter data from the RV Marcus G Langseth and the RV Melville, in addition to the previously-used two datasets from the RV Knorr. The new analysis allows us to compare the quality of the gravity data from these three ships in two ways, using: 1) Differences along nearly perfectly coincident gravity anomaly data profiles collected underway, during passage through calm and narrow channels with little or no vertical ship motion; and 2) Observed vertical-motion-induced accelerations, with no horizontal motion, experienced during lock operations. We use the raw 1-Hz output of the BGM-3 gravimeter and compare various filtering methods. Furthermore, good quality vertical channel GPS is used to compare to the output of our solution of a boundary value problem: Given the observed outputs of the gravimeter, solve for h(t), the elevation of the ship vs time and also for two parameters: initial gravity value prior to vertical motion in the lock and apparent vertical gravity gradient.

  12. The first high-precision gravity survey in the North Pole region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, A. V.; Krasnov, A. A.; Koneshov, V. N.; Glazko, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The experience with conducting a marine gravity survey onboard a surface vessel under complicated ice conditions at high latitude is described. In 2014, a high-precision marine gravity survey with two modifications of the Chekan-AM gravimeter was carried out in the North Pole region. The measurements were conducted during two months from aboard the Akademik Fedorov research vessel on a given grid with a total length of 10000 km of the routes. As a result, 70000 gravity points at Arctic latitudes including the region of the geographical North Pole itself are acquired. In this paper, we discuss the methodical aspects of conducting the survey and present the accuracy estimates of the gravity measurements. The comparison of the obtained results with the Earth's gravity models demonstrates the absence of systematic errors and the higher spatial resolution of the measurements with the Chekan-AM gravimeters.

  13. Airborne Hyperspectral Infrared Imaging Survey of the Southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, D. K.; Tratt, D. M.; Buckland, K. N.; Johnson, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) between Desert Hot Springs and Bombay Beach has been surveyed with Mako, an airborne hyperspectral imager operating across the wavelength range 7.6-13.2 μm in the thermal-infrared (TIR) spectral region. The data were acquired with a 4-km swath width centered on the SAF, and many tectonic features are recorded in the imagery. Spectral analysis using diagnostic features of minerals can identify rocks, soils and vegetation. Mako imagery can also locate rupture zones and measure slip distances. Designed and built by The Aerospace Corporation, the innovative and highly capable airborne imaging spectrometer used for this work enables low-noise performance (NEΔT ≲ 0.1 K @ 10 μm) at small pixel IFOV (0.55 mrad) and high frame rates, making possible an area-coverage rate of 20 km2 per minute with 2-m ground resolution from 12,500 ft (3.8 km) above-ground altitude. Since its commissioning in 2010, Mako has been used in numerous studies involving other earthquake fault systems (Hector Mine, S. Bristol Mts.), mapping of surface geology, geothermal sources (fumaroles near the Salton Sea), urban surveys, and the detection, quantification, and tracking of natural and anthropogenic gaseous emission plumes. Mako is available for airborne field studies and new applications are of particular interest. It can be flown at any altitude below 20,000 ft to achieve the desired GSD.

  14. Airborne Surveys of Snow Depth over Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.; Panzer, B.; Leuschen, C.; Pang, S.; Markus, T.; Holt, B.; Gogineni, S.

    2011-01-01

    During the spring of 2009, an ultrawideband microwave radar was deployed as part of Operation IceBridge to provide the first cross-basin surveys of snow thickness over Arctic sea ice. In this paper, we analyze data from three approx 2000 km transects to examine detection issues, the limitations of the current instrument, and the regional variability of the retrieved snow depth. Snow depth is the vertical distance between the air \\snow and snow-ice interfaces detected in the radar echograms. Under ideal conditions, the per echogram uncertainty in snow depth retrieval is approx 4 - 5 cm. The finite range resolution of the radar (approx 5 cm) and the relative amplitude of backscatter from the two interfaces limit the direct retrieval of snow depths much below approx 8 cm. Well-defined interfaces are observed over only relatively smooth surfaces within the radar footprint of approx 6.5 m. Sampling is thus restricted to undeformed, level ice. In early April, mean snow depths are 28.5 +/- 16.6 cm and 41.0 +/- 22.2 cm over first-year and multiyear sea ice (MYI), respectively. Regionally, snow thickness is thinner and quite uniform over the large expanse of seasonal ice in the Beaufort Sea, and gets progressively thicker toward the MYI cover north of Ellesmere Island, Greenland, and the Fram Strait. Snow depth over MYI is comparable to that reported in the climatology by Warren et al. Ongoing improvements to the radar system and the utility of these snow depth measurements are discussed.

  15. Development of a network RTK positioning and gravity-surveying application with gravity correction using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsoo; Lee, Youngcheol; Cha, Sungyeoul; Choi, Chuluong; Lee, Seongkyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a smartphone-based network real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning and gravity-surveying application (app) that allows semi-real-time measurements using the built-in Bluetooth features of the smartphone and a third-generation or long-term evolution wireless device. The app was implemented on a single smartphone by integrating a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) controller, a laptop, and a field-note writing tool. The observation devices (i.e., a GNSS receiver and relative gravimeter) functioned independently of this system. The app included a gravity module, which converted the measured relative gravity reading into an absolute gravity value according to tides; meter height; instrument drift correction; and network adjustments. The semi-real-time features of this app allowed data to be shared easily with other researchers. Moreover, the proposed smartphone-based gravity-survey app was easily adaptable to various locations and rough terrain due to its compact size. PMID:23857258

  16. Development of a Network RTK Positioning and Gravity-Surveying Application with Gravity Correction Using a Smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinsoo; Lee, Youngcheol; Cha, Sungyeoul; Choi, Chuluong; Lee, Seongkyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a smartphone-based network real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning and gravity-surveying application (app) that allows semi-real-time measurements using the built-in Bluetooth features of the smartphone and a third-generation or long-term evolution wireless device. The app was implemented on a single smartphone by integrating a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) controller, a laptop, and a field-note writing tool. The observation devices (i.e., a GNSS receiver and relative gravimeter) functioned independently of this system. The app included a gravity module, which converted the measured relative gravity reading into an absolute gravity value according to tides; meter height; instrument drift correction; and network adjustments. The semi-real-time features of this app allowed data to be shared easily with other researchers. Moreover, the proposed smartphone-based gravity-survey app was easily adaptable to various locations and rough terrain due to its compact size. PMID:23857258

  17. Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region, Kern, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.

    1952-01-01

    Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region Kern, Riverside, and Bernardino counties were made in five areas recommended as favorable for the occurrence of radioactive raw materials: (1) Rock Corral area, San Bernardino County. (2) Searles Station area, Kern county. (3) Soledad area, Kern County. (4) White Tank area, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. (5) Harvard Hills area, San Bernardino County. Anomalous radiation was detected in all but the Harvard Hills area. The radioactivity anomalies detected in the Rock Corral area are of the greatest amplitude yet recorded by the airborne equipment over natural sources. The activity is apparently attributable to the thorium-beating mineral associated with roof pendants of crystalline metamorphic rocks in a granitic intrusive. In the Searles Station, Soledad, and White Tank area, several radioactivity anomalies of medium amplitude were recorded, suggesting possible local concentrations of radioactive minerals.

  18. Airborne EM survey in volcanoes : Application to a volcanic hazards assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, T.

    2010-12-01

    Airborne electromagnetics (AEM) is a useful tool for investigating subsurface structures of volcanoes because it can survey large areas involving inaccessible areas. Disadvantages include lower accuracy and limited depth of investigation. AEM has been widely used in mineral exploration in frontier areas, and have been applying to engineering and environmental fields, particularly in studies involving active volcanoes. AEM systems typically comprise a transmitter and a receiver on an aircraft or in a towed bird, and although effective for surveying large areas, their penetration depth is limited because the distance between the transmitter and receiver is small and higher-frequency signals are used. To explore deeper structures using AEM, a semi-airborne system called GRounded Electrical source Airborne Transient ElectroMagnetics (GREATEM) has been developed. The system uses a grounded-electrical-dipole as the transmitter and generates horizontal electric fields. The GREATEM technology, first proposed by Mogi et al. (1998), has recently been improved and used in practical surveys (Mogi et al., 2009). The GREATEM survey system was developed to increase the depth of investigation possible using AEM. The method was tested in some volcanoes at 2004-2005. Here I will talk about some results of typical AEM surveys and GREATEM surveys in some volcanoes in Japan to mitigate hazards associated with volcano eruption. Geologic hazards caused by volcanic eruptions can be mitigated by a combination of prediction, preparedness and land-use control. Risk management depends on the identification of hazard zones and forecasting of eruptions. Hazard zoning involves the mapping of deposits which have formed during particular phases of volcanic activity and their extrapolation to identify the area which would be likely to suffer a similar hazard at some future time. The mapping is usually performed by surface geological surveys of volcanic deposits. Resistivity mapping by AEM is useful

  19. Comparison of thermal data from airborne and vessel surveys of Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeton, Alfred M.; Moffett, James W.; Parker, Dana C.

    1969-01-01

    A study of the applications of airborne infrared equipment for detecting water masses and currents of the Great Lakes is described. Infrared scanners were used to make thermal strip maps and an infrared radiometer was used to obtain surface temperatures of the western end of Lake Erie and the lower Detroit River. Simultaneously, surface water temperatures were taken and water samples were collected for chloride determinations from four vessels making a 4 day synoptic survey of the test area. The remote infrared measurements are compared with shipboard temperature data to evaluate their usefulness in demonstrating thermal structure, water masses, and currents in the test area.

  20. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: north/south tieline. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted along the 99/sup 0/ longitude meridian from the Canadian border southward to the Mexican border. A total of 1555 line miles of geophysical data were acquired and, subsequently, compiled. The north-south tieline was flown as part of the National Uranium Resources Evaluation. NURE is a program of the US Department of Energy's Grand Junction, Colorado, office to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  1. Predicting gravity and sediment thickness in Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, W.; Brozena, J.; Peters, M.

    2013-02-01

    The US Naval Research Laboratory conducted comprehensive high-altitude (7 km above mean sea level) aero-geophysical surveys over Afghanistan in 2006 (Rampant Lion I). The surveys were done in collaboration with the US Geological Survey and upon the request of Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Ministry of Mines. In this study, we show that a best fitting admittance between topography and airborne gravity in western Afghanistan can be used to predict airborne gravity for the no-data area of eastern Afghanistan where the mountains are too high to conduct airborne surveys, due to the threat of ground fire. The differences between the airborne and the predicted gravity along a tie-track through the no-data area were found to be within ±12 mGal range with rms difference 7.3 mGal, while those between the predicted gravity from a simple Airy model (with compensation depth of 32 km and crustal density of 2.67 g cm-3) and the airborne gravity were within ±22 mGal range with rms difference 10.3 mGal. A combined airborne free-air anomaly has been constructed by merging the predicted gravity with the airborne data. We also demonstrate that sediment thickness can be estimated for basin areas where surface topography and airborne free-air anomaly profiles do not show a correlation presumably because of thick sediments. In order to estimate sediment thickness, we first determine a simple linear relationship from a scatter plot of the airborne gravity points and the interpolated Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) topography along the Rampant Lion I tracks, and computed corresponding quasi-topography tracks by multiplying the linear relationship with the airborne free-air anomalies. We then take the differences between the SRTM and quasi-topography as a first-order estimate of sediment thickness. A global gravity model (GOCO02S), upward continued to the same altitude (7 km above mean sea level) as the data collection, was compared with the low-pass filtered (with cutoff

  2. Detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys in the Black Rock Desert Area, Utah. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Serpa, L.F.; Cook, K.L.

    1980-01-01

    Aeromagnetic and gravity surveys were conducted during 1978 in the Black Rock Desert, Utah over an area of about 2400 km/sup 2/ between the north-trending Pavant and Cricket Mountains. The surveys assisted in evaluating the geothermal resources in the Meadow-Hatton Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) and vicinity by delineating geophysical characteristics of the subsurface. The gravity measurements from approximately 700 new stations were reduced to complete Bouguer gravity anomaly values with the aid of a computerized terrain-correction program and contoured at an interval of 1 milligal. The aeromagnetic survey was drape flown at an altitude of 305 m (1000 ft) and a total intensity residual aeromagnetic map with a contour interval of 20 gammas was produced. Two gravity and aeromagnetic east-west profiles and one north-south profile were modeled using a simultaneous 2 1/2-dimensional modeling technique to provide a single model satisfying both types of geophysical data.

  3. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS). Topical report, October 1993--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This document is a Final Technical Report that describes the results of the Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) research project. The objectives were to construct a geophysical data acquisition system that uses a remotely operated unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and to evaluate its effectiveness for characterization of hazardous environmental sites. The GAUSS is a data acquisition system that mitigates the potential risk to personnel during geophysical characterization of hazardous or radioactive sites. The fundamental basis of the GAUSS is as follows: (1) an unmanned survey vehicle carries geophysical sensors into a hazardous location, (2) the pilot remains outside the hazardous site and operates the vehicle using radio control, (3) geophysical measurements and their spatial locations are processed by an automated data-acquisition system which displays data on an off-site monitor in real-time, and (4) the pilot uses the display to direct the survey vehicle for complete site coverage. The objective of our Phase I research was to develop a data acquisition and processing (DAP) subsystem and geophysical sensors suitable for UAV deployment. We integrated these two subsystems to produce an automated, hand-held geophysical surveying system. The objective of the Phase II effort was to modify the subsystems and integrate them into an airborne prototype. The completed GAUSS DAP system consists of a UAV platform, a laser tracking and ranging subsystem, a telemetry subsystem, light-weight geophysical sensors, a base-station computer (BC), and custom-written survey control software (SCS). We have utilized off-the-shelf commercial products, where possible, to reduce cost and design time.

  4. Airborne full tensor magnetic gradiometry surveys in the Thuringian basin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queitsch, M.; Schiffler, M.; Goepel, A.; Stolz, R.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, H.; Kukowski, N.

    2013-12-01

    In this contribution we introduce a newly developed fully operational full tensor magnetic gradiometer (FTMG) instrument based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) and show example data acquired in 2012 within the framework of the INFLUINS (Integrated Fluid Dynamics in Sedimentary basins) project. This multidisciplinary project aims for a better understanding of movements and interaction between shallow and deep fluids in the Thuringian Basin in the center of Germany. In contrast to mapping total magnetic field intensity (TMI) in conventional airborne magnetic surveys for industrial exploration of mineral deposits and sedimentary basins, our instrument measures all components of the magnetic field gradient tensor using highly sensitive SQUID gradiometers. This significantly constrains the solutions of the inverse problem. Furthermore, information on the ratio between induced and remanent magnetization is obtained. Special care has been taken to reduce motion noise while acquiring data in airborne operation. Therefore, the sensors are mounted in a nonmagnetic and aerodynamically shaped bird made of fiberglas with a high drag tail which stabilizes the bird even at low velocities. The system is towed by a helicopter and kept at 30m above ground during data acquisition. Additionally, the system in the bird incorporates an inertial unit for geo-referencing and enhanced motion noise compensation, a radar altimeter for topographic correction and a GPS system for high precision positioning. Advanced data processing techniques using reference magnetometer and inertial unit data result in a very low system noise of less than 60 pT/m peak to peak in airborne operation. To show the performance of the system we present example results from survey areas within the Thuringian basin and along its bordering highlands. The mapped gradient tensor components show a high correlation to existing geologic maps. Furthermore, the measured gradient components indicate

  5. NASA IceBridge: Scientific Insights from Airborne Surveys of the Polar Sea Ice Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter-Menge, J.; Farrell, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Operation IceBridge (OIB) airborne sea ice surveys are designed to continue a valuable series of sea ice thickness measurements by bridging the gap between NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), which operated from 2003 to 2009, and ICESat-2, which is scheduled for launch in 2017. Initiated in 2009, OIB has conducted campaigns over the western Arctic Ocean (March/April) and Southern Oceans (October/November) on an annual basis when the thickness of sea ice cover is nearing its maximum. More recently, a series of Arctic surveys have also collected observations in the late summer, at the end of the melt season. The Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) laser altimeter is one of OIB's primary sensors, in combination with the Digital Mapping System digital camera, a Ku-band radar altimeter, a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) snow radar, and a KT-19 infrared radiation pyrometer. Data from the campaigns are available to the research community at: http://nsidc.org/data/icebridge/. This presentation will summarize the spatial and temporal extent of the OIB campaigns and their complementary role in linking in situ and satellite measurements, advancing observations of sea ice processes across all length scales. Key scientific insights gained on the state of the sea ice cover will be highlighted, including snow depth, ice thickness, surface roughness and morphology, and melt pond evolution.

  6. Airborne Hyperspectral Survey of Afghanistan 2007: Flight Line Planning and HyMap Data Collection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, K. Eric

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data were acquired over Afghanistan with the HyMap imaging spectrometer (Cocks and others, 1998) operating on the WB-57 high altitude NASA research aircraft (http://jsc-aircraft-ops.jsc.nasa.gov/wb57/index.html). These data were acquired during the interval of August 22, 2007 to October 2, 2007, as part of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) project 'Oil and Gas Resources Assessment of the Katawaz and Helmand Basins'. A total of 218 flight lines of hyperspectral remote sensing data were collected over the country. This report describes the planning of the airborne survey and the flight lines that were flown. Included with this report are digital files of the nadir tracks of the flight lines, including a map of the labeled flight lines and corresponding vector shape files for geographic information systems (GIS).

  7. DATA ACQUISITION AND APPLICATIONS OF SIDE-LOOKING AIRBORNE RADAR IN THE U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, John Edwin; Kover, Allan N.

    1985-01-01

    The Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) program encompasses a multi-discipline effort involving geologists, hydrologists, engineers, geographers, and cartographers of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). Since the program began in 1980, more than 520,000 square miles of aerial coverage of SLAR data in the conterminous United States and Alaska have been acquired or contracted for acquisition. The Geological Survey has supported more than 60 research and applications projects addressing the use of this technology in the earth sciences since 1980. These projects have included preparation of lithographic reproductions of SLAR mosaics, research to improve the cartographic uses of SLAR, research for use of SLAR in assessing earth hazards, and studies using SLAR for energy and mineral exploration through improved geologic mapping.

  8. A 0.4 to 10 GHz airborne electromagnetic environment survey of USA urban areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Hill, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    An airborne electromagnetic-environment survey of some U.S. metropolitan areas measured terrestrial emissions within the broad frequency spectrum from 0.4 to 10 GHz. A Cessna 402 commercial aircraft was fitted with both nadir-viewing and horizon-viewing antennas and instrumentation, including a spectrum analyzer, a 35 mm continuous film camera, and a magnetic tape recorder. Most of the flights were made at a nominal altitude of 10,000 feet, and Washington, D. C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and Chicago were surveyed. The 450 to 470 MHz land-mobile UHF band is especially crowded, and the 400 to 406 MHz space bands are less active. This paper discusses test measurements obtained up to 10 GHz. Sample spectrum analyzer photograhs were selected from a total of 5,750 frames representing 38 hours of data.

  9. 0.4- to 10-GHz airborne electromagnetic-environment survey of United States urban areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Hill, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    An airborne electromagnetic-environment survey of some U.S. metropolitan areas measured terrestrial emissions within the broad-frequency spectrum from 0.4 to 10 GHz. A Cessna 402 commercial aircraft was fitted with both nadir-viewing and horizon-viewing antennas and instrumentation, including a spectrum analyzer, a 35-mm continuous-film camera, and a magnetic-tape recorder. Most of the flights were made at a nominal altitude of 10,000 ft, and Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and Chicago were surveyed. The 450- to 470-MHz land-mobile UHF band is especially crowded, and the 400- to 406-MHz space bands are less active. Test measurements obtained up to 10 GHz are discussed. Sample spectrum-analyzer photographs were selected from a total of 5750 frames representing 38 hours of data.

  10. Borehole Gravity Meter Surveys at the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, Jeffrey D.; Mann, Ethan

    2007-04-06

    Microg-LaCoste (MGL) was contracted by Pacfic Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to record borehole gravity density data in 3 wells at the HanfordWaste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The survey was designed to provide highly accurate density information for use in seismic modeling. The borehole gravity meter (BHGM) tool has a very large depth of investigation (hundreds of feet) compared to other density tools so it is not influenced by casing or near welbore effects, such as washouts.

  11. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Gulf of Mexico beach between Sanibel Island and Caladesi Island, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.; Bortner, T.E.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Gulf of Mexico beach between Sanibel Island and Caladesi Island in Florida. This survey was made May 4, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude , parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varies with the areal extent and intensity of the radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1400 feet. The accompanying map and index map show the approximate locations of the areas of greater-than-average radioactivity and the location of the traverse flown. The abnormal radioactivity is apparently caused by radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits which occur locally along the beach in the region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given in the accompanying map showing the localities of greater-than-average radioactivity therefore, suggests area in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  12. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Atlantic Ocean beach, Virginia to Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, R.M.; Johnson, R.W.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying maps show the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Atlantic Ocean beach from Cape Henry, Virginia to Cape Fear, North Carolina and from Savannah Bach Georgia to Miami Beach, Florida. The survey was made March 23-24, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude, parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the normal 500 foot flight altitude varies with the areal extent radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone would be as much as 1,400 feet. The location of the flight lines is shown on the index map below. No abnormal radioactivity was detected along the northern flight line between Cape Henry, Virginia and Cape Fear, North Carolina. Along the southern flight line fourteen areas of abnormal radioactivity were detected between Savannah Beach, Georgia and Anastasia Island, Florida as shown on the map on the left. The abnormal radioactivity is apparently due to radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits with occur locally along the beach in this region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity sue to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given on the accompanying map indicates only those localities of greater-than-average radioactivity and, therefore suggest areas in which uranium and thorium deposits are more

  13. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of the Atlantic Ocean beach, North and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.; Bortner, T.E.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Atlantic Ocean beach between Edisto Island, South Carolina and Cape Fear, North Carolina. The survey was made May 20, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude, parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varies with areal extent and intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1400 feet. The accompanying maps show the approximate locations of the areas of greater-than-average radioactivity (at left) and the location of the traverse flown (at right). The abnormal radioactivity is apparently caused by radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits which occur locally along the beach in this region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given in the accompanying map showing the localities of greater-than-average radioactivity therefore, suggests areas in which uranium and thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  14. A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge

    2011-09-30

    Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

  15. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer survey data application in spatial methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bresnahan, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to develop a methodology that used geographic information system (GIS) tools to convert airborne gamma-ray spectrometer (AGRS) survey data to various spatial data formats for use in radiological hazard mapping and risk assessments. The importance of this conversion methodology results from the versatility and consistency of spatial interpolations using commercially supported software as opposed to previous methods. Maps of interpolated AGRS data provide potential radiological hazard boundaries, delineated by user-defined limits, to guide intense field surveys. Resulting GIS products may be combined with other risk assessment inputs to model and monitor hazardous environments. The AGRS data used in this research was collected during the 1991 sitewide survey at Savannah River site (SRS) as part of the comprehensive integrated remote sensing (CIRS) program conducted by EG&G for the SRS. The AGRS survey component of the program is designed to provide a database for studying the transport of manufactured radionuclides through the environment at the SRS and surrounding areas. The AGRS data have historically been presented only in hardcopy format as acetate overlays on aerial photography. Recently, digital files representing contoured isotopic response have been delivered to the SRS as GIS themes. Since AGRS data are often a collection of dense sample points, interpolation of the data has previously been conducted by connecting points in series along flight paths. To improve on the original algorithm used to contour AGRS data, a triangulated irregular network (TIN) was used as the data model for contour and raster generation.

  16. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Miller Hill area, Carbon county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 65 square miles northwest of Miller Hill, Carbon county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either the radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to uranium, or to thorium, or to a combination of uranium and thorium. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly

  17. A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner

    2005-12-13

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 4.3 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. This report covers 3/19/05 to 9/18/05. During this time, gravity and pressure modeling were completed and graduate student Scott Nooner finished his Ph.D. dissertation, of which this work is a major part. Three new ROVDOG (Remotely Operated Vehicle deployable Deep Ocean Gravimeter) instruments were also completed with funding from Statoil. The primary changes are increased instrument precision and increased data sampling rate. A second gravity survey was carried out from August to September of 2005, allowing us to begin examining the time-lapse gravity changes caused by the injection of CO{sub 2} into the underground aquifer, known as the Utsira formation. Preliminary processing indicates a repeatability of 3.6 {micro}Gal, comparable to the baseline survey.

  18. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge

    2003-06-13

    At the Sleipner gas field, excess CO{sub 2} is sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. A high precision micro-gravity survey was carried out on the seafloor to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. Simple modeling of the first year data give inconclusive results, thus a more detailed approach is needed. Work towards this is underway.

  19. New Airborne LiDAR Survey of the Hayward Fault, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocher, T. M.; Prentice, C. S.; Phillips, D. A.; Bevis, M.; Shrestha, R. L.

    2007-12-01

    We present a digital elevation model (DEM) constructed from newly acquired high-resolution LIght Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data along the Hayward Fault in Northern California. The data were acquired by the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) in the spring of 2007 in conjunction with a larger regional airborne LIDAR survey of the major crustal faults in northern California coordinated by UNAVCO and funded by the National Science Foundation as part of GeoEarthScope. A consortium composed of the U. S. Geological Survey, Pacific Gas & Electric Company, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, and the City of Berkeley separately funded the LIDAR acquisition along the Hayward Fault. Airborne LIDAR data were collected within a 106-km long by 1-km wide swath encompassing the Hayward Fault that extended from San Pablo Bay on the north to the southern end of its restraining stepover with the Calaveras Fault on the south. The Hayward Fault is among the most urbanized faults in the nation. With its most recent major rupture in 1868, it is well within the time window for its next large earthquake, making it an excellent candidate for a "before the earthquake" DEM image. After the next large Hayward Fault event, this DEM can be compared to a post-earthquake LIDAR DEM to provide a means for a detailed analysis of fault slip. In order to minimize location errors, temporary GPS ground control stations were deployed by Ohio State University, UNAVCO, and student volunteers from local universities to augment the available continuous GPS arrays operated in the study area by the Bay Area Regional Deformation (BARD) Network and the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The vegetation cover varies along the fault zone: most of the vegetation is non-native species. Photographs from the 1860s show very little tall vegetation along the fault zone. A number of interesting geomorphic features are associated with the Hayward Fault, even in urbanized areas. Sag ponds and

  20. A Survey and Recent Development of Lunar Gravity Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penzo, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    Earth's moon is the largest in the solar system relative to its parent body, the Earth, and can have significant effect on the path of a spacecraft flying close by. This effect, when planned to benefit a specific mission, is called lunar gravity assist (LGA) , and assumes that one aims the spacecraft towards the Moon in such a way that the Moon's gravitational pull will alter the spacecraft's course in a favorable manner. The first application of LGA was in the Apollo program, where the command and lunar modules (and astronauts) were propelled to the Moon such that, if no additional course changes were made, they would swing around the backside of the Moon at a certain altitude and be flung back to Earth to enter the atmosphere at a specified location in the Pacific ocean. This LGA was an essential element saving the lives of the astronauts on Apollo 13. This paper will illustrate the basic mechanics of gravity assist, and list the many applications where it has been used effectively over the past 30 some years. These include missions to the sun and Earth libration points, redirecting a spacecraft from one of these point to a comet encounter, and enhancing payloads by providing an energy boost by the Moon. More recently, studies and actual missions have shown the benefits of LGA in: (1) assisting lunar capture, (2) repositioning geosynchronous communications satellites, (3) boosting spacecraft to Earth escape and departure to planets and other solar system bodies, and (4) allowing small spacecraft to be launched as secondary payloads and released into almost a random orbit from which each may depart and maneuver in space with gravity assists from the Earth and Moon to perform a specific planetary or other mission. This latter application is a recent development by the author and is being applied in 2002 and later years, with piggyback flights on the Ariane 5 which launches comsats to GEO.

  1. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, New Rockford Quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the New Rockford map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1397 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  2. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Mitchell map area. The purpose of this program is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1479 line miles are in this quadrangle.

  3. Gravity and Magnetic Surveys Over the Santa Rita Fault System, Southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hegmann, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Gravity and magnetic surveys were performed in the northeast portion of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, in southeastern Arizona, to identify faults and gain a better understanding of the subsurface geology. A total of 234 gravity stations were established, and numerous magnetic data were collected with portable and truck-mounted proton precession magnetometers. In addition, one line of very low frequency electromagnetic data was collected together with magnetic data. Gravity anomalies are used to identify two normal faults that project northward toward a previously identified fault. The gravity data also confirm the location of a second previously interpreted normal fault. Interpretation of magnetic anomaly data indicates the presence of a higher-susceptibility sedimentary unit located beneath lowersusceptibility surficial sediments. Magnetic anomaly data identify a 1-km-wide negative anomaly east of these faults caused by an unknown source and reveal the high variability of susceptibility in the Tertiary intrusive rocks in the area.

  4. Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Eric; Will, Clifford M.

    2014-05-01

    Preface; 1. Foundations of Newtonian gravity; 2. Structure of self-gravitating bodies; 3. Newtonian orbital dynamics; 4. Minkowski spacetime; 5. Curved spacetime; 6. Post-Minkowskian theory: formulation; 7. Post-Minkowskian theory: implementation; 8. Post-Newtonian theory: fundamentals; 9. Post-Newtonian theory: system of isolated bodies; 10. Post-Newtonian celestial mechanics, astrometry and navigation; 11. Gravitational waves; 12. Radiative losses and radiation reaction; 13. Alternative theories of gravity; References; Index.

  5. Airborne electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data of the Yukon Flats and Fort Wainwright areas, central Alaska, June 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Smith, Bruce D.; Minsley, Burke J.; Abraham, Jared D.; Voss, Clifford I.; Astley, Beth N.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Cannia, James C.

    2011-01-01

    In June 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted airborne electromagnetic and magnetic surveys of the Yukon Flats and Fort Wainwright study areas in central Alaska. These data were collected to estimate the three-dimensional distribution of permafrost at the time of the survey. These data were also collected to evaluate the effectiveness of these geophysical methods at mapping permafrost geometry and to better define the physical properties of the subsurface in discontinuous permafrost areas. This report releases digital data associated with these surveys. Inverted resistivity depth sections are also provided in this data release, and data processing and inversion methods are discussed.

  6. Airborne radioactivity survey of the West Lonetree area, Uinta county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 154 square miles in Uinta county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 23, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area

  7. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Tabernacle Buttes area, Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 670 square miles in Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 20, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the

  8. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 700 square miles in the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 22, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils

  9. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Devils Tower area, Crook county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 45 square miles northwest of Devils Tower, Crook County, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey on September 4, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the

  10. Volume of water equivalent estimates in Central Chilean glaciers, derived from airborne radar surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberreuter, J.; Gacitúa, G.; Uribe, J.; Rivera, A.; Zamora, R.; Loriaux, T.

    2013-12-01

    Central Chilean glaciers (33-35°S) are an important melt water resource for human consumption, agriculture, mining and industrial activities in this, the most populated region of the country. These glaciers have been retreating and shrinking during recent decades, in response to ongoing climatic changes. As a result, there is increasing concern about future water availability especially during dry summers, when glaciers are thought to have the maximum contribution to runoff. In spite of their importance, very little is known about the total volume of water equivalent storage in these glaciers. In order to improve our knowledge about this issue, we have utilized a new airborne radar system, which was developed at CECs, specially designed to penetrate temperate and cold ice, which is working at central frequencies between 20 and 60 MHz, depending on the penetration range capacity at each glacier. This system has been installed on helicopters, where the metal structure antenna (receptor and transmitter) is carried as a hanging load while flying along pre designated tracks, enabling to survey steep and remote glacier areas, many of them without any ice thickness data up to date. The helicopter is geo-located using dual frequency GPS receivers and an inertial navigation unit installed onboard, and each measurement is geo referenced using a pointing laser located at the radar antenna. The antenna must be flown at 40 m above the glacier surface at an air speed of 40 knots. This system has been successfully used on 24 glaciers representing 16% of the total glacier area of the Aconcagua, Maipo and Rapel basins. A mean ice thickness of 168 m and a maximum of 342 m were detected among the surveyed glaciers. Crossing points between overlapping surveyed tracks resulted in mean differences of near 20 m (less than 10% of the total ice thickness). Subsequent ice volumes were calculated by interpolating radar data collected along tracks. These volumetric estimations correlated

  11. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner; Glenn Sasagawa

    2004-05-19

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 9/19/03 to 3/18/04. During this time, significant advancement in the 3-D gravity forward modeling code was made. Testing of the numerical accuracy of the code was undertaken using both a sheet of mass and a frustum of a cone for test cases. These were chosen because of our ability to do an analytic calculation of gravity for comparison. Tests were also done to determine the feasibility of using point mass approximations rather than cuboids for the forward modeling code. After determining that the point mass approximation is sufficient (and over six times faster computationally), several CO{sub 2} models were constructed and the time-lapse gravity signal was calculated from each. From these models, we expect to see a gravity change ranging from 3-16 {micro}Gal/year, depending on reservoir conditions and CO{sub 2} geometry. While more detailed modeling needs to be completed, these initial results show that we may be able to learn a great deal about the state of the CO{sub 2} from the time-lapse gravity results. Also, in December of 2003, we presented at the annual AGU meeting in San Francisco.

  12. Three decades of BGR airborne geophysical surveys over the polar regions - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaske, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    The Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) has been conducting geological polar research since 1979. A few years later BGR engaged in airborne geophysical projects. Investigation of the lithosphere of the continent and the continental margins was one of the key issues for BGR. Right from the beginning geophysical research was closely associated with the geological activities. The GANOVEX (German Antarctic North Victoria Land Expedition) program combined geological research with geophysical (mainly airborne) investigations. This proved to be a fruitful approach to many of the open questions regarding the tectonic development of the Ross Sea region. Aeromagnetic surveys evolved into a powerful tool for identifying geological structures and following them underneath the ice covered areas - not accessible to direct geological investigations. To achieve this aim it was essential to lay out these surveys with a relatively closely spaced line separation on the expense of covering large areas at the same time. Nevertheless, over many years of continues research areas of more than a just regional extent could be covered. This was, however, only possible through international collaboration. During the first years, working in the Ross Sea area, the cooperation with the US and Italian programs played a significant role, especially the GITARA (German-Italian Aeromagnetic Research in Antarctica) program has to be mentioned. GEOMAUD (Geoscientific Expedition to Dronning Maud Land) and the German-Australian joint venture PCMEGA (Prince Charles Mountains Expedition of Germany & Australia) expanded research activities to the East Antarctic shield area. In the International Polar Year (IPY), BGR played a leading role in the international project AGAP (Antarctica's GAmburtsev Province) as part of the main topic "Venture into Unknown Regions". AGAP was jointly conducted by the USA, Great Britain, Australia, China and Germany. While in the Ross Sea area even

  13. Insights on Volcanic Activity - Self-Potential and Gravity surveys of Masaya volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Jones, G.; Mauri, G.; Saracco, G.

    2006-12-01

    For more than ten years, the activity of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, has been surveyed annually in order to characterize the long term mass/density variations within the shallow magma chamber. However, the injection of new magma is a rapid process, requiring only several hours or days. Other cyclical short period phenomena may be present (e.g., hydrothermal systems) and responsible for noise in the measured signal during a typical dynamic gravity survey. In order to determine the origin and importance of this noise and fully characterize any short period variations, a continuous gravity survey was made from February 16, 2006 to March 12, 2006 in the summit crater of Masaya. During this period, a short term of gravity variation of 60 μGal was measured with a wavelength of 20 hours. Hydrothermal systems, which may or may not be well developed, are directly related to heat, gas and fluids coming from the shallow magma chamber and plumbing system. Others sources of fluids are rainfall and the local aquifer, notably at the caldera lake, Laguna Masaya. Movement of hydrothermal fluids, which will generate self-potential (SP) signals, are directly influenced by superficial dyke injection and fluctuations of magma in the shallow plumbing system. The depth and movement of large fluid cells can be localized by self- potential data when processed by continuous wavelet transform. To characterize the shape and position of the hydrothermal system on the Masaya volcano, several SP profiles were made in conjunction with the continuous gravity survey. The SP data from around the summit pit craters were processed by continuous wavelet transform to localize the main large cell of hydrothermal fluid and determine the effects of the hydrothermal fluids on the continuous gravity measurements. The combination of SP and continuous gravity can give insight into short and medium term variations in magmatic activity.

  14. Geodetic Impact of Aquifer On Regional Gravity Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsch, N.; Llubes, M.

    The time-varying water masses present in the ground acts on gravity measurements in at least three ways. Firstly, by direct attraction (Newton effect). Secondly, the weight causes a flexure which is taken into account as a free-air effect. Thirdly, the induced deformation generates a redistribution potential linked to the modification in the mass distribution. These terms can be gathered by using a Green function formalism which permits to characterize the phenomenon quantitatively by simple convolution. We show that at a under-regional scale (saying 20 km), the direct attraction effect dominates widely the others. However, when considering a quasi continental scale, an equivalent 1-meter layer induces about 55 microGal variation in which the last two effects contribute 15 microGals.

  15. Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part I. Gravity survey

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.A.; Cook, K.L.

    1983-04-01

    During 1980 and 1981 a total of 569 new gravity stations were taken in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. The new stations were combined with 530 other gravity stations taken in previous surveys which resulted in a compilation of 1099 stations which were used in this study. The additional surveys were undertaken to assist in the evaluation of the area for the possible development of geothermal resources by providing an interpreted structural framework by delineating faults, structural trends, intrusions, thickness of valley fill, and increased density of host rock. The gravity data are presented as (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a 2 mgal contour interval on a scale of 1:100,000 and (2) five generally east-trending gravity profiles. A geologic interpretation of the study area was made from the gravity map and from the interpretive geologic cross sections which were modeled along the gravity profiles.

  16. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Eureka quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Eureka/Crescent City, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were aquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 349.5 line miles are in this area. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  17. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Medford Quadrangle Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Medford, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 2925 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  18. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Roseburg Quadrangle, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Roseburg, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1596 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  19. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey Coos Bay, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    During the months of August, September, and October of 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Coos Bay, Oregon, map area. Line spacing was generally six miles for east/west traverses and eighteen miles for north/south tie lines over the northern one-half of the area. Traverses and tie lines were flown at three miles and twelve miles respectively over the southern one-half of the area. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 863.8 line miles are in this quadrangle.

  20. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Susanville quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Susanville, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1642.8 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  1. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Ukiah quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Ukiah, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1517 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  2. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Chico quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Chico, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 3026.4 line miles are in the quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  3. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Alturas quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Alturas, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1631.6 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  4. Relationships between ground and airborne gamma-ray spectrometric survey data, North Ras Millan, Southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Mohamed A S

    2016-02-01

    In the last decades of years, there was considerable growth in the use of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry. With this growth, there was an increasing need to standardize airborne measurements, so that they can be independent of survey parameters. Acceptable procedures were developed for converting airborne to ground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of total-count intensity as well as, potassium, equivalent uranium and equivalent thorium concentrations, due to natural sources of radiation. The present study aims mainly to establish relationships between ground and airborne gamma-ray spectrometric data, North Ras Millan, Southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. The relationships between airborne and ground gamma-ray spectrometric data were deduced for the original and separated rock units in the study area. Various rocks in the study area, represented by Quaternary Wadi sediments, Cambro-Ordovician sandstones, basic dykes and granites, are shown on the detailed geologic map. The structures are displayed, which located on the detailed geologic map, are compiled from the integration of previous geophysical and surface geological studies. PMID:26650828

  5. Vertical wind retrieved by airborne lidar and analysis of island induced gravity waves in combination with numerical models and in situ particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Jähn, Michael; Rahm, Stephan; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the analysis of island induced gravity waves observed by an airborne Doppler wind lidar (DWL) during SALTRACE. First, the instrumental corrections required for the retrieval of high spatial resolution vertical wind measurements from an airborne DWL are presented and the measurement accuracy estimated by means of two different methods. The estimated systematic error is below -0.05 m s-1 for the selected case of study, while the random error lies between 0.1 and 0.16 m s-1 depending on the estimation method. Then, the presented method is applied to two measurement flights during which the presence of island induced gravity waves was detected. The first case corresponds to a research flight conducted on 17 June 2013 in the Cabo Verde islands region, while the second case corresponds to a measurement flight on 26 June 2013 in the Barbados region. The presence of trapped lee waves predicted by the calculated Scorer parameter profiles was confirmed by the lidar and in situ observations. The DWL measurements are used in combination with in situ wind and particle number density measurements, large-eddy simulations (LES), and wavelet analysis to determine the main characteristics of the observed island induced trapped waves.

  6. An interpretation of the 1997 airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey, Fort Huachuca vicinity, Cochise County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bultman, Mark W.; Gettings, Mark E.; Wynn, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    In March of 1997, an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey of the Fort Huachuca Military Reservation and immediate surrounds was conducted. This survey was sponsored by the U.S. Army and contracted through the Geologic Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Data were gathered by Geoterrex-Dighem Ltd. of Ottawa, Canada. The survey aircraft is surrounded by a coil through which a large current pulse is passed. This pulse induces currents in the Earth which are recorded by a set of three mutually perpendicular coils towed in a "bird" about 100 m behind and below the aircraft. The bird also records the Earth's magnetic field. The system samples the Earth response to the electromagnetic pulse about every 16 m along the aircraft flight path. For this survey, the bulk of the flightpaths were spaced about 400 m apart and oriented in a northeast-southwest direction extending from bedrock over the Huachuca Mountains to bedrock over the Tombstone Hills. A preliminary report on the unprocessed data collected in the field was delivered to the U.S. Army by USGS in July 1997 (USGS Open-File Report 97–457). The final data were delivered in March, 1998 by the contractor to USGS and thence to the U.S. Army. The present report represents the final interpretive report from USGS. The objectives of the survey were to: 1) define the structure of the San Pedro basin in the Sierra Vista-Fort Huachuca-Huachuca City area, including the depth and shape of the basin, and to delineate large faults that may be active within the basin fill and therefore important in the hydrologic regime; 2) define near surface and subsurface areas that contain a large volume fraction of silt and clay in the basin fill and which both reduce the volume of available storage for water and reduce the permeability of the aquifer; and 3) to evaluate the use of the time domain electromagnetic method in the southwest desert setting as a means of mapping depth to water.

  7. Airborne electromagnetic surveys in support of groundwater models in western Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. D.; Viezzoli, A.; Cannia, J. C.; Smith, B. D.; Brown, W.; Peterson, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    The USGS, SkyTEM, Aarhus Geophysics, North Platte, South Platte and Twin Platte Natural Resource Districts have collaborated to collect airborne time domain geophysical surveys over selected of areas of western Nebraska. The objective of the surveys was to map the aquifers and bedrock topography of the area to help improve the understanding of groundwater-surface water relations to be used in water management decisions. The base of aquifer in many of these areas is in excess of 100 meters deep and little detailed information of the configuration of the bedrock exits. Many of the aquifers exist as alluvial fills in paleochannels upon complex bedrock topography. Controlling factors for groundwater flow are the variations of the hydraulic properties of the fill and the boundary geometry of the paleochannels. Results from groundwater modeling efforts prior to the addition of the airborne data revealed the hydrogeologic framework was sufficient for the regional scale models, but when these models were reduced to 40 acres cell size, the lack of detail adversely affected model results. The SkyTEM system is a helicopter-borne time-domain electromagnetic system capable of detecting small changes in resistivity from the near-surface down to depths of up to 300 m and is well-suited for aquifer mapping. An innovative design of the receiver coils and transmitter pattern eliminates the self response that is characteristic of airborne systems and spatial measurement sensors mounted on a rigid frame enable rigorous quantitative interpretation of the EM data. The ability to quickly collect and deliver high quality, high resolution geophysical data contributes significantly to modeling efforts and further understanding of subsurface hydrological systems. The raw AEM data have to be edited to exclude data that have been affected by coupling with man made infrastructures. For resistivity data to be related to lithologic information to refine groundwater model inputs, and to make the

  8. Estimating specific yield and storage change in an unconfined aquifer using temporal gravity surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehman, Carter L.; Harry, Dennis L.; Sanford, William E.; Stednick, John D.; Beckman, Nathaniel A.

    2009-04-01

    Two high-precision gravity surveys were conducted to determine groundwater mass changes at a managed groundwater recharge site in northeastern Colorado. Gravity data were collected during pumping and two months after pumping ceased. During pumping, gravity was lower by as much as 46 μGal near the pumping wells and higher by as much as 90 μGal near the recharge ponds in comparison to data collected after pumping had ceased. These differences are attributed to changes in groundwater mass associated with drawdown and infiltration. Inverse modeling of the gravity data indicates a 5.1 × 105 m3 decrease in storage beneath the recharge ponds between the two surveys, which we attribute to dissipation of the groundwater mound created by recharge during pumping. This estimate of the change in groundwater storage is made independently of assumptions of physical properties of the aquifer. Dividing the change in water volume per unit area determined from the gravity modeling by the change in water level measured in wells provides an estimate of specific yield (Sy) of 0.21 ± 0.03, which is within the range of specific yield estimates derived from aquifer tests at the site. Water level changes predicted from the gravity data agree on average to within ±0.45 m of those measured, which we take to be an estimate of the uncertainty in water table depth predictions that can be obtained from gravimetric data in unconfined aquifers. The study covers a 3.2 km2 area, providing a prototype for similar studies at larger scales.

  9. Interaction between two adjacent grounded sources in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haigen; Lin, Jun; Liu, Changsheng; Kang, Lili; Li, Gang; Zeng, Xinsen

    2016-03-01

    Multi-source and multi-frequency emission method can make full use of the valuable and short flight time in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic (FSAEM) exploration, which has potential to investigate the deep earth structure in complex terrain region. Because several sources are adjacent in multi-source emission method, the interaction of different sources should be considered carefully. An equivalent circuit model of dual-source is established in this paper to assess the interaction between two individual sources, where the parameters are given with the typical values based on the practical instrument system and its application. By simulating the output current of two sources in different cases, the influence from the adjacent source is observed clearly. The current waveforms show that the mutual resistance causes the fluctuation and drift in another source and that the mutual inductance causes transient peaks. A field test with dual-source was conducted to certify the existence of interaction between adjacent sources. The simulation of output current also shows that current errors at low frequency are mainly caused by the mutual resistance while those at high frequency are mainly due to the mutual inductance. Increasing the distance between neighboring sources is a proposed measure to reduce the emission signal errors with designed ones. The feasible distance is discussed in the end. This study gives a useful guidance to lay multi sources to meet the requirement of measurement accuracy in FSAEM survey.

  10. Interaction between two adjacent grounded sources in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic survey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haigen; Lin, Jun; Liu, Changsheng; Kang, Lili; Li, Gang; Zeng, Xinsen

    2016-03-01

    Multi-source and multi-frequency emission method can make full use of the valuable and short flight time in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic (FSAEM) exploration, which has potential to investigate the deep earth structure in complex terrain region. Because several sources are adjacent in multi-source emission method, the interaction of different sources should be considered carefully. An equivalent circuit model of dual-source is established in this paper to assess the interaction between two individual sources, where the parameters are given with the typical values based on the practical instrument system and its application. By simulating the output current of two sources in different cases, the influence from the adjacent source is observed clearly. The current waveforms show that the mutual resistance causes the fluctuation and drift in another source and that the mutual inductance causes transient peaks. A field test with dual-source was conducted to certify the existence of interaction between adjacent sources. The simulation of output current also shows that current errors at low frequency are mainly caused by the mutual resistance while those at high frequency are mainly due to the mutual inductance. Increasing the distance between neighboring sources is a proposed measure to reduce the emission signal errors with designed ones. The feasible distance is discussed in the end. This study gives a useful guidance to lay multi sources to meet the requirement of measurement accuracy in FSAEM survey. PMID:27036795

  11. 3. Neural changes in different gravity and ecophysiological environments - A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slenzka, K.

    Neural changes or neuronal plasticity occur after and during different stimulations and inputs in general. Gravity is one major input to the brain transferred from the vestibular system. However, often also direct effects of gravity on the cellular level are discussed. Our group was investigating the influence of different gravity environments on a large variety of neuronal enzymes in the developing fish brain. Long-term space travel or bases on Moon and Mars will have to deal not only with neural changes based on the different gravity environment, but also with potential negative or even toxic changes in the respective life support system. Our goal is now to identify reported enzyme activity changes in the brain based for example on potential toxic drugs or endocrine disruptors in combination with gravity induced changes. In this paper a survey will be undertaken discussing recent results obtained in ecotoxicology, gravitational biology combined with new data from our group regarding potential differences in brain glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase of medaka and zebrafish.

  12. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner

    2005-07-11

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 9/19/04 to 3/18/05. During this time, gravity and pressure modeling were completed and work graduate student Scott Nooner began writing his Ph.D. dissertation, of which this work is a the major part. Improvements to the gravimeters are also underway that will hopefully increase the measurement precision.

  13. Using cosmic voids to distinguish f(R) gravity in future galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivick, Paul; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Li, Baojiu; Lam, Tsz Yan

    2015-08-01

    We use properties of void populations identified in N-body simulations to forecast the ability of upcoming galaxy surveys to differentiate models of f (R) gravity from cold dark matter cosmology. We analyse multiple simulation realizations, which were designed to mimic the expected number densities, volumes, and redshifts of the upcoming Euclid satellite and a lower-redshift ground-based counterpart survey, using the public VIDE toolkit. We examine void abundances, ellipicities, radial density profiles, and radial velocity profiles at redshifts 1.0 and 0.43. We find that stronger f (R) coupling strengths eliminates small voids and produces voids up to ˜20 per cent larger in radius, leading to a significant tilt in the void number function. Additionally, under the influence of modified gravity, voids at all scales tend to be measurably emptier with correspondingly higher compensation walls. The velocity profiles reflect this, showing increased outflows inside voids and increased inflows outside voids. Using the void number function as an example, we forecast that future surveys can constrain the modified gravity coupling strength to ˜3 × 10-5 using voids.

  14. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner; Ola Eiken

    2004-11-29

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 3/18/04 to 9/19/04. During this time, we participated in several CO{sub 2} sequestration-related meetings and conferences. On March 29, 2004, we participated in the 2004 Carbon Sequestration Project Review Meeting for the Department of Energy in Pittsburgh, PA. During the week of May 2, 2004, we attended and presented at the Third Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration in Alexandria, VA. Finally, during the week of August 8, 2004, we took part in the U.S.-Norway, CO{sub 2} Summer School in Santa Fe, NM. Additional modeling was also completed, examining the seismic velocity pushdown estimates from the gravity models and the expected deformation of the seafloor due to the injected CO{sub 2}.

  15. Input formats and specifications of the National Geodetic Survey data base. Volume 3: Gravity control data (revised September 1985)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhurst, W. T.

    1985-09-01

    The user's guide to the formats and specifications used within the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) data base is commonly referred to as the Blue Book, and is comprised of three volumes. Gravity control (GRAV) data are discussed.

  16. Seafloor micro-gravity survey of the Sleipner CO2 sequestration site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooner, S. L.; Zumberge, M. A.; Eiken, O.; Stenvold, T.; Sasagawa, G. S.

    2003-12-01

    The Sleipner fields make up a natural gas production area in the North Sea operated by Statoil, the major Norwegian oil company. The gas recovered there has an excess CO2 content of about 7 percent, which is separated out and collected. CO2 collected from most production areas is released into the atmosphere, increasing the atmospheric content of this greenhouse gas. Sleipner is the world's first large scale concentrated CO2 sequestration project. Each year 1 MT of CO2 is injected into a large, deep saline reservoir called the Utsira formation. This is a high porosity sandstone aquifer capped by low porosity shale 720 m below the seafloor. The multi-institutional SACS (Saline Aquifer CO2 Storage) group began geologic analysis, reservoir simulations, seismic modeling, and geophysical monitoring of Sleipner in 1998. The primary monitoring technique is 4-D or time-lapse seismics. The results show a clearly defined CO2 bubble. However, uncertainties exist such that the density, thus mass, of CO2 within the Utsira sand is not precisely known. Preliminary gravity modeling indicates that the density changes due to a year of CO2 injection should cause a change in the local gravity ranging from 5-15 microGal (the range is due to an uncertainty in the reservoir temperature). In August of 2002, we carried out the first phase of a seafloor gravity survey, establishing a baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the CO2 bubble as well as obtaining a gravity data set for initial reservoir modeling. Gravity was measured on the seafloor above the Sleipner CO2 injection site from the 15th to the 21st of August, 2002, on top of 30 concrete benchmarks, which were permanently deployed on the seafloor spaced from 300 to 500 m apart. The area spans about 7 km E-W and 3 km N-S and has a water depth of 80 m. Gravity measurements were gathered using ROVDOG (ROV deployed Deep Ocean Gravimeter), a package consisting of three relative gravimeters. In relative gravity surveys, the

  17. Airborne Gravimetry and Downward Continuation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jekeli, C.; Yang, H.; Kwon, J.

    2009-12-01

    Measuring the Earth’s gravity field using airborne instrumentation is fully operational and has been widely practiced for nearly three decades since its official debut in the early 1980s (S. Hammer: “Airborne Gravity is Here!”) coinciding with the precision kinematic positioning capability of GPS. Airborne gravimetry is undertaken for both efficient geophysical exploration purposes, as well as the determination of the regional geoid to aid in the modernization of height systems. Especially for the latter application, downward continuation of the data and combination with existing terrestrial gravimetry pose theoretical as well as practical challenges, which, on the other hand, create multiple processing possibilities. Downward continuation may be approached in various ways from the viewpoint of potential theory and the boundary-value problem to using gradients either estimated locally or computed from existing models. Logistical constraints imposed by the airborne survey, instrumental noise, and the intrinsic numerical instability of downward continuation all conspire to impact the final product in terms of achievable resolution and accuracy. In this paper, we review the theory of airborne gravimetry and the methodology of downward continuation, and provide a numerical comparison of possible schemes and their impact on geoid determination.

  18. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zuberge; Scott Nooner; Glenn Sasagawa

    2003-11-17

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A three-week trip to Statoil Research Centre in Trondheim, Norway, was made in the summer of 2003. This visit consisted of gathering data and collaborating with scientists working on the Sleipner project. The trip ended with a presentation of the seafloor gravity results to date at a SACS2 (Saline Aquifer CO{sub 2} Storage 2) meeting. This meeting provided the perfect opportunity to meet and gather information from the world's experts on the Sleipner project.

  19. High Resolution Magnetic and Gravity Surveys to Constrain Maar Geometry and Eruption Mechanisms, Rattlesnake Crater, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, A. M.; Kruse, S. E.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Abdollahzadeh, M.; Harburger, A.; Richardson, J. A.; Courtland, L. M.; Farrell, A. K.; Kiflu, H. G.; Malservisi, R.; McNiff, C. M.; Njoroge, M.; Nushart, N.; Rookey, K.

    2013-12-01

    Located 25 kilometers east of Flagstaff, Arizona, Rattlesnake Crater is an oblong phreatomagmatic feature in the San Francisco Volcanic Field. The shallow crater is approximately 1.4 kilometers at its widest point, and surrounded by an uneven tuff ring which is overlapped by a scoria cone volcano on the southeastern side. Improved understanding of its formation and evolution requires geophysical study because there are very few outcrops, and no digging is permitted on site. Geologic features related to the crater are further obscured by deposits from the overlapping scoria cone, as well as tephra from eruptions at nearby Sunset Crater. We present the results of a detailed magnetic and gravity survey in and around Rattlesnake Crater. A substantial NW-SE trending elongate magnetic anomaly (1400 nT) and a smaller similarly trending anomaly are observed inside the crater, as well as a longer wavelength positive gravitational anomaly (+1.0-1.5 mGal) across the crater. The magnetic survey was completed on foot with a 50 meter line spacing inside the crater, and 100 meter line spacing across a portion of the surrounding area outside the crater. The gravity survey was done on two intersecting survey lines - one running west to east, and another roughly north to south, with recordings every 100 meters extending at least 1000 meters outside the crater in all four directions. 2D models of the magnetic and gravity data are presented illustrating the possible geometry of the diatreme, and the approximate size and shape of the major intrusive features. Eruption estimates based on the models are calculated, and the models are favorably compared to the size and depth estimates given in a recent publication (Valentine 2012) that used xenolith content to estimate the size and depth of the diatreme.

  20. Airborne radar surveys of snow depth over Antarctic sea ice during Operation IceBridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzer, B.; Gomez-Garcia, D.; Leuschen, C.; Paden, J. D.; Gogineni, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    comparison of snow depths with two weeks elapsed between passes. [1] Farrell, S.L., et al., "A First Assessment of IceBridge Snow and Ice Thickness Data Over Arctic Sea Ice," IEEE Tran. Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 50, No. 6, pp. 2098-2111, June 2012. [2] Kwok, R., and G. F. Cunningham, "ICESat over Arctic sea ice: Estimation of snow depth and ice thickness," J. Geophys. Res., 113, C08010, 2008. [3] Kwok, R., et al., "Airborne surveys of snow depth over Arctic sea ice," J. Geophys. Res., 116, C11018, 2011. [4] Panzer, B., et al., "An ultra-wideband, microwave radar for measuring snow thickness on sea ice and mapping near-surface internal layers in polar firn," Submitted to J. Glaciology, July 23, 2012. [5] Wingham, D.J., et al., "CryoSat: A Mission to Determine the Fluctuations in Earth's Land and Marine Ice Fields," Advances in Space Research, Vol. 37, No. 4, pp. 841-871, 2006. [6] Zwally, H. J., et al., "ICESat's laser measurements of polar ice, atmosphere, ocean, and land," J. Geodynamics, Vol. 34, No. 3-4, pp. 405-445, Oct-Nov 2002. [7] Zwally, H. J., et al., "ICESat measurements of sea ice freeboard and estimates of sea ice thickness in the Weddell Sea," J. Geophys. Res., 113, C02S15, 2008.

  1. Results of a detailed gravity survey in the Alamosa Area, Alamosa County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Mackelprang, C.E.

    1983-09-01

    A total of 322 stations, centered on the City of Alamosa, were surveyed with a gravimeter during September 1981. These data have shown the Alamosa horst to have an irregular top. This irregularity is thought to be caused by paleovalleys and/or down-dropped fault blocks within the Precambrian horst. The City of Alamosa lies directly over a local gravity low. Volcanic rocks within this low may contain a reservoir for geothermal fluids, as yet unsubstantiated by drilling. Thermal fluids are thought to enter the Alamosa area via aquifers from the west (San Juan Mountains) and/or from the Rio Grande Rift zone with the fluids rising along fractures within and bordering the horst. The most favorable drilling targets appear to be either near the center of the local gravity low or in the fracture zone at the edges of the inferred down-dropped fault blocks.

  2. Airborne Geophysical Surveys Illuminate the Geologic and Hydrothermal Framework of the Pilgrim Springs Geothermal Area, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, D. K.; Glen, J. M.; Bedrosian, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    An airborne magnetic and frequency-domain electromagnetic (EM) survey of the Pilgrim Springs geothermal area, located on the Seward Peninsula in west-central Alaska, delineates key structures controlling hydrothermal fluid flow. Hot springs, nearby thawed regions, and high lake temperatures are indicative of high heat flow in the region that is thought to be related to recent volcanism. By providing a region-wide geologic and geophysical framework, this work will provide informed decisions regarding drill-site planning and further our understanding of geothermal systems in active extensional basins. Helicopter magnetic and EM data were acquired using a Fugro RESOLVE system equipped with a high sensitivity cesium magnetometer and a multi-coil, multi-frequency EM system sensitive to the frequency range of 400-140,000 Hz. The survey was flown ~40 m above ground along flight lines spaced 0.2-0.4 km apart. Various derivative and filtering methods, including maximum horizontal gradient of the pseudogravity transformation of the magnetic data, are used to locate faults, contacts, and structural domains. A dominant northwest trending anomaly pattern characterizes the northeastern portion of the survey area between Pilgrim Springs and Hen and Chickens Mountain and may reflect basement structures. The area south of the springs, however, is dominantly characterized by east-west trending, range-front-parallel anomalies likely caused by late Cenozoic structures associated with the north-south extension that formed the basin. Regionally, the springs are characterized by a magnetic high punctuated by several east-west trending magnetic lows, the most prominent occurring directly over the springs. The lows may result from demagnetization of magnetic material along range-front parallel features that dissect the basin. We inverted in-phase and quadrature EM data along each profile using the laterally-constrained inversion of Auken et al. (2005). Data were inverted for 20-layer

  3. GMinterp, A Matlab Based Toolkit for Gravity and Magnetic Data Analysis: Example Application to the Airborne Magnetic Anomalies of Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Y. L.; Yiǧitbaş, E.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of gravity and magnetic field methods is becoming increasingly significant for the earth sciences as a whole and these potential field methods efficiently assist in working out both shallow and deep geologic problems and play important role on modeling and interpretation procedures. The main advantage of some gravity and magnetic data processing techniques is to present the subtle details in the data which are not clearly identified in anomaly maps, without specifying any prior information about the nature of the source bodies. If the data quality permits, many analyzing techniques can be carried out that help to build a general understanding of the details and parameters of the shallower or deeper causative body distributions such as depth, thickness, lateral and vertical extensions. Gravity and magnetic field data are usually analyzed by means of analytic signal (via directional derivatives) methods, linear transformations, regional and residual anomaly separation techniques, spectral methods, filtering and forward and inverse modeling techniques. Some commercial software packages are commonly used for analyzing potential field data by employing some of the techniques specified above. Additionally, many freeware and open-source codes can be found in the literature, but unfortunately they are focused on special issues of the potential fields. In this study, a toolkit, that performs numerous interpretation and modeling techniques for potential field data, is presented. The toolkit, named GMinterp, is MATLAB-based consisting of a series of linked functions along with a graphical user interface (GUI). GMinterp allows performing complex processing such as transformations and filtering, editing, gridding, mapping, digitizing, extracting cross-sections, forward and inverse modeling and interpretation tasks. The toolkit enables to work with both profile and gridded data as an input file. Tests on the theoretically produced data showed the reliability of

  4. Using remote sensing and ancillary data to extend airborne electromagnetic resistivity surveys for regional permafrost interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastick, N.; Wylie, B. K.; Minsley, B. J.; Jorgenson, T. T.; Ji, L.; Walvoord, M. A.; Smith, B. D.; Abraham, J. D.; Rose, J.

    2011-12-01

    Permafrost has a significant impact on high latitude ecosystems and is spatially heterogeneous. However, only generalized maps of permafrost extent are available. Due to its impacts on subsurface hydrology, lake water levels, vegetation communities, and surface soil deformations, understanding the spatial extents and depth of permafrost are critical. Electrical resistivity increases dramatically as a soil freezes and can be used as a proxy for permafrost presence particularly if the underlying soils and geologic characteristics are understood. An airborne electromagnetic survey (AEM) was conducted over a portion of the Yukon Flats ecoregion in central Alaska with measurements taken in both reconnaissance lines and contiguous block area coverage. The AEM was flown in June 2010 and subsurface resistivity models were derived by inverting the AEM data. Landsat TM at-sensor reflectance, thermal, and spectral index data from late August to early September 2008, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) and derivatives, and other ancillary data were used in a regression tree model to predict near surface electrical resistivity at the 0-1m and the 0-2.6m depth intervals. AEM locations from homogenous landsat 90 m by 90 m windows were randomly separated into a training set for model development (n = 8,848) and an impendent test data set (n = 988) for model accuracy assessment. Model development and independent test accuracies for 0-1 m electric resistivity had training and test R2 values of 0.90 and 0.87, respectively, and for the 0-2.6m electric resistivity training and test R2 values were also 0.90 and 0.87, respectively, which indicated accurate prediction models. Important variables for stratifying the various piecewise regressions were elevation and averaged 2000-2008 ecosystem performance anomalies. Important independent variables used in the multiple regression equations were the Normalized Difference Infrared Index (NDII), NDII7 (NDII using band 7), soil moisture mapped from

  5. Preliminary analysis of gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Timber Mountain Area, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.F.; Webring, M.W.; Bhattacharyya, B.K.

    1981-12-31

    Recent (1977 to 1978) gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Timber Mountain region, southern Nevada, have revealed new details of subsurface structure and lithology. The data strongly suggest that deformation caused by volcanic events has been accommodated along straight-line faults combining in such a fashion as to given a curvilinear appearance to regional structure. The magnetic data suggest that rock units in the central graben and along the southeast margin of Timber Mountain may have been altered, perhaps thermally, from their original state. The gravity data indicate that the south part of the Timber Mountain is underlain by relatively dense rock possibly intrusive rock, like that which crops out along its southeast side. The gravity data also suggest that the Silent Canyon caldera may extend considerably south of its presently indicated southern limit and may underlie much of the area of Timber Mountain. The moat areas appear to be more rectangular or triangular than annular in shape. The southern part of Timber Mountain caldera is separated from the Yucca Mountain area to the south by a triangular horst. The structural relations of the rock units making up the horst are complex. Several linear terrain features in the southern part of the caldera area are closely aligned with geophysical features, implying that the terrain features are fault-controlled.

  6. Detailed gravity survey over a known carbonate reef (Devonian) in Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, S.M.

    1988-07-01

    A detailed gravity study, conducted over the Shell Golden carbonate reef located in the Winnipegosis Formation (Devonian) of the Williston basin in north-central North Dakota, indicates a massive carbonate platform with several interconnected vertical accumulations, perhaps pinnacle in nature, from this platform. This reef is found at a depth of about 2400 m (8000 ft). Because elevations and north-south positions were surveyed to /+-/3 cm (0.1 ft) and /+-/ 1 (3.3 ft), respectively, an accuracy of 0.01 mgal was obtained. Five profiles were made: three lines running east-west and two lines running north-south, forming a grid pattern over the reef. The distance between each line was 1.6 km (1.0 mi) with gravity-station spacing along each line being 0.4 km (0.25 mi). The Golden reef and most reefs of this nature throughout the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin have been interpreted to be isolated pinnacles with physical dimensions about 60-75 m (200-250 ft) thick and 0.8 km (0.5 mi) in basal diameter. However, analysis of the residual Bouguer gravity anomalies (0.2-0.5 mgal) obtained from this study indicates this reef is more complex than previously thought. The maximum thicknesses of the complex are on the order of 120-185 m (400-600 ft) with compaction anticlines also contributing to the total gravity anomaly. The modeled reef complex extends in a northeast-southwest direction and probably extends beyond the study area along that line.

  7. Principal facts for a gravity survey made in northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas during 1948

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, K.L.; Hoskinson, A.J.; Shelton, G.R.

    1971-01-01

    Observed gravity values, station locations, elevations, theoretical gravity, and free-air anomaly values are provided in tabular form for 554 gravity locations in northeastern Oklahoma-southeastern Kansas.

  8. Exploring Liquid Water Beneath Glaciers and Permafrost in Antarctica Through Airborne Electromagnetic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auken, E.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Foley, N.; Dugan, H.; Schamper, C.; Peter, D.; Virginia, R. A.; Sørensen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Here, we demonstrate how high powered airborne electromagnetic resistivity is efficiently used to map 3D domains of unfrozen water below glaciers and permafrost in the cold regions of the Earth. Exploration in these parts of the world has typically been conducted using radar methods, either ground-based or from an airborne platform. Radar is an excellent method if the penetrated material has a low electrical conductivity, but in materials with higher conductivity, such as sediments with liquid water, the energy is attenuated . Such cases are efficiently explored with electromagnetic methods, which attenuate less quickly in conductive media and can therefore 'see through' conductors and return valuable information about their electrical properties. In 2011, we used a helicopter-borne, time-domain electromagnetic sensor to map resistivity in the subsurface across the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV). The MDV are a polar desert in coastal Antarctica where glaciers, permafrost, ice-covered lakes, and ephemeral summer streams coexist. In polar environments, this airborne electromagnetic system excels at finding subsurface liquid water, as water which remains liquid under cold conditions must be sufficiently saline, and therefore electrically conductive. In Taylor Valley, in the MDV, our data show extensive subsurface low resistivity layers beneath higher resistivity layers, which we interpret as cryoconcentrated hypersaline brines lying beneath glaciers and frozen permafrost. These brines appear to be contiguous with surface lakes, subglacial regions, and the Ross Sea, which could indicate a regional hydrogeologic system wherein solutes may be transported between surface reservoirs by ionic diffusion and subsurface flow. The system as of 2011 had a maximum exploration depth of about 300 m. However, newer and more powerful airborne systems can explore to a depth of 500 - 600 m and new ground based instruments will get to 1000 m. This is sufficient to penetrate to the base of

  9. Comparison of Precision of Biomass Estimates in Regional Field Sample Surveys and Airborne LiDAR-Assisted Surveys in Hedmark County, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naesset, Erik; Gobakken, Terje; Bollandsas, Ole Martin; Gregoire, Timothy G.; Nelson, Ross; Stahl, Goeran

    2013-01-01

    Airborne scanning LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) has emerged as a promising tool to provide auxiliary data for sample surveys aiming at estimation of above-ground tree biomass (AGB), with potential applications in REDD forest monitoring. For larger geographical regions such as counties, states or nations, it is not feasible to collect airborne LiDAR data continuously ("wall-to-wall") over the entire area of interest. Two-stage cluster survey designs have therefore been demonstrated by which LiDAR data are collected along selected individual flight-lines treated as clusters and with ground plots sampled along these LiDAR swaths. Recently, analytical AGB estimators and associated variance estimators that quantify the sampling variability have been proposed. Empirical studies employing these estimators have shown a seemingly equal or even larger uncertainty of the AGB estimates obtained with extensive use of LiDAR data to support the estimation as compared to pure field-based estimates employing estimators appropriate under simple random sampling (SRS). However, comparison of uncertainty estimates under SRS and sophisticated two-stage designs is complicated by large differences in the designs and assumptions. In this study, probability-based principles to estimation and inference were followed. We assumed designs of a field sample and a LiDAR-assisted survey of Hedmark County (HC) (27,390 km2), Norway, considered to be more comparable than those assumed in previous studies. The field sample consisted of 659 systematically distributed National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots and the airborne scanning LiDAR data were collected along 53 parallel flight-lines flown over the NFI plots. We compared AGB estimates based on the field survey only assuming SRS against corresponding estimates assuming two-phase (double) sampling with LiDAR and employing model-assisted estimators. We also compared AGB estimates based on the field survey only assuming two-stage sampling (the NFI

  10. A survey of airborne HDI, HDI-based polyisocyanate and solvent concentrations in the manufacture and application of polyurethane coatings.

    PubMed

    Myer, H E; O'Block, S T; Dharmarajan, V

    1993-11-01

    This study summarizes the results of industrial hygiene surveys performed between 1979 and 1987 in paint manufacturing and application operations using polyurethane coatings containing hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and HDI-based polyisocyanates (trade name Desmodur N). A total of 466 Desmodur N and 457 HDI samples were collected from 47 operations most of which were in application. The application surveys covered manufacture and refinishing of transportation vehicles, painting of large military and civilian equipment, industrial finishing operations, and maintenance and construction operations. The primary objective of the surveys was to assess the potential exposure to HDI and HDI-based polyisocyanate. In more than 60% of the surveys, concentrations of airborne organic solvents also were monitored. Isocyanates were sampled using toluene/nitroreagent in midget impingers, and solvents were collected using charcoal tubes. They were analyzed using high pressure liquid chromatography and gas chromatography, respectively. The data from these workplace situations show there is some potential for isocyanate overexposure of unprotected workers and that it is greater in spray than in nonspray operations. PMID:8256690

  11. Association between first airborne cedar pollen level peak and pollinosis symptom onset: a web-based survey.

    PubMed

    Bando, Harumi; Sugiura, Hiroaki; Ohkusa, Yasushi; Akahane, Manabu; Sano, Tomomi; Jojima, Noriko; Okabe, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    Cedar pollinosis in Japan affects nearly 25 % of Japanese citizens. To develop a treatment for cedar pollinosis, it is necessary to understand the relationship between the time of its occurrence and the amount of airborne cedar pollen. In the spring of 2009, we conducted daily Internet-based epidemiologic surveys, which included 1453 individuals. We examined the relationship between initial date of onset of pollinosis symptoms and daily amount of airborne cedar pollen to which subjects were exposed. Approximately 35.2 % of the subjects experienced the onset of pollinosis during a one-week interval in which the middle day coincided with the peak pollen count. The odds ratio for this one-week time interval was 4.03 (95 % confidence interval: 3.34-4.86). The predicted date of the cedar pollen peak can be used to determine the appropriate date for initiation of self-medication with anti-allergy drugs and thus avoid development of sustained and severe pollinosis. PMID:24720339

  12. Elemental composition of airborne particulates and source identification - An extensive one year survey. [in Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Antoine, A. C.; Leibecki, H. F.; Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Concentrations of 60 chemical elements in the airborne particulate matter were measured at 16 sites in Cleveland, OH over a 1 year period during 1971 and 1972 (45 to 50 sampling days). Analytical methods used included instrumental neutron activation, emission spectroscopy, and combustion techniques. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, the analytical methods, the use of several analytical facilities, and samples with concentrations below the detection limits are evaluated in detail. The data are discussed in relation to other studies and source origins. The trace constituent concentrations as a function of wind direction are used to suggest a practical method for air pollution source identification.

  13. Optimizing cosmic shear surveys to measure modifications to gravity on cosmic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Donnacha; Laszlo, Istvan; Bridle, Sarah; Bean, Rachel

    2013-03-01

    We consider how upcoming photometric large-scale structure surveys can be optimized to measure the properties of dark energy (DE) and possible cosmic-scale modifications to General Relativity in light of realistic astrophysical and instrumental systematic uncertainties. In particular, we include flexible descriptions of intrinsic alignments (IAs), galaxy bias and photometric redshift uncertainties in a Fisher Matrix analysis of shear, position and position-shear correlations, including complementary cosmological constraints from the cosmic microwave background. We study the impact of survey trade-offs in depth versus breadth, and redshift quality. We parametrize the results in terms of the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit, and deviations from General Relativity through an analogous modified gravity (MG) figure of merit. We find that IAs weaken the dependence of figure of merit on area and that, for a fixed observing time, halving the area of a Stage IV reduces the figure of merit by 20 per cent when IAs are not included and by only 10 per cent when IAs are included. While reducing photometric redshift scatter improves constraining power, the dependence is shallow. The variation in constraining power is stronger once IAs are included and is slightly more pronounced for MG constraints than for DE. The inclusion of IAs and galaxy position information reduces the required prior on photometric redshift accuracy by an order of magnitude for both the fiducial Stage III and IV surveys, equivalent to a factor of 100 reduction in the number of spectroscopic galaxies required to calibrate the photometric sample.

  14. Reflection surveys conducted on the western side of the mid-continental gravity high

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.W.; Fromm, A.J. ); Okita, P. )

    1992-01-01

    The few spatially isolated deeper drill holes available on the western side of the mid-continental gravity high have established elevation changes in the Sioux quartzite that exceed 500m within a few hundred kilometers. Thirteen, 12-fold, CMP, reflection surveys were conducted within this area to supplement the limited drilling data. These surveys used an elastic wave generator as the energy source and a digital 24 channel IFP system for recording. The survey locations were selected to best supplement the existing drill hole data. Phone spacings and near offsets were selected on the basis of walk-out surveys conducted at each reflection site. No velocity control was available and the stacking velocities were selected based on graded velocity stacks. Interval velocities, constrained by general stratigraphic considerations, were calculated from the stacking velocities. For the near surface, interval velocities were extracted from the first arrivals. The lack of velocity control did not appear to seriously degrade the interpretation of gross structural features. Both the Sioux quartzite and a deeper interface, assumed to be the top of igneous basement, were reliably mapped. The two-way times of the basement reflector varied from 400m sec to 200m sec, approximately 500m to 300m respectively. The two-way times to the top of the quartzite varied from 300 m secs to 135m secs, approximately 350m to 160m respectively. The results suggest a major northeast, southwest trending basement fault with displacements exceeding 100m. The structure of both the basement and the quartzite appear to be a faulted anticline or dome. The reflection surveys provided a cost effective method for reconnaissance studies required to establish gross structural features.

  15. Experimental investigations on airborne gravimetry based on compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yapeng; Wu, Meiping; Wang, Jinling; Zhang, Kaidong; Cao, Juliang; Cai, Shaokun

    2014-01-01

    Gravity surveys are an important research topic in geophysics and geodynamics. This paper investigates a method for high accuracy large scale gravity anomaly data reconstruction. Based on the airborne gravimetry technology, a flight test was carried out in China with the strap-down airborne gravimeter (SGA-WZ) developed by the Laboratory of Inertial Technology of the National University of Defense Technology. Taking into account the sparsity of airborne gravimetry by the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), this paper proposes a method for gravity anomaly data reconstruction using the theory of compressed sensing (CS). The gravity anomaly data reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem, which can be transformed into a sparse optimization problem. This paper uses the zero-norm as the objective function and presents a greedy algorithm called Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) to solve the corresponding minimization problem. The test results have revealed that the compressed sampling rate is approximately 14%, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by OMP is 0.03 mGal and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 56.48 dB. In contrast, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by the existing nearest-interpolation method (NIPM) is 0.15 mGal and the SNR is 42.29 dB. These results have shown that the OMP algorithm can reconstruct the gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and fewer measurements. PMID:24647125

  16. Experimental Investigations on Airborne Gravimetry Based on Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yapeng; Wu, Meiping; Wang, Jinling; Zhang, Kaidong; Cao, Juliang; Cai, Shaokun

    2014-01-01

    Gravity surveys are an important research topic in geophysics and geodynamics. This paper investigates a method for high accuracy large scale gravity anomaly data reconstruction. Based on the airborne gravimetry technology, a flight test was carried out in China with the strap-down airborne gravimeter (SGA-WZ) developed by the Laboratory of Inertial Technology of the National University of Defense Technology. Taking into account the sparsity of airborne gravimetry by the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), this paper proposes a method for gravity anomaly data reconstruction using the theory of compressed sensing (CS). The gravity anomaly data reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem, which can be transformed into a sparse optimization problem. This paper uses the zero-norm as the objective function and presents a greedy algorithm called Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) to solve the corresponding minimization problem. The test results have revealed that the compressed sampling rate is approximately 14%, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by OMP is 0.03 mGal and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 56.48 dB. In contrast, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by the existing nearest-interpolation method (NIPM) is 0.15 mGal and the SNR is 42.29 dB. These results have shown that the OMP algorithm can reconstruct the gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and fewer measurements. PMID:24647125

  17. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  18. Autonomous and Remote-Controlled Airborne and Ground-Based Robotic Platforms for Adaptive Geophysical Surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spritzer, J. M.; Phelps, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Low-cost autonomous and remote-controlled robotic platforms have opened the door to precision-guided geophysical surveying. Over the past two years, the U.S. Geological Survey, Senseta, NASA Ames Research Center, and Carnegie Mellon University Silicon Valley, have developed and deployed small autonomous and remotely controlled vehicles for geophysical investigations. The purpose of this line of investigation is to 1) increase the analytical capability, resolution, and repeatability, and 2) decrease the time, and potentially the cost and map-power necessary to conduct near-surface geophysical surveys. Current technology has advanced to the point where vehicles can perform geophysical surveys autonomously, freeing the geoscientist to process and analyze the incoming data in near-real time. This has enabled geoscientists to monitor survey parameters; process, analyze and interpret the incoming data; and test geophysical models in the same field session. This new approach, termed adaptive surveying, provides the geoscientist with choices of how the remainder of the survey should be conducted. Autonomous vehicles follow pre-programmed survey paths, which can be utilized to easily repeat surveys on the same path over large areas without the operator fatigue and error that plague man-powered surveys. While initial deployments with autonomous systems required a larger field crew than a man-powered survey, over time operational experience costs and man power requirements will decrease. Using a low-cost, commercially available chassis as the base for autonomous surveying robotic systems promise to provide higher precision and efficiency than human-powered techniques. An experimental survey successfully demonstrated the adaptive techniques described. A magnetic sensor was mounted on a small rover, which autonomously drove a prescribed course designed to provide an overview of the study area. Magnetic data was relayed to the base station periodically, processed and gridded. A

  19. The Application of Gravity and CSAMT Survey on Baishan Molybdenum Deposit, Hami, Xinjiang,China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Lu, H.; Zhang, K.

    2014-12-01

    Baishan molybdenum deposit is located in the eastern Tianshan Carboniferous rift at Hami, Xinjiang, China, where exposed upper Carboniferous Gandun formation. Molybdenum ore appeared at thermal contact metamorphism hornfelsed banded quartz stockwork in the concealed porphyritic granite top, Potassium and metal sulfide mineralization existed in the top of concealed rockbody.The Baishan molybdenum ore bodies were delineated 2700 meters long and 40 meters thickness, with molybdenum @ 0.59%. The main orebody shows in stratoid, small orebody appears in lenticular and vein.In order to predict potential resources, we proposes a combined method of CSAMT and GS technology,and has applied it to the survey of concealed molybdenum deposit in the Baishan.This combind method can explore to larger depths, discriminate anomalies well and has higher resolution to deep objects, thus it is an efficient tool for surveys.By drilling, we found there exsit a hidden granite body in 1400 meters deep of Hami Baishan molybdenum mine, it confirmed that Baishan molybdenum mine is a porphyry molybdenum ore. Cataclastic hornfelsed zone in the coping granite are the product of heat contact metamorphism, the ore materials are mainly derived from deep magma hydrothermal solution. The CSAMT and Gravity Survey were able to reflect the space and intrusive boundary in rough of buried granite body clearly, deep hidden granite showed high-resistivity and high-gravity anomaly and the low-resistivity anomaly distributied around them, drilling verified that 200-2500Ω low-resistivity anomaly range at top of high-resistivity corresponded to the molybdenum ore horizon. Line 15 of southern section shows two low resistance anomaly zone, and the surface of them is corresponding to the granite and intrusive contact parts,inferring it was caused by the fault structure.In granite gravity anomaly is obviously high and the width is about 560m,Δg residual value is 400 × 10-8m/s2. According to the control of

  20. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Sand Creek SW and Sand Creek SE quadrangles, Sweetwater county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 125 square miles of Sand Creek SW and Sand Creek SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of nine radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The

  1. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Carbon and Sweetwater counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 151 square miles of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of twelve radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The radioactivity

  2. Development of a laser fluorosensor for airborne surveying of the aquatic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, M. P. F.; Houston, W. R.; Measures, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    A field based laser fluorosensor, employing a pulsed nitrogen laser and telescope photomultiplier detector system, has been successfully tested at night from a cliff top site overlooking Lake Ontario providing target ranges greater than 274 meters. Remotely sensed spectra and amplitude changes in the fluorescence emission of natural waters have shown potential as a water quality indicator. In this connection, a convenient internal reference standard with which to gauge the amplitude of the fluorescence signal is realized in the form of the concurrent water Raman emission. Remote measurements of oil fluorescence emission spectra suggest that airborne laser fluorosensors are capable of detecting and characterizing the oil in a given slick and that environmental aging of these slicks does not significantly alter their fluorescence emission signature.

  3. Multi-trophic invasion resistance in Hawaii: bioacoustics, field surveys, and airborne remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Boelman, Natalie T; Asner, Gregory P; Hart, Patrick J; Martin, Roberta E

    2007-12-01

    We used airborne imaging spectroscopy and scanning light detection and ranging (LiDAR), along with bioacoustic recordings, to determine how a plant species invasion affects avian abundance and community composition across a range of Hawaiian submontane ecosystems. Total avian abundance and the ratio of native to exotic avifauna were highest in habitats with the highest canopy cover and height. Comparing biophysically equivalent sites, stands dominated by native Metrosideros polymorpha trees hosted larger native avian communities than did mixed stands of Metrosideros and the invasive tree Morella faya. A multi-trophic analysis strongly suggests that native avifauna provide biotic resistance against the invasion of Morella trees and exotic birds, thus slowing invasion "meltdowns" that disrupt the functioning of native Hawaiian ecosystems. PMID:18213957

  4. A survey of natural aggregate properties and characteristics important in remote sensing and airborne geophysics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, D.H., Jr.; Langer, W.H.; Miller, S.

    1995-01-01

    Natural aggregate is vital to the construction industry. Although natural aggregate is a high volume/low value commodity that is abundant, new sources are becoming increasingly difficult to find and develop because of rigid industry specifications, political considerations, development and transportation costs, and environmental concerns. There are two primary sources of natural aggregate: (1) exposed or near-surface bedrock that can be crushed, and (2) deposits of sand and gravel. Remote sensing and airborne geophysics detect surface and near-surface phenomena, and may be useful for detecting and mapping potential aggregate sources; however, before a methodology for applying these techniques can be developed, it is necessary to understand the type, distribution, physical properties, and characteristics of natural aggregate deposits. The distribution of potential aggregate sources is closely tied to local geologic history. Conventional exploration for natural aggregate deposits has been largely a ground-based operation, although aerial photographs and topographic maps have been extensively used to target possible deposits. Today, the exploration process also considers factors such as the availability of the land, space and water supply for processing, political and environmental factors, and distance from the market; exploration and planning cannot be separated. There are many physical properties and characteristics by which to judge aggregate material for specific applications; most of these properties and characteristics pertain only to individual aggregate particles. The application of remote sensing and airborne geophysical measurements to detecting and mapping potential aggregate sources, however, is based on intrinsic bulk physical properties and extrinsic characteristics of the deposits that can be directly measured, mathematically derived from measurement, or interpreted with remote sensing and geophysical data. ?? 1995 Oxford UniversityPress.

  5. Seasonal changes in groundwater storage estimated by absolute ground gravity and MRS surveys in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favreau, G.; Boucher, M.; Luck, B.; Pfeffer, J.; Genthon, P.; Hinderer, J.

    2009-04-01

    Important and fast groundwater storage changes occur in tropical monsoon regions in response to seasonal rainfall and subsequent surface water redistribution. In West Africa, one main goal of the GHYRAF experiment (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa, 2008-2010) is to compare absolute gravimetric measurements with dense hydrological surveys to better estimate and model water storage changes at various time scales. Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) is a non-invasive geophysical method having a signal directly related to groundwater quantity. In SW Niger, MRS surveys were performed concurrently with gravimetric (FG5) measurements for monitoring seasonal changes in groundwater storage. Water table levels were recorded on a 4-piezometers profile (~500 m) near a temporary pond (area ~2 ha) fed by sandy gullies. The volume of water drained from the pond to the phreatic aquifer was computed to be ~100,000 m3/yr. Large piezometric fluctuations (3-6 m) occurred in response to indirect recharge through the pond during the 2008 rainy season (July-Sept.), with stronger water table fluctuations recorded near the pond. Absolute gravimetric (FG5) measurements were performed at a distance of 150 m from the pond, in order to minimize the influence of 2D effects on gravimetric records. The increase in absolute gravity measured between two dates (July-Sept.) was 8.7 ± 2.6 µGal; for the same period, the measured water table rise was +3.0 m. Considering these values, a first estimate of the groundwater storage increase is 0.2 m, corresponding to a porosity filled up by the water table rise of ~7%. Repeated MRS surveys were performed at the same location for different dates (three soundings in Sept., one in Dec.). The MRS water content was 13%, with little variation in space (±3%) along the piezometric profile. In response to a 3 metres drop in the water table (Sept- Dec), there was no significant recorded change in the MRS water content and/or in the estimated MRS water table depth. MRS

  6. Possible role of gravity in collapse of the wave-function: a brief survey of some ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tejinder P.

    2015-07-01

    This article is a brief survey of some approaches to implementing the suggestion that collapse of the wave function is mediated by gravity. These approaches include: a possible connection between the problem of time and problem of quantum measurement, decoherence models based on space-time uncertainty, the Schrödinger-Newton equation, attempts to introduce gravity into collapse models such as CSL, ideas based on the black hole - elementary particle complementarity, and the possible role of a complex space-time metric.

  7. Stream Morphologic Measurements from Airborne Laser Swath Mapping: Comparisons with Field Surveys, Traditional DEMs, and Aerial Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, N. P.; Schultz, L. L.

    2005-12-01

    Precise measurement of stream morphology over entire watersheds is one of the great research opportunities provided by airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM). ALSM surveys allow for rapid quantification of factors, such as channel width and gradient, that control stream hydraulic and ecologic properties. We compare measurements from digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from ALSM data collected by the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) to field surveys, traditional DEMs (rasterized from topographic maps), and aerial photographs. The field site is in the northern Black Mountains in arid Death Valley National Park (California). The area is unvegetated, and therefore is excellent for testing DEM analysis methods because the ALSM data required minimal filtering, and the resulting DEM contains relatively few unphysical sinks. Algorithms contained in geographic information systems (GIS) software used to extract stream networks from DEMs yield best results where streams are steep enough for resolvable pixel-to-pixel elevation change, and channel width is on the order of pixel resolution. This presents a new challenge with ALSM-derived DEMs because the pixel size (1 m) is often an order of magnitude or more smaller than channel width. We find the longitudinal profile of Gower Gulch in the northern Black Mountains (~4 km total length) extracted using the ALSM DEM and a flow accumulation algorithm is 14% longer than a traditional 10-m DEM, and 13% longer than a field survey. These differences in length (and therefore gradient) are due to the computed channel path following small-scale topographic variations within the channel bottom that are not relevant during high flows. However, visual analysis of shaded-relief images created from high-resolution ALSM data is an excellent method for digitizing channel banks and thalweg paths. We used these lines to measure distance, elevation, and width. In Gower Gulch, the algorithm-derived profile is 10% longer than that

  8. Insights into the Structure and Surface Geology of Isla Socorro, Mexico, from Airborne Magnetic and Gamma-Ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, V.; Gruber, S.; Varley, N.; D'Antonio, M.; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.

    2016-05-01

    The island of Socorro is located in the eastern Pacific Ocean, 650 km off the coast of Mexico. It is a rare example of an oceanic volcanic island whose above sea level volume is made up mostly of peralkaline trachytes and rhyolites, with subordinate mafic rocks. Subaerial volcanism started several hundred thousand years ago and continues until recent times. We present an investigation of surface and subsurface geology of the island, based on the first detailed extensive geophysical survey on the island. Acquired airborne magnetic and gamma-ray data were compared to existing geological information and supplemented with field investigations and satellite imagery. Magnetic data show a wide minimum in the central part of the island, possibly connected to a high-temperature zone in the deeper central portion of the volcano, likely to be due to a still hot magma body. The data also depict two parallel edges possibly suggesting the existence of a nested caldera. Analysis on upward continued magnetic data by recent imaging techniques highlighted two deep sources located around 5 km b.s.l., interpreted as feeding structures that are now filled with crystalline rocks. Gamma-ray data have been interpreted through integration with the geological survey results. Several previously known volcanic deposits have been identified based on radioelement distribution, and others have been redefined based on field evidence. A new succession of volcanic members is proposed, to be verified through more detailed geological mapping, geochemical analyses of rock samples and radiometric dating.

  9. Gravity Disturbances at Altitude and at the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, T.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is committed to redefining the nation's vertical datum by 2022. In support of the new vertical datum, NGS is collecting high-altitude airborne gravity data across the United States through the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project. GRAV-D (as of August 2013) has publicly released full-field gravity products from these high-altitude flights for >15% of the country. The full-field gravity (FFG) at altitude product is versatile because it allows the user to calculate any disturbance or anomaly that is appropriate for their application- based on any datum and height above the datum desired. However, conventional geophysical methods for calculating gravity disturbances assume very low altitudes above the ellipsoid. This presentation addresses the differences between several conventional and non-conventional methods for calculating gravity disturbances, from the perspective of altitudes as high as 40,000 ft. The methods for calculating a disturbance at altitude apply different corrections to the FFG for: 1. Normal gravity at the surface of the ellipsoid and the free-air reduction (1st order, 2nd order, and higher order approximations); 2. Normal gravity at the surface of the ellipsoid, upward continued to flight height; 3. Normal gravity at flight altitude above the ellipsoid from Heiskanen and Moritz (1967)'s closed equations; 4. Normal gravity at flight altitude above the ellipsoid from spherical and ellipsoidal harmonic coefficients of the ellipsoid. Initial results indicate that these methods produce gravity disturbances that are 10s of mGals different at altitude. This presentation will also investigate disturbances calculated at the surface of the ellipsoid, by downward continuing the results of the above methods. Gravity disturbances continued from airborne flight heights down to the surface are desired for comparison to terrestrial and marine gravity data.

  10. Non-Destructive Survey of Archaeological Sites Using Airborne Laser Scanning and Geophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poloprutský, Z.; Cejpová, M.; Němcová, J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the non-destructive documentation of the "Radkov" (Svitavy district, Czech Republic) archaeological site. ALS, GPR and land survey mapping will be used for the analysis. The fortified hilltop settlement "Radkov" is an immovable historical monument with preserved relics of anthropogenic origin in relief. Terrain reconnaissance can identify several accentuated objects on site. ALS enables identification of poorly recognizable archaeological objects and their contexture in the field. Geophysical survey enables defunct objects identification. These objects are hidden below the current ground surface and their layout is crucial. Land survey mapping provides technical support for ALS and GPR survey. It enables data georeferencing in geodetic reference systems. GIS can then be used for data analysis. M. Cejpová and J. Němcová have studied this site over a long period of time. In 2012 Radkov was surveyed using ALS in the project "The Research of Ancient Road in Southwest Moravia and East Bohemia". Since 2015 the authors have been examining this site. This paper summarises the existing results of the work of these authors. The digital elevation model in the form of a grid (GDEM) with a resolution 1 m of 2012 was the basis for this work. In 2015 the survey net, terrain reconnaissance and GPR survey of two archaeological objects were done at the site. GDEM was compared with these datasets. All datasets were processed individually and its results were compared in ArcGIS. This work was supported by the Grant Agency of the CTU in Prague, grant No. SGS16/063/OHK1/1T/11.

  11. Arctic gravity exploration: state of the art and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneshov, V. N.; Nepoklonov, V. B.; Pogorelov, V. V.; Solov'ev, V. N.; Afanas'eva, L. V.

    2016-05-01

    The application of the airborne gravimetry method for gravity measurements in the Arctic is considered. This method has been extensively employed in foreign studies for determining the figure of the Earth in high-latitude conditions. The possibility of conducting comparative studies along the extensive survey lines and the necessity of aerogravimetry studies for improving the global Earth's gravity field (EGF) models are discussed. The possibility of the efficient application of the modern EGF models for estimating the systematical errors for different types of gravimetry surveys and exploring the influence of the anomalous far-zone field in the calculations of the plumb line deviations is demonstrated.

  12. A survey of airborne radar systems for deployment on a High Altitude Powered Platform (HAPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Leung, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    A survey was conducted to find out the system characteristics of commercially available and unclassified military radars suitable for deployment on a stationary platform. A total of ten domestic and eight foreign manufacturers of the radar systems were identified. Questionnaires were sent to manufacturers requesting information concerning the system characteristics: frequency, power used, weight, volume, power radiated, antenna pattern, resolution, display capabilities, pulse repetition frequency, and sensitivity. A literature search was also made to gather the system characteristics information. Results of the survey are documented and comparisons are made among available radar systems.

  13. Airborne Hydromapping - How high-resolution bathymetric surveys will change the research and work focused on waterbody-related topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, Frank; Baran, Ramona; Dobler, Wolfgang; Aufleger, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Repetitive surveying of inshore waters and coastal zones is becoming more and more essential in order to evaluate water-level dynamics, structural and zonal variations of rivers and riparian areas, river degradation, water flow, reservoir sedimentation, delta growth, as well as coastal processes. This can only be achieved in an effective manner by employing hydrographic airborne laser scanning (hydromapping). A new laser scanner is introduced, which has been specifically designed for the acquisition of high-resolution hydrographic data in order to survey and monitor inland waters and shallow coastal zones. Recently, this scanner has been developed within the framework of an Austrian research cooperation between Riegl LMS and the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck. We present exemplary measurement results obtained with the compact airborne laser-scanning system during our project work. Along the Baltic Sea coast northeast of Kiel city, northern Germany, we obtained measurement depths up to 8 m under clear-water conditions. Moreover, we detect underwater dune-structures and the accumulation of sediment within groin structures. In contrast, under turbid water conditions we obtained depths of approximately 3 m along the Rhine River at Rheinfelden, German-Swiss border east of Basel city. Nevertheless, we were able to map small-scale and complex morphologic features within a fish ramp or bedrock cliffs. The laser data had been combined with sonar measurements displaying the bathymetry at depths of ca. 2-25 m in order to document comprehensively the actual hydrographic setting after the new construction of the hydropower plant Rheinfelden. In summary, a high-resolution spatial view on the ground of various waterbodies is now possible for the first time with point densities in the usual range of approximately 10-20 points/m². However, the combination of these data with high-resolution aerial (approximately < 5 cm/pixel) or spectral images offers

  14. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, R. W.

    2006-12-28

    subtle mine pool anomalies. However, post-survey modeling suggested that thicker, more conductive mine pools might be detected at a more suitable location. The current study sought to identify the best time domain electromagnetic sensor for detecting mine pools and to test it in an area where the mine pools are thicker and more conductive that those in southwestern Virginia. After a careful comparison of all airborne time domain electromagnetic sensors (including both helicopter and fixed-wing systems), the SkyTEM system from Denmark was determined to be the best technology for this application. Whereas most airborne time domain electromagnetic systems were developed to find large, deep, highly conductive mineral deposits, the SkyTEM system is designed for groundwater exploration studies, an application similar to mine pool detection.

  15. High-resolution gravity and seismic-refraction surveys of the Smoke Tree Wash area, Joshua Tree National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, Victoria E.; Rymer, Michael J.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Goldman, Mark R.; Watt, Janet T.; Powell, Robert E.; Matti, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    We describe high-resolution gravity and seismic refraction surveys acquired to determine the thickness of valley-fill deposits and to delineate geologic structures that might influence groundwater flow beneath the Smoke Tree Wash area in Joshua Tree National Park. These surveys identified a sedimentary basin that is fault-controlled. A profile across the Smoke Tree Wash fault zone reveals low gravity values and seismic velocities that coincide with a mapped strand of the Smoke Tree Wash fault. Modeling of the gravity data reveals a basin about 2–2.5 km long and 1 km wide that is roughly centered on this mapped strand, and bounded by inferred faults. According to the gravity model the deepest part of the basin is about 270 m, but this area coincides with low velocities that are not characteristic of typical basement complex rocks. Most likely, the density contrast assumed in the inversion is too high or the uncharacteristically low velocities represent highly fractured or weathered basement rocks, or both. A longer seismic profile extending onto basement outcrops would help differentiate which scenario is more accurate. The seismic velocities also determine the depth to water table along the profile to be about 40–60 m, consistent with water levels measured in water wells near the northern end of the profile.

  16. Contribution of the airborne geophysical survey to the study of the regolith : A case study in southern Paris Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prognon, Francois; Lacquement, Fréderic; Deparis, Jacques; Martelet, Guillaume; Perrin, José

    2010-05-01

    Studies of soil and subsoil, also called regolith, are at the crossroads of scientific new challenging questions as well as new environmental needs. Historically, geological maps were focussed on solid geology. Present societal needs increasingly require knowledge of regolith properties: superficial studies combining geology, geochemistry and geophysics become essential to better understand the natural processes which govern the repartition and evolution of subsoil formations. Such progress is critical to better orient the use and management of natural and groundwater resources. Among other techniques, airborne geophysics is appropriate to provide information on near surface, because of i) its high spatial coverage ii) the rapidity of acquisition and iii) the variety of available sensors (magnetic, spectral radiometry, electromagnetic …). We illustrate the results of an airborne geophysical survey carried out in France, in "Région Centre" administrative region in the southern part of the Paris Basin. Spectral radiometry data were collected throughout "Région Centre" with a line spacing of 1 km. This method provides maps of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) which are the only naturally occurring elements with direct or indirect radioisotopes that produce gamma rays of sufficient intensity to be measured at airborne survey heights. Gamma-rays emitted from the Earth surface are related to the primary mineralogy and geochemistry of the bedrock and/or the nature of secondary weathering including regolith materials. Obtained images are confronted with former geological investigations (1:50 000e geological maps). Geophysical data and geological maps are generally consistent on most of the covered area since the first-rate information delivered by the spectrometry derives from the geochemistry of the solid geology. Second-rate gamma-ray responses come from superimposed allochtonous deposits as well as in situ geochemical modifications. For instance

  17. Aeromagnetic, gravity anomaly, and derivative maps of the Craig and Dixon Entrance 1-degree by 3-degree quadrangles of southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeffrey C.; Kucks, R.P.; Grybeck, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains aeromagnetic, gravity, geology, and topographic data as well as several derivative products, for the Craig and Dixon Entrance 1? ? 3? quadrangles of Southeastern Alaska. The data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey directly and by means of several contract airborne surveys, through August 1991.

  18. New Antarctic gravity anomaly grid for enhanced geodetic and geophysical studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinert, M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Schwabe, J.; Bell, R.; Studinger, M.; Damaske, D.; Jokat, W.; Aleshkova, N.; Jordan, T.; Leitchenkov, G.; Blankenship, D. D.; Damiani, T. M.; Young, D.; Cochran, J. R.; Richter, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    Gravity surveying is challenging in Antarctica because of its hostile environment and inaccessibility. Nevertheless, many ground-based, airborne, and shipborne gravity campaigns have been completed by the geophysical and geodetic communities since the 1980s. We present the first modern Antarctic-wide gravity data compilation derived from 13 million data points covering an area of 10 million km2, which corresponds to 73% coverage of the continent. The remove-compute-restore technique was applied for gridding, which facilitated leveling of the different gravity data sets with respect to an Earth gravity model derived from satellite data alone. The resulting free-air and Bouguer gravity anomaly grids of 10 km resolution are publicly available. These grids will enable new high-resolution combined Earth gravity models to be derived and represent a major step forward toward solving the geodetic polar data gap problem. They provide a new tool to investigate continental-scale lithospheric structure and geological evolution of Antarctica.

  19. The US Geological Survey's side-looking airborne radar acquisition program: Image data from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Kovar, A.N.; Schoonmaker, J.W. Jr. )

    1993-04-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) has been systematically collecting side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) image data for the US since 1980. The image strip swaths, ranging in width from 20 to 46 km, are acquired commercially by X-band (3 cm) radar systems. Data are acquired with 60 percent side-lap for better mosaic preparation and stereoscopic capability. The image strips are assembled into 1[degree] x 2[degree] mosaic quadrangles that are based on the USGS 1:250,000-topographic map series for control, format, and nomenclature. These mosaics present the data in a broad synoptic view that facilitates geologic interpretation. SLAR image mosaics have been prepared for more than 35 percent of the US west of the Rocky Mountain front. In addition to quadrangle mosaics, regional composite mosaics have been prepared as value-added products. These include Pacific Northwest (14 quadrangles), southern California Coastal (from San Francisco to San Diego), Reno-Walker (includes parts of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks), Uinta Basin (Salt Lake City, Price and Grand Junction), and Salton Sea Region (San Diego, Santa Ana, El Centro and Salton Sea). Most of the image data are available on computer compatible tapes and photographic products. To make the data more accessible and reasonably priced, the strip images are being processed into CD-ROM (compact disc, read-only memory). One demonstration CD-ROM includes the mosaics of Las Vegas, Mariposa, Ritzville, Walla Walla, and Pendleton quadrangles.

  20. OSSE impact analysis of airborne ocean surveys for improving upper-ocean dynamical and thermodynamical forecasts in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliwell, George R.; Kourafalou, Vassiliki; Le Hénaff, Matthieu; Shay, Lynn K.; Atlas, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A prototype, rigorously validated ocean Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) system is used to evaluate the impact of different sampling strategies for rapid-response airborne ocean profile surveys in the eastern interior Gulf of Mexico. Impacts are assessed with respect to improving ocean analyses, and forecasts initialized from those analyses, for two applications: improving oil spill forecasts and improving the ocean model response to tropical cyclone (TC) forcing. Rapid model error growth in this region requires that repeat surveys be conducted frequently in time, with separation of less than 4 days required to approach maximum error reduction in model analyses. Substantial additional error reduction in model dynamical fields is achieved by deploying deep (1000 m) AXCTDs instead of shallow (400 m) AXBTs. Shallow AXBTs constrain the ocean thermal field over the upper 400 m nearly as well as deep AXCTDs. However, in addition to constraining ocean fields over a greater depth range, AXCTDs also measure salinity profiles and more accurately constrain upper-ocean density than AXBTs, leading to a more accurate representation of upper ocean pressure and velocity fields. Sampling AXCTD profiles over a one-half degree array compared to one degree leads to substantial additional error reduction by constraining variability with horizontal scales too small to be corrected by satellite altimetry assimilation. A 2-day lag in availability of airborne profiles does not increase errors in dynamical ocean fields, but it does increase errors in upper-ocean thermal field including Tropical Cyclone Heat Potential (TCHP), demonstrating that these profiles must be rapidly made available for assimilation to improve TC forecasts. The additional error reduction in ocean analyses achieved by assimilation of airborne surveys translates into significantly improved forecasts persisting over time intervals ranging between 1 and 2 weeks for most model variables but several weeks for

  1. A Survey of Airborne Observations of Biological Aerosol over the Continental United States during NASA SEAC4RS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Venkateswaran, K.; Froyd, K.; Dibb, J. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Hudgins, C.; Lin, J. J.; Moore, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols play a significant role in regulating Earth's climate. Biological aerosols exist in the atmosphere in many forms including bacteria, fungal spores, pollens, viruses, and plant detritus. While laboratory studies have illustrated the potential for biological aerosol to act as efficient ice nuclei, ambient observations do not clearly show the significance of this mechanism for ice formation. Particularly lacking for assessing the role of biological aerosol on cloud processes are observations of the vertical extent of biological aerosol, especially in conjunction with strong convection as a pathway for redistributing particles from surface sources to the free troposphere. An extensive suite of instrumentation measuring aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties was deployed aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the SEAC4RS campaign (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) in August/September of 2013. Flights were focused on characterizing emissions and transport of aerosols in the Southeast United States, a region characterized by strong biogenic activity. Additionally, convection associated with the North American Monsoon and Atlantic-basin hurricanes was targeted. Airborne biological aerosol was specifically measured during SEAC4RS with a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A, Droplet Measurement Technologies). WIBS-4A utilizes a single-particle laser-induced fluorescence technique at two excitation wavelengths (280nm and 370nm) to identify biological aerosol, in addition to simultaneous determination of optical size and asymmetry factor for particles with diameter greater than 800nm. Single-particle mass spectrometry coupled with filter-based chemical composition and bacterial speciation analyses will be used to assess relationships with co-emitted mineral dusts. Vertical profiles for the background atmosphere will be compared to profiles influenced by convective storms to assess

  2. Postal survey on airborne occupational exposure and respiratory disorders in Norway: causes and consequences of non-response.

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, P; Gulsvik, A; Lilleng, P; Overå, O; Hanoa, R; Eide, G E

    1990-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to examine causes for non-response in a community survey, and how non-response influences prevalence estimates of some exposure and disease variables, and associations between the variables. DESIGN--This was a cross sectional questionnaire study with two reminder letters. The questionnaire asked for information on smoking habits, occupational airborne exposure and respiratory disorders. SETTING--A random sample of 4992 subjects from the general population aged 15-70 years of Hordaland County, Norway. MAIN RESULTS--The overall response rate was 90%, with a 63% response to the initial letter. The response rates to the first and second reminder letters were 56% and 36% respectively. In 20% of the non-respondents an uncompleted questionnaire was returned with cause for non-response; in two thirds of these the cause for non-response was that the subject was not resident at the mailing address. A home visit to a random sample of 50 urban non-respondents provided further information on 29 subjects. A wrong address at the Central Population Registry and the subject's feeling of lack of personal benefit from a postal survey were the major reasons for non-response. Smokers were late respondents and subjects with respiratory disorders tended to be early respondents. CONCLUSION--The main reasons for non-response were a wrong mailing address and a feeling of lack of personal benefit from responding. Using only the initial letter would have changed the estimated prevalence of smokers from 39% to 35%. Otherwise, the estimated prevalence of the exposure and disease variables as well as the associations between them were only slightly changed after including the respondents to the first and second reminder letters. PMID:2277255

  3. Snow measurement system for airborne snow surveys (GPR system from helicopter) in high mountian areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorteberg, Hilleborg K.

    2010-05-01

    In the hydropower industry, it is important to have precise information about snow deposits at all times, to allow for effective planning and optimal use of the water. In Norway, it is common to measure snow density using a manual method, i.e. the depth and weight of the snow is measured. In recent years, radar measurements have been taken from snowmobiles; however, few energy supply companies use this method operatively - it has mostly been used in connection with research projects. Agder Energi is the first Norwegian power producer in using radar tecnology from helicopter in monitoring mountain snow levels. Measurement accuracy is crucial when obtaining input data for snow reservoir estimates. Radar screening by helicopter makes remote areas more easily accessible and provides larger quantities of data than traditional ground level measurement methods. In order to draw up a snow survey system, it is assumed as a basis that the snow distribution is influenced by vegetation, climate and topography. In order to take these factors into consideration, a snow survey system for fields in high mountain areas has been designed in which the data collection is carried out by following the lines of a grid system. The lines of this grid system is placed in order to effectively capture the distribution of elevation, x-coordinates, y-coordinates, aspect, slope and curvature in the field. Variation in climatic conditions are also captured better when using a grid, and dominant weather patterns will largely be captured in this measurement system.

  4. Test plan and preliminary report of airborne electromagentic environment survey over USA urban areas 0.4 to 18.0 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Hill, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    An airborne electromagnetic environment survey is described of five urban areas where terrestrially-generated radio-frequency interference was measured over the frequency range from 0.4 to 18.0 GHz. A chartered Cessna 402 aircraft contained necessary measurement test equipment, including the receiving antennas mounted beneath the fuselage. Urban areas including Washington, D.C.; Baltimore, MD; Philadelphia, PA; New York, NY; Chicago, ILL; and Palestine, TX were surveyed. A flight test plan and preliminary test results for the 0.4 to 1.4 GHz frequency range, are included; a final test report describes more detailed results.

  5. Implications of Preliminary Gravity and Magnetic Surveys to the Understanding of the Bartlett Springs Fault Zone, Northern California Coast Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Jachens, R. C.; Morin, R. L.; McCabe, C. M.; Page, W. D.

    2007-12-01

    We use new gravity and magnetic data in the Lake Pillsbury region to help understand the geometry and character of the Bartlett Springs fault zone, one of the three main strands of the San Andreas system north of the San Francisco Bay area. We collected 153 new gravity stations in the Lake Pillsbury region that complement the sparse regional dataset and are used to estimate the thickness of Quaternary deposits in the inferred Gravelly Valley (Lake Pillsbury) pull-apart basin. We also collected 38 line-km of ground magnetic data on roads and 65 line-km by boat on the lake to supplement regional aeromagnetic surveys and to map concealed fault strands beneath the lake. The new gravity data show a significant northwest-striking gravity gradient at the base of which lies the Bartlett Springs fault zone. Superposed on this major east-facing gravity gradient is a 5 mGal low centered on Lake Pillsbury and Gravelly Valley. Inversion of the gravity field for basin thickness assuming a density contrast of 400 kg/m3 indicates the deepest part of the basin is about 400 m and located in the northern part of the valley, although the inversion lacks gravity stations within the lake. The basin is about 3 km wide and 5 km long and basin edges coincide with strands of the Bartlett Springs fault zone. Our gravity data suggest that Potter Valley, which lies between the Maacama and Bartlett Springs faults, is also as much as 400 m deep in the southern part of the valley, although additional data west of the valley would better isolate the gravity low. Geomorphologic characteristics of the valley suggest that this structure has been quiescent during the late Quaternary. Ground magnetic data are very noisy but the data in conjunction with 9.6 km-spaced NURE aeromagnetic lines suggest that regional analog aeromagnetic data flown in 1962 may suffer from location errors. The regional and NURE data show a northwest-striking magnetic high that extends across Lake Pillsbury. The northeast edge

  6. Biomineralisation under zero gravity: A survey of past experience and theoretical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epple, M.; Slenzka, K.

    Biomineralisation denotes the utilisation of inorganic minerals by biological systems for different purposes like mechanical protection (shells), tools (teeth and spicules), internal stabilisation (bones), and gravity sensors (otoliths, statoliths). The main principles are now understood, i.e. the biological control over crystal nucleation, crystal growth, crystallisation in confined compartments, and incorporation of biomolecules (mostly proteins) into inorganic structures. It is a question of fundamental interest whether these processes that have been developed over millions of years under 1 g-gravity on earth are still working properly under zero gravitation. Biominerals like calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, silica, and iron oxide have a high specific weight, and therefore the absence of gravity may well influence the biomineralisation process in a purely physico-chemical and mechanical way. Of course, biological signalling pathways should also depend on the gravitational force. Of immediate medical interest is the influence of gravity on bone formation that is commonly associated with osteoporosis. Further points are teeth development and pathological biomineralisation phenomena like atherosclerosis. The contributions will highlight past experiments from the literature about biomineralisation under zero-gravity and try to formulate principles for the influence of gravity on biomineralisation.

  7. Gravity and geoid model for South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blitzkow, Denizar; Oliveira Cancoro de Matos, Ana Cristina; do Nascimento Guimarães, Gabriel; Pacino, María Cristina; Andrés Lauría, Eduardo; Nunes, Marcelo; Castro Junior, Carlos Alberto Correia e.; Flores, Fredy; Orihuela Guevara, Nuris; Alvarez, Ruber; Napoleon Hernandez, José

    2016-04-01

    In the last 20 years, South America Gravity Studies (SAGS) project has undertaken an ongoing effort in establishing the fundamental gravity network (FGN); terrestrial, river and airborne relative gravity densifications; absolute gravity surveys and geoid (quasi-geoid) model computation for South America. The old FGN is being replaced progressively by new absolute measurements in different countries. In recent years, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Paraguay and Venezuela organizations participated with relative gravity surveys. Taking advantage of the large amount of data available, GEOID2015 model was developed for 15°N and 57°S latitude and 30 ° W and 95°W longitude based on EIGEN-6C4 until degree and order 200 as a reference field. The ocean area was completed with mean free air gravity anomalies derived from DTU10 model. The short wavelength component was estimated using FFT. The global gravity field models EIGEN-6C4, DIR_R5 were used for comparison with the new model. The new geoid model has been evaluated against 1,319 GPS/BM, in which 592 are located in Brazil and the reminder in other countries. The preliminary RMS difference between GPS/BM and GEOID2015 throughout South America and in Brazil is 46 cm and 17 cm, respectively. New activities are carrying out with the support of the IGC (Geographic and Cartographic Institute) under the coordination of EPUSP/LTG and CENEGEO (Centro de Estudos de Geodesia). The new project aims to establish new gravity points with the A-10 absolute gravimeter in South America. Recent such surveys occurred in São Paulo state, Argentina and Venezuela.

  8. The Continuous wavelet in airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Liu, L.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne gravimetry is an efficient method to recover medium and high frequency band of earth gravity over any region, especially inaccessible areas, which can measure gravity data with high accuracy,high resolution and broad range in a rapidly and economical way, and It will play an important role for geoid and geophysical exploration. Filtering methods for reducing high-frequency errors is critical to the success of airborne gravimetry due to Aircraft acceleration determination based on GPS.Tradiontal filters used in airborne gravimetry are FIR,IIR filer and so on. This study recommends an improved continuous wavelet to process airborne gravity data. Here we focus on how to construct the continuous wavelet filters and show their working principle. Particularly the technical parameters (window width parameter and scale parameter) of the filters are tested. Then the raw airborne gravity data from the first Chinese airborne gravimetry campaign are filtered using FIR-low pass filter and continuous wavelet filters to remove the noise. The comparison to reference data is performed to determinate external accuracy, which shows that continuous wavelet filters applied to airborne gravity in this thesis have good performances. The advantages of the continuous wavelet filters over digital filters are also introduced. The effectiveness of the continuous wavelet filters for airborne gravimetry is demonstrated through real data computation.

  9. Detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and vicinity, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.L.; Serpa, L.F.; Pe, W.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed gravity survey (comprising 231 stations over about 900 km/sup 2/) was made in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource area (KGRA) and vicinity, Millard and Beaver counties, Utah to assist in the appraisal of the potential of this area as a geothermal resource. The survey reinforced the results and information obtained in the previous regional gravity surveys comprising 522 stations. The gravity data from about 700 stations were reduced and compiled as a terrain-corrected (out to 20 km) Bouguer gravity anomaly map with 1-mgal contour interval. In August 1975, an aeromagnetic survey was flown over part of the survey area at a constant barometric elevation of 12,000 ft (3660 m). These aeromagnetic data are used to supplement the interpretation of the gravity data. The aeromagnetic field intensity residual anomaly map and the second-order polynomial residual aeromagnetic map (obtained by removing a second-order polynomial surface) are presented with a 20-gamma contour interval. Two north-south profiles and one east-west profile were selected for magnetic interpretative modeling. The two north-south profiles were also stacked and averaged over 6-km-wide strips and modeled. The occurrences of hydrothermal alteration, hot spring deposits, and flowing hot springs coincide with inferred fault zones. No evidence of extensive alteration can be interpreted from the magnetic data.

  10. Gravity and Magnetic Survey of Southern Oklahoma Alcugen in Texas Panhandle, Near the 2000 earthquake swarm North of Amarillo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, S.; Gurrola, H.; Robinson, R.; Horton, M.; Herrmann, M.; Seshhadri, S.; Anderson, H.; Bribiesca, E.; Lindsey, C.; Montalvo, R.; Cyrek, C.; Allen, T.; Hoemberg, J.; Hassan, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Texas panhandle is not a region normally thought of as being prone to seismic activity. Earthquakes with magnitudes of 3 to 4 do however occur in this region every year or so and are felt by residents in the area. There are historical reports of earthquakes of magnitude 5 during the early twentieth century. The earthquakes in this region are most likely associated with displacement on old faults related to the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (SOA, 600 Ma) which was deformed during the Ouachita orogeny to form the Wichita Mts. During the summer of 2000 there were an unusually large number of earthquakes for this region, five, all from the same location a few kilometers north of Amarillo Texas, 35.39 degrees north latitude and 101.81 degrees west longitude according to the NEIC catalogue. The non-seismic exploration class at Texas Tech University collected and interpreted gravity and magnetic data along a dirt road crossing the location of this earthquake "swarm" (yes in Texas 5 is a swarm) to determine if the old faults of the SOA coincide with the location of these earthquakes. The survey was conducted along a service road of the Santa Fe Railroad that crosses US 87 approximately 20 miles north of Amarillo, Texas trending in a south-southwest direction. Gravity data were collected every 100m along a 5 km profile using Warden and Lacoste gravity meters with elevation control provided by leveling survey tied to elevation markers on the map. Gravity data were colleted, using GPS elevation location and elevation, on roads over more than 20 km surrounding the local survey to provide regional control. Magnetic data were collected along the 5 km profile. Models derived from these data indicate a 200 m thick layer of poorly consolidated sediments with densities of 2.0 g/cc that can be interpreted as the Ogallala aquifer overlaying a layer with density of 2.6 g/cc. The interface between these layers is very structured and has at least three sharp ridges that we interpret as

  11. 3D modelling of an aero-gravity and -magnetic survey as an first exploration step in a frontier basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köther, Nils; Eckard, Marcel; Götze, Hans-Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    The West African Taoudeni basin covers a desert area of about 1.8 million km² and is one of the last frontier basins worldwide. Here Wintershall Holding AG holds acreage of about 68000 km². During 2005-2007 geological surveys and an aero-gravity and -magnetic survey were conducted in this area. The potential field modelling should contribute first insight about the subsurface to plan an economic seismic survey. 2D models lead to poor results. 2008 the results of an internship (NK) were 3D subsurface models, which were enhanced during the following diploma thesis (Köther, 2009). Complex igneous rocks and sparsely distributed constraints lead to an ambiguous interpretation. Therefore, several simple 3D models were compiled with the in-house software IGMAS+, which base on geological ideas of the underground and fit well the measured data. These basic models allow a geophysical evaluation of different geological theories about the subsurface. Also, for a thorough interpretation field transformations (Euler, Curvature, and Derivatives) were calculated. These results led to new constraints for further interpretation of the basin structures and therefore they are important contributions for future exploration e.g. the planning of seismic surveys.

  12. Three-dimensional resistivity characterization of a coastal area: Application of Grounded Electrical-Source Airborne Transient Electromagnetic (GREATEM) survey data from Kujukuri Beach, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Allah, Sabry; Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Jomori, Akira; Yuuki, Youichi; Fomenko, Elena; Kiho, Kenzo; Kaieda, Hideshi; Suzuki, Koichi; Tsukuda, Kazuhiro

    2013-12-01

    An airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey using the Grounded Electrical-Source Airborne Transient Electromagnetic (GREATEM) system was conducted over the Kujukuri coastal plain in southeast Japan to assess the system's ability to accurately describe the geological structure beneath shallow seawater. To obtain high-quality data with an optimized signal-to-noise ratio, a series of data processing techniques were used to obtain the final transient response curves from the field survey data. These steps included movement correction, coordinate transformation, the removal of local noise, data stacking, and signal portion extraction. We performed numerical forward modeling to generate a three-dimensional (3D) resistivity structure model from the GREATEM data. This model was developed from an initial one-dimensional (1D) resistivity structure that was also inverted from the GREATEM field survey data. We modified a 3D electromagnetic forward-modeling scheme based on a finite-difference staggered-grid method and used it to calculate the response of the 3D resistivity model along each survey line. We verified the model by examining the fit of the magnetic-transient responses between field data and the 3D forward-model computed data, the latter of which were convolved with the measured system responses of the corresponding data set. The inverted 3D resistivity structures showed that the GREATEM system has the capability to map resistivity structures as far as 800 m offshore and as deep as 300-350 m underground in coastal areas of relatively shallow seawater depth (5-10 m).

  13. Precise gravity-field modeling in the area of the Japanese Antarctic station Syowa and evaluation of recent EGMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yoichi; Nogi, Yoshifumi; Matsuzaki, Kazuya

    2016-03-01

    By combining a Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) Earth Gravity Model (EGM) and in situ gravity data obtained from the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) surveys, we estimated the regional gravity field in the area of Syowa Station, a Japanese research station located in Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica. In situ data sets that were used consisted of land gravity data collected since 1967, shipborne data collected since 1985 and airborne gravity data collected in 2006. The GOCE direct (DIR) solution release 5 (R5) model was used as the long-wavelength reference of the gravity field. Using these data sets, we calculated gravity anomalies and geoid heights at 1-by-1‧ grid by means of least-squares collocation. The resulting geoid height at Syowa Station was compared with a local height based on GPS, spirit leveling and tide gauge data. The result suggests that the sea surface height at Syowa Station is -1.57 m, which is consistent with a dynamic ocean topography model. During this investigation, we also evaluated GOCE EGMs and other recent EGMs by comparing them with the airborne gravity data. The results indicate that the GOCE DIR R5 produced the smallest RMS (Root Mean Square) differences and that the newer models performed nearly as well. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using reliable in situ data when evaluating satellite-only EGMs.

  14. Gravity survey and depth to bedrock in Carson Valley, Nevada-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurer, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    Gravity data were obtained from 460 stations in Carson Valley, Nevada and California. The data have been interpreted to obtain a map of approximate depth to bedrock for use in a ground-water model of the valley. This map delineates the shape of the alluvium-filled basin and shows that the maximum depth to bedrock exceeds 5,000 feet, on the west side of the valley. A north-south trending offset in the bedrock surface shows that the Carson-Valley/Pine-Nut-Mountain block has not been tilted to the west as a simple unit, but is comprised of several smaller blocks. (USGS)

  15. Underwater gravity meter survey of San Francisco and San Pablo bays, California, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childs, Jonathan R.; Beyer, L.A.; McCulloch, D.S.; McHendrie, G.A.; Steele, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Seafloor gravity measurements were made at 281 bottom stations in San Francisco and San Pablo Bays, California, on a series of lines oriented approximately NNE.. Line spacing was approximately 2.8 km and stations along the lines mere spaced 0.5 to 1.5 km apart, between 0.5 and 1.5 km perpendicular to the axis. Sample Bouguer anomalies in the San Francisco Bay range from -15 to +15 mGals (?0.1 mgal), while anomalies in the San Pablo Bay are consistently negative, ranging from +4.0 to -40.0 mGal (?0.2 mGal).

  16. 3D Geothermal Modelling Using Gravity Survey on Dolok Marawa, Simalungun District, North Sumatera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivandi, A.; Destawan, R.; Fajri, Z. R.; Hidayat, W.

    2016-01-01

    In North Sumatera, gravity method is applied to identify the geothermal model. This method measured the earth gravitational field. This research has 160 measurement points covering 9 square kilometers. We obtained complete Bouguer anomaly values ranging 85 mGal - 130.68 mGal interpreted as a heat source of andesitic igneous rocks that are affected by the presence of Mount Bahtopu magma chamber. We interpreted the values between 40 mGal - 80 mGal as reservoir and caprock. The 3D gravity inverse modelling conducted using Gravblox, and identifying the following lithologies; Toba Pyroclastic Fall (Qjt) with density 1.92 g/cm3, Toba Pyroclastic Flow (Qjt) with density 2.00 g/cm3, Mount Bahtopu Andesite (Qlb) with density 2.4 g/cm3, and 2.6 g/cm3 which is interpreted as heat source in form of andesitic rock and Mount Bahtopu magma chamber. This heat source is estimated to be at a depth of 1.45 km to 3.78 km below the surface.

  17. Aeromagnetic and Gravity Surveys in Afghanistan: A Web Site for Distribution of Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweeney, Ronald E.; Kucks, Robert P.; Hill, Patricia L.; Finn, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    Aeromagnetic data were digitized from aeromagnetic maps created from aeromagnetic surveys flown in southeastern and southern Afghanistan in 1966 by PRAKLA, Gesellschaft fur praktische Lagerstattenforschung GmbH, Hannover, Germany, on behalf of the 'Bundesanstalt fur Bodenforschung', Hannover, Germany. The digitization was done along contour lines, followed by interpolation of the data along the original survey flight-lines. Survey and map specifications can be found in two project reports, 'prakla_report_1967.pdf' and 'bgr_report_1968.pdf', made available in this open-file report.

  18. The use of high resolution ground and airborne magnetic surveys to evaluate the geometry of hydrothermal alteration zones over volcanic provinces (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouligand, C.; Glen, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical methods can provide critical constraints on the distribution and volume of hydrothermal alteration, important parameters in understanding the evolution of geothermal systems. Because hydrothermal alteration modifies the magnetic properties of the volcanic substratum, magnetic surveys can be used to provide constraints on the distribution of hydrothermal alteration at depth. Using Yellowstone caldera as an example, we show that both ground and airborne magnetic surveys can be used to map and assess the volume of hydrothermal alteration. Ground magnetic surveys over unaltered volcanic terranes display high-amplitude, short-wavelength anomalies, in contrast to smooth, subdued magnetic anomalies over volcanic substrata demagnetized by hydrothermal alteration. We use this contrast to map areas of hydrothermal alteration in detail. Inverse methods applied to high-resolution airborne and ground magnetic data can be used to create three-dimensional models of the distribution of magnetization and thus illuminate the geometry of hydrothermal alteration. Because of the non-uniqueness of potential fields, the construction of inverse models requires simplifying assumptions on the distribution of magnetization, knowledge of induced and remanent magnetization of fresh and altered geological units, and detailed geological and geophysical data. Within the three hydrothermal sites that we investigated in Yellowstone National Park, subdued short-wavelength signal indicates pervasive demagnetization (alteration) of the shallow substratum that extends over larger areas than initially mapped by geology. These data also reveal that the largest degree of demagnetization (alteration) and maximum thicknesses of demagnetized (altered) substratum, reaching a few hundred meters, are associated with hydrothermal vents and with superficial hydrothermal alteration. Our three dimensional models of magnetization provide estimates of the volume of buried hydrothermal alteration ranging

  19. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Forsyth quadrangle, Round Up quadrangle, Hardin quadrangle (Montana), Sheridan quadrangle, (Wyoming). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the area covered by the Forsyth, Hardin, and Sheridan, and Roundup, 1:250,000 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS), quadrangle maps. The survey was part of DOE's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer with a large crystal volume, and with a high sensitivity proton precession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration Pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test Range. Data quality was ensured during the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, plotted, and contoured to produce anomaly maps based on the radiometric response of individual geological units. The anomalies were interpreted and an interpretation map produced. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data collection procedures, the data processing procedures, the data presentation, the interpretation rationale, and the interpretation methodology. A separate Volume II for each quadrangle contains the data displays and the interpretation results.

  20. Airborne fungi--a resurvey

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.H.; Prince, H.E.; Raymer, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    A 15-month survey of airborne fungi at 14 geographical stations was conducted to determine the incidence of different fungal genera. Five of these stations were surveyed 25 years earlier. A comparison between previous studies and present surveys revealed similar organisms at each station with slight shifts in frequency of dominant genera.

  1. Making Carbon Emissions Remotely Sensible: Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL), its Near-Surface Survey of Carbon Gases and Isotopologues on Alaska's North Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E. J.; Sayres, D. S.; Healy, C. E.; Munster, J. B.; Baker, B.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed process-oriented study of the mechanisms of conversion in the Arctic of fossil carbon to atmospheric gas is progressing, but necessarily limited to a few point locations and requiring detailed subsurface measurements inaccessible to remote sensing. Airborne measurements of concentration, transport and flux of these carbon gases at sufficiently low altitude to reflect surface variations can tie such local measurements to remotely observable features of the landscape. Carbon dioxide and water vapor have been observable for over 20 years from low-altitude small aircraft in the Arctic and elsewhere. Methane has been more difficult, requiring large powerful aircraft or limited flask samples. Recent developments in spectroscopy, however, have reduced the power and weight required to measure methane at rates suitable for eddy-covariance flux estimates. The Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL) takes advantage of Integrated Cavity-Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, and water vapor in a new airborne system. The system, moreover, measures these gases' stable isotopologues every two seconds or faster helping to separate thermogenic from biogenic emissions. Paired with the Best Airborne Turbulence (BAT) probe developed for small aircraft by NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory and a light twin-engine aircraft adapted by Aurora Flight Sciences Inc., the FOCAL measures at 6 m spacing, covering 100 km in less than 30 minutes. It flies between 10 m and 50 m above ground interspersed with profiles to the top of the boundary layer and beyond. This presentation gives an overview of the magnitude and variation in fluxes and concentrations of CH4, CO2, and H2O with space, time, and time of day in a spatially extensive survey, more than 7500 km total in 15 flights over roughly a 100 km square during the month of August 2013. An extensive data set such as this at low altitude with high-rate sampling addresses features that repeat on 1 km scale

  2. Interpretation of an airborne geophysical survey in southern Paris Basin: towards a lithological cartography, key tool for the management of shrinking/swelling clay problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prognon, F.; Tourliere, B.; Perrin, J.; Lacquement, F.; Martelet, G.; Deparis, J.; Gourdier, S.; Drufin, S.

    2011-12-01

    Regolith formations support a full spectrum of human activities. Among others, they provide a source of extractable materials and form the substratum of soils. As such, they should be considered as a capital to be managed and protected. Moreover, one of the main challenges for present and future land settlement is to prevent house building programs from being planned inside shrink-swell risky areas which is only possible thanks to an complete lithological mapping of the french regolith. We illustrate here the results of the geological interpretation of an airborne geophysical survey carried out in "Région Centre" administrative region in the southern part of the Paris Basin, in France. Among other techniques, airborne geophysics is appropriate to quickly provide information on near surface, because of i) its high spatial coverage ii) the rapidity of acquisition and iii) the variety of available sensors (magnetic, spectral radiometry, electromagnetic...). Spectral radiometry data were collected with a line spacing of 1 km. This method provides maps of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) which are the only naturally occurring elements with direct or indirect radioisotopes that produce gamma rays of sufficient intensity to be measured at airborne survey heights. On the radiometric data we applied the HAC (Hierarchical Ascendant Classification) computation procedure: taking into account several variables, the statistical HAC method groups individuals based on their resemblance. Also in this study, calibrated Total Count channel (TCm) is compared to an estimated dose rate (TCe) computed from the measured radioelement abundances: TCe = 13.078 * K + 5.675 * U + 2.494 * Th. Our results show that the ratio TCe/TCm came out to be a good indicator of ground property changes within Sologne mixed sandy-clay environment. Processed geophysical data are cross-checked with geological data (from field observations) and field or laboratory measurements of mineralogical data

  3. Gravity-dependent signal path variation in a large VLBI telescope modelled with a combination of surveying methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, C.; Vittuari, L.

    2009-11-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) antenna in Medicina (Italy) is a 32-m AZ-EL mount that was surveyed several times, adopting an indirect method, for the purpose of estimating the eccentricity vector between the co-located VLBI and Global Positioning System instruments. In order to fulfill this task, targets were located in different parts of the telescope’s structure. Triangulation and trilateration on the targets highlight a consistent amount of deformation that biases the estimate of the instrument’s reference point up to 1 cm, depending on the targets’ locations. Therefore, whenever the estimation of accurate local ties is needed, it is critical to take into consideration the action of gravity on the structure. Furthermore, deformations induced by gravity on VLBI telescopes may modify the length of the path travelled by the incoming radio signal to a non-negligible extent. As a consequence, differently from what it is usually assumed, the relative distance of the feed horn’s phase centre with respect to the elevation axis may vary, depending on the telescope’s pointing elevation. The Medicina telescope’s signal path variation Δ L increases by a magnitude of approximately 2 cm, as the pointing elevation changes from horizon to zenith; it is described by an elevation-dependent second-order polynomial function computed as, according to Clark and Thomsen (Techical report, 100696, NASA, Greenbelt, 1988), a linear combination of three terms: receiver displacement Δ R, primary reflector’s vertex displacement Δ V and focal length variations Δ F. Δ L was investigated with a combination of terrestrial triangulation and trilateration, laser scanning and a finite element model of the antenna. The antenna gain (or auto-focus curve) Δ G is routinely determined through astronomical observations. A surprisingly accurate reproduction of Δ G can be obtained with a combination of Δ V, Δ F and Δ R.

  4. Extensive 1-year survey of trace elements and compounds in the airborne suspended particulate matter in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Antoine, A. C.; Leibecki, H. F.; Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Concentrations of 75 chemical constituents in the airborne particulate matter were measured in Cleveland, Ohio, during 1971 and 1972. Values covering a 1-year period (45 to 50 sampling days) at each of 16 sites are presented for 60 elements. A lesser number of values is given for sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, acidity, 10 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, and the aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds as a group. Methods used included instrumental neutron activation, emission spectroscopy, gas chromatography, combustion techniques, and colorimetry. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, the analysis methods, the use of several analytical facilities, and samples with concentrations below the detection limits are evaluated in detail. The data is discussed in relation to other studies and source origins. The trace constituent concentrations as a function of wind direction are used to suggest a practical method for air pollution source identification.

  5. Using Airborne and Ground Electromagnetic Surveys and DC Resistivity Surveys to Delineate a Plume of Conductive Water at an In-Channel Coalbed Methane Produced Water Impoundment Near the Powder River, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, B. A.; Harbert, W.; Hammack, R.; Sams, J.; Veloski, G.; Smith, B. D.

    2004-12-01

    Development of coal bed methane (CBM) in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana has significantly increased since 1997. Production of CBM involves withdrawing groundwater from the coal bed to lower the hydrostatic pressure thereby allowing methane to desorb from the coal. The water co-produced with CBM is managed by storing it in impoundments until it can infiltrate to the groundwater, be used for beneficial purposes, or be discharged to surface streams. Skewed Reservoir was constructed as a research site to evaluate disposal of CBM water through infiltration ponds constructed by damming ephemeral streams. Geochemical data collected from monitoring wells placed downgradient of the reservoir detected a plume of water with total dissolved solids concentrations an order of magnitude higher than the CBM water stored in the impoundment. Infiltrating CBM water is suspected to have dissolved salts that were present in the unconsolidated materials beneath the reservoir. A geophysical investigation of the Skewed Reservoir area was conducted in July of 2004 to map the horizontal and vertical extent of the plume and to possibly identify the source of solutes to the infiltrating water. The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory contracted Fugro Airborne Surveys to fly their RESOLVE frequency domain airborne electromagnetic (AEM) system with 50-m line spacing at the site. A ground investigation was completed at the same time as the airborne survey. Five 2-D dipole-dipole resistivity surveys and one 3-D pole-dipole survey were conducted using the AGI SuperSting R8/IP multi-channel resistivity imaging system. Additionally, ground conductivity measurements were recorded along each resistivity line using a Geophex GEM-2 multi-frequency ground conductivity meter. All geoelectrical measurements were inverted to obtain the subsurface conductivity distribution. Inversions were constrained using results of downhole borehole induction logs. Results were

  6. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  7. Initial results of the 2011 Geoid Slope Validation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA), National Geodetic Survey (NGS) has embarked on a ten year project called GRAV-D (Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum).The purpose of this project is to replace the current official vertical datum, NAVD 88 (the North American Vertical Datum of 1988) with a geopotential reference system based on a new survey of the gravity field and a gravimetric geoid. As part of GRAV-D, NGS plans to execute a set of "geoid validation surveys" at various locations of the country.These will be surveys designed to independently measure the geoid to provide a check against both the data and theory used to create the final gravimetric geoid which will be used in the geopotential reference system. The first of these surveys, known as the Geoid Slope Validation Survey of 2011 (GSVS11) was executed between July and October, 2011 in the west central region of Texas.The survey took place over a 330 kilometer line running more or less north-south from Austin to Corpus Christi, Texas.Measurements were taken at 220 marks (one per mile) and included static GPS, RTN GPS, geodetic leveling, astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical using the Swiss DIADEM camera, absolute gravity, gravity gradients and LIDAR.This region was chosen for many factors including the availability of GRAV-D airborne gravity over the area, its relatively low elevation (220 meter orthometric height max), its geoid slope (about 130 cm over 300 km), lack of significant topographic relief, lack of large forestation, availability of good roads, clarity of weather and lack of large water crossings. This talk will outline the initial results of the survey, specifically the comparison of various geoid slopes over this region:gravimetric geoid models (with and without airborne gravity), minimally constrained GPS and leveling and from astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical.

  8. Advances and Best Practices in Airborne Gravimetry from the U.S. GRAV-D Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Theresa; Childers, Vicki; Preaux, Sandra; Holmes, Simon; Weil, Carly

    2013-04-01

    The Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project, an official policy of the U.S. National Geodetic Survey as of 2007, is working to survey the entire U.S. and its holdings with high-altitude airborne gravimetry. The goal of the project is to provide a consistent, high-quality gravity dataset that will become the cornerstone of a new gravimetric geoid and national vertical datum in 2022. Over the last five years, the GRAV-D project has surveyed more than 25% of the country, accomplishing almost 500 flights on six different aircraft platforms and producing more than 3.7 Million square km of data thus far. This wealth of experience has led to advances in the collection, processing, and evaluation of high-altitude (20,000 - 35,000 ft) airborne gravity data. This presentation will highlight the most important practical and theoretical advances of the GRAV-D project, giving an introduction to each. Examples of innovation include: 1. Use of navigation grade inertial measurement unit data and precise lever arm measurements for positioning; 2. New quality control tests and software for near real-time analysis of data in the field; 3. Increased accuracy of gravity post-processing by reexamining assumptions and simplifications that were inconsistent with a goal of 1 mGal precision; and 4. Better final data evaluation through crossovers, additional statistics, and inclusion of airborne data into harmonic models that use EGM08 as a base model. The increases in data quality that resulted from implementation of the above advances (and others) will be shown with a case study of the GRAV-D 2008 southern Alaska survey near Anchorage, over Cook Inlet. The case study's statistics and comparisons to global models illustrate the impact that these advances have had on the final airborne gravity data quality. Finally, the presentation will summarize the best practices identified by the project from its last five years of experience.

  9. A Flight Test of the Strapdown Airborne Gravimeter SGA-WZ in Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Forsberg, René; Wu, Meiping; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Zhang, Kaidong; Cao, Juliang

    2015-01-01

    An airborne gravimeter is one of the most important tools for gravity data collection over large areas with mGal accuracy and a spatial resolution of several kilometers. In August 2012, a flight test was carried out to determine the feasibility and to assess the accuracy of the new Chinese SGA-WZ strapdown airborne gravimeter in Greenland, in an area with good gravity coverage from earlier marine and airborne surveys. An overview of this new system SGA-WZ is given, including system design, sensor performance and data processing. The processing of the SGA-WZ includes a 160 s length finite impulse response filter, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 6 km. For the primary repeated line, a mean r.m.s. deviation of the differences was less than 1.5 mGal, with the error estimate confirmed from ground truth data. This implies that the SGA-WZ could meet standard geophysical survey requirements at the 1 mGal level. PMID:26057039

  10. A Flight Test of the Strapdown Airborne Gravimeter SGA-WZ in Greenland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Forsberg, René; Wu, Meiping; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Zhang, Kaidong; Cao, Juliang

    2015-01-01

    An airborne gravimeter is one of the most important tools for gravity data collection over large areas with mGal accuracy and a spatial resolution of several kilometers. In August 2012, a flight test was carried out to determine the feasibility and to assess the accuracy of the new Chinese SGA-WZ strapdown airborne gravimeter in Greenland, in an area with good gravity coverage from earlier marine and airborne surveys. An overview of this new system SGA-WZ is given, including system design, sensor performance and data processing. The processing of the SGA-WZ includes a 160 s length finite impulse response filter, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 6 km. For the primary repeated line, a mean r.m.s. deviation of the differences was less than 1.5 mGal, with the error estimate confirmed from ground truth data. This implies that the SGA-WZ could meet standard geophysical survey requirements at the 1 mGal level. PMID:26057039

  11. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  12. Airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-06-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  13. Gravity and Magnetic Survey of the Oaxaca-Juarez Terrane Boundary (Oaxaca Fault), Southern Mexico: Evidence for three Half Grabens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Belmonte-Jimenez, S. I.; Ortega-Gutierrez, F.; Keppie-Moorhouse, J. D.; Martinez-Silva, J.; Martinez-Serrano, R.

    2007-05-01

    A geophysical survey of the Oaxaca Fault boundary between the Oaxaca (Oaxaquia) (Zapoteco) and Juarez (Cuicateco) terranes along the Etla and Zaachila valleys area, southern Mexico shows a series of NW-SE Bouguer and magnetic anomalies with stronger gradients towards the east. The basement from the Oaxaca terrane has a high density (2.8 gr/cm3 ) and magnetic susceptibility of up to 0.0051 cgs units, which contrast with the Juarez basement that has a lower density (2.67 gr/cm3) and a higher magnetic susceptibility (values ranging between 0.0025 to 0.0045 cgs units). The magnetic susceptibility is similar south of the Donaji fault. Interpretation of six combined gravity and magnetic NE-SW profiles perpendicular to the valleys indicates the presence of a composite depression comprising three N-S sub-basins with the Etla and Zachila sub-basins located at the northern and southern portions, respectively, separated by a third sub-basin relatively displaced westwards. They are bounded on the east by the steeply W-dipping Oaxaca master fault, and on the west by the gently E-dipping Huitzo-Zimatlan fault. Two interpretations are suggested for the southward continuation of the Oaxaca Fault: 1) it continues southwards at depth with the same strike. Together the Bouguer and total field magnetic anomalies suggest that the Oaxaca fault is continuous from Etla via Oaxaca City and Ocotlán de Morelos probably to Miahuatlán de Porfirio Díaz, and 2) it continues with the same strike but is displaced eastwards ~20 km along a sinistral transfer fault, which forms the northern boundary of the Zaachila sub-basin.

  14. Estimating and interpretation of radioactive heat production using airborne gamma-ray survey data of Gabal Arrubushi area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mohamed A. S.

    2016-02-01

    The present work deals with mapping of radioactive heat production from rocks in the Gabal Arrubushi area in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt based on airborne spectral gamma-ray survey data. The results show that the radioactive heat production in the areas ranges from 0.01 μWm-3 to 5.2 μWm-3. Granites, muscovite and sericite schists in the western part of Gabal Arrubushi area have abnormally high radioactive heat production values from 2.57 μWm-3 to 4.44 μWm-3. Meanwhile, the higher averages of radioactive heat production of these rock units change from 1.21 μWm-3 to 1.5 μWm-3. The intermediate averages of heat production of felsitic mylonite schist, chlorite schist, felsites, amphibolites and Hammamat sediments are below the crustal average value range, i.e., from 0.8 μWm-3 to 1.2 μWm-3. The lowest averages of heat production values are less than 0.8 μWm-3 and found in the following rock units: Wadi sediments, rhyolites, andesites, gabbro and serpentinites.

  15. Comparison of ground-based measurements of natural radiation to airborne radiation survey data on transects from coastal California to the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffer, P. W.; Hernández, L.; Messina, P.; Dearaujo, J.; Li, A.; Hicks, A.; White, L.

    2008-12-01

    Natural gamma radiation measurements were collected with a hand-held Geiger counter at nearly 400 locations on two general transects across the southwestern United States. The data are used to provide ground-truth comparison to published airborne radiation surveys of the region. The first transect was collected by high school students in the SF-ROCKS program at San Francisco State University in the summer of 2008 starting in San Francisco. Data were collected across the Sierra Nevada Range on I-80, and across Highway 50 in Nevada, and I-70 in Utah. Data were collected in and around Great Basin, Arches, Capitol Reef, Bryce, and Zion National Parks, and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. A second transect extends from San José, California to Flagstaff, Arizona and includes the Mojave National Reserve, Death Valley region, and locations throughout the Navajo Reservation region in northern Arizona and western New Mexico. Radiation data (with GPS reference) were collected from all the major sedimentary rock formations and igneous rocks of the Colorado Plateau and from many igneous and metamorphic rocks throughout the Great Basin and southern California deserts. Anomalously high localized levels were noted in selected sedimentary units associated with uranium exploration targets in the Colorado Plateau region, and in caverns and rock fissures where radon gas (and accumulation of derivative fission products) are the inferred sources.

  16. Assessing modern ground survey methods and airborne laser scanning for digital terrain modelling: A case study from the Lake District, England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallay, Michal; Lloyd, Christopher D.; McKinley, Jennifer; Barry, Lorraine

    2013-02-01

    This paper compares the applicability of three ground survey methods for modelling terrain: one man electronic tachymetry (TPS), real time kinematic GPS (GPS), and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Vertical accuracy of digital terrain models (DTMs) derived from GPS, TLS and airborne laser scanning (ALS) data is assessed. Point elevations acquired by the four methods represent two sections of a mountainous area in Cumbria, England. They were chosen so that the presence of non-terrain features is constrained to the smallest amount. The vertical accuracy of the DTMs was addressed by subtracting each DTM from TPS point elevations. The error was assessed using exploratory measures including statistics, histograms, and normal probability plots. The results showed that the internal measurement accuracy of TPS, GPS, and TLS was below a centimetre. TPS and GPS can be considered equally applicable alternatives for sampling the terrain in areas accessible on foot. The highest DTM vertical accuracy was achieved with GPS data, both on sloped terrain (RMSE 0.16 m) and flat terrain (RMSE 0.02 m). TLS surveying was the most efficient overall but veracity of terrain representation was subject to dense vegetation cover. Therefore, the DTM accuracy was the lowest for the sloped area with dense bracken (RMSE 0.52 m) although it was the second highest on the flat unobscured terrain (RMSE 0.07 m). ALS data represented the sloped terrain more realistically (RMSE 0.23 m) than the TLS. However, due to a systematic bias identified on the flat terrain the DTM accuracy was the lowest (RMSE 0.29 m) which was above the level stated by the data provider. Error distribution models were more closely approximated by normal distribution defined using median and normalized median absolute deviation which supports the use of the robust measures in DEM error modelling and its propagation.

  17. Airborne geophysical surveys in the north-central region of Goias (Brazil): implications for radiometric characterization of tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Suze Nei P; Hamza, Valiya M; da Silva, Joney Justo

    2013-02-01

    Progress obtained in analysis aerogammaspectrometric and aeromagnetic survey data for the north-central region of the state of Goias (Brazil) are presented. The results obtained have allowed not only determination of the abundances of naturally radioactive elements but also new insights into the processes that determine the radiometric characteristics of the main soil types. There are indications that the radioelement abundances of soils are not only related to their physical properties, but also chemical characteristics of source rocks from which they are derived. For example, oxisol soils derived from the felsic source rocks of the Mara Rosa and Green stone belts have equivalent uranium (eU) values higher than 1.7 ppm, while those derived from source rocks of the relatively more basic Uruaçu Group and sediment sequences of Proterozoic age are characterized by eU contents of less than 1 ppm. Oxisol soils of the Median massif, ultisol soils of the Paranoá, Canastra and Araxá Groups, cambisol soils of the Araí Group and plintosol soils of the Bambuí Group constitute an intermediate class with eU contents in the range of 1-1.3 ppm. Equivalent thorium abundances of soil types display similar trends, the range of variation being 4-16 ppm. Potassium abundances on the other hand are rather uniform with values in the range of 1-1.3%, the only exception being the sedimentary sequences of Proterozoic age, which has a mean value of 0.7%. These observations have been considered as indicative of characteristic features of tropical soils in the study area. In this context, we point out the possibility of using results of aerogammaspectrometry surveys as a convenient complementary tool in identifying geochemical zoning of soils in tropical environments. The ratios of eU/K are found to fall in the range of 1-1.7, which is typical of common soils. The ratios of eTh/K exhibit a relatively wide interval, with values in the range of 4-16. The ratios of eTh/eU are found to have

  18. Gravity gradiometry developments at Lockheed Martin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difrancesco, D.

    2003-04-01

    Lockheed Martin has developed and fielded multiple configurations of the rotating accelerometer gravity gradiometer instrument. Applications for both static and moving-base measurements have been demonstrated for a variety of scenarios, including vehicle navigation, hydrocarbon exploration, mineral exploration, reservoir monitoring, underground void detection and treaty monitoring and compliance. The most recent systems built by Lockheed Martin extend the performance range of the early 4-accelerometer gradiometers by adding a second complement of four accelerometers. This achieves the benefit of lower instrument noise and improved frequency response (wider bandwidth) for stringent application scenarios. A summary of the gradiometer development history, functional concepts, instrument and system operation, and demonstrated performance will be presented. Development Background The U. S. Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL; now AFRL) instituted a program in 1982 to develop and field a moving base gradiometer system that could be used both on land and in the air. The result was the Gravity Gradiometer Survey System (GGSS) which first demonstrated the ability to make airborne gravity gradient measurements in 1987 (Jekeli, 1988). At the same time, the U.S. Navy began development of the Gravity Sensors System (GSS) for use on the Fleet Ballistic Submarine Trident II navigation subsystem. This military background paved the way for commercial uses of gravity gradiometry. Both the GSS and GGSS employed a first generation gravity gradiometer instrument (GGI), which was comprised of four accelerometers mounted on a rotating disk. The details of the GGI operation are further described in the work by Gerber and Hofmeyer (Gerber, 1978 and Hofmeyer, 1994). Recent Advancements in Gradiometer Instrumentation With the instrumentation experience gained through such programs as GSS and GGSS, Lockheed Martin embarked upon an ambitious effort in the early 1990's to further improve the

  19. Airborne laser topographic mapping results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Collins, J. G.; Link, L. E.; Swift, R. N.; Butler, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of terrain mapping experiments utilizing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) over forested areas are presented. The flight tests were conducted as part of a joint NASA/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (CE) investigation aimed at evaluating the potential of an airborne laser ranging system to provide cross-sectional topographic data on flood plains that are difficult and expensive to survey using conventional techniques. The data described in this paper were obtained in the Wolf River Basin located near Memphis, TN. Results from surveys conducted under winter 'leaves off' and summer 'leaves on' conditions, aspects of day and night operation, and data obtained from decidous and coniferous tree types are compared. Data processing techniques are reviewed. Conclusions relative to accuracy and present limitations of the AOL, and airborne lidar systems in general, to terrain mapping over forested areas are discussed.

  20. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Durango A, B, C, and D, Colorado. Volume I. Detail area. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the Durango A, Durango B, Durango C, and Durango D Detail Areas of southwestern Colorado. The Durango A Detail Area is within the coverage of the Needle Mountains and Silverton 15' map sheets, and the Pole Creek Mountain, Rio Grande Pyramid, Emerald Lake, Granite Peak, Vallecito Reservoir, and Lemon Reservoir 7.5' map sheets of the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS). The Durango B Detail Area is within the coverage of the Silverton 15' map sheet and the Wetterhorn Peak, Uncompahgre Peak, Lake City, Redcloud Peak, Lake San Cristobal, Pole Creek Mountain, and Finger Mesa 7.5' map sheets of the NTMS. The Durango C Detail Area is within the coverage of the Platoro and Wolf Creek Pass 15' map sheets of the NTMS. The Durango D Detail Area is within the coverage of the Granite Lake, Cimarrona Peak, Bear Mountain, and Oakbrush Ridge 7.5' map sheets of the NTMS. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, gridded, and contoured to produce maps of the radiometric variables, uranium, potassium, and thorium; their ratios; and the residual magnetic field. These maps have been analyzed in order to produce a multi-variant analysis contour map based on the radiometric response of the individual geological units. A geochemical analysis has been performed, using the radiometric and magnetic contour maps, the multi-variant analysis map, and factor analysis techniques, to produce a geochemical analysis map for the area.

  1. Identification of subsurface brines in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, via an airborne EM resistivity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, N.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Auken, E.; Schamper, C.; Dugan, H. A.; Mikucki, J.; Virginia, R. A.; Doran, P. T.

    2015-12-01

    We used a helicopter-borne time domain electromagnetic resistivity survey to detect and map hypersaline brines beneath glaciers and permafrost in the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV). In the MDV, a substantially ice-free region of coastal Antarctica, liquid water is present at the surface only in summer streams, ice-covered lakes with brackish to hypersaline bottom waters, and at Blood Falls, a hypersaline discharge from Taylor Glacier. Beneath the surface, however, water can remain liquid at temperatures below 0 °C (and therefore at unexpectedly shallow depths) as a hypersaline brine. These brines, which are measured as zones of low resistivity in an otherwise high resistivity environment, are widespread in Taylor Valley, where they may connect lakes, subglacial waters, and the ocean. By using surface landscape characteristics - such as the presence of lakes, glaciers, or bare ground - we are able to compare changes in resistivity with depth. We find that in areas of surface permafrost (most of the MDV) there is a marked shift to low resistivity material around 200 m below the surface. At lakes, the stratified nature of their waters is detectable and sufficiently large lakes create taliks (unfrozen 'holes' in permafrost) that penetrate to the low resistivity zone around 200 m depth, suggesting connectivity through a regional aquifer. Underneath Taylor Glacier, we detect similar brines, which are the probable source for Blood Falls. These subglacial brines extend from the snout of Taylor Glacier (where they appear to connect to the hypersaline waters of West Lake Bonney) to the limit of our detection ability several kilometers up glacier where the ice became too thick for measurements. Our measurements are consistent with limited drilling done in the MDV during the 1970s and radar measurements taken more recently on Taylor Glacier. The transition to low resistivity at ~200 m depth occurs over a temperature range measured in boreholes of about -10 to -5 °C, which is

  2. Recent Advancements in Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometry for Resource Exploration: A Case study from West Africa - Birmian Greenstone Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, J.; Mataragio, J.

    2014-12-01

    Over the years significant progress has been made in understanding the regional geologic models of the Greenstone Belts associated with gold mineralization in the fields of exploration geochemistry, geophysics and data integration. Improved knowledge of the geological models together with advancements in exploration techniques have resulted in the discovery of many near surface, and relatively large gold mines around the world such as the Abitibi, Isua, Barberton, Lake Victoria, Sadiola, and Yatela. However, the search for new deposits becomes more difficult due to the fact that most easily detectable, near surface deposits have been discovered. Many of the remaining deposits tend to be remotely located and deep underground. Effective exploration for new economically viable deposits requires approaches that integrate multiple techniques capable of resolving smaller, deeper and remotely located resources. Gravity surveys have been widely used to map and define geometry and structure of greenstones belts at a regional scale. Structure and hydrothermally altered zones can be mapped, either directly by gravity in weathered environments or inferred in terrains where geological units of different density are offset and/or altered Gravity gradiometry is increasingly becoming a standard method of commercial minerals exploration. Gradiometry presents a significant increase in spatial resolution when compared to previous airborne gravity methods. Airborne full tensor gravity gradiometry surveys have been flown in the past for prospect-level gold exploration in Quebec, Nunavut, Nevada, Brazil, Mali, Zambia and New Zealand and Nevada. The application of airborne gravity gradiometry for prospect-level gold exploration over greenstone belts is discussed in this paper. The high resolution system capability to detect small, high frequency targets is the key for successful results. In addition, this paper presents and discusses data enhancement and 3D inversion results. It is

  3. Implications of a Gravity Survey for the Formation Mechanisms and Stage of Evolution of Topographic (Stealth) Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Stofan, E. R.

    2001-01-01

    Gravity/topography admittance spectra for 34 topographic (stealth) coronae show a range of bottom and top loading signatures. Here we interpret these loading signatures in the context of possible models of their formation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Modeling Gravity Data From a Recent (2009-2010) Survey Across the Border Ranges Fault System, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankhemthong, N.; Doser, D. I.; Baker, M. R.; Kaip, G. M.; Eslick, B. E.; Jones, S.

    2010-12-01

    We have collected ~1,000 gravity observations within the Anchorage and Kenai Peninsula regions to better determine the structural geometry of the Border Ranges fault system (BRFS). The BRFS is characterized by a strong gradient between the deep low (~-130 mGal) of the Cook Inlet Basin and the gravity high of -10 mGal associated with the western range front of the Chugach Mountains. On the Kenai Peninsula the gravity field remains high across the Chugach Mountains, but in the Anchorage region it decreases, possibly due to the presence of the Eagle River thrust sheet. We have begun 2.5-D forward modeling of the combined new and existing gravity data using densities constrained by density logs, hand samples, seismic velocities and Nettleton’s density inversion method. Our preliminary results suggest the main fault of the BRFS dips steeply (60 to 70 degrees) toward the west. Many subsidiary buried faults are also apparent. Our ultimate goal is to test several plausible models of structure along the BRFS by implementing a novel 3-D inversion scheme that directly models known geology, and revises a priori uncertainties on the geologic model to let us compare alternative interpretations.

  5. Airborne Sodium and Rayleigh Lidar Observations from ALOHA-90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetler, Chris A.; Gardner, Chester S.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne Na and Rayleigh lidar observations from the Airborne Lidar and Observations of Hawaiian Airglow Campaign (ALOHA-90) campaign are described. We present gravity wave vertical and horizontal wave number spectra from the upper stratosphere and the upper mesosphere. Also, we document the occurrence of a large amplitude short horizontal scale quasi-monochromatic gravity wave event and discuss the implications of the event in light of recently developed gravity wave horizontal wave number spectra models. Finally, we discuss observations of sporadic Na layer events.

  6. World Gravity Map (WGM) Project: Objectives and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalot, S.; Briais, A.; Peyrefitte, A.; Biancale, R.; Gabalda, G.; Moreaux, G.; Sarrailh, M.; Fayard, T.

    2009-12-01

    The WGM project is a gravity mapping project undertaken under the aegis of the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW) to complement a set of global geological and geophysical digital maps published and updated by CGMW, such as the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM), released in 2007. This new global digital map aims to provide a high-resolution picture of the gravity anomalies of the world (free-air and topography-corrected Bouguer) based on the available information on the Earth gravity field, with the final objective to contribute to research and educational projects. The WGM project is conducted by the International Gravimetric Bureau (IGB), a center of the International Gravity Field Service (IGFS) of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), with the support of the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Major contributions to the WGM are provided by the EGM08 global model, recently released by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA, USA), as well as the new global marine gravity fields derived from satellite altimetry (DNSC08 computed at the Danish National Space Center, and V18.1 computed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography). The WGM also aims to improve the gravity anomalies at regional scale, using available products from recent regional compilations of land, marine and airborne surveys (possibly derived from BGI or other global or regional databases). As other geophysical maps published by CGMW, the WGM maps and digital products should be regularly updated according to the incoming gravity datasets. We present here the current status of the WGM project.

  7. Close-range airborne Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry for high-resolution beach morphometric surveys: Examples from an embayed rotating beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Fleury, Jules; Anthony, Edward J.; Gardel, Antoine; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The field of photogrammetry has seen significant new developments essentially related to the emergence of new computer-based applications that have fostered the growth of the workflow technique called Structure-from-Motion (SfM). Low-cost, user-friendly SfM photogrammetry offers interesting new perspectives in coastal and other fields of geomorphology requiring high-resolution topographic data. The technique enables the construction of topographic products such as digital surface models (DSMs) and orthophotographs, and combines the advantages of the reproducibility of GPS surveys and the high density and accuracy of airborne LiDAR, but at very advantageous cost compared to the latter. Three SfM-based photogrammetric experiments were conducted on the embayed beach of Montjoly in Cayenne, French Guiana, between October 2013 and 2014, in order to map morphological changes and quantify sediment budgets. The beach is affected by a process of rotation induced by the alongshore migration of mud banks from the mouths of the Amazon River that generate spatial and temporal changes in wave refraction and incident wave angles, thus generating the reversals in longshore drift that characterise this process. Sub-vertical aerial photographs of the beach were acquired from a microlight aircraft that flew alongshore at low elevation (275 m). The flight plan included several parallel flight axes with an overlap of 85% between pictures in the lengthwise direction and 50% between paths. Targets of 40 × 40 cm, georeferenced by RTK-DGPS, were placed on the beach, spaced 100 m apart. These targets served in optimizing the model and in producing georeferenced 3D products. RTK-GPS measurements of random points and cross-shore profiles were used to validate the photogrammetry results and assess their accuracy. We produced dense point clouds with 150 to 200 points/m², from which we generated DSMs and orthophotos with respective resolutions of 10 cm and 5 cm. Compared to the GPS control

  8. High-resolution digital elevation model of lower Cowlitz and Toutle Rivers, adjacent to Mount St. Helens, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of October 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the Toutle River basin, which drains the northern and western flanks of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and lower Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, continues to monitor and mitigate excess sediment in North and South Fork Toutle River basins to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From October 22–27, 2007, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 273 square kilometers (105 square miles) of lower Cowlitz and Toutle River tributaries from the Columbia River at Kelso, Washington, to upper North Fork Toutle River (below the volcano's edifice), including lower South Fork Toutle River. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at

  9. High-resolution digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens crater and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the North Fork Toutle River basin, which drains the northern flank of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, built a sediment retention structure on the North Fork Toutle River in 1989 to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From September 16–20, 2009, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 214 square kilometers (83 square miles) of Mount St. Helens and the upper North Fork Toutle River basin from the sediment retention structure to the volcano's crater. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at Castle, Coldwater, and Spirit Lakes. Final results averaged about five laser last

  10. Spectral Correlation of Antarctic Satellite Magnetic and Gravity Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, S. B.; von Frese, R. R.; Kim, H.; Potts, L.; Kim, J.; Gaya-Pique, L. R.

    2005-05-01

    Large areas of the Antarctic continent lack terrestrial or airborne magnetic and gravity survey coverage due to the harsh climate and extended distances involved. Satellite missions therefore play an important role, often being the only source of information for the study of remote regions. NASA's GRACE satellite mission provides global-scale gravity measurements with a much higher spatial resolution than previous missions. The free-air gravity anomalies in Antarctica from GRACE offer new insights on the poorly understood Antarctic crust. New interpretations and candidates for further investigation are presented from spectral correlation analysis between the new GRACE free-air gravity anomalies and magnetic anomalies measured by the CHAMP and Ørsted satellites. We quantify the anomaly correlations using correlation filters based on Poisson's relation. Favorability indices are derived that highlight the positive and negative correlations between the satellite observed geopotential anomalies. Several positively and negatively correlated regional anomalies yield new insights on the enigmatic crustal tectonics of Queen Maud Land, Enderby Land and other regions of East Antarctica, and the West Antarctic Peninsula.

  11. Porous gravity currents: A survey to determine the joint influence of fluid rheology and variations of medium properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciriello, Valentina; Longo, Sandro; Chiapponi, Luca; Di Federico, Vittorio

    2016-06-01

    We develop a model to grasp the combined effect of rheology and spatial stratifications on two-dimensional non-Newtonian gravity-driven flow in porous media. We consider a power-law constitutive equation for the fluid, and a monomial variation of permeability and porosity along the vertical direction (transverse to the flow) or horizontal direction (parallel to the flow). Under these assumptions, similarity solutions are derived in semi-analytical form for thin gravity currents injected into a two-dimensional porous medium and having constant or time-varying volume. The extent and shape of the porous domain affected by the injection is significantly influenced by the interplay of model parameters. These describe the fluid (flow behaviour index n), the spatial heterogeneity (coefficients β, γ, δ, ω for variations of permeability and porosity in the horizontal or vertical direction), and the type of release (volume exponent α). Theoretical results are validated against two sets of experiments with α = 1 (constant inflow) conducted with a stratified porous medium (simulated by superimposing layers of glass beads of different diameter) and a Hele-Shaw analogue for power-law fluid flow, respectively. In the latter case, a recently established Hele-Shaw analogy is extended to the variation of properties parallel to the flow direction. Comparison with experimental results shows that the proposed model is able to capture the propagation of the current front and the current profile.

  12. From Germany to Antarctica: Airborne geodesy and geophysics and the utilization of the research aircraft HALO (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinert, M.; Barthelmes, F.; Foerste, C.; Heyde, I.

    2013-12-01

    The geoid as an equipotential surface of the gravity potential plays a crucial role for the realiziation of the Global Geodetic Observation System (GGOS) of IAG (International Association of Geodesy). It is the major reference surface for physical height systems. The gravity potential is needed to precisely predict the orbits of artificial satellites of the earth. A precise static solution enters analyses of temporal changes of the gravity field due to mass transport processes between the different subsystems of the earth. However, also in neighbouring disciplines the geoid is applied. In oceanography, for example, the geoid serves as a reference surface for the determination of the mean sea-surface topography (MSST). In glaciology, it enters analyses of the thickness of ice bodies floating in polar waters, based on freeboard heights and the equilibrium supposition. To come up with high resolution global gravity field models, satellite observations - preferably of the dedicated satellite gravity missions - have to be combined with surface gravity data. Although the majority of the continental surface is captured by ground-based or near-surface gravity measurements - and gravity over the oceans is determined by satellite altimetry - still large gaps in surface gravity data exist. In this respect it is the Antarctic continent which suffers large data gaps, not only in surface gravity but also due to the polar gap of GOCE satellite gravimetry. Chairing the IAG Subcommission 2.4f 'Gravity and Geoid in Antarctica' (AntGG) the author will discuss the current status of gravity surveys in Antarctica. Especially airborne gravimetry has been and is being widely applied as the only reasonable method to survey large areas in this vast and hostile environment. As a novel application the German research aircraft HALO was utilized for a geodetic-geophysical flight mission. Measurements were realized to acquire data of the gravity and magnetic fields, of GNSS remote sensing and of

  13. Integrated magnetic, gravity, and GPR surveys to locate the probable source of hydrocarbon contamination in Sharm El-Sheikh area, south Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsy, Mona; Rashed, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Sharm El-Sheikh waters were suddenly hit by hydrocarbon spills which created a serious threat to the prosperous tourism industry in and around the city. Analysis of soil samples, water samples, and seabed samples collected in and around the contaminated bay area showed anomalous levels of hydrocarbons. An integrated geophysical investigation, using magnetic, gravity, and ground penetrating radar geophysical tools, was conducted in the headland overlooking the contaminated bay in order to delineate the possible subsurface source of contamination. The results of the geophysical investigations revealed three underground manmade reinforced concrete tanks and a complicated network of buried steel pipes in addition to other unidentified buried objects. The depths and dimensions of the discovered objects were determined. Geophysical investigations also revealed the presence of a north-south oblique slip fault running through the eastern part of the studied area. Excavations, conducted later on, confirmed the presence of one of the tanks delineated by the geophysical surveys.

  14. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  15. Understanding the thermal and tectonic evolution of Marie Byrd Land from a reanalysis of airborne geophysical data in the West Antarctic Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartini, E.; Powell, E. M.; Richter, T.; Damiani, T.; Burris, S. G.; Young, D. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) is a region characterized by a significant topographic range, a complex tectonic history, and active subglacial volcanism. Those elements exert a large influence on the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, which flows within the cradle-shaped rift system and is currently grounded well below sea level. This potentially unstable configuration is the motivation for gaining a better understanding of the ice sheet boundary conditions dictated by rift evolution and how they impact the ice flow. In this study we focus on characterizing the distribution of and transition between sedimentary basins and inferred geothermal heat flux from the flanks to the floor of the rift system. We do so through analysis of gravity data both for sources within the deep lithosphere and near surface targets in the crust. A compilation of gravity datasets over West and Central Antarctica and the analysis thereof is presented. In particular we use gravity data collected during several airborne geophysical surveys: CASERTZ (1994-1997), SOAR/WMB (1997-1998), AGASEA (2004-2005), ICEBRIDGE (2008-2011), and GIMBLE (2012-2013). New processing and data reduction methodologies are applied to the older gravity surveys to improve the high frequency signal content and to make these surveys compatible with modern works (i.e. AGASEA, ICEBRIDGE, GIMBLE). The high frequency signal provides better resolution of small-scale features within survey blocks but long-wavelength integrity is retained by registering the airborne free-air disturbance within those blocks to the gravity disturbance derived from the GOCE global satellite gravity field. This allows for consistent long wavelength interpretation across the merged surveys and provides improved gravity analysis of the deep lithosphere while retaining the capacity to study smaller scale features. A crustal model for the area is produced using the Bouguer anomaly and spectral analyses of the Bouguer anomaly and free

  16. Recent Advances in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Chaykov, Spasen

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in alternative gravitational theories. Although MOND remains the leading candidate among the alternative models, Conformal Gravity has been studied by Mannheim and O'Brien to solve the rotation curve problem without the need for dark matter. Recently, Mannheim, O'Brien and Chaykov have begun solving other gravitational questions in Conformal Gravity. In this presentation, we highlight the new work of Conformal Gravity's application to random motions of clusters (the original Zwicky problem), gravitational bending of light, gravitational lensing and a very recent survey of dwarf galaxy rotation curves. We will show in each case that Conformal Gravity can provide an accurate explanation and prediction of the data without the need for dark matter. Coupled with the fact that Conformal Gravity is a fully re-normalizable metric theory of gravity, these results help to push Conformal Gravity onto a competitive stage against other alternative models.

  17. The Lunar Scout Program: An international program to survey the Moon from orbit for geochemistry, mineralogy, imagery, geodesy, and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Donald A. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Lunar Scout Program was one of a series of attempts by NASA to develop and fly an orbiting mission to the moon to collect geochemical, geological, and gravity data. Predecessors included the Lunar Observer, the Lunar Geochemical Orbiter, and the Lunar Polar Orbiter - missions studied under the auspices of the Office of Space Science. The Lunar Scout Program, however, was an initiative of the Office of Exploration. It was begun in late 1991 and was transferred to the Office of Space Science after the Office of Exploration was disbanded in 1993. Most of the work was done by a small group of civil servants at the Johnson Space Center; other groups also responsible for mission planning included personnel from the Charles Stark Draper Laboratories, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Boeing, and Martin Marietta. The Lunar Scout Program failed to achieve new start funding in FY 93 and FY 94 as a result of budget downturns, the de-emphasis of the Space Exploration Initiative, and the fact that lunar science did not rate as high a priority as other planned planetary missions, and was cancelled. The work done on the Lunar Scout Program and other lunar orbiter studies, however, represents assets that will be useful in developing new approaches to lunar orbit science.

  18. The Lunar Scout Program: an international program to survey the Moon from orbit for geochemistry, mineralogy, imagery, geodesy, and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Donald A.

    1994-04-01

    The Lunar Scout Program was one of a series of attempts by NASA to develop and fly an orbiting mission to the moon to collect geochemical, geological, and gravity data. Predecessors included the Lunar Observer, the Lunar Geochemical Orbiter, and the Lunar Polar Orbiter - missions studied under the auspices of the Office of Space Science. The Lunar Scout Program, however, was an initiative of the Office of Exploration. It was begun in late 1991 and was transferred to the Office of Space Science after the Office of Exploration was disbanded in 1993. Most of the work was done by a small group of civil servants at the Johnson Space Center; other groups also responsible for mission planning included personnel from the Charles Stark Draper Laboratories, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Boeing, and Martin Marietta. The Lunar Scout Program failed to achieve new start funding in FY 93 and FY 94 as a result of budget downturns, the de-emphasis of the Space Exploration Initiative, and the fact that lunar science did not rate as high a priority as other planned planetary missions, and was cancelled. The work done on the Lunar Scout Program and other lunar orbiter studies, however, represents assets that will be useful in developing new approaches to lunar orbit science.

  19. Neotectonic implications by geophysical surveys of topographic features identified by Airborne Laser Scanning in the Neusiedlersee/Ferto area (Austria/Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timár, G.; Székely, B.; Zámolyi, A.; Houseman, G.; Stuart, G.; Grasemann, B.; Dombrádi, E.; Galsa, A.; Spahic, D.; Draganits, E.

    2009-04-01

    The area around the Lake Neudsiedlersee (Lake Fertő in Hungarian) was analysed to understand its neotectonic activity and gather possible explanations of the features of the topography and microtopography. The area consists of two, considerably different parts in terms of topography and geomorphology. The western and north-western shores of the lake are connected to the Leitha Mts., a low ridge (its relative height is about 300 meters) that connects the Alpine orogen in the SW with the Carpathians to NE bounded by active strike-slip faulting. In this part of the area, several outcrops were investigated, of which the one at St. Margarethen was systematically measured by multielectric sounding and GPR, and an other one at St. Georgen, north of Eisenstadt, was used for auxiliary data gathering. The eastern and southern shores, belonging to the Pannonian Basin, are mostly flatlands, parts of the Little Hungarian Plain with extremely low relief and no real natural drainage. The small variations of the surface altitude (less than ten meters), referred to as microtopography here, are due to elongated ridges and extremely shallow perennial or temporal playa lakes. In order to understand better the subsurface structure, a multimethod approach has been applied. Geophysical survey methods (vertical electric sounding, land seismics, gravity measurements) were carried out to describe the layer structure of this area, especially a zone, north of Illmitz, connected to interesting elements of microtopography. The identification of microtopographic features were carried out using high resolution digital elevation datasets, derived from Aerial Laser Scannings (ALS). Seismic measurements were carried out also in the lake itself to understand the structural geological settings of the lake bottom to the depth of ca. 50 meters. All of these measurements were made in the framework of a common student fieldwork of the Eötvös University, the University of Leeds and the University of

  20. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  1. The Subaru FMOS galaxy redshift survey (FastSound). IV. New constraint on gravity theory from redshift space distortions at z ˜ 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Teppei; Hikage, Chiaki; Totani, Tomonori; Tonegawa, Motonari; Okada, Hiroyuki; Glazebrook, Karl; Blake, Chris; Ferreira, Pedro G.; More, Surhud; Taruya, Atsushi; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Akiyama, Masayuki; Dalton, Gavin; Goto, Tomotsugu; Ishikawa, Takashi; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Matsubara, Takahiko; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Ohta, Kouji; Shimizu, Ikkoh; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Takato, Naruhisa; Tamura, Naoyuki; Yabe, Kiyoto; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    We measure the redshift-space correlation function from a spectroscopic sample of 2783 emission line galaxies from the FastSound survey. The survey, which uses the Subaru Telescope and covers a redshift range of 1.19 < z < 1.55, is the first cosmological study at such high redshifts. We detect clear anisotropy due to redshift-space distortions (RSD) both in the correlation function as a function of separations parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight and its quadrupole moment. RSD has been extensively used to test general relativity on cosmological scales at z < 1. Adopting a ΛCDM cosmology with the fixed expansion history and no velocity dispersion (σv = 0), and using the RSD measurements on scales above 8 h-1 Mpc, we obtain the first constraint on the growth rate at the redshift, f (z)σ8(z) = 0.482 ± 0.116 at z ˜ 1.4 after marginalizing over the galaxy bias parameter b(z)σ8(z). This corresponds to 4.2 σ detection of RSD. Our constraint is consistent with the prediction of general relativity fσ8 ˜ 0.392 within the 1 σ confidence level. When we allow σv to vary and marginalize over it, the growth rate constraint becomes fσ _8=0.494^{+0.126}_{-0.120}. We also demonstrate that by combining with the low-z constraints on fσ8, high-z galaxy surveys like the FastSound can be useful to distinguish modified gravity models without relying on CMB anisotropy experiments.

  2. The Subaru FMOS galaxy redshift survey (FastSound). IV. New constraint on gravity theory from redshift space distortions at z ˜ 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Teppei; Hikage, Chiaki; Totani, Tomonori; Tonegawa, Motonari; Okada, Hiroyuki; Glazebrook, Karl; Blake, Chris; Ferreira, Pedro G.; More, Surhud; Taruya, Atsushi; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Akiyama, Masayuki; Dalton, Gavin; Goto, Tomotsugu; Ishikawa, Takashi; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Matsubara, Takahiko; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Ohta, Kouji; Shimizu, Ikkoh; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Takato, Naruhisa; Tamura, Naoyuki; Yabe, Kiyoto; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We measure the redshift-space correlation function from a spectroscopic sample of 2783 emission line galaxies from the FastSound survey. The survey, which uses the Subaru Telescope and covers a redshift range of 1.19 < z < 1.55, is the first cosmological study at such high redshifts. We detect clear anisotropy due to redshift-space distortions (RSD) both in the correlation function as a function of separations parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight and its quadrupole moment. RSD has been extensively used to test general relativity on cosmological scales at z < 1. Adopting a ΛCDM cosmology with the fixed expansion history and no velocity dispersion (σv = 0), and using the RSD measurements on scales above 8 h-1 Mpc, we obtain the first constraint on the growth rate at the redshift, f (z)σ8(z) = 0.482 ± 0.116 at z ˜ 1.4 after marginalizing over the galaxy bias parameter b(z)σ8(z). This corresponds to 4.2 σ detection of RSD. Our constraint is consistent with the prediction of general relativity fσ8 ˜ 0.392 within the 1 σ confidence level. When we allow σv to vary and marginalize over it, the growth rate constraint becomes fσ _8=0.494^{+0.126}_{-0.120}. We also demonstrate that by combining with the low-z constraints on fσ8, high-z galaxy surveys like the FastSound can be useful to distinguish modified gravity models without relying on CMB anisotropy experiments.

  3. Airborne Gravimetry and Laser Altimetry over Lake Vostok, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, T. G.; Kempf, S. D.; Holt, J. W.; Morse, D. L.; Blankenship, D. D.; Peters, M. E.

    2002-05-01

    In response to an NSF-OPP proposal from Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory (R. Bell and M. Studinger) to study Lake Vostok, a team from the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) conducted the first comprehensive aerogeophysical survey of Lake Vostok during the 2000/01 austral summer. A Twin Otter was instrumented for measurements of gravity, magnetics, ice thickness, and surface elevation. The survey grid was 165 x 330 km (line spacing 7.5 km with 11.25 km and 22.5 km tie-lines), augmented by 12 regional lines extending 180 - 440 km from the primary grid. The remote polar location, high altitude, and extreme cold presented significant technical and physiological challenges, but the survey was completed successfully in 36 flights over 26 days, and has resulted in excellent geophysical data sets. We describe here the acquisition and reduction of the gravity field and ice-surface elevation data sets. Gravimetry and laser altimetry both require high-quality, precise positioning for use in data reduction. Three carrier-phase GPS receivers were operated in parallel aboard the aircraft, with an identical suite at the surface camp. All GPS data sets were reduced using two different software packages -- K&RS and GIPSY-OASIS. K&RS produced the most accurate positions but is inappropriate for long baselines. While GIPSY-OASIS yields positions in circumstances unfavorable to K&RS (i.e., long baselines and lines without closure), it was about half as accurate as K&RS and was insufficient for achieving the desired accuracy of 1-2 mGal in the reduced gravity data. Gravity was measured with a Bell Aerospace BGM-3 marine gravimeter provided by the Naval Oceanographic Office and modified for airborne use. GPS data are used to correct for inertial accelerations induced by aircraft movement. Up to 21 GPS solutions were available for each line. Selection was made through correlation of the high-frequency accelerations recorded by the gravity meter and those derived from the

  4. Satellite and airborne IR sensor validation by an airborne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gumley, L.E.; Delst, P.F. van; Moeller, C.C.

    1996-11-01

    The validation of in-orbit longwave IR radiances from the GOES-8 Sounder and inflight longwave IR radiances from the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) is described. The reference used is the airborne University of Wisconsin High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS). The calibration of each sensor is described. Data collected during the Ocean Temperature Interferometric Survey (OTIS) experiment in January 1995 is used in the comparison between sensors. Detailed forward calculations of at-sensor radiance are used to account for the difference in GOES-8 and HIS altitude and viewing geometry. MAS radiances and spectrally averaged HIS radiances are compared directly. Differences between GOES-8 and HIS brightness temperatures, and GOES-8 and MAS brightness temperatures, are found to be with 1.0 K for the majority of longwave channels examined. The same validation approach will be used for future sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). 11 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Effects of modified gravity in galactic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Murli; Krishna Yadav, Bal

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the distinct effects of the modified gravity, especially f(R) gravity in structure formation. The small redshift as well as high redshift epochs are studied with a potential set of diagnostics distinguishing between the standard general relativistic and the modified gravity. These diagnostics are further put to test against the observations obtained in clustering surveys.

  6. Accuracies of Positioning and Geodata Using Helicopters for Geodetic and Geophysical Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielenberg, O.; Meyer, U.; Vasterling, M.

    2010-12-01

    : Helicopters are frequently used for airborne surveys in geodesy and geophysics. The range of accuracies needed for proper data reconstruction is wide spread from some meters for airborne magnetics to centimeters for laser scanner measurements. This study lists up to date methods of online and offline positioning, discusses their accuracies that may be achieved and relates them to different geodetic as geophysical surveys in different types of terrain. The goal is to match helicopter positioning methods with the given survey task to optimize results and work efficiency. Some fundamental studies have been conducted on helicopter work during the DESIRE (Dead Sea Integrated Research) project in Israel and Jordan which have been continued in Germany. These studies include the impact of vibrations on INS, IMU and gravity meter systems as well as the choice of antenna locations on the shell of the helicopter.

  7. Constraining f (R ) Gravity Theory Using Weak Lensing Peak Statistics from the Canada-France-Hawii-Telescope Lensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangkun; Li, Baojiu; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Chiu, Mu-Chen; Fang, Wei; Pan, Chuzhong; Wang, Qiao; Du, Wei; Yuan, Shuo; Fu, Liping; Fan, Zuhui

    2016-07-01

    In this Letter, we report the observational constraints on the Hu-Sawicki f (R ) theory derived from weak lensing peak abundances, which are closely related to the mass function of massive halos. In comparison with studies using optical or x-ray clusters of galaxies, weak lensing peak analyses have the advantages of not relying on mass-baryonic observable calibrations. With observations from the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Lensing Survey, our peak analyses give rise to a tight constraint on the model parameter |fR 0| for n =1 . The 95% C.L. is log10|fR 0|<-4.82 given WMAP9 priors on (Ωm , As ). With Planck15 priors, the corresponding result is log10|fR 0|<-5.16 .

  8. Constraining f(R) Gravity Theory Using Weak Lensing Peak Statistics from the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Lensing Survey.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangkun; Li, Baojiu; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Chiu, Mu-Chen; Fang, Wei; Pan, Chuzhong; Wang, Qiao; Du, Wei; Yuan, Shuo; Fu, Liping; Fan, Zuhui

    2016-07-29

    In this Letter, we report the observational constraints on the Hu-Sawicki f(R) theory derived from weak lensing peak abundances, which are closely related to the mass function of massive halos. In comparison with studies using optical or x-ray clusters of galaxies, weak lensing peak analyses have the advantages of not relying on mass-baryonic observable calibrations. With observations from the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Lensing Survey, our peak analyses give rise to a tight constraint on the model parameter |f_{R0}| for n=1. The 95% C.L. is log_{10}|f_{R0}|<-4.82 given WMAP9 priors on (Ω_{m}, A_{s}). With Planck15 priors, the corresponding result is log_{10}|f_{R0}|<-5.16. PMID:27517761

  9. Venus gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The anomalous gravity field of Venus shows high correlation with surface features revealed by radar. We extract gravity models from the Doppler tracking data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) by means of a two-step process. In the first step, we solve the nonlinear spacecraft state estimation problem using a Kalman filter-smoother. The Kalman filter was evaluated through simulations. This evaluation and some unusual features of the filter are discussed. In the second step, we perform a geophysical inversion using a linear Bayesian estimator. To allow an unbiased comparison between gravity and topography, we use a simulation technique to smooth and distort the radar topographic data so as to yield maps having the same characteristics as our gravity maps. The maps presented cover 2/3 of the surface of Venus and display the strong topography-gravity correlation previously reported. The topography-gravity scatter plots show two distinct trends.

  10. Dynamics of water mass in the Central Siberia permafrost zone based on gravity survey from the grace satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, S. T.; Kharuk, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    The GRACE gravimetric survey is applied to analyze the equivalent water mass anomalies (EWMAs) in the permafrost zone of Central Siberia. Variations in EWMAs are related to precipitation, air temperature, potential evapotranspiration, and soil composition (drainage conditions). The EWMA dynamics demonstrates two periods. The period of 2003-2008 is characterized by a positive trend. The one of 2008-2012 shows a decrease in the trend with a simultaneous increase by 30-70% of EWMA dispersion in the background of growth (up to 40%) of precipitation variability. The rate of water mass increment demonstrates a positive correlation with the sand and gravel contents in soil ( r = 0.72) and a negative one with clay content ( r =-0.69 to-0.77). For Taimyr Peninsula, there is a deficit of residual water mass (~250 mm for the period of 2012-2013) indicating the deeper thawing of permafrost soils. In the Central Siberian Plateau, the indicator of more intensive permafrost thawing (and that of an increase in active layer thickness) is a considerable trend of water mass increase (2003-2008). The increasing trend of the largest Siberian rivers (Yenisei and Lena) is revealed in the period of 2003-2012.

  11. Satellite borne gravity gradiometer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, E.; Jircitano, A.; Affleck, C.

    1976-01-01

    Gravity gradiometry is recognized to be a very difficult instrumentation problem because extremely small differential acceleration levels have to be measured, 0.1 EU corresponds to an acceleration of 10 to the minus 11th power g at two points 1 meter apart. A feasibility model of a gravity gradiometer is being developed for airborne applications using four modified versions of the proven Model VII accelerometers mounted on a slowly rotating fixture. Gravity gradients are being measured to 1.07 EU in a vertical rotation axis orientation. Equally significant are the outstanding operational characteristics such as fast reaction time, low temperature coefficients and high degree of bias stability over long periods of time. The rotating accelerometer gravity gradiometer approach and its present status is discussed and it is the foundation for the orbital gravity gradiometer analyzed. The performance levels achieved in a 1 g environment of the earth and under relatively high seismic disturbances, lend the orbital gravity gradiometer a high confidence level of success.

  12. CO2 degassing in the Hartoušov mofette area, western Eger Rift, imaged by CO2 mapping and geoelectrical and gravity surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickschick, Tobias; Kämpf, Horst; Flechsig, Christina; Mrlina, Jan; Heinicke, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Strong, subcontinental mantle-dominated CO2 degassing occurs in the Hartoušov and Bublák mofette fields in the western Eger Rift. The combination of CO2 gas flux and soil gas measurements as well as gravity and geoelectric surveys provides insight into the surface and subsurface of this unique mofette area. CO2 soil gas and gas flux measurements reveal that large amounts of carbon dioxide are released via channels with diameters below 1 m. Carbon dioxide emissions of several tens and up to more than 100 kg day-1 are ejected via these small seeps. Measurements with small spacings are necessary to account for the point like, focused gas discharge in the lesser degassing surrounding. We estimate that between 23 and 97 tons of CO2 are released over an area of about 350,000 m2 each day in the Hartoušov mofette field. The application of widely used geostatistical tools leads to estimations of the CO2 discharge with very high standard deviations due to the strong positive skewness of the data distribution. Geophysical investigations via electrical resistivity tomography and gravity measurements were carried out over areas of strong seepage and reveal distinct anomalies in the subsurface below mofettes, indicating rock and sediment alterations and/or sediment transport by pressurised, ascending CO2 and water mobilised by it. This study reveals that the gas emanations only occur west of a morphological step which is related to a N-S-oriented fault zone, the Počatky-Plesná fault zone. The results of CO2 mapping and the geophysical studies can track the course of this fault zone in this area. Our results fit into a tectonic model in which the mofette fields are in the centres of two independent pull-apart basin-like structures. We hypothesise that the sinistral strike-slip movement of the Počatky-Plesná fault zone leads to a pull-apart basin-like opening, at which the strong, mantle-derived CO2 degassing occurs nowadays. Since the Hartoušov and Bublák mofette fields

  13. Continuous gravity gradient logging

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.L.; Lyle, W.D. Jr.

    1986-07-29

    A method is described for conducting a gravimetry survey of an earth formation, comprising the steps of: (a) continuously traversing the earth formation with a gravity logging tool having a column of fluid within the tool, (b) measuring a first pressure difference along a first interval within the column of fluid, (c) measuring a second pressure difference along a second interval within the column of fluid, (d) differencing the first and second pressure differences to determine the gravity gradient along the earth formation between the first and second intervals.

  14. Aircraft Positioning for Airborne Gravimetry: GRAV-D's 'Kinematic GPS Processing Challenge' (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, T.; Bilich, A. L.; Mader, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Geodetic Survey's (NGS's) Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) program will collect airborne gravity data across the entire U.S. and its holdings by 2022 to support a new national vertical datum. By July 2013, >26% of data collection was complete. To achieve the best airborne gravity data accuracy possible, the GPS-derived position, velocity, and accelerations of the aircraft must also be highly accurate. In Fall 2010, NGS issued the 'Kinematic GPS Challenge', asking for kinematic GPS experts to voluntarily process dual-frequency GPS data from two 2008 GRAV-D flights over Louisiana. The Challenge data have: long baselines (> 500 km), high altitudes (35,000 ft), high speeds (280 kts), and difficult locations (half of each flight is over the Gulf of Mexico). For both flights, 1s GPS receiver data was available from: the aircraft, nearby CORS stations, and an NGS-run Ashtech GPS base station at the New Orleans airport. The goal of the Challenge was to compare the position results of a variety of methods, and to compare the airborne gravity calculated using each of those position solutions. In response to the Challenge, eighteen position results from twelve contributors (including two from NGS), using both differential and PPP methods, were submitted. Initial analysis of submitted solutions showed many of the position solutions were contaminated by a 'sawtooth' pattern. Eventually, the 'sawtooth' was attributed to problems with the Trimble receiver in the aircraft. Despite the receiver problem and after removal of two outlier solutions, the submitted position solutions were different by no more than +/- 0.25 m in X, Y, and Z. The differential and PPP solutions were indistinguishable from one another, even when the aircraft was over 500 km away from the airport. The two best gravity results came from position solutions that incorporated smoothing into their processing. For the high-noise flight, NGS' preferred GPS+IMU loosely

  15. A decade of sea ice thickness mapping by airborne lidar between Greenland and the North Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvidegaard, S. M.; Forsberg, R.; Skourup, H.; Stenseng, L.; Hanson, S.

    2007-12-01

    Airborne laser altimetry provides a direct measurement of sea ice freeboard, when combined with a precise geoid model and a lowest-level filtering algorithm to take into account residual errors in GPS-positioning, ocean dynamic topography, tides etc. Using swath laser scanning, the method additionally gives detailed information on the geometry of leads, ridges and the distribution of thin ice and open water. The conversion of sea ice freeboard heights to thickness is based on the assumption of equilibrium, with major errors sources relating to snow depth and density of sea ice. In the paper we describe results of measurements with airborne laser north of Greenland, Ellesmere Island and in the Fram Strait region, carried out on a yearly basis since 1998, in the first years using a single beam laser, and since 2001 using swath laser scanning giving a resolution of approximately 1 m in the ice features. The campaigns have mostly been done in the spring period, typically in connection with airborne gravity surveys or CryoSat calibration and validation activities. Observed secular changes in the sea ice freeboard heights are masked by limited spatial and temporal extent of campaigns, as well as interannual variability in the sea ice regime of the region. To address the error sources in the lidar thickness determination, a number of in-situ and helicopter EM comparisons have been carried out, e.g latest in April 2007 around the Tara drifting station beyond the North Pole, as part of the Damocles project. In cooperation with ESA and APL, coincident Ku-band radar and laser systems have also been flown, giving a unique opportunity for airborne measurement of snow depth as well.

  16. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The characteristics of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) are given. The AOL system is described and its potential for various measurement applications including bathymetry and fluorosensing is discussed.

  17. Gravity investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, D.L.

    1983-12-31

    A large density contrast exists between the Paleozoic rocks (including the rocks of Climax stock) and less dense, Tertiary volcanic rocks and alluvium. This density contrast ranges widely, and herein for interpretive purposes, is assumed to average 0.85 Mg/m{sup 3} (megagrams per cubic meter). The large density contrast makes the gravity method a useful tool with which to study the interface between these rock types. However, little or no density contrast is discernible between the sedimentary Paleozoic rocks that surround the Climax stock and the intrusive rocks of the stock itself. Therefore the gravity method can not be used to define the configuration of the stock. Gravity highs coincide with outcrops of the dense Paleozoic rocks, and gravity lows overlie less-dense Tertiary volcanic rocks and Quaternary alluvium. The positions of three major faults (Boundary, Yucca, and Butte faults) are defined by steep gravity gradients. West of the Climax stock, the Tippinip fault has juxtaposed Paleozoic rocks of similar density, and consequently, has no expression in the gravity data in that area. The gravity station spacing, across Oak Spring Butte, is not sufficient to adequately define any gravity expression of the Tippinip fault. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Airborne lidar global positioning investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) network of satellites shows high promise of revolutionizing methods for conducting surveying, navigation, and positioning. This is especially true in the case of airborne or satellite positioning. A single GPS receiver (suitably adapted for aircraft deployment) can yield positioning accuracies (world-wide) in the order of 30 to 50 m vertically, as well as horizontally. This accuracy is dramatically improved when a second GPS receiver is positioned at a known horizontal and vertical reference. Absolute horizontal and vertical positioning of 1 to 2 m are easily achieved over areas of separation of tens of km. If four common satellites remain in lock in both receivers, then differential phase pseudo-ranges on the GPS L-band carrier can be utilized to achieve accuracies of + or - 10 cm and perhaps as good as + or - 2 cm. The initial proof of concept investigation for airborne positioning using the phase difference between the airborne and stationary GPS receivers was conducted and is examined.

  19. Planar electrostatic gradiometer for airborne geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Lebat, V.; Boulanger, D.

    2011-12-01

    The knowledge of the gravity field of the Earth has been considerably improved for the last decades, thanks to satellites, in particular, both for gravity measurements and positioning. Gravity, and especially gravity gradiometry data are then of great interest to the study of the structure of the continental margins. Space gravity measurements, in particular with the GOCE satellite in orbit since 2009, provide an absolute gravity reference and should contribute to estimate the systematic effects that would affect the surface datasets. But the spatial resolution of those data essentially addresses the large and medium wavelengths of the field (down to a resolution of 90km) and it is therefore essential to complete them at the shorter wavelengths in particular in the littoral area. To this aim, gravity gradiometry systems may be particularly suitable by covering the land/sea transition zone with a uniform precision, and a spatial resolution higher than from gravimetry. The GREMLIT instrument is taking advantage of technologies, formerly developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions, by adapting them to an airborne environment, using a planar configuration for the gradiometer and designing and building a dedicated stabilized platform controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself similarly to the drag free control of the GOCE satellite. The mains interests of the planar configuration are: - its definition, optimized for levitation in the Earth's gravity field ; - its intrinsic linearity, which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth ; - its compactness, ensuring an excellent dimensional stability, a better thermal homogeneity and making the realization of the decoupling platform easier. The performance objective is 0.1 Eötvös. This lowered performance level with respect to a one hundred times better GOCE-type instrument, takes into account the difficulty of measurements

  20. Extending airborne electromagnetic surveys for regional active layer and permafrost mapping with remote sensing and ancillary data, Yukon Flats ecoregion, central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Minsley, Burke J.; Ji, Lei; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Smith, Bruce D.; Abraham, Jared D.; Rose, Joshua R.

    2013-01-01

    Machine-learning regression tree models were used to extrapolate airborne electromagnetic resistivity data collected along flight lines in the Yukon Flats Ecoregion, central Alaska, for regional mapping of permafrost. This method of extrapolation (r = 0.86) used subsurface resistivity, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) at-sensor reflectance, thermal, TM-derived spectral indices, digital elevation models and other relevant spatial data to estimate near-surface (0–2.6-m depth) resistivity at 30-m resolution. A piecewise regression model (r = 0.82) and a presence/absence decision tree classification (accuracy of 87%) were used to estimate active-layer thickness (ALT) (< 101 cm) and the probability of near-surface (up to 123-cm depth) permafrost occurrence from field data, modelled near-surface (0–2.6 m) resistivity, and other relevant remote sensing and map data. At site scale, the predicted ALTs were similar to those previously observed for different vegetation types. At the landscape scale, the predicted ALTs tended to be thinner on higher-elevation loess deposits than on low-lying alluvial and sand sheet deposits of the Yukon Flats. The ALT and permafrost maps provide a baseline for future permafrost monitoring, serve as inputs for modelling hydrological and carbon cycles at local to regional scales, and offer insight into the ALT response to fire and thaw processes.

  1. On the use of L-band multipolarization airborne SAR for surveys of crops, vineyards, and orchards in a California irrigated agricultural region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The airborne L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) collected multipolarization calibrated image data over an irrigated agricultural test site near Fresno, CA, on March 6, 1984. The conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) the effects of incidence angle on the measured backscattering coefficients could be removed by using a correction factor equal to the secant of the angle raised to the 1.4 power, (2) for this scene and time of year, the various polarization channels were highly correlated such that the use of more than one polarization added little to the ability of the radar to discriminate vegetation type or condition; the exception was barley which separated from vineyards only when a combination of like and cross polarization data were used (polarization was very useful for corn identification in fall crops), (3) an excellent separation between herbaceous vegetation (alfalfa, barley, and oats) or bare fields and trees in orchards existed in brightness was well correlated to alfalfa height or biomass, especially for the HH polarization combination, (5) vineyards exhibited a narrow range of brightnesses with no systematic effects of type or number of stakes nor of number of wires in the trellises nor of the size of the vines, (6) within the orchard classes, areal biomass characterized by basal area differences caused radar image brightness differences for small to medium trees but not for medium to large trees.

  2. Airborne electromagnetic hydrocarbon mapping in Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffhuber, Andreas A.; Monstad, Ståle; Rudd, Jonathan

    2009-09-01

    The Inhaminga hydrocarbon exploration licence in central Mozambique sets the location for a multi-method airborne geophysical survey. The size of the Inhaminga block, spanning some 16500km2 from Beira to the Zambezi, limited available data and a tight exploration schedule made an airborne survey attractive for the exploration portfolio. The aim of the survey was to map hydrocarbon seepage zones based on the evidence that seepage may create resistivity, radiometric and sometimes magnetic anomalies. The survey involved a helicopter-borne time domain electromagnetic induction system (AEM) and a fixed wing magnetic gradiometer and radiometer. Our data analysis highlights an anomaly extending some tens of kilometres through the survey area along the eastern margin of the Urema Graben. The area is imaged by AEM as a shallow resistive unit below a strong surface conductor and shows high Uranium and low Potassium concentrations (normalised to mean Thorium ratios). A seismic dimming zone on a 2D seismic line crossing the area coincides with the resistivity and radiometric anomaly. The geological exploration model expects seepage to be linked to the graben fault systems and an active seep has been sampled close to the anomaly. We thus interpret this anomaly to be associated with a gas seepage zone. Further geological ground work and seismic investigations are planned to assess this lead. Airborne data has further improved the general understanding of the regional geology allowing spatial mapping of faults and other features from 2D seismic lines crossing the survey area.

  3. Modeling Airborne Gravimetry with High-Degree Harmonic Expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Simon; Wang, Yan Ming; Roman, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Since its official unveiling at the 2008 General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union, EGM2008 has demonstrated that high-degree harmonic expansions constitute a useful and effective final representation for high-resolution global gravitational models. However, such expansions also provide a versatile means of capturing (modeling), inter-comparing, and optimally combining local and regional high-resolution terrestrial data sets of different types. Here we present a general recipe for using high-degree expansions to capture, downward-continue and assimilate airborne survey data. This approach relies on the production of two ‘competing' high-degree expansions. A first, ‘terrestrial-only' expansion incorporates EGM2008 globally, and high-resolution terrestrial gravimetry regionally. This expansion can be used to upward-continue the regional terrestrial data to the flight level of the airborne survey, such that the terrestrial gravimetry outside the survey area can be merged with the airborne data inside the survey area, all at flight level. Harmonic analysis of this merged data set, also at flight level, yields a second ‘airborne-augmented' expansion, which closely matches the ‘terrestrial-only' expansion outside the survey area, but which also closely reproduces the airborne survey data inside the survey area. Capturing the airborne and terrestrial data in this way means that downward-continuation of the airborne data, as well as spectral/spatial comparison (and ultimate combination) of the airborne data with the terrestrial (and satellite) data, can all be achieved through spherical- and ellipsoidal-harmonic synthesis of these two competing expansions, and their spectral combination. This general approach is illustrated with a worked example.

  4. Compliance with Standard Guidelines for the Prevention of Occupational Transmission of Bloodborne and Airborne Pathogens: A Survey of Postanesthesia Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, Alan R.; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Tuttle, Dale B.; Malviya, Shobha

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 34 nurses found that 81% always complied with guidelines for caring for patients with human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B; only 31% complied when patients were low risk. Reasons for noncompliance were "no anticipated blood contact" (53%) or "too busy" (25%). (SK)

  5. Detection of groundwater conduits in limestones with gravity surveys: data from the area of the Chicxulub Impact crater, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsland, G. L.; Hurtado, M.; Pope, K. O.; Ocampo, A. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Small negative gravity anomalies are found in gravity data from along the northwestern shoreline of the Yucatan Peninsula. These anomalies are shown to be due to elongate, shallow anomalous porosity zones in the Tertiary carbonates. These zones are caused primarily by groundwater solution and are presently active conduits for groundwater flow. The association of these small gravity anomalies with known topographic and structural features of the area, which partially overlies the Chicxulub Impact crater, indicates their development was influenced by structures, faults and/or fractures, within the Tertiary and pre-Tertiary carbonates.

  6. Cosmological tests of modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard Λ CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  7. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years. PMID:27007681

  8. Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John E.

    1997-03-01

    This book comprehensively describes all aspects of gravity flow, a physical process in the environment that is covered by many disciplines including meteorology, oceanography, the earth sciences and industrial processes. The first edition was very well received, and the author has brought the new edition completely up to date, with much new material. Simpson describes gravity currents with a variety of laboratory experiments, many from his own work. Gravity Currents is a valuable supplementary textbook for undergraduates and a reference work for research workers. The general reader will also find much of interest, since the author clearly describes the physics of flows involved without advanced mathematics, and with numerous photographs and illustrations.

  9. Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John E.

    1999-11-01

    This book comprehensively describes all aspects of gravity flow, a physical process in the environment that is covered by many disciplines including meteorology, oceanography, the earth sciences and industrial processes. The first edition was very well received, and the author has brought the new edition completely up to date, with much new material. Simpson describes gravity currents with a variety of laboratory experiments, many from his own work. Gravity Currents is a valuable supplementary textbook for undergraduates and a reference work for research workers. The general reader will also find much of interest, since the author clearly describes the physics of flows involved without advanced mathematics, and with numerous photographs and illustrations.

  10. Data reduction and tying in regional gravity surveys—results from a new gravity base station network and the Bouguer gravity anomaly map for northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado-Cardador, Manuel; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime

    2006-12-01

    Since 1947 Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) has conducted oil exploration projects using potential field methods. Geophysical exploration companies under contracts with Pemex carried out gravity anomaly surveys that were referred to different floating data. Each survey comprises observations of gravity stations along highways, roads and trails at intervals of about 500 m. At present, 265 separate gravimeter surveys that cover 60% of the Mexican territory (mainly in the oil producing regions of Mexico) are available. This gravity database represents the largest, highest spatial resolution information, and consequently has been used in the geophysical data compilations for the Mexico and North America gravity anomaly maps. Regional integration of gravimeter surveys generates gradients and spurious anomalies in the Bouguer anomaly maps at the boundaries of the connected surveys due to the different gravity base stations utilized. The main objective of this study is to refer all gravimeter surveys from Pemex to a single new first-order gravity base station network, in order to eliminate problems of gradients and spurious anomalies. A second objective is to establish a network of permanent gravity base stations (BGP), referred to a single base from the World Gravity System. Four regional loops of BGP covering eight States of Mexico were established to support the tie of local gravity base stations from each of the gravimeter surveys located in the vicinity of these loops. The third objective is to add the gravity constants, measured and calculated, for each of the 265 gravimeter surveys to their corresponding files in the Pemex and Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo database. The gravity base used as the common datum is the station SILAG 9135-49 (Latin American System of Gravity) located in the National Observatory of Tacubaya in Mexico City. We present the results of the installation of a new gravity base network in northeastern Mexico, reference of the 43 gravimeter surveys

  11. Advances and perspectives in bathymetry by airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Wang, Chenxi; Li, Mingyan; Wang, Yuefeng; Ye, Siqi; Han, Caiyun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the history of the airborne lidar and the development stages of the technology are reviewed. The basic principle of airborne lidar and the method of processing point-cloud data were discussed. At present, single point laser scanning method is widely used in bathymetric survey. Although the method has high ranging accuracy, the data processing and hardware system is too much complicated and expensive. For this reason, this paper present a kind of improved dual-frequency method for bathymetric and sea surface survey, in this method 176 units of 1064nm wavelength laser has been used by push-broom scanning and due to the airborne power limits still use 532nm wavelength single point for bathymetric survey by zigzag scanning. We establish a spatial coordinates for obtaining the WGS-84 of point cloud by using airborne POS system.

  12. Val d'Agri: structural settings by using gravity gradient tensor (ggt) components.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, M.; Ferranti, L.; Florio, G.; Giori, I.; Italiano, F.

    2003-04-01

    Within the investigated area, which covers the median and frontal zone of the Campano-Lucano segment of the Southern Apennines, the gravity field shows a clear spatial relation with the tectonic structure of the belt. The fold and thrust belt formed in response to late Miocene-Early Pleistocene shortening and allochthon emplacement toward the northeast, and was subsequently affected by extensional faulting which migrated to northeast ahead of the thrust system. As a result, contractional structures are found associated to Pliocene-Early Pleistocene thrust-top basins in the NE part of the area, whereas extensional faults shape Middle Pleistocene-Holocene basin on the SW sector. The main structural grain of the belt is NW-SE, but E-W structures are widespread in the area as a result of phases of non-coaxial thrusting and strike-slip faulting. Gravity anomalies mirrors the spatial distribution of thrust-top and extensional basins and of the deeper bedrock structures controlling basin deposition. The gravity gradient is a second rank tensor containing the second spatial derivatives of the gravity potential. At present gravity gradient airborne surveys are just at the beginning, while gradiometry instrumentations have not yet being implemented for land surveys over rugged terrains. In order to access to this important geophysical quantity for land surveys, we use here a stable technique to compute it from gravity data. The gradient tensor of gravity helps detecting the geometrical parameters of a geological body and has been used in regions traditionally difficult for reflection seismic, such as those where sub-salt and sub-basalt structures occur. The analysis, one by one, of the components of the gradient tensor of gravity has proved to yield a fine image of the structural setting of the Val d'Agri. The Tzz component allows accurate location of the anomalies and appreciation of their spatial relation with basins and structures, but other components of the GGT provide

  13. Gravity brake

    DOEpatents

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  14. Deconvolution of gravity gradient tensor data using an infinite dike model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiki, M.; Pedersen, L. B.

    2010-12-01

    demonstrated on a real GGT data set from the Vredefort dome in South Africa. The Vredefort dome is known as the largest and oldest impact structure on Earth. The impact structure has a diameter of 250-300 km. The age of the Vredefort impact structure is estimated to be over 2.02 Ga, impacting during the paleoprotrozoic era. In 2007, the Vredefort dome area was covered with a Falcon airborne gravity gradiometry survey conducted by Fugro Airborne Surveys. The introduced method is applied to the 2D structures located in the north east of the study area. The results show a good agreement with geology information and the other techniques e.g., Euler deconvolution and the eigenvector analysis, applied to the same data set.

  15. Airborne gamma radiation soil moisture measurements over short flight lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Eugene L.; Carrol, Thomas R.; Lipinski, Daniel M.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on airborne gamma radiation measurements of soil moisture condition, carried out along short flight lines as part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE). Data were collected over an area in Kansas during the summers of 1987 and 1989. The airborne surveys, together with ground measurements, provide the most comprehensive set of airborne and ground truth data available in the U.S. for calibrating and evaluating airborne gamma flight lines. Analysis showed that, using standard National Weather Service weights for the K, Tl, and Gc radiation windows, the airborne soil moisture estimates for the FIFE lines had a root mean square error of no greater than 3.0 percent soil moisture. The soil moisture estimates for sections having acquisition time of at least 15 sec were found to be reliable.

  16. Toolsets for Airborne Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-02

    article title:  Toolsets for Airborne Data     View larger image The ... limit of detection values. Prior to accessing the TAD Web Application ( https://tad.larc.nasa.gov ) for the first time, users must ...

  17. The airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven; Schall, Harold; Shattuck, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the current program status.

  18. Airborne electromagnetics (EM) as a three-dimensional aquifer-mapping tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Pool, Don; Bultman, Mark; Gettings, Mark; Lemieux, Jean

    2000-01-01

    The San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona hosts a major migratory bird flyway, and was declared a Riparian Conservation Area by Congress in 1988. Recharge of the adjacent Upper San Pedro Valley aquifer was thought to come primarily from the Huachuca Mountains, but the U. S. Army Garrison of Fort Huachuca and neighboring city of Sierra Vista have been tapping this aquifer for many decades, giving rise to claims that they jointly threatened the integrity of the Riparian Conservation Area. For this reason, the U. S. Army funded two airborne geophysical surveys over the Upper San Pedro Valley (see figure 1), and these have provided us valuable information on the aquifer and the complex basement structure underlying the modern San Pedro Valley. Euler deconvolution performed on the airborne magnetic data has provided a depth-to-basement map that is substantially more complex than a map obtained earlier from gravity data, as would be expected from the higher-resolution magnetic data. However, we found the output of the Euler deconvolution to have "geologic noise" in certain areas, interpreted to be post-Basin-and-Range Tertiary volcanic flows in the sedimentary column above the basement but below the ground surface.

  19. Systematic Analysis of Resolution and Uncertainties in Gravity Interpretation of Bathymetry Beneath Floating Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, J. R.; Tinto, K. J.; Elieff, S. H.; Bell, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Airborne geophysical surveys in West Antarctica and Greenland carried out during Operation IceBridge (OIB) utilized the Sander Geophysics AIRGrav gravimeter, which collects high quality data during low-altitude, draped flights. This data has been used to determine bathymetry beneath ice shelves and floating ice tongues (e.g., Tinto et al, 2010, Cochran et al, 2010). This paper systematically investigates uncertainties arising from survey, instrumental and geologic constraints in this type of study and the resulting resolution of the bathymetry model. Gravity line data is low-pass filtered with time-based filters to remove high frequency noise. The spatial filter length is dependent on aircraft speed. For parameters used in OIB (70-140 s filters and 270-290 knots), spatial filter half-wavelengths are ~5-10 km. The half-wavelength does not define a lower limit to the width of feature that can be detected, but shorter wavelength features may appear wider with a lower amplitude. Resolution can be improved either by using a shorter filter or by flying slower. Both involve tradeoffs; a shorter filter allows more noise and slower speeds result in less coverage. These filters are applied along tracks, rather than in a region surrounding a measurement. In areas of large gravity relief, tracks in different directions can sample a very different range of gravity values within the length of the filter. We show that this can lead to crossover mismatches of >5 mGal, complicating interpretation. For dense surveys, gridding the data and then sampling the grid at the measurement points can minimize this effect. Resolution is also affected by the elevation of survey flights. For a distributed mass, the gravity amplitude decreases with distance and short-wavelength components attenuate faster. This is not a serious issue for OIB, which flew draped flights <500 m above the ice surface, but is a serious factor for gravimeters that require a constant elevation above the highest

  20. Three-Axis Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung

    1987-01-01

    Gravity gradients measured even on accelerating platforms. Three-axis superconducting gravity gradiometer based on flux quantization and Meissner effect in superconductors and employs superconducting quantum interference device as amplifier. Incorporates several magnetically levitated proof masses. Gradiometer design integrates accelerometers for operation in differential mode. Principal use in commercial instruments for measurement of Earth-gravity gradients in geo-physical surveying and exploration for oil.

  1. Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. I. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.A.; Paik, H.J.

    1987-06-15

    Because of the equivalence principle, a global measurement is necessary to distinguish gravity from acceleration of the reference frame. A gravity gradiometer is therefore an essential instrument needed for precision tests of gravity laws and for applications in gravity survey and inertial navigation. Superconductivity and SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) technology can be used to obtain a gravity gradiometer with very high sensitivity and stability. A superconducting gravity gradiometer has been developed for a null test of the gravitational inverse-square law and space-borne geodesy. Here we present a complete theoretical model of this instrument. Starting from dynamical equations for the device, we derive transfer functions, a common mode rejection characteristic, and an error model of the superconducting instrument. Since a gradiometer must detect a very weak differential gravity signal in the midst of large platform accelerations and other environmental disturbances, the scale factor and common mode rejection stability of the instrument are extremely important in addition to its immunity to temperature and electromagnetic fluctuations. We show how flux quantization, the Meissner effect, and properties of liquid helium can be utilized to meet these challenges.

  2. An Assessment of Airborn Gravimetry Collected under the NGS GRAV-D Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the United States, the National Geodetic Survey [NGS] holds the official charter to maintain the vertical datum for the USA and its territories. This includes the responsibility to maintain a current geoid model for transforming between orthometric (H) and geodetic (h) heights. The latest (2009) NGS geoid model incorporates the latest GRACE-based satellite-only geopotential solutions, very-high-resolution digital elevation models [DEMs] derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission [SRTM], and other additional data and processing improvements. This recent geoid model also benefited greatly from the prior release of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s [NGA] Earth Gravitational Model 2008 [EGM2008], which served as a computational reference field for the new geoid, but was also particularly useful for identifying and removing corrupted data from the NGS gravimetry database. Looking forwards, NGS intends to increase its efforts to refine and improve its future national geoid models. To this end, their ambitious "Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Datum” [GRAV-D] project aims to update the NGS gravimetry holdings by flying new airborn gravity surveys over a large fraction of the USA and it territories. Concurrent efforts will focus on developing new processing techniques for optimally incorporating improved gravimetry into the final geoid solution. To this end, the GRAV-D team has already flown several surveys in the Gulf of Mexico, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands, and Alaska. Testing and analysis aimed at calibrating and validating the preliminary survey data is already underway. The latest assessment of these recent efforts, including the extent to which this new data can be expected to contribute to an improved gravimetric geoid model, is presented here.

  3. World Gravity Map: a set of global complete spherical Bouguer and isostatic anomaly maps and grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalot, S.; Balmino, G.; Briais, A.; Kuhn, M.; Peyrefitte, A.; Vales, N.; Biancale, R.; Gabalda, G.; Reinquin, F.

    2012-04-01

    Intelligence Agency (NGA) (Pavlis et al., 2008) and the DTU10 (Andersen, 2010) who represents the best up-to-date global gravity models (including surface gravity measurements from land, marine and airborne surveys as well as gravity and altimetry satellite measurements). The surface free-air anomaly is computed at the Earth's surface in the context of Molodensky theory and includes corrections from the mass of the atmosphere. The way gravity anomalies are computed on a worldwide basis slightly differs from the classical usage, but meets modern concerns which tend to take into account of the real Earth. The resulting anomaly maps and grids will be distributed for scientific and education purposes by the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW) (http://ccgm.free.fr) and by the Bureau Gravimetrique International (BGI) (http://bgi.omp.obs-mip.fr). Upgraded versions might be done as soon as new global gravity model will be available (including satellite GOCE data for instance). Institutions who are interested to contribute with new datasets of surface gravity measurements (i.e. ground, marine or airborne gravity data) are also invited to contact BGI bgi@cnes.fr.

  4. User definition and mission requirements for unmanned airborne platforms, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhner, M. B.; Mcdowell, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The airborne measurement requirements of the scientific and applications experiment user community were assessed with respect to the suitability of proposed strawman airborne platforms. These platforms provide a spectrum of measurement capabilities supporting associated mission tradeoffs such as payload weight, operating altitude, range, duration, flight profile control, deployment flexibility, quick response, and recoverability. The results of the survey are used to examine whether the development of platforms is warranted and to determine platform system requirements as well as research and technology needs.

  5. Examination of consistency of marine gravity with land gravity in and around the Japanese Islands using a helicopter-borne gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Jiro; Komazawa, Masao; Kumar, K. Vijay; Nakayama, Eiji; Joseph, E. John; Kusumoto, Shigekazu; Onodera, Ken-ei; Kuroishi, Yuki

    2005-04-01

    This paper reports a finding that marine gravity data around the Japanese Islands are inconsistent with nearby land gravity data. The comparison between land and marine gravity was made possible by the gravity measurements from the air using a helicopter-borne gravimeter (SEGAWA Model) developed by the present authors. The ground/sea truth gravity anomaly can be checked against the gravity from the air, though it is not free air gravity anomaly but gravity disturbance. The newly-developed airborne gravimeter first manufactured in 1998 shows a good performance with a 1-2 mgal average repeatability of measurement under a 90-knot flight speed. Thus we have found disagreements between ground truth and sea truth gravity anomalies on the basis of airborne gravity data in the areas in Japan where we have so far made measurements. Among them we will report the case in the area from Saitama and Ibaraki offshore to the Kashima-Nada Sea, p]Japan. Our conclusion about this area is that the past marine gravity data obtained by surface ship gravimeters involve systematic errors of more than 10 mgals. This kind of inconsistency between marine and land gravity is expected to be found in a number of other areas around the Japanese Islands.

  6. Tectonics and crustal structures related to Bhuj earthquake of January 26, 2001: based on gravity and magnetic surveys constrained from seismic and seismological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, D. C.; Chandrasekhar, D. V.; Singh, B.

    2005-02-01

    Gravity and magnetic data of the Kachchh basin and surrounding regions have delineated major E-W and NW-SE oriented lineaments and faults, which are even extending up to plate boundaries in the north Arabian Sea and western boundary of the Indian plate, respectively. The epicentral zone of Bhuj earthquake and its aftershocks is located over the junction of Rann of Kachchh and median uplifts viz. Kachchh mainland and Wagad uplifts, which are separated by thrust faults. Gravity data with constraints from the results of the seismic studies along a profile suggest that the basement is uplifted towards the north along thrust faults dipping 40-60° south. Similarly gravity and magnetic modeling along a profile across Wagad uplift suggest south dipping (50-60°) basement contacts separating rocks of high susceptibility and density towards the north. One of these contacts coincides with the fault plane of the Bhuj earthquake as inferred from seismological studies and its projection on the surface coincides with the E-W oriented north Wagad thrust fault. A circular gravity high in contact with the fault in northern part of the Wagad uplift along with high amplitude magnetic anomaly suggests plug type mafic intrusive in this region. Several such gravity anomalies are observed over the island belt in the Rann of Kachchh indicating their association with mafic intrusions. The contact of these intrusives with the country rock demarcates shallow crustal inhomogeneities, which provides excellent sites for the accumulation of regional stress. A regional gravity anomaly map based on the concept of isostasy presents two centers of gravity lows of -11 to -13 mGal (10 -5 m/s 2) representing mass deficiency in the epicentral region. Their best-fit model constrained from the receiver function analysis and seismic refraction studies suggest crustal root of 7-8 km (deep crustal inhomogeneity) under them for a standard density contrast of -400 kg/m 3. It is, therefore, suggested that

  7. Limitations on the resolution and suitability of global gravity and magnetic models for geological interpretation: A user health warning!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhead, J. D.; Somerton, I. W.

    2011-12-01

    There have been major advances in the generation of global gravity and crustal magnetic models that are now down loadable from the Internet. All models have variable spatial resolution which is not always readily apparent when viewing these models. The global models include: 1) Free air gravity: EGM08 (5'), Danish DTU(1') and Sandwell and Smith V16.1 (1'). 2) TMI crustal magnetic: WDMAM (3') and EMAG3 (3'), where grid cell size is in arc minutes, where 1'≈ 2 km Both models can be spectrally divided into Long wavelength components: that are very well constrained and are derived from satellite observations. For Free air gravity: wavelengths > 150 km from Grace and for TMI crustal magnetic:wavlengths > 400 km from CHAMP MF6 Shorter wavelength components: The spatial resolution is very dependent on the data coverage of the terrestrial (ground, ship and airborne) surveys and are discussed below Gravity Model: The gravity model is expressed as the Free air gravity anomaly. For marine and large inland water areas the data used are derived from satellite altimeter measurements that generate a spatial gravity resolution of 15 to 20 km (full wavelength) from 3 to 4 km spaced orbital track data. For onshore areas the data coverage is highly variable from no data (e.g. interior Angola) to more than adequate coverage (e.g. Europe). To infill data gaps, free air correction values derived from the SRTM topography data were used. This results in a free air anomaly grid that appears to have full spectral content down to the resolution of the model. Locating where the data gaps exist is difficult, since the land gravity survey coverage for EGM08, used by all models, has not been released. A further resolution problem is that many large surveys used in EGM08 have been decimated to preserve their commercial value (e.g. GETECH input grids were decimated to at least 15' grid). TMI Crustal Magnetic Model: For marine areas these models suffer even larger problems in that the sparsity of

  8. Gravity settling

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Hyman R.; Long, R. H.; Simone, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Solids are separated from a liquid in a gravity settler provided with inclined solid intercepting surfaces to intercept the solid settling path to coalesce the solids and increase the settling rate. The intercepting surfaces are inverted V-shaped plates, each formed from first and second downwardly inclined upwardly curved intersecting conical sections having their apices at the vessel wall.

  9. Simulating Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  10. Model selection for modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Kitching, T D; Simpson, F; Heavens, A F; Taylor, A N

    2011-12-28

    In this article, we review model selection predictions for modified gravity scenarios as an explanation for the observed acceleration of the expansion history of the Universe. We present analytical procedures for calculating expected Bayesian evidence values in two cases: (i) that modified gravity is a simple parametrized extension of general relativity (GR; two nested models), such that a Bayes' factor can be calculated, and (ii) that we have a class of non-nested models where a rank-ordering of evidence values is required. We show that, in the case of a minimal modified gravity parametrization, we can expect large area photometric and spectroscopic surveys, using three-dimensional cosmic shear and baryonic acoustic oscillations, to 'decisively' distinguish modified gravity models over GR (or vice versa), with odds of ≫1:100. It is apparent that the potential discovery space for modified gravity models is large, even in a simple extension to gravity models, where Newton's constant G is allowed to vary as a function of time and length scale. On the time and length scales where dark energy dominates, it is only through large-scale cosmological experiments that we can hope to understand the nature of gravity. PMID:22084296

  11. Close-range airborne photogrammetry: an effective tool for high-resolution sandy beach morphometric surveys. Examples from embayed beaches in French Guyana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Fleury, Jules; Anthony, Edward; Gardel, Antoine; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    have a mean vertical accuracy less than +/- 5 cm compared to the GPS control points, with a maximum of 20 cm in marginal sectors near vegetation and in the swash zone in low-water conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first time a poorly textured surface composed of sand is reconstructed by photogrammetry, contrast in the studied object being necessary for this method. Our highly accurate photo resolution and pre-processing permitted imaging enough texture to proceed. Morphological features in the upper surf zone such as rip channels, and subaerial features, such as erosion scarps and aeolian forms, clearly appear. The comparison between the DSM validates the estimation of sediment transfers and the rotation process on this beach, unlike traditional beach monitoring with GPS, which involves large uncertainty linked to sparse point acquisition. It can be claimed that photogrammetry is low-cost, user-friendly, and offers new perspectives for non-specialist users in geomorphology and other fields recquiring high-resolution topographic data. It combines the advantages of the reproducibility of GPS topographic surveys and the high density and accuracy of LIDAR, but at very advantageous cost compared to the latter.

  12. Gravity survey and interpretation of Fort Irwin and vicinity, Mojave Desert, California: Chapter H in Geology and geophysics applied to groundwater hydrology at Fort Irwin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, Robert C.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2014-01-01

    In support of a hydrogeologic study of the groundwater resources on Fort Irwin, we have combined new gravity data with preexisting measurements to produce an isostatic residual gravity map, which we then separated into two components reflecting (1) the density distribution in the pre-Cenozoic basement complex and (2) the distribution of low-density Cenozoic volcanic and sedimentary deposits that lie on top of the basement complex. The second component was inverted to estimate the three-dimensional distribution of Cenozoic deposits by using constraints from geology, drillholes, and time-domain electromagnetic soundings. In most of the base, the Cenozoic deposits are no more than 300 m thick, except in the basins with more than 500 m of fill beneath Coyote Lake, Red Pass Lake, west of Nelson Lake, west of Superior Lake, Bicycle Lake, and in the vicinity of Nelson Lake.

  13. LeRC reduced gravity fluid management technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Symons, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the reduced gravity fluid management technology program is presented. Information on reduced gravity fluid behavior, techniques for thermal control of cryogenic tankage, and design for fluid management systems are discussed. The development of Spacelab experiments, propellant management systems for orbit transfer vehicles, and computer techniques for simulating reduced gravity fluid dynamic processes is reported.

  14. Quantum gravity: A brief history of ideas and some prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlip, Steven; Chiou, Dah-Wei; Ni, Wei-Tou; Woodard, Richard

    2015-08-01

    We present a bird's-eye survey on the development of fundamental ideas of quantum gravity, placing emphasis on perturbative approaches, string theory, loop quantum gravity (LQG) and black hole thermodynamics. The early ideas at the dawn of quantum gravity as well as the possible observations of quantum gravitational effects in the foreseeable future are also briefly discussed.

  15. The Airborne Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-09-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  16. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Specifications and preliminary design of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system, which is to be constructed for installation and used on a NASA Wallops Flight Center (WFC) C-54 research aircraft, are reported. The AOL system is to provide an airborne facility for use by various government agencies to demonstrate the utility and practicality of hardware of this type in the wide area collection of oceanographic data on an operational basis. System measurement and performance requirements are presented, followed by a description of the conceptual system approach and the considerations attendant to its development. System performance calculations are addressed, and the system specifications and preliminary design are presented and discussed.

  17. Expanding Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Sol

    2005-04-01

    Newton's gravitational constant Gn and Laws of Gravity are based upon observations in our solar system. Mysteries appear when they are used far outside our solar system Apparently, Newton's gravitational constant can not be applied at large distances. Dark matter was needed to explain the observed flat rotational velocity curves of spiral galaxies (Rubin), and of groups of remote galaxies (Zwicky). Our expansion of Newton's gravitational constant Gn as a power series in distance r, is sufficient to explain these observations without using dark matter. This is different from the MOND theory of Milgrom involving acceleration. Also, our Expanded Gravitational Constant (EGC) can show the correct use of the red shift. In addition to the Doppler contribution, there are three other contributions and these depend only upon gravity. Thus, velocity observations only based on the red shift can not be used to support the concept of the expanding universe, the accelerating expansion, or dark energy. Our expanded gravity constant can predict and explain Olbers' paradox (dark sky), and the temperature of the CMB (cosmic microwave background). Thus, CMB may not support the big bang and inflation.

  18. Bed topography of Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland from high-resolution gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Rignot, E. J.; Morlighem, M.; Paden, J. D.; Holland, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Jakobshavn Isbræ (JKS) is one of the largest marine terminating outlet glaciers in Greenland, feeding a fjord about 800 m deep in the west coast. JKS sped up more than twofold since 2002 and contributed nearly 1 mm of global sea level rise during the period from 2000 to 2011. Holland et al. (2008) posit that these changes coincided with a change in ocean conditions beneath the former ice tongue, yet little is known about the depth of the glacier at its grounding line and upstream of the grounding line and the sea floor depth of the fjord is not well known either. Here, we present a new approach to infer the glacier bed topography, ice thickness and sea floor bathymetry near the grounding line of JKS using high-resolution airborne gravity data from AirGRAV. AirGRAV data were collected in August 2012 from a helicopter platform. The data combined with radio echo sounding data, discrete point soundings in the fjord and the mass conservation approach on land ice. AirGRAV acquired a 500m spacing grid of free-air gravity data at 50 knots with sub-milligal accuracy, i.e. much higher than NASA Operation IceBridge (OIB)'s 5.2km resolution at 290 knots. We use a 3D inversion of the gravity data combining our observations and a forward modeling of the surrounding gravity field, and constrained at the boundary by radar echo soundings and point bathymetry. We reconstruct seamless bed topography at the grounding line that matches interior data and the sea floor bathymetry. The results reveal the true depth at the elbow of the terminal valley and the bed reversal in the proximity of the current grounding line. The analysis provides guidelines for future gravity survey of narrow fjords in terms of spatial resolution and gravity precision. The results also demonstrate the practicality of using high resolution gravity survey to resolve bed topography near glacier snouts, in places where radar sounding has been significantly challenged in the past. The inversion results are critical

  19. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  20. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  1. Is nonrelativistic gravity possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharyan, A. A.

    2009-07-15

    We study nonrelativistic gravity using the Hamiltonian formalism. For the dynamics of general relativity (relativistic gravity) the formalism is well known and called the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We show that if the lapse function is constrained correctly, then nonrelativistic gravity is described by a consistent Hamiltonian system. Surprisingly, nonrelativistic gravity can have solutions identical to relativistic gravity ones. In particular, (anti-)de Sitter black holes of Einstein gravity and IR limit of Horava gravity are locally identical.

  2. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Schaffner, P. R.; Mielke, R. R.; Gilreath, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for numerically calculating radiation patterns of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas using the Volumetric Pattern Analysis Program is presented. Special attention is given to aircraft modeling. An actual case study involving a large commercial aircraft is included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

  3. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  4. Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, F. C.; Markle, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator enables prospecting for fluorescent materials, hydrography with fluorescent dyes, and plant studies based on fluorescence of chlorophyll. Optical unit design is the coincidence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum occurring at the characteristic wavelengths of some fluorescent materials.

  5. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  6. A new degree-2190 (10 km resolution) gravity field model for Antarctica developed from GRACE, GOCE and Bedmap2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Christian; Rexer, Moritz; Scheinert, Mirko; Pail, Roland; Claessens, Sten; Holmes, Simon

    2016-02-01

    The current high-degree global geopotential models EGM2008 and EIGEN-6C4 resolve gravity field structures to ˜ 10 km spatial scales over most parts of the of Earth's surface. However, a notable exception is continental Antarctica, where the gravity information in these and other recent models is based on satellite gravimetry observations only, and thus limited to about ˜ 80-120 km spatial scales. Here, we present a new degree-2190 global gravity model (GGM) that for the first time improves the spatial resolution of the gravity field over the whole of continental Antarctica to ˜ 10 km spatial scales. The new model called SatGravRET2014 is a combination of recent Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite gravimetry with gravitational signals derived from the 2013 Bedmap2 topography/ice thickness/bedrock model with gravity forward modelling in ellipsoidal approximation. Bedmap2 is a significantly improved description of the topographic mass distribution over the Antarctic region based on a multitude of topographic surveys, and a well-suited source for modelling short-scale gravity signals as we show in our study. We describe the development of SatGravRET2014 which entirely relies on spherical harmonic modelling techniques. Details are provided on the least-squares combination procedures and on the conversion of topography to implied gravitational potential. The main outcome of our work is the SatGravRET2014 spherical harmonic series expansion to degree 2190, and derived high-resolution grids of 3D-synthesized gravity and quasigeoid effects over the whole of Antarctica. For validation, six data sets from the IAG Subcommission 2.4f "Gravity and Geoid in Antarctica" (AntGG) database were used comprising a total of 1,092,981 airborne gravimetric observations. All subsets consistently show that the Bedmap2-based short-scale gravity modelling improves the agreement over satellite

  7. Airborne investigation of bathymetric sills in Godthåbsfjord, Greenland - results from IcePOD and Operation IceBridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinto, K. J.; Zappa, C. J.; Bell, R. E.; Frearson, N.; Cochran, J. R.; Boghosian, A.; Porter, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    The bathymetry of Greenlandic fjords is an important boundary condition for understanding circulation within the fjord. This in turn is crucial to the understanding of ocean-ice interactions at the margins of the Greenland ice sheet. Marine-based surveys have identified sills at the heads of many of these fjords, and demonstrated their importance to the circulation patterns within the fjords themselves. The inaccessibility of much of the Greenland fjord system leaves many regions poorly surveyed, with important data gaps remaining in the interior of the fjords. Airborne surveys provide a valuable platform for the study of fjord dynamics by offering wide coverage and the ability to survey otherwise inaccessible regions of fjords. In this study we combine results from Operation IceBridge gravity surveys with visible and infrared imagery from the IcePOD project to investigate circulation, transport, and mixing in Godthåbsfjord, Greenland, at the calving front of Kangiata Nunâta Sermia. The bathymetry of this fjord has been well mapped, but information is sparse from the inner 13 km where the fjord is filled with icebergs. Gravity data show a 4 mGal positive anomaly 10 km from the calving front. Models constrained by the gravity anomaly over a known sill further up the fjord give this newly identified sill a predicted depth of approximately 100 m. IcePOD is a multi-instrument pod flown on an LC130 operated by the New York Air National Guard. During test flights in the summer of 2013 multiple passes were made of the inner, iceberg-filled part of Godthåbsfjord with both visible and infra-red cameras. Here we compare the movement of ice within the fjord with modelled bathymetry from IceBridge to investigate the circulation of the inner part of the fjord.

  8. Estimation of Error in Western Pacific Geoid Heights Derived from Gravity Data Only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, M. F.; Brozena, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of the Western Pacific Geoid estimation project was to generate geoid height models for regions in the Western Pacific Ocean, and formal error estimates for those geoid heights, using all available gravity data and statistical parameters of the quality of the gravity data. Geoid heights were to be determined solely from gravity measurements, as a gravimetric geoid model and error estimates for that model would have applications in oceanography and satellite altimetry. The general method was to remove the gravity field associated with a "lower" order spherical harmonic global gravity model from the regional gravity set; to fit a covariance model to the residual gravity, and then calculate the (residual) geoid heights and error estimates by least-squares collocation fit with residual gravity, available statistical estimates of the gravity and the covariance model. The geoid heights corresponding to the lower order spherical harmonic model can be added back to the heights from the residual gravity to produce a complete geoid height model. As input we requested from NGA all unclassified available gravity data in the western Pacific between 15° to 45° N and 105° to 141°W. The total data set that was used to model and estimate errors in gravimetric geoid comprised an unclassified, open file data set (540,012 stations), a proprietary airborne survey of Taiwan (19,234 stations), and unclassified NAVO SSP survey data (95,111 stations), for official use only. Various programs were adapted to the problem including N.K. Pavlis' HSYNTH program and the covariance fit program GPFIT and least-squares collocation program GPCOL from the GRAVSOFT package (Forsberg and Schering, 2008 version) which were modified to handle larger data sets, but in some regions data were still too numerous. Formulas were derived that could be used to block-mean the data in a statistically optimal sense and still retain the error estimates required for the collocation algorithm. Running the

  9. Mapping permafrost with airborne electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsley, B. J.; Ball, L. B.; Bloss, B. R.; Kass, A.; Pastick, N.; Smith, B. D.; Voss, C. I.; Walsh, D. O.; Walvoord, M. A.; Wylie, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost is a key characteristic of cold region landscapes, yet detailed assessments of how the subsurface distribution of permafrost impacts the environment, hydrologic systems, and infrastructure are lacking. Data acquired from several airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys in Alaska provide significant new insight into the spatial extent of permafrost over larger areas (hundreds to thousands of square kilometers) than can be mapped using ground-based geophysical methods or through drilling. We compare several AEM datasets from different areas of interior Alaska, and explore the capacity of these data to infer geologic structure, permafrost extent, and related hydrologic processes. We also assess the impact of fires on permafrost by comparing data from different burn years within similar geological environments. Ultimately, interpretations rely on understanding the relationship between electrical resistivity measured by AEM surveys and the physical properties of interest such as geology, permafrost, and unfrozen water content in the subsurface. These relationships are often ambiguous and non-unique, so additional information is useful for reducing uncertainty. Shallow (upper ~1m) permafrost and soil characteristics identified from remotely sensed imagery and field observations help to constrain and aerially extend near-surface AEM interpretations, where correlations between the AEM and remote sensing data are identified using empirical multivariate analyses. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) measurements quantify the contribution of unfrozen water at depth to the AEM-derived electrical resistivity models at several locations within one survey area. AEM surveys fill a critical data gap in the subsurface characterization of permafrost environments and will be valuable in future mapping and monitoring programs in cold regions.

  10. Gravity survey and regional geology of the Prince William Sound epicentral region, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Case, J.E.; Barnes, D.F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S.L.

    1966-01-01

    Sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Mesozoic and early Tertiary age form a roughly arcuate pattern in and around Prince William Sound, the epicentral region of the Alaska earthquake of 1964. These rocks include the Valdez Group, a predominantly slate and graywacke sequence of Jurassic and Cretaceous age, and the Orca Group, a younger sequence of early Tertiary age. The Orca consists of a lower unit of dense-average 2.87 g per cm3 (grams per cubic centimeter) pillow basalt and greenstone intercalated with sedimentary rocks and an upper unit of lithologically variable sandstone interbedded with siltstone or argillite. Densities of the clastic rocks in both the Valdez and Orca Groups average about 2.69 g per cm3. Granitic rocks of relatively low density (2.62 g per cm3) cut the Valdez and Orca Groups at several localities. Both the Valdez and the Orca Groups were complexly folded and extensively faulted during at least three major episodes of deformation: an early period of Cretaceous or early Tertiary orogeny, a second orogeny that probably culminated in late Eocene or early Oligocene time and was accompanied or closely followed by emplacement of granitic batholiths, and a third episode of deformation that began in late Cenozoic time and continued intermittently to the present. About 500 gravity stations were established in the Prince William Sound region in conjunction with postearthquake geologic investigations. Simple Bouguer anomaly contours trend approximately parallel to the arcuate geologic structure around the sound. Bouguer anomalies decrease northward from +40 mgal (milligals) at the southwestern end of Montague Island to -70 mgal at College and Harriman Fiords. Most of this change may be interpreted as a regional gradient caused by thickening of the continental crust. Superimposed on the gradient is a prominent gravity high of as much as 65 mgal that extends from Elrington Island on the southwest, across Knight and Glacier Islands to the Ellamar Peninsula

  11. Gravity data from the San Pedro River Basin, Cochise County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Winester, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Arizona Water Science Center in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Geodetic Survey has collected relative and absolute gravity data at 321 stations in the San Pedro River Basin of southeastern Arizona since 2000. Data are of three types: observed gravity values and associated free-air, simple Bouguer, and complete Bouguer anomaly values, useful for subsurface-density modeling; high-precision relative-gravity surveys repeated over time, useful for aquifer-storage-change monitoring; and absolute-gravity values, useful as base stations for relative-gravity surveys and for monitoring gravity change over time. The data are compiled, without interpretation, in three spreadsheet files. Gravity values, GPS locations, and driving directions for absolute-gravity base stations are presented as National Geodetic Survey site descriptions.

  12. [Air-borne disease].

    PubMed

    Lameiro Vilariño, Carmen; del Campo Pérez, Victor M; Alonso Bürger, Susana; Felpeto Nodar, Irene; Guimarey Pérez, Rosa; Pérez Alvarellos, Alberto

    2003-11-01

    Respiratory protection is a factor which worries nursing professionals who take care of patients susceptible of transmitting microorganisms through the air more as every day passes. This type of protection covers the use of surgical or hygienic masks against the transmission of infection by airborne drops to the use of highly effective masks or respirators against the transmission of airborne diseases such as tuberculosis or SARS, a recently discovered disease. The adequate choice of this protective device and its correct use are fundamental in order to have an effective protection for exposed personnel. The authors summarize the main protective respiratory devices used by health workers, their characteristics and degree of effectiveness, as well as the circumstances under which each device is indicated for use. PMID:14705591

  13. Airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1992-01-01

    Proper interpretation of airborne gravimetry and altimetry requires good knowledge of aircraft trajectory. Recent advances in precise navigation with differential GPS have made it possible to measure gravity from the air with accuracies of a few milligals, and to obtain altimeter profiles of terrain or sea surface correct to one decimeter. These developments are opening otherwise inaccessible regions to detailed geophysical mapping. Navigation with GPS presents some problems that grow worse with increasing distance from a fixed receiver: the effect of errors in tropospheric refraction correction, GPS ephemerides, and the coordinates of the fixed receivers. Ionospheric refraction and orbit error complicate ambiguity resolution. Optimal navigation should treat all error sources as unknowns, together with the instantaneous vehicle position. To do so, fast and reliable numerical techniques are needed: efficient and stable Kalman filter-smoother algorithms, together with data compression and, sometimes, the use of simplified dynamics.

  14. Airborne Bacterial Diversity from the Low Atmosphere of Greater Mexico City.

    PubMed

    García-Mena, Jaime; Murugesan, Selvasankar; Pérez-Muñoz, Ashael Alfredo; García-Espitia, Matilde; Maya, Otoniel; Jacinto-Montiel, Monserrat; Monsalvo-Ponce, Giselle; Piña-Escobedo, Alberto; Domínguez-Malfavón, Lilianha; Gómez-Ramírez, Marlenne; Cervantes-González, Elsa; Núñez-Cardona, María Teresa

    2016-07-01

    Greater Mexico City is one of the largest urban centers in the world, with an estimated population by 2010 of more than 20 million inhabitants. In urban areas like this, biological material is present at all atmospheric levels including live bacteria. We sampled the low atmosphere in several surveys at different points by the gravity method on LB and blood agar media during winter, spring, summer, and autumn seasons in the years 2008, 2010, 2011, and 2012. The colonial phenotype on blood agar showed α, β, and γ hemolytic activities among the live collected bacteria. Genomic DNA was extracted and convenient V3 hypervariable region libraries of 16S rDNA gene were high-throughput sequenced. From the data analysis, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria were the more abundant phyla in all surveys, while the genera from the family Enterobacteriaceae, in addition to Bacillus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Acinetobacter spp., Erwinia spp., Gluconacetobacter spp., Proteus spp., Exiguobacterium spp., and Staphylococcus spp. were also abundant. From this study, we conclude that it is possible to detect live airborne nonspore-forming bacteria in the low atmosphere of GMC, associated to the microbial cloud of its inhabitants. PMID:26944561

  15. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  16. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  17. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles. PMID:7005667

  18. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  19. Airborne gravimetry data sparse reconstruction via L1-norm convex quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ya-Peng; Wu, Mei-Ping; Tang, Gang

    2015-06-01

    In practice, airborne gravimetry is a sub-Nyquist sampling method because of the restrictions imposed by national boundaries, financial cost, and database size. In this study, we analyze the sparsity of airborne gravimetry data by using the discrete Fourier transform and propose a reconstruction method based on the theory of compressed sensing for large-scale gravity anomaly data. Consequently, the reconstruction of the gravity anomaly data is transformed to a L1-norm convex quadratic programming problem. We combine the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm (PCG) and the improved interior-point method (IPM) to solve the convex quadratic programming problem. Furthermore, a flight test was carried out with the homegrown strapdown airborne gravimeter SGA-WZ. Subsequently, we reconstructed the gravity anomaly data of the flight test, and then, we compared the proposed method with the linear interpolation method, which is commonly used in airborne gravimetry. The test results show that the PCG-IPM algorithm can be used to reconstruct large-scale gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and more effectiveness than the linear interpolation method.

  20. Airborne Dust in Space Vehicles and Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John

    2006-01-01

    Airborne dust, suspended inside a space vehicle or in future celestial habitats, can present a serious threat to crew health if it is not controlled. During the Apollo missions to the moon, lunar dust brought inside the capsule caused eye irritation and breathing difficulty to the crew when they launched from the moon and re-acquired "microgravity." During Shuttle flights reactive and toxic dusts such as lithium hydroxide have created a risk to crew health, and fine particles from combustion events can be especially worrisome. Under nominal spaceflight conditions, airborne dusts and particles tend to be larger than on earth because of the absence of gravity settling. Aboard the ISS, dusts are effectively managed by HEPA filters, although floating dust in newly-arrived modules can be a nuisance. Future missions to the moon and to Mars will present additional challenges because of the possibility that external dust will enter the breathing atmosphere of the habitat and reach the crew's respiratory system. Testing with simulated lunar and Martian dust has shown that these materials are toxic when placed into the lungs of test animals. Defining and evaluating the physical and chemical properties of Martian dusts through robotic missions will challenge our ability to prepare better dust simulants and to determine the risk to crew health from exposure to such dusts.

  1. Calibration Matters: Advances in Strapdown Airborne Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, D.

    2015-12-01

    Using a commercial navigation-grade strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU) for airborne gravimetry can be advantageous in terms of cost, handling, and space consumption compared to the classical stable-platform spring gravimeters. Up to now, however, large sensor errors made it impossible to reach the mGal-level using such type IMUs as they are not designed or optimized for this kind of application. Apart from a proper error-modeling in the filtering process, specific calibration methods that are tailored to the application of aerogravity may help to bridge this gap and to improve their performance. Based on simulations, a quantitative analysis is presented on how much IMU sensor errors, as biases, scale factors, cross couplings, and thermal drifts distort the determination of gravity and the deflection of the vertical (DOV). Several lab and in-field calibration methods are briefly discussed, and calibration results are shown for an iMAR RQH unit. In particular, a thermal lab calibration of its QA2000 accelerometers greatly improved the long-term drift behavior. Latest results from four recent airborne gravimetry campaigns confirm the effectiveness of the calibrations applied, with cross-over accuracies reaching 1.0 mGal (0.6 mGal after cross-over adjustment) and DOV accuracies reaching 1.1 arc seconds after cross-over adjustment.

  2. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  3. Approaches to Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele

    2009-03-01

    Preface; Part I. Fundamental Ideas and General Formalisms: 1. Unfinished revolution C. Rovelli; 2. The fundamental nature of space and time G. 't Hooft; 3. Does locality fail at intermediate length scales R. Sorkin; 4. Prolegomena to any future quantum gravity J. Stachel; 5. Spacetime symmetries in histories canonical gravity N. Savvidou; 6. Categorical geometry and the mathematical foundations of quantum gravity L. Crane; 7. Emergent relativity O. Dreyer; 8. Asymptotic safety R. Percacci; 9. New directions in background independent quantum gravity F. Markopoulou; Questions and answers; Part II: 10. Gauge/gravity duality G. Horowitz and J. Polchinski; 11. String theory, holography and quantum gravity T. Banks; 12. String field theory W. Taylor; Questions and answers; Part III: 13. Loop Quantum Gravity T. Thiemann; 14. Covariant loop quantum gravity? E. LIvine; 15. The spin foam representation of loop quantum gravity A. Perez; 16. 3-dimensional spin foam quantum gravity L. Freidel; 17. The group field theory approach to quantum gravity D. Oriti; Questions and answers; Part IV. Discrete Quantum Gravity: 18. Quantum gravity: the art of building spacetime J. Ambjørn, J. Jurkiewicz and R. Loll; 19. Quantum Regge calculations R. Williams; 20. Consistent discretizations as a road to quantum gravity R. Gambini and J. Pullin; 21. The causal set approach to quantum gravity J. Henson; Questions and answers; Part V. Effective Models and Quantum Gravity Phenomenology: 22. Quantum gravity phenomenology G. Amelino-Camelia; 23. Quantum gravity and precision tests C. Burgess; 24. Algebraic approach to quantum gravity II: non-commutative spacetime F. Girelli; 25. Doubly special relativity J. Kowalski-Glikman; 26. From quantum reference frames to deformed special relativity F. Girelli; 27. Lorentz invariance violation and its role in quantum gravity phenomenology J. Collins, A. Perez and D. Sudarsky; 28. Generic predictions of quantum theories of gravity L. Smolin; Questions and

  4. Airborne Electromagnetic Mapping of Subsurface Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. D.; Minsley, B. J.; Cannia, J. C.; Smith, B. D.; Walvoord, M. A.; Voss, C. I.; Jorgenson, T. T.; Wylie, B. K.; Anderson, L.

    2011-12-01

    Concerns over the impacts of climate change have recently energized research on the potential impacts thawing permafrost may have on groundwater flow, infrastructure, forest health, ecosystems, energy production, CO2 release, and contaminant transport. There is typically little knowledge about subsurface permafrost distributions, such as thickness and where groundwater-surface-water connections may occur through taliks. In June of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey in the area of Fort Yukon, Alaska in order to map the 3-D distribution of permafrost and provide information for the development of groundwater models within the Yukon River Basin. Prior to the development of these models, information on areas of groundwater-surface water interaction was extremely limited. Lithology determined from a borehole drilled in Fort Yukon in 1994 agrees well with the resistivity depth sections inferred from the airborne survey. In addition to lithology, there a thermal imprint appears on the subsurface resistivity values. In the upper 20-50 m, the sections show continuous areas of high electrical resistivity, consistent with alluvial gravel deposits that are likely frozen. At depth, unfrozen gravel deposits have intermediate-to-high resistivity; frozen silts have intermediate resistivity; and unfrozen silts have low resistivity. Under the Yukon River and lakes where the subsurface is not frozen, zones of moderate resistivity intermix with areas of low resistivity. The areas of loess hills on the margins of the Yukon Flats have very-high electrical resistivity, indicating higher ice content, and are associated with the some of the greatest thickness of permafrost in the survey area. This work provides the first look into the 3-D distribution of permafrost in the areas around Fort Yukon and is a demonstration of the application of AEM to permafrost mapping. The AEM survey provides unprecedented 3-D images of subsurface electrical

  5. The fate of airborne polycyclic organic matter.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, T; Ramdahl, T; Bjørseth, A

    1983-01-01

    Biological tests have shown that a significant part of the mutagenicity of organic extracts of collected airborne particulate matter is not due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It is possible that part of these unknown compounds are transformation products of PAH. This survey focuses on the reaction of PAH in the atmosphere with other copollutants, such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, ozone and free radicals and their reaction products. Photochemically induced reactions of PAH are also included. The reactivity of particle-associated PAH is discussed in relation to the chemical composition and the physical properties of the carrier. Recommendations for future work are given. PMID:6825615

  6. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  7. Airborne radioactive contamination monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, C.R.; Adams, J.R.; Bounds, J.A.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-03-01

    Current technologies for the detection of airborne radioactive contamination do not provide real-time capability. Most of these techniques are based on the capture of particulate matter in air onto filters which are then processed in the laboratory; thus, the turnaround time for detection of contamination can be many days. To address this shortcoming, an effort is underway to adapt LRAD (Long-Range-Alpha-Detection) technology for real-time monitoring of airborne releases of alpa-emitting radionuclides. Alpha decays in air create ionization that can be subsequently collected on electrodes, producing a current that is proportional to the amount of radioactive material present. Using external fans on a pipe containing LRAD detectors, controlled samples of ambient air can be continuously tested for the presence of radioactive contamination. Current prototypes include a two-chamber model. Sampled air is drawn through a particulate filter and then through the first chamber, which uses an electrostatic filter at its entrance to remove ambient ionization. At its exit, ionization that occurred due to the presence of radon is collected and recorded. The air then passes through a length of pipe to allow some decay of short-lived radon species. A second chamber identical to the first monitors the remaining activity. Further development is necessary on air samples without the use of particulate filtering, both to distinguish ionization that can pass through the initial electrostatic filter on otherwise inert particulate matter from that produced through the decay of radioactive material and to separate both of these from the radon contribution. The end product could provide a sensitive, cost-effective, real-time method of determining the presence of airborne radioactive contamination.

  8. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  9. Airborne Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaps, Wm. S.; Burris, J.

    1996-12-01

    We designed and tested an airborne lidar system using Raman scattering to make simultaneous measurements of methane, water vapor, and temperature in a series of flights on a NASA-operated C-130 aircraft. We present the results for methane detection, which show that the instrument has the requisite sensitivity to atmospheric trace gases. Ultimately these measurements can be used to examine the transport of chemically processed air from within the polar vortex to mid-latitudinal regions and the exchange of stratospheric air between tropical and mid-latitudinal regions.

  10. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  11. Cosmological probes of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassat, Anais Marie Melanie

    This Thesis is concerned with two cosmological probes of linear gravity. The first relates to Large Scale Structure (LSS) in the Universe, probed by galaxy surveys. The second to temperature anisotropics of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), probed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Map (WMAP). Both probe the matter and dark energy distributions in the Universe and can be used to test general relativity. The first part of this Thesis (Chapters 2 to 4) is concerned with the analysis of galaxy clustering in redshift space. The second part (Chapters 5 to 7) is concerned with the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect using LSS-CMB cross-correlations. Chapter 1 introduces the cosmological theory and overviews the subsequent chapters. Chapter 2 gives a review of recent results from the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and its Redshift Survey (2MRS). It includes work published in Erdogdu (a) et al. (2006) and Erdogdu (b) et al. (2006). Chapter 3 quantifies the clustering of 2MRS galaxies in redshift space. Chapter 4 uses results from Chapter 3 to constrain cosmological parameters. A selection of work from Chapters 3 and 4 will shortly become available in Rassat et al. (2008), entitled 'Redshift Space Analysis of 2MRS'. Chapter 5 overviews the late-time Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) and cross- correlations between the LSS and the CMB. Chapter 6 is also published in Rassat et al. (2007), entitled "Cross-correlation of 2MASS and WMAP3: Implications for the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect". It investigates a detection of the ISW effect and correlations which may affect statistical isotropy in the CMB ('Axis of Evil'). Chapter 7 uses the ISW effect to forecast constraints on dark energy parameters and general modifications of general relativity for the next generation of galaxy surveys, particularly the Dark UNiverse Explorer (DUNE) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Chapter 8 presents the overall conclusions of this Thesis. Chapter 9 discusses possible extensions to

  12. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown. PMID:23406937

  13. Airborne ballistic camera tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redish, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    An operational airborne ballistic camera tracking system was tested for operational and data reduction feasibility. The acquisition and data processing requirements of the system are discussed. Suggestions for future improvements are also noted. A description of the data reduction mathematics is outlined. Results from a successful reentry test mission are tabulated. The test mission indicated that airborne ballistic camera tracking systems are feasible.

  14. Surface Gravity Data Contribution to the Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands Geoid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Gerhards, C.; Holmes, S. A.; Saleh, J.; Shaw, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project provides updated local gravity field information for the XGEOID15 models. In particular, its airborne gravity data in the area of Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands (PRVI) made substantial improvements (~60%) on the precision of the geoid models at the local GNSS/Leveling bench marks in the target area. Fortunately, PRVI is free of the huge systematic error in the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88). Thus, the airborne contribution was evaluated more realistically. In addition, the airborne data picked up more detailed gravity field information in the medium wavelength band (spherical harmonic degree 200 to 600) that are largely beyond the resolution of the current satellite missions, especially along the nearby ocean trench areas. Under this circumstance (significant airborne contributions in the medium band), local surface gravity data need to be examined more carefully than before during merging with the satellite and airborne information for local geoid improvement, especially considering the well-known systematic problems in the NGS historical gravity holdings (Saleh et al 2013 JoG). Initial tests showed that it is very important to maintain high consistency between the surface data sets and the airborne enhanced reference model. In addition, a new aggregation method (Gerhards 2014, Inverse Problems) will also be tested to optimally combine the local surface data with the reference model. The data cleaning and combining procedures in the target area will be summarized here as reference for future applications.

  15. Detecting inertial effects with airborne matter-wave interferometry.

    PubMed

    Geiger, R; Ménoret, V; Stern, G; Zahzam, N; Cheinet, P; Battelier, B; Villing, A; Moron, F; Lours, M; Bidel, Y; Bresson, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2011-01-01

    Inertial sensors relying on atom interferometry offer a breakthrough advance in a variety of applications, such as inertial navigation, gravimetry or ground- and space-based tests of fundamental physics. These instruments require a quiet environment to reach their performance and using them outside the laboratory remains a challenge. Here we report the first operation of an airborne matter-wave accelerometer set up aboard a 0g plane and operating during the standard gravity (1g) and microgravity (0g) phases of the flight. At 1g, the sensor can detect inertial effects more than 300 times weaker than the typical acceleration fluctuations of the aircraft. We describe the improvement of the interferometer sensitivity in 0g, which reaches 2 x 10-4 ms-2 / √Hz with our current setup. We finally discuss the extension of our method to airborne and spaceborne tests of the Universality of free fall with matter waves. PMID:21934658

  16. Detecting inertial effects with airborne matter-wave interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, R.; Ménoret, V.; Stern, G.; Zahzam, N.; Cheinet, P.; Battelier, B.; Villing, A.; Moron, F.; Lours, M.; Bidel, Y.; Bresson, A.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2011-01-01

    Inertial sensors relying on atom interferometry offer a breakthrough advance in a variety of applications, such as inertial navigation, gravimetry or ground- and space-based tests of fundamental physics. These instruments require a quiet environment to reach their performance and using them outside the laboratory remains a challenge. Here we report the first operation of an airborne matter-wave accelerometer set up aboard a 0g plane and operating during the standard gravity (1g) and microgravity (0g) phases of the flight. At 1g, the sensor can detect inertial effects more than 300 times weaker than the typical acceleration fluctuations of the aircraft. We describe the improvement of the interferometer sensitivity in 0g, which reaches 2 x 10-4 ms-2 / √Hz with our current setup. We finally discuss the extension of our method to airborne and spaceborne tests of the Universality of free fall with matter waves. PMID:21934658

  17. Airborne transmission of lyssaviruses.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N; Phillpotts, R; Fooks, A R

    2006-06-01

    In 2002, a Scottish bat conservationist developed a rabies-like disease and subsequently died. This was caused by infection with European bat lyssavirus 2 (EBLV-2), a virus closely related to Rabies virus (RABV). The source of this infection and the means of transmission have not yet been confirmed. In this study, the hypothesis that lyssaviruses, particularly RABV and the bat variant EBLV-2, might be transmitted via the airborne route was tested. Mice were challenged via direct introduction of lyssavirus into the nasal passages. Two hours after intranasal challenge with a mouse-adapted strain of RABV (Challenge Virus Standard), viral RNA was detectable in the tongue, lungs and stomach. All of the mice challenged by direct intranasal inoculation developed disease signs by 7 days post-infection. Two out of five mice challenged by direct intranasal inoculation of EBLV-2 developed disease between 16 and 19 days post-infection. In addition, a simple apparatus was evaluated in which mice could be exposed experimentally to infectious doses of lyssavirus from an aerosol. Using this approach, mice challenged with RABV, but not those challenged with EBLV-2, were highly susceptible to infection by inhalation. These data support the hypothesis that lyssaviruses, and RABV in particular, can be spread by airborne transmission in a dose-dependent manner. This could present a particular hazard to personnel exposed to aerosols of infectious RABV following accidental release in a laboratory environment. PMID:16687600

  18. A gravity survey of parts of quadrangles 26E, 26F, 27E, and 27F, northeastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C.H.; Showail, A.A.; Kane, M.F.; Khoja, I.A.; Al Ghandi, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    The greatest complete Bouguer anomaly is associated with basaltic lava flows located in the northeastern part of the survey area. The thickness of the basalt in outcrop does not account for the anomalies with the highest amplitudes, but the latter may be due to the presence of a basalt-filled vent. Those anomalies that are present do not define the basalt flows well, but the largest free-air anomaly occurs over the southwestern margin of the Salma Caldera, located about 15 km from the basalt flows. The source of the free-air anomaly is unknown, but it may be related to another hidden basaltic vent.

  19. Chiral gravity, log gravity, and extremal CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, Alexander; Song Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2010-03-15

    We show that the linearization of all exact solutions of classical chiral gravity around the AdS{sub 3} vacuum have positive energy. Nonchiral and negative-energy solutions of the linearized equations are infrared divergent at second order, and so are removed from the spectrum. In other words, chirality is confined and the equations of motion have linearization instabilities. We prove that the only stationary, axially symmetric solutions of chiral gravity are BTZ black holes, which have positive energy. It is further shown that classical log gravity--the theory with logarithmically relaxed boundary conditions--has finite asymptotic symmetry generators but is not chiral and hence may be dual at the quantum level to a logarithmic conformal field theories (CFT). Moreover we show that log gravity contains chiral gravity within it as a decoupled charge superselection sector. We formally evaluate the Euclidean sum over geometries of chiral gravity and show that it gives precisely the holomorphic extremal CFT partition function. The modular invariance and integrality of the expansion coefficients of this partition function are consistent with the existence of an exact quantum theory of chiral gravity. We argue that the problem of quantizing chiral gravity is the holographic dual of the problem of constructing an extremal CFT, while quantizing log gravity is dual to the problem of constructing a logarithmic extremal CFT.

  20. Feeling Gravity's Pull: Gravity Modeling. The Gravity Field of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank; Smith, David; Rowlands, David; Zuber, Maria; Neumann, G.; Chinn, Douglas; Pavlis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Most people take the constant presence of gravitys pull for granted. However, the Earth's gravitational strength actually varies from location to location. This variation occurs because mass, which influences an object's gravitational pull, is not evenly distributed within the planet. Changes in topography, such as glacial movement, an earthquake, or a rise in the ocean level, can subtly affect the gravity field. An accurate measurement of the Earth's gravity field helps us understand the distribution of mass beneath the surface. This insight can assist us in locating petroleum, mineral deposits, ground water, and other valuable substances. Gravity mapping can also help notice or verify changes in sea surface height and other ocean characteristics. Such changes may indicate climate change from polar ice melting and other phenomena. In addition, gravity mapping can indicate how land moves under the surface after earthquakes and other plate tectonic processes. Finally, changes in the Earth's gravity field might indicate a shift in water distribution that could affect agriculture, water supplies for population centers, and long-term weather prediction. Scientists can map out the Earth's gravity field by watching satellite orbits. When a satellite shifts in vertical position, it might be passing over an area where gravity changes in strength. Gravity is only one factor that may shape a satellite's orbital path. To derive a gravity measurement from satellite movement, scientists must remove other factors that might affect a satellite's position: 1. Drag from atmospheric friction. 2. Pressure from solar radiation as it heads toward Earth and. as it is reflected off the surface of the Earth 3. Gravitational pull from the Sun, the Moon, and other planets in the Solar System. 4. The effect of tides. 5. Relativistic effects. Scientists must also correct for the satellite tracking process. For example, the tracking signal must be corrected for refraction through the

  1. New free-air and Bouguer gravity fields of Taiwan from multiple platforms and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Hsu, Hung-Jui; Chang, Emmy T. Y.; Featherstone, W. E.; Tenzer, Robert; Lien, Tzuyi; Hsiao, Yu-Shen; Shih, Hsuan-Chang; Jai, Pang-Ho

    2014-01-01

    We construct 1‧ × 1‧ grids of free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies around Taiwan with well-defined error estimates for quality assessment. The grids are compiled from land, airborne and shipborne gravity measurements, augmented with altimeter gravity at sea. Three sets of relative land gravity measurements are network-adjusted and outlier-edited, yielding accuracies of 0.03-0.09 mGal. Three airborne gravity sets are collected at altitudes 5156 and 1620 m with accuracies of 2.57-2.79 mGal. Seven offshore shipborne gravity campaigns around Taiwan and its offshore islands yield shallow-water gravity values with 0.88-2.35 mGal accuracies. All data points are registered with GPS-derived geodetic coordinates at cm-dm accuracies, allowing for precise gravity reductions and computing gravity disturbances. The various datasets are combined by the band-limited least-squares collocation in a one-step procedure. In the eastern mountainous (or offshore) region, Bouguer anomalies and density contrasts without considering the oceanic (or land) topographic contribution are underestimated. The new grids show unprecedented tectonic features that can revise earlier results, and can be used in a broad range of applications.

  2. Laser Systems For Use With Airborne Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsky, Joseph

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes a family of airborne laser systems in use for terrain profiling, surveying, mapping, altimetry, collision avoidance and shipboard landing systems using fixed and rotary wing aircraft as the platforms. The laser altimeter has also been used in systems compatible with the Army T-16 and. T-22 carrier missiles (platform). Both pulsed gallium arsenide and Nd:YAG (neodymium-doped, yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser rangefinders have been used for these applications. All of these systems use ACCI's advanced measurement techniques that permit range accuracies of 8 cm, single shot, 1 cm averaged, to be achieved. Pulse rates up to 4 Khz are employed for airborne profiling. This high data density rate provides 1 data point every 2" along the aircraft flight line at aircraft speed of 500 knots. Scanning modes for some applications are employed. Systems have been integrated with all current inertial navigation systems (Litton, Ferranti and Honeywell), as well as a number of microwave positioning systems. Removal of aircraft motion from the laser range measurements by use of an accelerometer is described. Flight data from a number of program performed by U.S. and Canadian Federal Agencies, in addition to those of commercial surveying and mapping companies are described.

  3. Airborne laser scanning for high-resolution mapping of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csatho, Bea; Schenk, Toni; Krabill, William; Wilson, Terry; Lyons, William; McKenzie, Garry; Hallam, Cheryl; Manizade, Serdar; Paulsen, Timothy

    In order to evaluate the potential of airborne laser scanning for topographic mapping in Antarctica and to establish calibration/validation sites for NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) altimeter mission, NASA, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) joined forces to collect high-resolution airborne laser scanning data.In a two-week campaign during the 2001-2002 austral summer, NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) system was used to collect data over several sites in the McMurdo Sound area of Antarctica (Figure 1a). From the recorded signals, NASA computed laser points and The Ohio State University (OSU) completed the elaborate computation/verification of high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) in 2003. This article reports about the DEM generation and some exemplary results from scientists using the geomorphologic information from the DEMs during the 2003-2004 field season.

  4. 2006 Compilation of Alaska Gravity Data and Historical Reports

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, Richard W.; Brown, Philip J., II; Morin, Robert L.; Hill, Patricia L.

    2008-01-01

    Gravity anomalies provide fundamental geophysical information about Earth structure and dynamics. To increase geologic and geodynamic understanding of Alaska, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected and processed Alaska gravity data for the past 50 years. This report introduces and describes an integrated, State-wide gravity database and provides accompanying gravity calculation tools to assist in its application. Additional information includes gravity base station descriptions and digital scans of historical USGS reports. The gravity calculation tools enable the user to reduce new gravity data in a consistent manner for combination with the existing database. This database has sufficient resolution to define the regional gravity anomalies of Alaska. Interpretation of regional gravity anomalies in parts of the State are hampered by the lack of local isostatic compensation in both southern and northern Alaska. However, when filtered appropriately, the Alaska gravity data show regional features having geologic significance. These features include gravity lows caused by low-density rocks of Cenozoic basins, flysch belts, and felsic intrusions, as well as many gravity highs associated with high-density mafic and ultramafic complexes.

  5. TR-GRAV: National Center for Turkish Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simav, Mehmet; Akpınar, İlyas; Sezen, Erdinc; Cingöz, Ayhan; Yıldız, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    TR-GRAV, the National Center for Turkish Gravity Field (TR-GRAV) that has recently become operational,is a national center that collects, processes and distributes Absolute Gravimetry,Relative Gravimetry, Airborne Gravimetry,Shipborne Gravimetry,Satellite Gravimetry, GNSS/Levelling, Astrogeodetic Vertical Deflection data to model and improve regional gravity field for the Turkish territory and its surrounding regions and to provide accurate, consistent and value-added data & products to the scientific and engineering communities. In this presentation, we will introduce the center web portal and give some details about the database.

  6. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  7. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  8. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  9. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  10. Airborne midwave and longwave infrared hyperspectral imaging of gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Duval, Marc; Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Characterization of gas clouds are challenging situations to address due to the large and uneven distribution of these fast moving entities. Whether gas characterization is carried out for gas leaks surveys or environmental monitoring purposes, explosives and/or toxic chemicals are often involved. In such situations, airborne measurements present distinct advantages over ground based-techniques since large areas can be covered efficiently from a safe distance. In order to illustrate the potential of airborne thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging for gas cloud characterization, measurements were carried out above smokestacks and a ground-based gas release experiment. Quantitative airborne chemical images of carbon monoxide (CO) and ethylene (C2H4) were obtained from measurements carried out using a midwave (MWIR, 3-5 μm) and a longwave (LWIR, 8-12 μm) airborne infrared hyperspectral sensor respectively. Scattering effects were observed in the MWIR experiments on smokestacks as a result of water condensation upon rapid cool down of the hot emission gases. Airborne measurements were carried out using both mapping and targeting acquisition modes. The later provides unique time-dependent information such as the gas cloud direction and velocity.

  11. Airborne midwave and longwave infrared hyperspectral imaging of gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Duval, Marc; Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Characterization of gas clouds are challenging situations to address due to the large and uneven distribution of these fast moving entities. Whether gas characterization is carried out for gas leaks surveys or environmental monitoring purposes, explosives and/or toxic chemicals are often involved. In such situations, airborne measurements present distinct advantages over ground based-techniques since large areas can be covered efficiently from a safe distance. In order to illustrate the potential of airborne thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging for gas cloud characterization, measurements were carried out above smokestacks and a ground-based gas release experiment. Quantitative airborne chemical images of carbon monoxide (CO) and ethylene (C2H4) were obtained from measurements carried out using a midwave (MWIR, 3-5 μm) and a longwave (LWIR, 8-12 μm) airborne infrared hyperspectral sensor respectively. Scattering effects were observed in the MWIR experiments on smokestacks as a result of water condensation upon rapid cool down of the hot emission gases. Airborne measurements were carried out using both mapping and targeting acquisition modes. The later provides unique time-dependent information such as the gas cloud direction and velocity.

  12. Airborne midwave and longwave infrared hyperspectral imaging of gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Duval, Marc; Farley, Vincent; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Characterization of gas clouds are challenging situations to address due to the large and uneven distribution of these fast moving entities. Whether gas characterization is carried out for gas leaks surveys or environmental monitoring purposes, explosives and/or toxic chemicals are often involved. In such situations, airborne measurements present distinct advantages over ground based-techniques since large areas can be covered efficiently from a safe distance. In order to illustrate the potential of airborne thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging for gas cloud characterization, measurements were carried out above smokestacks and a ground-based gas release experiment. Quantitative airborne chemical images of carbon monoxide (CO) and ethylene (C2H4) were obtained from measurements carried out using a midwave (MWIR, 3-5 μm) and a longwave (LWIR, 8-12 μm) airborne infrared hyperspectral sensor respectively. Scattering effects were observed in the MWIR experiments on smokestacks as a result of water condensation upon rapid cool down of the hot emission gases. Airborne measurements were carried out using both mapping and targeting acquisition modes. The later provides unique time-dependent information such as the gas cloud direction and velocity.

  13. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  14. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration of all chemical particles in the urine. ... changes to will tell the provider the specific gravity of your urine. The dipstick test gives only ...

  15. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Tethered gravity laboratories study is presented. The following subject areas are covered: variable gravity laboratory; attitude tether stabilizer; configuration analysis (AIT); dynamic analysis (SAO); and work planned for the next reporting period.

  16. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  17. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  18. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^-23 Hz^-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  19. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  20. Challenging Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roveto, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    A recent proposal by Erik Verlinde claims that gravity should be viewed not as a fundamental force, but an emergent thermodynamic phenomenon due to some yet undetermined microscopic theory. We present a challenge to this reformulation of gravity. Our claim is that a detailed derivation using Verlinde's proposed theory fails to correctly give Newton's laws or Einstein gravity.

  1. Gravity science investigation of Ceres from Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ryan; Konopliv, Alexander; Bills, Bruce; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Asmar, Sami; Rambaux, Nicolas; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher; Zuber, Maria; Ermakov, Anton; King, Scott; Rayman, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn gravity science investigation utilizes the DSN radiometric tracking of the spacecraft and on-board framing camera images to determine the global shape and gravity field of Ceres. The gravity science data collected during Approach, Survey, and High-Altitude Mapping Orbit phases were processed. Currently, the latest gravity field called CERES08A is available, which is globally accurate to degree and order 5. Combining the gravity and shape data gives the bulk density of 2162.5±8 kg/m3. The low Bouguer gravity at high topography area, or vice versa, indicates that the surface of Ceres is likely compensated and that its interior presents a low-viscosity layer at depth. The degree 2 gravity harmonics show that the rotation of Ceres is very nearly about a principal axis. This consistent with hydrostatic equilibrium at 1% level, and infers a mean moment of inertia of Ceres is 0.36, implying some degree of central condensation. Based on a simple two-layer model of Ceres and assuming carbonaceous chondrites and hydrostatic equilibrium, the core size is expected to be ~280 km with corresponding average thickness of the outer shell of ~190 km.

  2. Assessing New Airborne Gravimetry Collected over New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, M.; McCubbine, J.; Caratori Tontini, F.; Winefield, R.

    2014-12-01

    Land Information New Zealand, in conjunction with GNS Science and Victoria University, has recently completed a ten month airborne gravimetry campaign across New Zealand. The survey has provided, for the first time, consistent regular coverage across the shallow coastal areas and rough topographic regions that have previously been extremely difficult to survey. This data will be used to update the gravimetric geoid model that forms the basis of New Zealand's official vertical datum. In this contribution we present the results of the survey campaign and evaluate the accuracy of the data collected over 2013/14.

  3. A combined magnetometry and gravity study across Zagros orogeny in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Maysam; Oskooi, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural geology and the tectonic conditions of the Zagros orogeny along the route of Qom to Kermanshah cities were investigated using the combined geophysical methods of the airborne magnetometry and the ground-based gravity data. Airborne magnetometry data of Iran with a line space of survey, 7.5 km, were used to model the magnetic susceptibility property along the route. At first, the airborne magnetic data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance minor changes of the Earth's magnetic field over the studied region. Afterward, 3D inverse modeling of the magnetic data was implemented to the downward continued data, and subsequently the section of magnetic susceptibility variation along the desired route was extracted and imaged at depth. The acquired model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data, showing low misfit values between the observation and the predicted data. The analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole (RTP) magnetic data leading to the determination of the active and probable hidden faults in the structural zones of the Zagros, such as Sanandaj-Sirjan, Central Domain (CD) and Urumieh-Dokhtar based upon the generated peaks along the profile of analytic signal filter. In addition, the density variations of the subsurface geological layers were determined by 3D inverting of the ground-based gravity data over the whole study area, and extracting this property along the route. The joint models of magnetic susceptibility and density variation could appropriately localize the traces of faults along with the geologically and tectonically structural boundaries in the region. The locations of faults correspond well to the variation of geophysical parameters on the inverted sections. Probable direction, slope and extension at depth of these faults were also determined on the sections, indicating a high tectonized zone of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) parallel to the zone of

  4. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  5. Localized Temporal Gravity Investigations at Long Valley Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiel, J. M.; Gabbert, R.; Smith, E.; Ingalls, S.; Beale, J.; Factor, J.; Holmes, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Accurately modeling temporal changes in the gravity field of the Earth is now a central concern of modern geodesy. Investigations in temporal gravity are currently the focus of considerable research on a global basis as reported by the IAG, Commission 2.2: Gravity Field [IAG, 2011]. These large scale investigations utilizing the GRACE/GOCE satellite datasets have demonstrated considerable time dependent variations in gravity as the result of mass changes, most notably owing to variations in water/ice regimes. However, these gravity missions are relatively recent, and so the length of the temporal period is limited to sub-decadal extent. Similarly, the long wavelength resolution of the satellite data precludes the derivation of a spatially dense, localized gravity model. The analysis of gravity changes on a localized basis is quite limited owing to the lack of quality gravity collections over a period of decades. Investigations over decadal time periods are accordingly unique. In this paper, we report the results of our recent investigations at Long Valley Caldera, California, USA with respect to localized temporal gravity changes. Leveraging early gravity acquisitions by Jachens and Roberts [1985] and Battaglia, et al, [2003], we analyze the recent (2012) gravity collections to establish a three decade study of gravity changes at the Long Valley Caldera site. Since all the data was collected at the same locations for each gravity survey (1982~1985, 1999, 2012), the resulting study is able to minimize errors associated with interpolation. Additionally, we compare the recent localized gravity model with the GRACE/GOCE gravity signature and analyze the correlation between the local and global models. Approved for public release 12-430

  6. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in

  7. Airborne Laser/GPS Mapping of Assateague National Seashore Beach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kradill, W. B.; Wright, C. W.; Brock, John C.; Swift, R. N.; Frederick, E. B.; Manizade, S. S.; Yungel, J. K.; Martin, C. F.; Sonntag, J. G.; Duffy, Mark; Hulslander, William

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented from topographic surveys of the Assateague Island National Seashore using recently developed Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and kinematic Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. In November, 1995, and again in May, 1996, the NASA Arctic Ice Mapping (AIM) group from the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility conducted the topographic surveys as a part of technology enhancement activities prior to conducting missions to measure the elevation of extensive sections of the Greenland Ice Sheet as part of NASA's Global Climate Change program. Differences between overlapping portions of both surveys are compared for quality control. An independent assessment of the accuracy of the ATM survey is provided by comparison to surface surveys which were conducted using standard techniques. The goal of these projects is to mdke these measurements to an accuracy of +/- 10 cm. Differences between the fall 1995 and 1996 surveys provides an assessment of net changes in the beach morphology over an annual cycle.

  8. Gravity Signature of the Teague Ring Impact Structure, Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.

    1998-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary effort to better define the nature of the Teague Ring structure and to understand specifics about the crustal structure, a GPS controlled gravity survey of the feature was undertaken in the austral winter of 1996.

  9. Comparison of airborne lidar measurements with 420 kHz echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Churnside, James H; Thorne, Richard E

    2005-09-10

    Airborne lidar has the potential to survey large areas quickly and at a low cost per kilometer along a survey line. For this reason, we investigated the performance of an airborne lidar for surveys of zooplankton. In particular, we compared the lidar returns with echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Data from eight regions of the Sound were compared, and the correlation between the two methods was 0.78. To obtain this level of agreement, a threshold was applied to the lidar return to remove the effects of scattering from phytoplankton. PMID:16161666

  10. How two gravity-gradient inversion methods can be used to reveal different geologic features of ore deposit - A case study from the Quadrilátero Ferrífero (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, Dionísio U.; Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2016-07-01

    Airborne gravity gradiometry data have been recently used in mining surveys to map the 3D geometry of ore deposits. This task can be achieved by different gravity-gradient inversion methods, many of which use a voxel-based discretization of the Earth's subsurface. To produce a unique and stable solution, an inversion method introduces particular constraints. One constraining inversion introduces a depth-weighting function in the first-order Tikhonov regularization imposing a smoothing on the density-contrast distributions that are not restricted to near-surface regions. Another gravity-gradient inversion, the method of planting anomalous densities, imposes compactness and sharp boundaries on the density-contrast distributions. We used these two inversion methods to invert the airborne gravity-gradient data over the iron-ore deposit at the southern flank of the Gandarela syncline in Quadrilátero Ferrífero (Brazil). Because these methods differ from each other in the particular constraint used, the estimated 3D density-contrast distributions reveal different geologic features of ore deposit. The depth-weighting smoothing inversion reveals variable dip directions along the strike of the retrieved iron-ore body. The planting anomalous density inversion estimates a compact iron-ore mass with a single density contrast, which reveals a variable volume of the iron ore along its strike increasing towards the hinge zone of the Gandarela syncline which is the zone of maximum compression. The combination of the geologic features inferred from each estimate leads to a synergistic effect, revealing that the iron-ore deposit is strongly controlled by the Gandarela syncline.

  11. Airborne GLM Simulator (FEGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Stewart, M. F.; Podgorny, S.; Corredor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Real time lightning observations have proven to be useful for advanced warning and now-casting of severe weather events. In anticipation of the launch of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard GOES-R that will provide continuous real time observations of total (both cloud and ground) lightning, the Fly's Eye GLM Simulator (FEGS) is in production. FEGS is an airborne instrument designed to provide cal/val measurements for GLM from high altitude aircraft. It consists of a 5 x 5 array of telescopes each with a narrow passband filter to isolate the 777.4 nm neutral oxygen emission triplet radiated by lightning. The telescopes will measure the optical radiance emitted by lightning that is transmitted through the cloud top with a temporal resolution of 10 μs. When integrated on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, the FEGS array with its 90° field-of-view will observe a cloud top area nearly equal to a single GLM pixel. This design will allow FEGS to determine the temporal and spatial variation of light that contributes to a GLM event detection. In addition to the primary telescope array, the instrument includes 5 supplementary optical channels that observe alternate spectral emission features and will enable the use of FEGS for interesting lightning physics applications. Here we present an up-to-date summary of the project and a description of its scientific applications.

  12. Airborne rescue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The airborne rescue system includes a boom with telescoping members for extending a line and collar to a rescue victim. The boom extends beyond the tip of the helicopter rotor so that the victim may avoid the rotor downwash. The rescue line is played out and reeled in by winch. The line is temporarily retained under the boom. When the boom is extended, the rescue line passes through clips. When the victim dons the collar and the tension in the line reaches a predetermined level, the clips open and release the line from the boom. Then the rescue line can form a straight line between the victim and the winch, and the victim can be lifted to the helicopter. A translator is utilized to push out or pull in the telescoping members. The translator comprises a tape and a rope. Inside the telescoping members the tape is curled around the rope and the tape has a tube-like configuration. The tape and rope are provided from supply spools.

  13. Laboratory analysis and airborne detection of materials stimulated to luminesce by the sun

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemphill, W.R.; Theisen, A.F.; Tyson, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) is an airborne electro-optical device used to image materials which have been stimulated to luminesce by the Sun. Such materials include uranium-bearing sandstone, sedimentary phosphate rock, marine oil seeps, and stressed vegetation. Prior to conducting an airborne survey, a fluorescence spectrometer may be used in the laboratory to determine the spectral region where samples of the target material exhibit maximum luminescence, and to select the optimum Fraunhofer line. ?? 1984.

  14. Advanced Airborne CO2 LAS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, J. T.; Braun, M. G.; McGregor, D. P.; Erxleben, W. H.; Browell, E. V.; Harrison, F. W.

    2009-12-01

    A unique airborne Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (LAS) system has been developed by ITT Space Systems, LLC to address the needs of the National Research Council Decadal Survey Tier 2 mission for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS). This instrument has undergone multiple airborne field tests in cooperation with our partners at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The instrument was built largely with off-the-shelf components and uses high reliability telecom components, including lasers, modulators and fiber amplifiers as the transmitter. Multiple wavelengths are transmitted simultaneously from a single collimator and the return signal is collected by a simple 8” telescope that is fiber coupled to a HgCdTe APD. The analog signal is sampled with a high resolution scope card housed in a National Instruments PXI chassis and the digitized signal is then passed through our custom-built software-based lock-in processing system which allows separation of the signals from the individual wavelengths. The separated signals are then used in the standard Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) relations to determine the integrated column differential optical depth. This presentation will give a detailed overview of this multi-frequency, single-beam, synchronous lock-in LAS instrument including the basic methodology of the measurement. Recent improvements in the lock-in methodology designed to eliminate the effects of multi- path fading and frequency dependence of the electronic components will also be discussed.

  15. Global marine gravity field map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloss, Peter W.

    A color relief image of the marine gravity field from SEASAT altimeter measurements of the topography of the ocean surface is now available through the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This image, prepared by William F. Haxby (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, N.Y.), has been published by NGDC for the Office of Naval Research, which was the principal sponsor of the effort leading to the development of the image. The U.S. Geological Survey, National Mapping Division, printed the map.

  16. Airborne Laser Polar Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Gerald W.

    1973-01-01

    A polar nephelometer has been developed at NCAR to measure the angular variation of the intensity of light scattered by air molecules and particles. The system has been designed for airborne measurements using outside air ducted through a 5-cm diameter airflow tube; the sample volume is that which is common to the intersection of a collimated source beam and the detector field of view within the airflow tube. The source is a linearly polarized helium-neon laser beam. The optical system defines a collimated field-of-view (0.5deg half-angle) through a series of diaphragms located behind a I72-mm focal length objective lens. A photomultiplier tube is located immediately behind an aperture in the focal plane of the objective lens. The laser beam is mechanically chopped (on-off) at a rate of 5 Hz; a two-channel pulse counter, synchronized to the laser output, measures the photomultiplier pulse rate with the light beam both on and off. The difference in these measured pulse rates is directly proportional to the intensity of the scattered light from the volume common to the intersection of the laser beam and the detector field-of-view. Measurements can be made at scattering angles from 15deg to 165deg with reference to the direction of propagation of the light beam. Intermediate angles are obtained by selecting the angular increments desired between these extreme angles (any multiple of 0.1deg can be selected for the angular increment; 5deg is used in normal operation). Pulses provided by digital circuits control a stepping motor which sequentially rotates the detector by pre-selected angular increments. The synchronous photon-counting system automatically begins measurement of the scattered-light intensity immediately after the rotation to a new angle has been completed. The instrument has been flown on the NASA Convair 990 airborne laboratory to obtain data on the complex index of refraction of atmospheric aerosols. A particle impaction device is operated simultaneously

  17. A Gravity data along LARSE (Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment) Line II, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooley, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a detailed gravity study along part of the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE) transect across the San Fernando Basin and Transverse Ranges to help characterize the structure underlying this area. 249 gravity measurements were collected along the transect and to augment regional coverage near the profile. An isostatic gravity low of 50-60 mGal reflects the San Fernando-East Ventura basin. Another prominent isostatic gravity with an amplitude of 30 mGal marks the Antelope Valley basin. Gravity highs occur over the Santa Monica Mountains and the Transverse Ranges. The highest isostatic gravity values coincide with outcrops of Pelona schist.

  18. Airborne lidar experiments at the Savannah River Plant, June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Krabill, W.B.; Swift, R.N.

    1987-09-01

    Results are presented from a series of studies conducted at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Plant (SRP) with the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL). These studies included a topographic survey of a {approximately}1000 acre lake basin (presently designated L Lake) which had been excavated for use as a cooling pond for L Reactor; a study of the movement of discharged cooling water in Pond C and the warm arm of Par Pond using Rhodamine WT dye as a tag; initial baseline studies of the vegetation cover of the Steel Creek corridor (through which the outflow of L Lake is carried to the Savannah River); and a demonstration of potential forestry applications of the AOL. These investigations were conducted over a 3-day period in June 1985. The AOL is an advanced airborne laser system capable of making temporal or time history measurements of laser backscatter (bathymetry mode) or spectral measurements of laser induced fluorescence from waterborne constituents (fluorosensing mode). The AOL is flown together with auxiliary instruments and camera systems on board a four engine P-3A aircraft. Recent modifications to the AOL allow in-flight changes between the two basic operational modes of the instrument which permitted the topographic study to be conducted on the same flights as the fluorescent dye study. The L Lake topographic survey represents a state-of-the-art demonstration of airborne laser surveying capability.

  19. NASA Airborne Science Program: NASA Stratospheric Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducts a wide variety of remote sensing projects using several unique aircraft platforms. These vehicles have been selected and modified to provide capabilities that are particularly important for geophysical research, in particular, routine access to very high altitudes, long range, long endurance, precise trajectory control, and the payload capacity to operate multiple, diverse instruments concurrently. While the NASA program has been in operation for over 30 years, new aircraft and technological advances that will expand the capabilities for airborne observation are continually being assessed and implemented. This presentation will review the current state of NASA's science platforms, recent improvements and new missions concepts as well as provide a survey of emerging technologies unmanned aerial vehicles for long duration observations (Global Hawk and Predator). Applications of information technology that allow more efficient use of flight time and the ability to rapidly reconfigure systems for different mission objectives are addressed.

  20. Airborne laser mapping of Assateague National Seashore Beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krabill, W.B.; Wright, C.W.; Swift, R.N.; Frederick, E.B.; Manizade, S.S.; Yungel, J.K.; Martin, C.F.; Sonntag, J.G.; Duffy, Mark; Hulslander, William; Brock, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Results are presented from topographic surveys of the Assateague Island National Seashore using an airborne scanning laser altimeter and kinematic Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. The instrument used was the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), developed by the NASA Arctic Ice Mapping (AIM) group from the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. In November, 1995, and again in May, 1996, these topographic surveys were flown as a functionality check prior to conducting missions to measure the elevation of extensive sections of the Greenland Ice Sheet as part of NASA's Global Climate Change program. Differences between overlapping portions of both surveys are compared for quality control. An independent assessment of the accuracy of the ATM survey is provided by comparison to surface surveys which were conducted using standard techniques. The goal of these projects is to make these measurements to an accuracy of ± 10 cm. Differences between the fall 1995 and 1996 surveys provides an assessment of net changes in the beach morphology over an annual cycle.

  1. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  2. Canonical gravity with fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin; Das, Rupam

    2008-09-15

    Canonical gravity in real Ashtekar-Barbero variables is generalized to allow for fermionic matter. The resulting torsion changes several expressions in Holst's original vacuum analysis, which are summarized here. This in turn requires adaptations to the known loop quantization of gravity coupled to fermions, which is discussed on the basis of the classical analysis. As a result, parity invariance is not manifestly realized in loop quantum gravity.

  3. Evaluation of the new gravity control in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sękowski, M.; Dykowski, P.; Krynski, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The new gravity control in Poland is based on absolute gravity measurements. It consists of 28 fundamental stations and 168 base stations. Fundamental stations are located in laboratories; they are to be surveyed in 2014 with the FG5-230 of the Warsaw University of Technology. Base stations are monumented field stations; they were surveyed in 2012 and 2013 with the A10-020 gravimeter. They are the subject of the paper. Besides absolute gravity measurements the vertical gravity gradient was precisely determined at all 168 base stations. Inconsistency of the determined vertical gravity gradients with respect to the normal ones has been presented. 77 base stations are also the stations of the previous gravity (POGK98) established in 90. of 20 century. Differences between newly determined gravity at those stations with those of POGK98 were evaluated. Alongside the establishment of the base stations of the gravity control multiple additional activities were performed to assure and provide the proper gravity reference level. They concerned regular gravity measurements on monthly basis with the A10-020 at three sites in Borowa Gora Geodetic-Geophysical Observatory, calibrations of metrological parameters of the A10-020 gravimeter and scale factor calibrations of LCR gravimeters, participation with the A10-020 in the international (ECAG2011, ICAG2013) and regional comparison campaigns of absolute gravimeters, and local comparisons of the A10-020 with the FG5-230. The summary of the work performed during the establishment of the gravity control is best described by total uncertainty budget for the A10-020 gravimeter determined on each of the 168 gravity stations.

  4. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  5. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  6. Evaluation of airborne topographic lidar for quantifying beach changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Krabill, W.B.; Swift, R.N.; Brock, J.; List, J.; Hansen, M.; Holman, R.A.; Manizade, S.; Sontag, J.; Meredith, A.; Morgan, K.; Yunkel, J.K.; Frederick, E.B.; Stockdon, H.

    2003-01-01

    A scanning airborne topographic lidar was evaluated for its ability to quantify beach topography and changes during the Sandy Duck experiment in 1997 along the North Carolina coast. Elevation estimates, acquired with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), were compared to elevations measured with three types of ground-based measurements - 1) differential GPS equipped all-terrain vehicle (ATV) that surveyed a 3-km reach of beach from the shoreline to the dune, 2) GPS antenna mounted on a stadia rod used to intensely survey a different 100 m reach of beach, and 3) a second GPS-equipped ATV that surveyed a 70-km-long transect along the coast. Over 40,000 individual intercomparisons between ATM and ground surveys were calculated. RMS vertical differences associated with the ATM when compared to ground measurements ranged from 13 to 19 cm. Considering all of the intercomparisons together, RMS ??? 15 cm. This RMS error represents a total error for individual elevation estimates including uncertainties associated with random and mean errors. The latter was the largest source of error and was attributed to drift in differential GPS. The ??? 15 cm vertical accuracy of the ATM is adequate to resolve beach-change signals typical of the impact of storms. For example, ATM surveys of Assateague Island (spanning the border of MD and VA) prior to and immediately following a severe northeaster showed vertical beach changes in places greater than 2 m, much greater than expected errors associated with the ATM. A major asset of airborne lidar is the high spatial data density. Measurements of elevation are acquired every few m2 over regional scales of hundreds of kilometers. Hence, many scales of beach morphology and change can be resolved, from beach cusps tens of meters in wavelength to entire coastal cells comprising tens to hundreds of kilometers of coast. Topographic lidars similar to the ATM are becoming increasingly available from commercial vendors and should, in the future

  7. Testing gravity using cosmic voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Padilla, Nelson; Li, Baojiu

    2015-07-01

    We explore voids in dark matter and halo fields from simulations of Λ cold dark matter and Hu-Sawicki f (R) models. In f (R) gravity, dark matter void abundances are greater than that of general relativity (GR). Differences for halo void abundances are much smaller, but still at the 2σ, 6σ and 14σ level for the f (R) model parameter |fR0| = 10-6, 10-5 and 10-4. Counter-intuitively, the abundance of large voids found using haloes in f (R) gravity is lower, which suggests that voids are not necessarily emptier of galaxies in this model. We find the halo number density profiles of voids are not distinguishable from GR, but the same voids are emptier of dark matter in f (R) gravity. This can be observed by weak gravitational lensing of voids, for which the combination of a spec-z and a photo-z survey over the same sky is necessary. For a volume of 1 (Gpc h-1)3, |fR0| = 10-5 and 10-4 may be distinguished from GR at 4σ and 8σ using the lensing tangential shear signal around voids. Sample variance and line-of-sight projection effect sets limits for constraining |fR0| = 10-6. This might be overcome with a larger volume. The smaller halo void abundance and the stronger lensing shear signal of voids in f (R) models may be combined to break the degeneracy between |fR0| and σ8. The outflow of dark matter from void centres are 5, 15 and 35 per cent faster in f (R) gravity for |fR0| = 10-6, 10-5 and 10-4. The velocity dispersions are greater than that in GR by similar amounts. Model differences in velocities imply potential powerful constraints for the model in phase space and in redshift space.

  8. Airborne measured analytic signal for UXO detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gamey, T.J.; Holladay, J.S.; Mahler, R.

    1997-10-01

    The Altmark Tank Training Range north of Haldensleben, Germany has been in operation since WWI. Weapons training and testing has included cavalry, cannon, small arms, rail guns, and tank battalions. Current plans are to convert the area to a fully digital combat training facility. Instead of using blank or dummy ordnance, hits will be registered with lasers and computers. Before this can happen, the 25,000 ha must be cleared of old debris. In support of this cleanup operation, Aerodat Inc., in conjunction with IABG of Germany, demonstrated a new high resolution magnetic survey technique involving the measurement of 3-component magnetic gradient data. The survey was conducted in May 1996, and covered 500 ha in two blocks. The nominal line spacing was 10 m, and the average sensor altitude was 7 m. The geologic column consisted of sands over a sedimentary basin. Topographic relief was generally flat with approximately 3 m rolling dunes and occasional man-made features such as fox holes, bunkers, tank traps and reviewing stands. Trees were sparse and short (2-3 metres) due to frequent burn off and tank activity. As such, this site was nearly ideal for low altitude airborne surveying.

  9. NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights Data from the 1982 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of El Chichon ... continuing to January 1984. Transcribed from the following NASA Tech Reports: McCormick, M. P., and M. T. Osborn, Airborne lidar ...

  10. Precision Gravity Monitoring of Artificial Recharge at Little Cottonwood Canyon, Wasatch Front, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. S.; Gettings, P.; Chapman, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Repeated high-precision (± 5 μGal) gravity surveys are used to monitor artificial groundwater recharge at the Little Cottonwood Water Treatment Plant (LCWTP) in the southern portion of the Salt Lake Valley, UT. The gravity survey network consists of 30 sites arranged to capture the expected horizontal migration (> 500 meters/yr) of the infiltrated water. An additional 4 stations are arranged 1500 meters from the LCWTP infiltration sites for regional and environmental background control. Prior to starting recharge operations, a set of five background surveys were made between spring 2006 and summer 2007. Background (natural/environmental) variability is reliably estimated at 20 μGals. Infiltration commenced in mid-September 2007 and bimonthly gravity surveys were conducted until July 2008. A peak gravity change of 100 μGals was observed at the end of infiltration. The campaigns following cessation of infiltration showed a decreasing gravity anomaly indicating a dispersion of the ground water mound produced by the infiltration. The final gravity results from July of 2008 showed a 70 μGal decrease from the peak gravity value. Observations suggest the subsurface water flowed to the west of the LCWTP; however the control stations at the western most extent of the survey area show no increase in gravity. The gravity observations are comparable to a previous study conducted in the Weber River delta, which showed that the gravity decay over 3-5 months can be used to determine the bulk hydraulic conductivity of the area.

  11. On the Gravity of the Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinders, A. F.; Ito, G.; Garcia, M. O.; Taylor, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are part of the most geologically studied intra-plate volcanic island chain. Surprisingly, the only chain wide compilation of marine and terrestrial gravity data is now more than 40 years old. Early terrestrial studies conducted by J. G. Moore, H.L Krivoy, G. P. Woollard, W. E Strange and others in the early 1960's were meant to serve as reconnaissance surveys only. In addition, early marine surveys were limited in both accurate positioning and data density. Detailed analysis of the crustal density structure of the island chain was limited. We present a new chain-wide gravity compilation incorporating the original island-specific survey data, recently published data on the island of Kauai and Hawaii, as well as more than 10 years of newly incorporated marine data collected aboard the University of Hawaii's R/V Kilo Moana. This data was supplemented by surveys aboard the R/V Farnella among others. We present free-air (FAA), simple/complete Bouguer, and residual gravity maps on an unprecedented resolution and geographical extent for the area. This data will be hosted as an interactive Google-Earth overlay at the Hawaii Mapping Research Group (HMRG - www.soest.hawaii.edu/HMRG) and made available to the scientific community. We hope that this dataset will be used for further comparison of the gravity fields of other intra-plate volcanic systems (French Polynesia, etc.) and to constrain seismic studies of crustal structure in the Hawaiian-chain through joint seismic-gravity inversions.

  12. Development status of the planar electrostatic gradiometer GREMLIT for airborne geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Douch, K.; Panet, I.

    2012-12-01

    The GREMLIT airborne gravity gradiometer is taking advantage of technologies, formerly developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions. Built using a planar configuration with four proof-masses at the corners of a square, the gradiometer is mounted on a dedicated stabilized platform which is controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself to achieve a sufficient rejection ratio of the perturbations/vibrations induced by the airborne environment in the horizontal directions. The levitation of the proof-masses along the normal gravity and the vibration isolation of the platform are designed to allow the instrument to support between +2.5 g and 0 g along the vertical axis. With the help of additional fiber gyro data, the gradiometer differential measurements provide the necessary information to extract the 3 Tyy, Tzz and Tyz independent components of the gravity gradient tensor at the location of the instrument. In addition to be especially well suited to sustain the proof-mass levitation in the Earth's gravity field, such a planar configuration also presents an intrinsic linearity of the horizontal control loops which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth. The compactness of the gradiometer design, with all the electrodes of the 4 accelerometers engrave on the same ULE plate, ensures excellent dimensional stability, good thermal homogeneity and makes the conception of the stabilized platform easier. The detailed error budget of the gradiometer instrument associated with the estimated performance of the platform and the assumed characteristics of the additional attitude, rate and position sensors lead to expect a performance objective between 0.1 and 1 Eötvös taking into account the difficulty of measurements onboard an aircraft by comparison to the particularly conducive satellite measurement environment. The GREMLIT gravity gradiometer systems is more particularly

  13. Airborne Radar Sounding and Ice Thickness Measurements over Lake Vostok, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, M. E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Morse, D. L.; Holt, J. W.; Kempf, S. D.; Richter, T. G.; Falola, B.; Oliason, S.

    2002-05-01

    Lake Vostok was discovered using airborne ice-sounding radar in East Antarctica during the mid 1970's, but interest in this largest known subglacial lake has increased in recent years. Frozen microbial discoveries from ice cores taken just above Lake Vostok suggest its potential for being an isolated biological ecosystem. Also, the lake's unique combination of glaciologic, hydrologic and geological processes make it a possible terrestrial analogue for sub-ice water on other planetary bodies. Satellite radar has mapped the spatial extent of the lake from surface topography, and Russian ground traverses have gathered radar and seismic data along select profiles, but the full subglacial environment has remained uncharted. In response to a proposal by R.E. Bell and M. Studinger at Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) conducted an airborne geophysical survey over Lake Vostok and its surroundings during the 2000/01 field season. The survey included 21,000 line-km of geophysical observations with a line spacing of 7.5 km and a tie-line spacing of 11.25 or 22.5 km. The instrument suite included incoherent ice-sounding radar, laser altimetry, and precise GPS positioning and navigation, as well as airborne gravity and magnetics measurements. The radar system consisted of a 60 MHz, 8000 watt peak power transmitter operating in pulsed continuous-wave mode at 12.5 kHz (with 250 ns pulse width), a log-detection incoherent receiver (with 80 dB dynamic range), and a signal digitizer with a unique capability to average signals rapidly. Incoherent radar observations constructed from 2048 averaged transmissions occurred roughly every 12 m along-track. Ice thicknesses in excess of 4000 m were routinely sounded over Lake Vostok using this system. In addition to the incoherent radar, a new acquisition system was developed on an experimental basis to coherently integrate radar signals utilizing synthetic aperture radar techniques

  14. Gauge/Gravity Duality (Gauge Gravity Duality)

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2010-02-24

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  15. Electricity from Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Roy

    2007-03-01

    Einstein's cosmological constant as gravity, will unify quantum mechanics to general relativity and link gravity to electromagnetism. Then, an electromagnetic vacuum engine driven by the force that spins, moves, and sustains mass at the subatomic level, will do free, what generators cannot. Flowing outward-bound sinusoidally from its source, this gravity force assumes a three-dimensional spherical universe. Lines of force intersect, spinning into gyroscopic particles and passes as time-present, with a compression gravity of space-time curvature continuum unifying all mass. The spaces between approaching masses suffer a decrease of right-angled vacuum energy, increasing external pressures, pushing them together. Ubiquitous gravity now interacts electromagnetically with mass. Gravity's ``heat energy'' operates below absolute zero and squeezes mass into thermonuclear ignition of stars. Creation needs a gravity field for the propagation of light that will make sense of its wave/particle behavior. Creation from a white hole recycles down through a black one, into new beginnings of galaxies. ``Vacuum energy'' will light cities and factories; faster than light spacecraft will raise silently from the ground utilizing the very gravity it defies, propelling us to the stars.

  16. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The use is studied of tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station. Particular emphasis is placed by the microgravity community on the achievement of high quality microgravity conditions. The tether capability is explored for active control of the center of gravity and the analysis of possible tethered configurations.

  17. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlman, Howard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes the construction of the Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator, which can be used to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena, including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems behave. Presents experiments, appropriate for classroom use, to demonstrate how the behavior of common physical systems change when…

  18. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  19. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  20. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  1. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  2. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  3. Anti-gravity device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palsingh, S. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An educational toy useful in demonstrating fundamental concepts regarding the laws of gravity is described. The device comprises a sphere 10 of radius r resting on top of sphere 12 of radius R. The center of gravity of sphere 10 is displaced from its geometrical center by distance D. The dimensions are so related that D((R+r)/r) is greater than r. With the center of gravity of sphere 10 lying on a vertical line, the device is in equilibrium. When sphere 10 is rolled on the surface of sphere 12 it will return to its equilibrium position upon release. This creates an illusion that sphere 10 is defying the laws of gravity. In reality, due to the above noted relationship of D, R, and r, the center of gravity of sphere 10 rises from its equilibrium position as it rolls a short distance up or down the surface of sphere 12.

  4. Digital Isostatic Gravity Map of the Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, David A.; Mankinen, E.A.; Davidson, J.G.; Morin, R.L.; Blakely, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    An isostatic gravity map of the Nevada Test Site area was prepared from publicly available gravity data (Ponce, 1997) and from gravity data recently collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (Mankinen and others, 1999; Morin and Blakely, 1999). Gravity data were processed using standard gravity data reduction techniques. Southwest Nevada is characterized by gravity anomalies that reflect the distribution of pre-Cenozoic carbonate rocks, thick sequences of volcanic rocks, and thick alluvial basins. In addition, regional gravity data reveal the presence of linear features that reflect large-scale faults whereas detailed gravity data can indicate the presence of smaller-scale faults.

  5. Ocean Melting Greenland (OMG) bathymetric survey of northwest Greenland and implications for the recent evolution of its glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Rignot, E. J.; Willis, J. K.; Fenty, I. G.

    2015-12-01

    Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) is a five-year Earth Ventures Suborbital Mission funded by NASA to investigate the role of the oceans in ice loss around the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet, which includes measurements of seafloor bathymetry from multibeam surveys and airborne gravity, glacier surface elevation from high-frequency radar interferometry, and temperature/salinity/depth from vessels and airborne-dropped probes. Here, we describe the results of the 2016 bathymetry survey of northwest Greenland that took place in the summer of 2015: july 22-August 19 and Sept 2-Sept 16 spanning from Ilulissat to Thule AFB in north Greenland, and to be complemented by a survey of southeast Greenland in 2016. We deployed a multibeam Reson 7160 with 512 beams installed on the hull of the Cape Race vessel, with enhanced capabilities for fjord wall and ice face mapping. The survey tracks were optimized based on the IBCAO3 database, recent cruises, airborne gravity data collected by NASA Operation IceBridge which indicated the presence of troughs, bed topography mapped inland using a mass conservation approach, the spatial distribution of ice discharge to locate the largest outlets and maximizing the number of major fjords sampled during the survey, with the goal to identify all troughs that are major pathways for subsurface ocean heat, and constrain as many glacier ice front thickness as permitted by time and the practicality of navigating the ice-choked fjords. The data reveal many deep, U-shaped, submarine valleys connected to the glaciers, intercut with sills and over deepened in narrower passages where former glaciers and ice streams merged into larger units; as well as fjords ending in shallow plateaus with glaciers in retreated positions. The presence of warm, salty water of Atlantic origin (AW) in the fjords is documented using CTD. Some glaciers sit on shallow plateaus in cold, fresh polar waters (PW) at the end of deep fjords, while others are deeper and standing in

  6. Drilling of airborne radioactivity anomalies in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina, 1954

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, J.B.

    1954-01-01

    From April 22 to May 19, 1953, airborne radioactivity surveys totalling 5,600 traverse miles were made in 10 areas in Florida (Moxham, 1954).  Abnormal radioactivity was recorded in Bradford, Clay, DeSoto, Dixie, Lake, Marion, Orange, Sumter, Taylor, and Union Counties, Florida.  Additional airborne surveys were made in the Spring of 1954 in Hardee and Manatee Counties, Florida, on the drainage of the Altamaha River in Georgia, and in the area of the old phosphate workings in and around Charleston County, South Carolina.

  7. Primordial gravity waves and weak lensing.

    PubMed

    Dodelson, Scott; Rozo, Eduardo; Stebbins, Albert

    2003-07-11

    Inflation produces a primordial spectrum of gravity waves in addition to the density perturbations which seed structure formation. We compute the signature of these gravity waves in the large scale shear field. The shear can be divided into a gradient mode (G or E) and a curl mode (C or B). The latter is produced only by gravity waves, so the observations of a nonzero curl mode could be seen as evidence for inflation. We find that the expected signal from inflation is small, peaking on the largest scales at l(l+1)C(l)/2pi<10(-11) at l=2 and falling rapidly thereafter. Even for an all-sky deep survey, this signal would be below noise at all multipoles. PMID:12906468

  8. Observational bounds on modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukherjee, Pia; Wang Yun

    2008-01-15

    Modified gravity provides a possible explanation for the currently observed cosmic acceleration. In this paper, we study general classes of modified gravity models. The Einstein-Hilbert action is modified by using general functions of the Ricci and the Gauss-Bonnet scalars, both in the metric and in the Palatini formalisms. We do not use an explicit form for the functions, but a general form with a valid Taylor expansion up to second order about redshift zero in the Riemann-scalars. The coefficients of this expansion are then reconstructed via the cosmic expansion history measured using current cosmological observations. These are the quantities of interest for theoretical considerations relating to ghosts and instabilities. We find that current data provide interesting constraints on the coefficients. The next-generation dark energy surveys should shrink the allowed parameter space for modified gravity models quite dramatically.

  9. Exploring Gravity Wave Predictability and Dynamics in Deepwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. D.; Fritts, D. C.; Smith, R. B.; Eckermann, S. D.; Taylor, M. J.; Dörnbrack, A.; Uddstrom, M.; Reynolds, C. A.; Reinecke, A.; Jiang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The DEEP propagating gravity WAVE program (DEEPWAVE) is a comprehensive, airborne and ground-based measurement and modeling program centered on New Zealand and focused on providing a new understanding of gravity wave dynamics and impacts from the troposphere through the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This program employed the NSF/NCAR GV (NGV) research aircraft from a base in New Zealand in a 6-week field measurement campaign in June-July 2014. During the field phase, the NGV was equipped with new lidar and airglow instruments, as well as dropwindsondes and a full suite of flight level instruments including the microwave temperature profiler (MTP), providing temperatures and vertical winds spanning altitudes from immediately above the NGV flight altitude (~13 km) to ~100 km. The region near New Zealand was chosen since all the relevant GW sources (e.g., mountains, cyclones, jet streams) occur strongly here, and upper-level winds in austral winter permit gravity waves to propagate to very high altitudes. The COAMPS adjoint modeling system provided forecast sensitivity in real time during the six-week DEEPWAVE field phase. Five missions were conducted using the NGV to observe regions of high forecast sensitivity, as diagnosed using the COAMPS adjoint model. In this presentation, we provide a summary of the sensitivity characteristics and explore the implications for predictability of low-level winds crucial for gravity wave launching, as well as predictability of gravity wave characteristics in the stratosphere. In general, the sensitive regions were characterized by localized strong dynamics, often involving intense baroclinic systems with deep convection. The results of the adjoint modeling system suggest that gravity wave launching and the characteristics of the gravity waves can be linked to these sensitive regions near frontal zones within baroclinic systems. The predictability links between the tropospheric fronts, cyclones, jet regions, and gravity

  10. Three-dimensional inversion of frequency domain airborne electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Leif Harrington

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys provide vast amounts of data over remote areas that may not be ground accessible. Typical surveys may contain hundreds of thousands of data points sampled every few meters. Quantitative interpretation of this large amount of data is computationally very time consuming and challenging. This dissertation presents two methods, based on the integral equation (IE), to invert AEM data in three dimensions. One inversion method is based on the localized quasi-linear (LQL) approximate inversion, which I have modified so the inverse and forward operators only include a small area of the inversion domain. This is possible for airborne data interpretation because the footprint, or region that affects the response of each measurement, is relatively small relative to the typical survey area. This modification to the approximate LQL inversion enables interpretation of full airborne surveys using tens of thousands of data points and hundreds of thousands of cells. The method is tested on both synthetic and field data, each showing accurate results. The second interpretation method is a rigorous inversion, which uses the full accuracy of the IE method. It is based on the iterative solution of the domain and field equations, while keeping the inverse operator linear to speed the inversion process. The domain equation is solved using a preconditioned form of the complex generalized minimum residual solver to guarantee convergence. This inversion includes the footprint method developed for the LQL inversion. It has also been tested on both synthetic and field data, demonstrating excellent results with respect to both the speed and accuracy of the method. With present computing power, the rigorous method is intended to interpret subsets of AEM surveys. The LQL inversion can be applied to entire survey areas, but the accuracy is limited by the approximate nature of the inversion. These two methods pair nicely, with the LQL method used to identify

  11. Data processing of remotely sensed airborne hyperspectral data using the Airborne Processing Library (APL): Geocorrection algorithm descriptions and spatial accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Mark A.; Taylor, Benjamin H.; Grant, Michael G.; Shutler, Jamie D.

    2014-03-01

    Remote sensing airborne hyperspectral data are routinely used for applications including algorithm development for satellite sensors, environmental monitoring and atmospheric studies. Single flight lines of airborne hyperspectral data are often in the region of tens of gigabytes in size. This means that a single aircraft can collect terabytes of remotely sensed hyperspectral data during a single year. Before these data can be used for scientific analyses, they need to be radiometrically calibrated, synchronised with the aircraft's position and attitude and then geocorrected. To enable efficient processing of these large datasets the UK Airborne Research and Survey Facility has recently developed a software suite, the Airborne Processing Library (APL), for processing airborne hyperspectral data acquired from the Specim AISA Eagle and Hawk instruments. The APL toolbox allows users to radiometrically calibrate, geocorrect, reproject and resample airborne data. Each stage of the toolbox outputs data in the common Band Interleaved Lines (BILs) format, which allows its integration with other standard remote sensing software packages. APL was developed to be user-friendly and suitable for use on a workstation PC as well as for the automated processing of the facility; to this end APL can be used under both Windows and Linux environments on a single desktop machine or through a Grid engine. A graphical user interface also exists. In this paper we describe the Airborne Processing Library software, its algorithms and approach. We present example results from using APL with an AISA Eagle sensor and we assess its spatial accuracy using data from multiple flight lines collected during a campaign in 2008 together with in situ surveyed ground control points.

  12. The combined gravity field model GOCO05c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecher, Thomas; Pail, Roland; Gruber, Thomas; GOCO Project Team

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the static gravity field is of importance for various scientific disciplines, such as geodesy, geophysics and oceanography. While for geophysics the gravity field provides insight into the Earth's interior, the geoid serves as an important reference surface for oceanographic applications. Moreover this reference surface is a key parameter on the way to a globally unified height system. In order to exploit the full potential of gravity measurements and to achieve the best gravity field solution, all kinds of complementary gravity field information have to be combined. By combining GRACE and GOCE information, a state of the art satellite-only gravity field is available, which is highly accurate at the very long to medium wavelengths (80-100 km). By adding information from terrestrial/airborne gravimetry and satellite altimetry, which both are measurement techniques providing short wavelength gravity information beyond the resolution of GOCE, the full gravity field spectrum can be obtained. This paper focuses on the presentation of the combined gravity field model GOCO05c, a global gravity field model up to degree and order 720 based on full normal equation systems (more than 500,000 parameters). During the calculation of GOCO05c we put emphasis on the question how the complementary data types can be combined in a global gravity field model in the way that all data types keep their specific strengths and are not degraded by the combination with other information in certain wavelengths. Realistic stochastic modelling and a tailored weighting scheme among all available data results in different regional relative weighting of satellite and terrestrial data in the combined solution, mainly depending on the quality of the available terrestrial gravity information. From this procedure, as complementary product realistic error estimates are available in terms of a full-covariance matrix, which can be mapped in a spatial error grid reflecting regionally specific

  13. Testing gravity with EG: mapping theory onto observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, C. Danielle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Heymans, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    We present a complete derivation of the observationally motivated definition of the modified gravity statistic EG. Using this expression, we investigate how variations to theory and survey parameters may introduce uncertainty in the general relativistic prediction of EG. We forecast errors on EG for measurements using two combinations of upcoming surveys, and find that theoretical uncertainties may dominate for a futuristic measurement. Finally, we compute predictions of EG under modifications to general relativity in the quasistatic regime, and comment on the pros and cons of using EG to test gravity with future surveys.

  14. The use of airborne lasers in terrestrial and water environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Link, L. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    This document has the objective to provide some information regarding the applications for which an airborne laser system can be utilized. The considered data have been collected with the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), operational since 1977 as a flying laser laboratory. The most basic mode of operation of the AOL involves operation as a profiler. The data collected are similar to those which would be collected by a ground survey party. In the fluorosensing mode, pulsed laser light is used to induce fluorescence in various pigments contained in land and water targets. A capability for reliably mapping bottom geometry in clear ocean water to depths of 10-12 meters was also demonstrated, while other studies are related to the utilization of the AOL for synoptic mapping of surface layer concentrations of chlorophyll and other photopigments contained in phytoplankton.

  15. Exposure to airborne asbestos in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.J.; Van Orden, D.R.; Corn, M.; Crump, K.S. )

    1992-08-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings and its implication for the health of building occupants is a major public health issue. A total of 2892 air samples from 315 public, commercial, residential, school, and university buildings has been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result of exposure to the presence of asbestos containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all asbestos structures was 0.02 structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of asbestos greater than or equal to 5 microns long was 0.00013 fibers/ml (f/ml). The concentration of asbestos was higher in schools than in other buildings. In 48% of indoor samples and 75% of outdoor samples, no asbestos fibers were detected. The observed airborne concentration in 74% of the indoor samples and 96% of the outdoor samples is below the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act clearance level of 0.01 s/ml. Finally, using those fibers which could be seen optically, all indoor samples and all outdoor samples are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure level of 0.1 f/ml for fibers greater than or equal to 5 microns in length. These results provide substantive verification of the findings of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency public building study which found very low ambient concentrations of asbestos fibers in buildings with ACM, irrespective of the condition of the material in the buildings.

  16. Monitoring Groundwater Contaminant Plumes Using Airborne Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Martin; Oftendinger, Ulrich; Ruffell, Alastair; Cowan, Marie; Cassidy, Rachel; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Wilson, Christopher; Desissa, Mohammednur

    2013-04-01

    Under the European Union Water Framework Directive, Member States are required to assess water quality across both surface water and groundwater bodies. Subsurface pollution plumes, originating from a variety of sources, pose a significant direct risk to water quality. The monitoring and characterisation of groundwater contaminant plumes is generally invasive, time consuming and expensive. In particular, adequately capturing the contaminant plume with monitoring installations, when the extent of the feature is unknown and the presence of contamination is only evident from indirect observations, can be prohibitively expensive. This research aims to identify the extent and nature of subsurface contaminant plumes using airborne geophysical survey data. This data was collected across parts of the island of Ireland within the scope of the original Tellus and subsequent Tellus Border projects. The rapid assessment of the airborne electro-magnetic (AEM) data allowed the identification of several sites containing possible contaminant plumes. These AEM anomalies were assessed through the analysis of existing site data and field site inspections, with areas of interest being examined for metallic structures that could affect the AEM data. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR) and ground-based electro-magnetic (EM) surveys were performed to ground-truth existing airborne data and to confirm the extent and nature of the affected area identified using the airborne data. Groundwater and surface water quality were assessed using existing field site information. Initial results collected from a landfill site underlain by basalt have indicated that the AEM data, coupled with ERT and GPR, can successfully be used to locate possible plumes and help delineate their extent. The analysis of a range of case study sites exhibiting different geological and environmental settings will allow for the development of a consistent methodology for examining the

  17. World gravity standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uotila, U. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to use gravity anomalies in geodetic computations and geophysical interpretations, the observed gravity values from which anomalies are derived should be referred to one consistent world wide system. The International Gravity Standardization Net 1971 was adapted by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics at Moscow in 1971, the network was result of extensive cooperation by many organizations and individuals around the world. The network contains more than 1800 stations around the world. The data used in the adjustment included more than 25,000 gravimetry, pendulum and absolute measurements.

  18. Effects of gravity data quality and spacing on the accuracy of the geoid in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, C.-K.; Kwon, J. H.; Lee, B. M.; Lee, J.; Choi, Y. S.; Lee, S.-B.

    2009-07-01

    The effects of gravity data quality and spacing on the accuracy of the computed geoid are analyzed. The analysis is performed using simulated gravity data that accommodate the real gravity signal in South Korea. The reference geoid is generated using both simulated gravity data and digital terrain models (DTM), assuming that both data sets are errorless. By artificially controlling the gravity data quality and spacing, we are able to calculate and analyze the geoid errors. The results show that the current distribution of real gravity data in South Korea causes geoid errors, with the standard deviation being as much as 8 cm, and that these geoid errors are mainly caused by the distribution of gravity data rather than by the noise in the data. Areas showing large geoid errors are also clearly identified; these areas should be subjected to supplementary gravity surveying at data spacing smaller than 2 km to achieve a 5-cm level of geoid accuracy.

  19. Hydrogeologic Framework of the Upper Santa Cruz Basin (Arizona and Sonora) using Well Logs, Geologic Mapping, Gravity, Magnetics, and Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegary, J. B.; Page, W. R.; Megdal, S.; Gray, F.; Scott, C. A.; Berry, M.; Rangel, M.; Oroz Ramos, L.; Menges, C. M.; Jones, A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Congress passed the U.S.-Mexico Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Act which provides a framework for study of aquifers shared by the United States and Mexico. The aquifer of the Upper Santa Cruz Basin was chosen as one of four priority aquifers for several reasons, including water scarcity, a population greater than 300,000, groundwater as the sole source of water for human use, and a riparian corridor that is of regional significance for migratory birds and other animals. Several new mines are also being proposed for this area which may affect water quality and availability. To date, a number of studies have been carried out by a binational team composed of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Mexican National Water Commission, and the Universities of Arizona and Sonora. Construction of a cross-border hydrogeologic framework model of the basin between Amado, Arizona and its southern boundary in Sonora is currently a high priority. The relatively narrow Santa Cruz valley is a structural basin that did not experience the same degree of late Cenozoic lateral extension and consequent deepening as found in other basin-and-range alluvial basins, such as the Tucson basin, where basin depth exceeds 3000 meters. This implies that storage may be much less than that found in other basin-and-range aquifers. To investigate the geometry of the basin and facies changes within the alluvium, a database of over one thousand well logs has been developed, geologic mapping and transient electromagnetic (TEM) surveys have been carried out, and information from previous electromagnetic, magnetic, and gravity studies is being incorporated into the hydrogeologic framework. Initial geophysical surveys and analyses have focused on the portion of the basin west of Nogales, Arizona, because it supplies approximately 50% of that city's water. Previous gravity and magnetic modeling indicate that this area is a narrow, fault-controlled half graben. Preliminary modeling of airborne

  20. Measuring gravity currents in the Chicago River, Chicago, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, K.A.; Czuba, J.A.; Johnson, K.K.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies of the Chicago River have determined that gravity currents are responsible for persistent bidirectional flows that have been observed in the river. A gravity current is the flow of one fluid within another caused by a density difference between the fluids. These studies demonstrated how acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) can be used to detect and characterize gravity currents in the field. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of these gravity currents, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has installed ADCPs and other instruments to continuously measure gravity currents in the Chicago River and the North Branch Chicago River. These instruments include stage sensors, thermistor strings, and both upward-looking and horizontal ADCPs. Data loggers and computers installed at gaging stations along the river are used to collect data from these instruments and transmit them to USGS offices. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  1. Gravity gradient grids at GOCE satellite altitude for lithospheric modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Sebera, Josef; Fuchs, Martin; Lieb, Verena; Holzrichter, Nils; Novak, Pavel; Haagmans, Roger

    2015-04-01

    We explore how GOCE gravity gradient data can improve modeling of the Earth's lithosphere and thereby contribute to a better understanding of the Earth's dynamic processes. We study the use of gravity gradient grids to provide improved information about the lithosphere and upper mantle in the well-surveyed North-East Atlantic Margin. In particular, we present the computation of gravity gradient grids at GOCE satellite altitude combining GOCE with GRACE gravity information. It is shown that regional solutions based on a tesseroid approach may contain more signal content than global gravity field models do. The patchwork of regional grids is presented as well as the subsequent error reduction through iterative downward and upward continuation using the Poisson integral equation. The promises and pitfalls are discussed of using grids at nominal altitude of 255 km and a lower altitude of 225 km for lithospheric modeling.

  2. Effects of background gravity stimuli on gravity-controlled behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    Physiological and developmental effects of altered gravity were researched. The stimulus properties of gravity have been found to possess reinforcing and aversive properties. Experimental approaches taken, used animals placed into fields of artificial gravity, in the form of parabolic or spiral centrifuges. Gravity preferences were noted and it was concluded that the psychophysics of gravity and background factors which support these behaviors should be further explored.

  3. Improved configuration of the planar electrostatic gradiometer GREMLIT for airborne geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, B.; Lebat, V.; Christophe, B.; Douch, K.; Panet, I.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the gravity field of the Earth has been considerably improved thanks to global positioning satellites constellations and to recent space gravity missions. However these gravity data do not adresse spatial resolution shorter than 90 km. Taking advantage of technologies, developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions, the GREMLIT airborne gravity gradiometer is more particularly developed to complete them at the short wavelengths in particular in the areas where spatial distribution and quality of ground data remain quite uneven like for example land/sea transition. Built using a double planar electrostatic gradiometer with eight proof-masses in a cubic configuration, the GREMLIT instrument is mounted on a dedicated stabilized platform which is controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself to achieve a sufficient rejection ratio of the perturbations/vibrations induced by the airborne environment in the horizontal directions. The levitation of the proof-masses along the normal gravity and the vibration isolation of the platform are designed to allow the instrument to support 1g × 1g along the vertical axis. In addition to be well suited to sustain the proof-mass levitation in the Earth's gravity field, the planar configuration of each accelerometer also presents an intrinsic linearity of the horizontal control loops which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth. Taking into account the estimated performance of the platform and associated with its additional attitude and angular rate sensors, the gradiometer differential measurements along the two horizontal axes provide the necessary information to extract 5 of the 6 components of the gravity gradient tensor at the location of the instrument with a performance objective between 0.1 and 1 Eötvös along the two Txx and Tyy horizontal components. The last vertical Tzz component of the gravity gradient

  4. Time dependent corrections to absolute gravity determinations in the establishment of modern gravity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykowski, Przemyslaw; Krynski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The establishment of modern gravity control with the use of exclusively absolute method of gravity determination has significant advantages as compared to the one established mostly with relative gravity measurements (e.g. accuracy, time efficiency). The newly modernized gravity control in Poland consists of 28 fundamental stations (laboratory) and 168 base stations (PBOG14 - located in the field). Gravity at the fundamental stations was surveyed with the FG5-230 gravimeter of the Warsaw University of Technology, and at the base stations - with the A10-020 gravimeter of the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography, Warsaw. This work concerns absolute gravity determinations at the base stations. Although free of common relative measurement errors (e.g. instrumental drift) and effects of network adjustment, absolute gravity determinations for the establishment of gravity control require advanced corrections due to time dependent factors, i.e. tidal and ocean loading corrections, atmospheric corrections and hydrological corrections that were not taken into account when establishing the previous gravity control in Poland. Currently available services and software allow to determine high accuracy and high temporal resolution corrections for atmospheric (based on digital weather models, e.g. ECMWF) and hydrological (based on hydrological models, e.g. GLDAS/Noah) gravitational and loading effects. These corrections are mostly used for processing observations with Superconducting Gravimeters in the Global Geodynamics Project. For the area of Poland the atmospheric correction based on weather models can differ from standard atmospheric correction by even ±2 µGal. The hydrological model shows the annual variability of ±8 µGal. In addition the standard tidal correction may differ from the one obtained from the local tidal model (based on tidal observations). Such difference at Borowa Gora Observatory reaches the level of ±1.5 µGal. Overall the sum of atmospheric and

  5. Large aperture scanning airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Bindschadler, R.; Boers, R.; Bufton, J. L.; Clem, D.; Garvin, J.; Melfi, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    A large aperture scanning airborne lidar facility is being developed to provide important new capabilities for airborne lidar sensor systems. The proposed scanning mechanism allows for a large aperture telescope (25 in. diameter) in front of an elliptical flat (25 x 36 in.) turning mirror positioned at a 45 degree angle with respect to the telescope optical axis. The lidar scanning capability will provide opportunities for acquiring new data sets for atmospheric, earth resources, and oceans communities. This completed facility will also make available the opportunity to acquire simulated EOS lidar data on a near global basis. The design and construction of this unique scanning mechanism presents exciting technological challenges of maintaining the turning mirror optical flatness during scanning while exposed to extreme temperatures, ambient pressures, aircraft vibrations, etc.

  6. Superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The employment of superconductivity and other material properties at cryogenic temperatures to fabricate sensitive, low-drift, gravity gradiometer is described. The device yields a reduction of noise of four orders of magnitude over room temperature gradiometers, and direct summation and subtraction of signals from accelerometers in varying orientations are possible with superconducting circuitry. Additional circuits permit determination of the linear and angular acceleration vectors independent of the measurement of the gravity gradient tensor. A dewar flask capable of maintaining helium in a liquid state for a year's duration is under development by NASA, and a superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer for the NASA Geodynamics Program is intended for a LEO polar trajectory to measure the harmonic expansion coefficients of the earth's gravity field up to order 300.

  7. Introduction to Massive Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rham, Claudia

    We review recent progress on massive gravity. We first show how extra dimensions prove to be a useful tool in building theories of modified gravity, including Galileon theories and their DBI extensions. DGP arises from an infinite size extra dimension, and we show how massive gravity arises from `deconstructing' the extra dimension in the vielbein formalism. We then explain how the ghost issue is resolved in that special theory of massive gravity. The viability of such models relies on the Vainshtein mechanism which is best described in terms of Galileons. While its implementation is successful in most of these models it also comes hand in hand with superluminalities and strong coupling which are reviewed and their real consequences are discussed.

  8. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Variable Gravity Laboratory studies are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) conceptual design and engineering analysis; (2) control strategies (fast crawling maneuvers, main perturbations and their effect upon the acceleration level); and (3) technology requirements.

  9. Rotating Gravity Gradiometer Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The application of a Rotating Gravity Gradiometer (RGG) system on board a Lunar Polar Orbiter (LPO) for the measurement of the Lunar gravity field was investigated. A data collection simulation study shows that a gradiometer will give significantly better gravity data than a doppler tracking system for the altitudes under consideration for the LOP, that the present demonstrated sensitivity of the RGG is adequate for measurement of the Lunar gravity gradient field, and that a single RGG instrument will provide almost as much data for geophysical interpretation as an orthogonal three axis RGG system. An engineering study of the RGG sensor/LPO spacecraft interface characteristics shows that the RGG systems under consideration are compatible with the present models of the LPO spacecraft.

  10. Theoretical support for the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, D.L.

    1992-03-01

    This investigation was to provide theoretical support during and after the deployment of NASA research aircraft to Punta Arenas, Chile during August and September of 1987 to conduct the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The experiment was very successful in demonstrating the role of anthropogenic chlorine in producing the ozone hole over Antarctica during September and October of 1987. The PI worked primarily on using tracer data from the ER-2 aircraft to show that transport could not have caused the ozone hole in 1987, and that transport of chemical species into the polar vortex was very weak during the period of the experiment. The presence of gravity waves was also very apparent in the ER-2 data, and papers were published on this analysis and on the use of meteorological analyses to position the aircraft within the vortex.

  11. Theoretical support for the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation was to provide theoretical support during and after the deployment of NASA research aircraft to Punta Arenas, Chile during August and September of 1987 to conduct the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The experiment was very successful in demonstrating the role of anthropogenic chlorine in producing the ozone hole over Antarctica during September and October of 1987. The PI worked primarily on using tracer data from the ER-2 aircraft to show that transport could not have caused the ozone hole in 1987, and that transport of chemical species into the polar vortex was very weak during the period of the experiment. The presence of gravity waves was also very apparent in the ER-2 data, and papers were published on this analysis and on the use of meteorological analyses to position the aircraft within the vortex.

  12. Assessing and Correcting Topographic Effects on Forest Canopy Height Retrieval Using Airborne LiDAR Data

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhugeng; Zhao, Dan; Zeng, Yuan; Zhao, Yujin; Wu, Bingfang; Zhu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Topography affects forest canopy height retrieval based on airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data a lot. This paper proposes a method for correcting deviations caused by topography based on individual tree crown segmentation. The point cloud of an individual tree was extracted according to crown boundaries of isolated individual trees from digital orthophoto maps (DOMs). Normalized canopy height was calculated by subtracting the elevation of centres of gravity from the elevation of point cloud. First, individual tree crown boundaries are obtained by carrying out segmentation on the DOM. Second, point clouds of the individual trees are extracted based on the boundaries. Third, precise DEM is derived from the point cloud which is classified by a multi-scale curvature classification algorithm. Finally, a height weighted correction method is applied to correct the topological effects. The method is applied to LiDAR data acquired in South China, and its effectiveness is tested using 41 field survey plots. The results show that the terrain impacts the canopy height of individual trees in that the downslope side of the tree trunk is elevated and the upslope side is depressed. This further affects the extraction of the location and crown of individual trees. A strong correlation was detected between the slope gradient and the proportions of returns with height differences more than 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 m in the total returns, with coefficient of determination R2 of 0.83, 0.76, and 0.60 (n = 41), respectively. PMID:26016907

  13. Assessing and correcting topographic effects on forest canopy height retrieval using airborne LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhugeng; Zhao, Dan; Zeng, Yuan; Zhao, Yujin; Wu, Bingfang; Zhu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Topography affects forest canopy height retrieval based on airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data a lot. This paper proposes a method for correcting deviations caused by topography based on individual tree crown segmentation. The point cloud of an individual tree was extracted according to crown boundaries of isolated individual trees from digital orthophoto maps (DOMs). Normalized canopy height was calculated by subtracting the elevation of centres of gravity from the elevation of point cloud. First, individual tree crown boundaries are obtained by carrying out segmentation on the DOM. Second, point clouds of the individual trees are extracted based on the boundaries. Third, precise DEM is derived from the point cloud which is classified by a multi-scale curvature classification algorithm. Finally, a height weighted correction method is applied to correct the topological effects. The method is applied to LiDAR data acquired in South China, and its effectiveness is tested using 41 field survey plots. The results show that the terrain impacts the canopy height of individual trees in that the downslope side of the tree trunk is elevated and the upslope side is depressed. This further affects the extraction of the location and crown of individual trees. A strong correlation was detected between the slope gradient and the proportions of returns with height differences more than 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 m in the total returns, with coefficient of determination R2 of 0.83, 0.76, and 0.60 (n = 41), respectively. PMID:26016907

  14. Marine gravity image available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The image below shows the gravity field from 30-72°S computed from Geosat geodetic mission (GM) and exact repeat mission (ERM) data. A color shaded-relief image of these gravity anomalies is available from NOAA in poster form (report MGG-8, [Marks et al., 1993] and also as a digital gridded data set on CD-ROM. To order, contact the National Geophysical Data Center, E/GC3, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303.

  15. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, F. F.

    2016-04-01

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed.

  16. What Is Gravity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, George

    2004-01-01

    Gravity is the name given to the phenomenon that any two masses, like you and the Earth, attract each other. One pulls on the Earth and the Earth pulls on one the same amount. And one does not have to be touching. Gravity acts over vast distances, like the 150 million kilometers (93 million miles) between the Earth and the Sun or the billions of…

  17. Airborne microorganisms from waste containers.

    PubMed

    Jedlicka, Sabrina S; Stravitz, David M; Lyman, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    In physician's offices and biomedical labs, biological waste is handled every day. This waste is disposed of in waste containers designed for holding red autoclave bags. The containers used in these environments are closed hands-free containers, often with a step pedal. While these containers protect the user from surface-borne microorganisms, the containers may allow airborne microorganisms to escape via the open/close mechanism because of the air current produced upon open/close cycles. In this study, the air current was shown to be sufficient to allow airborne escape of microorganisms held in the container, including Aspergillus niger. However, bacterial cultures, such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis did not escape. This may be due to the choice of bacterial cultures and the absence of solid waste, such as dust or other particulate matter in the waste containers, that such strains of bacteria could travel on during aerosolization. We compared these results to those obtained using a re-designed receptacle, which mimimizes air currents, and detected no escaping microorganisms. This study highlights one potential source of airborne contamination in labs, hospitals, and other environments that dispose of biological waste. PMID:23047084

  18. NASA Student Airborne Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, E. L.; Shetter, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) is a unique summer internship program for advanced undergraduates and early graduate students majoring in the STEM disciplines. SARP participants acquire hands-on research experience in all aspects of an airborne research campaign, including flying onboard an major NASA resource used for studying Earth system processes. In summer 2012, thirty-two participants worked in four interdisciplinary teams to study surface, atmospheric, and oceanographic processes. Participants assisted in the operation of instruments onboard the NASA P-3B aircraft where they sampled and measured atmospheric gases and imaged land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Along with airborne data collection, students participated in taking measurements at field sites. Mission faculty and research mentors helped to guide participants through instrument operation, sample analysis, and data reduction. Over the eight-week program, each student developed an individual research project from the data collected and delivered a conference-style final presentation on his/her results. We will discuss the results and effectiveness of the program from the first four summers and discuss plans for the future.

  19. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  20. Integrated gravity and gravity gradient 3D inversion using the non-linear conjugate gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Pengbo; Huang, Danian; Yuan, Yuan; Geng, Meixia; Liu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Gravity data, which are critical in mineral, oil, and gas exploration, are obtained from the vertical component of the gravity field, while gravity gradient data are measured from changes in the gravity field in three directions. However, few studies have sought to improve exploration techniques by integrating gravity and gravity gradient data using inversion methods. In this study, we developed a new method to integrate gravity and gravity gradient data in a 3D density inversion using the non-linear conjugate gradient (NLCG) method and the minimum gradient support (MGS) functional to regularize the 3D inverse problem and to obtain a clear and accurate image of the anomalous body. The NLCG algorithm, which is suitable for solving large-scale nonlinear optimization problems and requires no memory storage, was compared to the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) quasi-Newton algorithm and the results indicated that the convergence rate of NLCG is slower, but that the storage requirement and computation time is lower. To counteract the decay in kernel function, we introduced a depth weighting function for anomalous bodies at the same depth, with information about anomalous body depth obtained from well log and seismic exploration data. For anomalous bodies at different depths, we introduced a spatial gradient weighting function to incorporate additional information obtained in the inversion. We concluded that the spatial gradient weighting function enhanced the spatial resolution of the recovered model. Furthermore, our results showed that including multiple components for inversion increased the resolution of the recovered model. We validated our model by applying our inversion method to survey data from Vinton salt dome, Louisiana, USA. The results showed good agreement with known geologic information; thus confirming the accuracy of this approach.

  1. Bed Topography of Store Glacier and Fjord, Greenland from High-Resolution Gravity Data and Multi-Beam Echo Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Rignot, E. J.; Muto, A.; Morlighem, M.; Kemp, C.

    2014-12-01

    Store Glacier is a major west Greenland outlet tidewater glacier draining an area of 30,000 square km into Uummannaq Fjord, and flowing at a speed of 4.8 km per year at its terminus. The bed topography of the glacier is poorly known and the fjord bathymetry was partially surveyed for the first time in August 2012. In this study, we present a new approach for the inference of the glacier bed topography, ice thickness and sea floor bathymetry using high-resolution airborne gravity data combined with other data. In August 2012, we acquired a 250 m spacing grid of free-air gravity data at a speed of 50 knots with accuracy at sub-milligal level much higher accuracy than NASA Operation IceBridge (OIB) gravity campaign with approximate 5.2 km resolution at 290 knots flying speed. In August 2012 and 2013, we used multi-beam echo sounding to survey the sea floor bathymetry in front of the glacier, extending to the calving face of the glacier. Inland, we combined radar-derived ice thickness with ice motion vectors to reconstruct the bed topography at a high resolution. Using a 3D inversion of the gravity data, we reconstruct seamless bed topography across the ice front boundary that matches interior data and sea floor bathymetry, and provides information about sediment thickness beneath and in front of the glacier. Comparison of the results with prior maps reveals vast differences. IBCAO3 bathymetry suggests an ice front grounded at sea level while the measured ice front is grounded 550 m below sea level. The seamless topography obtained across the grounding line reveals the presence of a previously unknown sill, which explains why the glacier has been so stable in the last 50 years. The results have important impacts on the interpretation of the glacier stability, and sensitivity to thermal forcing from the ocean and surface melt. This work was conducted at UCI under a contract with the Gordon and Betty More Foundation and with NASA.

  2. Partial gravity habitat study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capps, Stephen; Lorandos, Jason; Akhidime, Eval; Bunch, Michael; Lund, Denise; Moore, Nathan; Murakawa, Kiosuke

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate comprehensive design requirements associated with designing habitats for humans in a partial gravity environment, then to apply them to a lunar base design. Other potential sites for application include planetary surfaces such as Mars, variable-gravity research facilities, and a rotating spacecraft. Design requirements for partial gravity environments include locomotion changes in less than normal earth gravity; facility design issues, such as interior configuration, module diameter, and geometry; and volumetric requirements based on the previous as well as psychological issues involved in prolonged isolation. For application to a lunar base, it is necessary to study the exterior architecture and configuration to insure optimum circulation patterns while providing dual egress; radiation protection issues are addressed to provide a safe and healthy environment for the crew; and finally, the overall site is studied to locate all associated facilities in context with the habitat. Mission planning is not the purpose of this study; therefore, a Lockheed scenario is used as an outline for the lunar base application, which is then modified to meet the project needs. The goal of this report is to formulate facts on human reactions to partial gravity environments, derive design requirements based on these facts, and apply the requirements to a partial gravity situation which, for this study, was a lunar base.

  3. Gravity Before Einstein and Schwinger Before Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-05-01

    Julian Schwinger was a child prodigy, and Albert Einstein distinctly not; Schwinger had something like 73 graduate students, and Einstein very few. But both thought gravity was important. They were not, of course, the first, nor is the disagreement on how one should think about gravity that is being highlighted here the first such dispute. The talk will explore, first, several of the earlier dichotomies: was gravity capable of action at a distance (Newton), or was a transmitting ether required (many others). Did it act on everything or only on solids (an odd idea of the Herschels that fed into their ideas of solar structure and sunspots)? Did gravitational information require time for its transmission? Is the exponent of r precisely 2, or 2 plus a smidgeon (a suggestion by Simon Newcomb among others)? And so forth. Second, I will try to say something about Scwinger's lesser known early work and how it might have prefigured his "source theory," beginning with "On the Interaction of Several Electrons (the unpublished, 1934 "zeroth paper," whose title somewhat reminds one of "On the Dynamics of an Asteroid," through his days at Berkeley with Oppenheimer, Gerjuoy, and others, to his application of ideas from nuclear physics to radar and of radar engineering techniques to problems in nuclear physics. And folks who think good jobs are difficult to come by now might want to contemplate the couple of years Schwinger spent teaching elementary physics at Purdue before moving on to the MIT Rad Lab for war work.

  4. A Comparison Between Three IMUs for Strapdown Airborne Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres-Sampaio, Diogo; Deurloo, Richard; Bos, Machiel; Magalhães, Américo; Bastos, Luísa

    2015-07-01

    Strapdown airborne gravimetry relies on the combination of an inertial measuring unit (IMU) and a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) to measure the Earth's gravity field. Early results with navigation-grade IMUs showed similar accuracies to those obtained with scalar gravimetric systems in the down component. This paper investigates the accuracy of three IMUs used for strapdown airborne gravimetry under the same flight conditions. The three systems considered were navigation-grade IMUs, iXSea AIRINS and iMAR iNAV-FMS, and a tactical-grade Litton LN-200. The data were collected in 2010 over the Island of Madeira, Portugal, in the scope of GEOid over MADeira campaign. The coordinates and orientation of the aircraft were computed using an extended Kalman filter based on the inertial navigation approach. GNSS position and velocity observations were used to update the filter, and the gravity disturbance was considered to be a stochastic process and was part of the state vector. A new crossover point-based serial tuning was introduced to deal with the uncertainty of choosing the filter's a priori information. The results show that with the iXSea accuracies of 2.1 and 1.6 mGal can be obtained for 1.7 and 5.0 km of spatial resolution (half-wavelength), respectively. iMAR's results were significantly affected by a nonlinear drift, which led to lower accuracies of 4.1-5.5 mGal. Remarkably, Litton showed very consistent results and achieved an accuracy of about 4.5 mGal at 5 km of spatial resolution (half-wavelength).

  5. Accurate method of modeling cluster scaling relations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian-hua; Li, Baojiu

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new method to model cluster scaling relations in modified gravity. Using a suite of nonradiative hydrodynamical simulations, we show that the scaling relations of accumulated gas quantities, such as the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (Compton-y parameter) and the x-ray Compton-y parameter, can be accurately predicted using the known results in the Λ CDM model with a precision of ˜3 % . This method provides a reliable way to analyze the gas physics in modified gravity using the less demanding and much more efficient pure cold dark matter simulations. Our results therefore have important theoretical and practical implications in constraining gravity using cluster surveys.

  6. Approximating edges of source bodies from magnetic or gravity anomalies.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Simpson, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Cordell and Grauch (1982, 1985) discussed a technique to estimate the location of abrupt lateral changes in magnetization or mass density of upper crustal rocks. The final step of their procedure is to identify maxima on a contoured map of horizontal gradient magnitudes. Attempts to automate their final step. The method begins with gridded magnetic or gravity anomaly data and produces a plan view of inferred boundaries of magnetic or gravity sources. The method applies to both local surveys and to continent-wide compilations of magnetic and gravity data.-from Authors

  7. Coupled Gravity and Elevation Measurement of Ice Sheet Mass Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, K. C.; Baumgartner, F.

    2005-01-01

    During June 2003, we measured surface gravity at six locations about a glaciological measurement site located on the South-central Greenland Ice. We operated a GPS unit for 90 minutes at each site -the unit was operated simultaneously with a base station unit in Sondrestrom Fjord so as to enable differential, post-processing of the data. We installed an aluminum, accumulation-rate-pole at each site. The base section of the pole also served as the mount for the GPS antenna. Two gravimeters were used simultaneously at each site. Measurements were repeated at each site with at time lapse of at least 50 minutes. We measured snow physical properties in two shallow pits The same measurement sites were occupied in 1981 and all were part of a hexagonal network of geodetic and glaciological measurements established by The Ohio State University in 1980. Additional gravity observations were acquired at three of the sites in 1993 and 1995. Gravity data were collected in conjunction with Doppler satellite measurements of position and elevation in 1981 and global positioning system measurements subsequently. The use of satellite navigation techniques permitted reoccupation of the same sites in each year to within a few 10 s of meters or better. After detrending the gravity data, making adjustments for tides and removing the residual effects of local spatial gradients in gravity, we observe an average secular decrease in gravity of about 0.01 milligal/year, but with tenths of milligal variations about the mean trend. The trend is consistent with a nearly linear increase in surface elevation of between 7 to 10 c d y r (depending on location) as measured by repeated airborne laser altimeter, surface Doppler satellite and GPS elevation measurements. Differences between the residual gravity anomalies after free air correction may be attributable to local mass changes. This project is a collaboration between the Byrd Polar Research Center of the Ohio State University and the Arctic

  8. Survival rate of airborne Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Gannon, B W; Hayes, C M; Roe, J M

    2007-04-01

    Despite years of study the principle transmission route of bovine tuberculosis to cattle remains unresolved. The distribution of pathological lesions, which are concentrated in the respiratory system, and the very low dose of Mycobacterium bovis needed to initiate infection from a respiratory tract challenge suggest that the disease is spread by airborne transmission. Critical to the airborne transmission of a pathogenic microorganism is its ability to survive the stresses incurred whilst airborne. This study demonstrates that M. bovis is resistant to the stresses imposed immediately after becoming airborne, 94% surviving the first 10 min after aerosolisation. Once airborne the organism is robust, its viability decreasing with a half-life of approximately 1.5 hours. These findings support the hypothesis that airborne transmission is the principle route of infection for bovine tuberculosis. PMID:17045316

  9. Photophoretic trapping of airborne particles using ultraviolet illumination.

    PubMed

    Redding, Brandon; Hill, Steven C; Alexson, Dimitri; Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate photophoretic trapping of micron-sized absorbing particles in air using pulsed and continuous-wave (CW) ultraviolet laser illumination at wavelengths of 351 nm and 244 nm. We compared the particle trapping dynamics in two trapping geometries consisting of a hollow optical cone formed by light propagating either with or against gravity. This comparison allowed us to isolate the influence of the photophoretic force from the radiative pressure and the convective forces. We found that the absorbing spherical particles tested experienced a positive photophoretic force, whereas the spatially irregular, non-spherical particles tested experienced a negative photophoretic force. By using two trapping geometries, both spherical and non-spherical absorbing particles could be trapped and held securely in place. The position of the trapped particles exhibited a standard deviation of less than 1 µm over 20 seconds. Moreover, by operating in the UV and deep-UV where the majority of airborne materials are absorptive, the system was able to trap a wide range of particle types. Such a general purpose optical trap could enable on-line characterization of airborne particles when coupled with interrogation techniques such as Raman spectroscopy. PMID:25836215

  10. Testing gravity using dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    Generic scalar-tensor theories of gravity predict deviations from Newtonian physics inside astrophysical bodies. In this paper, we point out that low mass stellar objects, red and brown dwarf stars, are excellent probes of these theories. We calculate two important and potentially observable quantities: the radius of brown dwarfs and the minimum mass for hydrogen burning in red dwarfs. The brown dwarf radius can differ significantly from the general relativity prediction, and upcoming surveys that probe the mass-radius relation for stars with masses

  11. Up-dated configuration of the planar electrostatic gradiometer GREMLIT for airborne geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, Bernard; Douch, Karim; Christophe, Bruno; Panet, Isabelle; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    The knowledge of the gravity field of the Earth has been considerably improved thanks to global positioning satellites constellations and to space gravity measurements from recent GRACE and GOCE missions. But the spatial resolution of those gravity data essentially addresses the large and medium wavelengths of the field (down to a resolution of 90km) and it is therefore essential to complete them at the shorter wavelengths in particular in the areas where spatial distribution and quality of ground data remain quite uneven like in high mountain or coastal areas. Taking advantage of technologies, formerly developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions, the GREMLIT airborne gravity gradiometer is more particularly developed to cover the land/sea transition zone with a uniform precision, and a spatial resolution expected higher than from classical airborne gravimetry. Built using a configuration with eight planar proof-masses at the corners of a cube, the gradiometer is mounted on a dedicated stabilized platform which is controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself to achieve a sufficient rejection ratio of the perturbations/vibrations induced by the airborne environment in the horizontal directions. The levitation of the proof-masses along the normal gravity and the vibration isolation of the platform are designed to allow the instrument to support between +2.5 g and 0 g along the vertical axis. The gradiometer differential measurements along the two horizontal axes provide the necessary information to extract the six components of the gravity gradient tensor at the location of the instrument. Well suited to sustain the proof-mass levitation in the Earth's gravity field, the planar configuration of each accelerometer also presents an intrinsic linearity of the horizontal control loops which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth. The compactness of the gradiometer

  12. Updated Status of the Planar Electrostatic Gradiometer GREMLIT for Airborne Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Douch, K.; Lebat, V.; Panet, I.

    2014-12-01

    In spite of the important improvement provided by the recent space missions GRACE and GOCE to the accuracy of Earth's gravity field models, many geodetic and geophysical issues require higher resolution models. To address spatial resolution in the range between 80 km and 10 km, the airborne gravity gradiometry is a convenient way to complete these global models at the short wavelengths in particular in land/sea transition areas where the gravity field is poorly covered by current measurements. Taking advantage of technologies, developed by ONERA for the accelerometers used in these space gravity missions, the new GREMLIT airborne gravity gradiometer is more particularly developed to determine the horizontal components of the gravity gradient tensor in the instrumental frame. GREMLIT is composed of a double deck of a compact planar assembly of 4 electrostatic accelerometers. The eight plane proof-masses are arranged in a cubic configuration and the whole instrument is mounted on a dedicated stabilized platform which is controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself to achieve a sufficient rejection ratio of the perturbations induced by the airborne environment in the horizontal directions. In addition to be well suited to sustain the proof-mass levitation in the Earth's gravity field, the planar configuration presents an intrinsic linearity of the control loops which minimizes the aliasing effects. Concerning the present development, in addition to the one axis prototype manufactured in order to verify the hardware performance of the concept, detailed numerical simulations were conducted over some realistic coastal test areas. Taking into account the data sheet performance of the associated commercial angular and data rate sensors and assuming actual airplane acceleration measurements, they lead to exhibit accuracy below 1E along the Txx and Tyy horizontal components. The characteristic of the controlled platform being one of the key point of the

  13. Superconducting gravity gradiometers for underground target recognition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adriaans, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most formidable intelligence challenges existing in the non-proliferation community is the detection of buried targets. The physical parameter that all buried targets share, whether the target is buried armaments, a tunnel or a bunker, is mass. In the case of buried armaments, there is an excess mass (higher density) compared to the surrounding area; for a tunnel or bunker, the mass is missing. In either case, this difference in mass generates a distinct gravitational signature. The Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer