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Sample records for airborne in-situ measurements

  1. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Rosenberg, Phil; Solomos, Stavros; Trembath, Jamie; Allan, James; Bacak, Asan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015).

  2. Integrated Airborne and In-Situ Measurements over Land-Fast Ice near Barrow, AK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozena, J. M.; Gardner, J. M.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Richter-Menge, J.; Claffey, K. J.; Abelev, A.; Hebert, D. A.; Jones, K.

    2014-12-01

    During March of 2014, the Naval Research Laboratory and the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory collected an integrated set of airborne and in-situ measurements over two areas of floating, but land-fast ice near the coast of Barrow, AK. The near-shore site was just north of Point Barrow, and the "offshore" site was ~ 20 km east of Point Barrow. The in-situ data provided ground-truth for airborne measurements from a scanning LiDAR (Riegl Q 560i), digital photogrammetry (Applanix DSS-439) and a snow radar procured from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of the University of Kansas. The objective of the survey was to aid our understanding of the use of the airborne data to calibrate/validate Cryosat-2 data. Sampling size or "footprint" plays a critical role in the attempt to compare in-situ measurements with airborne (or satellite) measurements. Thus the in-situ data were arranged to minimize aliasing. Ground measurements were collected along transects at both sites consisting of a 2 km long profile of snow depth and ice thickness measurements with periodic boreholes. A 60 m x 400 m swath of snow depth measurements was centered on this profile. Airborne data were collected on five overflights of the two transect areas. The LiDAR measured total freeboard (ice + snow) referenced to leads in the ice, and produced swaths 200-300 m wide. The radar measured snow thickness. The freeboard and snow thickness measurements are used to estimate ice thickness via isostasy and density estimates. The central swath of in situ snow depth data allows examination of the effects of cross-track variations considering the relatively large footprint of the snow radar. Assuming a smooth, flat surface the radar range resolution in air is < 4 cm, but the along-track sampling distance is ~ 3 m after unfocussed SAR processing. The width of the footprint varies from ~ 9 m up to about 40 m (beam-limited) for uneven surfaces. However, the radar could not resolve snow thickness

  3. Airborne, In Situ and Laboratory Measurements of the Optical and Photochemical Properties of Surface Marine Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Airborne, In Situ And Laboratory Measurements Of The Optical And Photochemical Properties Of Surface Marine Waters Neil V. Blough Department of...matter (CDOM) in marine and estuarine waters , 2) to determine the impact of CDOM on the aquatic light field and remotely-sensed optical signals, 3) to...October 1999 was performed to examine the optical and photochemical properties of waters in the Middle Atlantic Bight and in the Delaware and Chesapeake

  4. Integrated Airborne and In-Situ Measurements Over Land-Fast Ice Near Barrow, AK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. M.; Brozena, J. M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Abelev, A.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Claffey, K. J.; Hebert, D. A.; Jones, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has collected two field seasons of integrated airborne and in-situ measurements over multiple sites of floating, but land-fast ice north of Barrow, AK. During the first season in March of 2014 the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory led the on-ice group including NRL personnel and Naval Academy midshipmen. The second season (March 2015) included only NRL scientists and midshipmen. The in-situ data provided ground-truth for airborne measurements from a scanning LiDAR (Riegl Q 560i), digital photogrammetry (Applanix DSS-439), a low-frequency SAR (P-band in 2014 and P and L bands in 2015) and a snow/Ku radar procured from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of the University of Kansas. The CReSIS radar was updated in 2015 to integrate the snow and Ku radars into a single continuous chirp, thus improving resolution. The objective of the survey was to aid our understanding of the use of the airborne data to calibrate/validate Cryosat-2 data. Sampling size or "footprint" plays a critical role in the attempt to compare in-situ measurements with airborne (or satellite) measurements. Thus the in-situ data were arranged to minimize aliasing. Ground measurements were collected along transects a sites generally consisting of a 2 km long profile of Magnaprobe and EM31 measurements with periodic boreholes. A 60 m x 400 m swath of Magnaprobe measurements was centered on this profile. Airborne data were collected on multiple overflights of the transect areas. The LiDAR measured total freeboard (ice + snow) referenced to leads in the ice, and produced swaths 200-300 m wide. The SAR imaged the ice beneath the snow and the snow/Ku radar measured snow thickness. The freeboard measurements and snow thickness are used to estimate ice thickness via isostasy and density estimates. Comparisons and processing methodology will be shown. The results of this ground-truth experiment will inform our analysis of grids of airborne data collected

  5. Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne in-situ, Space-borne, and Ground-Based Measurements of Troposoheric Aerosol in Ace-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Collins, D.; Gasso, S.; Ostrom, E.; Powell, D.; Welton, E.; Durkee, P.; Livingstron, J.; Russell, P.; Flagan, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report on clear-sky column closure experiments performed in the Canary Islands during the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June/July 1997. We present results obtained by combining airborne sunphotometer and in-situ aerosol measurements taken aboard the Pelican aircraft, space-borne NOAA/AVHRR data and ground-based lidars A wide range of aerosol types was encountered throughout the ACE-2 area, including background Atlantic marine, European pollution-derived, and African mineral dust. During !he two days discussed here, vertical profiles flown in cloud free air masses revealed three distinctly different layers: a marine boundary layer (MBL) with varying pollution levels, an elevated dust layer, and a very clean layer between the MBL and the dust layer. We found that the presence of the elevated dust layer removes the good agreement between satellite and sunphotometer AOD usually found in the absence of the dust layer. Using size-resolved composition information we have computed optical properties of the ambient aerosol from the in-situ measurements and subsequently compared those to the sunphotometer results. In the dust, the agreement in layer aerosol optical depth (380-1060 nm) is 3-8%. In the MBL there is tendency for the in-situ results to be slightly lower than the sunphotometer measurements (10-17% at 525 nm), but these differences are within the combined error bars of the measurements and computations.

  6. Using in situ airborne measurements to evaluate three cloud phase products derived from CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesana, G.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D.; Getzewich, B.; Cai, X.; Jourdan, O.; Mioche, G.; Okamoto, H.; Hagihara, Y.; Noel, V.; Reverdy, M.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the cloud detection and cloud phase determination of three independent climatologies based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) to airborne in situ measurements. Our analysis of the cloud detection shows that the differences between the satellite and in situ measurements mainly arise from three factors. First, averaging CALIPSO Level l data along track before cloud detection increases the estimate of high- and low-level cloud fractions. Second, the vertical averaging of Level 1 data before cloud detection tends to artificially increase the cloud vertical extent. Third, the differences in classification of fully attenuated pixels among the CALIPSO climatologies lead to differences in the low-level Arctic cloud fractions. In another section, we compare the cloudy pixels detected by colocated in situ and satellite observations to study the cloud phase determination. At midlatitudes, retrievals of homogeneous high ice clouds by CALIPSO data sets are very robust (more than 94.6% of agreement with in situ). In the Arctic, where the cloud phase vertical variability is larger within a 480 m pixel, all climatologies show disagreements with the in situ measurements and CALIPSO-General Circulation Models-Oriented Cloud Product (GOCCP) report significant undefined-phase clouds, which likely correspond to mixed-phase clouds. In all CALIPSO products, the phase determination is dominated by the cloud top phase. Finally, we use global statistics to demonstrate that main differences between the CALIPSO cloud phase products stem from the cloud detection (horizontal averaging, fully attenuated pixels) rather than the cloud phase determination procedures.

  7. Reconciling In Situ Foliar Nitrogen and Vegetation Structure Measurements with Airborne Imagery Across Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagg, C.

    2015-12-01

    Over the next 30 years the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will monitor environmental and ecological change throughout North America. NEON will provide a suite of standardized data from several ecological topics of interest, including net primary productivity and nutrient cycling, from 60+ sites across 20 eco-climatic domains when fully operational in 2017. The breadth of sampling includes ground-based measurements of foliar nitrogen and vegetation structure, ground-based spectroscopy, airborne LIDAR, and airborne hyperspectral surveys occurring within narrow overlapping time intervals once every five years. While many advancements have been made in linking and scaling in situ data with airborne imagery, establishing these relationships across dozens of highly variable sites poses significant challenges to understanding continental-wide processes. Here we study the relationship between foliar nitrogen content and airborne hyperspectral imagery at different study sites. NEON collected foliar samples from three sites in 2014 as part of a prototype study: Ordway Swisher Biological Station (pine-oak savannah, with active fire management), Jones Ecological Research Center (pine-oak savannah), and San Joaquin Experimental Range (grass-pine oak woodland). Leaf samples and canopy heights of dominant and co-dominant species were collected from trees located within 40 x 40 meter sampling plots within two weeks of aerial LIDAR and hyperspectral surveys. Foliar canopy samples were analyzed for leaf mass per area (LMA), stable isotopes of C and N, C/N content. We also examine agreement and uncertainty between ground based canopy height and airborne LIDAR derived digital surface models (DSM) for each site. Site-scale maps of canopy nitrogen and canopy height will also be presented.

  8. Column Closure Studies of Lower Tropospheric Aerosol and Water Vapor During ACE-Asia Using Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne In-Situ and Ship-Based Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Hegg, A.; Wang, J.; Bates, D.; Redemann, J.; Russells, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Jonsson, H. H.; Welton, E. J.; Seinfield, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    We assess the consistency (closure) between solar beam attenuation by aerosols and water vapor measured by airborne sunphotometry and derived from airborne in-situ, and ship-based lidar measurements during the April 2001 Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). The airborne data presented here were obtained aboard the Twin Otter aircraft. Comparing aerosol extinction o(550 nm) from four different techniques shows good agreement for the vertical distribution of aerosol layers. However, the level of agreement in absolute magnitude of the derived aerosol extinction varied among the aerosol layers sampled. The sigma(550 nm) computed from airborne in-situ size distribution and composition measurements shows good agreement with airborne sunphotometry in the marine boundary layer but is considerably lower in layers dominated by dust if the particles are assumed to be spherical. The sigma(550 nm) from airborne in-situ scattering and absorption measurements are about approx. 13% lower than those obtained from airborne sunphotometry during 14 vertical profiles. Combining lidar and the airborne sunphotometer measurements reveals the prevalence of dust layers at altitudes up to 10 km with layer aerosol optical depth (from 3.5 to 10 km altitude) of approx. 0.1 to 0.2 (500 nm) and extinction-to-backscatter ratios of 59-71 sr (523 nm). The airborne sunphotometer aboard the Twin Otter reveals a relatively dry atmosphere during ACE- Asia with all water vapor columns less than 1.5 cm and water vapor densities w less than 12 g/cu m. Comparing layer water vapor amounts and w from the airborne sunphotometer to the same quantities measured with aircraft in-situ sensors leads to a high correlation (r(sup 3)=0.96) but the sunphotometer tends to underestimate w by 7%.

  9. Airborne Sunphotometer Studies of Aerosol Properties and Effects, Including Closure Among Satellite, Suborbital Remote, and In situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russlee, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Airborne sunphotometry has been used to measure aerosols from North America, Europe, and Africa in coordination with satellite and in situ measurements in TARFOX (1996), ACE-2 (1997), PRIDE (2000), and SAFARI 2000. Similar coordinated measurements of Asian aerosols are being conducted this spring in ACE-Asia and are planned for North American aerosols this summer in CLAMS. This paper summarizes the approaches used, key results, and implications for aerosol properties and effects, such as single scattering albedo and regional radiative forcing. The approaches exploit the three-dimensional mobility of airborne sunphotometry to access satellite scenes over diverse surfaces (including open ocean with and without sunglint) and to match exactly the atmospheric layers sampled by airborne in situ measurements and other radiometers. These measurements permit tests of the consistency, or closure, among such diverse measurements as aerosol size-resolved chemical composition; number or mass concentration; light extinction, absorption, and scattering (total, hemispheric back and 180 deg.); and radiative fluxes. In this way the airborne sunphotometer measurements provide a key link between satellite and in situ measurements that helps to understand any discrepancies that are found. These comparisons have led to several characteristic results. Typically these include: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements than between remote and in situ measurements. (2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements. (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from in situ measurements. Aerosol intensive properties derived from these closure studies have been combined with satellite-retrieved fields of optical depth to produce fields of regional radiative forcing. We show results for the North Atlantic derived from AVHRR optical depths and aerosol intensive properties from TARFOX and ACE-2. Companion papers

  10. Regular, Fast and Accurate Airborne In-Situ Methane Measurements Around the Tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, Christoph; Rauthe-Schöch, Armin; Schuck, Tanja J.; Zahn, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    We present a laser spectrometer for automated monthly measurements of methane (CH4) mixing ratios aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft. The instrument is based on a commercial fast methane analyzer (FMA, Los Gatos Res.), which was modified for fully unattended employment. A laboratory characterization was performed and the results with emphasis on the precision, cross sensitivity to H2O, and accuracy are presented. An in-flight calibration strategy is described, that utilizes CH4 measurements obtained from flask samples taken during the same flights. By statistical comparison of the in-situ measurements with the flask samples we derive a total uncetrainty estimate of ~ 3.85 ppbv (1?) around the tropopause, and ~ 12.4 ppbv (1?) during aircraft ascent and descent. Data from the first two years of airborne operation are presented that span a large part of the northern hemispheric upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere, with occasional crossings of the tropics on flights to southern Africa. With its high spatial resolution and high accuracy this data set is unprecedented in the highly important atmospheric layer of the tropopause.

  11. Aspects regarding vertical distribution of greenhouse gases resulted from in situ airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscornea, Andreea; Sorin Vajaiac, Nicolae; Ardelean, Magdalena; Benciu, Silviu Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades the air quality, as well as other components of the environment, has been severely affected by uncontrolled emissions of gases - most known as greenhouse gases (GHG). The main role of GHG is given by the direct influence on the Earth's radiative budget, through Sun light scattering and indirectly by participating in cloud formation. Aldo, many efforts were made for reducing the high levels of these pollutants, e.g., International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) initiatives, Montreal Protocol, etc., this issue is still open. In this context, this study aims to present several aspects regarding the vertical distribution in the lower atmosphere of some greenhouse gases: water vapours, CO, CO2 and methane. Bucharest and its metropolitan area is one of the most polluted regions of Romania due to high traffic. For assessing the air quality of this area, in situ measurements of water vapours, CO, CO2 and CH4 were performed using a Britten Norman Islander BN2 aircraft equipped with a Picarro gas analyser, model G2401-mc, able to provide precised, continuous and accurate data in real time. This configuration consisting in aircraft and airborne instruments was tested for the first time in Romania. For accomplishing the objectives of the measurement campaign, there were proposed several flight strategies which included vertical and horizontal soundings from 105 m to 3300 m and vice-versa around Clinceni area (20 km West of Bucharest). During 5 days (25.08.2015 - 31.08.2015) were performed 7 flights comprising 10h 18min research flight hours. The measured concentrations of GHS ranged between 0.18 - 2.2 ppm for water vapours with an average maximum value of 1.7 ppm, 0.04 - 0.53 ppm for CO with an average maximum value of 0.21 ppm, 377 - 437.5 ppm for CO2 with an average maximum value of 397 ppm and 1.7 - 6.1 ppm for CH4 with an average maximum value of 2.195 ppm. It was noticed that measured concentrations of GHG are decreasing for high values of sounding

  12. In Situ Airborne Measurement of Formaldehyde with a New Laser Induced Fluorescence Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkinson, H.; Hanisco, T. F.; Cazorla, M.; Fried, A.; Walega, J.

    2012-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a highly reactive and ubiquitous compound in the atmosphere that originates from primary emissions and secondary formation by photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds. HCHO is an important precursor to the formation of ozone and an ideal tracer for the transport of boundary layer pollutants to higher altitudes. In situ measurements of HCHO are needed to improve understanding of convective transport mechanisms and the effects of lofted pollutants on ozone production and cloud microphysics in the upper troposphere. The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign addressed the effects of deep, midlatitude continental convective clouds on the upper troposphere by examining vertical transport of fresh emissions and water aloft and by characterizing subsequent changes in composition and chemistry. Observations targeting convective storms were conducted over Colorado, Alabama, and Texas and Oklahoma. We present measurements of the In Situ Airborne Formaldehyde instrument (ISAF), which uses laser induced fluorescence to achieve the high sensitivity and fast time response required to detect low concentrations in the upper troposphere and capture the fine structure characteristic of convective storm outflow. Preliminary results from DC3 indicate that the ISAF is able to resolve concentrations ranging from under 35 ppt to over 35 ppb, spanning three orders of magnitude, in less than a few minutes. Frequent, abrupt changes in HCHO captured by the ISAF are corroborated by similar patterns observed by simultaneous trace gas and aerosol measurements. Primary HCHO emissions are apparent in cases when the DC-8 flew over combustion sources or biomass burning, and secondary HCHO formation is suggested by observations of enhanced HCHO concurrent with other elevated hydrocarbons. Vertical transport of HCHO is indicated by measurements of over 6 ppb from outflow in the upper troposphere. The DC-8 payload also included the

  13. In situ airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties during photochemical pollution events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; van Dingenen, R.; Roger, J. C.; Despiau, S.; Cachier, H.

    2005-02-01

    Dry aerosol optical properties (scattering, absorbing coefficients, and single scattering albedo) were derived from in situ airborne measurements during two photochemical pollution events (25 and 26 June) observed during the Experience sur Site pour Contraindre les Modeles de Pollution atmospherique et de Transport d'Emissions (ESCOMPTE) experiment. Two flights were carried out during daytime (one during the morning and one at noon) over a domain, allowing the investigation of how an air pollution event affects the particle optical properties. Both horizontal distribution and vertical profiles are presented. Results from the horizontal mapping show that plumes of enhanced scattering and absorption are formed in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) during the day in the sea breeze-driven outflow of the coastal urban-industrial area of Marseille-Fos de Berre. The domain-averaged scattering coefficient (at 550 nm) over land σs changes from 35 (28) Mm-1 during land breeze to 63 (43) Mm-1 during sea breeze on 25 June (26 June), with local maxima reaching > 100 Mm-1. The increase in the scattering coefficient is associated with new particle formation, indicative of secondary aerosol formation. Simultaneously, the domain-averaged absorption coefficient increases from 5.6 (3.4) Mm-1 to 9.3 (8.0) Mm-1. The pollution plume leads to strong gradients in the single scattering albedo ωo over the domain studied, with local values as low as 0.73 observed inside the pollution plume. The role of photochemistry and secondary aerosol formation during the 25 June case is shown to increase ωo and to make the aerosol more `reflecting' while the plume moves away from the sources. The lower photochemical activity, observed in the 26 June case, induces a relatively higher contribution of black carbon, making the aerosol more absorbing. Results from vertical profiles at a single near-urban location in the domain indicate that the changes in optical properties happen almost entirely within

  14. Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.; Kucera, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by the University of North Dakota (UND) under NASA Grant NAG5-11509, titled Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE. This work focused on the collection of data by two key platforms: the UND Citation II research aircraft and the NASA NPOL radar system. The CRYSTAL-FACE (C-F) mission addresses several key issues from the NASA Earth System Enterprise, including the variability of water in the atmosphere, the forcing provided by tropical cirrus and the response of the Earth system to this forcing. In situ measurements and radar observations of tropical convection, cirrus clouds and their environment are core elements of C-F. One of the primary issues that C-F is addressing is the relationship of tropical cirrus anvils to precipitating deep convection. The in situ measurements from C-F are being used to validate remote sensing of Earth-Atmosphere properties, increase our knowledge of upper tropospheric water vapor and its distribution, and increase our knowledge of tropical cirrus cloud morphology and composition. Radar measurements, especially polarimetric diversity observations available fiom the NASA NPOL radar, are providing essential information about the initiation, modulation, and dissipation of convective cores and the generation of associated anvils in tropical convection. Specifically, NPOL radar measurements contain information about convective intensity and its vertical structure for comparison with thermodynamic and kinematic environmental measurements observed from soundings. Because of the polarimetric diversity of MOL, statistics on bulk microphysical properties can be retrieved and compared to the other characteristics of convection and associated cirrus anvils. In summary, the central objectives of this proposal were to deploy the UND Citation research aircraft as an in situ sensing platform for this mission and to provide collaborative

  15. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; Bansemer, A.; Borrmann, S.; Brown, P.; Bundke, U.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cziczo, D.; Field, P.; Gallagher, M.; Gayet, J. -F.; Korolev, A.; Kraemer, M.; McFarquhar, G.; Mertes, S.; Moehler, O.; Lance, S.; Lawson, P.; Petters, M. D.; Pratt, K.; Roberts, G.; Rogers, D.; Stetzer, O.; Stith, J.; Strapp, W.; Twohy, C.; Wendisch, M.

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently under review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.

  16. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; ...

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently undermore » review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.« less

  17. Airborne vacuum ultraviolet resonance fluorescence instrument for in situ measurement of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegawa, N.; Kita, K.; Kondo, Y.; Matsumi, Y.; Parrish, D. D.; Holloway, J. S.; Koike, M.; Miyazaki, Y.; Toriyama, N.; Kawakami, S.; Ogawa, T.

    2001-10-01

    An airborne instrument for fast-response, high-precision measurement of tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) was developed using a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) resonance fluorescence technique. The excitation radiation is obtained by a DC discharge CO resonance lamp combined with an optical filter for the CO fourth positive band emission around 150 nm. The optical filter consists of a VUV monochromator and a crystalline quartz window (<147-nm cutoff). The crystalline quartz window ensures a sharp discrimination against wavelengths below 135.7 nm that yield a positive interference from water vapor. Laboratory tests showed that the optical system achieved a precision of 1.1 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at a CO concentration of 100 ppbv for a 1-s integration period, and the flow system provided a response time (1/e time constant) of ˜2 s. The aircraft measurement campaign Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment-phase B (BIBLE-B) was conducted between August and September 1999 over the western Pacific and Australia. The flight data obtained during this campaign were used to demonstrate the high precision and fast response of the instrument. An intercomparison of the VUV CO measurement and a gas chromatographic CO measurement was conducted during BIBLE-B. Overall, these two independent measurements showed good agreement, within the experimental uncertainties.

  18. Comparisons of Arctic In-Situ Snow and Ice Data with Airborne Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, T.; Cavalien, D. J.; Gasiewski, A.; Sturm, M.; Klein, M.; Maslanik, J.; Stroeve, J.; Heinrichs, J.; Holmgren, J.; Irisov, V.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the AMSR-E sea ice validation campaign in March 2003, aircraft flights over the Arctic sea ice were coordinated with ground measurements of snow and sea ice properties. The surface-based measurements were in the vicinity of Barrow, AK, and at a Navy ice camp located in the Beaufort Sea. The NASA P-3 aircraft was equipped with the NOAA ETL PSR microwave radiometer that has the same frequencies as the AMSR-E sensor. The goal was to validate the standard AMSR-E products ice temperature and snow depth on sea ice. Ground measurements are the only way to validate these parameters. The higher spatial resolution of the PSR instrument (between 30 and 500 m, depending on altitude) enables a better comparison between ground measurements and microwave data because of the expected smaller spatial variability. Maps of PSR data can then be used for further down-scaling to AMSR-E pixel areas. Initial results show a good qualitative agreement between the in-situ snow depths and the PSR data. Detailed studies are underway and latest results will be presented.

  19. Identifying a Sea Breeze Circulation Pattern Over the Los Angeles Basin Using Airborne In Situ Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannan, A. L.; Schill, S.; Trousdell, J.; Heath, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Yang, M. M.; Bertram, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Los Angeles Basin in Southern California is an optimal location for a circulation study, due to its location between the Pacific Ocean to the west and the Santa Monica and San Gabriel mountain ranges to the east, as well as its booming metropolitan population. Sea breeze circulation carries air at low altitudes from coastal to inland regions, where the air rises and expands before returning back towards the coast at higher altitudes. As a result, relatively clean air is expected at low altitudes over coastal regions, but following the path of sea breeze circulation should increase the amount of anthropogenic influence. During the 2014 NASA Student Airborne Research Program, a highly modified DC-8 aircraft completed flights from June 23 to 25 in and around the LA Basin, including missed approaches at four local airports—Los Alamitos and Long Beach (coastal), Ontario and Riverside (inland). Because carbon dioxide (CO2) is chemically inert and well-suited as a conserved atmospheric tracer, the NASA Langley Atmospheric Vertical Observations of CO2 in the Earth's Troposphere (AVOCET) instrument was used to make airborne in situ carbon dioxide measurements. Combining measured wind speed and direction data from the aircraft with CO2 data shows that carbon dioxide can be used to trace the sea breeze circulation pattern of the Los Angeles basin.

  20. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde over California: First Results from the COFFEE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Josette; St. Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma; Swanson, Andrew; Gore, Warren; Iraci, Laura; Hanisco, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. We will present results from flights performed over the Central Valley of California, including boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. These results will be presented in conjunction with formaldehyde. Targets in the Central Valley consist of an oil field, agricultural areas, and highways, each of which can emit HCHO primarily and generate HCHO through secondary production. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  1. First Results from the COFFEE Instrument: Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; St Clair, J.; Marrero, J. E.; Gore, W.; Swanson, A. K.; Hanisco, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of formaldehyde as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. COFFEE, developed at NASA-GSFC, has a sensitivity of 100 pptv (1 sec) and can operate over a wide range of altitudes from the boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. It is mounted in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA-ARC, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. We will present results from test flights performed in Fall 2015 over the Central Valley of California. Targets include an oil field, agricultural areas, and highways. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space, and we will present plans to compare COFFEE in-situ data with space-based formaldehyde observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP).

  2. Airborne In-Situ Trace Gas Measurements of Multiple Wildfires in California (2013-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Yates, E. L.; Tanaka, T.; Roby, M.; Gore, W.; Clements, C. B.; Lareau, N.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Quayle, B.; Schroeder, W.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning emissions are an important source of a wide range of trace gases and particles that can impact local, regional and global air quality, climate forcing, biogeochemical cycles and human health. In the western US, wildfires dominate over prescribed fires, contributing to atmospheric trace gas budgets and regional and local air pollution. Limited sampling of emissions from wildfires means western US emission estimates rely largely on data from prescribed fires, which may not be a suitable proxy for wildfire emissions. We report here in-situ measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, ozone and water vapor from the plumes of a variety of wildfires sampled in California in the fire seasons of 2013 and 2014. Included in the analysis are the Rim Fire (August - October 2013, near Yosemite National Park), the Morgan Fire (September 2013, near Clayton, CA), and the El Portal Fire (July - August 2014, in Yosemite National Park), among others. When possible, fires were sampled on multiple days. Emission ratios and estimated emission factors will be presented and discussed in the context of fuel composition, plume structure, and fire phase. Correlations of plume chemical composition to MODIS/VIIRS Fire Radiative Power (FRP) and other remote sensing information will be explored. Furthermore, the role of plumes in delivery of enhanced ozone concentrations to downwind municipalities will be discussed.

  3. The analysis of in situ and retrieved aerosol properties measured during three airborne field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, Chelsea A.

    Aerosols can directly influence climate, visibility, and photochemistry by scattering and absorbing solar radiation. Aerosol chemical and physical properties determine how efficiently a particle scatters and/or absorbs incoming short-wave solar radiation. Because many types of aerosol can act as nuclei for cloud droplets (CCN) and a smaller population of airborne particles facilitate ice crystal formation (IN), aerosols can also alter cloud-radiation interactions which have subsequent impacts on climate. Thus aerosol properties determine the magnitude and sign of both the direct and indirect impacts of aerosols on radiation-dependent Earth System processes. This dissertation will fill some gaps in our understanding of the role of aerosol properties on aerosol absorption and cloud formation. Specifically, the impact of aerosol oxidation on aerosol spectral (350nm < lambda< 500nm) absorption was examined for two biomass burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-S aircraft during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) mission in Spring and Summer 2008. Spectral aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved using actinic flux measured aboard the NASA DC-8 was used to calculate the aerosol absorption Angstrom exponents (AAE) for a 6-day-old plume on April 17 th and a 3-hour old plume on June 29th. Higher AAE values for the April 17th plume (6.78+/-0.38) indicate absorption by aerosol was enhanced in the ultraviolet relative to the visible portion of the short-wave spectrum in the older plume compared to the fresher plume (AAE= 3.34 0.11). These differences were largely attributed to the greater oxidation of the organic aerosol in the April 17th plume which can arise either from the aging of primary organic aerosol or the formation of spectrally-absorbing secondary organic aerosol. The validity of the actinic flux retrievals used above were also evaluated in this work by the comparison of SSA retrieved using

  4. Fast in situ airborne measurement of ammonia using a mid-infrared off-axis ICOS spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Leen, J Brian; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas S; Hubbe, John M; Kluzek, Celine D; Tomlinson, Jason M; Hubbell, Mike R

    2013-09-17

    A new ammonia (NH3) analyzer was developed based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy. Its feasibility was demonstrated by making tropospheric measurements in flights aboard the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft. The ammonia analyzer consists of an optical cell, quantum-cascade laser, gas sampling system, control and data acquisition electronics, and analysis software. The NH3 mixing ratio is determined from high-resolution absorption spectra obtained by tuning the laser wavelength over the NH3 fundamental vibration band near 9.67 μm. Excellent linearity is obtained over a wide dynamic range (0-101 ppbv) with a response rate (1/e) of 2 Hz and a precision of ±90 pptv (1σ in 1 s). Two research flights were conducted over the Yakima Valley in Washington State. In the first flight, the ammonia analyzer was used to identify signatures of livestock from local dairy farms with high vertical and spatial resolution under low wind and calm atmospheric conditions. In the second flight, the analyzer captured livestock emission signals under windy conditions. Our results demonstrate that this new ammonia spectrometer is capable of providing fast, precise, and accurate in situ observations of ammonia aboard airborne platforms to advance our understanding of atmospheric compositions and aerosol formation.

  5. Fast In Situ Airborne Measurement of Ammonia Using a Mid-Infrared Off-Axis ICOS Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, J. Brian; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas S.; Hubbe, John M.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Hubbell, Mike R.

    2013-08-23

    A new ammonia (NH3) analyzer was developed based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy. Its feasibility was demonstrated by making tropospheric measurements in flights aboard the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft. The ammonia analyzer consists of an optical cell, quantum-cascade laser, gas sampling system, control and data acquisition electronics, and analysis software. The NH3 mixing ratio is determined from high-resolution absorption spectra obtained by tuning the laser wavelength over the NH3 fundamental vibration band near 9.67 μm. Excellent linearity is obtained over a wide dynamic range (0–101 ppbv) with a response rate (1/e) of 2 Hz and a precision of ±90 pptv (1σ in 1 s). Two research flights were conducted over the Yakima Valley in Washington State. In the first flight, the ammonia analyzer was used to identify signatures of livestock from local dairy farms with high vertical and spatial resolution under low wind and calm atmospheric conditions. In the second flight, the analyzer captured livestock emission signals under windy conditions. Finally, our results demonstrate that this new ammonia spectrometer is capable of providing fast, precise, and accurate in situ observations of ammonia aboard airborne platforms to advance our understanding of atmospheric compositions and aerosol formation.

  6. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  7. CBSIT 2009: Airborne Validation of Envisat Radar Altimetry and In Situ Ice Camp Measurements Over Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, Laurence; Farrell, Sinead; McAdoo, David; Krabill, William; Laxon, Seymour; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    with (1) Envisat RA-2 returns retracked optimally for sea ice and (2) in situ measurements of sea ice thickness and snow depth gathered from ice camp surveys. Particular attention is given to lead identification and classification using the continuous photo-imaging system along the Envisat underflight as well as the performance of the snow radar over the ice camp survey lines.

  8. Airborne aerosol in situ measurements during TCAP: A closure study of total scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Sedlacek, Arthur; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail; Barnard, James; Chand, Duli; Flynn, Connor; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John; Tomlinson, Jason; Fast, Jerome

    2015-07-31

    We present a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total scattering is demonstrated using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) aircraft during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these data types are: (1) size distributions measured by a suite of OPC’s; (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer; and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a integrating nephelometer and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system. We demonstrate that good agreement (~10%) between the observed and calculated scattering can be obtained under ambient conditions (RH < 80%) by applying chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction or using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40%) or overestimation (~35%) of the calculated scattering, respectively.

  9. Airborne aerosol in situ measurements during TCAP: A closure study of total scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Sedlacek, Arthur; Berg, Larry K.; ...

    2015-07-31

    We present a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total scattering is demonstrated using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) aircraft during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these data types are: (1) size distributions measured by amore » suite of OPC’s; (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer; and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a integrating nephelometer and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system. We demonstrate that good agreement (~10%) between the observed and calculated scattering can be obtained under ambient conditions (RH < 80%) by applying chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction or using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40%) or overestimation (~35%) of the calculated scattering, respectively.« less

  10. A study to identify and compare airborne systems for in-situ measurements of launch vehicle effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, T. J.; Chace, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    An in-situ system for monitoring the concentration of HCl, CO, CO2, and Al2O3 in the cloud of reaction products that form as a result of a launch of solid propellant launch vehicle is studied. A wide array of instrumentation and platforms are reviewed to yield the recommended system. An airborne system suited to monitoring pollution concentrations over urban areas for the purpose of calibrating remote sensors is then selected using a similar methodology to yield the optimal configuration.

  11. Turbulence in breaking mountain waves and atmospheric rotors estimated from airborne in situ and Doppler radar measurements.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Lukas; Serafin, Stefano; Haimov, Samuel; Grubišić, Vanda

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence generated in flow over mountainous terrain is studied using airborne in situ and cloud radar measurements over the Medicine Bow Mountains in southeast Wyoming, USA. During the NASA Orographic Clouds Experiment (NASA06) in 2006, two complex mountain flow cases were documented by the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft carrying the Wyoming Cloud Radar. The structure of turbulence and its intensity across the mountain range are described using the variance of vertical velocity σw2 and the cube root of the energy dissipation rate ɛ(1/3) (EDR). For a quantitative analysis of turbulence from the cloud radar, the uncertainties in the Doppler wind retrieval have to be taken into account, such as the variance of hydrometeor fall speed and the contamination of vertical Doppler velocity by the horizontal wind. A thorough analysis of the uncertainties shows that 25% accuracy or better can be achieved in regions of moderate to severe turbulence in the lee of the mountains, while only qualitative estimates of turbulence intensity can be obtained outside the most turbulent regions. Two NASA06 events exhibiting large-amplitude mountain waves, mid-tropospheric wave breaking, and rotor circulations are examined. Moderate turbulence is found in a wave-breaking region with σw2 and EDR reaching 4.8 m(2) s(-2) and 0.25 m(2/3) s(-1), respectively. Severe turbulence is measured within the rotor circulations with σw2 and EDR respectively in the ranges of 7.8-16.4 m(2) s(-2) and 0.50-0.77 m(2/3) s(-1). A unique result of this study is the quantitative estimation of the intensity of turbulence and its spatial distribution in the interior of atmospheric rotors, provided by the radar-derived turbulence fields.

  12. Airborne Aerosol In situ Measurements during TCAP: A Closure Study of Total Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Chand, Duli; Shilling, John E.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Barnard, James C.; Sedlacek, Art; Schmid, Beat

    2015-07-31

    We present here a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. The synergistically employed aircraft data involve aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical components and ambient relative humidity measurements. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of the complementary chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total aerosol scattering is demonstrated for different ambient conditions with a wide range of relative humidities (from 5 to 80%) using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft during the recent Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these three types of data employed are: (1) size distributions measured by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS; 0.06-1 µm), a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP; 0.1-3 µm) and a Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS; 0.6- >10 µm), (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS; 0.06-0.6 µm) and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2; 0.06-0.6 µm), and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a TSI integrating nephelometer at three wavelengths (0.45, 0.55, 0.7 µm) and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system at three RHs (near 45%, 65% and 90%) at a single wavelength (0.525 µm). We demonstrate that good agreement (~10% on average) between the observed and calculated scattering at these three wavelengths can be obtained using the best available chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction and using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40

  13. Remote sensing of large scale methane emission sources with the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument over the Kern River and Kern Front Oil fields and validation through airborne in-situ measurements - Initial results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, K.; Krautwurst, S.; Kolyer, R.; Jonsson, H.; Krings, T.; Horstjann, M.; Leifer, I.; Schuettemeyer, D.; Fladeland, M. M.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2014-12-01

    During three flights performed with the MAMAP (Methane Airborne MAPper) airborne remote sensing instrument in the framework of the CO2 and MEthane Experiment (COMEX) - a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities - large scale methane plumes were detected over the Kern River and Kern Front Oil fields in the period between June 3 and 13, 2014. MAMAP was installed for these flights aboard of the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer (operate by the Ames Research Center, ARC), a 5 hole turbulence probe as well as a atmospheric measurement package (operated by CIRPAS), measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point and other atmospheric parameters. Data collected with the in-situ GHG analyzer will be used for validation of MAMAP remotely sensed data by acquiring vertical cross sections of the discovered plumes at a fixed downwind distance. Precise airborne wind information from the turbulence probe together with ground based wind data from the nearby airport will be used to estimate emission rates from the remote sensed and in-situ measured data. Remote sensed and in-situ data as well as initial flux estimates for the three flights will be presented.

  14. An airborne infrared laser spectrometer for in-situ trace gas measurements: application to tropical convection case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catoire, V.; Krysztofiak, G.; Robert, C.; Chartier, M.; Jacquet, P.; Guimbaud, C.; Hamer, P. D.; Marécal, V.

    2015-09-01

    A three-channel laser absorption spectrometer called SPIRIT (SPectromètre InfraRouge In situ Toute altitude) has been developed for airborne measurements of trace gases in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. More than three different species can be measured simultaneously with high time resolution (each 1.6 s) using three individual CW-DFB-QCLs (Continuous Wave Distributed FeedBack Quantum Cascade Lasers) coupled to a single Robert multipass optical cell. The lasers are operated in a time-multiplexed mode. Absorption of the mid-infrared radiations occur in the cell (2.8 L with effective path lengths of 134 to 151 m) at reduced pressure, with detection achieved using a HgCdTe detector cooled by Stirling cycle. The performances of the instrument are described, in particular precisions of 1, 1 and 3 %, and volume mixing ratio (vmr) sensitivities of 0.4, 6 and 2.4 ppbv are determined at 1.6 s for CO, CH4 and N2O, respectively (at 1σ confidence level). Estimated accuracies without calibration are about 6 %. Dynamic measuring ranges of about four decades are established. The first deployment of SPIRIT was realized aboard the Falcon-20 research aircraft operated by DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) within the frame of the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) European project in November-December 2011 over Malaysia. The convective outflows from two large convective systems near Borneo Island (6.0° N-115.5° E and 5.5° N-118.5° E) were sampled above 11 km in altitude on 19 November and 9 December, respectively. Correlated enhancements in CO and CH4 vmr were detected when the aircraft crossed the outflow anvil of both systems. These enhancements were interpreted as the fingerprint of transport from the boundary layer up through the convective system and then horizontal advection in the outflow. Using these observations, the fraction of boundary layer air contained in fresh convective outflow was calculated to range

  15. Ultrasensitive Analyzer for Realtime, In-Situ Airborne and Terrestrial Measurements of OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, R. A.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.; Genty, B.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive research has suggested that OCS plays a critical role in Earth's environment. Due to its long atmospheric lifetime of ~ 35 years, OCS is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere and has been implicated in controlling the sulfur budget and aerosol loading of the stratosphere with tropical stratospheric levels exceeding 400 pptv as determined by remote satellite sensing. During volcanically-quiet periods, OCS is primarily responsible for the stratospheric aerosol layer, and flight data suggests that OCS may be used as an inverse tracer for biogenic volatile organic carbon compounds, including those thought to be responsible for the formation of secondary organic aerosols. Additionally, since the primary source and sink of non-anthropogenic OCS are considered to be the ocean emission and terrestrial vegetation uptake respectively, preliminary experimental and modeling studies have suggested that OCS/CO2 ratios may provide a tool to measure photosynthesis and help distinguish it from respiration. These results, and other similar data, have led researchers to propose that simultaneous measurements of OCS and CO2 can constrain the parameterizations of respiration and photosynthesis in carbon cycle models, and OCS gradients in the continental growing season may have broad use as a measurement-based tracer of photosynthesis. Despite the importance of carbonyl sulfide in atmospheric processes, the OCS atmospheric budget is poorly determined. Its primary sources are ocean outgassing, industrial processes (many of which produce CS2 that then oxidized into OCS), and biomass burning. Its primary sinks are vegetation and soils. However, the budget is poorly balanced with very high uncertainty. Improved, in-situ terrestrial flux and airborne measurements of OCS are required to improve this budget and further elucidate its role in stratospheric aerosol formation and as a tracer for biogenic volatile organics and photosynthesis. In this work, we have fabricated a

  16. Vertical wind retrieved by airborne lidar and analysis of island induced gravity waves in combination with numerical models and in situ particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Jähn, Michael; Rahm, Stephan; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the analysis of island induced gravity waves observed by an airborne Doppler wind lidar (DWL) during SALTRACE. First, the instrumental corrections required for the retrieval of high spatial resolution vertical wind measurements from an airborne DWL are presented and the measurement accuracy estimated by means of two different methods. The estimated systematic error is below -0.05 m s-1 for the selected case of study, while the random error lies between 0.1 and 0.16 m s-1 depending on the estimation method. Then, the presented method is applied to two measurement flights during which the presence of island induced gravity waves was detected. The first case corresponds to a research flight conducted on 17 June 2013 in the Cabo Verde islands region, while the second case corresponds to a measurement flight on 26 June 2013 in the Barbados region. The presence of trapped lee waves predicted by the calculated Scorer parameter profiles was confirmed by the lidar and in situ observations. The DWL measurements are used in combination with in situ wind and particle number density measurements, large-eddy simulations (LES), and wavelet analysis to determine the main characteristics of the observed island induced trapped waves.

  17. Passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from Oil Fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Thompson, David R.; Thorpe, Andrew K.; Kolyer, Richard W.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Frankenberg, Christian; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Fladeland, Matthew; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2016-04-01

    The CO2 and MEthane EXperiment (COMEX) was a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of the HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities. As a part of this effort, seven flights were performed between June 3 and September 4, 2014 with the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) remote sensing instrument (operated by the University of Bremen in cooperation with the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ) over the Kern River, Kern Front, and Poso Creek Oil Fields located in California's San Joaquin Valley. MAMAP was installed for the flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with: a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer operated by the NASA Ames Research Center, ARC; a 5-hole turbulence probe; and an atmospheric measurement package operated by CIRPAS measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point, and other atmospheric parameters. Three of the flights were accompanied by the Next Generation Airborne Visual InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG), operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, installed aboard a second Twin Otter aircraft. Large-scale, high-concentration CH4 plumes were detected by the MAMAP instrument over the fields and tracked over several kilometers. The spatial distribution of the MAMAP observed plumes was compared to high spatial resolution CH4 anomaly maps derived by AVIRIS-NG imaging spectroscopy data. Remote sensing data collected by MAMAP was used to infer CH4 emission rates and their distributions over the three fields. Aggregated emission estimates for the three fields were compared to aggregated emissions inferred by subsequent airborne in-situ validation measurements collected by the Picarro instrument. Comparison of remote sensing and in-situ flux estimates will be presented, demonstrating the ability of airborne remote sensing data to provide accurate emission estimates for concentrations above the

  18. Clear-Sky Closure Studies of Lower Tropospheric Aerosol and Water Vapor During ACE-2 Using Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne In-Situ, Space-Borne, and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Durkee, Philip A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfield, John H.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.

    2000-01-01

    We report on clear-sky column closure experiments (CLEARCOLUMN) performed in the Canary Islands during the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June/July 1997. We present CLEARCOLUMN results obtained by combining airborne sunphotometer and in-situ (optical particle counter, nephelometer, and absorption photometer) measurements taken aboard the Pelican aircraft, space-borne NOAA/AVHRR data and ground-based lidar and sunphotometer measurements. During both days discussed here, vertical profiles flown in cloud-free air masses revealed 3 distinctly different layers: a marine boundary layer (MBL) with varying pollution levels, an elevated dust layer, and a very clean layer between the MBL and the dust layer. A key result of this study is the achievement of closure between extinction or layer aerosol optical depth (AOD) computed from continuous in-situ aerosol size-distributions and composition and those measured with the airborne sunphotometer. In the dust, the agreement in layer AOD (lambda = 380-1060 nm) is 3-8%. In the MBL there is a tendency for the in-situ results to be slightly lower than the sunphotometer measurements (10-17% at lambda = 525 nm), but these differences are within the combined error bars of the measurements and computations.

  19. Airborne passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from oil fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Initial results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Kolyer, Richard W.; Thompson, David R.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Fladeland, Matthew; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2015-04-01

    On several flights performed over the Kern River, Kern Front, and Poso Creek Oil Fields in California between June 3 and September 4, 2014, in the framework of the CO2 and MEthane Experiment (COMEX) - a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of the HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities - the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) remote sensing instrument (operated by the University of Bremen in cooperation with the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ) detected large-scale, high-concentration, methane plumes. MAMAP was installed for the flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer (operated by the NASA Ames Research Center, ARC), a 5-hole turbulence probe and an atmospheric measurement package (operated by CIRPAS), measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point, and other atmospheric parameters. Some of the flights were accompanied by the next generation of the Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG), operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, installed aboard a second Twin Otter aircraft (operated by Twin Otter International). Data collected with the in-situ GHG analyzer were used for validation of the MAMAP and AVIRIS-NG remotely sensed data. The in-situ measurements were acquired in vertical cross sections of the discovered plumes at fixed distances downwind of the sources. Emission rates are estimated from both the remote and in-situ data using wind information from the turbulence probe together with ground-based wind data from the nearby airport. Remote sensing and in-situ data as well as initial flux estimates for selected flights will be presented.

  20. Design and instrumentation of an airborne far infrared radiometer for in-situ measurements of ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proulx, Christian; Ngo Phong, Linh; Lamontagne, Frédéric; Wang, Min; Fisette, Bruno; Martin, Louis; Châteauneuf, François

    2016-09-01

    We report on the design and instrumentation of an aircraft-certified far infrared radiometer (FIRR) and the resulting instrument characteristics. FIRR was designed to perform unattended airborne measurements of ice clouds in the arctic in support of a microsatellite payload study. It provides radiometrically calibrated data in nine spectral channels in the range of 8-50 μm with the use of a rotating wheel of bandpass filters and reference blackbodies. Measurements in this spectral range are enabled with the use of a far infrared detector based on microbolometers of 104-μm pitch. The microbolometers have a new design because of the large structure and are coated with gold black to maintain uniform responsivity over the working spectral range. The vacuum sealed detector package is placed at the focal plane of a reflective telescope based on a Schwarschild configuration with two on-axis spherical mirrors. The telescope field-of-view is of 6° and illuminates an area of 2.1-mm diameter at the focal plane. In operation, FIRR was used as a nonimaging radiometer and exhibited a noise equivalent radiance in the range of 10-20 mW/m2-sr. The dynamic range and the detector vacuum integrity of FIRR were found to be suited for the conditions of the airborne experiments.

  1. In-situ Ground-Based and Airborne Formaldehyde Measurements in the Houston Area During TexAQS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglueck, B.; Byun, D.; Alvarez, S.; Buhr, M.; Coarfa, V.; Czader, B.; Dasgupta, P.; Estes, M.; Kim, S.; Leuchner, M.; Luke, W.; Shauck, M.; Zanin, G.

    2007-12-01

    Formaldehyde is considered to play a significant role in summertime photochemistry in the Houston area, in particular it is considered an important source for radicals. Secondary formation seems to be the most important fraction of ambient HCHO. Enhanced nighttime values may indicate primary sources. Potential sources may include mobile sources such as traffic exhaust, in particular not well maintained Diesel engines. Other possible sources may include point sources such as coffee roasting and flares from refineries. In this study we focused on the TexAQS-II continuous in-situ formaldehyde data set based on Hantzsch reaction which was obtained in the Ship Channel area (HRM3 and Lynchburg Ferry site) and at the Moody Tower for several weeks. We also include in-situ HCHO measurements obtained with the same technique aboard the Baylor aircraft during TexAQS-II flight missions. Formaldehyde data was compared to several trace gases that are supposed to be coemitted including CO (traffic), ethylene (flares), and SO2 (industry). In order to keep photochemical processes at a minimum special focus was on nighttime data. Case studies will be discussed where meteorological conditions including recirculation and boundary layer developments seem to play a major role in the redistribution of HCHO. Observations will be compared to CMAQ model studies.

  2. Evaluation of Terms in the Water Vapor Budget Using Airborne Dial and In Situ Measurements from the Southern Great Plans 1997 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senff, Christoph J.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lenschow, Donald H.; Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed

    1998-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP97) field experiment was conducted in Oklahoma during June and July 1997 primarily to validate soil moisture retrieval algorithms using microwave radiometer measurements from aircraft as well as in situ surface measurements. One important objective of the SGP97 experiment plan was to examine the effect of soil moisture on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and clouds over the Southern Great Plains during the warm season. To support boundary layer studies during SGP97. the NASA Langley Research Center's Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) was flown on a NASA-P3 aircraft in conjunction with the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR). The LASE instrument is an airborne, downward-looking differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system capable of measuring water vapor concentration as well as aerosol backscatter with high horizontal and vertical resolution in the ABL. Here, we will demonstrate how the LASE data can be used to determine water vapor statistics and most of the water vapor budget terms in the ABL. This information can then be related to spatial variations in soil moisture and the surface energy budget. The extensive surface and aircraft in situ measurements conducted during SGP97 provide information on the ABL that cannot be retrieved from the LASE data alone and also offer an excellent opportunity to validate the remote water vapor budget measurements with LASE.

  3. Fast-response airborne in situ measurements of HNO3 during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, J. A.; Huey, L. G.; Dissly, R. W.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Flocke, F.; Holecek, J. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Hübler, G.; Jakoubek, R.; Nicks, D. K.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sueper, D. T.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2002-10-01

    Nitric acid (HNO3) was measured from an aircraft in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere up to 7 km on 14 flights during the Texas Air Quality Study in August and September 2000. HNO3 mixing ratios were measured at 1 Hz using a fast-response chemical ionization mass spectrometer with SiF5- reagent ions. HNO3 measurement using this highly selective ion chemistry is insensitive to water vapor and is not degraded by interferences from other species. Rapid time response (1 s) was achieved using a heated Teflon inlet. In-flight standard addition calibrations from a HNO3 permeation source were used to determine the instrument sensitivity of 1.1 ± 0.1 ion counts pptv-1 s-1 over the duration of the study. Contributions to the HNO3 signal from instrument artifacts were accounted for by regularly performing in-flight instrument background checks, where HNO3 was removed from the ambient air sample by diverting the sampled air though a nylon wool scrubber. Measurement inaccuracy, which is determined from uncertainties in the standard addition calibrations, was ±10%. Measurement precision at low HNO3 levels was ±25 pptv (1σ) for the 1 Hz data and ±9 pptv for 10 s averages of the 1 s measurements. Coincident in situ measurements of other reactive nitrogen species are used to examine NOy partitioning and HNO3 formation during this month long measurement campaign. The sum of the individually measured reactive nitrogen species is shown to be in agreement with the measured NOy. HNO3 formation in plumes from electric utility power plants, urban areas, and petrochemical facilities was studied. The observed differences in the fractional contribution of HNO3 to NOy in plumes from different anthropogenic source types are discussed.

  4. Fusing enhanced radar precipitation, in-situ hydrometeorological measurements and airborne LIDAR snowpack estimates in a hyper-resolution hydrologic model to improve seasonal water supply forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochis, D. J.; Busto, J.; Howard, K.; Mickey, J.; Deems, J. S.; Painter, T. H.; Richardson, M.; Dugger, A. L.; Karsten, L. R.; Tang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Scarcity of spatially- and temporally-continuous observations of precipitation and snowpack conditions in remote mountain watersheds results in fundamental limitations in water supply forecasting. These limitationsin observational capabilities can result in strong biases in total snowmelt-driven runoff amount, the elevational distribution of runoff, river basin tributary contributions to total basin runoff and, equally important for water management, the timing of runoff. The Upper Rio Grande River basin in Colorado and New Mexico is one basin where observational deficiencies are hypothesized to have significant adverse impacts on estimates of snowpack melt-out rates and on water supply forecasts. We present findings from a coordinated observational-modeling study within Upper Rio Grande River basin whose aim was to quanitfy the impact enhanced precipitation, meteorological and snowpack measurements on the simulation and prediction of snowmelt driven streamflow. The Rio Grande SNOwpack and streamFLOW (RIO-SNO-FLOW) Prediction Project conducted enhanced observing activities during the 2014-2015 water year. Measurements from a gap-filling, polarimetric radar (NOXP) and in-situ meteorological and snowpack measurement stations were assimilated into the WRF-Hydro modeling framework to provide continuous analyses of snowpack and streamflow conditions. Airborne lidar estimates of snowpack conditions from the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory during mid-April and mid-May were used as additional independent validations against the various model simulations and forecasts of snowpack conditions during the melt-out season. Uncalibrated WRF-Hydro model performance from simulations and forecasts driven by enhanced observational analyses were compared against results driven by currently operational data inputs. Precipitation estimates from the NOXP research radar validate significantly better against independent in situ observations of precipitation and snow-pack increases

  5. Under-canopy snow accumulation and ablation measured with airborne scanning LiDAR altimetry and in-situ instrumental measurements, southern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, P. B.; Bales, R. C.; Musselman, K. N.; Molotch, N. P.

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the influence of canopy on snow accumulation and melt in a mountain forest using paired snow on and snow off scanning LiDAR altimetry, synoptic measurement campaigns and in-situ time series data of snow depth, SWE, and radiation collected from the Kaweah River watershed, Sierra Nevada, California. Our analysis of forest cover classified by dominant species and 1 m2 grided mean under canopy snow accumulation calculated from airborne scanning LiDAR, demonstrate distinct relationships between forest class and under-canopy snow depth. The five forest types were selected from carefully prepared 1 m vegetation classifications and named for their dominant tree species, Giant Sequoia, Jeffrey Pine, White Fir, Red Fir, Sierra Lodgepole, Western White Pine, and Foxtail Pine. Sufficient LiDAR returns for calculating mean snow depth per m2 were available for 31 - 44% of the canopy covered area and demonstrate a reduction in snow depth of 12 - 24% from adjacent open areas. The coefficient of variation in snow depth under canopies ranged from 0.2 - 0.42 and generally decreased as elevation increased. Our analysis of snow density snows no statistical significance between snow under canopies and in the open at higher elevations with a weak significance for snow under canopies at lower elevations. Incident radiation measurements made at 15 minute intervals under forest canopies show an input of up to 150 w/m2 of thermal radiation from vegetation to the snow surface on forest plots. Snow accumulated on the mid to high elevation forested slopes of the Sierra Nevada represents the majority of winter snow storage. However snow estimates in forested environments demonstrate a high level of uncertainty due to the limited number of in-situ observations and the inability of most remote sensing platforms to retrieve reflectance under dense vegetation. Snow under forest canopies is strongly mediated by forest cover and decoupled from the processes that dictate accumulation

  6. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Properties in Mixed-Phase Clouds Under Varying Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comstock, J. M.; Fan, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Hubbe, J. M.; Schmid, B.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud microphysical properties impact the interaction of clouds and radiation in the atmosphere, and can influence atmospheric circulations through changes in cloud phase. Characterizing the conditions that control phase changes and the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds is important for improving understanding of physical processes that influence cloud phase. We characterize the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in relation to the atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic conditions observed in mixed-phase clouds during several aircraft-based field experiments. The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Gulfstream-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and cloud properties in warm and cold clouds during several recent field experiments. We analyze in-situ observations from the CalWater and TCAP field campaigns to examine the variability of cloud properties (phase, hydrometeor size, ice and liquid water content, particle habit) with changes in aerosol, vertical velocity, and temperature. These measurements indicate that in addition to aerosol concentration, vertical velocity strength has important influence on cloud phase in mixed-phase cloud regimes.

  7. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde over California: First Results from the Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero, Josette; St. Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren; Swanson, Andrew K.; Iraci, Laura T.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. Results of the first COFFEE science flights preformed over the California's Central Valley will be presented. Boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column will both be included. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  8. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde Over California: First Results from the Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero, Josette Elizabeth; Saint Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren; Swanson, Andrew K.; Iraci, Laura T.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. Results of the first COFFEE science flights preformed over the California's Central Valley will be presented. Boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column will both be included. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  9. Deriving an atmospheric budget of total organic bromine using airborne in-situ measurements from the Western Pacific during SHIVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, S.; Bönisch, H.; Keber, T.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G.; Engel, A.

    2014-02-01

    During the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project an extensive dataset of all halogen species relevant for the atmospheric budget of total organic bromine has been collected in the West Pacific region using the FALCON aircraft operated by the German Aerospace agency DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) covering a vertical range from the planetary boundary layer up to the ceiling altitude of the aircraft of 13 km. In total, more than 700 measurements were performed with the newly developed fully-automated in-situ instrument GHOST-MS (Gas cHromatograph for the Observation of Tracers - coupled with a Mass Spectrometer) by the Goethe University of Frankfurt (GUF) and with the onboard whole-air sampler WASP with subsequent ground based state-of-the-art GC/MS analysis by the University of East Anglia (UEA). Both instruments yield good agreement for all major (CHBr3 and CH2Br2) and minor (CHBrCl, CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl) VSLS (very short-lived substances), at least at the level of their 2 σ measurement uncertainties. In contrast to the suggestion that the Western Pacific could be a major source region for VSLS (Pyle et al., 2011), we found only slightly enhanced mixing ratios of brominated halogen source gases relative to the levels reported in Montzka et al. (2011) for other tropical regions. A budget for total organic bromine, including all four halons,CH3Br and the VSLS, is derived for the upper troposphere, the input region for the TTL and thus also for the stratosphere, compiled from the SHIVA dataset. With exception of the two minor VSLS CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl, excellent agreement with the values reported in Montzka et al. (2011) is found, while being slightly higher than previous studies from our group based on balloon-borne measurements.

  10. Vortex dynamics behind cruising aircraft studied by a ground-based scanning lidar and airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussmann, Ralf; Jaeger, Horst

    1997-05-01

    By LIDAR and CCD camera analysis the geometrical evolution of a vortex phase contrail (descent rate Vd equals 2.7 m/s, vortex separation D equals 47 m, vertical extension (sigma) z equals 140 m after 77 s) is analyzed. The contrail of a four-engine aircraft is showing a diffuse central wake phenomenon. From coincident in situ measurements all relevant meteorological parameters are characterized. Ambient humidity had been close to ice saturation. From this a non-exhaust formation of ice can be excluded. Also the mechanism of non- entrainment of exhaust into the vortices is excluded of being responsible for the observed early onset of the central wake (870 m behind aircraft). The central wake onset originates from early detrainment starting after a 3/4 roll-up period of the vortex. Baroclinic and shear forces do not contribute to the detrainment (imaginary Brunt-Vaisala-frequency N2 equals negative 3 multiplied by 10-5 s-2, shear dS/dz equals negative 0.01 s-1, bulk Richardson number Ri, equals N2/(dS/dz)2 equals negative 0.3). Ambient turbulence had been fully developed with an inertial range and locally isotropic turbulence for wavenumbers k-equals 0.004 - 0.1 radian/m. The eddy dissipation rate (epsilon) equals 7.4 plus or minus 0.5 multiplied by 10-5 m2s-3 exceeds the values found over the North Atlantic flight corridor at cruising altitude by a factor of 1000. Turbulence was identified as the dominating detrainment mechanism.

  11. Deriving an atmospheric budget of total organic bromine using airborne in situ measurements from the western Pacific area during SHIVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, S.; Bönisch, H.; Keber, T.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G.; Engel, A.

    2014-07-01

    During the recent SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project an extensive data set of all halogen species relevant for the atmospheric budget of total organic bromine was collected in the western Pacific region using the Falcon aircraft operated by the German Aerospace agency DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) covering a vertical range from the planetary boundary layer up to the ceiling altitude of the aircraft of 13 km. In total, more than 700 measurements were performed with the newly developed fully automated in situ instrument GHOST-MS (Gas chromatograph for the Observation of Tracers - coupled with a Mass Spectrometer) by the Goethe University of Frankfurt (GUF) and with the onboard whole-air sampler WASP with subsequent ground-based state-of-the-art GC / MS analysis by the University of East Anglia (UEA). Both instruments yield good agreement for all major (CHBr3 and CH2Br2) and minor (CH2BrCl, CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl) VSLS (very short-lived substances), at least at the level of their 2σ measurement uncertainties. In contrast to the suggestion that the western Pacific could be a region of strongly increased atmospheric VSLS abundance (Pyle et al., 2011), we found only in the upper troposphere a slightly enhanced amount of total organic bromine from VSLS relative to the levels reported in Montzka and Reimann et al. (2011) for other tropical regions. From the SHIVA observations in the upper troposphere, a budget for total organic bromine, including four halons (H-1301, H-1211, H-1202, H-2402), CH3Br and the VSLS, is derived for the level of zero radiative heating (LZRH), the input region for the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and thus also for the stratosphere. With the exception of the two minor VSLS CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl, excellent agreement with the values reported in Montzka and Reimann et al. (2011) is found, while being slightly higher than previous studies from our group based on balloon-borne measurements.

  12. In situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  13. Vertical mass impact and features of Saharan dust intrusions derived from ground-based remote sensing in synergy with airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Andrey-Andrés, Javier; Gómez, Laura; Adame, José Antonio; Sorribas, Mar; Navarro-Comas, Mónica; Puentedura, Olga; Cuevas, Emilio; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    A study of the vertical mass impact of Saharan dust intrusions is presented in this work. Simultaneous ground-based remote-sensing and airborne in-situ measurements performed during the AMISOC-TNF campaign over the Tenerife area (Canary Islands) in summertime from 01 July to 11 August 2013 were used for that purpose. A particular dusty (DD) case, associated to a progressively arriving dust intrusion lasting for two days on 31 July (weak incidence) and 01 August (strong incidence), is especially investigated. AERONET AOD and AEx values were ranging, respectively, from 0.2 to 1.4 and 0.35 to 0.05 along these two days. Vertical particle size distributions within fine and coarse modes (0.16-2.8 μm range) were obtained from aircraft aerosol spectrometer measurements. Extinction profiles and Lidar Ratio (LR) values were derived from MPLNET/Micro Pulse Lidar observations. MAXDOAS measurements were also used to retrieve the height-resolved aerosol extinction for evaluation purposes in comparison to Lidar-derived profiles. The synergy between Lidar observations and airborne measurements is established in terms of the Mass Extinction Efficiency (MEE) to calculate the vertical mass concentration of Saharan dust particles. Both the optical and microphysical profilings show dust particles mostly confined in a layer of 4.3 km thickness from 1.7 to 6 km height. LR ranged between 50 and 55 sr, typical values for Saharan dust particles. In addition, this 2-day dust event mostly affected the Free Troposphere (FT), being less intense in the Boundary Layer (BL). In particular, rather high Total Mass Concentrations (TMC) were found on the stronger DD day (01 August 2013): 124, 70 and 21 μg m-3 were estimated, respectively, at FT and BL altitudes and on the near-surface level. This dust impact was enhanced due to the increase of large particles affecting the FT, but also the BL, likely due to their gravitational settling. However, the use of an assumed averaged MEE value can be

  14. Vertical distribution of trace gas species in the troposphere over the south of West Siberia: comparison of airborne in situ measurements and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belan, Boris D.; Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belov, Vladimir V.; Gridnev, Yurii V.; Davydov, Denis K.; Machida, Toshinobu; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Nédélec, Philippe; Fofonov, Alexander V.

    2014-05-01

    A comparison of the vertical distributions of O3, CO, CO2 and CH4 derived from the airborne in situ measurements and satellite observations over the southern part of West Siberia is presented. In this study we used data of monthly research flights of 'Optik' TU-134 aircraft laboratory carried out from 2012 to 2013 and data retrieved from measurements of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument on-board the MetOp satellite. It was found that differences in ozone mixing ratios between the airborne and satellite data can vary from +3 to +18 ppb at 0.5 km AGL and form -8 to -37 ppb at 7 km AGL, and relative ones ranged from +8 to +30 % and from -12 to -88 %, respectively. Differences in CO concentrations varied from +32 to +103 ppb at 0.5 km height and from -18 to +23 ppb at 3 km. Relative differences were in the range from -4 to +48 % at 0.5 km and from -8 to +20 % at 7 km. The maximal difference in all CH4 profiles reached 150 ppb in the atmospheric boundary layer, and the minimal one was -10 ppb. The average relative difference varied between +2.8 and -0.5 %. The average difference in CO2 concentration lies within ±1.5 ppm, while individual profiles are incommensurable. Maximal and minimal differences during the all flights were observed in the atmospheric boundary layer (+10 and -12 ppm or +2.3 and -3.3%, respectively). In the free troposphere, relative difference decreased down to ±1.0%. This work was funded by Research funds for Global Environmental Monitoring in NIES (Japan), CNRS (France), the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, CEA (France), Presidium of RAS (Program No. 4), Brunch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5), Interdisciplinary integration projects of Siberian Branch of RAS (No. 35, No. 70, No. 131), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants No 14-05-00526, 14-05-00590).

  15. Constraining climate model simulations of aerosol size distributions over the North Pacific and North America using in-situ airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaughton, Cameron Stuart

    The effect of aerosols on climate is poorly understood compared to green house gases. Aerosols can scatter and/or absorb solar radiation (the "direct effect") and modify cloud properties (the "indirect effect"), affecting Earth's radiation balance and hydrological cycle. Aerosol lifetimes vary from minutes to weeks in the Earth's atmosphere, so they are heterogeneously distributed in both time and space. Over longer time scales, aerosols can influence climate through sulfur (e.g. CLAW Hypothesis) and iron (e.g. Iron Hypothesis) biogeochemical cycling. Determination of natural and anthropogenic aerosol effects on past and future climate can only be achieved using global climate models (GCM's). Satellites allow global measurements of the present-day atmosphere, but require calibration/validation by observations in-situ. Ground- and ship-based observations are confined to the surface boundary layer which can be decoupled from overlying layers and the free troposphere. Here I use in-situ aircraft measurements from five NASA and NSF airborne field campaigns conducted over the North Pacific and North America between 2001 and 2006 to establish a reduced set of airmass types that are stratified vertically, by source region and according to processes governing their characteristics. For each airmass type the aerosol size distribution, mixing state, optical properties and chemical composition are summarized and discussed. In this study I found, (i) parameterizations of background free troposphere aerosol overestimate extinction by ˜50%, minimizing the differences between pre-industrial versus contemporary radiative forcing, (i) meteorological model errors in water vapour mixing ratio can overwhelm the influence of composition-dependent aerosol hygroscopicity on radiating forcing, (iii) aerosol number in convective cloud outflow over North America in summer were reduced by 1/e after ˜2 days with no detectable increase in aerosol mass or decrease in SO2, illustrating the

  16. Clear-Sky Closure Studies of Tropospheric Aerosol and Water Vapor During ACE-2 Using Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne In-Situ, Space-Borne, and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Collins, Donald R.; Gasso, Santiago; Oestroem, Elisabeth; Powell, Donna M.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Durkee, Philip A.; Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Hegg, Dean A.; Noone, Kevin J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gordon, Howard R.; Reagan, John A.; Spinhirne, James D.

    2000-01-01

    We report on clear-sky column closure experiments (CLEARCOLUMN) performed in the Canary Islands during the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June/July 1997. We present CLEARCOLUMN results obtained by combining airborne sunphotometer and in-situ (a differential mobility analyzer, three optical particle counters, three nephelometers, and one absorption photometer) measurements taken aboard the Pelican aircraft, space-borne NOAA/AVHRR data and ground-based lidars. A wide range of aerosol types was encountered throughout the ACE-2 area, including background Atlantic marine, European pollution-derived, and (although less frequently than expected) African mineral dust. During the two days discussed here, vertical profiles flown in cloud free air masses revealed three distinctly different layers: a marine boundary layer (MBL) with varying pollution levels, an elevated dust layer, and a very clean layer between the MBL and the dust layer. Based on size-resolved composition information we have established an aerosol model that allows us to compute optical properties of the ambient aerosol using the optical particle counter results. In the dust, the agreement in layer AOD (lambda=380-1060 nm) is 3-8%. In the MBL there is a tendency for the in-situ results to be slightly lower than the sunphotometer measurements (10-17% at lambda=525 nm), but these differences are within the combined error bars of the measurements and computations. Aerosol size-distribudon closure based on in-situ size distributions and inverted sunphotometer extinction spectra has been achieved in the MBL (total surface area and volume agree within 0.2, and 7%, respectively) but not in the dust layer. The fact that the three nephelometers operated at three different relative humidities (RH) allowed to parameterize hygroscopic growth and to therefore estimate optical properties at ambient RH. The parameters derived for different aerosol types are themselves useful for the aerosol modeling

  17. Practical application of in situ aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Rader, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    The use of in situ, real-time measurement techniques permits the characterization of airborne droplets and particles under conditions where traditional sampling methods can fail. For example, sampling method rely on the ability to sample and transport particles without biasing the properties of interest, and often are not applicable in harsh environment. Although in situ methods offer unique opportunities in these cases, these techniques introduce new concerns and must be used carefully if accurate measurement are to be made. Several in situ measurement techniques are reviewed here. As the field is rapidly evolving, the discussion is limited to those techniques which: (1) are commercially available, (2) provide real-time output, (3) measure the aerosol size distribution. Discussion is divided between single particle counters (which provide a flux-based or temporal measurement) and ensemble techniques (which provide a concentration-based or spatial measurement). Specific techniques discussed include phase Doppler, Mie scattering, and Fraunhofer diffraction, and commercial instruments based on these techniques.

  18. Evaluation of NOx emission inventories in California using multi-satellite data sets, AMAX-DOAS and in-situ airborne measurements, and regional model simulations during the CalNex field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Baidar, S.; Boersma, F.; Brioude, J.; Bucsela, E. J.; Burrows, J. P.; Celarier, E. A.; Cohen, R. C.; Frost, G. J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Lamsal, L. N.; Martin, R. V.; McKeen, S. A.; Oetjen, H.; Pollack, I. B.; Richter, A.; Russell, A. R.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Valin, L. C.; Volkamer, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite NO2 column measurements indicate large NOx emissions from urban and agricultural sources in California. In this presentation, we highlight the NOx sources identified in California using the satellite measurements. Comparison of regional model-simulated NO2 columns with satellite retrievals has proven useful in evaluating emission inventories for various sectors. We compare the NO2 columns from the WRF-Chem model with the multi-satellite data sets from different instruments and retrieval groups for a variety of California sources. Use of multiple satellite data sets help to define the uncertainties in the satellite retrievals. In addition, the CalNex 2010 intensive field campaign provides a unique opportunity to independently assess California's emission inventories. CU-AMAX-DOAS and in-situ airborne observations from CalNex 2010 and fine-resolution model simulations are used to estimate the accuracy of the satellite NO2 column retrievals.

  19. Comparison of Airborne Sunphotometer and Near-Coincident In Situ and Remotely Sensed Water Vapor Measurements during INTEX-ITCT 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P.; Ramirez, S.; Eilers, J.; Gore, W.; Howard, S.; Pommier, J.; Bates, T.; Quinn, P.; Chu, D. A.; Gao, B.; Fetzer, E.; McMillan, W.; Seemann, S. W.; Borbas, E.

    2005-12-01

    The NASA Ames 14-channel Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) took measurements from aboard a Jetstream 31 (J31) twin turboprop aircraft during 19 science flights (~53 flight hours) over the Gulf of Maine during the period 12 July to 8 August 2004. The flights were conducted in support of the INTEX-NA (INtercontinental chemical Transport EXperiment-North America) and ITCT (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation of anthropogenic pollution) field studies. AATS-14 measures the solar direct-beam transmission at 14 discrete wavelengths between 354 and 2138 nm, and provides instantaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 13 wavelengths and water vapor column content, which is derived from measurements at 940 nm and surrounding wavelengths. AATS-14 measurements obtained during aircraft ascents and descents are differentiated to yield vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and water vapor density. Specific J31 flight patterns were designed to address a variety of science goals and, therefore, included a mixture of vertical profiles (spiral and ramped ascents and descents) and constant altitude horizontal transects at a variety of altitudes. In general, flights were designed to include a near sea surface horizontal transect in a region of minimal cloud cover during or near the time of an Aqua and/or Terra satellite overpass, in addition to a low altitude flyby and vertical profile above the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown. In this paper, we will compare AATS-14 water vapor profiles with simultaneous measurements obtained with a Vaisala humidity sensor on board the J-31 and with spatially and temporally near-coincident data from radiosondes launched from the Ron Brown. AATS-14 data will also be compared with water vapor retrievals from measurements acquired by remote sensors on Aqua and Terra during near-coincident satellite overflights.

  20. In-situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.

    1983-01-01

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop "hairpin" configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. The electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements are obtained, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  1. Integration of airborne altimetry and in situ radar measurements to estimate marine ice thickness beneath the Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, D.; Steffen, K.; Rodriguez Lagos, J.

    2010-12-01

    Observed atmospheric and oceanic warming is driving significant retreat and / or collapse of ice shelves along the Antarctic Peninsula totaling over 25,000 km2 in the past five decades. Basal melting of meteoric ice can occur near the grounding line of deep glacier inflows if the ocean water is above the pressure melting point. Buoyant meltwater will develop thermohaline circulation, rising beneath the ice shelf, where it may become supercooled and subsequently refreeze in ice draft minima. Marine ice, due to its warm and thus relatively viscous nature, is hypothesized to suture parallel flow bands, increasing ice shelf stability by arresting fracture propagation and controlling iceberg calving dimensions. Thus efforts to model ice shelf stability require accurate estimates of marine ice location and thickness. Ice thickness of a floating ice shelf can be determined in two manners: (1) from measurements of ice elevation above sea level and the calculation of ice thickness from assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium, and (2) from radar echo measurements of the ice-water interface. Marine ice can confound the latter because its high dielectric constant and strong absorptive properties attenuate the radar energy, often preventing a return signal from the bottom of the ice shelf. These two methods are complementary for determining the marine ice component though because positive anomalies in (1) relative to (2) suggest regions of marine ice accretion. Nearly 350 km of ice penetrating radar (25 MHz) surveys were collected on the Larsen C ice shelf, in conjunction with kinematic GPS measurements and collocated with surface elevation data from the NASA Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) as part of the ICE Bridge mission in 2009. Basal ice topography and total ice thickness is accurately mapped along the survey lines and compared with calculated ice thickness from both the kinematic GPS and ATM elevation data. Positive anomalies are discussed in light of visible imagery and

  2. Evaluation of airborne radar-lidar retrieval of ice water content using in-situ probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Sujan

    Cloud water content and how that water is distributed across hydrometeors are fundamental cloud microphysical properties that influence cloud dynamical and radiative properties. This study utilizes in-situ and remote sensing data collected by the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft during the Colorado Airborne Multi-phase Cloud Study, 2010-2011 (CAMPS) field campaign to study the reliability of different cloud water content measuring instruments. It has been shown in several previous studies and again demonstrated here from the CAMPS dataset that Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) measurements are subject to contamination by shattering artifacts in ice and mixed phase clouds. Contaminated measurements from CAMPS show a significant overestimation of large (D > 28 microm) particles and derived liquid water content (LWC). A new approach is developed to characterize, quantify and correct the shattering contribution in FSSP measurements using ice particle information measured by an OAP cloud probe (2D-C). Comparisons with cloud droplet probe (CDP) measurements show that this new approach adequately corrects for ice shattering effects. This new approach can also be applied to standard FSSP historical datasets. These studies may have erroneous conclusions that can be re-evaluated based on this new correction. University of Colorado closed-path tunable diode laser hygrometer (CLH) total water measurements are used to develop a mass-length relationship for CAMPS dataset to calculate ice water content (IWC) from 2D-C size distribution. Then, these well characterized in-situ instruments are used to evaluate IWC retrievals from combined radar and lidar measurements. Comparison of near flight level remote sensing IWC retrievals with in-situ measurements indicates statistically reasonable agreements (difference in mean values about 33%) providing confidence on the retrieved vertical IWC profile. The collocated airborne radar-lidar measurements combined

  3. Analysis of motor vehicle emissions over eastern Los Angeles, California from in-situ airborne measurements of trace gases and particulates during CalNex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Frost, G. J.; Holloway, J. S.; McKeen, S. A.; Peischl, J.; Fahey, D. W.; Perring, A.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ measurements of trace gases and particulates were acquired on the instrumented NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field study in May and June 2010. Multiple daytime research flights under similar meteorological conditions provide a sufficient data set for characterizing automobile emissions over the eastern Los Angeles (eLA) area of the South Coast air basin. Ratios of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and black carbon (BC) to carbon monoxide (CO) are used to isolate emissions of light duty vehicles from those of medium/heavy duty diesel trucks. Observations in the mixed boundary layer for the eLA area are separated according to latitude, longitude, and altitude. Industrial influences are eliminated by filtering the data according to SO2 mixing ratio and wind direction. The resulting correlations show weekday-to-weekend differences in enhancement ratios of NOx to CO and BC to CO, indicating a general tendency for higher emissions from heavy duty vehicles during the week. The CalNex data over eLA in 2010 will be compared to eLA data from a research flight in May 2002 by the WP-3D aircraft during the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) field study.

  4. Decadal changes in ozone and precursor emissions in the Los Angeles California region using in-situ airborne and ground-based field observations, roadside monitoring data, and surface network measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Flynn, J. H.; Frost, G. J.; Grossberg, N.; Harley, R. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Lefer, B. L.; Lueb, R.; Parrish, D. D.; Peischl, J.

    2011-12-01

    In-situ observations from the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) surface network show decreases in ozone (O3), nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and select volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). Decreases in CO, NOx, and VOCs reflect changes, such as improved catalytic converters and reformulated fuels etc., that have been implemented in response to increasingly strict emissions standards placed upon on-road vehicles in the state of California. Here, we compare changes in emissions ratios of NOx and VOCs to CO determined from surface network data collected since 1994 to changes in emissions ratios from biennial roadside studies conducted in west Los Angeles since 1999 and airborne and ground-based measurements from three independent field campaigns conducted in California in 2002, 2008, and 2010. Using the more extensive in-situ surface network data set, we show that decreasing ozone is positively correlated with decreasing abundances of NOx and VOCs and with decreasing VOC/NOx ratio over time. The changes observed from 1994 to present suggest that reductions in both NOx and VOCs and the VOC/NOx ratio over the years have been effective in reducing ozone in the SoCAB.

  5. In situ sensors for measurements in the global trosposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeger, M. L.; Eaton, W. C.; Wright, R. S.; White, J. H.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Current techniques available for the in situ measurement of ambient trace gas species, particulate composition, and particulate size distribution are reviewed. The operational specifications of the various techniques are described. Most of the techniques described are those that have been used in airborne applications or show promise of being adaptable to airborne applications. Some of the instruments described are specialty items that are not commercially-available. In situ measurement techniques for several meteorological parameters important in the study of the distribution and transport of ambient air pollutants are discussed. Some remote measurement techniques for meteorological parameters are also discussed. State-of-the-art measurement capabilities are compared with a list of capabilities and specifications desired by NASA for ambient measurements in the global troposphere.

  6. Optical properties of urban aerosol from airborne and ground-based in situ measurements performed during the Etude et Simulation de la Qualité de l'air en Ile de France (ESQUIF) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazette, Patrick; Randriamiarisoa, Hariliva; Sanak, Joseph; Couvert, Pierre; Flamant, Cyrille

    2005-01-01

    Urban aerosol microphysical and optical properties were investigated over the Paris area coupling, for the first time, with dedicated airborne in situ instruments (nephelometer and particle sizers) and active remote sensor (lidar) as well as ground-based in situ instrumentation. The experiment, covering two representative pollution events, was conducted in the framework of the Etude et Simulation de la Qualité de l'air en Ile de France (ESQUIF) program. Pollution plumes were observed under local northerly and southerly synoptic wind conditions on 19 and 31 July 2000, respectively. The 19 July (31 July) event was characterized by north-northwesterly (westerly) advection of polluted (clean) air masses originating from Great Britain (the Atlantic Ocean). The aerosol number size distribution appeared to be composed mainly of two modes in the planetary boundary layer (accumulation and nucleation) and three modes in the surface layer (accumulation, nucleation, and coarse). The characteristics of the size distribution (modal radii and geometric dispersion) were remarkably similar on both days and very coherent with the aerosol optical parameters retrieved from lidar and nephelometer measurements. The city of Paris mainly produces aerosols in the nucleation mode (modal radius of ˜0.03 μm) that have little influence on the aerosol optical properties in the visible spectral range. The latter are largely dominated by the scattering properties of aerosols in the accumulation mode (modal radius of ˜0.12 μm). When the incoming air mass is already polluted (clear), the aerosol in the accumulation mode is shown to be essentially hydrophobic (hydrophilic) in the outgoing air mass.

  7. Airborne and surface-level in situ observations of wintertime clouds in the Southern Rockies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsi, Samuel Winchester

    The phase of cloud water has important impacts on cloud radiative properties, cloud lifetime, and the formation of precipitation. Mixed-phase clouds, or those in which liquid droplets, ice particle and water vapor co-exist, are of particular importance in the Southern Rockies of the United States, where these clouds enhance wintertime mountain precipitation mass and annual water storage in the snowpack. The interaction between multiple water phases within a cloud presents challenges for in situ observation. I describe the existing in situ cloud microphysical instrumentation, and introduce a new instrument for the in situ measurement of total water concentration: the second-generation University of Colorado closed-path tunable-diode laser hygrometer (CLH-2). This compact instrument can be flown within a scientific aircraft under-wing canister and is designed for operation in diverse environmental conditions. During the winter 2010-2011, the CLH-2 was installed on a wind vane at Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL) in the Park Range of Colorado as a part of the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (StormVEx) campaign. I apply a new method for determining the bulk mass-dimensional relationship of ice particles from ground-based observations. Despite important difference between airborne and ground-based particle measurements, my parameterization yields particle masses close to those from recent airborne studies that take into account the effect of ice particle shattering on observed number concentrations. Variations in particle density over the course of a storm are suggested by time variations between the observed and parameterized ice water concentrations. Using observations from the Wyoming King Air research aircraft collected during the Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study (CAMPS) in winter 2010-2011, cloud water phase is identified using in situ microphysical measurements. While mixed-phase clouds are identified throughout the study area, the

  8. Airborne in-situ spectral characterization and concentration estimates of fluorescent organics as a function of depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittle, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    The primary purpose of many in-situ airborne light scattering experiments in natural waters is to spectrally characterize the subsurface fluorescent organics and estimate their relative concentrations. This is often done by shining a laser beam into the water and monitoring its subsurface return signal. To do this with the proper interpretation, depth must be taken into account. If one disregards depth dependence when taking such estimates, both their spectral characteristics and their concentrations estimates can be rather ambiguous. A simple airborne lidar configuration is used to detect the subsurface return signal from a particular depth and wavelength. Underwater scatterometer were employed to show that in-situ subsurface organics are very sensitive to depth, but they also require the use of slow moving boats to cover large sample areas. Also, their very entry into the water disturbs the sample it is measuring. The method described is superior and simplest to any employed thus far.

  9. Detection of airborne Legionella while showering using liquid impingement and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Deloge-Abarkan, Magali; Ha, Thi-Lan; Robine, Enric; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Mathieu, Laurence

    2007-01-01

    Aerosols of water contaminated with Legionella bacteria constitute the only mode of exposure for humans. However, the prevention strategy against this pathogenic bacteria risk is managed through the survey of water contamination. No relationship linked the Legionella bacteria water concentration and their airborne abundance. Therefore, new approaches in the field of the metrological aspects of Legionella bioaerosols are required. This study was aimed at testing the main principles for bioaerosol collection (solid impaction, liquid impingement and filtration) and the in situ hybridization (FISH) method, both in laboratory and field assays, with the intention of applying such methodologies for airborne Legionella bacteria detection while showering. An aerosolization chamber was developed to generate controlled and reproducible L. pneumophila aerosols. This tool allowed the identification of the liquid impingement method as the most appropriate one for collecting airborne Legionella bacteria. The culturable fraction of airborne L. pneumophila recovered with the liquid impingement principle was 4 and 700 times higher compared to the impaction and filtration techniques, respectively. Moreover, the concentrations of airborne L. pneumophila in the impinger fluid were on average 7.0 x 10(5) FISH-cells m(-3) air with the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method versus 9.0 x 10(4) CFU m(-3) air with the culture method. These results, recorded under well-controlled conditions, were confirmed during the field experiments performed on aerosols generated by hot water showers in health institutions. This new approach may provide a more accurate characterization of aerobiocontamination by Legionella bacteria.

  10. Combining Remote Sensing with in situ Measurements for Riverine Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, J.; Palmsten, M. L.; Simeonov, J.; Dobson, D. W.; Zarske, K.; Puleo, J. A.; Holland, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    At the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory we are employing a wide variety of novel remote sensing techniques combined with traditional in situ sampling to characterize riverine hydrodynamics and morphodynamics. Surface currents were estimated from particle image velocimetry (PIV) using imagery from visible to infrared bands, from both fixed and airborne platforms. Terrestrial LIDAR has been used for subaerial mapping from a fixed platform. Additionally, LIDAR has been combined with hydrographic surveying (multibeam) in mobile scanning mode using a small boat. Hydrographic surveying (side scan) has also been performed using underwater autonomous vehicles. Surface drifters have been deployed in combination with a remotely operated, floating acoustic Doppler current profiler. Other fixed platform, in situ sensors, such as pencil beam and sector scanning sonars, acoustic Doppler velocimeters, and water level sensors have been deployed. We will present an overview of a variety of measurements from different rivers around the world focusing on validation examples of remotely sensed quantities with more traditional in situ measurements. Finally, we will discuss long-term goals to use remotely sensed data within an integrated environmental modeling framework.

  11. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions.

  12. Remote versus in situ turbulence measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Walter

    1987-01-01

    Comparisons of in situ wind and turbulence measurements made with the NASA B-57 instrumented aircraft and those remotely made with both radar and lidar systems are presented. Turbulence measurements with a lidar or radar system as compared with those from an aircraft are the principal themes. However, some discussion of mean wind speed and direction measurements is presented. First, the principle of measuring turbulence with Doppler lidar and radar is briefly and conceptually described. The comparisons with aircraft measurements are then discussed. Two studies in particular are addressed: one uses the JAWS Doppler radar data and the other uses data gathered both with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the the NOAA Wave Propagation Lab. gound based lidars. Finally, some conclusions and recommendations are made.

  13. Investigation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds during VERDI and RACEPAC: Combining airborne remote sensing and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, André; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    To improve our understanding of Arctic mixed-phase clouds in sea-ice covered areas the airborne research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) and the Radiation-Aerosol-Cloud Experiment in the Arctic Circle (RACEPAC, April/May 2014) were initiated by a collaboration of German and French research institutes. The aircraft operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Germany were based in Inuvik, Canada from where the research flights of in total 149 flight hours (62 h during VERDI, 87 h during RACEPAC) were able to cover a wide area above the Canadian Beaufort. The aim of both campaigns was to combine remote sensing and in-situ cloud, aerosol and trace gas measurements to investigate interactions between radiation, cloud and aerosol particles. Remote sensing instrumentation contained a backscatter lidar and spectral solar radiation measurements including a hyperspectral camera. In-situ sampling was highlighted by a suit of comprehensive cloud particle probes, aerosol particle counters and mass spectroscopy as well as trace gas detectors. While during VERDI remote sensing and in-situ measurements were performed by one aircraft (Polar 5) subsequently, for RACEPAC two identical aircraft (Polar 5 & 6, Basler BT-67) were coordinated at different altitudes to horizontally collocate both remote sensing and in-situ measurements. In this way not only the combined analysis of radiative and microphysical processes in the clouds can by studied more reliably, also remote sensing methods can be validated efficiently. Here we will illustrate the scientific strategy of both projects including instrumentation and flight patterns of the research flights. Beside flight missions dedicated to sample low level clouds by remote sensing and in situ probing, flights were also coordinated with satellite overpasses and ground based stations. Exemplary results will be highlighted.

  14. Studying the vertical aerosol extinction coefficient by comparing in situ airborne data and elastic backscatter lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Herrmann, Erik; Bucci, Silvia; Fierli, Federico; Cairo, Francesco; Gysel, Martin; Tillmann, Ralf; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Di Liberto, Luca; Di Donfrancesco, Guido; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Weingartner, Ernest; Virtanen, Annele; Mentel, Thomas F.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol particle optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ˜ 50 and 800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol particle size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a single wavelength polarization diversity elastic lidar system provided estimates of aerosol extinction coefficients using the Klett method to accomplish the inversion of the signal, for a vertically resolved comparison between in situ and remote-sensing results. Note, however, that the comparison was for the most part done in the altitude range where the overlap function is incomplete and accordingly uncertainties are larger. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20 % was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 and 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ˜ 10:00 LT - local time) before the mixing layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ˜ 12:00 LT) the ML was fully developed, resulting in

  15. In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Davey, John R; Spendalow, Jacob S

    2008-01-01

    Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

  16. Estimating Turbulence in Mountainous Regions from Airborne In Situ and Remotely-Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Lukas; Serafin, Stefano; Grubišić, Vanda

    2013-04-01

    Turbulence in atmospheric flow over and around orographic obstacles has been at the focus of numerous studies in the past. Reasons for this range from primary interest in the turbulence-generating processes (gravity-wave breaking, downslope windstorms etc.) to, more recently, issues regarding flight safety. Our work focuses on the observational analysis of turbulence during events of boundary-layer separation and rotor formation. The study is based on observations from two recent field campaigns over the Medicine Bow Mountains in SE Wyoming (NASA06) and the Sierra Nevada in Southern California (T-REX). During these campaigns, the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) research aircraft flew straight-and-level legs aligned with the mean wind direction to document the variation of flow and turbulence over the mountain ridges. Aircraft in situ data of wind, pressure and temperature were recorded at a frequency of 25 Hz. The Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR), carried aboard UWKA, measured Doppler vertical wind velocities at multiple levels at a frequency of 30 Hz. The objective of this work is to quantify turbulence intensity during the observed boundary-layer separation and rotor formation events. To this end, estimates of the variance of vertical wind speed and the eddy-dissipation rate are computed from airborne in situ as well as remotely-sensed data. The comparison of two wave events during the NASA06 campaign reveals similar turbulence intensities with maximum eddy-dissipation rates in the range 0.25-0.30 m2 s-3. The dynamic origin of turbulence, however, appears to be different. For 26 January 2006, results are indicative of a breaking gravity wave aloft leading to wave-induced boundary-layer separation and rotor formation, with maximum turbulence levels located in the rotor interior. In contrast, on 5 February 2006, the lee wave pattern aloft remained laminar while the boundary-layer flow was heavily perturbed. The spatial distribution of turbulence in the flow suggests

  17. Validation of Airborne CO2 Laser Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Kooi, S.; Fenn, M. A.; Choi, Y.; Vay, S. A.; Harrison, F. W.; Moore, B.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses the flight test validation of a unique, multi-frequency, intensity-modulated, single-beam laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) that operates near 1.57 μm for remote column CO2 measurements. This laser system is under development for a future space-based mission to determine the global distribution of regional-scale CO2 sources and sinks, which is the objective of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions during Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. A prototype of this LAS system, called the Multi-frequency Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), was developed by ITT, and it has been flight tested in nine airborne campaigns since May 2005. This paper focuses on the most recent results obtained over the last two years of flight-testing where the MFLL remote CO2 column measurements were evaluated against airborne in situ CO2 profile measurements traceable to World Meteorological Organization standards. A comprehensive multiple-aircraft flight test program was conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia in July-August 2009. The MFLL obtained surface reflectance and average CO2 column variations along the 50-km flight legs over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility (CF) in Lamont, Oklahoma; over rural Virginia and North Carolina; and over the Chesapeake Bay. For a flight altitude of 4.6 km, the average signal to noise ratio (SNR) for a 1-s CO2 column measurement was found to be 760, which is the equivalent of a CO2 mixing ratio precision of 0.60 ppmv, and for a 10-s average the SNR was found to be 2002 or 0.20 ppmv. Absolute comparisons of MFLL-derived and in situ-derived CO2 column measurements were made for all daytime flights conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia with an average agreement to within 0.32 ppmv. A major ASCENDS flight test campaign was conducted using the NASA DC-8 during 6-18 July 2010. The MFLL system and associated in situ CO2 instrumentation were operated on DC-8 flights over the Central Valley

  18. Experimental Measurement of In Situ Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbo, Maria; Milkereit, Bernd; Nasseri, Farzine; Schmitt, Douglas; Young, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The World Stress Map data is determined by stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanisms, in situ measurement in mining, oil and gas boreholes as well as the borehole cores, and geologic data. Unfortunately, these measurements are not only infrequent but sometimes infeasible, and do not provide nearly enough data points with high accuracy to correctly infer stress fields in deep mines around the world. Improvements in stress measurements of Earth's crust is fundamental to several industries such as oil and gas, mining, nuclear waste management, and enhanced geothermal systems. Quantifying the state of stress and the geophysical properties of different rock types is a major complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines. Most stress measurement techniques involve either the boreholes or their cores, however these measurements usually only give stress along one axis, not the complete stress tensor. The goal of this project is to investigate a new method of acquiring a complete stress tensor of the in situ stress in the Earth's crust. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and focuses on two boreholes located in this mine. These boreholes are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and are located at depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples of varying geologies from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. The apparatus' used for this project are geophysical imaging cells capable

  19. Airborne tunable diode laser spectrometer for trace-gas measurement in the lower stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Podolske, J; Loewenstein, M

    1993-09-20

    This paper describes the airborne tunable laser absorption spectrometer, a tunable diode laser instrument designed for in situ trace-gas measurement in the lower stratosphere from an ER-2 high-altitude research aircraft. Laser-wavelength modulation and second-harmonic detection are employed to achieve the required constituent detection sensitivity. The airborne tunable laser absorption spectrometer was used in two polar ozone campaigns, the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, and measured nitrous oxide with a response time of Is and an accuracy ≤ 10%.

  20. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  1. AVIATR - Aerial Vehicle for In-situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance A Titan Airplane Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Lemke, Lawrence; Foch, Rick; McKay, Christopher P.; Beyer, Ross A.; Radebaugh, Jani; Atkinson, David H.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; LeMouelic, Stephane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Gundlach, Jay; Giannini, Francesco; Bain, Sean; Flasar, F. Michael; Hurford, Terry; Anderson, Carrie M.; Merrison, Jon; Adamkovics, Mate; Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Mitchell, Jonathan; Burr, Devon M.; Colaprete, Anthony; Schaller, Emily; Friedson, A. James; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Coradini, Angioletta; Adriani, Alberto; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Malaska, Michael J.; Morabito, David; Reh, Kim

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mission concept for a stand-alone Titan airplane mission: Aerial Vehicle for In-situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance (AVIATR). With independent delivery and direct-to-Earth communications, AVIATR could contribute to Titan science either alone or as part of a sustained Titan Exploration Program. As a focused mission, AVIATR as we have envisioned it would concentrate on the science that an airplane can do best: exploration of Titan's global diversity. We focus on surface geology/hydrology and lower-atmospheric structure and dynamics. With a carefully chosen set of seven instruments-2 near-IR cameras, 1 near-IR spectrometer, a RADAR altimeter, an atmospheric structure suite, a haze sensor, and a raindrop detector-AVIATR could accomplish a significant subset of the scientific objectives of the aerial element of flagship studies. The AVIATR spacecraft stack is composed of a Space Vehicle (SV) for cruise, an Entry Vehicle (EV) for entry and descent, and the Air Vehicle (AV) to fly in Titan's atmosphere. Using an Earth-Jupiter gravity assist trajectory delivers the spacecraft to Titan in 7.5 years, after which the AVIATR AV would operate for a 1-Earth-year nominal mission. We propose a novel 'gravity battery' climb-then-glide strategy to store energy for optimal use during telecommunications sessions. We would optimize our science by using the flexibility of the airplane platform, generating context data and stereo pairs by flying and banking the AV instead of using gimbaled cameras. AVIATR would climb up to 14 km altitude and descend down to 3.5 km altitude once per Earth day, allowing for repeated atmospheric structure and wind measurements all over the globe. An initial Team-X run at JPL priced the AVIATR mission at FY10 $715M based on the rules stipulated in the recent Discovery announcement of opportunity. Hence we find that a standalone Titan airplane mission can achieve important science building on Cassini's discoveries and can likely do so within

  2. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aiken, Arthur C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extraterrestrial material is the source of metal ions in the Earth's atmosphere, Each year approx. 10(exp 8) kg of material is intercepted by the Earth. The origin of this material is predominantly solar orbiting interplanetary debris from comets or asteroids that crosses the Earth's orbit. It contains a very small amount of interstellar material. On occasion the Earth passes through enhanced amounts of debris associated with the orbit of a decaying comet. This leads to enhanced meteor shower displays for up to several days. The number flux of shower material is typically several times the average sporadic background influx of material. Meteoric material is some of the earliest material formed in the solar system. By studying the relative elemental abundances of atmospheric metal ions, information can be gained on the chemical composition of cometary debris and the chemical makeup of the early solar system. Using in situ sampling with rocket-borne ion mass spectrometers; there have been approximately 50 flights that made measurements of the metal ion abundances at attitudes between 80 and 130 km. It is this altitude range where incoming meteoric particles am ablated, the larger ones giving rise to visible meteor. displays. In several rocket measurements isotopic ratios of different atomic ion mass components and metal molecular ion concentrations have been determined and used to identify unambiguously the measured species and to investigate the processes controlling the metal ion distributions The composition of the Earth's ionosphere was first sampled by an ion mass spectrometer flown an a rocket in 1956. In 1958 a rocket-borne ion spectrometer identified, fbr the first time, a layer of metal ions near 95 km. These data were interpreted as evidence of an extraterrestrial rather than a terrestrial source. Istomin predicted: "It seems probable that with some improvement in the method that analysis of the ion composition in the E-region may be used for determining

  3. Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Hair, J.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.; Kleinman, L.; Clarke, A.; Russell, P.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Szykman, J.; Al-Saadi, J.

    2007-05-01

    . Several B200 flights conducted during MILAGRO were coordinated with flights carried out by the Department of Energy G-1 aircraft, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130 aircraft, and/or the Sky Research J-31 aircraft. In situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties acquired on G-1 and C-130 are being used to investigate the ability to discern various aerosol types using the HSRL data. Aerosol extinction profiles derived from the in situ measurements and from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer on board the J-31 are being used to assess the HSRL aerosol extinction profiles. Additional applications of airborne HSRL data to be discussed include: 1) characterization of the spatial and vertical distributions of aerosols, 2) investigation of aerosol variability near clouds, 3) evaluation of model simulations of aerosol transport, and 4) assessments of aerosol optical properties derived from a combination of surface, airborne, and satellite measurements.

  4. Husbandry Trace Gas Emissions from a Dairy Complex By Mobile in Situ and Airborne and Spaceborne Remote Sensing: A Comex Campaign Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, I.; Tratt, D. M.; Bovensmann, H.; Buckland, K. N.; Burrows, J. P.; Frash, J.; Gerilowski, K.; Iraci, L. T.; Johnson, P. D.; Kolyer, R.; Krautwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Leen, J. B.; Hu, C.; Melton, C.; Vigil, S. A.; Yates, E. L.; Zhang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field study reviews on the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) found significant underestimation from fossil fuel industry and husbandry. The 2014 COMEX campaign seeks to develop methods to derive CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) from remote sensing data by combining hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages synergies between high spatial resolution HSI column abundance maps and moderate spectral/spatial resolution NIS. Airborne husbandry data were collected for the Chino dairy complex (East Los Angeles Basin) by NIS-MAMAP, HSI-Mako thermal-infrared (TIR); AVIRIS NG shortwave IR (SWIR), with in situ surface mobile-AMOG Surveyor (AutoMObile greenhouse Gas)-and airborne in situ from a Twin Otter and the AlphaJet. AMOG Surveyor uses in situ Integrated Cavity Off Axis Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, H2O, H2S and NH3 at 5-10 Hz, 2D winds, and thermal anomaly in an adapted commuter car. OA-ICOS provides high precision and accuracy with excellent stability. NH3 and CH4 emissions were correlated at dairy size-scales but not sub-dairy scales in surface and Mako data, showing fine-scale structure and large variations between the numerous dairies in the complex (herd ~200,000-250,000) embedded in an urban setting. Emissions hotspots were consistent between surface and airborne surveys. In June, surface and MAMAP data showed a weak overall plume, while surface and Mako data showed a stronger plume in late (hotter) July. Multiple surface plume transects using NH3 fingerprinting showed East and then NE advection out of the LA Basin consistent with airborne data. Long-term trends were investigated in satellite data. This study shows the value of synergistically combined NH3 and CH4 remote sensing data to the task of CH4 source attribution using airborne and space-based remote sensing (IASI for NH3) and top of atmosphere sensitivity calculations for Sentinel V and Carbon Sat (CH4).

  5. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometer for the in situ measurement of methyl hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    St Clair, Jason M.; McCabe, David C.; Crounse, John D.; Steiner, Urs; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2010-09-15

    A new approach for measuring gas-phase methyl hydrogen peroxide [(MHP) CH{sub 3}OOH] utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Tandem mass spectrometry is used to avoid mass interferences that hindered previous attempts to measure atmospheric CH{sub 3}OOH with CF{sub 3}O{sup -} clustering chemistry. CH{sub 3}OOH has been successfully measured in situ using this technique during both airborne and ground-based campaigns. The accuracy and precision for the MHP measurement are a function of water vapor mixing ratio. Typical precision at 500 pptv MHP and 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is {+-}80 pptv (2 sigma) for a 1 s integration period. The accuracy at 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is estimated to be better than {+-}40%. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry shows considerable promise for the determination of in situ atmospheric trace gas mixing ratios where isobaric compounds or mass interferences impede accurate measurements.

  6. In situ exhaust cloud measurements. [particle size distribution and cloud physics of rocket exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, D.

    1980-01-01

    Airborne in situ exhaust cloud measurements were conducted to obtain definitions of cloud particle size range, Cl2 content, and HCl partitioning. Particle size distribution data and Cl2 measurements were made during the May, August, and September 1977 Titan launches. The measurements of three basic effluents - HCl, NO sub X, and particles - against minutes after launch are plotted. The maximum observed HCl concentration to the maximum Cl2 concentration are compared and the ratios of the Cl2 to the HCl is calculated.

  7. Analysis of field-sampled, in-situ network, and PALS airborne soil moisture observations over SMAPVEX12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. R.; Berg, A. A.; McNairn, H.; Cosh, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment in 2012 (SMAPVEX12) was conducted over an agricultural domain in southern Manitoba, Canada. The purpose of the campaign was to develop ground and airborne datasets for pre-launch validation of SMAP satellite soil moisture retrieval algorithms. Three key soil moisture datasets were collected in support of the campaign objectives: 1) intensive field sampling over (up to) 55 agricultural fields on 17 sampling days; 2) a continuously operated temporary in-situ network (> 30 stations) distributed over the domain; and 3) L-band microwave data from NASA's Passive Active L-band Sensor (PALS) onboard a Twin-Otter aircraft. This presentation addresses whether dense temporary in-situ networks can supplant intensive field-sampling during pre-/post-launch validation campaigns. SMAPVEX12 datasets are examined at the field and aircraft pixel (~800 m) scale, and at the domain scale. Preliminary results demonstrate that, at the field-scale, there is generally limited agreement between a single station and sampled data over its field. Over the duration of the campaign, the majority of temporary soil moisture stations have > 0.04 m3m-3 RMSE with sampled field data, suggesting that a single station has limited representativeness of an agricultural field. Furthermore, the in-situ stations and field-sampled data are compared with PALS generated soil moisture to assess differences in daily RMSE. For wet-periods, both ground datasets provide a comparable RMSE for the PALS estimate. Although for dry-periods, the difference in RMSE between the ground datasets becomes more significant (> 0.04 m3m-3). This is because the field-sampled data exhibit a sharper dry-down than the in-situ station measurements. However, at the domain scale there is strong agreement between the soil moisture datasets. Additional results describe the sources of variability affecting these soil moisture datasets and the statistical number of stations needed to

  8. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2016-05-01

    Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing Tg. Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance monitoring therefore enable the optimal preparation of conductive nanocomposite films.

  9. Evaluation of LIDAR/Polarimeter Aerosol Measurements by In Situ Instrumentation during DEVOTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Dolgos, G.; Ottaviani, M.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Yang, M. M.; Hair, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    -based). In situ measurements include aerosol number density, size, scattering, absorption and hygroscopicity (aerosol scattering as a function of relative humidity). The PI-Neph will provide the first airborne in situ measurements of aerosol polarized phase function for comparison to the RSP retrievals. As this is the first airborne use of the PI-Neph, aerosol scattering measurements from the PI-Neph will be compared to an integrating nephelometer to provide a primary indication of instrument functionality. Specific flights will be performed to study a range of aerosol classifications including fresh anthropogenic pollution (flights over populated regions), aged pollution (tracking pollution as it moves off shore), sea salt (low altitude ocean flights by the in situ aircraft) and biogenic (flights over forest canopies). In addition, the DLH and a wing-mounted cloud aerosol precipitation spectrometer will provide insight into aerosol retrievals above and near clouds.

  10. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Leifer, I.; Bovensmann, H.; Eastwood, M.; Fladeland, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Gerilowski, K.; Green, R. O.; Kratwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Luna, B.; Thorpe, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of the NASA/ESA CO2 and Methane Experiment (COMEX) campaign in California during June and August/September 2014. COMEX was a multi-platform campaign to measure CH4 plumes released from anthropogenic sources including oil and gas infrastructure. We discuss principles for real-time spectral signature detection and measurement, and report performance on the NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG). AVIRIS-NG successfully detected CH4 plumes in real-time at Gb s-1 data rates, characterizing fugitive releases in concert with other in situ and remote instruments. The teams used these real-time CH4 detections to coordinate measurements across multiple platforms, including airborne in situ, airborne non-imaging remote sensing, and ground-based in situ instruments. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of real-time trace gas signature detection in an airborne science campaign, and presages many future applications.

  11. IN SITU ELLIPSOMETRY FOR SHOCK COMPRESSION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-28

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the alpha->epsilon phase transition.

  12. Airborne UV DIAL Measurements of Ozone and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system measures vertical profiles of ozone and aerosols above and below the aircraft along its flight track. This system has been used in over 20 airborne field missions designed to study the troposphere and stratosphere since 1980. Four of these missions involved tropospheric measurement programs in the Pacific Ocean with two in the western North Pacific and two in the South Pacific. The UV DIAL system has been used in these missions to study such things as pollution outflow, long-range transport, and stratospheric intrusions; categorize the air masses encountered; and to guide the aircraft to altitudes where interesting features can be studied using the in situ instruments. This paper will highlight the findings with the UV DIAL system in the Pacific Ocean field programs and introduce the mission planned for the western North Pacific for February-April 2001. This will be an excellent opportunity for collaboration between the NASA airborne mission and those with ground-based War systems in Asia Pacific Rim countries to make a more complete determination of the transport of air from Asia to the western Pacific.

  13. A comparison of in situ and airborne radar observations of ocean wave directionality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Peng, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The directional spectrum of a fully arisen, about 3 m sea as measured by an experimental airborne radar, the NASA K(u)-band radar ocean wave spectrometer (ROWS), is compared to reference pitch-roll buoy data and to the classical SWOP (stereo wave observations project) spectrum for fully developed conditions. The ROWS spectrum, inferred indirectly from backscattered power measurements at 5-km altitude, is shown to be in excellent agreement with the buoy spectrum. Specifically, excellent agreement is found between the two nondirectional height spectra, and mean wave directions and directional spreads as functions of frequency. A comparison of the ROWS and SWOP spectra shows the two spectra to be very similar, in detailed shape as well as in terms of the gross spreading characteristics. Both spectra are seen to exhibit bimodal structures which accord with the Phillips' (1958) resonance mechanism. This observation is thus seen to support Phillips' contention that the SWOP modes were indeed resonance modes, not statistical artifacts.

  14. In situ performance measurements of the mitre photovoltaic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherdak, A. S.; Haas, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    A data acquisition system was developed to provide more accurate and consistent measurement of the degradation of solar arrays. A technique was developed for in-situ measurement of photovoltaic panels of sufficient quality to permit evaluation of electrical performance over extended periods of several years.

  15. Subsurface In Situ Elemental Composition Measurements with PING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Ann; McClanahan, Timothy; Bodnarik, Julia; Evans, Larry; Nowicki, Suzanne; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Starr, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Probing In situ with Neutron and Gamma rays (PING) instrument, that can measure the subsurface elemental composition in situ for any rocky body in the solar system without the need for digging into the surface. PING consists of a Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG), a gamma ray spectrometer and neutron detectors. Subsurface elements are stimulated by high-energy neutrons to emit gamma rays at characteristic energies. This paper will show how the detection of these gamma rays results in a measurement of elemental composition. Examples of the basalt to granite ratios for aluminum and silicon abundance are provided.

  16. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) Arctic Campaign (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, A.; Metzger, S.; Hartmann, J.; Kohnert, K.; Sachs, T.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most pressing questions with regard to climate feedback processes in a warming Arctic is the regional-scale methane release from Arctic permafrost areas. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) campaign is designed to quantitatively and spatially explicitly address this question. Ground-based eddy covariance (EC) measurements provide continuous in-situ observations of the surface-atmosphere exchange of methane. However, these observations are rare in the Arctic permafrost zone and site selection is bound by logistical constraints among others. Consequently, these observations cover only small areas that are not necessarily representative of the region of interest. Airborne measurements can overcome this limitation by covering distances of hundreds of kilometers over time periods of a few hours. Here, we present the potential of environmental response functions (ERFs) for quantitatively linking methane flux observations in the atmospheric surface layer to meteorological and biophysical drivers in the flux footprints. For this purpose thousands of kilometers of AIRMETH data across the Alaskan North Slope are utilized, with the aim to extrapolate the airborne EC methane flux observations to the entire North Slope. The data were collected aboard the research aircraft POLAR 5, using its turbulence nose boom and fast response methane and meteorological sensors. After thorough data pre-processing, Reynolds averaging is used to derive spatially integrated fluxes. To increase spatial resolution and to derive ERFs, we then use wavelet transforms of the original high-frequency data. This enables much improved spatial discretization of the flux observations, and the quantification of continuous and biophysically relevant land cover properties in the flux footprint of each observation. A machine learning technique is then employed to extract and quantify the functional relationships between the methane flux observations and the meteorological and

  17. In situ, operando measurements of rechargeable batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Howard; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews recent in operando measurements (IOMs) for addressing challenges in advancing rechargeable battery (RB) technologies. As the demands on energy and power density of RBs for broader applications continue to grow, current RB technologies are pushed to their theoretical and engineering limits while new approaches are being extensively investigated. Also, IOMs have become more powerful and effective research tools in recent years; they will play an essential role in developing next generation RBs. This review is organized around outstanding issues in battery science and engineering. Finally, we emphasize the critical need for quantifying the distribution and transport ofmore » active ions in functioning batteries over wide temporal and spatial scales in real time.« less

  18. In situ, operando measurements of rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Howard; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews recent in operando measurements (IOMs) for addressing challenges in advancing rechargeable battery (RB) technologies. As the demands on energy and power density of RBs for broader applications continue to grow, current RB technologies are pushed to their theoretical and engineering limits while new approaches are being extensively investigated. Also, IOMs have become more powerful and effective research tools in recent years; they will play an essential role in developing next generation RBs. This review is organized around outstanding issues in battery science and engineering. Finally, we emphasize the critical need for quantifying the distribution and transport of active ions in functioning batteries over wide temporal and spatial scales in real time.

  19. Airborne in situ vertical profiling of HDO/H216O in the subtropical troposphere during the MUSICA remote sensing validation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Zahn, A.; Balzer, M.; Bouquet, H.; McManus, J. B.; González-Ramos, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical profiles of water vapor (H2O) and its isotope ratio D / H expressed as δ D(H2O were measured in situ by the ISOWAT II diode-laser spectrometer during the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA) airborne campaign. We present recent modifications of the instrument design. The instrument calibration on the ground as well as in flight is described. Based on the calibration measurements, the humidity-dependent uncertainty of our airborne data is determined. For the majority of the airborne data we achieved an accuracy (uncertainty of the mean) of Δ(δ D) ≈ 10‰. Vertical profiles between 150 and ~7000 m were obtained during 7 days in July and August 2013 over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean near Tenerife. The flights were coordinated with ground-based (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change, NDACC) and space-based (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, IASI) FTIR remote-sensing measurements of δ D(H2O) as a means to validate the remote sensing humidity and δ D(H2O) data products. The results of the validation are presented in detail in a separate paper (Schneider et al., 2014). The profiles were obtained with a high vertical resolution of around 3 m. By analyzing humidity and δ D(H2O) correlations we were able to identify different layers of airmasses with specific isotopic signatures. The results are discussed.

  20. Airborne in situ vertical profiling of HDO / H216O in the subtropical troposphere during the MUSICA remote sensing validation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Zahn, A.; Balzer, M.; Bouquet, H.; McManus, J. B.; Gonzalez-Ramos, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2015-05-01

    Vertical profiles of water vapor (H2O) and its isotope ratio D / H expressed as δD(H2O) were measured in situ by the ISOWAT II diode-laser spectrometer during the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA) airborne campaign. We present recent modifications of the instrument design. The instrument calibration on the ground as well as in flight is described. Based on the calibration measurements, the humidity-dependent uncertainty of our airborne data is determined. For the majority of the airborne data we achieved an accuracy (uncertainty of the mean) of Δ(δD) ≈10‰. Vertical profiles between 150 and ~7000 m were obtained during 7 days in July and August 2013 over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean near Tenerife. The flights were coordinated with ground-based (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change, NDACC) and space-based (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, IASI) FTIR remote sensing measurements of δD(H2O) as a means to validate the remote sensing humidity and δD(H2O) data products. The results of the validation are presented in detail in a separate paper (Schneider et al., 2014). The profiles were obtained with a high vertical resolution of around 3 m. By analyzing humidity and δD(H2O) correlations we were able to identify different layers of air masses with specific isotopic signatures. The results are discussed.

  1. In situ spectrophotometric measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liua, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Adornato, Lori; Yates, Kimberly K.; Kaltenbacher, Eric; Ding, Xiaoling; Yang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous in situ sensors are needed to document the effects of today’s rapid ocean uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (e.g., ocean acidification). General environmental conditions (e.g., biofouling, turbidity) and carbon-specific conditions (e.g., wide diel variations) present significant challenges to acquiring long-term measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with satisfactory accuracy and resolution. SEAS-DIC is a new in situ instrument designed to provide calibrated, high-frequency, long-term measurements of DIC in marine and fresh waters. Sample water is first acidified to convert all DIC to carbon dioxide (CO2). The sample and a known reagent solution are then equilibrated across a gas-permeable membrane. Spectrophotometric measurement of reagent pH can thereby determine the sample DIC over a wide dynamic range, with inherent calibration provided by the pH indicator’s molecular characteristics. Field trials indicate that SEAS-DIC performs well in biofouling and turbid waters, with a DIC accuracy and precision of ∼2 μmol kg–1 and a measurement rate of approximately once per minute. The acidic reagent protects the sensor cell from biofouling, and the gas-permeable membrane excludes particulates from the optical path. This instrument, the first spectrophotometric system capable of automated in situ DIC measurements, positions DIC to become a key parameter for in situ CO2-system characterizations.

  2. In situ measurements of phytoplankton fluorescence using low cost electronics.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S; Wright, Dana L

    2013-06-19

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger.

  3. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Wright, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger. PMID:23783738

  4. IN SITU Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fossil Energy Research

    2008-03-31

    SCR catalyst management has become an important operations and maintenance activity for coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. To facilitate this activity, a method to determine Catalyst Activity in situ is being developed. This report describes the methodology and presents the results of a two ozone season demonstration conducted at Alabama Power Company's Gorgas Unit 10 during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons. The results showed that the in situ measurements are in good agreement with the laboratory measurements and the technique has some advantages over the traditional laboratory method of determining Catalyst Activity and Reactor Potential. SCR Performance is determined by the overall Reactor Potential (the product of the Catalyst Activity and the available surface area per unit of flue gas). The in situ approach provides a direct measurement of Reactor Potential under actual operating conditions, whereas laboratory measurements of Catalyst Activity need to be coupled with estimates of catalyst pluggage and flue gas flowrate in order to assess Reactor Potential. The project also showed that the in situ activity results can easily be integrated into catalyst management software to aid in making informed catalyst decisions.

  5. Micro weather stations for in situ measurements in the Martian planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.; Kaiser, W. J.; Kenny, T. W.; Vanzandt, T. R.; Tillman, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Viking Lander meteorology measurements show that the Martian planetary boundary layer (PBL) has large diurnal and seasonal variations in pressure, wind velocity, relative humidity, and airborne dust loading. An even larger range of conditions was inferred from remote sensing observations acquired by the Mariner 9 and Viking orbiters. Numerical models indicate that these changes may be accompanied by dramatic vertical and horizontal wind shears (100 m/s/km) and rapid changes in the static stability. In-situ measurements from a relatively small number surface stations could yield global constraints on the Martian climate and atmospheric general circulation by providing ground truth for remote sensing instruments on orbiters. A more complete understanding of the meteorology of the PBL is an essential precursor to manned missions to Mars because this will be their working environment. In-situ measurements are needed for these studies because the spatial and temporal scales that characterize the important meteorological processes near the surface cannot be resolved from orbit. The Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) Program will provide the first opportunity to deploy a network of surface weather stations for a comprehensive investigation of the Martian PBL. The feasibility and utility of a network of micro-weather stations for making in-situ meteorological measurements in the Martian PBL are assessed.

  6. Airborne Wind Measurements at Cape Blanco, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jung-Tai Lin; Veenhuizen, Scott D.

    1983-12-01

    The airborne wind measuring system using a fixed wing airplane and a Loran-C navigation unit was proven to be feasible to provide the large scale background wind flow for initialization of numerical wind modeling. The rms errors in the airborne wind measuring system were +- 2 mph in wind speed and +- 12 degrees in wind direction. The advantages of this method were that wind speeds over a large area (5 miles x 14 miles, or 18 miles x 30 miles) may be determined rapidly, economically and at altitudes above the normal altitudes of TALA kite mesurements. The disadvantages were that the spatial resolution of the measurements was poor and near surface measurements were not feasible using a fixed wing aircraft. 1 reference, 10 figures, 1 table.

  7. The Relationship Between Fossil and Dairy Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Complex Urban Land-Use Patterns by In Situ and Remote Sensing Data from Surface Mobile, Airborne, and Satellite Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, I.; Melton, C.; Tratt, D. M.; Kuze, A.; Buckland, K. N.; Butz, A.; Deguchi, A.; Eastwood, M. L.; Fischer, M. L.; Frash, J.; Fladeland, M. M.; Gore, W.; Iraci, L. T.; Johnson, P. D.; Kataoka, F.; Kolyer, R.; Leen, J. B.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Shiomi, K.; Suto, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thompson, D. R.; Yates, E. L.; Van Damme, M.; Yokota, T.

    2015-12-01

    The GOSAT-COMEX-IASI Experiment (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite-CO2and Methane EXperiment) demonstrated a novel approach to airborne-surface mobile in situ data fusion for interpretation and validation of satellite and airborne remote sensing data of greenhouse gases and direct calculation of flux. Key data were collected for the Chino Dairy in the Los Angeles Basin, California and for the Kern River Oil Fields adjacent to Bakersfield, California. In situ surface and remote sensing greenhouse gas and ammonia observations were compared with IASI and GOSAT retreivals, while hyperspectral imaging data from the AVIRIS, AVIRIS NG, and Mako airborne sensors were analyzed to relate emissions and land use. Figure - platforms participating in the experiment. TANSO-FTS aboard the Ibuki satellite (GOSAT) provided targeted pixels to measure column greenhouse gases. AMOG is the AutoMObile Gas Surveyor which supports a suite of meteorology and in situ trace gas sensors for mobile high speed measurement. AVIRIS, the Airborne Visual InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer aboard the NASA ER-2 airplane collected hyperspectral imaging data at 20 m resolution from 60,000 ft. Mako is a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer that was flown on the Twin Otter International. AJAX is a fighter jet outfitted for science sporting meteorology and greenhouse gas sensors. RAMVan is an upward looking FTIR for measuring column methane and ammonia and other trace gases.

  8. Aerosol Characteristics during the CLAMS Experiment: in situ and Remote Sensing Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J.; Remer, L.; Castanho, A.; Kaufman, Y.; Artaxo, P.; Mattoo, S.; Levy, R.; Kleidman, R.; Hobbs, P. V.; Plana-Fattori, A.; Yamasoe, M.; Redemann, J.

    2002-05-01

    Remote sensing measurements of aerosol properties were performed with MODIS on the Terra satellite, and with the MAS (MODIS Airborne Simulator) on the ER-2 aircraft during the CLAMS experiment. Remote sensing measurements were validated and complemented by in situ observations. MODIS measurements were operationally obtained over the dark ocean and were explored experimentally over the sun glint. During the experiment, MODIS results indicated episodes of long range transport of large aerosol particles over the CLAMS region. These particles were also identified in the in situ aerosol measurements and by aeronet size distributions. In situ aerosol measurements were performed aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 Research Aircraft, on the Cheasapeake Lighthouse (about 25km from the coast), and on Wallops Island. Spectral absorption measurements performed on Nuclepore filters showed relatively low absorption efficiencies (about 0.21+/-0.08m2/g at 0.55um and 0.052+/-0.023m2/g at 2.1um at the Wallops Island station) and a spectral dependence close to 1/lambda or stronger. The spectral absorption shows characteristics of small black carbon (BC) particles (spectral dependence around 1/lambda) and soil dust-like particles (stronger absorption in the blue). Electron Microscopy pictures show cluster aggregates typically composed by black carbon particles and medium to large dust-like particles. The elemental composition of the particles measured on the Nuclepore filters also indicated the presence of dust-like particles on certain days of the experiment. The average absorption efficiency found in the area was significantly lower (by about one order of magnitude) than the absorption efficiency of biomass burning particles or urban pollution from developing countries. The complementarities of remote sensing and in situ measurements in the interpretation of the aerosol over the region will be discussed and explored.

  9. BOREAS RSS-12 Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Wrigley, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-12 team collected both ground and airborne sunphotometer measurements for use in characterizing the aerosol optical properties of the atmosphere during the BOREAS data collection activities. These measurements are to be used to: 1) measure the magnitude and variability of the aerosol optical depth in both time and space; 2) determine the optical properties of the boreal aerosols; and 3) atmospherically correct remotely sensed data acquired during BOREAS. This data set contains airborne tracking sunphotometer data that were acquired from the C-130 aircraft during its flights over the BOREAS study areas. The data cover selected days and times from May to September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. Aerosol Classification using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.; Froyd, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired extensive datasets of aerosol extinction (532 nm), aerosol optical thickness (AOT) (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) profiles during 18 field missions that have been conducted over North America since 2006. The lidar measurements of aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratio, depolarization, backscatter color ratio, spectral depolarization ratio) are shown to vary with location and aerosol type. A methodology based on observations of known aerosol types is used to qualitatively classify the extensive set of HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate types. Several examples are presented showing how the aerosol intensive parameters vary with aerosol type and how these aerosols are classified according to this new methodology. The HSRL-based classification reveals vertical variability of aerosol types during the NASA ARCTAS field experiment conducted over Alaska and northwest Canada during 2008. In two examples derived from flights conducted during ARCTAS, the HSRL classification of biomass burning smoke is shown to be consistent with aerosol types derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of particle size and composition. The HSRL retrievals of aerosol optical thickness and inferences of aerosol types are used to apportion aerosol optical thickness to aerosol type; results of this analysis are shown for several experiments.

  11. Airborne Atmospheric Aerosol Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, K.; Park, Y.; Eun, H.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to understand the atmospheric aerosols compositions and size distributions since they greatly affect the environment and human health. Particles in the convection layer have been a great concern in global climate changes. To understand these characteristics satellite, aircraft, and radio sonde measurement methods have usually been used. An aircraft aerosol sampling using a filter and/or impactor was the method commonly used (Jay, 2003). However, the flight speed particle sampling had some technical limitations (Hermann, 2001). Moreover, the flight legal limit, altitude, prohibited airspace, flight time, and cost was another demerit. To overcome some of these restrictions, Tethered Balloon Package System (T.B.P.S.) and Recoverable Sonde System(R.S.S.) were developed with a very light optical particle counter (OPC), impactor, and condensation particle counter (CPC). Not only does it collect and measure atmospheric aerosols depending on altitudes, but it also monitors the atmospheric conditions, temperature, humidity, wind velocity, pressure, GPS data, during the measurement (Eun, 2013). In this research, atmospheric aerosol measurement using T.B.P.S. in Ansan area is performed and the measurement results will be presented. The system can also be mounted to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and create an aerial particle concentration map. Finally, we will present measurement data using Tethered Balloon Package System (T.B.P.S.) and R.S.S (Recoverable Sonde System).

  12. Four-laser airborne infrared spectrometer for atmospheric trace gas measurements.

    PubMed

    Roths, J; Zenker, T; Parchatka, U; Wienhold, F G; Harris, G W

    1996-12-20

    We describe the four-laser airborne infrared (FLAIR) instrument, a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for simultaneous high-sensitivity in situ measurements of four atmospheric trace gases in the troposphere. The FLAIR spectrometer was employed during the large-scale airborne research campaign on tropospheric ozone (TROPOZ II) in 1991 and was used to measure CO, H(2) O(2), HCHO, and NO(2) in the free troposphere where detection limits below 100 parts in 10(12) by volume were achieved.

  13. In situ growth rate measurement of selective LPCVD of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Holleman, J.; Hasper, A.; Middelhoek, J. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on the reflectance measurement during the selective deposition of W on Si covered with an insulator rating proven to be a convenient method to monitor the W deposition. The reflectance change during deposition allows the in situ measurement of the deposition rate. The influence of surface roughening due to either the W growth or an etching pretreatment of the wafer is modeled, as well as the effect of selectivity loss and lateral overgrowth.

  14. In situ and remote measurements of ions escaping from Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, P.; Brandt, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    Venus is thought to lose a large fraction of its atmosphere in the form ions, mainly via pickup. The relative loss rate of the exosphere as neutrals or ions is not known, nor is the flux of escaping ions well constrained. Knowledge of these processes will shed light on the role an intrinsic magnetic field has in atmospheric erosion. We use the complementary in-situ plasma and energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from the Venus Express (VEx) spacecraft in order to constrain the ion escape. VEx completed about 2500 orbits to date and reached altitudes as low as 200km. The ASPERA/IMA instrument measured directional proton and oxygen ion spectra in the 10eV to 40keV range. We bin the data accumulated over the mission in space and bulk flow direction, yielding a direct measure of the local ion escape flux. While such in-situ measurements provide data without ambiguity, they are limited by the orbital coverage. This is why we include remote ENA measurements from the ASPERA/NPD (100eV to 10keV) instrument to our study. ENAs are created when escaping ions charge exchange with the high atmosphere atoms or molecules. We have done an exhaustive analysis of the data, excluding time periods of instrument contamination. Most ENA emission originates from low altitudes above Venus' limb. These measurements will be compared with the in-situ data, which allows constraining the atmospheric density at high altitudes. Interestingly, there are also ENA emissions from other directions, which were not sampled in-situ. This allows us to put a lower limit to the escape from these regions.

  15. Airborne in situ characterization of dry urban aerosol optical properties around complex topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targino, Admir Créso; Noone, Kevin J.

    2006-02-01

    In situ data from the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study—NARSTO were used to describe the aerosol optical properties in an urban area whose aerosol distribution is modified as the aerosols are advected over the surrounding topography. The data consist of measurements made with a nephelometer and absorption photometer onboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Pelican aircraft. The cases investigated in this study include vertical profiles flown over coastal sites as well as sites located along some important mountain ranges in southern California. The vertical distribution of the aerosol in the Los Angeles Basin showed a complex configuration, directly related with the local meteorological circulations and the surrounding topography. High spatial and temporal variability in air pollutant concentrations within a relatively small area was found, as indicated by the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficient data. The results suggest that in areas with such complex terrain, a high spatial resolution is required in order to adequately describe the aerosol optical quantities. Principal components analysis (PCA) has been applied to aerosol chemical samples in order to identify the major aerosol types in the Los Angeles Basin. The technique yielded four components that accounted for 78% of the variance in the data set. These were indicative of marine aerosols, urban aerosols, trace elements and secondary aerosol components of traffic emissions and agricultural activities. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer model has been employed to simulate the effects that different aerosol vertical profiles have on the attenuation of solar energy. The cases examined were selected using the results of the PCA and in situ data were used to describe the atmospheric optical properties in the model. These investigations comprise a number of sensitivity tests to evaluate the effects on the results of the location of the aerosol layers as well as

  16. Validation of Airborne FMCW Radar Measurements of Snow Thickness Over Sea Ice in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galin, Natalia; Worby, Anthony; Markus, Thorsten; Leuschen, Carl; Gogineni, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Antarctic sea ice and its snow cover are integral components of the global climate system, yet many aspects of their vertical dimensions are poorly understood, making their representation in global climate models poor. Remote sensing is the key to monitoring the dynamic nature of sea ice and its snow cover. Reliable and accurate snow thickness data are currently a highly sought after data product. Remotely sensed snow thickness measurements can provide an indication of precipitation levels, predicted to increase with effects of climate change in the polar regions. Airborne techniques provide a means for regional-scale estimation of snow depth and distribution. Accurate regional-scale snow thickness data will also facilitate an increase in the accuracy of sea ice thickness retrieval from satellite altimeter freeboard estimates. The airborne data sets are easier to validate with in situ measurements and are better suited to validating satellite algorithms when compared with in situ techniques. This is primarily due to two factors: better chance of getting coincident in situ and airborne data sets and the tractability of comparison between an in situ data set and the airborne data set averaged over the footprint of the antennas. A 28-GHz frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar loaned by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets to the Australian Antarctic Division is used to measure snow thickness over sea ice in East Antarctica. Provided with the radar design parameters, the expected performance parameters of the radar are summarized. The necessary conditions for unambiguous identification of the airsnow and snowice layers for the radar are presented. Roughnesses of the snow and ice surfaces are found to be dominant determinants in the effectiveness of layer identification for this radar. Finally, this paper presents the first in situ validated snow thickness estimates over sea ice in Antarctica derived from an FMCW radar on a helicopterborne platform.

  17. Validation of LIRIC aerosol concentration retrievals using airborne measurements during a biomass burning episode over Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Amiridis, Vassilis; Allan, James D.; Papayannis, Alexandros; Solomos, Stavros; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Nenes, Athanasios; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Vasilescu, Jeni; Nicolae, Doina; Coe, Hugh; Bacak, Asan; Chaikovsky, Anatoli

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we validate the Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) retrievals of the aerosol concentration in the fine mode, using the airborne aerosol chemical composition dataset obtained over the Greater Athens Area (GAA) in Greece, during the ACEMED campaign. The study focuses on the 2nd of September 2011, when a long-range transported smoke layer was observed in the free troposphere over Greece, in the height range from 2 to 3 km. CIMEL sun-photometric measurements revealed high AOD ( 0.4 at 532 nm) and Ångström exponent values ( 1.7 at 440/870 nm), in agreement with coincident ground-based lidar observations. Airborne chemical composition measurements performed over the GAA, revealed increased CO volume concentration ( 110 ppbv), with 57% sulphate dominance in the PM1 fraction. For this case, we compare LIRIC retrievals of the aerosol concentration in the fine mode with the airborne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) measurements. Our analysis shows that the remote sensing retrievals are in a good agreement with the measured airborne in-situ data from 2 to 4 km. The discrepancies observed between LIRIC and airborne measurements at the lower troposphere (below 2 km), could be explained by the spatial and temporal variability of the aerosol load within the area where the airborne data were averaged along with the different time windows of the retrievals.

  18. Electrical charge measurements on fine airborne particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tardos, G.I.; Dietz, P.W.; Snaddon, R.W.L.

    1984-11-01

    A small parallel-plate precipitator and a theoretical collection model have been used to determine the distribution of charges acquired by monodisperse airborne polystyrene latex particles in a corona charger. The mean charge based on the total number of particles was found to be slightly higher than half the predicted saturation charge, and it agreed well with independent measurements made in a Faraday cage particle separator. The importance of careful measurements of particle charge in fine particle transport studies is highlighted by a discussion of the effect of charge (particle mobility) distribution width on observed transport characteristics.

  19. In situ measurement of tritium permeation through stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Walter G. Luscher; David J. Senor; Kevin K. Clayton; Glen R. Longhurst

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292 degrees C and 330 degrees C. In situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. Results from in situ permeation measurements were compared with predictions based on an ex-reactor permeation correlation in the literature. In situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure over the ranges considered in this study. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330 degrees C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  20. Comparison between S. T. radar and in situ balloon measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalaudier, F.; Barat, J.; Bertin, F.; Brun, E.; Crochet, M.; Cuq, F.

    1986-01-01

    A campaign for simultaneous in situ and remote observation of both troposphere and stratosphere took place near Aire-sur-l'Adour (in southeastern France) on May 4, 1984. The aim of this campaign was a better understanding of the physics of radar echoes. The backscattered signal obtained with a stratosphere-troposphere radar both at the vertical and 15 deg. off vertical is compared with the velocity and temperature measurements made in the same region (about 10 km north of the radar site) by balloon-borne ionic anenometers and temperature sensors. In situ measurements clearly indicate that the temperature fluctuations are not always consistent with the standard turbulent theory. Nevertheless, the assumptions generally made (isotropy and turbulent field in k) and the classical formulation so derived for radar reflectivity are able to reproduce the shape of the radar return power profiles in oblique directions. Another significant result is the confirmation of the role played by the atmospheric stratification in the vertical echo power. It is important to develop these simultaneous in situ and remote experiments for a better description of the dynamical and thermal structure of the atmosphere and for a better understanding of the mechanisms governing clear-air radar reflectivity.

  1. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Leifer, I.; Bovensmann, H.; Eastwood, M.; Fladeland, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Gerilowski, K.; Green, R. O.; Kratwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Luna, B.; Thorpe, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of the NASA/ESA CO2 and MEthane eXperiment (COMEX) campaign in California during June and August/September 2014. COMEX was a multi-platform campaign to measure CH4 plumes released from anthropogenic sources including oil and gas infrastructure. We discuss principles for real-time spectral signature detection and measurement, and report performance on the NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG). AVIRIS-NG successfully detected CH4 plumes in real-time at Gb s-1 data rates, characterizing fugitive releases in concert with other in situ and remote instruments. The teams used these real-time CH4 detections to coordinate measurements across multiple platforms, including airborne in situ, airborne non-imaging remote sensing, and ground-based in situ instruments. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of real-time trace-gas signature detection in an airborne science campaign, and presages many future applications. Post-analysis demonstrates matched filter methods providing noise-equivalent (1σ) detection sensitivity for 1.0 % CH4 column enhancements equal to 141 ppm m.

  2. In Situ Measurement of Tritium Permeation Through Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292° and 330°C. In-situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. An irradiation enhancement factor (IEF) was determined by comparing in-situ permeation data with a correlation for ex-reactor hydrogen permeation through austenitic stainless steel developed from literature data and reported by Le Claire. Nominal values for the IEF ranged between 3 and 5 for 316 SS. In-situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330°C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  3. IN-SITU MEASUREMENT OF TRITIUM PERMEATION THROUGH STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292° and 330°C. In-situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. An irradiation enhancement factor (IEF) was determined by comparing in-situ permeation data with a correlation for ex-reactor hydrogen permeation through austenitic stainless steel developed from literature data and reported by Le Claire. Nominal values for the IEF ranged between 3 and 5 for 316 SS. In-situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330°C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  4. In situ refractometry for concentration measurements in refrigeration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, T.A.

    1997-12-31

    An in situ refractometer was developed that is capable of measuring both the concentrations of oil in refrigerants, and the concentrations of aqueous coolant brines. A description of the technique, and example data are presented for R-134a/PAG oil, aqueous ethylene glycol, and aqueous propylene glycol solutions. The R-134a/PAG oil sensor data show a measurement sensitivity of less than 0.1% oil in the refrigerant, although error between data sets shows an uncertainty of approximately {+-}0.8%. Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol data show high signal level variations due to the large variation of the index of refraction between water and the glycols.

  5. In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Gruen, E.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-04-01

    Jupiter's ring system -- the archetype of ethereal ring systems -- consists of at least three components: the main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s). The small moonlets Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring region and structure in the intensity obtained from imaging observations indicates that these moons are the dominant sources of the gossamer ring material. The current picture implies that particles ejected from a source moon evolve inward under the Poynting-Robertson drag. Beyond Thebe's orbit, a very faint outward extension of the gossamer ring has also been observed which is not yet explained. Typical grain radii derived from optical imaging are a few micrometers. In November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed the gossamer ring for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. With the in-situ dust detector on board, dust measurements were collected throughout the gossamer ring and close to Amalthea. Several hundred impacts of dust grains were recorded and the data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 70 impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly provide dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. This allows to test and refine current models of ring particle dynamics (see D. P. Hamilton et al., this conference). In particular, the direct measurement of grain sizes and dust spatial density in different regions of the gossamer ring allow to better constrain the forces dominating the grains' dynamics. The Galileo measurements in Jupiter's gossamer ring pave the way towards the in-situ dust measurements with Cassini in Saturn's E ring beginning in 2004.

  6. Galileo in-situ dust measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Grün, E.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Jupiter's ring system -- the archetype of ethereal ring systems -- consists of at least three components: the main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s). The small moonlets Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring region and structure in the intensity obtained from imaging observations indicates that these moons are the dominant sources of the gossamer ring material. The current picture implies that particles ejected from a source moon evolve inward under the Poynting-Robertson drag. Beyond Thebe's orbit, a very faint outward extension of the gossamer ring has also been observed which is not yet explained. Typical grain radii derived from optical imaging are a few micrometers. In November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed the gossamer ring for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. With the in-situ dust detector on board, dust measurements were collected throughout the gossamer ring and close to Amalthea. Several hundred impacts of dust grains were recorded and the data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 90 impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly provide dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. This allows to test and refine current models of ring particle dynamics (see D. P. Hamilton et al., this conference). In particular, the direct measurement of grain sizes and dust spatial density in different regions of the gossamer ring allow to better constrain the forces dominating the grains' dynamics. The Galileo measurements in Jupiter's gossamer ring pave the way towards the in-situ dust measurements with Cassini in Saturn's E ring beginning in 2004.

  7. Lidar measurements of airborne particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangkun; Philbrick, C. Russell

    2003-03-01

    Raman lidar techniques have been used in remote sensing to measure the aerosol optical extinction in the lower atmosphere, as well as water vapor, temperature and ozone profiles. Knowledge of aerosol optical properties assumes special importance in the wake of studies strongly correlating airborne particulate matter with adverse health effects. Optical extinction depends upon the concentration, composition, and size distribution of the particulate matter. Optical extinction from lidar returns provide information on particle size and density. The influence of relative humidity upon the growth and size of aerosols, particularly the sulfate aerosols along the northeast US region, has been investigated using a Raman lidar during several field measurement campaigns. A particle size distribution model is being developed and verified based on the experimental results. Optical extinction measurements from lidar in the NARSTO-NE-OPS program in Philadelphia PA, during summer of 1999 and 2001, have been analyzed and compared with other measurements such as PM sampling and particle size measurements.

  8. Airborne Measurements in Support of the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Byron; Davis, Ken; Barrick, John; Browell, Edward; Chen, Gao; Dobler, Jeremy; Fried, Alan; Lauvaux, Thomas; Lin, Bing; McGill, Matt; Miles, Natasha; Nehrir, Amin; Obland, Michael; O'Dell, Chris; Sweeney, Colm; Yang, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    NASA announced the research opportunity Earth Venture Suborbital -2 (EVS-2) mission in support of the NASA's science strategic goals and objectives in 2013. Penn State University, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and other academic institutions, government agencies, and industrial companies together formulated and proposed the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport -America (ACT -America) suborbital mission, which was subsequently selected for implementation. The airborne measurements that are part of ACT-America will provide a unique set of remote and in-situ measurements of CO2 over North America at spatial and temporal scales not previously available to the science community and this will greatly enhance our understanding of the carbon cycle. ACT -America will consist of five airborne campaigns, covering all four seasons, to measure regional atmospheric carbon distributions and to evaluate the accuracy of atmospheric transport models used to assess carbon sinks and sources under fair and stormy weather conditions. This coordinated mission will measure atmospheric carbon in the three most important regions of the continental US carbon balance: Northeast, Midwest, and South. Data will be collected using 2 airborne platforms (NASA Wallops' C-130 and NASA Langley's B-200) with both in-situ and lidar instruments, along with instrumented ground towers and under flights of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) satellite. This presentation provides an overview of the ACT-America instruments, with particular emphasis on the airborne CO2and backscatter lidars, and the, rationale, approach, and anticipated results from this mission.

  9. AVIATR—Aerial Vehicle for In-situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance. A Titan airplane mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Lemke, Lawrence; Foch, Rick; McKay, Christopher P.; Beyer, Ross A.; Radebaugh, Jani; Atkinson, David H.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Gundlach, Jay; Giannini, Francesco; Bain, Sean; Flasar, F. Michael; Hurford, Terry; Anderson, Carrie M.; Merrison, Jon; Ádámkovics, Máté; Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Mitchell, Jonathan; Burr, Devon M.; Colaprete, Anthony; Schaller, Emily; Friedson, A. James; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Coradini, Angioletta; Adriani, Alberto; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Malaska, Michael J.; Morabito, David; Reh, Kim

    2012-03-01

    We describe a mission concept for a stand-alone Titan airplane mission: Aerial Vehicle for In-situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance (AVIATR). With independent delivery and direct-to-Earth communications, AVIATR could contribute to Titan science either alone or as part of a sustained Titan Exploration Program. As a focused mission, AVIATR as we have envisioned it would concentrate on the science that an airplane can do best: exploration of Titan's global diversity. We focus on surface geology/hydrology and lower-atmospheric structure and dynamics. With a carefully chosen set of seven instruments—2 near-IR cameras, 1 near-IR spectrometer, a RADAR altimeter, an atmospheric structure suite, a haze sensor, and a raindrop detector—AVIATR could accomplish a significant subset of the scientific objectives of the aerial element of flagship studies. The AVIATR spacecraft stack is composed of a Space Vehicle (SV) for cruise, an Entry Vehicle (EV) for entry and descent, and the Air Vehicle (AV) to fly in Titan's atmosphere. Using an Earth-Jupiter gravity assist trajectory delivers the spacecraft to Titan in 7.5 years, after which the AVIATR AV would operate for a 1-Earth-year nominal mission. We propose a novel `gravity battery' climb-then-glide strategy to store energy for optimal use during telecommunications sessions. We would optimize our science by using the flexibility of the airplane platform, generating context data and stereo pairs by flying and banking the AV instead of using gimbaled cameras. AVIATR would climb up to 14 km altitude and descend down to 3.5 km altitude once per Earth day, allowing for repeated atmospheric structure and wind measurements all over the globe. An initial Team-X run at JPL priced the AVIATR mission at FY10 715M based on the rules stipulated in the recent Discovery announcement of opportunity. Hence we find that a standalone Titan airplane mission can achieve important science building on Cassini's discoveries and can likely do so

  10. A proposed in situ debris measurement in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opiela, J.; Liou, J.; Stansbery, E.

    Unlike the low Earth o bit (LEO) region, the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO)r debris environment is not well characterized. Since there is no natural mechanism to remove debris from GEO, where atmospheric drag is negligible, the GEO debris population will continue to grow. A good environment definition is needed for GEO satellite designers and operators to have reliable debris impact risk assessments and protection for their satellites. The current, general debris mitigation and protection measures may be applied to GEO satellites, but characterizing the GEO debris environment (flux, size distribution, orbit distribution, sources) will also allow measures tailored specifically for that environment. Ground-based GEO optical measurements in general have been limited to objects greater than about 15 cm. It is highly unlikely that any ground-based telescope can detect GEO debris smaller than 1 cm. In situ measurements are required to characterize the particle environment below the threshold of remote sensors. Firsthand knowledge of the untrackable debris population is critical to GEO environment definition. Two specific issues need to be addressed for any effective in situ measurements in GEO: detector type and potential contamination from interplanetary and interstellar dust. In this paper, we will discuss why the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) material makes an ideal GEO debris detector. We will also show that impacts from debris, interplanetary dust, and interstellar dust are very different in many ways (size, impact speed, flux, etc). Debris impacts can be easily distinguished from other impacts.

  11. Monitoring and Modeling Crop Health and Water Use via in-situ, Airborne and Space-based Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    The accurate retrieval of plant water use, health and function together with soil state and condition, represent key objectives in the management and monitoring of large-scale agricultural production. In regions of water shortage or stress, understanding the sustainable use of available water supplies is critical. Unfortunately, this need is all too often limited by a lack of reliable observations. Techniques that balance the demand for reliable ground-based data with the rapid retrieval of spatially distributed crop characteristics represent a needed line of research. Data from in-situ monitoring coupled with advances in satellite retrievals of key land surface variables, provide the information necessary to characterize many crop health and water use features, including evaporation, leaf-chlorophyll and other common vegetation indices. With developments in UAV and quadcopter solutions, the opportunity to bridge the spatio-temporal gap between satellite and ground based sensing now exists, along with the capacity for customized retrievals of crop information. While there remain challenges in the routine application of autonomous airborne systems, the state of current technology and sensor developments provide the capacity to explore the operational potential. While this presentation will focus on the multi-scale estimation of crop-water use and crop-health characteristics from satellite-based sensors, the retrieval of high resolution spatially distributed information from near-surface airborne and ground-based systems will also be examined.

  12. In situ impedance measurement of microwave atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. T.; Nam, W. J.; Lee, J. K.; Yun, G. S.

    2017-04-01

    The impedance of atmospheric pressure argon plasma jets driven by microwave frequency is determined in situ by a novel ‘two frequency method’. In the conventional method of reflection coefficient ({{S}}11) measurement, the frequency of the driving microwave power is scanned, which inevitably affects the plasma characters and leads to uncertainty in the estimated plasma impedance. In our proposed method, the frequency-scanning signal additional to the driving power is used to measure {{S}}11 over a wide frequency range, which enables accurate determination of the plasma impedance based on an equivalent circuit model. The measured resistance and reactance of the plasma increase with the driving power in agreement with the transmission line theory. Based on this in situ measurement of the plasma impedance, the net power coupled to the plasma has been determined. The overall power efficiency remains approximately unchanged around 45% for different input power levels owing to the competing effects between the impedance mismatch and the volume change of the plasma.

  13. In situ measurements of the mesosphere and stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosky, C.

    1976-01-01

    The operation of a subsonic, Gerdien condenser probe for in situ measurements of the mesosphere and stratosphere is presented. The inclusion of a flashing Lyman alpha ultraviolet source provides an artifically produced ionization of particular constituents. Detailed theory of operation is presented and the data results from two flights are shown. A great deal of fine structure in mobility is observed due to the presence of various hydrated positive ions. The effect of the Lyman alpha source in the 35 km region was to dissociate a light hydrate ion rather than produce additional ionization. At the 70 km region, photodissociation of the heaviest ions (probably ice crystals) was also observed.

  14. In situ etch rate measurements of thin film combinatorial libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J. D.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Teplin, C. W.; Dabney, M. S.; Ginley, D. S.

    2007-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of optical reflection mapping as an in situ characterization tool to evaluate the corrosion rate of compositionally graded thin film combinatorial libraries coated with a commercial glass etching paste. A multi-channel fiber-optically coupled CCD-array-based spectrometer was used to collect a series of reflectance maps from 300 to 1000 nm versus time. The thin film interference oscillations in the measured reflection spectra have been fitted to determine the film thickness as a function of time and thereby the etch rate. Application of this technique to an In–Mo–O composition spread library is presented as an example.

  15. In situ respiration measurements of megafauna in the Kermadec Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunnally, Clifton C.; Friedman, Jason R.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to measure metabolic rates of megafauna living in depths greater than 6000 m. Echinoderms, actinarians and a polychaete were captured by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and inserted into respiration chambers in situ at depths of 4049 m, 7140 m and 8074 m in the region of the Kermadec Trench SW Pacific Ocean. Hadal research has moved into a new frontier as technological improvements now allow for a meticulous investigation of trench ecology in depths greater than 6000 m. The development of an in situ respirometer for use in these studies was deployed in the Kermadec Trench to obtain the first ever rates of basal metabolic rates of hadal megafauna. Typical deep-sea experiments of individual animal physiology must deal with covarying factors of pressure, temperature, light and food supply in this study investigated the effects of pressure and increased food supply on overall animal metabolism. In the Kermadec Trench, holothurian respiration rates (n=4), 0.079±0.011 (mean±SE) μmol-O2 g-1 h-1, were higher than those captured at abyssal depths (n=2), 0.018±0.002 μmol-O2 g-1h-1, in the same region (p<0.001). When Q10 adjusted to a common temperature of 2.5 °C trench holothurian respiration rates ranged between 0.068 and 0.119 μmol-O2 g-1 h-1. Anemone respiration rates were remarkably similar between abyssal and hadal specimens, 0.110 and 0.111 μmol-O2 g-1 h-1, respectively. Our results on echinoderm respiration when corrected for temperature and mass fall below the slope regression when compared with other in situ measurements at shallower ocean depths.

  16. In situ measurements of Li isotopes in foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Nathalie; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Spezzaferri, Silvia; Brunet, Fabrice

    2007-01-01

    In situ measurement of Li isotope ratios in foraminifera has been developed using a Cameca ims 1270 ion microprobe. In situ δ7Li analyses have been performed in biogenic calcite of planktonic foraminifera from various locations. Results show that for west Pacific mixed Globigerinoides and Globorotalia (22°S161°E), the isotopic variability between tests and within a single test, respectively, is not significantly greater than estimated analytical uncertainty (˜1.5‰). Mean δ7Li for several planktonic foraminifera tests corresponds to the seawater value, strongly suggesting negligible Li isotope fractionation relative to seawater, as previously inferred by Hall et al. (2005) using thermo-ionization mass spectrometer and multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry techniques. Combined with scanning electron microscopy and ion microprobe imaging, micron-sized grains, enriched in lithium, silica and aluminum have been found in the foraminifera calcite matrix. A simple mixing model shows that 0.3-2 wt % of marine clays incorporated within the analyzed calcite would lower the foraminifera δ7Li value, by 3‰ to 10‰ relative to the isotopic composition of the pure calcite. By comparison, no such grains have been detected in corals. The presence of micron-sized silicate grains embedded within the foraminifera calcite is consistent with the Erez (2003) biomineralization model, involving calcite precipitation from seawater vacuoles. By contrast, coral calcium carbonate is instead precipitated from ions, which have been pumped or diffused through several membranes, impermeable to micrometric grains. Ion microprobe in situ δ7Li measurements in biogenic calcite present new methods for investigating both biomineralization processes and the past record of the ocean composition by exploring geochemical variations at a scale that is smaller in space and in time.

  17. In situ measurement requirements for a solar probe

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.A.; Gosling, J.T.

    1996-09-01

    The authors present the rationale and in situ measurement requirements for a near-Sun mission intended to answer the central questions of the heating of the corona and the acceleration of the solar wind. These conclusions are based on panel discussions and presentations at the Marlboro workshop. They have in mind not a minimum mission, but rather one that is constrained but feasible within the current mass and telemetry rate restrictions. To distinguish between thermal, wave-driven, and microflare-driven models, the measurements must determine wave levels in a broad range of frequencies, resolve fine-scale structures, find the energetic particle content and its variations, and determine the bulk properties of a few species with detailed distributions for at least electrons and protons. They find that the in situ measurements needed to answer the main questions are similar to those proposed previously (magnetic field, plasma, high-energy particles, and plasma wave instruments) but without neutron and dust experiments. Telemetry and mass constraints will be significant but should not be prohibitive.

  18. In situ measurements of magnetic nanoparticles after placenta perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Robert; Gläser, Marcus; Göhner, Claudia; Seyfarth, Lydia; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Hofmann, Andreas; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) present promising tools for medical applications. However, the investigation of their spatial and temporal distribution is hampered by missing in-situ particle detection and quantification technologies. The placenta perfusion experiment represents an interesting model for the study of the particle distribution at a biological barrier. It allows the ex-vivo investigation of the permeability of the placenta for materials of interest. We introduce an approach based on a magnetic system for an in situ measurement of the concentration of magnetic NPs in such an experiment. A previously off-line utilized magnetic readout device (sensitivity of ≈10-8 Am2) was used for long term measurements of magnetic NP of 100-150 nm size range in a closed circuit of a placenta perfusion. It represents a semiquantitative approach. The behavior of particles in the placenta and in the measurement system was studied, as well as the influence of particle surface modifications. The results suggest a transfer of a low amount of particles from the maternal to the fetal blood circuit.

  19. Statistical modeling of in situ hiss amplitudes using ground measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, D. I.; Spasojevic, M.; Li, W.; Nishimura, Y.

    2012-05-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is a naturally occurring extremely low frequency electromagnetic emission that is often observed within the Earth's plasmasphere. Plasmaspheric hiss plays a major role in the scattering and loss of electrons from the Earth's radiation belts, thereby contributing to the maintenance of the slot region between the inner and outer electron belt. Traditionally, in situ satellite observations have been the measurement modality of choice for studies of plasmaspheric hiss due to their ability to directly measure the hiss source region. However, satellite studies are relatively short-lived and very few satellite receivers remain operational for an entire 11-year solar cycle. Ground stations, in contrast, may collect multiple solar cycles' worth of data during their lifetime, yet they cannot directly measure the hiss source region. This study aims to determine the extent to which measurements of hiss at midlatitude ground stations may be used to predict the mean amplitude of in situ measurements of plasmaspheric hiss. We use coincident measurements between Palmer Station, Antarctica (L = 2.4, 50°S invariant latitude) and the THEMIS spacecraft from June 2008 through May 2010, during solar minimum. Using an autoregressive multiple regression model, we show that in the local time sector from 00 < MLT < 12, when the ionosphere above Palmer Station is in darkness and hiss is observed at Palmer, the amplitude of plasmaspheric hiss observed by the THEMIS spacecraft is 1.4 times higher than when hiss is not observed at Palmer. In the same local time sector when the ground station is in daylight and hiss is observed, the THEMIS observed amplitudes are not significantly different from those when hiss is not observed on the ground. A stronger relationship is found in the local time sector from 12 < MLT < 24 where, when Palmer is in daylight and hiss is observed, THEMIS plasmaspheric hiss amplitudes are 2 times higher compared to when hiss is not observed at Palmer

  20. In situ Micrometeorological Measurements during RxCADRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, C. B.; Hiers, J. K.; Strenfel, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Prescribed Fire Combustion and Atmospheric Dynamics Research Experiment (RxCADRE) was a collaborative research project designed to fully instrument prescribed fires in the Southeastern United States. Data were collected on pre-burn fuel loads, post burn consumption, ambient weather, in situ atmospheric dynamics, plume dynamics, radiant heat release (both from in-situ and remote sensors), in-situ fire behavior, and select fire effects. The sampling was conducted at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, and the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center in Newton, Georgia, from February 29 to March 6, 2008. Data were collected on 5 prescribed burns, totaling 4458 acres. The largest aerial ignition totaled 2,290 acres and the smallest ground ignition totaled 104 acres. Quantifying fire-atmospheric interactions is critical for understanding wildland fire dynamics and enhancing modeling of smoke plumes. During Rx-CADRE, atmospheric soundings using radiosondes were made at each burn prior to ignition. In situ micrometeorological measurements were made within each burn unit using five portable, 10-m towers equipped with sonic and prop anemometers, fine-wire thermocouples, and a carbon dioxide probes. The towers were arranged within the burn units to capture the wind and temperature fields as the fire front and plume passed the towers. Due to the interaction of fire lines following ignition, several of the fire fronts that passed the towers were backing fires and thus less intense. Preliminary results indicate that the average vertical velocities associated with the fire front passage were on the order of 3-5 m s-1 and average plume temperatures were on the order of 30-50 °C above ambient. During two of the experimental burns, radiosondes were released into the fire plumes to determine the vertical structure of the plume temperature, humidity, and winds. A radiosonde released into the plume during the burn conducted on 3 March 2008 indicated a definite plume boundary in the

  1. Ground and Airborne Methane Measurements using Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Kawa, Stephan R.; Abshire, James; Dawsey, Martha; Ramanathan, Anand

    2012-01-01

    We report on an initial airborne demonstration of atmospheric methane column measurements at 1.65 micrometers using a widely tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier (OPA) lidar and a photon counting detector. Methane is an important greenhouse gas and accurate knowledge of its sources and sinks is needed for climate modeling. Our lidar system uses 20 pulses at increasing wavelengths and integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) to map a methane line at 1650.9 nanometers. The wavelengths are generated by using a Nd:YAG pump laser at 1064.5 nanometers and distributed feedback diode laser at 1650.9 nanometers and a periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. The pulse width was 3 nanoseconds and the pulse repetition rate was 6.28 KHz. The outgoing energy was approximately 13 microJoules/pulse. A commercial 20 nanometer diameter fiber-coupled telescope with a photon counting detector operated in analog mode with a 0.8 nanometer bandpass filter was used as the lidar receiver. The lidar system was integrated on NASA's DC-8 flying laboratory, based at Dryden Airborne operations Facility (DAOF) in Palmdale CA. Three flights were performed in the central valley of California. Each flight lasted about 2.5 hours and it consisted of several flight segments at constant altitudes at approximately 3, 4.5, 6, 7.6, 9.1, 10.6 km (l0, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 kft). An in-situ cavity ring down spectrometer made by Picarro Inc. was flown along with the lidar instrument provided us with the "truth" i.e. the local CH4, CO2 and H2O concentrations at the constant flight altitude segments. Using the aircraft's altitude, GPS, and meteorological data we calculated the theoretical differential optical depth of the methane absorption at increasing altitudes. Our results showed good agreement between the experimentally derived optical depth measurements from the lidar instrument and theoretical calculations as the flight altitude was increased from 3 to 10.6 kilometers, assuming a

  2. An Intercomparison of Airborne VOC and PAN Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Flocke, F.; Weinheimer, A.; Fall, R.; Goldan, P.; Hübler, G.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2002-12-01

    As part of the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000) an informal airborne intercomparison has been conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-art of fast-response, in-situ methods for analyzing Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Instrumentation included a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), the Tropospheric Airborne Chromatograph for Oxy-hydrocarbons and Hydrocarbons (TACOH) and a gas chromatograph for PAN detection using electron capture (GC/ECD). The measurements were made in the Greater Houston area and East Texas in August/September 2000 during 13 flights with the NSF/NCAR ELECTRA aircraft. The intercomparison was conducted mainly in the boundary layer but included some encounters with air masses from the free troposphere. Final results from the intercomparison show that measurements of acetaldehyde, isoprene, the sum\\textsuperscript{*} of acetone and propanal, the sum\\textsuperscript{*} methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein (\\textsuperscript{*} PTR-MS does not distinguish between isobaric species) and toluene agree very well. Poor agreement was achieved in the case of methanol and the underlying sensitivity problem in the PTR-MS or TACOH system is under investigation. The results of the PAN intercomparison indicate that the PTR-MS technique suffered from an interference most likely associated with the presence of peracetic acid in photochemically aged air. If this interfering signal was traced by periodically inserting a selective PAN scrubber (thermal decomposition) into the sample air stream and subtracted from the original signal, the corrected PTR-MS PAN data are in very good agreement with the GC/ECD results.

  3. Epoxy and acrylate sterolithography resins: in-situ property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Chambers, R.S.; Hinnerichs, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Stereolithography is a rapid prototyping method that is becoming an important product realization and concurrent engineering tool, with applications in advanced and agile manufacturing. During the build process, material behavior plays a significant role in the mechanics leading to internal stresses and, potentially, to distortion (curling) of parts. The goal of the ``Stereolithography Manufacturing Process Modeling and Optimization`` LDRD program was to develop engineering tools for improving overall part accuracy during the stereolithography build process. These tools include phenomenological material models of solidifying stereolithography photocurable resins and a 3D finite element architecture that incorporates time varying material behavior, laser path dependence, and structural linkage. This SAND report discusses the in situ measurement of shrinkage and force relaxation behavior of two photocurable resins, and the measurement of curl in simple cantilever beams. These studies directly supported the development of phenomenological material models for solidifying resins and provided experimental curl data to compare to model predictions.

  4. In situ laser reflectance measurement of diffuse surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chan, W S; Khan, S U

    1978-08-01

    Report is made on an in situ method of laser reflectance measurement of diffuse surfaces by using a GaAs laser and off-the-shelf optical components not involving radiation integration over a hemisphere as with most conventional reflectometers. The design features and limitations are described. Several diffuse surfaces were evaluated by this method, and the reflectance results obtained were in good agreement with those determined by the method of integrating sphere that used MgCO(3) surface as a standard. The main advantages of this method are: the elimination of the need of a surface standard; the avoidance of having the surfaces in close contact with the measuring equipment; the accuracy better than 10%; and the relatively straightforward alignment.

  5. Contact sponge water absorption test implemented for in situ measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, Laura; Scrivano, Simona

    2016-04-01

    The contact sponge method is a non-destructive in-situ methodology used to estimate a water uptake coefficient. The procedure, unlike other in-situ measurement was proven to be directly comparable to the water uptake laboratory measurements, and was registered as UNI 11432:2011. The UNI Normal procedure requires to use a sponge with known density, soaked in water, weighed, placed on the material for 1 minute (UNI 11432, 2011; Pardini & Tiano, 2004), then weighed again. Difficulties arise in operating on test samples or on materials with porosity varied for decay. While carrying on the test, fluctuations in the bearing of the environmental parameters were negligible, but not the pressure applied to the surface, that induced the release of different water amounts towards the material. For this reason we designed a metal piece of the same diameter of the plate carrying the sponge, to be screwed at the tip of a pocket penetrometer. With this instrument the sponge was kept in contact with the surface for 1 minute applying two different loads, at first pushed with 0.3 kg/cm2 in order to press the sponge, but not its holder, against the surface. Then, a load of 1.1 kg/ cm2 was applied, still avoiding deviating the load to the sponge holder. We applied both the current and our implemented method to determine the water absorption by contact sponge on 5 fresh rock types (4 limestones: Fine - and Coarse grained Pietra di Vicenza, Rosso Verona, Breccia Aurora, and the silicoclastic Macigno sandstone). The results show that 1) the current methodology imply manual skill and experience to produce a coherent set of data; the variable involved are in fact not only the imposed pressure but also the compression mechanics. 2) The control on the applied pressure allowed reproducible measurements. Moreover, 3) the use of a thicker sponge enabled to apply the method even on rougher surfaces, as the device holding the sponge is not in contact with the tested object. Finally, 4) the

  6. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Gruen, E.

    Jupiter's ring system consists of at least three components: the inner main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s) further out. The small moons Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring and are believed to be the sources of gossamer ring material. A very faint ring extension has also been observed beyond Thebe's orbit. On 5 November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed Jupiter's gossamer ring system for the first time. High-resolution dust data were obtained with the dust detector on board down to 2.33 R_J , i.e. well inside Amalthea's orbit. A second ring passage occurred on 21 September 2003, a few hours before Galileo impacted Jupiter. This time, dust data were successfully received down to Amalthea's orbit at 2.5 R_J , however, with much reduced time-resolution. Several thousand dust impacts were counted during both ring passages, and the full data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 90 dust impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly measure dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. Our as yet preliminary analysis %of the gossamer ring data implies particle sizes in the sub-micron and micron range. The size distribution -- increasing towards smaller particles -- is similar in the Thebe ring and the ring's outer extension, whereas in the Amalthea ring it is steeper. Dust number densities are about 104 - 106 km-3 . Our dust data allow for the first time to compare in-situ measurements with the results optical obtained from the inversion of optical images. It appears that small sub-micron grains dominate the number density whereas larger particles with at least a few micron radii contribute most to the optical depth. The dust density shows previously unrecognised fine-structure in the ring between

  7. Airborne intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Torres, Arnold L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during missions flown in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system and two chemiluminescence instruments (CL). NO mixing ratios from below 5 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) to greater than 100 pptv were reported, with the majority less than 20 pptv. Good correlation was observed between the measurements reported by the CL and LIF techniques. The general level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements obtained during the two missions provides the basis from which one can conclude that equally 'valid' measurements of background levels of NO can be expected from either CL or LIF instruments. At the same time the periods of disagreement that were observed between the CL and LIF instruments as well as between the two CL instruments highlight the difficulty of obtaining reliable measurements with NO mixing ratios in the 5-20 pptv range and emphasize the vigilance that should be maintained in future NO measurements.

  8. Micro-sensors for in-situ meteorological measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David; Kaiser, William J.; Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Tillman, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Improved in-situ meteorological measurements are needed for monitoring the weather and climate of the terrestrial and Martian atmospheres. We have initiated a program to assess the feasibility and utility of micro-sensors for precise in-situ meteorological measurements in these environments. Sensors are being developed for measuring pressure, temperature, wind velocity, humidity, and aerosol amounts. Silicon micro-machining and large scale integration technologies are being used to make sensors that are small, rugged, lightweight, and require very little power. Our long-term goal is to develop very accurate miniaturized sensors that can be incorporated into complete instrument packages or 'micro weather stations,' and deployed on a variety of platforms. If conventional commercially available silicon production techniques can be used to fabricate these sensor packages, it will eventually be possible to mass-produce them at low cost. For studies of the Earth's troposphere and stratosphere, they could be deployed on aircraft, dropsondes, radiosondes, or autonomous surface stations at remote sites. Improved sensor accuracy and reduced sensor cost are the primary challenges for these applications. For studies of the Martian atmosphere, these sensor packages could be incorporated into the small entry probes and surface landers that are being planned for the Mars Environmental SURvey (MESUR) Mission. That decade-long program will deploy a global network of small stations on the Martian surface for monitoring meteorological and geological processes. Low mass, low power, durability, large dynamic range and calibration stability are the principal challenges for this application. Our progress on each of these sensor types is presented.

  9. In-situ measurements of velocity structure within turbidity currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, J. P.; Noble, M.A.; Rosenfeld, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Turbidity currents are thought to be the main mechanism to move ???500,000 m3 of sediments annually from the head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon to the deep-sea fan. Indirect evidence has shown frequent occurrences of such turbidity currents in the canyon, but the dynamic properties of the turbidity currents such as maximum speed, duration, and dimensions are still unknown. Here we present the first-ever in-situ measurements of velocity profiles of four turbidity currents whose maximum along-canyon velocity reached 190 cm/s. Two turbidity currents coincided with storms that produced the highest swells and the biggest stream flows during the year-long deployment. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Fault and anthropogenic processes in central California constrained by satellite and airborne InSAR and in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Lundgren, Paul

    2016-07-01

    , but are subject to severe decorrelation. The L-band ALOS and UAVSAR SAR sensors provide improved coherence compared to the shorter wavelength radar data. Joint analysis of UAVSAR and ALOS interferometry measurements show clear variability in deformation along the fault strike, suggesting variable fault creep and locking at depth and along strike. Modeling selected fault transects reveals a distinct change in surface creep and shallow slip deficit from the central creeping section towards the Parkfield transition. In addition to fault creep, the L-band ALOS, and especially ALOS-2 ScanSAR interferometry, show large-scale ground subsidence in the SJV due to over-exploitation of groundwater. Groundwater related deformation is spatially and temporally variable and is composed of both recoverable elastic and non-recoverable inelastic components. InSAR time series are compared to GPS and well-water hydraulic head in-situ time series to understand water storage processes and mass loading changes. We are currently developing poroelastic finite element method models to assess the influence of anthropogenic processes on surface deformation and fault mechanics. Ongoing work is to better constrain both tectonic and non-tectonic processes and understand their interaction and implication for regional earthquake hazard.

  11. Temperature and wind measurements and model atmospheres of the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. R.; Bui, T. P.; Scott, S. G.; Bowen, S. W.; Dean-Day, J.

    1990-01-01

    The ER-2 Meteorological Measurement System provides accurate in situ measurements of atmospheric state variables. During the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) the ER-2 flew over the polar region on 14 occasions in January and February, 1989. Vertical temperature profiles, during aircraft takeoff at about 60 deg N and during midflight descent and ascent at high latitudes, are presented. Latitudinal variations of the horizontal wind measurement are illustrated and discussed. Based on observation data, model atmospheres at 60 deg and 75 deg N, representative of the environment of the AASE campaign, are developed.

  12. Evaporation Measured In Situ by Sensible Heat Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitman, Josh; Xiao, Xinhua; Sauer, Thomas; Ren, Tusheng; Horton, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Measurement of evaporation independent from evapotranspiration remains a major challenge for quantifying water fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Methodology based on soil sensible heat balance (SHB) has been developed to measure in situ, sub-surface soil water evaporation with heat-pulse sensors. Soil sensible heat flux and change in heat storage are measured at multiple depths near the soil surface, and a simple energy balance calculation is applied to determine latent heat flux (i.e., evaporation) as a residual. For bare surface conditions, comparison of SHB to micrometerological (Bowen ratio) and micro-lysimeter approaches indicates strong correlation (r2 = 0.96) with near 1:1 relationship and root mean square error of 0.2 mm/d. Recent efforts to apply SHB methodology in row-crop (maize) and vineyard systems demonstrate the potential for quantifying evaporation separate from evapotranspiration. For the maize system, SHB evaporation estimates differed from micro-lysimeters by < 0.2 mm/d. The SHB approach is one of very few measurement approaches that may be applied to partition evaporation from evapotranspiration.

  13. In situ measurement of thermal diffusivity in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feseker, Tomas; Treude, Tina; Krastel, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    The temperature of marine sediments depends on the interplay between heat flow from below and bottom water temperature above. The heat flow is controlled by the regional geological history and stable over long periods of time, whereas the bottom water temperature is subject to both seasonal and long-term climatic changes. The thermal inertia of the sediment determines how rapidly and to what depth temperature changes propagate from the bottom water into the seabed. The influence of seasonal changes is usually limited to shallow depths, while long-term trends may also affect deeper sediment layers. The thermal diffusivity of sediment is its ability to conduct thermal energy relative to its ability to store thermal energy. It is a measure of thermal inertia. While the thermal conductivity can be measured using regular heat flow probes, it is difficult to measure the diffusivity in situ. Hence, empirical relationships that link conductivity to diffusivity are widely used to characterize the thermal inertia of sediments. Here, we present a new method for measuring the thermal diffusivity of marine sediments in situ, which is based on monitoring the changes in sediment temperature profiles over short periods of time. We report on a successful measurement from 400 m water depth on the western Svalbard margin, where we deployed a temperature probe by submersible. The "T-Stick" consists of a lance with 8 temperature sensors distributed equally over a length of 0.6 m and a data logger, which is attached to the upper part of the lance. Temperature profiles were recorded at a sampling interval of 10 seconds for a period of 10 days. The observations show that variations in the temperature profile were driven by changes in bottom water temperature. Inverse modeling of the recorded temperature profiles allowed us to determine the thermal diffusivity of the sediment. The new method will help to better characterize the heat exchange across the sediment-water interface and

  14. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aikin, Arthur C.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal ions found in the atmosphere above 60 km are the result of incoming meteoroid atmospheric ablation. Layers of metal ions are detected by sounding rocket in situ mass spectrometric sampling in the 80 to 130 km region, which coincides with the altitude region where meteors are observed. Enhancements of metal ion concentrations occur during meteor showers. Even outside of shower periods, the metal ion altitude profiles vary from measurement to measurement. Double layers are frequent at middle latitudes. More than 40 different meteoric atomic and molecular ions, including isotopes, have been detected. Atmospheric metal ions on average have an abundance that matches chrondritic material, the same composition as the early solar system. However there are frequently local departures from this composition due to differential ablation, species dependent chemistry and mass dependent ion transport. Metal ions react with atmospheric O2, O, O3, H2O and H2O2 to form oxygenated and hydrogenated ionic compounds. Metal atomic ions at high altitudes have long lifetimes. As a result, these ions, in the presence of Earth's magnetic field, are transported over long distances by upper atmospheric winds and ionospheric electric fields. Satellite measurements have detected metal ions as high as, approximately 1000 km and have revealed circulation of the ions on a global scale.

  15. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  16. Utilization of Airborne and in Situ Data Obtained in SGP99, SMEX02, CLASIC and SMAPVEX08 Field Campaigns for SMAP Soil Moisture Algorithm Development and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, Andreas; Chan, Steven; Yueh, Simon; Cosh, Michael; Bindlish, Rajat; Jackson, Tom; Njoku, Eni

    2010-01-01

    Field experiment data sets that include coincident remote sensing measurements and in situ sampling will be valuable in the development and validation of the soil moisture algorithms of the NASA's future SMAP (Soil Moisture Active and Passive) mission. This paper presents an overview of the field experiment data collected from SGP99, SMEX02, CLASIC and SMAPVEX08 campaigns. Common in these campaigns were observations of the airborne PALS (Passive and Active L- and S-band) instrument, which was developed to acquire radar and radiometer measurements at low frequencies. The combined set of the PALS measurements and ground truth obtained from all these campaigns was under study. The investigation shows that the data set contains a range of soil moisture values collected under a limited number of conditions. The quality of both PALS and ground truth data meets the needs of the SMAP algorithm development and validation. The data set has already made significant impact on the science behind SMAP mission. The areas where complementing of the data would be most beneficial are also discussed.

  17. Microphysical and optical properties of precipitating drizzle and ice particles obtained from alternated lidar and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayet, J.-F.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Jourdan, O.; Shcherbakov, V.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Neuber, R.

    2007-07-01

    During the international ASTAR experiment (Arctic Study of Aerosols, Clouds and Radiation) carried out from Longyearbyen (Spitsbergen) from 10 May to 11 June 2004, the AWI (Alfred Wegener Institute) Polar 2 aircraft was equipped with a unique combination of remote and in situ instruments. The airborne AMALi lidar provided downward backscatter and Depolarisation ratio profiles at 532 nm wavelength. The in situ instrumental setup comprised a Polar Nephelometer, a Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) as well as a Nevzorov and standard PMS probes to measure cloud particle properties in terms of scattering characteristics, particle morphology and size, and in-cloud partitioning of ice/water content. The objective of the paper is to present the results of a case study related to observations with ice crystals precipitating down to supercooled boundary-layer stratocumulus. The flight pattern was predefined in a way that firstly the AMALi lidar probed the cloud tops to guide the in situ measurements into a particular cloud formation. Three kinds of clouds with different microphysical and optical properties have therefore been quasi-simultaneously observed: (i) water droplets stratiform-layer, (ii) drizzle-drops fallstreak and (iii) precipitating ice-crystals from a cirrus cloud above. The signatures of these clouds are clearly evidenced from the in situ measurements and from the lidar profiles in term of backscatter and Depolarisation ratio. Accordingly, typical lidar ratios, i.e., extinction-to-backscatter ratios, are derived from the measured scattering phase function combined with subsequent particle shapes and size distributions. The backscatter profiles can therefore be retrieved under favourable conditions of low optical density. From these profiles extinction values in different cloud types can be obtained and compared with the direct in situ measurements.

  18. Comparison of vertical aerosol extinction coefficients from in-situ and LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Herrmann, E.; Bucci, S.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Gysel, M.; Tillmann, R.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Di Liberto, L.; Di Donfrancesco, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weingartner, E.; Virtanen, A.; Mentel, T. F.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ~ 50-800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a LIDAR system provided aerosol extinction coefficients for a vertically resolved comparison between in-situ and remote sensing results. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20% was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 to 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ~ 10 local time) before the mixed layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ~ 12 local time) the ML was fully developed, resulting in constant extinction coefficients at all altitudes measured on the Zeppelin NT. LIDAR results captured these dynamic features well and good agreement was found for the extinction coefficients compared to the in-situ results, using fixed LIDAR ratios (LR) between 30 and 70 sr for the altitudes probed with the Zeppelin. These LR are

  19. Hybrid-type temperature sensor for in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Tohru; Hiraka, Kensuke

    2006-11-15

    A hybrid-type surface temperature sensor combines the contact and noncontact methods, which allows us to overcome the shortcomings of both methods. The hybrid-type surface thermometer is composed mainly of two components: a metal film sheet that makes contact with an object and a radiometer that is used to detect the radiance of the rear surface of the metal film, which is actually a modified radiation thermometer. Temperature measurement using the hybrid-type thermometer with a several tens micrometer thick Hastelloy sheet, a highly heat and corrosion resistant alloy, is possible with a systematic error of -0.5 K and random errors of {+-}0.5 K, in the temperature range from 900 to 1000 K. This thermometer provides a useful means for calibration of in situ temperature measurement in various processes, especially in the silicon semiconductor industry. This article introduces the basic idea of the hybrid-type surface sensor, presents experimental results and discussions, and finally describes some applications.

  20. Scattering error corrections for in situ absorption and attenuation measurements.

    PubMed

    McKee, David; Piskozub, Jacek; Brown, Ian

    2008-11-24

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to establish a weighting function that describes the collection of angular scattering for the WETLabs AC-9 reflecting tube absorption meter. The equivalent weighting function for the AC-9 attenuation sensor is found to be well approximated by a binary step function with photons scattered between zero and the collection half-width angle contributing to the scattering error and photons scattered at larger angles making zero contribution. A new scattering error correction procedure is developed that accounts for scattering collection artifacts in both absorption and attenuation measurements. The new correction method does not assume zero absorption in the near infrared (NIR), does not assume a wavelength independent scattering phase function, but does require simultaneous measurements of spectrally matched particulate backscattering. The new method is based on an iterative approach that assumes that the scattering phase function can be adequately modeled from estimates of particulate backscattering ratio and Fournier-Forand phase functions. It is applied to sets of in situ data representative of clear ocean water, moderately turbid coastal water and highly turbid coastal water. Initial results suggest significantly higher levels of attenuation and absorption than those obtained using previously published scattering error correction procedures. Scattering signals from each correction procedure have similar magnitudes but significant differences in spectral distribution are observed.

  1. Investigation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds by combining airborne remote sensing and in situ observations during VERDI, RACEPAC and ACLOUD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, André; Bierwirth, Eike; Borrmann, Stephan; Crewell, Susanne; Herber, Andreas; Hoor, Peter; Jourdan, Olivier; Krämer, Martina; Lüpkes, Christof; Mertes, Stephan; Neuber, Roland; Petzold, Andreas; Schnaiter, Martin; Schneider, Johannes; Weigel, Ralf; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Wendisch, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    To improve our understanding of Arctic mixed-phase clouds a series of airborne research campaigns has been initiated by a collaboration of German research institutes. Clouds in areas dominated by a close sea-ice cover were observed during the research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) and the Radiation-Aerosol-Cloud Experiment in the Arctic Circle (RACEPAC, April/May 2014) which both were based in Inuvik, Canada. The aircraft (Polar 5 & 6, Basler BT-67) operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Germany did cover a wide area above the Canadian Beaufort with in total 149 flight hours (62h during VERDI, 87h during RACEPAC). For May/June 2017 a third campaign ACLOUD (Arctic Clouds - Characterization of Ice, aerosol Particles and Energy fluxes) with base in Svalbard is planned within the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre TR 172 ArctiC Amplification: Climate Relevant Atmospheric and SurfaCe Processes, and Feedback Mechanisms (AC)3 to investigate Arctic clouds in the transition zone between open ocean and sea ice. The aim of all campaigns is to combine remote sensing and in-situ cloud, aerosol and trace gas measurements to investigate interactions between radiation, cloud and aerosol particles. While during VERDI remote sensing and in-situ measurements were performed by one aircraft subsequently, for RACEPAC and ACLOUD two identical aircraft are coordinated at different altitudes to horizontally collocate both remote sensing and in-situ measurements. The campaign showed that in this way radiative and microphysical processes in the clouds can by studied more reliably and remote sensing methods can be validated efficiently. Here we will illustrate the scientific strategy of the projects including the progress in instrumentation. Differences in the general synoptic and sea ice situation and related changes in cloud properties at the different locations and seasons will be

  2. In situ flume measurements of resuspension in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. E. L.; Couceiro, F.; Fones, G. R.; Helsby, R.; Amos, C. L.; Black, K.; Parker, E. R.; Greenwood, N.; Statham, P. J.; Kelly-Gerreyn, B. A.

    2011-07-01

    The in situ annular flume, Voyager II, was deployed at three sites in the North Sea in order to investigate resuspension events, to determine the physical characteristics of the seabed, to determine the threshold of resuspension of the bed and to quantify erosion rates and erosion depths. These are the first controlled, in situ flume experiments to study resuspension in the North Sea, and were combined with long-term measurements of waves and currents. Resuspension experiments were undertaken at two muddy, and one sandy site: north of the Dogger Bank (DG: water depths ˜80 m, very fine, poorly sorted, very fine-skewed sediment experiencing seasonal thermal stratification of the water column along with oxygen depletion); the Oyster Grounds (OG: ˜40 m, similar bed properties, year round water column thermal stratification, Atlantic forcing); and in the Sean Gas Field (SGF: ˜20 m, moderately sorted, very coarse-skewed sand, and well mixed water column). The erosion thresholds of the bed were found to be 0.66-1.04 Pa (DG) and 0.91-1.27 Pa (OG), with corresponding erosion depths of 0.1-0.15 mm and 0.02-0.06 mm throughout the experiments. Evaluation of a year of current velocities from 2007 indicated that at OG, resuspension of the consolidated bed was limited to on average ˜8% of the time as a result of tidal forcing alone for short (<30 min) durations, but would potentially increase during the winter as a result of wave influences. At DG, under similar conditions this would increase to 13%, and in the SGF, wave-induced resuspension events occurred throughout the year, with the potential exceedance of the threshold for suspension greater than 50% in January and March. Resuspension of bed material and erosion rates were closely related to applied bed shear stresses, and eroded depths were significantly correlated with the physical properties of the bed. Therefore, while complex variations in biogeophysical factors affected the critical threshold of erosion, once

  3. Aerodynamic influences on atmospheric in situ measurements from sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbel, Jörg

    2001-06-01

    Sounding rockets are essential tools for studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. However, in situ measurements from rockets are potentially subject to a number of perturbations related to the gas flow around the vehicle. This paper reviews the aerodynamic principles behind these perturbations. With respect to both data analysis and experiment design, there is a substantial need for improved understanding of aerodynamic effects. Any such analysis is complicated by the different flow regimes experienced during a rocket flight through the rarefied environment of the mesosphere and thermosphere. Numerical studies are presented using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach, which is based on a tracing of individual molecules. Complementary experiments have been performed in a low-density wind tunnel. These experiments are crucial for the development of appropriate model parameterization. However, direct similarity between scaled wind tunnel results and arbitrary atmospheric flight conditions is usually difficult to achieve. Density, velocity, and temperature results are presented for different payload geometries and flow conditions. These illustrate a wide range of aerodynamic effects representative for rocket flights in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  4. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  5. Measurements of in situ chemical ozone (oxidant) production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Faloon, Kate; Najera, Juan; Bloss, William

    2013-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a major air pollutant, harmful to human health, agricultural crops and vegetation, the main precursor to the atmospheric oxidants which initiate the degradation of most reactive gases emitted to the atmosphere, and an important greenhouse gas in its own right. The capacity to understand and predict tropospheric ozone levels is a key goal for atmospheric science - but one which is challenging, as ozone is formed in the atmosphere from the complex oxidation of VOCs in the presence of NOx and sunlight, on a timescale such that in situ chemical processes, deposition and transport all affect ozone levels. Known uncertainties in emissions, chemistry, dynamics and deposition affect the accuracy of predictions of current and future ozone levels, and hinder development of optimal air quality policies to mitigate against ozone exposure. Recently new approaches to directly measure the local chemical ozone production rate, bypassing the many uncertainties in emissions and chemical schemes, have been developed (Cazorla & Brune, AMT 2010). Here, we describe the development of an analogous Ozone Production Rate (OPR) approach: Air is sampled into parallel reactors, within which ozone formation either occurs as in the ambient atmosphere, or is suppressed. Comparisons of ozone levels exiting a pair of such reactors determines the net chemical oxidant production rate, after correction for perturbation of the NOx-O3 photochemical steady state, and when operated under conditions such that wall effects are minimised. We report preliminary measurements of local chemical ozone production made during the UK NERC ClearfLo (Clean Air for London) campaign at an urban background location in London in January and July 2012. The OPR system was used to measure the local chemical oxidant formation rate, which is compared with observed trends in O3 and NOx and the prevailing meteorology, and with the predictions of a detailed zero-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model

  6. Measurement of airborne mite allergen exposure in individual subjects.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Sasaki, R; Hashimoto, M; Kobayashi, C; Yasueda, H

    1996-05-01

    To evaluate the extent of personal exposure to airborne mite allergens, subjects were asked to carry a personal air sampler when in their houses. The level of Der 1 allergen trapped by the sampler was measured with a highly sensitive immunoassay. There were great variations in airborne Der 1 exposure in each subject. When used bedding was replaced with new allergen-free bedding, we detected a decrease in the allergen level. The use of new bedding seems to be an effective measure for reducing airborne mite allergen exposure.

  7. In situ correlative measurements for the ultraviolet differential absorption lidar and the high spectral resolution lidar air quality remote sensors: 1980 PEPE/NEROS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Beck, S. M.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In situ correlative measurements were obtained with a NASA aircraft in support of two NASA airborne remote sensors participating in the Environmental Protection Agency's 1980persistent elevated pollution episode (PEPE) and Northeast regional oxidant study (NEROS) field program in order to provide data for evaluating the capability of two remote sensors for measuring mixing layer height, and ozone and aerosol concentrations in the troposphere during the 1980 PEPE/NEROS program. The in situ aircraft was instrumented to measure temperature, dewpoint temperature, ozone concentrations, and light scattering coefficient. In situ measurements for ten correlative missions are given and discussed. Each data set is presented in graphical and tabular format aircraft flight plans are included.

  8. Exploratory Meeting on Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, G. H. (Editor); Kaufman, J. W. (Editor); Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific interests and applications of the Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement System to severe storms and local weather are discussed. The main areas include convective phenomena, local circulation, atmospheric boundary layer, atmospheric dispersion, and industrial aerodynamics.

  9. Integration of satellite data and in situ measurements to improve coastal water quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, Teodosio

    2015-04-01

    Coastal areas are "sensitive" zones exposed to different natural hazards and anthropic risks. The increasing level of urbanization, the even more irrational exploitation of those areas and, more generally, climate changes are some of the most relevant phenomena able to strongly change such sites. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement an adequate water quality monitoring system able to give a reliable description of water status for reducing the negative effects which coastal marine waters are exposed to. Remote sensing data offer a relevant contribution in this framework, providing, with a quite good level of accuracy, information about the spatial distribution of sea water constituents over large areas with high temporal rates and at relatively low costs. On the other hand, in situ measurements allow to analyze the history of these elements at a very small scale, both in terms of investigated area and period. The integration of these two kind of information may improve the monitoring in the space-time domain of a specific area, allowing also for a calibration, at local scale, of the satellite data/products. In this paper results achieved in such a context while carrying out two projects on Mediterranean Sea water quality will be described. More than 15 years of MODIS Ocean Colour data have been analyzed and compared with different specific in-situ and airborne data concerning different areas of Mediterranean Sea collected in the framework of the following projects: IOSMOS (IOnian Sea water quality MOnitoring by Satellite data, OP ERDF Basilicata) and MOMEDAS (MOnitoraggio delle acque del mar MEditerraneo mediante DAti Satellitari, OP Basilicata ESF). Specifically, preliminary achievements regarding the analysis of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (Kd 490) products as well as suspended sediment material (SSM) transport phenomena and the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) variations occurring in the analyzed areas will be

  10. In situ measurement of odor compound production by benthic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Min; Hobson, Peter; Burch, Michael D; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2010-03-01

    A simple technique was developed to make in situ measurements of emission rates of two common odorants, 2-MIB and geosmin, and was validated with different natural communities of benthic cyanobacterial mats in Hope Valley Reservoir (HVR), South Australia, and Kin-Men Water Treatment Plant (TLR-WTP), Taiwan. A pair of parallel columns was used to differentiate between emission and loss rates caused by biodegradation, volatilization, and other mechanisms. Experimental results indicated that the loss rates followed a first-order relationship for all cases tested, with biodegradation and volatilization being the key mechanisms. The loss rates were comparable to those reported in the literature for biodegradation and those calculated from two-film theory for volatilization. After accounting for the loss rates, the net emission of geosmin and 2-MIB was estimated from experimental data. Odorant emission rates on the basis of column surface area, cyanobacterial cell number, and chlorophyll a (chl-a) were 4.2-4.4 ng h(-1) cm(-2), 1.0-5.5 x 10(-6) ng h(-1) cell(-1), and 3.2-3.5 ng h(-1)microg-chl(-1), respectively for 2-MIB released from benthic mats in TLR-WTP, and, 18-190 ng h(-1) cm(-2), 0.053-1.8 x 10(-3) ng h(-1) cell(-1), and 48-435 ng h(-1)microg-chl(-1) respectively for geosmin from benthic mats in HVR. The method developed provides a simple means to estimate the emission rates of odorants and possibly other algal metabolites from benthic cyanobacterial mats.

  11. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  12. Airborne 2-micron double-pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar for column CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 mJ and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 µs and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-µm direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-μm IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  13. Huygens Probe In-Situ Measurements : An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    The global Titan perspective afforded by ongoing Cassini observations, and prospects for future in-situ exploration, have prompted a re-examination of Huygens data, yielding a number of recent new results. Gravity waves have been detected (Lorenz, Ferri and Young, Icarus, 2014) in the HASI descent temperature data, with ~2K amplitude. These waves are seen above about 60km, and analysis suggests they may therefore be controlled by interaction of upward-propagating waves with the zonal wind field. A curious cessation of detection of sound pulses by a Surface Science Package ultrasound instrument about 15 minutes after the probe landed appears to be best explained (Lorenz et al., Planetary and Space Science, 2014) by an accumulation of polyatomic vapors such as ethane, sweated out of the ground by the warm probe. Such gases have high acoustic attenuation, and were independently measured by the probe GCMS. The Huygens probe carried two radar altimeters. While their principal function was merely to trigger observation sequences at specific altitudes on the science instruments, the surface range history, and the Automatic Gain Control (AGC) housekeeping data, provide some useful information on Titan's surface (Lorenz et al., submitted). Small-scale topographic variations, and the surface radar reflectivity characteristics implied by the AGC variation with height, are discussed. A new integrated timeline product, which arranges second-by-second measurements from several Huygens sensors on a convenient, common tabulation, has been recently archived on the PDS Atmospheres node. Finally, a troubling discrepancy exists between radio occultation and infrared soundings from Cassini, and Huygens methane and temperature measurements in the lower stratosphere. The interdependence of these parameters will be discussed. In particular the possible role of the assumed probe mass history (depending on the unmeasured ablation from the heat shield) and the assumed zonal wind profile on

  14. Cooperative Mobile Sensing Systems for In Situ Measurements in Hazardous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argrow, B.

    2005-12-01

    Sondes are typically deployed from manned aircraft or taken to altitude by a balloon before they are dropped. There are obvious safety and physical limitations that dictate where and how sondes are deployed. These limitations have severely constrained sonde deployment into highly dynamic and dangerous environments. Additionally, conventional parachute dropsondes provide no means for active control. The "smartsonde" idea is to integrate miniature sonde packages into micro air vehicles (MAVs). These MAVs will be ferried into the hard to reach and hazardous environments to provide in situ measurements in regions that have been heretofore out of reach. Once deployed, the MAV will provide some means of control of the sonde, to enable it to remain aloft and to provide some measure of directional control. Preliminary smartsonde communications experiments have been completed. These experiments focused on characterizing the capabilities of the 802.11.4 wireless protocol. Range measurements with 60-mW, 2.4-GHz radios showed 100% throughput rate over 2.7 km during air to ground tests. The experiments also demonstrated the integration of an in-house distributed computing system that provides the interface between the sensors, UAV flight computers, and the telemetry system. The University of Colorado's Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles (RECUV) is developing an engineering system that integrates small mobile sensor attributes into flexible mobile sensor infrastructures to be deployed for in situ sensing in hazardous environments. There are three focus applications: 1) Wildfire, to address sensing, communications, situational awareness, and safety needs to support fire-fighting operations and to increase capabilities for dynamic data acquisition for modeling and prediction; 2) Polar, where heterogeneous mixes of platforms and sensors will provide in-situ data acquisition from beneath the ocean surface into the troposphere; 3) Storm, to address the challenges

  15. The international soil moisture network: A data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land co...

  16. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under

  17. Combining in situ and Remote Measurements with Models: Picking the Right Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Hains, J. C.; Burrows, J. P.

    2004-05-01

    Visibility reduction, photochemical smog, and the global climate changes these pollutants engender involve complex interactions of emissions, atmospheric transformations, and transport. In situ measurements, numerical simulations, and remotely sensed data all have strengths and weaknesses, but picking the right combination of tools can avoid the limitations of any one method to advance the science and provide policy-relevant research on the causes and nature of air pollution. The Regional Atmospheric Measurement, Modeling, and Prediction Program (RAMMPP) seeks a balanced approach to air pollution studies in the Mid Atlantic. We employ surface and airborne measurements as input and tests for air quality models of the Baltimore/Washington area. Both ozone and summertime haze tend to form in blobs covering areas hundreds of km on a side and lasting several days. Point and aircraft measurements offer high accuracy, but cannot always characterize the spatial and temporal extent of these masses. To provide the big picture, we are exploring the use of satellite data including GOME and SCIAMACHY for SO2, TOMS for tropospheric O3, and MODIS for aerosol optical depth. Comparison with direct measurements can greatly improve retrievals of atmospheric composition. For example, GOME identified a persistent hot spot in SO2 over eastern North America where many large, coal-fired power plants are located. Aircraft measurements confirmed the presence of this hotspot, but indicated an average column content of 0.65 DU (m atm cm), while the satellite instrument, indicated only 0.14 DU. GOME uses, however, an initial guess for the altitudinal distribution of the SO2, and when the retrieval algorithm is corrected with the observed profile, the result is 0.42 DU. Further improving the retrieval with more representative background values yields a mean SO2 column content of 0.52 DU, within experimental uncertainty of the aircraft value. Ozone and aerosol retrievals can be similarly

  18. Remote sensing and in situ measurements of methane and ammonia emissions from a megacity dairy complex: Chino, CA.

    PubMed

    Leifer, Ira; Melton, Christopher; Tratt, David M; Buckland, Kerry N; Clarisse, Lieven; Coheur, Pierre; Frash, Jason; Gupta, Manish; Johnson, Patrick D; Leen, J Brian; Van Damme, Martin; Whitburn, Simon; Yurganov, Leonid

    2017-02-01

    Methane (CH4) and ammonia (NH3) directly and indirectly affect the atmospheric radiative balance with the latter leading to aerosol generation. Both have important spectral features in the Thermal InfraRed (TIR) that can be studied by remote sensing, with NH3 allowing discrimination of husbandry from other CH4 sources. Airborne hyperspectral imagery was collected for the Chino Dairy Complex in the Los Angeles Basin as well as in situ CH4, carbon dioxide (CO2) and NH3 data. TIR data showed good spatial agreement with in situ measurements and showed significant emissions heterogeneity between dairies. Airborne remote sensing mapped plume transport for ∼20 km downwind, documenting topographic effects on plume advection. Repeated multiple gas in situ measurements showed that emissions were persistent on half-year timescales. Inversion of one dairy plume found annual emissions of 4.1 × 10(5) kg CH4, 2.2 × 10(5) kg NH3, and 2.3 × 10(7) kg CO2, suggesting 2300, 4000, and 2100 head of cattle, respectively, and Chino Dairy Complex emissions of 42 Gg CH4 and 8.4 Gg NH3 implying ∼200k cows, ∼30% more than Peischl et al. (2013) estimated for June 2010. Far-field data showed chemical conversion and/or deposition of Chino NH3 occurs within the confines of the Los Angeles Basin on a four to six h timescale, faster than most published rates, and likely from higher Los Angeles oxidant loads. Satellite observations from 2011 to 2014 confirmed that observed in situ transport patterns were representative and suggests much of the Chino Dairy Complex emissions are driven towards eastern Orange County, with a lesser amount transported to Palm Springs, CA. Given interest in mitigating husbandry health impacts from air pollution emissions, this study highlights how satellite observations can be leveraged to understand exposure and how multiple gas in situ emissions studies can inform on best practices given that emissions reduction of one gas could increase those of

  19. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-15

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  20. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  1. 15 years of upper tropospheric relative humidity in-situ measurements by the MOZAIC programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neis, Patrick; Smit, Herman G. J.; Alteköster, Lukas; Rohs, Susanne; Wahner, Andreas; Spichtinger, Peter; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Water vapour is a major parameter in weather prediction and climate research. However, the interaction between water vapour in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LS) and tropopause dynamics are not well understood. Furthermore, the knowledge about potential trends and feedback mechanisms of upper troposphere/lower stratosphere water vapour is low because of the large variability of observations and relatively short data records. A continuous measurement of upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) is still difficult because the abundance of UTH is highly variable on spatial and temporal scales, which cannot be resolved, neither by the global radiosondes network nor by satellites. Since 1994, UTH data with high spatial and temporal resolution are provided by the in-situ measurements aboard civil passenger aircraft from the MOZAIC/IAGOS-programme (www.iagos.org). The measurement system is based on a capacitive hygrometer with a simultaneous temperature measurement installed in a conventional Rosemount housing. In recent studies the MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer (MCH) and its improved successor IAGOS Capacitive Hygrometer (ICH) are compared against research-grade water vapour instruments during airborne field studies. The qualification of the Capacitive Hygrometer for the use in long-term observation programmes is successfully demonstrated and the continuation of high data quality is confirmed for the transition from MCH to ICH. After the reanalysis of the relative humidity data from 1994 to 2009, this extensive and unique data set is examined by criteria of continuity, homogeneity and quantity of data coverage, to identify global regions suitable for UTH climatology and trend analyses. For the identified target regions time series and climatologies of, e.g., relative humidity with respect to ice, temperature, and absolute humidity are investigated. First results of this study will be presented.

  2. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Saharan Dust Layers Derived from In-Situ Measurements and CALIPSO Overflights During NAMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Ismail, Syed; Powell, Kathleen A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter (Sa) ratios of dust using airborne in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, and CALIPSO observations during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA). The NAMMA field experiment was conducted from Sal, Cape Verde during Aug-Sept 2006. Using CALIPSO measurements of the attenuated backscatter of lofted Saharan dust layers, we apply the transmittance technique to estimate dust Sa ratios at 532 nm and a 2-color method to determine the corresponding 1064 nm Sa. Using this method, we found dust Sa ratios of 39.8 plus or minus 1.4 sr and 51.8 plus or minus 3.6 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Secondly, Sa ratios at both wavelengths is independently calculated using size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 and estimates of Saharan dust complex refractive indices applied in a T-Matrix scheme. We found Sa ratios of 39.1 plus or minus 3.5 sr and 50.0 plus or minus 4 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, using the T-Matrix calculations applied to measured size spectra. Finally, in situ measurements of the total scattering (550 nm) and absorption coefficients (532 nm) are used to generate an extinction profile that is used to constrain the CALIPSO 532 nm extinction profile.

  3. Use of In Situ and Airborne Multiangle Data to Assess MODIS- and Landsat-based Estimates of Surface Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Miguel O.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Shuai, Yanmin; Wang, Zhuosen; Gao, Feng; Masek, Jeff; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of uncertainty of global surface albedo data and products is a critical part of producing complete, physically consistent, and decadal land property data records for studying ecosystem change. A current challenge in validating satellite retrievals of surface albedo is the ability to overcome the spatial scaling errors that can contribute on the order of 20% disagreement between satellite and field-measured values. Here, we present the results from an uncertain ty analysis of MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Landsat albedo retrievals, based on collocated comparisons with tower and airborne multi-angular measurements collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program s (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site during the 2007 Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLAS33 IC 07). Using standard error propagation techniques, airborne measurements obtained by NASA s Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) were used to quantify the uncertainties associated with MODIS and Landsat albedos across a broad range of mixed vegetation and structural types. Initial focus was on evaluating inter-sensor consistency through assessments of temporal stability, as well as examining the overall performance of satellite-derived albedos obtained at all diurnal solar zenith angles. In general, the accuracy of the MODIS and Landsat albedos remained under a 10% margin of error in the SW(0.3 - 5.0 m) domain. However, results reveal a high degree of variability in the RMSE (root mean square error) and bias of albedos in both the visible (0.3 - 0.7 m) and near-infrared (0.3 - 5.0 m) broadband channels; where, in some cases, retrieval uncertainties were found to be in excess of 20%. For the period of CLASIC 07, the primary factors that contributed to uncertainties in the satellite-derived albedo values include: (1) the assumption of temporal stability in the retrieval of 500 m MODIS BRDF values over extended periods of cloud

  4. A case study of observations of volcanic ash from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption: 1. In situ airborne observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Kate; Johnson, Ben; Marenco, Franco; Haywood, Jim; Minikin, Andreas; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Schlager, Hans; Schumann, Ulrich; Leadbetter, Susan; Woolley, Alan

    2012-10-01

    On 17 May 2010, the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft made remote and in situ measurements of the volcanic ash cloud from Eyjafjallajökull over the southern North Sea. The Falcon 20E aircraft operated by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) also sampled the ash cloud on the same day. While no "wingtip-to-wingtip" co-ordination was performed, the proximity of the two aircraft allows worthwhile comparisons. Despite the high degree of inhomogeneity (e.g., column ash loadings varied by a factor of three over ˜100 km) the range of ash mass concentrations and the ratios between volcanic ash mass and concentrations of SO2, O3 and CO were consistent between the two aircraft and within expected instrumental uncertainties. The data show strong correlations between ash mass, SO2concentration and aerosol scattering with the FAAM BAe-146 data providing a specific extinction coefficient of 0.6-0.8 m2 g-1. There were significant differences in the observed ash size distribution with FAAM BAe-146 data showing a peak in the mass at ˜3.5μm (volume-equivalent diameter) and DLR data peaking at ˜10μm. Differences could not be accounted for by refractive index and shape assumptions alone. The aircraft in situ and lidar data suggest peak ash concentrations of 500-800 μg m-3with a factor of two uncertainty. Comparing the location of ash observations with the ash dispersion model output highlights differences that demonstrate the difficulties in forecasting such events and the essential nature of validating models using high quality observational data from platforms such as the FAAM BAe-146 and the DLR Falcon.

  5. Initial results of detected methane emissions from landfills in the Los Angeles Basin during the COMEX campaign by the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument and a greenhouse gas in-situ analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautwurst, Sven; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Kolyer, Richard; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Vigil, Sam; Buchwitz, Michael; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Fladeland, Matthew M.; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2015-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas beside carbon dioxide (CO2). Significant contributors to the global methane budget are fugitive emissions from landfills. Due to the growing world population, it is expected that the amount of waste and, therefore, waste disposal sites will increase in number and size in parts of the world, often adjacent growing megacities. Besides bottom-up modelling, a variety of ground based methods (e.g., flux chambers, trace gases, radial plume mapping, etc.) have been used to estimate (top-down) these fugitive emissions. Because landfills usually are large, sometimes with significant topographic relief, vary temporally, and leak/emit heterogeneously across their surface area, assessing total emission strength by ground-based techniques is often difficult. In this work, we show how airborne based remote sensing measurements of the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CH4 can be utilized to estimate fugitive emissions from landfills in an urban environment by a mass balance approach. Subsequently, these emission rates are compared to airborne in-situ horizontal cross section measurements of CH4 taken within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) upwind and downwind of the landfill at different altitudes immediately after the remote sensing measurements were finished. Additional necessary parameters (e.g., wind direction, wind speed, aerosols, dew point temperature, etc.) for the data inversion are provided by a standard instrumentation suite for atmospheric measurements aboard the aircraft, and nearby ground-based weather stations. These measurements were part of the CO2 and Methane EXperiment (COMEX), which was executed during the summer 2014 in California and was co-funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The remote sensing measurements were taken by the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) developed and operated by the University of Bremen and

  6. Diver-Operated Instruments for In-Situ Measurement of Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    IMPACT/APPLICATION The new instruments are intended to advance the state of the art in diver-operated tools for underwater spectral measurements. They...Diver-Operated Instruments for In-Situ Measurement of Optical Properties Charles Mazel Physical Sciences Inc. 20 New England Business Center Andover...improved diver-operated instrumentation for making reflectance and fluorescence spectral measurements from benthic features in situ. The new instrument

  7. Airborne water vapor DIAL research: System development and field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Chyba, Thomas H.; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurement of water vapor (H2O) and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. The airborne H2O DIAL system was flight tested aboard the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Electra aircraft in three separate field deployments between 1989 and 1991. Atmospheric measurements were made under a variety of atmospheric conditions during the flight tests, and several modifications were implemented during this development period to improve system operation. A brief description of the system and major modifications will be presented, and the most significant atmospheric observations will be described.

  8. Tunable diode laser in-situ CH4 measurements aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft: instrument performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Zahn, A.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Schuck, T. J.

    2014-03-01

    A laser spectrometer for automated monthly measurements of methane (CH4) mixing ratios aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft is presented. The instrument is based on a commercial Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Los Gatos Res.), which was adapted to meet the requirements imposed by unattended airborne operation. It was characterised in the laboratory with respect to instrument stability, precision, cross sensitivity to H2O, and accuracy. For airborne operation, a calibration strategy is described that utilises CH4 measurements obtained from flask samples taken during the same flights. The precision of airborne measurements is 2 ppb for 10 s averages. The accuracy at aircraft cruising altitude is 3.85 ppb. During aircraft ascent and descent, where no flask samples were obtained, instrumental drifts can be less accurately determined and the uncertainty is estimated to be 12.4 ppb. A linear humidity bias correction was applied to the CH4 measurements, which was most important in the lower troposphere. On average, the correction bias was around 6.5 ppb at an altitude of 2 km, and negligible at cruising flight level. Observations from 103 long-distance flights are presented that span a large part of the northern hemispheric upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LMS), with occasional crossing of the tropics on flights to southern Africa. These accurate data mark the largest UT/LMS in-situ CH4 dataset worldwide. An example of a tracer-tracer correlation study with ozone is given, highlighting the possibility for accurate cross-tropopause transport analyses.

  9. Tunable diode laser in-situ CH4 measurements aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft: instrument performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Zahn, A.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Schuck, T. J.

    2013-10-01

    A laser spectrometer for automated monthly measurements of methane (CH4) mixing ratios aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft is presented. The instrument is based on a commercial Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA, Los Gatos Res.), which was adapted to meet the requirements imposed by unattended airborne employment. The modified instrument is described. A laboratory characterization was performed to determine the instrument stability, precision, cross sensitivity to H2O, and accuracy. For airborne operation a calibration strategy is described, that utilizes CH4 measurements obtained from flask samples taken during the same flights. The precision of airborne measurements is 2 ppbv for 10 s averages. The accuracy at aircraft cruising altitude is 3.85 ppbv. During aircraft ascent and descent, where no flask samples were obtained, instrumental drifts can be less accurately considered and the uncertainty is estimated to be 12.4 ppbv. A linear humidity bias correction was applied to the CH4 measurements, which was most important in the lower troposphere. On average, the correction bias was around 6.5 ppbv at an altitude of 2 km, and negligible at cruising flight level. Observations from 103 long-distance flights are presented that span a large part of the northern hemispheric upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LMS), with occasional crossing of the tropics on flights to southern Africa. These accurate data mark the largest UT/LMS in-situ CH4 dataset worldwide. An example of a tracer-tracer correlation study with ozone is given, highlighting the possibility for accurate cross-tropopause transport analyses.

  10. In situ Gas Temperature Measurements by UV-Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, A.; Clausen, S.

    2009-02-01

    The absorption spectrum of the NO A2Σ+ ← X2Πγ-system can be used for in situ evaluation of gas temperature. Experiments were performed with a newly developed atmospheric-pressure high-temperature flow gas cell at highly uniform and stable gas temperatures over a 0.533 m path in the range from 23 °C to 1,500 °C. The gas temperature was evaluated (1) from the analysis of the structure of selected NO high-resolution γ-absorption bands and (2) from the analysis of vibrational distribution in the NO γ-absorption system in the (211-238) nm spectral range. The accuracy of both methods is discussed. Validation of the classical Lambert-Beer law has been demonstrated at NO concentrations up to 500 ppm and gas temperatures up to 1,500 °C over an optical absorption path length of 0.533 m.

  11. Validation of Large-Scale Geophysical Estimates Using In Situ Measurements with Representativeness Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konings, A. G.; Gruber, A.; Mccoll, K. A.; Alemohammad, S. H.; Entekhabi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Validating large-scale estimates of geophysical variables by comparing them to in situ measurements neglects the fact that these in situ measurements are not generally representative of the larger area. That is, in situ measurements contain some `representativeness error'. They also have their own sensor errors. The naïve approach of characterizing the errors of a remote sensing or modeling dataset by comparison to in situ measurements thus leads to error estimates that are spuriously inflated by the representativeness and other errors in the in situ measurements. Nevertheless, this naïve approach is still very common in the literature. In this work, we introduce an alternative estimator of the large-scale dataset error that explicitly takes into account the fact that the in situ measurements have some unknown error. The performance of the two estimators is then compared in the context of soil moisture datasets under different conditions for the true soil moisture climatology and dataset biases. The new estimator is shown to lead to a more accurate characterization of the dataset errors under the most common conditions. If a third dataset is available, the principles of the triple collocation method can be used to determine the errors of both the large-scale estimates and in situ measurements. However, triple collocation requires that the errors in all datasets are uncorrelated with each other and with the truth. We show that even when the assumptions of triple collocation are violated, a triple collocation-based validation approach may still be more accurate than a naïve comparison to in situ measurements that neglects representativeness errors.

  12. Calibrated In Situ Measurement of UT/LS Water Vapor Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A.; Gao, R.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past several decades there has been considerable disagreement among in situ water vapor measurements by different instruments at the low part per million (ppm) mixing ratios found in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). These discrepancies contribute to uncertainty in our understanding of the microphysics related to cirrus cloud particle nucleation and growth and affect our ability to determine the effect of climate changes on the radiatively important feedback from UT/LS water vapor. To address the discrepancies observed in measured UT/LS water vapor, a new chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) instrument has been developed for the fast, precise, and accurate measurement of water vapor at low mixing ratios. The instrument utilizes a radioactive α particle source to ionize a flow of sample air drawn into the instrument. A cascade of ion-molecule reactions results in the production of protonated water ions proportional to the water vapor mixing ratio that are then detected by the mass spectrometer. The multi-step nature of the ionization mechanism results in a non-linear sensitivity to water vapor, necessitating calibration across the full range of values to be measured. To accomplish this calibration, we have developed a novel calibration scheme using catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to produce well-defined water vapor mixing ratios that can be introduced into the instrument inlet during flight. The CIMS instrument was deployed for the first time aboard the NASA WB-57 high altitude research aircraft during the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) mission in March and April 2011. The sensitivity of the instrument to water vapor was calibrated every ~45 minutes in flight from < 1 to 150 ppm. Analysis of in-flight data demonstrates a typical sensitivity of 2000 Hz/ppm at 4.5 ppm with a signal to noise ratio (2 σ) > 50 for a 1 second measurement. The instrument and its calibration system performed successfully in

  13. Linking surface in-situ measurements to columnar aerosol optical properties at Hyytiälä, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Aalto, P.; Aaltonen, V.; Äijälä, M.; Backman, J.; Ehn, M.; Hong, J.; Krejci, R.; Laborde, M.; de Leeuw, G.; Petäjä, T.; Pfüller, A.; Rosati, B.; Tesche, M.; Väänänen, R.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient optical properties of aerosols strongly depend on the particles' hygroscopicity and the relative humidity (RH) of the surrounding air. The key parameter to describe the influence of RH on the particle light scattering is the scattering enhancement factor f(RH), which is defined as the particle light scattering coefficient at defined RH divided by its dry value. Knowledge of this hygroscopicity effect is of crucial importance for climate forcing calculations and is needed for the comparison or validation of remote sensing with in-situ measurements. We will present results of an intensive field campaign carried out in summer 2013 at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Finland, which was part of the EU-FP7 project PEGASOS (Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study). Ground-based and airborne measurements of aerosol optical, chemical and microphysical properties were conducted. The f(RH) measured at ground by a humidified nephelometer was found to be significantly lower (1.53 ± 0.24 at RH=85% and wavelength λ=450 nm) than observed at other European sites (Zieger et al., 2013). One reason is the high organic mass fraction of the boreal aerosol as measured by an aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM). A closure study using Mie theory showed the consistency of the ground based in-situ measurements. Our measurements allowed to determine the ambient particle light extinction coefficient. Together with intensive aircraft measurements (lasting one month) of the particle number size distribution and ambient humidity, different columnar values were determined and compared to direct measurements and inversions of the AERONET Sun photometer (e.g., the columnar aerosol volume size distribution). The aerosol optical depth strongly correlated (R2≈0.9 for λ=440 nm to R2≈0.6 for λ=1020 nm) with the in situ derived values, but was significantly lower compared to the direct measurements of the Sun photometer (slope ≈0.5). This was explained by the loss of

  14. Airborne backscatter lidar measurements at three wavelengths during ELITE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, H. G.; Wirth, Martin; Moerl, P.; Renger, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    The German Aerospace Establishment (DLR) operates an airborne backscatter lidar based on a Nh:YAG laser which is flashlamp-pumped at 10 Hz. It works on the wavelengths 1064, 532, and 354 nm. It is mounted downward-looking on the research aircraft Falcon 20, flying at about 12 km altitude at speeds of 200 m/s. We present airborne measurements correlated with the orbit tracks of the shuttle-borne LITE-instrument (lidar in-space technology experiment). The emphasis in data evalution is on the comparison between the airborne and the shuttle- borne lidars. First results show excellent agreement between the two instruments even on details of cirrus clouds. The results comprise cloud geometrical and optical depths, as well as profiles of aerosol backscattering coefficients at three wavelengths.

  15. Airborne measurements of gases and particles from an Alaskan wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nance, J. D.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Radke, Lawrence F.; Ward, Darold E.

    1993-08-01

    Airborne measurements of several gaseous and particulate chemical species were obtained in the emissions from a wildfire that burned in an old black spruce forest in Alaska during the summer of 1990. The relative proportions of most of the measured plume constituents are consistent with ground-based and airborne measurements in the plumes of several other biomass fires, and with laboratory measurements. Possible exceptions include the mean fine-particle emission factor, which was about 3 times larger than predicted from a regression relation based on measurements of the smoke from several prescribed biomass fires, and the mean CH4/CO molar emission ratio which was at the low end of a range of values measured for other biomass fires. Measurements of water-soluble particulate ions in the smoke plume from the Alaskan wildfire indicate that acids formed from the oxides of sulphur and nitrogen were partially neutralized inside cloud droplets by NH3 absorbed from the plume.

  16. ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements

    DOE Data Explorer

    Biraud, Sebastien

    2013-03-26

    The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

  17. Downwelling Solar Irradiance as a Critical Parameter for In-Situ Measurements in the MERMAID Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Kathryn; Huot, Jean-Paul; Moore, Gerald; Mazeran, Constant; Lerebourg, Christophe; Zagolski, Francis

    2010-12-01

    The MERIS MAtchup In-situ Database (MERMAID) provides an essential tool for MERIS calibration and validation activities of ESA's Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS). MERMAID comprises in-situ ρw from several measurement approaches, from fixed buoys and towers to floating instrumentation rigs. Analysis of the provided measurement protocols and the matchup data (in-situ and MERIS) has identified that sensor tilt seriously affects measurements of surface irradiance, and has consequent impacts on the accuracy of water reflectance, ρw, and matchup results. Activities intrinsic to the third MERIS reprocessing, such as the development of the vicarious adjustment gains computation, depend intrinsically on the MERMAID matchups and as such it is essential to ensure the quality of in-situ irradiance data. Results indicated the need to include in MERMAID 'homogenised' versions of datasets (consistent with MERIS assumptions), and stressed the need to investigate further the potential for tilt correction of Es.

  18. Fast in-situ measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO) and nitrous acid (HONO) in northern Chinese plane during CAREBEIJING - NCP2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K. E.; Dube, W. P.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Langford, A. O.; Brown, S. S.; Broch, S.; Fuchs, H.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Hu, M.; Huey, L. G.; Kubik, K.; Li, X.; Liu, X.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Shao, M.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Tan, Z.; Zhu, T.; Wahner, A.; Wang, B.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern China Plain has experienced visibility degradation and detrimental health impacts due to aerosol and photochemical pollution. To examine these air quality issues, CAREBEIJING-NCP2014 (Care Beijing - Northern China Plain 2014) was held in WangDu, Hebei province, China from 6 June to 15 July 2014. We deployed our newly developed instrument, ACES (Airborne Cavity Enhanced Spectrometer), for high time resolution in-situ measurement of glyoxal (CHOCHO), nitrous acid (HONO) and other trace gases (NO2, H2O) to investigate mechanisms of oxidation processes and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. The in situ measurements of CHOCHO provide observational constraints on secondary organic aerosol formation and oxidation processes, since this molecule has been proposed to play a crucial role in forming aerosol due to its high water solubility, isomerization, and abundant production from the oxidation of many different volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A box model analysis incorporating secondary glyoxal sources from VOC oxidation and sinks to OH reaction, photolysis and heterogeneous uptake will be used to determine a budget and potential for SOA formation. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21190052), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDB05010500) and the U.S. National Science Foundation Atmospheric (AGS-1405805).

  19. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  20. Airborne lidar measurements of ozone during the 1989 airborne Arctic stratospheric expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Fenn, Marta A.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) was conducted during the winter to study the conditions leading to possible ozone (O3) destruction in the wintertime Arctic stratosphere. As part of this experiment, the NASA-Langley airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system was configured for operation on the NASA-Ames DS-8 aircraft to make measurements of O3 profiles from about 1 km above the aircraft to altitudes of 22 to 26 km. The airborne DIAL system remotely sensed O3 above the DC-8 by transmitting two laser beams at 10 Hz using wavelengths of 301.5 and 311 nm. Large scale distributions of O3 were obtained on 15 long range flights into the polar vortex during the AASE. Selected data samples are presented of O3 observed during these flights, general trends observed in O3 distributions, and correlations between these measurements and meteorological and chemical parameters. The O3 distribution observed on the first flight of the DC-8 into the polar vortex on Jan. 6 reflected the result of diabatic cooling of the air inside the vortex during the winter compared to the warmer air outside the vortex. On a potential temperature surface, the O3 mixing ratio generally increases when going from outside to inside the vortex.

  1. Mesures spectroscopiques de constituants et de polluants atmosphériques par techniques in situ et à distance, au sol ou embarquéesSpectroscopic measurements of atmospheric constituents and pollutants by in situ and remote techniques from the ground and in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camy-Peyret, Claude; Payan, Sébastien; Jeseck, Pascal; Té, Yao

    2001-09-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful tool for precise measurements of atmospheric trace species concentrations through the use of characteristic spectral signatures of the different molecular species and their associated vibration-rotation bands in the mid- or near-infrared. Different methods based on quantitative spectroscopy permit tropospheric or stratospheric measurements: in situ long path absorption, atmospheric absorption/emission by Fourier transform spectroscopy with high spectral resolution instruments on the ground, airborne, balloon-borne or satellite-borne.

  2. In situ analysis of measurements of auroral dynamics and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella, Meghan R.

    Two auroral sounding rocket case studies, one in the dayside and one in the nightside, explore aspects of poleward boundary aurora. The nightside sounding rocket, Cascades-2 was launched on 20 March 2009 at 11:04:00 UT from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska, and flew across a series of poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs). Each of the crossings have fundamentally different in situ electron energy and pitch angle structure, and different ground optics images of visible aurora. The different particle distributions show signatures of both a quasistatic acceleration mechanism and an Alfvenic acceleration mechanism, as well as combinations of both. The Cascades-2 experiment is the first sounding rocket observation of a PBI sequence, enabling a detailed investigation of the electron signatures and optical aurora associated with various stages of a PBI sequence as it evolves from an Alfvenic to a more quasistatic structure. The dayside sounding rocket, Scifer-2 was launched on 18 January 2008 at 7:30 UT from the Andoya Rocket Range in Andenes, Norway. It flew northward through the cleft region during a Poleward Moving Auroral Form (PMAF) event. Both the dayside and nightside flights observe dispersed, precipitating ions, each of a different nature. The dispersion signatures are dependent on, among other things, the MLT sector, altitude, source region, and precipitation mechanism. It is found that small changes in the shape of the dispersion have a large influence on whether the precipitation was localized or extended over a range of altitudes. It is also found that a single Maxwellian source will not replicate the data, but rather, a sum of Maxwellians of different temperature, similar to a Kappa distribution, most closely reproduces the data. The various particle signatures are used to argue that both events have similar magnetospheric drivers, that is, Bursty Bulk Flows in the magnetotail.

  3. LAI estimation in a Mediterranean grassland by in situ radiometric measurements and MODIS satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzarolo, M.; Arriga, N.; Papale, D.

    2009-04-01

    Leaf Area Index (LAI) is one of a key variables in studying and understanding biogeochemical cycle mechanisms and ecosystem functionalities and, then, one of a main inputs for ecological modeling. Leaf area surface is related to the main interactions between leaves and the atmosphere as water interception, radiation extinction, energy, mass and gas exchange. Therefore LAI reduction, consequently the loss of productivity, is expression of any physiological and biochemical change of plant status due for example to summer water stress in Mediterranean areas. A good knowledge of seasonal trend and spatial variability of LAI can helps not only modelers but also local farmer to manage grasslands in a sustainable way (grazing, harvesting). In situ LAI measurements are often limited to relatively small areas whit a small number of samplings that can be sporadic, destructive and time-consuming. Nowadays an interesting alternative to estimate LAI is provided by a large variety of radiometric sensors (ground, airborne and satellite based) whit several spatial, temporal and spectral resolutions. However, few studies shown the effect of different radiometers set-up on VIs-LAI relationships that are also differently sensible to different ranges of LAI, management and to which method is used for LAI measurements. In this work, we analyzed the relations between several spectral vegetation indexes (VIs) and LAI for the Mediterranean grassland of Amplero, in the Abruzzo Region, Italy. In situ measurements were carried out in 2005 and 2006. Contemporaneously to destructive LAI measurements, radiometric measurements over the grass herbage were made by two different radiometric sensors: by hyperspectral Hand Held ASD spettroradiometer (HYS) field samplings and by broad band measurements (BNR) of incoming and outgoing global (shortwave) solar radiation components and of incident and reflected photosintetically active radiation (PAR). In addition we included in this analysis VIs

  4. Ground and Airborne Methane Measurements with an Optical Parametric Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    We report on ground and airborne atmospheric methane measurements with a differential absorption lidar using an optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Methane is a strong greenhouse gas on Earth and its accurate global mapping is urgently needed to understand climate change. We are developing a nanosecond-pulsed OPA for remote measurements of methane from an Earth-orbiting satellite. We have successfully demonstrated the detection of methane on the ground and from an airplane at approximately 11-km altitude.

  5. Testing of a Two-Micron Double-Pulse IPDA Lidar Instrument for Airborne Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Singh, U. N.

    2015-12-01

    Utilizing a tunable two-micron double-pulse laser transmitter, an airborne IPDA lidar system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for atmospheric carbon dioxide column measurements. The instrument comprises a receiver with 0.4 m telescope and InGaAs pin detectors coupled to 12-bit, 200 MS/s waveform digitizers. For on-site ground testing, the 2-μm CO2 IPDA lidar was installed inside a trailer located where meteorological data and CO2 mixing ratio profiles were obtained from CAPABLE and LiCoR in-suite sampling, respectively. IPDA horizontal ground testing with 860 m target distance indicated CO2 sensitivity of 2.24 ppm with -0.43 ppm offset, while operating at 3 GHz on-line position from the R30 line center. Then, the IPDA lidar was integrated inside the NASA B-200 aircraft, with supporting instrumentation, for airborne testing and validation. Supporting instruments included in-situ LiCoR sensor, GPS and video recorder for target identification. Besides, aircraft built-in sensors provided altitude, pressure, temperature and relative humidity sampling during flights. The 2-mm CO2 IPDA lidar airborne testing was conducted through ten daytime flights (27 hours flight time). Airborne testing included different operating and environmental conditions for flight altitude up to 7 km, different ground target conditions such as vegetation, soil, ocean, snow and sand and different cloud conditions. Some flights targeted power plant incinerators for investigating IPDA sensitivity to CO2 plums. Relying on independent CO2 in-situ sampling, conducted through NOAA, airborne IPDA CO2 sensitivity of 4.15 ppm with 1.14 ppm offset were observed at 6 km altitude and 4 GHz on-line offset frequency. This validates the 2-μm double-pulse IPDA lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurement.

  6. Airborne instruments to measure atmospheric aerosol particles, clouds and radiation: A cook's tour of mature and emerging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Brenguier, J. L.; Bucholtz, A.; Coe, H.; DeMott, P.; Garrett, T. J.; Gayet, J. F.; Hermann, M.; Heymsfield, A.; Korolev, A.; Krämer, M.; Petzold, A.; Strapp, W.; Pilewskie, P.; Taylor, J.; Twohy, C.; Wendisch, M.; Bachalo, W.; Chuang, P.

    2011-10-01

    An overview is presented of airborne systems for in situ measurements of aerosol particles, clouds and radiation that are currently in use on research aircraft around the world. Description of the technology is at a level sufficient for introducing the basic principles of operation and an extensive list of references for further reading is given. A number of newer instruments that implement emerging technology are described and the review concludes with a description of some of the most important measurement challenges that remain. This overview is a synthesis of material from a reference book that is currently in preparation and that will be published in 2012 by Wiley.

  7. The validation of ATSR measurements with in situ sea temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Minnett, P.J.; Stansfield, K.L.

    1993-10-08

    The largest source of uncertainty in the retrieval of SST (sea-surface) temperature from space-borne infrared radiometric measurements is in the correction for the effects of the intervening atmosphere. During a research cruise of the R/V Alliance measurements of sea surface temperature, surface meteorological variables and surface infrared radiances were taken. SST fields were generated from the ATSR data using pre-launch algorithims derived by the ATSR Instrument Team (A.M. Zavody, personal communication), and the initial comparison between ATSR measurements and SST taken along the ship`s track indicate that the dual-angle atmospheric correction is accurate in mid-latitude conditions.

  8. Aerosol classification using airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar measurements - methodology and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Froyd, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired extensive datasets of aerosol extinction (532 nm), aerosol optical depth (AOD) (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) profiles during 18 field missions that have been conducted over North America since 2006. The lidar measurements of aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratio, depolarization, backscatter color ratio, and spectral depolarization ratio) are shown to vary with location and aerosol type. A methodology based on observations of known aerosol types is used to qualitatively classify the extensive set of HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate types. Several examples are presented showing how the aerosol intensive parameters vary with aerosol type and how these aerosols are classified according to this new methodology. The HSRL-based classification reveals vertical variability of aerosol types during the NASA ARCTAS field experiment conducted over Alaska and northwest Canada during 2008. In two examples derived from flights conducted during ARCTAS, the HSRL classification of biomass burning smoke is shown to be consistent with aerosol types derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of particle size and composition. The HSRL retrievals of AOD and inferences of aerosol types are used to apportion AOD to aerosol type; results of this analysis are shown for several experiments.

  9. Aerosol classification using airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar measurements - methodology and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Froyd, K. D.

    2011-09-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired extensive datasets of aerosol extinction (532 nm), aerosol optical thickness (AOT) (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) profiles during 18 field missions that have been conducted over North America since 2006. The lidar measurements of aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratio, depolarization, backscatter color ratio, and spectral depolarization ratio) are shown to vary with location and aerosol type. A methodology based on observations of known aerosol types is used to qualitatively classify the extensive set of HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate types. Several examples are presented showing how the aerosol intensive parameters vary with aerosol type and how these aerosols are classified according to this new methodology. The HSRL-based classification reveals vertical variability of aerosol types during the NASA ARCTAS field experiment conducted over Alaska and northwest Canada during 2008. In two examples derived from flights conducted during ARCTAS, the HSRL classification of biomass burning smoke is shown to be consistent with aerosol types derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of particle size and composition. The HSRL retrievals of AOT and inferences of aerosol types are used to apportion AOT to aerosol type; results of this analysis are shown for several experiments.

  10. In Situ Leaf Level Gas Exchange Measurements, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Alistair Rogers; Stefanie Lasota

    2015-01-13

    Survey measurements of photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance together with carbon dioxide concentration, temperature, PAR, and relative humidity for 8 species on the BEO. Previously titled "Plant Physiology Data, Barrow, Alaska, 2013"

  11. A model-based framework for the quality assessment of surface albedo in situ measurement protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jennifer; Gobron, Nadine; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Mio, Corrado

    2016-09-01

    Satellite-based retrievals of land surface albedo are essential for climate and environmental modelling communities. To be of use, satellite-retrievals are required to comply to given accuracy requirements, mainly achieved through comparison with in situ measurements. Differences between in situ and satellite-based retrievals depend on their actual difference and their associated uncertainties. It is essential that these uncertainties can be computed to properly understand the differences between satellite-based and in situ measurements of albedo, however quantifying the individual contributions of uncertainty is difficult. This study introduces a model-based framework for assessing the quality of in situ albedo measurements. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) radiative transfer model is used to simulate field measurements of surface albedo, and is able to identify and quantify potential sources of error in the field measurement. Compliance with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) requirement for 3% accuracy is tested. 8 scenarios were investigated, covering a range of ecosystem types and canopy structures, seasons, illumination angles and tree heights. Results indicate that height of measurement above the canopy is the controlling factor in accuracy, with each canopy scenario reaching the WMO requirement at different heights. Increasing canopy heterogeneity and tree height noticeably reduces the accuracy, whereas changing seasonality from summer to winter in a deciduous forest increases accuracy. For canopies with a row structure, illumination angle can significantly impact accuracy as a result of shadowing effects. Tests were made on the potential use of multiple in situ measurements, indicating considerably increased accuracy if two or more in situ measurements can be made.

  12. A Study of Reflected Sonic Booms Using Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantor, Samuel R.; Cliatt, Larry J., II

    2017-01-01

    In support of ongoing efforts to bring commercial supersonic flight to the public, the Sonic Booms in Atmospheric Turbulence (SonicBAT) flight test was conducted at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. During this test, airborne sonic boom measurements were made using an instrumented TG-14 motor glider, called the Airborne Acoustic Measurement Platform (AAMP).During the flight program, the AAMP was consistently able to measure the sonic boom wave that was reflected off of the ground, in addition to the incident wave, resulting in the creation of a completely unique data set of airborne sonic boom reflection measurements. This paper focuses on using this unique data set to investigate the ability of sonic boom modeling software to calculate sonic boom reflections. Because the algorithms used to model sonic boom reflections are also used to model the secondary carpet and over the top booms, the use of actual flight data is vital to improving the understanding of the effects of sonic booms outside of the primary carpet. Understanding these effects becomes especially important as the return of commercial supersonic approaches, as well as ensuring the accuracy of mission planning for future experiments.

  13. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Ocean Directional Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; King, Michael D.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Arnold, G. Thomas; Redemann, Jens

    2004-01-01

    During summer of 2001 NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) obtained measurement of ocean angular distribution of reflected radiation or BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft under cloud-free conditions. The measurements took place aver the Atlantic Ocean off the eastern seaboard of the U.S. in the vicinity of the Chesapeake Light Tower and at nearby National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Buoy Stations. The measurements were in support of CLAMS, Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites, field campaign that was primarily designed to validate and improve NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite data products being derived from three sensors: MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectro-Radiometer), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) and CERES (Clouds and Earth s Radiant Energy System). Because of the high resolution of the CAR measurements and its high sensitivity to detect weak ocean signals against a noisy background, results of radiance field above the ocean are seen in unprecedented detail. The study also attempts to validate the widely used Cox-Munk model for predicting reflectance from a rough ocean surface.

  14. Acoustic backscattering by deepwater fish measured in situ from a manned submersible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Kelley, Christopher D.; Taylor, Christopher

    2003-02-01

    An outstanding problem in fisheries acoustics is the depth dependence of scattering characteristics of swimbladder-bearing fish, and the effects of pressure on the target strength of physoclistous fish remain unresolved. In situ echoes from deepwater snappers were obtained with a sonar transducer mounted on a manned submersible next to a low-light video camera, permitting simultaneous echo recording and identification of species, fish size and orientation. The sonar system, consisting of a transducer, single board computer, hard disk, and analog-to-digital converter, used a 80 μs, broadband signal (bandwidth 35 kHz, center frequency 120 kHz). The observed relationship between fish length and in situ target strength shows no difference from the relationship measured at the surface. No differences in the species-specific temporal echo characteristics were observed between surface and in situ measures. This indicates that the size and shape of the snappers' swimbladders are maintained both at the surface and at depths of up to 250 m. Information obtained through controlled backscatter measurements of tethered, anesthetized fish at the surface can be applied to free-swimming fish at depth. This is the first published account of the use of a manned submersible to measure in situ scattering from identified, individual animals with known orientations. The distinct advantage of this technique compared with other in situ techniques is the ability to observe the target fish, obtaining accurate species, size, and orientation information.

  15. Active-passive airborne ocean color measurement. II - Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Yungel, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    Reported here for the first time is the use of a single airborne instrument to make concurrent measurements of oceanic chlorophyll concentration by (1) laser-induced fluorescence, (2) passive upwelling radiance, and (3) solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence. Results from field experiments conducted with the NASA airborne oceanographic lidar (AOL) in the New York Bight demonstrate the capability of a single active-passive instrument to perform new and potentially important ocean color studies related to (1) active lidar validation of passive ocean color in-water algorithms, (2) chlorophyll a in vivo fluorescence yield variability, (3) calibration of active multichannel lidar systems, (4) effect of sea state on passive and active ocean color measurements, (5) laser/solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence investigations, and (6) subsequent improvement of satellite-borne ocean color scanners. For validation and comparison purposes a separate passive ocean color sensor was also flown along with the new active-passive sensor during these initial field trials.

  16. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2007-07-01

    A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF), enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI) and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL) for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02)-i0.017(±0.003) at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH) profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  17. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2008-02-01

    A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF), enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI) and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL) for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02)-i0.017(±0.003) at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH) profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  18. In situ performance curves measurements of large pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, A.

    2010-08-01

    The complex energetic system on the river Lotru in Romania comprises of a series of lakes and pumping stations and a major hydroelectric power plant: Lotru-Ciunget. All the efforts have been oriented towards the maintenance of the Pelton turbines and very little attention has been directed to the pumps. In the system, there are three large pumping stations and only in the last 5 years, the pump performances have become a concern. The performances where determined using portable ultrasonic flow meters, a Yates meter, precision manometers and appropriate electrical equipment for power measurement (Power Analiser - NORMA D4000 LEM). The measurements are not supposed to interfere with the normal operation so only a limited number of tests could be performed. Based on those tests, portions of the test curves have been measured and represented in specific diagrams.

  19. In-Situ Measurements of Fabric Thickness Evolution During Draping

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D. S.; Van Gestel, C.; Lomov, S. V.; Verpoest, I.

    2011-05-04

    The paper presents results of experimental program aimed at measuring fabric thickening while draping. The thickness evolution is important factor in resin infusion manufacturing where the resultant composite thickness is not controlled. The measurements are conducted by means of laser distance sensors adapted to the picture frame testing. Several carbon fabrics of very different architectures have been tested. Additionally, the pretension of the carbon fabric due to the gripping has been estimated by means of digital image correlation technique and an attempt to discuss the results obtained on different set-ups is made.

  20. The NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX):High-Altitude Aircraft Measurements in the Tropical Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, E. J.; Pfister, L.; Jordan, D. E.; Bui, T. V.; Ueyama, R.; Singh, H. B.; Lawson, P.; Thornberry, T.; Diskin, G.; McGill, M.; Pittman, J.; Atlas, E.; Kim, J.

    2016-01-01

    The February through March 2014 deployment of the NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) provided unique in situ measurements in the western Pacific Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Six flights were conducted from Guam with the long-range, high-altitude, unmanned Global Hawk aircraft. The ATTREX Global Hawk payload provided measurements of water vapor, meteorological conditions, cloud properties, tracer and chemical radical concentrations, and radiative fluxes. The campaign was partially coincident with the CONTRAST and CAST airborne campaigns based in Guam using lower-altitude aircraft The ATTREX dataset is being used for investigations of TTL cloud, transport, dynamical, and chemical processes as well as for evaluation and improvement of global-model representations of TTL processes.

  1. Review of Techniques for Measuring Soil Moisture In situ.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    tested and sensor (1965) showed that modern improvements in the calibration, technique, such as using of Peltier devices for 3. Size of the sensitive...rays in measuring water con- Marais, P C and W B. De V Smit (1%2) Effet t of bulk density tent and permeability in unsaturated columns of :iI and of

  2. In situ thermal conductivity measurements of Titan's lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathi, B.; Ball, A. J.; Banaszkiewicz, M.; Daniell, P. M.; Garry, J. R. C.; Hagermann, A.; Leese, M. R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Rosenberg, P. D.; Towner, M. C.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2008-10-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements, presented in this paper (Fig. 3), were made during the descent of the Huygens probe through the atmosphere of Titan below the altitude of 30 km. The measurements are broadly consistent with reference values derived from the composition, pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere; except in narrow altitude regions around 19 km and 11 km, where the measured thermal conductivity is lower than the reference by 1% and 2%, respectively. Only single data point exists at each of the two altitudes mentioned above; if true however, the result supports the case for existence for molecules heavier than nitrogen in these regions (such as: ethane, other primordial noble gases, carbon dioxide, and other hydrocarbon derivatives). The increasing thermal conductivity observed below 7 km altitude could be due to some liquid deposition during the descent; either due to condensation and/or due to passing through layers of fog/cloud containing liquid nitrogen-methane. Thermal conductivity measurements do not allow conclusions to be drawn about how such liquid may have entered the sensor, but an estimate of the cumulative liquid content encountered in the last 7 km is 0.6% by volume of the Titan's atmosphere sampled during descent.

  3. Rock matrix diffusivity determinations by in-situ electrical conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Y; Löfgren, M; Neretnieks, I

    2001-02-01

    A fast method to determine rock matrix diffusion properties directly in the bedrock would be valuable in the investigation of a possible site for disposal of nuclear waste. An "effective diffusivity borehole log" would provide important information on the variability of this entity over the area studied. As opposed to traditional matrix diffusion laboratory experiments, electrical conductivity measurements are fast, inexpensive and also easy to carry out in-situ. In this study, electrical resistivity data from borehole logging, as well as from measurements on the actual core, is evaluated with the purpose of extracting matrix diffusivity data. The influence of migration of ions in the electrical double layer, which can be of great importance in low ionic strength pore water, is also considered in evaluating the in-situ data to accurately determine the effective pore diffusivity. The in-situ data compare fairly well to those measured in the rock core.

  4. Radon measurements aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Rosner, Stefan W.

    1995-01-01

    We have carried out three (piggyback) radon-related projects aboard the KAO. The first, which was limited to upper tropospheric measurements while in level flight, revealed the systematic occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations in this region of the atmosphere. The second project was an instrument development project, which led to the installation of an automatic radon measurement system aboard the NASA ER-2 High Altitude Research Aircraft. In the third, we installed a new system capable of collecting samples during the normal climb and descent of the KAO. The results obtained in these projects have resulted in significant contributions to our knowledge of atmospheric transport processes, and are currently playing a key role in the validation of global circulation and transport models.

  5. Airborne in-situ investigations of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume on Iceland and over north-western Germany with light aircrafts and optical particle counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K.; Eliasson, J.; Vogel, A.; Fischer, C.; Pohl, T.; van Haren, G.; Meier, M.; Grobéty, B.; Dahmann, D.

    2012-03-01

    During the time period of the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April/May 2010 the Duesseldorf University of Applied Sciences has performed 14 research flights in situations with and without the volcanic ash plume over Germany. In parallel to the research flights in Germany three measurement flights have been performed by the University of Iceland in May 2010 over the western part of Iceland. During two of these flights the outskirts of the eruption plume were entered directly, delivering most direct measurements within the eruption plume during this eruptive event. For all the measurement flights reported here, light durable piston-motor driven aircrafts were used, which were equipped with optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. Real-time monitoring of the particle concentrations was possible during the flights. As different types of optical particle counters have been used in Iceland and Germany, the optical particle counters have been re-calibrated after the flights to the same standard using gravimetric reference methods and original Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash samples. In-situ measurement results with high spatial resolution, directly from the eruption plume in Iceland as well as from the dispersed and several days old plume over Germany, are therefore presented here for the first time. They are normalized to the same ash concentration calibration standard. Moreover, airborne particles could be sampled directly out of the eruption plume in Iceland as well as during the flights over Germany. During the research flights over Iceland from 9 May 2011 to 11 May 2011 the ash emitted from the vent of the volcano turned out to be concentrated in a narrow well-defined plume of about 10 km width at a distance of 45-60 km away from the vent. Outside this plume the airborne ash concentrations could be proved to be below 50 μg m -3 over western Iceland. However, by entering the outskirts of the plume directly the research aircraft could

  6. In Situ ATP Bioluminescent Measurements in Subglacial Environments - The Engabreen Glacier in the Norwegian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, D. C.; Wadham, J. L.; Pancost, R.; Kelly, S.; Barnett, M. J.; Jackson, M.

    2007-12-01

    Engabreen is a northern outlet glacier from the western Svartisen ice cap on the Nordland coast of Norway just inside the Arctic Circle. A unique feature of the glacier is a man-made tunnel system within the bedrock beneath the glacier that offers scientists direct access to the glacier-bedrock interface. This unique facility - called the Engabreen Subglacial Laboratory - is ideal to test developments of new in situ analytical techniques. We have used the facility to perform the first in situ detection of microbial life in a subglacial environment using standard off-the-shelf ATP bioluminescence detection technology and therefore using ATP levels as a proxy of microbial life. Measurements were performed both in melt-waters in the tunnels and from melted ice samples directly from the glacier-bedrock interface. Levels of ATP above background were detected and appeared to be associated with suspended sediment particles rather than in the water or ice component. This indicated the presence of microbial life. Development of protocols for in situ sample processing and use of in situ ATP measurements in the directing and choice of sampling points for other techniques was explored. This study has shown that off-the-shelf portable ATP bioluminescence can be used to perform in situ measurements within sub-glacial environments but that further development work is required to optimize experimental protocols and to correlate findings with other life detection and enumeration techniques.

  7. A Coordinated Ice-based and Airborne Snow and Ice Thickness Measurement Campaign on Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter-Menge, J.; Farrell, S.; Elder, B. C.; Gardner, J. M.; Brozena, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    A rare opportunity presented itself in March 2011 when the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and NASA IceBridge teamed with scientists from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) to coordinate a multi-scale approach to mapping snow depth and sea ice thickness distribution in the Arctic. Ground-truth information for calibration/validation of airborne and CryoSat-2 satellite data were collected near a manned camp deployed in support of the US Navy's Ice Expedition 2011 (ICEX 2011). The ice camp was established at a location approximately 230 km north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, at the edge of the perennial ice zone. The suite of measurements was strategically organized around a 9-km-long survey line that covered a wide range of ice types, including refrozen leads, deformed and undeformed first year ice, and multiyear ice. A highly concentrated set of in situ measurements of snow depth and ice thickness were taken along the survey line. Once the survey line was in place, NASA IceBridge flew a dedicated mission along the survey line, collecting data with an instrument suite that included the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), a high precision, airborne scanning laser altimeter; the Digital Mapping System (DMS), nadir-viewing digital camera; and the University of Kansas ultra-wideband Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) snow radar. NRL also flew a dedicated mission over the survey line with complementary airborne radar, laser and photogrammetric sensors (see Brozena et al., this session). These measurements were further leveraged by a series of CryoSat-2 under flights made in the region by the instrumented NRL and NASA planes, as well as US Navy submarine underpasses of the 9-km-long survey line to collect ice draft measurements. This comprehensive suite of data provides the full spectrum of sampling resolutions from satellite, to airborne, to ground-based, to submarine and will allow for a careful determination of

  8. Disassembling "evapotranspiration" in-situ with a complex measurement tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormanski, Jaroslaw; Kleniewska, Malgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Sporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatylowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2014-05-01

    In this work we present a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them from the total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its components transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project will be the estimation of energy and

  9. Enzymatic method for measuring starch gelatinization in dry products in situ

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An enzymatic method based on hydrolysis of starch by amyloglucosidase and measurement of D-glucose released by glucose oxidase-peroxidase was developed to measure both gelatinized starch and hydrolyzable starch in situ of dried starchy products. Efforts focused on the development of sample handling ...

  10. In situ granular charge measurement by free-fall videography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, S. R.; Jaeger, H. M.

    2013-02-01

    We present the design and performance characterization of a new experimental technique for measuring individual particle charges in large ensembles of macroscopic grains. The measurement principle is qualitatively similar to that used in determining the elementary charge by Millikan in that it follows individual particle trajectories. However, by taking advantage of new technology we are able to work with macroscopic grains and achieve several orders of magnitude better resolution in charge to mass ratios. By observing freely falling grains accelerated in a horizontal electric field with a co-falling, high-speed video camera, we dramatically increase particle tracking time and measurement precision. Keeping the granular medium under vacuum, we eliminate air drag, leaving the electrostatic force as the primary source of particle accelerations in the co-moving frame. Because the technique is based on direct imaging, we can distinguish between different particle types during the experiment, opening up the possibility of studying charge transfer processes between different particle species. For the ˜300 μm diameter grains reported here, we achieve an average acceleration resolution of ˜0.008 m/s2, a force resolution of ˜500 pN, and a median charge resolution ˜6× 104 elementary charges per grain (corresponding to surface charge densities ˜1 elementary charges per μm2). The primary source of error is indeterminacy in the grain mass, but with higher resolution cameras and better optics this can be further improved. The high degree of resolution and the ability to visually identify particles of different species or sizes with direct imaging make this a powerful new tool to characterize charging processes in granular media.

  11. In situ granular charge measurement by free-fall videography.

    PubMed

    Waitukaitis, S R; Jaeger, H M

    2013-02-01

    We present the design and performance characterization of a new experimental technique for measuring individual particle charges in large ensembles of macroscopic grains. The measurement principle is qualitatively similar to that used in determining the elementary charge by Millikan in that it follows individual particle trajectories. However, by taking advantage of new technology we are able to work with macroscopic grains and achieve several orders of magnitude better resolution in charge to mass ratios. By observing freely falling grains accelerated in a horizontal electric field with a co-falling, high-speed video camera, we dramatically increase particle tracking time and measurement precision. Keeping the granular medium under vacuum, we eliminate air drag, leaving the electrostatic force as the primary source of particle accelerations in the co-moving frame. Because the technique is based on direct imaging, we can distinguish between different particle types during the experiment, opening up the possibility of studying charge transfer processes between different particle species. For the ∼300 μm diameter grains reported here, we achieve an average acceleration resolution of ∼0.008 m/s(2), a force resolution of ∼500 pN, and a median charge resolution ∼6× 10(4) elementary charges per grain (corresponding to surface charge densities ∼1 elementary charges per μm(2)). The primary source of error is indeterminacy in the grain mass, but with higher resolution cameras and better optics this can be further improved. The high degree of resolution and the ability to visually identify particles of different species or sizes with direct imaging make this a powerful new tool to characterize charging processes in granular media.

  12. The principles of dielectric measurements for in situ monitoring of composite processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijovic, Jovan; Kenny, Jose M.; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Trivisano, Antonio; Bellucci, Francesco; Nicolais, Luigi

    The fundamental concepts of dielectric behavior of polymers and the utilization of dielectric measurements for in situ monitoring of cure of polymers and composites are discussed. Information is presented on currently used dielectric sensors and the procedure for calculation of dielectric parameters from the monitored signal. The review is written to accommodate both the fundamental and the pragmatic aspects of dielectric monitoring of cure. In the final part of the review, a critical assessment is offered of the advantages and disadvantages of dielectric measurements for the in situ monitoring of processing of polymers and composites.

  13. First in-situ lattice strains measurements under load at VULCAN

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ke; Skorpenske, Harley David; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Cakmak, Ercan

    2011-01-01

    The engineering materials diffractometer, VULCAN, at the Spallation Neutron Source began commissioning on June 26, 2009. This instrument is designed for materials science and engineering studies. In situ lattice strain measurements of a model metallic material under monotonic tensile load have been performed on VULCAN. The tensile load was applied under two different strain rates, and neutron diffraction measurements were carried out in both high-intensity and high-resolution modes. These experiments demonstrated VULCAN's in situ study capability of deformation behaviors even during the early phases of commissioning.

  14. Airborne Measurements of atmospheric PAH's across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, B.; Jaward, F.; Jones, K.; Lee, R.

    2003-04-01

    Atmospheric measurements of PAHs were taken aboard the DRL Falcon 20 during May 2001. A sampling system was designed to work aboard this aircraft platform. Particulate PAHs were collected on a glass fiber filter (GFF) with their gaseous component concentrated on a polyurethane foam sheets located behind the filter. Typically sampling volumes of between 20-50m^3 were collected which equated to a collection time of about 30minutes. In this way the distance travelled was kept within an acceptable level, about 60 nautical miles. The average concentrations of the data set for phenanthrene was 450 pg m-3 while values for many of the heavier PAH marker compounds used in the UK such as benzo(a)pyrene, diben(ah)anthracene were below the detection limits on all flights. The results will be discussed with consideration of location, altitude and airmass trajectory.

  15. In situ seismic measurements in claystone at Tournemire (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillmer, M.; Marthelot, J.-M.; Gélis, C.; Cabrera, J.; Druivenga, G.

    2014-12-01

    Compressional and shear wave seismic measurements were performed in an old railway tunnel and in galleries excavated in a 250-m-thick Toarcian claystone formation in the Tournemire experimental station (France). Three component (3C) geophones and three orthogonal orientations of the vibroseismic force source were used. Additionally, vertical seismic profiling (VSP) measurements were recorded with a 3C borehole geophone, a hydrophone and a microphone in a 159 m deep borehole (ID180) in the tunnel. The seismic data show that Toarcian claystone has strong transverse isotropy (TI) with a vertical symmetry axis. The qP, SH and qSV wave propagation velocities in horizontal directions-the plane of isotropy of the TI medium-are measured as 3550, 1850 and 1290 m s-1, respectively. The zero-offset VSP reveals that only one shear wave propagates in the vertical (depth) direction and the P- and S-wave velocities are 3100 and 1375 m s-1, respectively. Four elastic moduli of the TI medium are determined from the seismic velocities and from the bulk density of 2.53 g cm-3: c11 = 31.9 GPa, c33 = 24.3 GPa, c44 = 4.5 GPa and c66 = 8.7 GPa. A walkaway VSP with the borehole geophone at 50 m depth in borehole ID180 and shot points in the galleries leads to oblique seismic ray paths which allow us to determine the fifth elastic modulus of the TI medium to c13 = 16 GPa. The tube wave recorded by a hydrophone in the water filled lower part of the borehole propagates with 1350 m s-1, which confirms the estimate of the elastic constant c66. The analysis of body wave and surface wave data from a seismic experiment in Galerie Est shows reflections from several fracture zones in the gallery floor. The thickness of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) in the floor of Galerie Est is estimated to 0.7 m.

  16. Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements for in Situ Characterization of Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oder, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic separation is a viable method for concentration of components of lunar soils and rocks for use as feedstocks for manufacture of metals, oxygen, and for recovery of volatiles such as He-3. Work with lunar materials indicates that immature soils are the best candidates for magnetic beneficiation. The magnetic susceptibility at which selected soil components such as anorthite, ilmenite, or metallic iron are separated is not affected by soil maturity, but the recovery of the concentrated components is. Increasing soil maturity lowers recovery. Mature soils contain significant amounts of glass-encased metallic iron. Magnetic susceptibility, which is sensitive to metallic iron content, can be used to measure soil maturity. The relationship between the ratio of magnetic susceptibility and iron oxide and the conventional maturity parameter, I(sub s)/FeO, ferromagnetic resonant intensity divided by iron oxide content is given. The magnetic susceptibilities were determined using apparatus designed for magnetic separation of the lunar soils.

  17. In Situ Measurement of Energetic Electron Fluxes Inside Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, S.; Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H.

    2013-12-01

    It is now well established that high-energy radiation is routinely produced by thunderclouds and lightning. This radiation is in the form of x-rays and gamma-rays with timescales ranging from sub-microsecond (x-rays associated with lightning leaders), to sub-millisecond (Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes), to minute long glows (Gamma-ray Glows from thunderclouds seen on the ground and in or near the cloud by aircrafts and balloons). It is generally accepted that these emissions originate from bremsstrahlung interactions of relativistic runaway electrons with air, which can be accelerated in the thundercloud/lightning electric fields and gain up to multi-MeV energies. However, the exact physical details of the mechanism that produces these runaway electrons are still unknown. In order to better understand the source of energetic radiation inside thunderclouds, we have begun a campaign of balloon-borne instruments to directly measure the flux of energetic electrons inside thunderclouds. In the current configuration, each balloon carries Geiger counters to record the energetic particles. Geiger counters are well suited for directly measuring energetic electrons and positrons and have the advantage of being lightweight and dependable. Due to the nature of the thunderstorm environment, the campaign has many design, communication, and safety challenges. In this presentation we will report on the status of the campaign and some of the physical insights gained from the data collected by our instruments. This work was supported in part by the NASA grant NNX12A002H and by DARPA grant HR0011-1-10-1-0061.

  18. Airborne sodium lidar measurements of gravity wave intrinsic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kang H.; Gardner, Chester S.

    1990-11-01

    A data analysis technique for determining gravity wave intrinsic parameters including wave propagation direction is described. The technique involves measuring the altitude variations of the wave-induced density perturbations of the atmospheric Na layer. This technique can be used with airborne lidars, multiple ground-based lidars, and steerable lidars. In this paper the technique is applied to airborne Na lidar data obtained during a round-trip flight from Denver, Colorado, to the Pacific Coast in November 1986. During the flight, strong wave perturbations were observed in the Na layer near the Pacific coast over a horizontal distance of nearly 700 km. The intrinsic horizontal wavelength of this wave was estimated to be about 85 km, and the vertical wavelength was 4.1 km. The intrinsic period was about 102 min, and the propagation direction was almost due south.

  19. Public transit bus ramp slopes measured in situ.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, Gina; Frost, Karen; Smalley, Craig

    2014-05-02

    Abstract Purpose: The slopes of fixed-route bus ramps deployed for wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users during boarding and alighting were assessed. Measured slopes were compared to the proposed Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) maximum allowable ramp slope. Methods: A ramp-embedded inclinometer measured ramp slope during WhMD user boarding and alighting on a fixed-route transit bus. The extent of bus kneeling was determined for each ramp deployment. In-vehicle video surveillance cameras captured ramp deployment level (street versus sidewalk) and WhMD type. Results: Ramp slopes ranged from -4° to 15.5° with means of 4.3° during boarding (n = 406) and 4.2° during alighting (n = 405). Ramp slope was significantly greater when deployed to street level. During boarding, the proposed ADA maximum allowable ramp slope (9.5°) was exceeded in 66.7% of instances when the ramp was deployed to street level, and in 1.9% of instances when the ramp was deployed to sidewalk level. During alighting, the proposed ADA maximum allowable slope was exceeded in 56.8% of instances when the ramp was deployed to street level and in 1.4% of instances when the ramp was deployed to sidewalk level. Conclusions: Deployment level, built environment and extent of bus kneeling can affect slope of ramps ascended/descended by WhMD users when accessing transit buses. Implications for Rehabilitation Since public transportation services are critical for integration of wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users into the community and society, it is important that they, as well as their therapists, are aware of conditions that may be encountered when accessing transit buses. Knowledge of real world ramp slope conditions that may be encountered when accessing transit buses will allow therapists to better access capabilities of WhMD users in a controlled clinical setting. Real world ramp slope conditions can be recreated in a clinical setting to allow WhMD users to develop and practice necessary

  20. General purpose in-situ surface tension measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary S.; Dowling, David R.; Schultz, William W.

    1996-11-01

    While the Wilhelmy method is over a century old, there is a need for clear hydrodynamic explanations for corrections to the basic weight-divided-by-slide-perimeter measurement. A technique tailored for a free surface with surfactants has been developed including the effects of hydrostatic pressure and for the angle that the free surface meets with the Wilhelmy plate. A two-dimensional hydrostatic analysis has captured much of the discrepency between the typically-applied simple model and experiments. However, three-dimensional end effects play an important role and add experimental uncertainty. To avoid these end effects, a circular geometry was used and compared to axisymmetric analysis. Unlike, the du Noüy ring, this apparatus has sharp corners and well-defined corrections. The technique can be used in any basin, with any liquid, and with any surface contamination condition provided the plate can be wetted. Experiments with standard Wilhelmy plates that prompted technique development and results from the new technique are discussed. This research is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  1. In-situ measurement of the substorm onset instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Rae, J.; Watt, C.; Forsyth, C.; Mann, I. R.; Yao, Z.; Kalmoni, N.

    2015-12-01

    The substorm is arguably the major mode of variability in near-Earth Space which unpredictably dissipates a considerable and variable amount of energy into the near-Earth magnetosphere and ionosphere. What process or processes determine when this energy is released is uncertain, although it is evident that both near-Earth plasma instability and magnetotail reconnection play a role in this energy release. Much emphasis has recently been placed on the role of magnetic reconnection in substorms, we focus here on observations of the unmistakeable signs of a plasma instability acting at substorm onset. Using data from the THEMIS spacecraft, we show that electromagnetic waves grow in the magnetotail at the expense of the local electron and ion thermal energy. The wave growth in space is the direct counterpart to the wave growth seen at the substorm onset location at the ionosphere, as measured by the CARISMA and THEMIS magnetometers and THEMIS all-sky-imagers. We present evidence that the free energy source for the instability is associated with the electron and ion thermal energy, and not the local electron or ion flow energy.

  2. Analyzers Measure Greenhouse Gases, Airborne Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    In complete darkness, a NASA observatory waits. When an eruption of boiling water billows from a nearby crack in the ground, the observatory s sensors seek particles in the fluid, measure shifts in carbon isotopes, and analyze samples for biological signatures. NASA has landed the observatory in this remote location, far removed from air and sunlight, to find life unlike any that scientists have ever seen. It might sound like a scene from a distant planet, but this NASA mission is actually exploring an ocean floor right here on Earth. NASA established a formal exobiology program in 1960, which expanded into the present-day Astrobiology Program. The program, which celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2010, not only explores the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe, but also examines how life begins and evolves, and what the future may hold for life on Earth and other planets. Answers to these questions may be found not only by launching rockets skyward, but by sending probes in the opposite direction. Research here on Earth can revise prevailing concepts of life and biochemistry and point to the possibilities for life on other planets, as was demonstrated in December 2010, when NASA researchers discovered microbes in Mono Lake in California that subsist and reproduce using arsenic, a toxic chemical. The Mono Lake discovery may be the first of many that could reveal possible models for extraterrestrial life. One primary area of interest for NASA astrobiologists lies with the hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor. These vents expel jets of water heated and enriched with chemicals from off-gassing magma below the Earth s crust. Also potentially within the vents: microbes that, like the Mono Lake microorganisms, defy the common characteristics of life on Earth. Basically all organisms on our planet generate energy through the Krebs Cycle, explains Mike Flynn, research scientist at NASA s Ames Research Center. This metabolic process breaks down sugars for energy

  3. Quantification of L-band InSAR coherence over volcanic areas using LiDAR and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab-Sedze, Melanie; Heggy, Essam; Bretard, Frederic; Berveiller, Daniel; Jacquemoud, Stephane

    2014-07-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful tool to monitor large-scale ground deformation at active volcanoes. However, vegetation and pyroclastic deposits degrade the radar coherence and therefore the measurement of 3-D surface displacements. In this article, we explore the complementarity between ALOS - PALSAR coherence images, airborne LiDAR data and in situ measurements acquired over the Piton de La Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island, France) to determine the sources of errors that may affect repeat-pass InSAR measure- ments. We investigate three types of surfaces: terrains covered with vegetation, lava flows (a'a, pahoehoe or slabby pahoehoe lava flows) and pyroclastic deposits (lapilli). To explain the loss of coherence observed over the Dolomieu crater between 2008 and 2009, we first use laser altimetry data to map topographic variations. The LiDAR intensity, which depends on surface reflectance, also provides ancillary information about the potential sources of coherence loss. In addition, surface roughness and rock dielectric properties of each terrain have been determined in situ to better understand how electromagnetic waves interact with such media: rough and porous surfaces, such as the a'a lava flows, produce a higher coherence loss than smoother surfaces, such as the pahoehoe lava flows. Variations in dielectric properties suggest a higher penetration depth in pyroclasts than in lava flows at L-band frequency. Decorrelation over the lapilli is hence mainly caused by volumetric effects. Finally, a map of LAI (Leaf Area Index) produced using SPOT 5 imagery allows us to quantify the effect of vegeta- tion density: radar coherence is negatively correlated with LAI and is unreliable for values higher than 7.5.

  4. Quantitative Imaging and In Situ Concentration Measurements of Quantum Dot Nanomaterials in Variably Saturated Porous Media

    DOE PAGES

    Uyuşur, Burcu; Snee, Preston T.; Li, Chunyan; ...

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the fate and transport of nanoparticles in the subsurface environment is limited, as techniques to monitor and visualize the transport and distribution of nanoparticles in porous media and measure their in situ concentrations are lacking. To address these issues, we have developed a light transmission and fluorescence method to visualize and measure in situ concentrations of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in variably saturated environments. Calibration cells filled with sand as porous medium and various known water saturation levels and QD concentrations were prepared. By measuring the intensity of the light transmitted through porous media exposed to fluorescent lightmore » and by measuring the hue of the light emitted by the QDs under UV light exposure, we obtained simultaneously in situ measurements of water saturation and QD nanoparticle concentrations with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Water saturation was directly proportional to the light intensity. A linear relationship was observed between hue-intensity ratio values and QD concentrations for constant water saturation levels. The advantages and limitations of the light transmission and fluorescence method as well as its implications for visualizing and measuring in situ concentrations of QDs nanoparticles in the subsurface environment are discussed.« less

  5. In situ and laboratory measurements of cold plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick-Frost, Kristen Mae

    Measurement of the ionospheric thermal particle population bridges the two different communities of ground-based radar and space-based rocket studies, which have the common goal of characterizing heavy ion transport in the cusp/cleft region. We report on the results of the SERSIO (Svalbard EISCAT Rocket Study of Ion Outflows) mission, which show broad-band-extremely-low-frequency wave-ion heating in an environment observed by the EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter) radars to have enhanced thermal electron temperature and density, and inferred ion-acoustic activity. The SERSIO data raise questions about the effects of spacecraft charging and sheath formation on thermal particle data analysis. These questions determined the design requirements for a low energy laboratory plasma calibration facility which we built and have begun to use. We discuss the magnetron-based cylindrical resonant plasma source, which produces charged particles with ionospheric energies and densities. The plasmas created with this source have Debye lengths similar to those encountered on ionospheric rocket flights, creating an ideal environment for charging and sheath studies that inform future thermal flight detector design. We investigate electron sheath structures by varying ion to electron collection ratios. The non-monotonic electron sheaths obtained by embedding a positively biased electrode within the sheath of a more negative conductor are explored. These initial plasma ion and electron sheath investigations both clarify the behavior of a thermal electron detector previously flown, and explore a low density and long Debye length parameter regime that is under-studied in the laboratory.

  6. Upscaling sparse, irregularly spaced in situ soil moisture measurements for calibration and validation of SMAP soil moisture products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, J.; Clewley, D.; Moghaddam, M.; Akbar, R.; Silva, A. R. D.

    2015-12-01

    There is a large difference in the footprints over which remote sensing instruments, such as the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, retrieve soil moisture and that of in situ networks. Therefore a method for upscaling in situ measurements is required before they can be used to validate remote sensing instruments. The upscaling problem is made more difficult when measurements are sparse and irregularly spaced within the footprint. To address these needs, we have developed a method for producing upscaled estimates of soil moisture based on a network of in situ soil moisture measurements and airborne P-band SAR data, and utilizing a Random Forests-based regression algorithm. Sites within the SoilSCAPE network, for which the technique was developed, typically contains sensors at ~30 locations, with each location sampled at multiple depths. Measurements are taken at 20 minute intervals and averaged over a selectable time interval, thereby supporting near-real time generation of soil moisture maps. The collected measurements are automatically uploaded to a central database from which they can be accessed for use in the regression algorithm. Our regression-based approach works well with irregularly-spaced sensors by incorporating a set of data layers that correlate well with soil moisture. The layers include thematic land cover, elevation, slope, aspect, flow accumulation, clay fraction, air temperature, precipitation, and P-Band HH, VV, and HV backscatter. Values from these data layers are extracted for each sensor location and applied to train the Random Forests algorithm. The decision trees generated are then applied to estimate soil moisture at a 100 m spacing throughout the network region, after which the evenly-spaced values are averaged to accord with the 3-, 9-, and 36-km SMAP measurement grids. The resulting set of near-real time soil moisture estimates suitable for SMAP calibration and validation is placed online for use by the SMAP Cal/Val team

  7. Estimates of total organic and inorganic chlorine in the lower stratosphere from in situ and flask measurements during AASE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbridge, E. L.; Elkins, J. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Heidt, L. E.; Solomon, S.; Baring, T. J.; Gilpin, T. M.; Pollack, W. H.; Schauffler, S. M.; Atlas, E. L.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft sampling has provided extensive in situ and flask measurements of organic chlorine species in the lower stratosphere. The recent Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2 (AASE 2) included two independent measurements of organic chlorine species using whole air sample and real-time techniques. From the whole air sample measurements we derive directly the burden of total organic chlorine (CCl(y)) in the lower stratosphere. From the more limited real-time measurements we estimate the CCl(y) burden using mixing ratios and growth rates of the principal CCl(y) species in the troposphere in conjunction with results from a two-dimensional photochemical model. Since stratospheric chlorine is tropospheric in origin and tropospheric mixing ratios are increasing, it is necessary to establish the average age of a stratospheric air parcel to assess its total chlorine (Cl(sub Total)) abundance. Total inorganic chlorine (Cl(y)) in the parcel is then estimated by the simple difference, Cl(y) = Cl(sub Total) - CCl(y). The consistency of the results from these two quite different techniques suggests that we can determine the CCl(y) and Cl(y) in the lower stratosphere with confidence. Such estimates of organic and inorganic chlorine are crucial in evaluating the photochemistry controlling chlorine partitioning and hence ozone loss processes in the lower stratosphere.

  8. Estimates of total organic and inorganic chlorine in the lower stratosphere from in situ and flask measurements during AASE 2

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbridge, E.L.; Elkins, J.W.; Fahey, D.W.; Heidt, L.E.; Solomon, S.; Baring, T.J.; Gilpin, T.M.; Pollack, W.H.; Schauffler, S.M.; Atlas, E.L. ||

    1995-02-01

    Aircraft sampling has provided extensive in situ and flask measurements of organic chlorine species in the lower stratosphere. The recent Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2 (AASE 2) included two independent measurements of organic chlorine species using whole air sample and real-time techniques. From the whole air sample measurements we derive directly the burden of total organic chlorine (CCl(y)) in the lower stratosphere. From the more limited real-time measurements we estimate the CCl(y) burden using mixing ratios and growth rates of the principal CCl(y) species in the troposphere in conjunction with results from a two-dimensional photochemical model. Since stratospheric chlorine is tropospheric in origin and tropospheric mixing ratios are increasing, it is necessary to establish the average age of a stratospheric air parcel to assess its total chlorine (Cl(sub Total)) abundance. Total inorganic chlorine (Cl(y)) in the parcel is then estimated by the simple difference, Cl(y) = Cl(sub Total) - CCl(y). The consistency of the results from these two quite different techniques suggests that we can determine the CCl(y) and Cl(y) in the lower stratosphere with confidence. Such estimates of organic and inorganic chlorine are crucial in evaluating the photochemistry controlling chlorine partitioning and hence ozone loss processes in the lower stratosphere.

  9. Upper Mississippi embayment shallow seismic velocities measured in situ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Huaibao P.; Hu, Y.; Dorman, J.; Chang, T.-S.; Chiu, J.-M.

    1997-01-01

    for shallow sediment obtained from reflection, refraction, crosshole and downhole techniques have been obtained for sites at the northern end of the embayment basin. The present borehole data, however, are measured from sites representative of large areas in the Mississippi embayment. Therefore, they fill a gap in information needed for modeling the response of the embayment to destructive seismic shaking.

  10. Airborne measurements of spatial NO2 distributions during AROMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Seyler, André; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Ruhtz, Thomas; Lindemann, Carsten; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry. In addition to their directly harmful effects on the respiratory system of living organisms, they influence the levels of tropospheric ozone and contribute to acid rain and eutrophication of ecosystems. As they are produced in combustion processes, they can serve as an indicator for anthropogenic air pollution. In September 2014 several European research groups conducted the ESA funded Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign to test and intercompare newly developed airborne observation sytsems dedicated to air quality satellite validation studies. The IUP Bremen contributed to this campaign with its Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution (AirMAP) on board a Cessna 207 turbo, operated by the FU Berlin. AirMAP allows the retrieval of integrated NO2 column densities in a stripe below the aircraft at a fine spatial resolution of up to 30 x 80 m2, at a typical flight altitude. Measurements have been performed over the city of Bucharest, creating for the first time high spatial resolution maps of Bucharest's NO2 distribution in a time window of approx. 2 hours. The observations were synchronised with ground-based car MAX-DOAS measurements for comparison. In addition, measurements were taken over the city of Berlin, Germany and at the Rovinari power plant, Romania. In this work the results of the research flights will be presented and conclusions will be drawn on the quality of the measurements, their applicability for satellite data validation and possible improvements for future measurements.

  11. Measurement of airborne {sup 218}Po - A Bayesian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Groer, P.G.; Lo, Y.

    1996-12-01

    The standard mathematical treatment of the buildup and decay of airborne radionuclides on a filter paper uses the solutions of the so-called bateman equations adapted to the sampling process. The equations can be interpreted as differential equations for the expectation of an underlying stochastic process, which describes the random fluctuations in the accumulation and decay of the sampled radioactive atoms. The process for the buildup and decay of airborne {sup 218}Po can be characterized as an {open_quotes}immigration-death process{close_quotes} in the widely adopted, biologically based jargon. The probability distribution for the number of {sup 218}Po atoms, accumulated after sampling time t, is Poisson. We show that the distribution of the number of counts, registered by a detector with efficiency {epsilon} during a counting period T after the end of sampling, it also Poisson, with mean dependent on {epsilon},t,T, the flowrate and N{sub o}, the number of airborne {sup 218}Po atoms per unit volume. This Poisson distribution was used to construct the likelihood given the observed number of counts. After inversion with Bayes` Theorem we obtained the posterior density for N{sub o}. This density characterizes the remaining uncertainty about the measured under of {sup 218}Po atoms per unit volume of air. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A numerical study of a method for measuring the effective in situ sound absorption coefficient.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Erwin R; Wijnant, Ysbrand H; de Boer, André

    2012-09-01

    The accuracy of a method [Wijnant et al., Proc. of ISMA 31, Leuven, Belgium (2010), Vol. 31] for measurement of the effective area-averaged in situ sound absorption coefficient is investigated. Based on a local plane wave assumption, this method can be applied to sound fields for which a model is not available. Investigations were carried out by means of finite element simulations for a typical case. The results show that the method is a promising method for determining the effective area-averaged in situ sound absorption coefficient in complex sound fields.

  13. Stratospheric free chlorine measured by balloon-borne in situ resonance fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. G.; Grassl, H. J.; Shetter, R. E.; Margitan, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Eight balloon-borne in situ measurements of ClO in the stratosphere are analyzed and are compared with recent model calculations. While the use of in situ stratospheric studies of free radicals to test models by comparing observed and predicted concentration profiles is essential for a prognosis of changes in stratospheric ozone, resulting from future changes in stratospheric ozone, such studies provide only limited insight into the nature of stratospheric photochemistry, because natural variability and the large number of fast reactions which compete in the coupling among the key radicals frustrate a detailed comparison between a mean distribution provided by the models and an instantaneous distribution provided by a single observation.

  14. A transportable magnetic resonance imaging system for in situ measurements of living trees: the Tree Hugger.

    PubMed

    Jones, M; Aptaker, P S; Cox, J; Gardiner, B A; McDonald, P J

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents the design of the 'Tree Hugger', an open access, transportable, 1.1 MHz (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system for the in situ analysis of living trees in the forest. A unique construction employing NdFeB blocks embedded in a reinforced carbon fibre frame is used to achieve access up to 210 mm and to allow the magnet to be transported. The magnet weighs 55 kg. The feasibility of imaging living trees in situ using the 'Tree Hugger' is demonstrated. Correlations are drawn between NMR/MRI measurements and other indicators such as relative humidity, soil moisture and net solar radiation.

  15. Functional requirements document for measuring emissions of airborne radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Criddle, J.D. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    This document states the functional requirements and procedures for systems making measurements of radioactive airborne emissions from facilities at the Hanford Site. The following issues are addressed in this document: Definition of the program objectives; Selection of the overall approach to collecting the samples; Sampling equipment design; Sampling equipment maintenance, and quality assurance issues. The intent of this document is to assist WHC in demonstrating a high quality of air emission measurements with verified system performance based on documented system design, testing, inspection, and maintenance.

  16. In-situ measurement of the electrical conductivity of aluminum oxide in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; White, D.P.; Snead, L.L.

    1996-10-01

    A collaborative DOE/Monbusho irradiation experiment has been completed which measured the in-situ electrical resistivity of 12 different grades of aluminum oxide during HFIR neutron irradiation at 450{degrees}C. No evidence for bulk RIED was observed following irradiation to a maximum dose of 3 dpa with an applied dc electric field of 200 V/mm.

  17. IN SITU APPARENT CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS AND MICROBIAL POPULATION DISTRIBUTION AT A HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the bulk electrical conductivity and microbial population distribution in sediments at a site contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). The bulk conductivity was measured using in situ vertical resistivity probes, while the most probable number met...

  18. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  19. Molecular recognition in gas sensing: Results from acoustic wave and in-situ FTIR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.; Bodenhoefer, K.; Goepel, W.

    1998-06-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements were combined with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopy to understand the interactions of surface-confined sensing films with gas-phase analytes. This was accomplished by collecting Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their specifically coated surfaces with key analytes.

  20. In situ technique for measuring heat transfer from a power transistor to a boiling liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, C. L.; Witte, L. C.

    1994-05-01

    A technique for in situ measurement of temperature and heat flux in boiling heat transfer from electronic chips is described. The method was used to obtain accurate partial boiling curves for jet impingement and pool boiling in R-113. While the characteristics of the heat transfer behavior agree with previous data, the data in general lie below data obtained with specialized test chips.

  1. In situ measurements of Arctic atmospheric trace constituents from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, G. M.; Briehl, D.; Nyland, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    In situ measurements of the ambient concentrations of several atmospheric trace constituents were obtained using instruments installed on board the NASA Convair 990 aircraft at altitudes up to 12.5 kilometers over Alaska and the Arctic Ocean. Concentration data on ozone, carbon monoxide, water vapor, and particles larger than 0.5 micrometer in diameter were acquired.

  2. Atmospheric CO2 measurements with a 2 μm airborne laser absorption spectrometer employing coherent detection.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Gary D; Menzies, Robert T; Jacob, Joseph; Christensen, Lance E; Phillips, Mark W; Choi, Yonghoon; Browell, Edward V

    2011-05-10

    We report airborne measurements of CO(2) column abundance conducted during two 2009 campaigns using a 2.05 μm laser absorption spectrometer. The two flight campaigns took place in the California Mojave desert and in Oklahoma. The integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) method is used for the CO(2) column mixing ratio retrievals. This instrument and the data analysis methodology provide insight into the capabilities of the IPDA method for both airborne measurements and future global-scale CO(2) measurements from low Earth orbit pertinent to the NASA Active Sensing of CO(2) Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission. The use of a favorable absorption line in the CO(2) 2 μm band allows the on-line frequency to be displaced two (surface pressure) half-widths from line center, providing high sensitivity to the lower tropospheric CO(2). The measurement repeatability and measurement precision are in good agreement with predicted estimates. We also report comparisons with airborne in situ measurements conducted during the Oklahoma campaign.

  3. Comparisons of soil moisture data from in situ measurements and global hydrological model outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.; Cazenave, A.; Milly, C.; Robock, A.

    2003-04-01

    In the context of the calibration of the GRACE geodetic mission, we investigated the accuracy of soil moisture variations predicted by a hydrological model. For this purpose, we compare outputs of the global hydrological LaD model with in situ measurements of soil moisture. In situ soil moisture measurements are available from the global moisture data bank (http://climate.envsci.rutgers.edu). The soil moisture values are interpolated in different regions of Eurasia (China, Mongolia, India, Russia) and in the United States, and for periods of several decades. To perform the observations-model comparisons, we interpolated the 1-degree gridded Land Dynamics hydrological model outputs at the locations of the in situ stations. We computed local and regional rms differences and their cross-coherency versus time and space for hundreds of station locations. In general, the model tends to under-estimate the absolute water storage in the soil, and provides smoother values than in situ measurements. However, in terms of temporal variations, both monthly model outputs and direct observations remain highly consistent, especially for the average seasonal cycle.

  4. Recent modifications, enhancements, and measurements with an airborne lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCoursey, Robert J.; Osborn, Mary T.; Winker, David M.; Woods, David C.

    1996-06-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's 14-inch airborne aerosol lidar system, which is routinely flown on several NASA aircraft including the DC-8 and the P-3, has been upgraded with several modifications to enhance its measurement capabilities. A new 900 mJ, 10 pps Nd:YAG laser was added with the capability of producing 5 watts of power at 1064 nm, 2.5 watts at 532 nm and 1.5 watts at 355 nm. The existing detector package has been modified to accommodate the three wavelengths and to permit cross-polarization measurements at 532 nm. New software was developed for on- line data visualization and analysis, and computer- controlled laser alignment is being incorporated. The system is now capable of producing real-time color modulated backscatter plots. Other additions include a Pentium/90 processor, GPS (Global Positioning System) and ARINC (Aeronautical Radio Inc.) receivers for acquiring accurate aircraft position data. In 1992 and 1993 this system was flown on several airborne missions to map and characterize the stratospheric aerosol cloud produced by the 1991 eruption of the Mount Pinatubo volcano. Efforts to map the global distribution of Pinatubo were made on both daytime as well as nighttime flights from Moffett Field in California to the South Pacific, to Central and South America, to Australia and to Alaska. In September 1994, the system (aboard NASA's P-3) made correlative measurements along shuttle orbit ground tracks in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment flown on the Space Shuttle. In this paper the system upgrades will be discussed and selected data obtained during these recent airborne campaigns will be presented.

  5. Snow Depths on Antarctic sea ice in the Bellingshausen - Amundsen Seas from NASA IceBridge and In-Situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, D. W.; Ackley, S. F.; Weissling, B.; Xie, H.

    2012-12-01

    Snow on sea ice is typically thought to control ice growth by modulating the conduction of heat through the ice and into the atmosphere as ice forms on the bottom and thickens the existing layer. An additional mechanism for Antarctic sea ice is that the accumulation of snow on the sea ice surface depresses it and causes flooding which can refreeze to snow ice, and thicken the sea ice from the top instead. In Situ measurements from two vessel expeditions in the Bellingshausen- and Amundsen Seas, J.C. Ross (Nov. 2010) and Oden (Dec. 2010 - Jan. 2011), showed that the majority of the sea ice surfaces were flooded during the period through ice stations and underway ASPeCt observations, and therefore identified the flooding-snow ice formation behavior as a principle source of ice thickening in these regions. A further consequence of widespread flooding is that the snow surface elevation is 90 to 100% of the snow depth on most of the sea ice cover. From in situ measurements, therefore, snow surface elevation has been determined to be an effective proxy for snow depth on Antarctic sea ice. In the same regions, airborne lidar was conducted from NASA's IceBridge aircraft in flights during Oct-Nov in 2009, 2010 and 2011. The same track lines were flown each year. Snow surface elevations are determined from airborne lidar with correction to local sea level made by returned signal intensity to locate leads which can then be used as a local sea level reference for elevation. Ship based measurements, near the same regions as portions of the flight lines are compared to snow depths determined from airborne snow elevation as validation data (2010 flight line). Interannual changes in snow depth are then determined over selected portions of the flights and used to examine regional variations in ice formation from 2009-2011 in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen Seas.

  6. Airborne Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Water Vapor in ACE-Asia and Their Comparisons to Correlative Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Russell, P.; Hegg, D.; Wang, J.; Kahn, R.; Hsu, C.; Masonis, S.; Murayama, T.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the Spring 2001 phase of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the 6-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated on 15 of the 19 research flights of the NCAR C-130, while its 14-channel counterpart (AATS-14) flew successfully on all 19 research flights of the CIRPAS Twin Otter. ACE-Asia studied aerosol outflow from the Asian continent to the Pacific basin. It was designed to integrate suborbital and satellite measurements and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosols. AATS-6 and AATS-14 measured solar beam transmission at six and 14 wavelengths (380-1021 and 354-1558 nm, respectively), yielding aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and columnar water vapor (CWV). Vertical differentiation in profiles yielded aerosol extinction spectra and water vapor concentration. In this paper, we plan to present examples of the following, preliminary findings that are based in part on our airborne sunphotometer measurements: (1) The wavelength dependence of sunphotometer-derived AOD and extinction indicates that supermicron dust was often a major component of the aerosol, frequently extending to high altitudes. The percentage of full-column AOD (525 nm) that Jay above 3 km was typically 34+/-13%. In contrast, the analogous percentage of columnar water vapor was only 10+/-4%; (2) Initial comparison studies between AOD data obtained by AATS-6 and AATS-14 during coordinated low-level flight legs show agreement well within the instruments' error bars; (3) Aerosol extinction has been derived from airborne in situ measurements of scattering (nephelometers) and absorption (particle soot/ absorption photometer, PSAP) or calculated from particle size distribution measurements (mobility analyzers and aerodynamic particle sizers). Comparison with corresponding extinction values derived from the Ames airborne sunphotometer measurements shows good agreement for the vertical distribution

  7. A towed airborne platform for turbulence measurements over the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friehe, Carl; Khelif, Djamal

    2008-11-01

    Measurements of wind stress and associated heat and mass fluxes (water vapor and CO2) down to ˜10 meters height over the ocean are required to establish parameterizations for wave, weather, hurricane and climate models. At high winds and accompanying sea states, such measurements are difficult or impossible. A new airborne instrumented towed platform has been developed that allows measurements down to 10 meters under radar-altitude control while the tow aircraft is safely above. Measurements include the three components of the wind, temperature, humidity, infrared surface temperature, CO2, and motion and navigational parameters. The bandwidth of the sensors allows calculation of the Reynolds averaged covariance's of stress and sensible heat and evaporation fluxes. Results are compared to equivalent measurements made with an instrumented aircraft. We would like to thank Robert Bluth of the Naval Postgraduate School and Jesse Barge and Dan Bierly of Zivko Aeronautics.

  8. Science Measurement Requirements for Imaging Spectrometers from Airborne to Spaceborne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Asner, Gregory P.; Boardman, Joseph; Ungar, Stephen; Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the objectives of the work to create imaging spectrometers. The science objectives are to remotely determine the properties of the surface and atmosphere (physics, chemistry and biology) revealed by the interaction of electromagnetic energy with matter via spectroscopy. It presents a review the understanding of spectral, radiometric and spatial science measurement requirements for imaging spectrometers based upon science research results from past and current airborne and spaceborne instruments. It also examines the future requirements that will enable the next level of imaging spectroscopy science.

  9. Initial in Situ Measurements of Perennial Meltwater Storage in the Greenland Firn Aquifer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Miege, Clement; Forster, Richard R.; Brucker, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    A perennial storage of water in a firn aquifer was discovered in southeast Greenland in 2011. We present the first in situ measurements of the aquifer, including densities and temperatures. Water was present at depths between approx. 12 and 37m and amounted to 18.7 +/- 0.9 kg in the extracted core. The water filled the firn to capacity at approx. 35m. Measurements show the aquifer temperature remained at the melting point, representing a large heat reservoir within the firn. Using model results of liquid water extent and aquifer surface depth from radar measurements, we extend our in situ measurements to the Greenland ice sheet. The estimated water volume is 140 +/- 20 Gt, representing approx. 0.4mm of sea level rise (SLR). It is unknown if the aquifer temporary buffers SLR or contributes to SLR through drainage and/or ice dynamics.

  10. Initial in situ measurements of perennial meltwater storage in the Greenland firn aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Miège, Clément; Forster, Richard R.; Brucker, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    perennial storage of water in a firn aquifer was discovered in southeast Greenland in 2011. We present the first in situ measurements of the aquifer, including densities and temperatures. Water was present at depths between ~12 and 37 m and amounted to 18.7 ± 0.9 kg in the extracted core. The water filled the firn to capacity at ~35 m. Measurements show the aquifer temperature remained at the melting point, representing a large heat reservoir within the firn. Using model results of liquid water extent and aquifer surface depth from radar measurements, we extend our in situ measurements to the Greenland ice sheet. The estimated water volume is 140 ± 20 Gt, representing ~0.4 mm of sea level rise (SLR). It is unknown if the aquifer temporary buffers SLR or contributes to SLR through drainage and/or ice dynamics.

  11. HOLOGondel: A novel in-situ cloud measurement platform on a cable car with a digital holographic imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander; Henneberger, Jan; Kanji, Zamin; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    Cloud particle properties observed in-situ are commonly conducted from airborne or ground-based measurements. When compared to airborne measurements, the advantages of ground-based measurements are a higher spatial resolution and much less costly to perform. However, ground-based observations allow only single-point measurements within a cloud. To overcome this disadvantage, a novel measurement platform with a digital holographic imager has been developed to allow in-situ cloud observations on the roof of a cable car cabin. With a traveling velocity of a cable car of a few m/s, such a measurement platform yields a spatial resolution comparable to those of ground-based measurements. In addition, it is possible to obtain vertical profiles of the microphysical properties within the cloud, because of the vertical distance covered by the cable car of approximately 800m. The major technical challenges for such a measurement platform are the lack of an external power supply and the additional weight constrain on a cable car cabin. To allow continuous operation for eight hours with a battery and to stay within the weight limit of 25kg at the same time, a compact design with carefully chosen material and components with a low power consumption was necessary. The new measurement platform HOLOGondel is equipped with a HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects (HOLIMO 3G). Digital in-line holography offers the advantages of measuring simultaneously an ensemble of cloud particles within a well-defined detection volume over a large range of particle size. The image captured, a hologram, yields information about the three-dimensional position, size and a shadow-graph of each particle within the detection volume. The HOLIMO 3G instrument is equipped with a 30MP camera and a 1.8 times magnifying, both-sided telecentric lens system. At a frame rate of six pictures per second a sample volume rate of about 100 cm3s-1 at a maximum resolution of 7 µm is achieved. This configuration

  12. A battery cell for in situ NMR measurements of liquid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Wiemers-Meyer, Simon; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2017-02-15

    This work describes the development of an in situ battery cell to monitor liquid electrolytes by means of NMR spectroscopy. The suitability of this approach is confirmed by NMR measurements and electrochemical analysis. The cell allows for undistorted high resolution NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, constant current cycling data, C-rate sequences and impedance measurements indicates a long cycle life as well as reasonable specific capacities and Ohmic resistances.

  13. Digital Holography for in Situ Real-Time Measurement of Plasma-Facing-Component Erosion

    SciTech Connect

    ThomasJr., C. E.; Granstedt, E. M.; Biewer, Theodore M; Baylor, Larry R; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, Steven J; Hillis, Donald Lee; Majeski, R.; Kaita, R.

    2014-01-01

    In situ, real time measurement of net plasma-facing-component (PFC) erosion/deposition in a real plasma device is challenging due to the need for good spatial and temporal resolution, sufficient sensitivity, and immunity to fringe-jump errors. Design of a high-sensitivity, potentially high-speed, dual-wavelength CO2 laser digital holography system (nominally immune to fringe jumps) for PFC erosion measurement is discussed.

  14. Large-Scale Ozone Variations in the Arctic During SOLVE-2 and Comparisons of Remote and In Situ Ozone Profile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browell, E. V.; Fenn, M. A.; Grant, W. B.; Avery, M. A.; Neuber, R.; McGee, T. J.; Trepte, C. R.; Butler, C. F.; Kooi, S. A.; Notari, A.; Hair, J. W.; Lait, L. R.

    2003-12-01

    Ozone cross sections were obtained from near the surface to above 30 km along the ground track of the NASA DC-8 on long-range flights across the Arctic during the 2003 SAGE-III (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE-2). Extensive regions of lower than expected ozone were found inside the polar vortex below about 22 km at the start of the mission (January 9, 2003), and by the end of mission (February 12, 2003) ozone had decreased to less than 2.0 ppm in localized regions inside the vortex at about 19 km. These regions of particularly low ozone were associated with air masses that had seen extended periods of sunlight. Extensive structure was observed in the ozone field near the edge of the vortex on many flights, and on occasion, large filaments of extra-vortex air were observed inside the vortex. When the vortex divided into two separate vortices, the ozone field reflected the separation with extra-vortex air in between. The nadir ozone data showed strong evidence of downward transport in vicinity of jet streams, and these intrusions were observed to extend down to below 4 km in some cases. Directly under the vortex, large-scale descent of stratospheric air produced ozone levels exceeding 100 ppbv down to 5 km. This is the first time the entire ozone cross section was obtained during an airborne field experiment, and it will provide important new information on atmospheric dynamics and ozone chemistry in the Arctic. This experiment also provided a unique opportunity to compare ozone measurements from several different remote and in situ instruments. Ozone profiles were measured above and below the DC-8 with the airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, and the Airborne Raman Ozone, Temperature, and Aerosol Lidar (AROTAL) measured ozone profiles above the aircraft. In situ ozone measurements were made at the DC-8 flight level, and ground-based lidar and ozonesonde measurements were made from Ny

  15. Unmanned Airborne System Deployment at Turrialba Volcano for Real Time Eruptive Cloud Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J. A.; Pieri, D. C.; Fladeland, M. M.; Bland, G.; Corrales, E.; Alan, A., Jr.; Alegria, O.; Kolyer, R.

    2015-12-01

    The development of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) with a variety of instrument packages enables in situ and proximal remote sensing measurements of volcanic plumes, even when the active conditions of the volcano do not allow volcanologists and emergency response personnel to get too close to the erupting crater. This has been demonstrated this year by flying a sUAS through the heavy ash driven erupting volcanic cloud of Turrialba Volcano, while conducting real time in situ measurement of gases over the crater summit. The event also achieved the collection of newly released ash samples from the erupting volcano. The interception of the Turrialba ash cloud occurred during the CARTA 2015 field campaign carried out as part of an ongoing program for remote sensing satellite calibration and validation purposes, using active volcanic plumes. These deployments are timed to support overflights of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) onboard the NASA Terra satellite on a bimonthly basis using airborne platforms such as tethered balloons, free-flying fixed wing small UAVs at altitudes up to 12.5Kft ASL within about a 5km radius of the summit crater. The onboard instrument includes the MiniGas payload which consists of an array of single electrochemical and infrared gas detectors (SO2, H2S CO2), temperature, pressure, relative humidity and GPS sensors, all connected to an Arduino-based board, with data collected at 1Hz. Data are both stored onboard and sent by telemetry to the ground operator within a 3 km range. The UAV can also carry visible and infrared cameras as well as other payloads, such as a UAV-MS payload that is currently under development for mass spectrometer-based in situ measurements. The presentation describes the ongoing UAV- based in situ remote sensing validation program at Turrialba Volcano, the results of a fly-through the eruptive cloud, as well as future plans to continue these efforts. Work presented here was

  16. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Higdon, N S; Browell, E V; Ponsardin, P; Grossmann, B E; Butler, C F; Chyba, T H; Mayo, M N; Allen, R J; Heuser, A W; Grant, W B; Ismail, S; Mayor, S D; Carter, A F

    1994-09-20

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H(2)O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and > 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H(2)O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H(2)O absorption-line parameters were perfo med to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H(2)O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H(2)O radiosondes. The H(2)O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by ≤ 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  17. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Hueser, Alene W.

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  18. Measurements of Absorbing Aerosols Using in Situ and Remote Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. V.; Martins, J. V.; Kaufman, Y.; Artaxo, P.; Andrea, C.; Yamasoe, M.; Remer, L.

    2001-12-01

    Reliable measurements of light absorption by aerosol particles are essential for an accurate assessment of the climate radiative forcing by aerosol particles. Depending on the absorption properties, the radiative forcing of the aerosols may change from a cooling to a heating effect. New techniques for the remote sensing of aerosol absorption over land and ocean are developed and applied in combination with in situ measurements for validation and addition of complementary information. Spectral measurements show the effects of aerosols on absorption of light from the UV to the near infrared. Depending on particle size and structure, there is a significant absorption component that must be accounted for the radiative forcing in the near infrared. Remote sensing results from MODIS and from the CLAMS field experiment, as well as in situ validation data will be discussed.

  19. In Situ Field Measurement of Leaf Water Potential Using Thermocouple Psychrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Wiebe, Herman H.; Cass, Alfred

    1983-01-01

    Thermocouple psychrometers are the only instruments which can measure the in situ water potential of intact leaves, and which can possibly be used to monitor leaf water potential. Unfortunately, their usefulness is limited by a number of difficulties, among them fluctuating temperatures and temperature gradients within the psychrometer, sealing of the psychrometer chamber to the leaf, shading of the leaf by the psychrometer, and resistance to water vapor diffusion by the cuticle when the stomates are closed. Using Citrus jambhiri, we have tested several psychrometer design and operational modifications and showed that in situ psychrometric measurements compared favorably with simultaneous Scholander pressure chamber measurements on neighboring leaves when the latter were corrected for the osmotic potential. PMID:16663267

  20. Validation of Satellite Observed Soil Moisture Using In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, Rogier; Yu, Xiaolong; Zheng, Donghai; Benninga, Harm-Jan F.; Shahmohamadi, Mohamad Ali; Hendriks, Dimmie; Hunnink, Joachim; Coliander, Andreas; Jackson, Thomas J.; Bindlish, Rajat; Chan, Steven K.; Su, Bob

    2016-08-01

    Although with in-situ techniques soil moisture can be measured reliably at point-scale, it remains a challengeto translate a collection of point measurements tothe scale of satellite footprints (> 10 km). Spatially distributed soil moisture simulations by the Dutch Landelijk Hydro-logisch Model (LHM, De Lange et al. 2014) are here employed for this task. The upscaled in- situ measurements are subsequently utilized to assess the CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS, Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, Jacquette et al. 2010) L3 and the NASA SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive)L2 radiometer-only soil moisture products (O'Neill et al. 2015).

  1. Combining Space-Based and In-Situ Measurements to Track Flooding in Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Mclaren, David; Tran, Daniel; Tanpipat, Veerachai; Chitradon, Royal; Boonya-aaroonnet, Surajate; Thanapakpawin, Porranee; Khunboa, Chatchai; Leelapatra, Watis; Plermkamon, Vichian; Raghavendra, Cauligi; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe efforts to integrate in-situ sensing, space-borne sensing, hydrological modeling, active control of sensing, and automatic data product generation to enhance monitoring and management of flooding. In our approach, broad coverage sensors and missions such as MODIS, TRMM, and weather satellite information and in-situ weather and river gauging information are all inputs to track flooding via river basin and sub-basin hydrological models. While these inputs can provide significant information as to the major flooding, targetable space measurements can provide better spatial resolution measurements of flooding extent. In order to leverage such assets we automatically task observations in response to automated analysis indications of major flooding. These new measurements are automatically processed and assimilated with the other flooding data. We describe our ongoing efforts to deploy this system to track major flooding events in Thailand.

  2. Comparison of MTI Satellite-Derived Surface Water Temperatures and In-Situ Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2001-07-26

    Temperatures of the water surface of a cold, mid-latitude lake and the tropical Pacific Ocean were determined from MTI images and from in situ concurrent measurements. In situ measurements were obtained at the time of the MTI image with a floating, anchored platform, which measured the surface and bulk water temperatures and relevant meteorological variables, and also from a boat moving across the target area. Atmospheric profiles were obtained from concurrent radiosonde soundings. Radiances at the satellite were calculated with the Modtran radiative transfer model. The MTI infrared radiances were within 1 percent of the calculated values at the Pacific Ocean site but were 1-2 percent different over the mid-latitude lake.

  3. Orthoclase surface structure dissolution measured in situ by x-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N. C.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Teng, H.

    2000-11-28

    Orthoclase (001) surface topography and interface structure were measured during dissolution by using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and synchrotrons X-ray reflectivity at pH 1.1-12.9 and T = 25-84 C. Terrace roughening at low pH and step motion at high pH were the main phenomena observed, and dissolution rates were measured precisely. Contrasting dissolution mechanisms are inferred for low- and high-pH conditions. These observations clarify differences in alkali feldspar dissolution mechanisms as a function of pH, demonstrate a new in situ method for measuring face-specific dissolution rates on single crystals, and improve the fundamental basis for understanding alkali feldspar weathering processes.

  4. Estimation of Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects from Satellite and In Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; McIntosh, Dawn

    2000-01-01

    Ames researchers have combined measurements from satellite, aircraft, and the surface to estimate the effect of airborne particles (aerosols) on the solar radiation over the North Atlantic region. These aerosols (which come from both natural and pollution sources) can reflect solar radiation, causing a cooling effect that opposes the warming caused by carbon dioxide. Recently, increased attention has been paid to aerosol effects to better understand the Earth climate system.

  5. In situ autonomous optical radiometry measurements for satellite ocean color validation in the Western Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibordi, G.; Mélin, F.; Berthon, J.-F.; Talone, M.

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of primary satellite ocean color data products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on-board Aqua (MODIS-A) and the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is investigated in the Western Black Sea using in situ measurements from the Gloria site included in the ocean color component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET-OC). The analysis is also extended to an additional well-established AERONET-OC site in the northern Adriatic Sea characterized by optically complex coastal waters exhibiting similarities to those observed at the Gloria site. Results from the comparison of normalized water-leaving radiance LWN indicate biases of a few percent between satellite-derived and in situ data at the center wavelengths relevant for the determination of chlorophyll a concentrations (443-547 nm, or equivalent). Remarkable is the consistency between the annual cycle determined with time series of satellite-derived and in situ LWN ratios at these center wavelengths. Contrarily, the differences between in situ and satellite-derived LWN are pronounced at the blue (i.e., 412 nm) and red (i.e., 667 nm, or equivalent) center wavelengths, confirming difficulties in confidently applying satellite-derived radiometric data from these spectral regions for quantitative analysis in optically complex waters.

  6. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Methane Using Pulsed Laser Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Wu, Stewart; Gonzalez, Brayler; Rodriguez, Michael; Hasselbrack, William; Fahey, Molly; Yu, Anthony; Stephen, Mark; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with approximately 25 times the radiative forcing of carbon dioxide (CO2) per molecule. At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) we have been developing a laser-based technology needed to remotely measure CH4 from orbit. We report on our development effort for the methane lidar, especially on our laser transmitters and recent airborne demonstration. Our lidar transmitter is based on an optical parametric process to generate near infrared laser radiation at 1651 nanometers, coincident with a CH4 absorption. In an airborne flight campaign in the fall of 2015, we tested two kinds of laser transmitters --- an optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The output wavelength of the lasers was rapidly tuned over the CH4 absorption by tuning the seed laser to sample the CH4 absorption line at several wavelengths. This approach uses the same Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) technique we have used for our CO2 lidar for ASCENDS. The two laser transmitters were successfully operated in the NASAs DC-8 aircraft, measuring methane from 3 to 13 kilometers with high precision.

  7. Time lapse 3D geoelectric measurements for monitoring of in-situ remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tildy, Péter; Neducza, Boriszláv; Nagy, Péter; Kanli, Ali Ismet; Hegymegi, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, different kinds of in-situ methods have been increasingly used for hydrocarbon contamination remediation due to their effectiveness. One of these techniques operates by injection of chemical oxidant solution to remove (degrade) the subsurface contaminants. Our aim was to develop a surface (non-destructive) measurement strategy to monitor oxidative in-situ remediation processes. The difficulties of the presented study originate from the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations, the effect of conductive groundwater and the high clay content of the targeted layer. Therefore a site specific synthetic modelling was necessary for measurement design involving the results of preliminary 2D ERT measurements, electrical conductivity measurements of different active agents and expected resistivity changes calculated by soil resistivity modelling. The results of soil resistivity modelling have suggested that the reagent have complex effects on contaminated soils because of chemical biodegradation. As a result the plume of resistivity changes caused by the injected agent was determined showing strong fracturing effect because of the high pressure of injection. Based on the sophisticated tests and synthetic modelling 3D time-lapse geo-electric measurements were proven to provide a usable monitoring tool for in-situ remediation to help in-field design of such techniques.

  8. Airborne Particle Size Distribution Measurements at USDOE Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Chittaporn, P.; Heikkinen, M.; Medora, R.; Merrill, R.

    2003-03-27

    There are no long term measurements of the particle size distribution and concentration of airborne radionuclides at any USDOE facility except Fernald. Yet the determinant of lung dose is the particle size, determining the airway and lower lung deposition. Beginning in 2000, continuous (6 to 8 weeks) measurements of the aerosol particle size distribution have been made with a miniature sampler developed under EMSP. Radon gas decays to a chain of four short lived solid radionuclides that attach immediately to the resident atmospheric aerosol. These in turn decay to long lived polonium 210. Alpha emitting polonium is a tracer for any atmospheric aerosol. Six samplers at Fernald and four at QC sites in New Jersey show a difference in both polonium concentration and size distribution with the winter measurements being higher/larger than summer by almost a factor of two at all locations. EMSP USDOE Contract DE FG07 97ER62522.

  9. Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.; Apte, M.G.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor.

  10. Ground and Airborne Methane Measurements Using Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Kawa, Stephan R.; Abshire, James Brice; Dawsey, Martha; Ramanathan, Anand

    2011-01-01

    We report on ground and airborne methane measurements with an active sensing instrument using widely tunable, seeded optical parametric generation (OPG). The technique has been used to measure methane, CO2, water vapor, and other trace gases in the near and mid-infrared spectral regions. Methane is a strong greenhouse gas on Earth and it is also a potential biogenic marker on Mars and other planetary bodies. Methane in the Earth's atmosphere survives for a shorter time than CO2 but its impact on climate change can be larger than CO2. Carbon and methane emissions from land are expected to increase as permafrost melts exposing millennial-age carbon stocks to respiration (aerobic-CO2 and anaerobic-CH4) and fires. Methane emissions from c1athrates in the Arctic Ocean and on land are also likely to respond to climate warming. However, there is considerable uncertainty in present Arctic flux levels, as well as how fluxes will change with the changing environment. For Mars, methane measurements are of great interest because of its potential as a strong biogenic marker. A remote sensing instrument that can measure day and night over all seasons and latitudes can localize sources of biogenic gas plumes produced by subsurface chemistry or biology, and aid in the search for extra-terrestrial life. In this paper we report on remote sensing measurements of methane using a high peak power, widely tunable optical parametric generator (OPG) operating at 3.3 micrometers and 1.65 micrometers. We have demonstrated detection of methane at 3.3 micrometers and 1650 nanometers in an open path and compared them to accepted standards. We also report on preliminary airborne demonstration of methane measurements at 1.65 micrometers.

  11. Aerial and in situ Measurements of Submesoscale Eddies, Fronts, and Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baschek, Burkard; Maarten Molemaker, Jeroen

    2010-05-01

    Submesoscale eddies, fronts, and filaments on scales of 10 m to 20 km are common features of many coastal regions of the world. Modeling results suggest that these submesoscale phenomena play an important role in local energy cascades, transferring energy from the large-scale ocean circulation to turbulence. It is also likely that submesoscale features are important for mixing, vertical transport, or biogeochemical processes. While submesoscale features have been observed using SAR satellite imagery, only very limited in situ measurements exist that reveal the dynamically relevant internal structure. Submesoscale features have a life time of several hours to a few days and advective speeds of up to 0.5 ms-1, which makes it very hard to measure them with traditional in situ sampling. Also satellite sea surface temperature (SST) data cannot sufficiently resolve the small scales of these features. We present aerial and in situ measurements of submesoscale eddies, fronts, and filaments, and believe to have carried out the first time in situ measurements of a spiral eddy (~2.5 km diameter) during a 5-day experiment in September 2009 off Catalina Island, CA. The observations are taken with a cost efficient and pragmatic observational approach for repeat quasi-synoptic measurements of submesoscale features in real-time and on the required small spatial and temporal scales of ~30min and ~20m. An IR camera mounted on a small plane is used to derive fine-resolution SST maps of this area and to guide a fast response vessel to distinct submesoscale features. A temperature/pressure array is towed in the upper 45m at speeds of 5 ms-1 through the features. The properties of the submesoscale features are examined within the context of the larger-scale circulation patterns of this highly variable coastal region combined with the analysis of satellite SST, coastal radar, and mooring data.

  12. Initial evaluation of airborne water vapour measurements by the IAGOS-GHG CRDS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filges, Annette; Gerbig, Christoph; Smit, Herman G. J.; Krämer, Martina; Spelten, Nicole

    2013-04-01

    Accurate and reliable airborne measurements of water vapour are still a challenge. Presently, no airborne humidity sensor exists that covers the entire range of water vapour content between the surface and the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region with sufficient accuracy and time resolution. Nevertheless , these data are a pre-requisite to study the underlying processes in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. The DENCHAR project (Development and Evaluation of Novel Compact Hygrometer for Airborne Research) addresses this deficit by developing and characterizing novel or improved compact airborne hygrometers for different airborne applications within EUFAR (European Facility for Airborne Research). As part of the DENCHAR inter-comparison campaign in Hohn (Germany), 23 May - 1 June 2011, a commercial gas analyzer (G2401-m, Picarro Inc.,US), based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), was installed on a Learjet to measure water vapour, CO2, CH4 and CO. The CRDS components are identical to those chosen for integration aboard commercial airliner within IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System). Thus the campaign allowed for the initial assessment validation of the long-term IAGOS H2O measurements by CRDS against reference instruments with a long performance record (FISH, the Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer, and CR2 frostpoint hygrometer, both research centre Juelich). The inlet system, a one meter long 1/8" FEP-tube connected to a Rosemount TAT housing (model 102BX, deiced) installed on a window plate of the aircraft, was designed to eliminate sampling of larger aerosols, ice particles, and water droplets, and provides about 90% of ram-pressure. In combination with a lowered sample flow of 0.1 slpm (corresponding to a 4 second response time), this ensured a fully controlled sample pressure in the cavity of 140 torr throughout an aircraft altitude operating range up to 12.5 km without the need of an upstream sampling pump

  13. Intercomparison of MODIS Albedo Retrievals and In Situ Measurements Across the Global FLUXNET Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cescatti, Alessandro; Marcolla, Barbara; Vannan, Suresh K. Santhana; Pan, Jerry Yun; Roman, Miguel O.; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Ciais, Philippe; Cook, Robert B.; Law, Beverly E.; Matteucci, Girogio; Migliavacca, Mirco; Moors, Eddy; Richardson, Andrew D.; Seufert, Guenther; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2012-01-01

    Surface albedo is a key parameter in the Earth's energy balance since it affects the amount of solar radiation directly absorbed at the planet surface. Its variability in time and space can be globally retrieved through the use of remote sensing products. To evaluate and improve the quality of satellite retrievals, careful intercomparisons with in situ measurements of surface albedo are crucial. For this purpose we compared MODIS albedo retrievals with surface measurements taken at 53 FLUXNET sites that met strict conditions of land cover homogeneity. A good agreement between mean yearly values of satellite retrievals and in situ measurements was found (R(exp 2)= 0.82). The mismatch is correlated to the spatial heterogeneity of surface albedo, stressing the relevance of land cover homogeneity when comparing point to pixel data. When the seasonal patterns of MODIS albedo is considered for different plant functional types, the match with surface observation is extremely good at all forest sites. On the contrary, in non-forest sites satellite retrievals underestimate in situ measurements across the seasonal cycle. The mismatch observed at grasslands and croplands sites is likely due to the extreme fragmentation of these landscapes, as confirmed by geostatistical attributes derived from high resolution scenes.

  14. Recent Advances in the Tempest UAS for In-Situ Measurements in Highly-Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argrow, B. M.; Frew, E.; Houston, A. L.; Weiss, C.

    2014-12-01

    The spring 2010 deployment of the Tempest UAS during the VORTEX2 field campaign verified that a small UAS, supported by a customized mobile communications, command, and control (C3) architecture, could simultaneously satisfy Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airspace requirements, and make in-situ thermodynamic measurements in supercell thunderstorms. A multi-hole airdata probe was recently integrated into the Tempest UAS airframe and verification flights were made in spring 2013 to collect in-situ wind measurements behind gust fronts produced by supercell thunderstorms in northeast Colorado. Using instantaneous aircraft attitude estimates from the autopilot, the in-situ measurements were converted to inertial wind estimates, and estimates of uncertainty in the wind measurements was examined. To date, the limited deployments of the Tempest UAS have primarily focused on addressing the engineering and regulatory requirements to conduct supercell research, and the Tempest UAS team of engineers and meteorologists is preparing for deployments with the focus on collecting targeted data for meteorological exploration and hypothesis testing. We describe the recent expansion of the operations area and altitude ceiling of the Tempest UAS, engineering issues for accurate inertial wind estimates, new concepts of operation that include the simultaneous deployment of multiple aircraft with mobile ground stations, and a brief description of our current effort to develop a capability for the Tempest UAS to perform autonomous path planning to maximize energy harvesting from the local wind field for increased endurance.

  15. Airborne IPDA Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Methane in Support of MERLIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, C.; Amediek, A.; Wirth, M.; Ehret, G.

    2015-12-01

    Space-based lidar missions targeting greenhouse gases are expected to close observational gaps, e.g., over subarctic permafrost and tropical wetlands, where in-situ and passive remote sensing techniques have difficulties. Consequently, a "Methane Remote Lidar Mission" (MERLIN) was proposed by the German and French space agencies DLR and CNES. MERLIN is now in Phase B, in which all mission components are planned in detail; launch is foreseen in 2020. An integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar will measure weighted columns of atmospheric methane (XCH4) along the satellite track. Primary objective is to provide accurate global observations of methane concentration gradients for inverse numerical models in order to better quantify regional fluxes. DLR has developed an airborne demonstrator, CHARM-F, for technology demonstration and validation purposes. First successful flights on-board the German HALO research aircraft have been performed in May 2015 over Central Europe. The measurements are expected to help solve general retrieval issues for future space-borne IPDA lidars. For example, the CHARM-F flights over ocean and lakes help assess the strength and variability of backscatter from water surfaces. The IPDA weighting function, or measurement sensitivity, is dependent on atmospheric pressure and temperature, in particular close to the surface. We use ECMWF analyses interpolated in space and time to the aircraft track that provide these auxiliary data at 14 km horizontal resolution. Due to the coarse representation of orography the model's pressure and temperature profiles have to be extrapolated down to the true lidar's scattering surface elevation, which generates uncertainties that we assess. We also assess biases by spectroscopic uncertainties in the methane absorption lines' parameters. Overall, the airborne results will support the development of advanced processing algorithms for future space lidar missions such as MERLIN.

  16. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Saharan Dust Layers Derived from In-Situ Measurements and CALIPSO Overflights During NAMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Thornhill, Kenneth L., II; Kittaka, Chieko; Ismail, Syed; Chen, Gao; Powell, Kathleen A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.; Trepte, Charles R.; Winstead, Edward L.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the extinction-to-backscatter (Sa) ratios of dust using (1) airborne in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, (2) modeling studies, and (3) the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) observations recorded during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA) field experiment conducted from Sal, Cape Verde during Aug-Sept 2006. Using CALIPSO measurements of the attenuated backscatter of lofted Saharan dust layers, we apply the transmittance technique to estimate dust Sa ratios at 532 nm and a 2-color method to determine the corresponding 1064 nm Sa. This method yielded dust Sa ratios of 39.8 plus or minus 1.4 sr and 51.8 plus or minus 3.6 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Secondly, Sa at both wavelengths is independently calculated using size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 and estimates of Saharan dust complex refractive indices applied in a T-Matrix scheme. We found Sa ratios of 39.1 plus or minus 3.5 sr and 50.0 plus or minus 4 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, using the T-Matrix calculations applied to measured size spectra. Finally, in situ measurements of the total scattering (550 nm) and absorption coefficients (532 nm) are used to generate an extinction profile that is used to constrain the CALIPSO 532 nm extinction profile and thus generate a stratified 532 nm Sa. This method yielded an Sa ratio at 532 nm of 35.7 sr in the dust layer and 25 sr in the marine boundary layer consistent with a predominantly seasalt aerosol near the ocean surface. Combinatorial simulations using noisy size spectra and refractive indices were used to estimate the mean and uncertainty (one standard deviation) of these Sa ratios. These simulations produced a mean (plus or minus uncertainty) of 39.4 (plus or minus 5.9) sr and 56.5 (plus or minus 16.5) sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, corresponding to percent uncertainties of 15% and 29%. These results will provide a measurements

  17. In situ azimuthal rotation device for linear dichroism measurements in scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cruz, D.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Tyliszczak, T.; Rousseau, M.-E.; Pézolet, M.

    2007-03-01

    A novel miniature rotation device used in conjunction with a scanning transmission x-ray microscope is described. It provides convenient in situ sample rotation to enable measurements of linear dichroism at high spatial resolution. The design, fabrication, and mechanical characterization are presented. This device has been used to generate quantitative maps of the spatial distribution of the orientation of proteins in several different spider and silkworm silks. Specifically, quantitative maps of the dichroic signal at the C 1s→π*amide transition in longitudinal sections of the silk fibers give information about the spatial orientation, degree of alignment, and spatial distribution of protein peptide bonds. A new approach for analyzing the dichroic signal to extract orientation distributions, in addition to magnitudes of aligned components, is presented and illustrated with results from Nephila clavipes dragline spider silk measured using the in situ rotation device.

  18. Chemical isolation of quartz for measurement of in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, C. P.; Nishiizumi, K.

    1992-01-01

    An isolation method relying totally on chemical steps was developed to separate large quantities (10-200 g) of clean mono-minerallic quartz samples from a variety of terrestrial rocks and soils for the purpose of measuring Be-10 (t1/2 = 1.5 Myr) and Al-26 (t1/2 = 0.705 Myr) produced by cosmic rays in situ in the quartz phase. The procedure consists of grinding the sample, heating it in HCl, and treating it with a series of leaches using a dilute HF/HNO3 mixture in a heated ultrasonic tank. The purified quartz was also used for the measurements of in situ cosmic-ray-produced Ne-21 and C-14 (t1/2 = 5730 yr). The method is applicable to any problem requiring purified quartz on a large scale.

  19. Spatially resolved, in situ potential measurements through porous electrodes as applied to fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hess, Katherine C; Epting, William K; Litster, Shawn

    2011-12-15

    We report the development and use of a microstructured electrode scaffold (MES) to make spatially resolved, in situ, electrolyte potential measurements through the thickness of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) electrode. This new approach uses a microfabricated apparatus to analyze the coupled transport and electrochemical phenomena in porous electrodes at the microscale. In this study, the MES allows the fuel cell to run under near-standard operating conditions, while providing electrolyte potential measurements at discrete distances through the electrode's thickness. Here we use spatial distributions of electrolyte potential to evaluate the effects of Ohmic and mass transport resistances on the through-plane reaction distribution for various operating conditions. Additionally, we use the potential distributions to estimate the ionic conductivity of the electrode. Our results indicate the in situ conductivity is higher than typically estimated for PEFC electrodes based on bulk polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) conductivity.

  20. Stresses in Copper Damascene Lines: In-situ Measurements and Finite Element Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gergaud, P.; Baldacci, A.; Thomas, O.; Rivero, C.; Sicardy, O.; Micha, J.-S.

    2006-02-07

    The mechanical properties of thin damascene Cu lines are investigated by in-situ x-ray diffraction, in-situ curvature measurements and finite element calculations. At variance with the behavior of blanket films, 0.3 {mu}m lines exhibit a thermo-elastic behavior which is well reproduced by finite element calculations. The curvature measurements confirm this pure elastic behavior. The triaxial stress state in the lines may explain the lack of plasticity at reduced temperatures because different stress tensor element make the resolved stress cancel out. Profile analysis of the X-ray peaks are compared to the strain distribution deduced from the finite element calculations. The good agreement confirms the large strain inhomogeneities in the lines due to interfacial effects.

  1. Comfort improvement of a nonlinear suspension using global optimization and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprez, K.; Moshou, D.; Ramon, H.

    2005-06-01

    The health problems encountered by operators of off-road vehicles demonstrate that a lot of effort still has to be put into the design of effective seat and cabin suspensions. Owing to the nonlinear nature of the suspensions and the use of in situ measurements for the optimization, classical local optimization techniques are prone to getting stuck in local minima. Therefore this paper develops a method for optimizing nonlinear suspension systems based on in situ measurements, using the global optimization technique DIRECT to avoid local minima. Evaluation of the comfort improvement of the suspension was carried out using the objective comfort parameters used in standards. As a test case, the optimization of a hydropneumatic element that can serve as part of a cabin suspension for off-road machinery was performed.

  2. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Melvin D.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position.

  3. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, M.D.

    1994-01-11

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position. 8 figures.

  4. Development of novel sol-gel indicators (SGI`s) for in-situ environmental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.; Wicks, G.G.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    Organic indicator molecules have been incorporated in a porous sol- gel matrix coated on the end of a fiber-optic lens assembly to create sensors for in situ environmental measurements. Probes have been made that are sensitive to pH and uranyl concentration. The use of fiber optics allows the probe to be lowered into a well or bore hole, while support equipment such as a spectrophotometer and computer may be situated hundreds of meters away.

  5. Experimental Development of a Novel Stress Sensor for in situ Stress Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Lance, Michael J; Mattus, Catherine H; Daniels, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe ongoing work to adapt a previously demonstrated method for measuring stress in ceramics to develop a borehole deployed in situ stress sensor. The method involves the use of a cementitious material which exhibits a strong piezo-spectroscopic stress response as a downhole stress gage. A description of the conceptual approach will be provided along with preliminary analysis and proof-of-concept laboratory results.

  6. Wind-Driven Angular Dependence of Sea-Surface Reflectance Measured with an Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Cutten, Dean R.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of wind-stress on the optical properties of the ocean surface have been studied for several decades. In particular, the classic study by Cox and Munk (1954) linking sea-surface wind field to wave slope statistics provides a phenomenology by which the sea-surface wind velocity can be estimated from direct measurement of the wave-modulated surface reflectance. A limited number of studies along these lines have been conducted using airborne or spaceborne lidar systems. In these instances, truthing was provided by in situ ship reports or satellite microwave remote sensing instruments (e.g., ERS scatterometer, SSM/I). During the second deployment of the MACAWS Doppler wind lidar in the summer of 1996 measurements of sea-surface reflectance as a function of azimuth- and nadir-viewing angles were acquired off the California coast. MACAWS data products include directly measured winds, as well as calibrated backscatter/reflectance profiles, thus enabling comparison of the winds inferred from sea-surface reflectance measurements with those deriving from the Doppler-processed direct line-of-sight (LOS) estimates. Additional validation data was extracted from the ERS and SSM/I satellite microwave sensor archives maintained by the JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO- DAAC).

  7. Processing and analysis of radiometer measurements for airborne reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Helmut

    1990-11-01

    Thi8 paper describes selected results of airborne, radiometric imaging measurements at 90 GHz and 140 GHz relevant for the application in reconnaissance. Using a temperature resolution below 0.5 K and an angular resolution of about 1 degree high quality images show the capability of discriminating between many brightness temperature classes within our natural environment and man-made objects. Measurement examples are given for cloud and fog penetration at 90 GHz, for the detection of vehicles on roads, and for the detection and classification of airports and airplanes. The application of different contour enhancement methods (Marr-Hildreth and Canny) shows the possibility of extracting lines and shapes precisely in order to improve automatic target recognition. The registration of the passive images with corresponding X-band synthetic aperture images from the same area is carried out and the high degree of correlation is dicussed.

  8. Processing and analysis of radiometer measurements for airborne reconnaissance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Helmut

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes selected results of airborne, radiometric imaging measurements at 90 GHz and 140 GHz relevant for the application in reconnaissance. Using a temperature resolution below 0.5 K and an angular resolution of about 1-degree high-quality images show the capability of discriminating between many brightness temperature classes within our natural environment and man-made objects. Measurement examples are given for cloud and fog penetration at 90 GHz, for the detection of vehicles on roads, and for the detection and classification of airports and airplanes. The application of different contour enhancement methods (Marr-Hildreth and Canny) shows the possibility of extracting lines and shapes precisely in order to improve automatic target recognition. The registration of the passive images with corresponding X-band synthetic aperture images from the same area is carried out and the high degree of correlation is discussed.

  9. Airborne compact rotational Raman lidar for temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Decheng; Wang, Zhien; Wechsler, Perry; Mahon, Nick; Deng, Min; Glover, Brent; Burkhart, Matthew; Kuestner, William; Heesen, Ben

    2016-09-05

    We developed an airborne compact rotational Raman lidar (CRL) for use on the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) aircraft to obtain two-dimensional (2D) temperature disman tributions. It obtained fine-scale 2D temperature distributions within 3 km below the aircraft for the first time during the PECAN (Plains Elevated Convection At Night) campaign in 2015. The CRL provided nighttime temperature measurements with a random error of <0.5 K within 800 m below aircraft at 45 m vertical and 1000 m horizontal resolution. The temperatures obtained by the CRL and a radiosonde agreed. Along with water vapor and aerosol measurements, the CRL provides critical parameters on the state of the lower atmosphere for a wide range of atmospheric research.

  10. Monitoring groundwater variation by satellite and implications for in-situ gravity measurements.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Keiko; Hasegawa, Takashi; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Nishijima, Jun; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2009-04-15

    In order to establish a new technique for monitoring groundwater variations in urban areas, the applicability of precise in-situ gravity measurements and extremely high precision satellite gravity data via GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) was tested. Using the GRACE data, regional scale water mass variations in four major river basins of the Indochina Peninsula were estimated. The estimated variations were compared with Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (SVATS) models with a river flow model of 1) globally uniform river velocity, 2) river velocity tuned by each river basin, 3) globally uniform river velocity considering groundwater storage, and 4) river velocity tuned by each river basin considering groundwater storage. Model 3) attained the best fit to the GRACE data, and the model 4) yielded almost the same values. This implies that the groundwater plays an important role in estimating the variation of total terrestrial storage. It also indicates that tuning river velocity, which is based on the in-situ measurements, needs further investigations in combination with the GRACE data. The relationships among GRACE data, SVATS models, and in-situ measurements were also discussed briefly.

  11. Orbital plane constraint applicable for in-situ measurement of sub-millimeter-size debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumoto, Masahiro; Fujita, Koki; Hanada, Toshiya; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Kitazawa, Yukihito

    2017-03-01

    Space debris smaller than 1 mm in size still have enough energy to cause a fatal damage on a spacecraft, but such tiny debris cannot be followed or tracked from the ground. Therefore, IDEA the project for In-situ Debris Environmental Awareness, which aims to detect sub-millimeter-size debris using a group of micro satellites, has been initiated at Kyushu University. First, this paper reviews the previous study on the nature of orbits on which debris may be detected through in-situ measurements proposed in the IDEA project. Second, this paper derives a simple equation that constrains the orbital plane on which debris is detected through in-situ measurements. Third, this paper also investigates the nature and sensitivity of this simple constraint equation to clear how frequently impacts have to be confirmed to reduce the measurement error. Finally, this paper introduces a torus model to describe the collision flux observed from the previous study approximately. This collision flux approximation agrees rather well with the observed collision flux. It is concluded, therefore, that the simple constraint equation and collision flux approximation introduced in this paper can replace the analytical method adopted by the previous study to conduct a further investigation more effectively.

  12. Challenging In-Situ Strain Measurement In Pneumatic Bulging Of AA5083

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liewald, M.; Kappes, J.

    2011-05-01

    Superplastic forming of sheet metal aluminum alloys exhibits numerous technical and economical advantages for manufacturing of complex part geometries in niche type production. For virtual engineering tasks prior manufacturing of superplastic forming equipment such as forming dies, numerical sheet metal forming simulations and material parameters are crucial. In such context the selected testing procedure should be as similar as possible to the subsequent forming technique. For that reason the pneumatic bulge test represents an appropriate testing procedure for the most common superplastic forming process—the blow forming process. In-situ strain measurement of pneumatic bulging AA5083 at 500° C results in high requirements in terms of the grid applied on the blank surface due to process temperature and large strain values. These large strain values result into pole heights up to 70 mm of the bulge test specimens using an initial blank thickness of 1.5 mm and a circular die opening of 100 mm. This paper describes the influence of different grid types and finally proposes adequate grid types for in-situ strain measurement for pneumatic bulging of AA5083. Furthermore the capabilities of in-situ measurement of strains during pneumatic bulging of AA5083 are highlighted.

  13. Analysis of airborne Doppler lidar, Doppler radar and tall tower measurements of atmospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluestein, H. B.; Doviak, R. J.; Eilts, M. D.; Mccaul, E. W.; Rabin, R.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Zrnic, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The first experiment to combine airborne Doppler Lidar and ground-based dual Doppler Radar measurements of wind to detail the lower tropospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather was conducted in central Oklahoma during four days in June-July 1981. Data from these unique remote sensing instruments, coupled with data from conventional in-situ facilities, i.e., 500-m meteorological tower, rawinsonde, and surface based sensors, were analyzed to enhance understanding of wind, waves and turbulence. The purposes of the study were to: (1) compare winds mapped by ground-based dual Doppler radars, airborne Doppler lidar, and anemometers on a tower; (2) compare measured atmospheric boundary layer flow with flows predicted by theoretical models; (3) investigate the kinematic structure of air mass boundaries that precede the development of severe storms; and (4) study the kinematic structure of thunderstorm phenomena (downdrafts, gust fronts, etc.) that produce wind shear and turbulence hazardous to aircraft operations. The report consists of three parts: Part 1, Intercomparison of Wind Data from Airborne Lidar, Ground-Based Radars and Instrumented 444 m Tower; Part 2, The Structure of the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer as Revealed by Lidar and Doppler Radars; and Part 3, Doppler Lidar Observations in Thunderstorm Environments.

  14. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  15. A case study of observations of volcanic ash from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption: 2. Airborne and satellite radiative measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Stuart M.; Clarisse, Lieven; Hurtmans, Daniel; Marenco, Franco; Johnson, Ben; Turnbull, Kate; Havemann, Stephan; Baran, Anthony J.; O'Sullivan, Debbie; Haywood, Jim

    2012-10-01

    An extensive set of airborne and satellite observations of volcanic ash from the Eyjafjallajökull Icelandic eruption are analyzed for a case study on 17 May 2010. Data collected from particle scattering probes and backscatter lidar on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe 146 aircraft allow estimates of ash concentration to be derived. Using radiative transfer simulations we show that airborne and satellite infrared radiances can be accurately modeled based on the in situ measured size distribution and a mineral dust refractive index. Furthermore, airborne irradiance measurements in the 0.3-1.7 μm range are well modeled with these properties. Retrievals of ash mass column loading using Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) observations are shown to be in accord with lidar-derived mass estimates, giving for the first time an independent verification of a hyperspectral ash variational retrieval method. The agreement of the observed and modeled solar and terrestrial irradiances suggests a reasonable degree of radiative closure implying that the physical and optical properties of volcanic ash can be relatively well constrained using data from state-of-the-science airborne platforms such as the FAAM BAe 146 aircraft. Comparisons with IASI measurements during recent Grímsvötn and Puyehue volcanic eruptions demonstrate the importance of accurately specifying the refractive index when modeling the observed spectra.

  16. Using Multiple Space Assests with In-Situ Measurements to Track Flooding in Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Mclaren, David; Tran, Daniel; Khunboa, Chatchai; Leelapatra, Watis; Pergamon, Vichain; Tanpipat, Veerachai; Chitradon, Royal; Boonya-aroonnet, Surajate; Thanapakpawin, Porranee; Meethome, Amara; Raghavendra, Cauligi (Raghu); Mandl, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Increasing numbers of space assets can enable coordinated measurements of flooding phenomena to enhance tracking of extreme events. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a flood monitoring system in Thailand. We utilize rapidly delivered MODIS data to detect major areas of flooding and the target the Earth Observing One Advanced Land Imager sensor to acquire higher spatial resolution data. Automatic surface water extent mapping products delivered to interested parties. We are also working to extend our network to include in-situ sensing networks and additional space assets.

  17. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  18. A Method to Measure the Flatness of the LSST Focal Plane Assembly in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, Willy; /SLAC

    2005-10-26

    In this note I describe an inexpensive and simple laser-based method to measure the flatness of the LSST focal plane assembly (FPA) in situ, i.e. while the FPA is inside its cryostat, at -100 C and under vacuum. The method may also allow measurement of the distance of the FPA to lens L3, and may be sensitive enough to measure gravity- and pressure-induced deformations of L3 as well. The accuracy of the method shows promise to be better than 1 micron.

  19. Intercomparisons of Lidar Backscatter Measurements and In-situ Data from GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudamani, S.; Spinhirne, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) took place during Nov. 1989 and May - Jun. 1990 and involved flight surveys of the Pacific region by the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The experimental instruments were lidars operating at wavelengths ranging from the visible to the thermal infrared and various optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. The primary motivation for GLOBE was the development of spaceborne wind sensing lidar. This paper will concern a comparison of direct backscatter measurements and backscatter calculated from particle counter data. Of special interest is that the particle measurements provided data on composition, and thus refractive index variation may be included in the analysis.

  20. Constraining isoprene emission factors using airborne flux measurements during CABERNET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Jiang, X.; Avise, J. C.; Scott, K.; Jonsson, H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    An aircraft flux study was conducted to assess biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from California ecosystems targeting oak woodlands and isoprene for most transects. The direct eddy covariance approach featured high speed proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry onboard a CIRPAS (Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies) Twin Otter aircraft during June 2011 as part of the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects) project. Isoprene fluxes were calculated using wavelet analysis and scaled to surface fluxes using a divergence term obtained by measuring fluxes at multiple altitudes over homogenous oak terrain. By normalization of fluxes to standard temperature and photosynthetically active radiation levels using standard BVOC modeling equations, the resulting emission factors could be directly compared with those used by MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature) and BEIGIS (Biogenic Emission Inventory Geographic Information System) models which are the most commonly used BVOC emission models for California. As expected, oak woodlands were found to be the dominant source of isoprene in all areas surrounding and in the Central Valley of California. The airborne fluxes averaged to 2 km spatial resolution matched remarkably well with current oak woodland distributions driving the models and hence the correspondence of modeled and aircraft derived emission factors was also good, although quantitative differences were encountered depending on the region and driving variables used. Fluxes measured from aircraft proved to be useful for the improvement of the accuracy of modeled predictions for isoprene and other important ozone and aerosol precursor compounds. These are the first regional isoprene flux measurements using direct eddy covariance on aircraft.

  1. In situ global method for measurement of oxygen demand and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Lundbaeck, K.M.O.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    Two aerobic microorganisms, Saccharomycopsis lipolytica and Brevibacterium lactofermentum, have been used in a study of mass transfer and oxygen uptake from a global perspective using a closed gas system. Oxygen concentrations in the gas and liquid were followed using oxygen electrodes, and the results allowed for easy calculation of in situ oxygen transport. The cell yields on oxygen for S. lipolytica and B. lactofermentum were 1.01 and 1.53 g/g respectively. The mass transfer coefficient was estimated as 10 h{sup {minus}1} at 500 rpm for both fermentations. The advantages with this method are noticeable since the use of model systems may be avoided, and the in situ measurements of oxygen demand assure reliable data for scale-up.

  2. A new technique for in situ measurement of the composition of neutral gas in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Neutral atoms in interplanetary space play an important role in many processes relevant to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. An experimental approach is proposed for in situ atom detection based on the conversion of neutral atoms to negative ions at a specially prepared sensitive surface. Negative ions are subsequently analyzed and detected in an essentially noise-free mode. The use of the technique for in situ study of the composition of neutral interstellar atoms is considered. It is shown that interstellar H, D, and O atoms and possibly H2 molecules can be measured by the proposed technique. The experiment can be performed from a high-apogee Earth-orbiting satellite or from a deep space probe. Possible applications of the technique are discussed.

  3. In situ growth rate measurements by normal-incidence reflectance during MOVPE growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.Q.; Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Chui, H.C.

    1996-05-01

    We present an in situ technique for monitoring metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy growth by normal-incidence reflectance. This technique is used to calibrate the growth rate periodically and to monitor the growth process routinely. It is not only a precise tool to measure the growth rate, but also very useful in identifying unusal problems during a growth run, such as depletion of source material, deterioration of surface morphology, and problems associated with an improper growht procedure. We will also present an excellent reproducibility ({+-}0.3% over a course of more than 100 runs) of the cavity wavelength of vertical-cavity surface emitting laser structures with periodic calibration by this in situ technique.

  4. A Multi-Pumping Flow System for In Situ Measurements of Dissolved Manganese in Aquatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, David; Prien, Ralf D.; Dellwig, Olaf; Waniek, Joanna J.; Schuffenhauer, Ingo; Donath, Jan; Krüger, Siegfried; Pallentin, Malte; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2016-01-01

    A METals In Situ analyzer (METIS) has been used to determine dissolved manganese (II) concentrations in the subhalocline waters of the Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea). High-resolution in situ measurements of total dissolved Mn were obtained in near real-time by spectrophotometry using 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN). PAN is a complexing agent of dissolved Mn and forms a wine-red complex with a maximum absorbance at a wavelength of 562 nm. Results are presented together with ancillary temperature, salinity, and dissolved O2 data. Lab calibration of the analyzer was performed in a pressure testing tank. A detection limit of 77 nM was obtained. For validation purposes, discrete water samples were taken by using a pump-CTD system. Dissolved Mn in these samples was determined by an independent laboratory based method (inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectrometry, ICP-OES). Mn measurements from both METIS and ICP-OES analysis were in good agreement. The results showed that the in situ analysis of dissolved Mn is a powerful technique reducing dependencies on heavy and expensive equipment (pump-CTD system, ICP-OES) and is also cost and time effective. PMID:27916898

  5. Visible and near-infrared imaging spectrometer (VNIS) for in-situ lunar surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiping; Xu, Rui; Li, Chunlai; Lv, Gang; Yuan, Liyin; Wang, Binyong; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

    2015-10-01

    The Visible and Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS) onboard China's Chang'E 3 lunar rover is capable of simultaneously in situ acquiring full reflectance spectra for objects on the lunar surface and performing calibrations. VNIS uses non-collinear acousto-optic tunable filters and consists of a VIS/NIR imaging spectrometer (0.45-0.95 μm), a shortwave IR spectrometer (0.9-2.4 μm), and a calibration unit with dust-proofing functionality. To been underwent a full program of pre-flight ground tests, calibrations, and environmental simulation tests, VNIS entered into orbit around the Moon on 6 December 2013 and landed on 14 December 2013 following Change'E 3. The first operations of VNIS were conducted on 23 December 2013, and include several explorations and calibrations to obtain several spectral images and spectral reflectance curves of the lunar soil in the Imbrium region. These measurements include the first in situ spectral imaging detections on the lunar surface. This paper describes the VNIS characteristics, lab calibration, in situ measurements and calibration on lunar surface.

  6. In Situ Thermal Characterization of Cooling/Crystallising Lavas During Rheology Measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Giordano, D.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Transport properties of silicate melts at super-liquidus temperatures are reasonably well understood. Migration and transport of silicate melts in the earth's crust and at its surface generally occur at sub-liquidus temperature regimes where they are subject to non-isothermal and non-equilibrium crystallization. To date, rheological data at sub-liquidus temperatures are scarce. In such dynamic situations heat capacities, latent heats of phase changes, viscous heating, thermal advection and thermal inertia of the apparatus are all potential factors in determining the thermal regime. Yet thermal characterisation of non- equilibrium conditions are absent, hampered by the inconvenience of recording in situ sample temperature during dynamic rheological measurements. Here we present a new experimental setup for in situ sample temperature monitoring in high temperature rheometry. We overcome the limitation of hardwired thermocouples during sample deformation by employing wireless data transmitters directly mounted onto the rotating spindle, immersed in the sample. This adaptation enables in situ, real-time, observations of the thermal regime of crystallising, deforming lava samples under the transient and non-equilibrium crystallization conditions expected in lava flows in nature. We present the apparatus calibration procedure, assess the experimental uncertainty in viscosity measurements and discuss experimental data investigating the dynamic, rheologic and thermal evolution of lavas in both temperature step and continuous cooling experiments.

  7. A Multi-Pumping Flow System for In Situ Measurements of Dissolved Manganese in Aquatic Systems.

    PubMed

    Meyer, David; Prien, Ralf D; Dellwig, Olaf; Waniek, Joanna J; Schuffenhauer, Ingo; Donath, Jan; Krüger, Siegfried; Pallentin, Malte; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E

    2016-11-30

    A METals In Situ analyzer (METIS) has been used to determine dissolved manganese (II) concentrations in the subhalocline waters of the Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea). High-resolution in situ measurements of total dissolved Mn were obtained in near real-time by spectrophotometry using 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN). PAN is a complexing agent of dissolved Mn and forms a wine-red complex with a maximum absorbance at a wavelength of 562 nm. Results are presented together with ancillary temperature, salinity, and dissolved O 2 data. Lab calibration of the analyzer was performed in a pressure testing tank. A detection limit of 77 nM was obtained. For validation purposes, discrete water samples were taken by using a pump-CTD system. Dissolved Mn in these samples was determined by an independent laboratory based method (inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, ICP-OES). Mn measurements from both METIS and ICP-OES analysis were in good agreement. The results showed that the in situ analysis of dissolved Mn is a powerful technique reducing dependencies on heavy and expensive equipment (pump-CTD system, ICP-OES) and is also cost and time effective.

  8. Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Size from the RSP Data: Validation Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Sinclair, Kenneth; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; Ziemba, Luke; Crosbie, Ewan; Hair, John; Hu, Yongxiang; Hostetler, Chris; Stamnes, Snorre

    2016-01-01

    We present comparisons of cloud droplet size distributions retrieved from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) data with correlative in situ measurements made during the North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study (NAAMES). This field experiment was based at St. Johns airport, Newfoundland, Canada with the latest deployment in May - June 2016. RSP was onboard the NASA C-130 aircraft together with an array of in situ and other remote sensing instrumentation. The RSP is an along-track scanner measuring polarized and total reflectances in9 spectral channels. Its unique high angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135 and 165 degrees. A parametric fitting algorithm applied to the polarized reflectances provides retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT), which allows us to retrieve the droplet size distribution (DSD) itself. The latter is important in the case of clouds with complex structure, which results in multi-modal DSDs. During NAAMES the aircraft performed a number of flight patterns specifically designed for comparison of remote sensing retrievals and in situ measurements. These patterns consisted of two flight segments above the same straight ground track. One of these segments was flown above clouds allowing for remote sensing measurements, while the other was at the cloud top where cloud droplets were sampled. We compare the DSDs retrieved from the RSP data with in situ measurements made by the Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP). The comparisons show generally good agreement with deviations explainable by the position of the aircraft within cloud and by presence of additional cloud layers in RSP view that do not contribute to the in situ DSDs. In the

  9. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, J. R.; Le Breton, M.; Allen, G.; Percival, C. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; O'Shea, S. J.; Muller, J. B. A.; Zahniser, M. S.; Pyle, J.; Palmer, P. I.

    2015-08-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We present details of the mid-IR Aerodyne Research Inc. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS) employed, including its configuration for airborne sampling, and evaluate its performance over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. A new in-flight calibration procedure to account for the observed sensitivity of the instrument to ambient pressure changes is described, and its impact on instrument performance is assessed. Test flight data linking this sensitivity to changes in cabin pressure is presented. Total 1σ uncertainties of 1.81 ppb for CH4 and 0.35 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Los Gatos Research Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA). Finally, a potential case study for the estimation of a regional N2O flux using a mass balance technique is identified, and the method for calculating such an estimate is outlined.

  10. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, J. R.; Le Breton, M.; Allen, G.; Percival, C. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; O'Shea, S. J.; Muller, J. B. A.; Zahniser, M. S.; Pyle, J.; Palmer, P. I.

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large atmospheric research aircraft. We present details of the mid-infrared quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS, Aerodyne Research Inc., USA) employed, including its configuration for airborne sampling, and evaluate its performance over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. A new in-flight calibration procedure to account for the observed sensitivity of the instrument to ambient pressure changes is described, and its impact on instrument performance is assessed. Test flight data linking this sensitivity to changes in cabin pressure are presented. Total 1σ uncertainties of 2.47 ppb for CH4 and 0.54 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Finally, a potential case study for the estimation of a regional N2O flux using a mass balance technique is identified, and the method for calculating such an estimate is outlined.

  11. First Airborne Lidar Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Applying the MERLIN Demonstrator CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, Axel; Büdenbender, Christian; Ehret, Gerhard; Fix, Andreas; Gerbig, Christoph; Kiemle, Chritstoph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Wirth, Martin

    2016-04-01

    CHARM-F is the new airborne four-wavelengths lidar for simultaneous soundings of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Due to its high technological conformity it is also a demonstrator for MERLIN, the French-German satellite mission providing a methane lidar. MERLIN's Preliminary Design Review was successfully passed recently. The launch is planned for 2020. First CHARM-F measurements were performed in Spring 2015 onboard the German research aircraft HALO. The aircraft's maximum flight altitude of 15 km and special features of the lidar, such as a relatively large laser ground spot, result in data similar to those obtained by a spaceborne system. The CHARM-F and MERLIN lidars are designed in the IPDA (integrated path differential absorption) configuration using short double pulses, which gives column averaged gas mixing ratios between the system and ground. The successfully completed CHARM-F flight measurements provide a valuable dataset, which supports the retrieval algorithm development for MERLIN notably. Furthermore, the dataset allows detailed analyses of measurement sensitivities, general studies on the IPDA principle and on system design questions. These activities are supported by another instrument onboard the aircraft during the flight campaign: a cavity ring down spectrometer, providing in-situ data of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor with high accuracy and precision, which is ideal for validation purposes of the aircraft lidar. For the near future, detailed characterizations of CHARM-F are planned, further support of the MERLIN design, as well as the scientific aircraft campaign CoMet.

  12. SeaWiFS Aerosol Product Compared to Coastal and Island in situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Pietras, C.; Knobelspiesse, K.; Fargion, G.; McClain, C.

    2002-05-01

    The Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS, http://simbios.gsfc.nasa.gov) Project is assisting the ocean color community to cross calibrate and merge data products from multiple ocean color missions. The atmospheric contribution plays an essential role in the analysis of the ocean color imagery. The correction of the atmospheric contribution is a crucial procedure that requires in situ measurements of atmospheric and bio-optical components to compare and validate satellite measurements. The SIMBIOS Project is using in situ atmospheric data for several purposes including validation of the SeaWiFS and other ocean color missions aerosol optical product, evaluation of the aerosol models currently used for atmospheric correction, and development of vicarious sensor calibration methodologies. The principal source of in situ aerosol observations is the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) that provides globally distributed, near-real time, observations of spectral aerosol optical depths, aerosol size distributions and precipitable water. Since 1997 the SIMBIOS Project has augmented the AERONET network with 12 additional island and coastal sites, including the Hawaiian Islands (Lanai and Oahu), Ascension Island, Bahrain, Tahiti, Wallops Island (US East Coast), South Korea, Turkey, Argentina, Azores, and Australia and more recently Morocco. The AERONET and SIMBIOS Projects have invested considerable effort to deploy and maintain the instruments to ensure the quality of the data for more than 4 years. Match-ups between aerosol optical thickness obtained for various sites from in situ and satellite-derived observations are presented and discussed. Match-up analysis methods and uncertainties are also discussed.

  13. Outlet-glacier flow dynamics estimation combining in-situ and spaceborne SAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohner, Christoph; Henke, Daniel; Small, David; Mercenier, Rémy; Lüthi, Martin; Vieli, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Terminus retreat and flow acceleration changes of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers contribute significantly to the current mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet and therefore to global sea level rise. In order to constrain models ice dynamics, detailed knowledge of geometry, ice-flow velocity and strain fields of such calving glaciers is needed. Of specific importance is the near terminus flow dynamics, as the flow fields there are highly influential on the glacier's calving rate. With the current temporal resolution of spaceborne radar systems, it is difficult to accurately capture the near terminus flow fields for fast moving outlet glaciers glaciers, while in-situ measurements using ground based radar interferometers are limited in coverage and constrained by distance and geometric shading of the glacier. We present and analyze the combined continuous velocity fields from a ground based, portable radar system as well as from spaceborne SAR scenes for Eqip Sermia, a medium-sized ocean terminating outlet glacier in western Greenland. The flow fields for the spaceborne data are calculated using feature tracking with a temporal resolution of 12 and 24 days for Sentinel-1 (Interferometric Wide Swath) and RADARSAT-2 (Ultra Fine/Fine Quad) respectively. The in-situ terrestrial radar data were recorded at one minute intervals were additionally processed using interferometry. The combination of in-situ and spaceborne radar enables a spatially continuous assessment of the strain fields of the ocean terminating outlet glacier. An assimilation of the data based on areas with both in-situ and spaceborne measurements is carried out and the results are compared to historical strain field data sets. These data ultimately provide constraints for a physical fracture and damage model.

  14. In-situ geophysical measurements in marine sediments: Applications in seafloor acoustics and paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgas, Thomas Joerg

    Acoustic in-situ sound speeds and attenuation were measured on the Eel River shelf, CA, with the Acoustic Lance between 5 and 15 kHz to 2.0 meters below seafloor (mbsf). A comparison with laboratory ultrasonic geoacoustic data obtained at 400 kHz on cored sediments showed faster in-situ and ultrasonic sound speeds in coarse-grained deposits in water depths to 60 m than in fine-grained deposits below that contour line. Ultrasonic attenuation was often greater than in-situ values and remained almost constant below 0.4 mbsf in these heterogeneous deposits. In-situ attenuation decreased with depth. These observations partly agree with results from other field studies, and with theoretical models that incorporate intergranular friction and dispersion from viscosity as main controls on acoustic wave propagation in marine sediments. Deviations among in-situ and laboratory acoustic data from the Eel Margin with theoretical studies were linked to scattering effects. Acoustic Lance was also deployed in homogeneous, fine-grained sediments on the inner shelf of SE Korea, where free gas was identified in late-September, but not in mid-September 1999. Free gas was evidenced by an abrupt decrease of in-situ sound speed and by characteristic changes in acoustic waveforms. These results suggest the presence of a gassy sediment layer as shallow as 2 mbsf along the 70 m bathymetry line, and was attributed to a variable abundance of free gas on short-term and/or small-regional scales on the SE Korea shelf. Bulk density variations in marine sediments obtained along the Walvis Ridge/Basin, SW Africa, at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1081 to 1084 were spectral-analyzed to compute high-resolution sedimentation rates (SRs) in both the time- and age domains by correctly identifying Milankovitch cycles (MCs). SRs for the ODP sites yielded age-depth models that often correlate positively with biostratigraphic data and with organic mass accumulation rates (MAR Corg), a proxy for

  15. Diode - Pumped Nd:YAG Lidar for Airborne Cloud Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehnert, A.; Halldorsson, TH.; Herrmann, H.; Haering, R.; Krichbaumer, W.; Streicher, J.; Werner, CH.

    1992-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental method used to separate scattering and to use it for the determination of cloud microphysical parameters. It is also the first airborne test of a lidar version related to the ATLID Program - ESA's scheduled spaceborne lidar. The already tested DLR microlidar was modified with the new diode-pumped laser and a faster data recording system was added. The system was used during the CLEOPATRA campaign in the DLR research aircraft Falcon 20 to measure cloud parameters. The diode pumped Nd:YAG laser we developed for the microlidar is a modification of the laser we introduced at the Lidar Congress at 'Laser 1991' in Munich. Various aspects of this work are discussed.

  16. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) operated onboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft during the SAFARI-2000 field campaign. The CPL provided high spatial resolution measurements of aerosol optical properties at both 1064 nm and 532 nm. We present here results of planetary boundary layer (PBL) aerosol optical depth analysis and profiles of aerosol extinction. Variation of optical depth and extinction are examined as a function of regional location. The wide-scale aerosol mapping obtained by the CPL is a unique data set that will aid in future studies of aerosol transport. Comparisons between the airborne CPL and ground-based MicroPulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net) sites are shown to have good agreement.

  17. Manipulation of Samples at Extreme Temperatures for Fast in-situ Synchrotron Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Richard

    2016-04-22

    An aerodynamic sample levitation system with laser beam heating was integrated with the APS beamlines 6 ID-D, 11 ID-C and 20 BM-B. The new capability enables in-situ measurements of structure and XANES at extreme temperatures (300-3500 °C) and in conditions that completely avoid contact with container surfaces. In addition to maintaining a high degree of sample purity, the use of aerodynamic levitation enables deep supercooling and greatly enhanced glass formation from a wide variety of melts and liquids. Development and integration of controlled extreme sample environments and new measurement techniques is an important aspect of beamline operations and user support. Processing and solidifying liquids is a critical value-adding step in manufacturing semiconductors, optical materials, metals and in the operation of many energy conversion devices. Understanding structural evolution is of fundamental importance in condensed materials, geology, and biology. The new capability provides unique possibilities for materials research and helps to develop and maintain a competitive materials manufacturing and energy utilization industry. Test samples were used to demonstrate key features of the capability including experiments on hot crystalline materials, liquids at temperatures from about 500 to 3500 °C. The use of controlled atmospheres using redox gas mixtures enabled in-situ changes in the oxidation states of cations in melts. Significant innovations in this work were: (i) Use of redox gas mixtures to adjust the oxidation state of cations in-situ (ii) Operation with a fully enclosed system suitable for work with nuclear fuel materials (iii) Making high quality high energy in-situ x-ray diffraction measurements (iv) Making high quality in-situ XANES measurements (v) Publishing high impact results (vi) Developing independent funding for the research on nuclear materials This SBIR project work led to a commercial instrument product for the niche market of processing and

  18. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-01-01

    US Department of Energy's (DOE) SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These flights were coordinated with DOE investigators who flew an in-situ CO2 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing CO2 line absorptions with altitudes were evident and comparison with in-situ measurements showed agreements to 6 ppm. In spring 2009 we improved the aircraft's nadir window and during July and August we made 9 additional 2 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over a variety of surface types in Nebraska, Illinois, the SGP ARM site, and near and over the Chesapeake Bay in North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Strong laser signals and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made through thin clouds. The flights over the ARM site were underflown with in-situ measurements made from the DOE Cessna. Analysis shows that the average signal levels follow predicted values, the altimetry measurements had an uncertainty of about 4 m, and that the average optical line depths follow the number density calculated from in-situ sensor readings. The Oklahoma and east coast flights were coordinated with a LaRC/ITT CO2 lidar on the LaRC UC-12 aircraft, a LaRC in-situ CO2 sensor, and the Oklahoma flights also included a JPL CO2 lidar on a Twin Otter aircraft. More details of the flights, measurements, analysis and scaling to space will be described in the presentation.

  19. Monitoring the Eyjafjöll volcanic plume using OPGC platforms : remote sensing and in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labazuy, Philippe; Gouhier, Mathieu; Hervo, Maxime; Freville, Patrick; Quehennen, Boris; Donnadieu, Frank; Guehenneux, Yannick; Cacault, Philippe; Colomb, Aurélie; Gayet, Jean-François; Pichon, Jean-Marc; Rivet, Sandrine; Schwarzenböck, Alfons; Sellegri, Karine

    2010-05-01

    OPGC (Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand) presents a unique combination of knowledge in volcanology and atmosphere physics, for the tracking and the monitoring of volcanic plumes. These competences interact through the combination of the mastering of Lidar and radar techniques; gas and aerosol measurement (in-situ and airborne) by the Laboratoire de Météorologie Physique (LaMP,OPGC) and the expertise of the Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans (LMV,OPGC) in eruption dynamics and spatial remote sensing. Platforms for observations benefit from the technical support and expertise of the OPGC staff. HOTVOLC group is dedicated to the near-real-time monitoring of thermal anomalies related to the eruptive activity of volcanoes. The main goal of HOTVOLC deals with estimation of quantitative parameters that give stringent constraints on ash plumes dynamics, from the vent to the atmosphere. Datas from HOTVOLC give near -real time monitoring of ash plume, and its height, crucial parameter for predictive models and risk assessment. The height of the plume of Eyjafjöll on April 15 2010 at 12:00 UTC was estimated at 5000-6500 m, in accordance with ground observations and Lidar data. TERRA MODIS and AURA OMI sensors were used for the daily quantitative estimation of ash and SO2 burden , respectively. Two peaks of ash and SO2 emissions occurring on April 15 (100 kt and 8 kt) and 19 (170 kt and 12 kt) were determined. HOTVOLC is involved in the monitoring of the eruption at Eyjafjöll(Iceland) and belongs to a volcano alert group, at the request of the MEEDDM (French Ministry for ecology, energy, sustainable development and sea). LIDAR at the OPGC, is a Rayleigh-Mie LIDAR emitting at 355nm, with parallel and crossed polarization channels. On April 19, a layer of depolarizing particles i.e.non-spherical particles was observed at 3000 m a.s.l, with maximum thickness of 500m. The instrumented station at the top of the Puy de Dôme allows measurements of gas-phase and of

  20. Combined MIPAS (airborne/satellite), CALIPSO and in situ study on large potential NAT particles observed in early Arctic winter stratosphere in December 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Pitts, Michael; Poole, Lamont; Oelhaf, Hermann; Molleker, Sergej; Borrmann, Stephan; Ebersoldt, Andreas; Frey, Wiebke; Gulde, Thomas; Maucher, Guido; Piesch, Christof; Sartorius, Christian; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of the characteristics of large HNO3-containing particles (potential 'NAT-rocks') involved in vertical redistribution of HNO3 in the polar winter stratosphere is limited due to the difficult accessibility of these particles by observations. While robust polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) classification schemes exist for observations by the space-borne lidar aboard CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) as well as for the passive mid-infrared limb observations by MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding), these observations are hardly exploited for the detection of large (diameter >10 μm) NAT particles. This is due to the facts that these particles have low overall number densities, resulting in weak detectable signatures, and that the physical characteristics of these particles (i.e. shape, morphology, HNO3-content and optical characteristics) are uncertain. We investigate collocated and complementary observations of a low-density potential large NAT particle field by the space-borne instruments CALIPSO and MIPAS-ENVISAT as well as the airborne observations by the limb-sounder MIPAS-STR and the in situ particle probe FSSP-100 (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe 100) aboard the high-altitude aircraft Geophysica. The observations aboard the Geophysica on 11 December 2011 associated to ESSenCe (ESa Sounder Campaign 2011) provided us the unique opportunity to study in detail the lower boundary region of a PSC where large potential NAT particles (>20 μm in diameter) were detected in situ. We analyse the ambient temperatures and gas-phase composition (HNO3 and H2O), the signatures of the observed particles in the CALIPSO and MIPAS observations, the HNO3-content of these particles suggested by the FSSP-100 and MIPAS-STR observations, and focus on the spectral fingerprint of these particles in the MIPAS-STR observations. While the spectral characterisation of the observed particles is subject

  1. Infrared heterodyne radiometer for airborne atmospheric transmittance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolczok, J. M.; Lange, R. A.; Dinardo, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    An infrared heterodyne radiometer (IHR) was used to measure atmospheric transmittance at selected hydrogen fluoride (2.7 micrometer) and deuterium fluoride (3.8 micrometer) laser transitions. The IHR was installed aboard a KC-135 aircraft for an airborne atmospheric measurements program that used the sun as a backlighting source for the transmission measurements. The critical components are: a wideband indium antimonide (1nSb) photomixer, a CW HF/DF laser L0, a radiometric processor, and a 1900 K blackbody reference source. The measured heterodyne receiver sensitivity (NEP) is 1.3 x 10 to the -19th power W/Hz, which yields a calculated IHR temperature resolution accuracy of delta I sub S/-3 sub S = 0.005 for a source temperature of 1000 K and a total transmittance of 0.5. Measured atmospheric transmittance at several wavelengths and aircraft altitudes from 9.14 km (30,000 ft) to 13.72 km (45,000 ft) were obtained during the measurements program and have been compared with values predicted by the AFGL Atmospheric Line Parameter Compilation.

  2. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-03-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  3. [In situ temperature measurement by absorption spectroscopy based on time division multiplexing technology].

    PubMed

    Lou, Nan-zheng; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-sheng

    2012-05-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology is a kind of high sensitivity, high selectivity of non contacting gas in situ measurement technique. In the present paper, in situ gas temperature measurement of an open environment was achieved by means of direct scanning multiple characteristic lines of H2O and combined with least-squares algorithm. Through the use of HITRAN spectral database, the boundary effect on the gas temperature and concentration measurements was discussed in detail, and results showed that the combination of scanning multiple characteristic lines and least-squares algorithm can effectively reduce the boundary effect on the gas temperature measurements under the open environment. Experiments using time division multiplexing technology to simultaneously scan 7444.36, 7185.60, 7182.95 and 7447.48 cm(-1), the four characteristic H2O lines, the gas temperature of tubular furnace in the range of 573-973 K was measured under different conditions. The maximum temperature difference between absorption spectrum measurement and thermocouple signal was less than 52.4 K, and the maximum relative error of temperature measurement was 6.8%.

  4. Simultaneous in-situ measurements of mesospheric temperature inversion layers and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Rapp, Markus

    For several decades rocket borne ionization gauges have been used to obtain observations of mesospheric turbulence and temperature-profiles. The main advantage of these in-situ turbu-lence measurements is that they are made at very high spatial resolution and cover a wide range of spatial scales. This makes it possible to study the spectral content of the turbulent eddies in the range of spatial scales from tens of centimeters to some kilometers. Spectral analysis of these data yields turbulent energy dissipation rates at a spatial resolution of about 100 m. This reveals the highly patchy structure of MLT turbulence. Our measurements of-ten show adjacent regions with very strong turbulence and non-turbulent layers on vertical scales as short as some kilometers. Some observations even show turbulence layers which are only some hundreds of meters thick. Most of these turbulence measurements were accompa-nied by simultaneous common volume temperature measurements. Among those simultaneous measurements temperature inversion layers were often observed. In the present paper we analyze simultaneous in-situ measurements of mesospheric temperature inversion layers and turbulence measurements. This study includes about 30 sounding rocket flights launched at high northern latitudes. We compare morphology of the turbulence field with temperature profiles to gain a deeper insight how temperature inversions are related to local turbulence activity.

  5. Removal of correlated noise online for in situ measurements by using multichannel magnetic resonance sounding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhang, Yang; Wan, Ling; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the other geophysical approaches, magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) technique is direct and nondestructive in subsurface water exploration. It provides water content distribution and estimates hydrogeological properties. The biggest challenge is that MRS measurement always suffers bad signal-to-noise ratio, and it can be carried out only far from sources of noise. To solve this problem, a series of de-noising methods are developed. However, most of them are post-processing, leading the data quality uncontrolled for in situ measurements. In the present study, a new approach that removal of correlated noise online is found to overcome the restriction. Based on LabVIEW, a method is provided to enable online data quality control by the way of realizing signal acquisition and noise filtering simultaneously. Using one or more reference coils, adaptive noise cancellation based on LabVIEW to eliminate the correlated noise is available for in situ measurements. The approach was examined through numerical simulation and field measurements. The correlated noise is mitigated effectively and the application of MRS measurements is feasible in high-level noise environment. The method shortens the measurement time and improves the measurement efficiency.

  6. Quantifying precision of in situ length and weight measurements of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, S.; Krzoska, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    We estimated and compared errors in field-made (in situ) measurements of lengths and weights of fish. We made three measurements of length and weight on each of 33 common carp Cyprinus carpio, and on each of a total of 34 bluegills Lepomis macrochirus and black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus. Maximum total lengths of all fish were measured to the nearest 1 mm on a conventional measuring board. The bluegills and black crappies (85–282 mm maximum total length) were weighed to the nearest 1 g on a 1,000-g spring-loaded scale. The common carp (415–600 mm maximum total length) were weighed to the nearest 0.05 kg on a 20-kg spring-loaded scale. We present a statistical model for comparison of coefficients of variation of length (Cl ) and weight (Cw ). Expected Cl was near zero and constant across mean length, indicating that length can be measured with good precision in the field. Expected Cw decreased with increasing mean length, and was larger than expected Cl by 5.8 to over 100 times for the bluegills and black crappies, and by 3 to over 20 times for the common carp. Unrecognized in situ weighing errors bias the apparent content of unique information in weight, which is the information not explained by either length or measurement error. We recommend procedures to circumvent effects of weighing errors, including elimination of unnecessary weighing from routine monitoring programs. In situ weighing must be conducted with greater care than is common if the content of unique and nontrivial information in weight is to be correctly identified.

  7. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  8. Mapping Particulate Matter in the European Alps from Modis, Seviri, and In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitta, M.; Emili, E.; Popp, C. T.; Wunderle, S.; Zebisch, M.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the spatially homogenous mapping of particulate matter over the complex topography of the European Alpine region by means of remote sensing and ground-based measurements. Knowledge about the spatio-temporal distribution and atmospheric evolution of particulate matter is of great interest because higher levels of PM can affect human health and therefore, such information can be used by authorities to take counteractions like e.g. traffic restrictions. The study area is frequently influenced by high PM concentrations, especially when atmospheric inversions occur during winter. Major anthropogenic aerosol sources in the European Alps include traffic, wood burning for heating and cooking, and industrial activities. Wefirst apply a linear model to relate aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the geostationary Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and polar orbiting Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) together with boundary layer height (BLH) to surface PM10 concentrations in order to derive spatially homogenous maps of PM10 over the study region for 2008-2009. In parallel, maps of PM10 are computed by inverse distance interpolation of in-situ measurements. Both (SEVIRI and MODIS) satellite based PM10 estimates reveal a moderate performance with a correlation coefficient (R) of ~0.6 and a root mean square error (RMSE) of around 10 μg m-1. In contrary, the sole inverse distance interpolation of in-situ measurements produces more accurate PM10 maps (R~0.8, RMSE < 6 μg m-1). Subsequently, the two separate maps are combined through an assimilation scheme where the interpolated maps serve as background field which is up-dated by the satellite product. However, this step only leads to a small improvement in accuracy when most of the in-situ sites are excluded from the interpolation simulating a much sparser network. We conclude that satellite based PM10 maps in the European Alpine region are of limited additional

  9. Particulate matter mapping in the European Alps from MODIS, SEVIRI, and in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emili, E.; Popp, C.; Zebisch, M.; Wunderle, S.; Petitta, M.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the spatially homogenous mapping of particulate matter over the complex topography of the European Alpine region by means of remote sensing and ground-based measurements. Knowledge about the spatio-temporal distribution and atmospheric evolution of particulate matter is of great interest because higher levels of PM can affect human health and therefore, such information can be used by authorities to take counteractions like e.g. traffic restrictions. The study area is frequently influenced by high PM concentrations, especially when atmospheric inversions occur during winter. Major anthropogenic aerosol sources in the European Alps include traffic, wood burning for heating and cooking, and industrial activities. Wefirst apply a linear model to relate aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the geostationary Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and polar orbiting Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) together with boundary layer height (BLH) to surface PM10 concentrations in order to derive spatially homogenous maps of PM10 over the study region for 2008-2009. In parallel, maps of PM10 are computed by inverse distance interpolation of in-situ measurements. Both (SEVIRI and MODIS) satellite based PM10 estimates reveal a moderate performance with a correlation coefficient (R) of ~0.6 and a root mean square error (RMSE) of around 10 μg m-1. In contrary, the sole inverse distance interpolation of in-situ measurements produces more accurate PM10 maps (R~0.8, RMSE < 6 μg m-1). Subsequently, the two separate maps are combined through an assimilation scheme where the interpolated maps serve as background field which is up-dated by the satellite product. However, this step only leads to a small improvement in accuracy when most of the in-situ sites are excluded from the interpolation simulating a much sparser network. We conclude that satellite based PM10 maps in the European Alpine region are of limited additional

  10. Validation of Land Surface Temperature products in arid climate regions with permanent in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettsche, F.; Olesen, F.; Trigo, I.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is operationally obtained from several space-borne sensors, e.g. from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) by the Land Surface Analysis - Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF) and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on EOS-Terra by the MODIS Land Team. The relative accuracy of LST products can be assessed by cross-validating different products. Alternatively, the so-called 'radiance based validation' can be used to compare satellite-retrieved LST with results from radiative transfer models: however, this requires precise a priori knowledge of land surface emissivity (LSE) and atmospheric conditions. Ultimately, in-situ measurements (';ground truth') are needed for validating satellite LST&E products. Therefore, the LST product derived by LSA-SAF is validated with independent in-situ measurements (';temperature based validation') at permanent validation stations located in different climate regions on the SEVIRI disk. In-situ validation is largely complicated by the spatial scale mismatch between satellite sensors and ground based sensors, i.e. areas observed by ground radiometers usually cover about 10 m2, whereas satellite measurements in the thermal infrared typically cover between 1 km2 and 100 km2. Furthermore, an accurate characterization of the surface is critical for all validation approaches, but particularly over arid regions, as shown by in-situ measurements revealing that LSE products can be wrong by more than 3% [1]. The permanent stations near Gobabeb (Namibia; hyper-arid desert climate) and Dahra (Senegal; hot-arid steppe-prairie climate) are two of KIT's four dedicated LST validation stations. Gobabeb station is located on vast and flat gravel plains (several 100 km2), which are mainly covered by coarse gravel, sand, and desiccated grass. The gravel plains are highly homogeneous in space and time, which makes them ideal for

  11. In situ measurements of volatile aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Warren, E.; Essaid, H.I.

    2010-01-01

    Benzene and alkylbenzene biodegradation rates and patterns were measured using an in situ microcosm in a crude-oil contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. Benzene-D6, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m- and p-xylenes and four pairs of C3- and C4-benzenes were added to an in situ microcosm and studied over a 3-year period. The microcosm allowed for a mass-balance approach and quantification of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates within a well-defined iron-reducing zone of the anoxic plume. Among the BTEX compounds, the apparent order of persistence is ethylbenzene > benzene > m,p-xylenes > o-xylene ≥ toluene. Threshold concentrations were observed for several compounds in the in situ microcosm, below which degradation was not observed, even after hundreds of days. In addition, long lag times were observed before the onset of degradation of benzene or ethylbenzene. The isomer-specific degradation patterns were compared to observations from a multi-year study conducted using data collected from monitoring wells along a flowpath in the contaminant plume. The data were fit with both first-order and Michaelis-Menten models. First-order kinetics provided a good fit for hydrocarbons with starting concentrations below 1 mg/L and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were a better fit when starting concentrations were above 1 mg/L, as was the case for benzene. The biodegradation rate data from this study were also compared to rates from other investigations reported in the literature.

  12. In situ measurements of volatile aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Bekins, Barbara A; Eganhouse, Robert P; Warren, Ean; Essaid, Hedeff I

    2010-01-15

    Benzene and alkylbenzene biodegradation rates and patterns were measured using an in situ microcosm in a crude-oil contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. Benzene-D6, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m- and p-xylenes and four pairs of C(3)- and C(4)-benzenes were added to an in situ microcosm and studied over a 3-year period. The microcosm allowed for a mass-balance approach and quantification of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates within a well-defined iron-reducing zone of the anoxic plume. Among the BTEX compounds, the apparent order of persistence is ethylbenzene > benzene > m,p-xylenes > o-xylene >or= toluene. Threshold concentrations were observed for several compounds in the in situ microcosm, below which degradation was not observed, even after hundreds of days. In addition, long lag times were observed before the onset of degradation of benzene or ethylbenzene. The isomer-specific degradation patterns were compared to observations from a multi-year study conducted using data collected from monitoring wells along a flowpath in the contaminant plume. The data were fit with both first-order and Michaelis-Menten models. First-order kinetics provided a good fit for hydrocarbons with starting concentrations below 1mg/L and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were a better fit when starting concentrations were above 1mg/L, as was the case for benzene. The biodegradation rate data from this study were also compared to rates from other investigations reported in the literature.

  13. In Situ Measurements of the Dynamics of A Full Scale Bottom Moored Mine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    A4P/?o 7935 WHOI-93-21 In Situ Measurements of the Dynamics - of A Full Scale Bottom Moored Mine Model by H.O. Berteaux, A. Bocconcelli, C. Eck and S...BOTTOM MOORED MINE MODEL by H.O. BERTEAUX, A. BOCCONCELLI, C. ECK, S. KERY Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543 -"iSi...of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution devised (1991) and conducted (1992) an experiment to measure the dynamic response of a full scale model

  14. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-15

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot ({approx}10 min) time scale with {approx}1 {mu}m depth and {approx}1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic - nuclear scattering of MeV ions - to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  15. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-01

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot (˜10 min) time scale with ˜1 μm depth and ˜1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic—nuclear scattering of MeV ions—to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  16. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2015-12-01

    From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy the Cessna 206 aircraft over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, collecting observations of trace-gas mixing ratios over the ARM’s SGP facility. The aircraft payload includes two Atmospheric Observing Systems, Inc., analyzers for continuous measurements of CO2 and a 12-flask sampler for analysis of carbon cycle gases (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, 13CO2, 14CO2, carbonyl sulfide, and trace hydrocarbon species, including ethane). The aircraft payload also includes instrumentation for solar/infrared radiation measurements. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program and builds upon previous ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) missions. The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange at the SGP site, 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative forcing, convective processes and CO2 concentrations over the SGP site, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  17. Analysis of satellite and airborne wind measurements during the SEMAPHORE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tournadre, J.; Hauser, D.

    1994-12-31

    During the SEMAPHORE experiment Intensive Observation Period (IOP), held in October and November 1993 in the Azores-Madeira region, two airplanes, instrumented for atmospheric research, and two oceanographic research vessels have conducted in situ measurements in a 500km x 500km domain. Within the framework of SEMAPHORE, the SOFIA program is dedicated to the study of the air-sea fluxes and interactions from local scale up to mesoscale. The analysis of the structure of the wind and wave fields and their relations to the surface fluxes (especially near oceanic fronts) and the validation of the satellite data are two of the main goals of the SOFIA program. During the IOP, the experiment domain was regularly overflown by the ERS-1 and Topex-Poseidon (TP) satellites. This study presents a preliminary analysis of the ERS-1 and TP altimeter wind and wave measurement and ERS-1 scatterometer wind fields. The data from the airborne RESSAC (a radar ocean wave spectrometer) are also presented.

  18. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-Micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael J.; Remus, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2-micron lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250 millijoules in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2-micron Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hours of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meters to 8000 meters. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a

  19. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael; Remus, Ruben

    2015-04-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2 µm lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2 µm lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250-mJ in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2 μm Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hrs of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meter to 8000 meter. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and NOAA airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a triple-pulsed 2 μm Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA

  20. Comparison of airborne lidar measurements with 420 kHz echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Churnside, James H; Thorne, Richard E

    2005-09-10

    Airborne lidar has the potential to survey large areas quickly and at a low cost per kilometer along a survey line. For this reason, we investigated the performance of an airborne lidar for surveys of zooplankton. In particular, we compared the lidar returns with echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Data from eight regions of the Sound were compared, and the correlation between the two methods was 0.78. To obtain this level of agreement, a threshold was applied to the lidar return to remove the effects of scattering from phytoplankton.

  1. In situ gas analysis for high pressure applications using property measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, J.; Span, R.; Fieback, T.

    2013-10-01

    As the production, distribution, and storage of renewable energy based fuels usually are performed under high pressures and as there is a lack of in situ high pressure gas analysis instruments on the market, the aim of this work was to develop a method for in situ high pressure gas analysis of biogas and hydrogen containing gas mixtures. The analysis is based on in situ measurements of optical, thermo physical, and electromagnetic properties in gas mixtures with newly developed high pressure sensors. This article depicts the calculation of compositions from the measured properties, which is carried out iteratively by using highly accurate equations of state for gas mixtures. The validation of the method consisted of the generation and measurement of several mixtures, of which three are presented herein: a first mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 17.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, 9 mol. % helium, and 9 mol. % ethane at 323 K and 423 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 17 MPa; a second mixture of 93.0 mol. % methane, 4.0 mol. % propane, 2.0 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 1.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 1.2 MPa to 3 MPa; and a third mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 30.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 5.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 4 MPa. The analysis of the tested gas mixtures showed that with measured density, velocity of sound, and relative permittivity the composition can be determined with deviations below 1.9 mol. %, in most cases even below 1 mol. %. Comparing the calculated compositions with the generated gas mixture, the deviations were in the range of the combined uncertainty of measurement and property models.

  2. Methyl mercury dynamics in a tidal wetland quantified using in situ optical measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Fleck, J.A.; Downing, B.D.; Boss, E.; Pellerin, B.; Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Byington, A.A.; Heim, W.A.; Stephenson, M.; Fujii, R.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed monomethylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in a tidal wetland over three seasons using a novel method that employs a combination of in situ optical measurements as concentration proxies. MeHg concentrations measured over a single spring tide were extended to a concentration time series using in situ optical measurements. Tidal fluxes were calculated using modeled concentrations and bi-directional velocities obtained acoustically. The magnitude of the flux was the result of complex interactions of tides, geomorphic features, particle sorption, and random episodic events such as wind storms and precipitation. Correlation of dissolved organic matter quality measurements with timing of MeHg release suggests that MeHg is produced in areas of fluctuating redox and not limited by buildup of sulfide. The wetland was a net source of MeHg to the estuary in all seasons, with particulate flux being much higher than dissolved flux, even though dissolved concentrations were commonly higher. Estimated total MeHg yields out of the wetland were approximately 2.5 μg m−2 yr−1—4–40 times previously published yields—representing a potential loading to the estuary of 80 g yr−1, equivalent to 3% of the river loading. Thus, export from tidal wetlands should be included in mass balance estimates for MeHg loading to estuaries. Also, adequate estimation of loads and the interactions between physical and biogeochemical processes in tidal wetlands might not be possible without long-term, high-frequency in situ measurements.

  3. Can in situ measurements be used to estimate the age of shallow cumulus clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2010-12-01

    Cumulus clouds exhibit a life cycle that consists of: a) the growth phase (increasing size, most notably in the vertical direction); b) mature phase (growth no longer occurs; any precipitation that develops is strongest during this period); and c) dissipation phase (cloud dissipates because of precipitation and/or entrainment; no more dynamical support). Radar can track clouds over time and give some sense of the age of each cloud, but most aircraft measurements are without a temporal context. If it is possible, determining the cloud age (even if it is approximate, i.e. determining the phase in its life cycle) based solely on in situ measurements could provide important context information. The existence of such a measure would be a useful tool for interpreting past and future in situ cloud measurements. We use LES model simulations of trade wind cumulus cloud fields from one case during the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX) to test several potential cumulus cloud “clocks.” One key metric is the in-cloud buoyancy perturbation from the clear air mean as a function of time, as measured by virtual potential temperature. In general, the mean buoyancy of a cloud initially increases from zero with time, peaks, and decreases to become negatively buoyant during the latter third of its life cycle, with the amplitude of buoyancy dependent on cloud size. In some cases (more commonly for larger clouds), multiple pulses of buoyancy occur, which complicate any potential cumulus clock (as also reported by Heus et al., 2009). Since the buoyancy perturbation is not single-valued over the life of a given cloud, nor is the magnitude of the perturbation sufficient to differentiate between a mature small cloud or a growing larger cloud, other parameters must be used in addition to cloud buoyancy to construct a useful in situ cloud clock.

  4. In situ method for real time measurement of dielectric film thickness in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sung-Ho; Kim, Gun-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-01-15

    An in situ thickness measurement method of dielectric films (dual frequency method) was developed, and the thicknesses were measured in an inductively coupled plasma. This method uses a small ac bias voltage with two frequencies for thickness measurement. The dielectric thickness is obtained from measuring the amplitudes of the two frequency ac currents through a sensor, as well as using an equivalent circuit model describing impedance of the dielectric film and the plasma sheath. In the experiment, the thicknesses of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film could be accurately measured in real time. To check the measurement reliability, the dual frequency method was compared with reflection spectrophotometry as a technique for optical thickness diagnostics. It was found that the dual frequency method agrees closely with reflection spectrophotometry at various rf powers and pressures. In addition, this method is very simple and can be installed anywhere in plasma reactors, in contrast with optical methods; therefore, it is expected to be applied to in situ surface diagnostics for various processing plasmas.

  5. Measurement techniques for in situ stresses around underground constructions in a deep clay formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstricht, J.; Areias, L.; Bastiaens, W.; Li, X. L.

    2010-06-01

    Disposal in deep underground geological formations is internationally recognized as the most viable option for the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste. In Belgium, the Boom clay formation is extensively studied in this context, in particular at the 225 m deep HADES Underground Research Facility in Mol. A cost-effective design of deep underground structures requires an accurate assessment of the in situ stresses; a good estimation of these stresses is also essential when interpreting in situ experiments regarding the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the host formation. Different measurement techniques are available to provide data on the stress evolution and other mechanical properties of the geological formation. The measurement can be direct (measurement of total pressure), or it can be an indirect technique, deriving the stress from related quantities such as strain (changes) in structural members. Most total stress measurements are performed through permanently installed sensors; also once-only measurements are performed through specific methods (e.g. pressuremeter). Direct measurement of the stress state is challenging due to the complex mechanical behaviour of the clay, and the fact that the sensor installation inevitably disturbs the original stress field. This paper describes ways to deal with these problems and presents the results obtained using different techniques at HADES.

  6. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions from California based on 2010 CalNex Airborne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, B.; Miller, S.; Kort, E. A.; Santoni, G. W.; Daube, B.; Commane, R.; Angevine, W. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Andrews, A. E.; Nehrkorn, T.; Tian, H.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important gas for climate and for stratospheric chemistry, with an atmospheric lifetime exceeding 100 years. Global concentrations have increased steadily since the 18th century, apparently due to human-associated emissions, principally from application of nitrogen fertilizers. However, quantitative studies of agricultural emissions at large spatial scales are lacking, inhibited by the difficulty of measuring small enhancements of atmospheric concentrations. Here we derive regional emission rates for N2O in the Central Valley of California, based on analysis of in-situ airborne atmospheric observations collected using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The data were obtained on board the NOAA P-3 research aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) program in May and June, 2010. We coupled WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model to STILT (Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport) to link our in-situ observations to surface emissions, and then used a variety of statistical methods to identify source areas and to extract optimized emission rates from the inversion. Our results support the view that fertilizer application is the largest source of N2O in the Central Valley. But the spatial distribution of derived surface emissions, based on California land use and activity maps, was very different than indicated in the leading emissions inventory (EDGAR 4.0), and our estimated total emission flux of N2O for California during the study period was 3 - 4 times larger than EDGAR and other inventories.

  7. OPTIMIZING THE PAKS METHOD FOR MEASURING AIRBORNE ACROLEIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne acrolein is produced from the combustion of fuel and tobacco and is of concern due to its potential for respiratory tract irritation and other adverse health effects. DNPH active-sampling is a method widely used for sampling airborne aldehydes and ketones (carbonyls); ...

  8. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from California based on 2010 CalNex airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Bin; Miller, Scot M.; Kort, Eric A.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Daube, Bruce C.; Commane, Roisin; Angevine, Wayne M.; Ryerson, Tom B.; Trainer, Michael K.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Tian, Hanqin; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important gas for climate and for stratospheric chemistry, with a lifetime exceeding 100 years. Global concentrations have increased steadily since the 18th century, apparently due to human-associated emissions, principally from the application of nitrogen fertilizers. However, quantitative studies of agricultural emissions at large spatial scales are lacking, inhibited by the difficulty of measuring small enhancements in atmospheric concentration. Here we derive regional emission rates for N2O in the agricultural heartland of California based on analysis of in-situ airborne atmospheric observations collected using a new quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The data were obtained on board the NOAA WP-3 research aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) program in late spring 2010. We coupled the WRF (weather research and forecasting) model, a meso-scale meteorology model, with the STILT (stochastic time-inverted Lagrangian transport) model, a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, to link our in-situ airborne observations to surface emissions. We then used a variety of statistical methods to identify source areas and to optimize emission rates. Our results are consistent with the view that fertilizer application is the largest source of N2O in the Central Valley. The spatial distribution of surface emissions, based on California land use and activity maps, was very different than indicated in the leading emission inventory (EDGAR 4.0). Our estimated total emission flux of N2O for California in May and June was 3 - 4 times larger than the annual mean given for the state by EDGAR and other inventories, indicating a strong seasonal variation. We estimated the statewide total annual emissions of N2O to be 0.042 ± 0.011 Tg N/year, roughly equivalent to inventory values if we account for seasonal variations using observations obtained in the midwestern United States. This state total N2O

  9. Novel, in-situ Raman and fluorescence measurement techniques: Imaging using optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Jerry Chance

    dibromostyrene. To further demonstrate the utility of in- situ spectral imaging, we have shown that small diameter (350 μm) image guides can be used for in-situ measurements of analyte transport in thin membranes. This has been applied to the measurement of H2O diffusion in Nafion™ membranes using the luminescent compound, [Ru(phen)2dppz] 2+, which is a H2O indicator.

  10. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth radiative budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation. Several methods are used to investigate aerosol properties and thus quantify their direct and indirect impacts on climate. At the Puy de Dôme station, continuous high-altitude near-surface in situ measurements and low-altitude ground-based remote sensing atmospheric column measurements give the opportunity to compare the aerosol extinction measured with both methods over a 1-year period. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a comparison is realised with continuous measurements of a high-altitude site during a long-term period. This comparison addresses to which extent near-surface in situ measurements are representative of the whole atmospheric column, the aerosol mixing layer (ML) or the free troposphere (FT). In particular, the impact of multi-aerosol layers events detected using lidar backscatter profiles is analysed. A good correlation between in situ aerosol extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer is observed with a correlation coefficient around 0.80, indicating that the in situ measurements station is representative of the overall atmospheric column. After filtering for multilayer cases and correcting for each layer optical contribution (ML and FT), the atmospheric structure seems to be the main factor influencing the comparison between the two measurement techniques. When the site lies in the ML, the in situ extinction represents 45 % of the sun photometer ML extinction while when the site lies within the FT, the in situ extinction is more than 2 times higher than the FT sun photometer extinction. Moreover, the assumption of a decreasing linear vertical aerosol profile in the whole atmosphere has been tested, significantly improving the instrumental agreement. Remote sensing retrievals of the aerosol particle size distributions (PSDs) from the sun photometer

  11. Relating Hyperspectral Airborne Data to Ground Measurements in a Complex and Discontinuous Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, Javier F.; Hellmann, Christine; Mendiguren, Gorka; Punalekar, Suvarna; Peón, Juanjo; MacArthur, Alasdair; Alonso, Luis

    2015-12-01

    The work described in this paper is aimed at validating hyperspectral airborne reflectance data collected during the Regional Experiments For Land-atmosphere EXchanges (REFLEX) campaign. Ground reflectance data measured in a vineyard were compared with airborne reflectance data. A sampling strategy and subsequent ground data processing had to be devised so as to capture a representative spectral sample of this complex crop. A linear model between airborne and ground data was tried and statistically tested. Results reveal a sound correspondence between ground and airborne reflectance data ( R2 > 0.97), validating the atmospheric correction of the latter.

  12. Disparity pattern-based autostereoscopic 3D metrology system for in situ measurement of microstructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Da; Cheung, Chi Fai; Ren, MingJun; Whitehouse, David; Zhao, Xing

    2015-11-15

    This paper presents a disparity pattern-based autostereoscopic (DPA) 3D metrology system that makes use of a microlens array to capture raw 3D information of the measured surface in a single snapshot through a CCD camera. Hence, a 3D digital model of the target surface with the measuring data is generated through a system-associated direct extraction of disparity information (DEDI) method. The DEDI method is highly efficient for performing the direct 3D mapping of the target surface based on tomography-like operation upon every depth plane with the defocused information excluded. Precise measurement results are provided through an error-elimination process based on statistical analysis. Experimental results show that the proposed DPA 3D metrology system is capable of measuring 3D microstructured surfaces with submicrometer measuring repeatability for high precision and in situ measurement of microstructured surfaces.

  13. ExoCube: In-Situ Measurement of Composition in the Exosphere, Thermosphere and Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noto, J.; Waldrop, L.; Paschalidis, N.; Taylor, C.; Gardner, D. D.; Jones, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Nossal, S. M.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Puig-Suari, J.; Kerr, R.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of neutral species densities in the upper thermosphere and lower exosphere remains elusive despite the analytical theories established by the pioneers of Aeronomy roughly fifty years ago, despite the evident requirements of Space Weather modeling, and despite the pragmatic reality of manned and unmanned spacecraft exploitation of the region. In fact, [O], [He] and [N2] have not been measured in-situ in the upper atmosphere since the era of DE-2, and then for only 18 months from 1981-1983 (near solar maximum). Prior to that, the Atmospheric Explorer program (AE-A launched in 1963, AE-E ended in 1980) provided the neutral density information upon which the MSIS model is largely based. No instrument has measured [H] in-situ, which is instead derived in MSIS by solution of the proton continuity equation.The ExoCube satellite provides a long-overdue benchmark for the densities of significant neutral and ionized species in the upper atmosphere, on a global scale, for the Space Weather and Aeronomy communities. These will be the first in-situ global neutral density data since DE-2, including the first direct measurements of [H] using a mass spectrometer technique. Since roughly half of the total electron column content (TEC) arises from photoionization of H, reliable knowledge of exospheric [H] is a crucial requirement of realistic Space Weather modeling of TEC. To insure that this project has enduring impact beyond the projected two-year duration of the satellite mission, experimental interaction with ground-based ISR and optical facilities is integrated. The simultaneous collection of ion and neutral densities will facilitate the use of ExoCube data for studies of charge exchange processes. Overpasses with observatories will enable ExoCube measurements to be used as a constraint for retrieval of density information from forward modeling of ground-based observations. Presented here will be the first post-launch mission status and operations.

  14. Feasibility of an in situ measurement device for bubble size and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Maciejak, Walter; Darnell, Branson; Lester, Michael; Pollack, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of in situ measurement device for bubble size and distribution was explored. A novel in situ probe measurement system, the EnviroCam™, was developed. Where possible, this probe incorporated strengths, and minimized weaknesses of historical and currently available real-time measurement methods for bubbles. The system was based on a digital, high-speed, high resolution, modular camera system, attached to a stainless steel shroud, compatible with standard Ingold ports on fermenters. Still frames and/or video were produced, capturing bubbles passing through the notch of the shroud. An LED light source was integral with the shroud. Bubbles were analyzed using customized commercially available image analysis software and standard statistical methods. Using this system, bubble sizes were measured as a function of various operating parameters (e.g., agitation rate, aeration rate) and as a function of media properties (e.g., viscosity, antifoam, cottonseed flour, and microbial/animal cell broths) to demonstrate system performance and its limitations. For selected conditions, mean bubble size changes qualitatively compared favorably with published relationships. Current instrument measurement capabilities were limited primarily to clear solutions that did not contain large numbers of overlapping bubbles. PMID:17566786

  15. Advanced Soil Moisture Network Technologies; Developments in Collecting in situ Measurements for Remote Sensing Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Silva, A. R. D.; Akbar, R.; Clewley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil moisture Sensing Controller And oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) wireless sensor network has been developed to support Calibration and Validation activities (Cal/Val) for large scale soil moisture remote sensing missions (SMAP and AirMOSS). The technology developed here also readily supports small scale hydrological studies by providing sub-kilometer widespread soil moisture observations. An extensive collection of semi-sparse sensor clusters deployed throughout north-central California and southern Arizona provide near real time soil moisture measurements. Such a wireless network architecture, compared to conventional single points measurement profiles, allows for significant and expanded soil moisture sampling. The work presented here aims at discussing and highlighting novel and new technology developments which increase in situ soil moisture measurements' accuracy, reliability, and robustness with reduced data delivery latency. High efficiency and low maintenance custom hardware have been developed and in-field performance has been demonstrated for a period of three years. The SoilSCAPE technology incorporates (a) intelligent sensing to prevent erroneous measurement reporting, (b) on-board short term memory for data redundancy, (c) adaptive scheduling and sampling capabilities to enhance energy efficiency. A rapid streamlined data delivery architecture openly provides distribution of in situ measurements to SMAP and AirMOSS cal/val activities and other interested parties.

  16. Comparison of in situ and airborne spectral measurements of the blue shift associated with forest decline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Hoshizaki, T.; Miller, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Visible IR Intelligent Spectrometer (VIRIS) reflectance data have been found to have similar features that are related to air-pollution-induced forest decline and visible damage in both the red spruce of Vermont and the Norway spruce of Baden-Wuerttemberg; the similarity suggests a common source of damage. Spectra of both species include a 5-nm blueshifting of the red-edge inflection point, while pigment data for both species indicate a loss of total chlorophylls. The blue shift of the chlorophyll absorption maximum, as well as the increased red radiance and decreased near-IR radiance of the damaged spruce, may be used to delineate and map damage areas.

  17. In-situ measurements of nighttime radical species (NO3 and N2O5) from Seoul N Tower in Korea during MAPS 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of nitrate radical (NO3) chemistry has been emphasized in the nocturnal atmosphere which influences on the air quality in following day. This chemistry could gather its importance even more in urban setting or in downwind area of large urban emission sources. In support of these issue, efforts in investigating the nighttime chemical mechanisms has been made during MAPS 2015 (Megacity Air Pollution Study 2015) at Seoul in Korea from May 18th to June 12th of 2015. By deploying NOAA's state-of-the-art instrument, ARNOLD (Airborne Ring-down Nitrogen Oxide Laser Detector), high time resolution in-situ measurement of nitrate (NO3), dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) as well as other related trace gases species (e.g. NO, NO2, NOy, and O3) were made on the Seoul N Tower (inlet height: 362m ASL). The in-situ measurements of NO3 radical will provide good observational constraints on night time oxidation processes. The NO3 and N2O5 equilibrium and reactivity will be analyzed by comparison of their lifetimes to those calculated from VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) measurements and kinetic calculations. Implications for nitrogen oxides species will be discussed.

  18. Measurements of Ultra-fine and Fine Aerosol Particles over Siberia: Large-scale Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Stohl, Andreas; Belan, Boris; Ciais, Philippe; Nédélec, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of in-situ measurements of ultra-fine and fine aerosol particles carried out in the troposphere from 500 to 7000 m in the framework of several International and Russian State Projects. Number concentrations of ultra-fine and fine aerosol particles measured during intensive airborne campaigns are presented. Measurements carried over a great part of Siberia were focused on particles with diameters from 3 to 21 nm to study new particle formation in the free/upper troposphere over middle and high latitudes of Asia, which is the most unexplored region of the Northern Hemisphere. Joint International airborne surveys were performed along the following routes: Novosibirsk-Salekhard-Khatanga-Chokurdakh-Pevek-Yakutsk-Mirny-Novosibirsk (YAK-AEROSIB/PLARCAT2008 Project) and Novosibirsk-Mirny-Yakutsk-Lensk-Bratsk-Novosibirsk (YAK-AEROSIB Project). The flights over Lake Baikal was conducted under Russian State contract. Concentrations of ultra-fine and fine particles were measured with automated diffusion battery (ADB, designed by ICKC SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia) modified for airborne applications. The airborne ADB coupled with CPC has an additional aspiration unit to compensate ambient pressure and changing flow rate. It enabled to classify nanoparticles in three size ranges: 3-6 nm, 6-21 nm, and 21-200 nm. To identify new particle formation events we used similar specific criteria as Young et al. (2007): (1) N3-6nm >10 cm-3, (2) R1=N3-6/N621 >1 and R2=N321/N21200 >0.5. So when one of the ratios R1 or R2 tends to decrease to the above limits the new particle formation is weakened. It is very important to notice that space scale where new particle formation was observed is rather large. All the events revealed in the FT occurred under clean air conditions (low CO mixing ratios). Measurements carried out in the atmospheric boundary layer over Baikal Lake did not reveal any event of new particle formation. Concentrations of ultra

  19. Rat airway morphometry measured from in situ MRI-based geometric models

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Jessica M.; Scadeng, Miriam; Breen, Ellen C.; Marsden, Alison L.

    2012-01-01

    Rodents have been widely used to study the environmental or therapeutic impact of inhaled particles. Knowledge of airway morphometry is essential in assessing geometric influence on aerosol deposition and in developing accurate lung models of aerosol transport. Previous morphometric studies of the rat lung performed ex situ provided high-resolution measurements (50–125 μm). However, it is unclear how the overall geometry of these casts might have differed from the natural in situ appearance. In this study, four male Wistar rat (268 ± 14 g) lungs were filled sequentially with perfluorocarbon and phosphate-buffered saline before being imaged in situ in a 7-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner at a resolution of 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.27 mm. Airway length, diameter, gravitational, bifurcation, and rotational angles were measured for the first four airway generations from 3D geometric models built from the MR images. Minor interanimal variability [expressed by the relative standard deviation RSD (=SD/mean)] was found for length (0.18 ± 0.07), diameter (0.15 ± 0.15), and gravitational angle (0.12 ± 0.06). One rat model was extended to 16 airway generations. Organization of the airways using a diameter-defined Strahler ordering method resulted in lower interorder variability than conventional generation-based grouping for both diameter (RSD = 0.12 vs. 0.42) and length (0.16 vs. 0.67). Gravitational and rotational angles averaged 82.9 ± 37.9° and 53.6 ± 24.1°, respectively. Finally, the major daughter branch bifurcated at a smaller angle (19.3 ± 14.6°) than the minor branch (60.5 ± 19.4°). These data represent the most comprehensive set of rodent in situ measurements to date and can be used readily in computational studies of lung function and aerosol exposure. PMID:22461437

  20. Return glider radiosonde for in situ upper-air research measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf

    2016-06-01

    Upper-air balloon soundings for weather predictions have been made since the beginning of the 20th century. New radiosonde instruments for in situ humidity-, radiation- and gas-profile measurements in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, were introduced in recent years for atmospheric research and climate monitoring, but such instruments are often expensive and it is desired they be reused on multiple flights. Recovering instruments that freely descend with parachutes is time consuming, sometimes difficult and even dangerous. Here, we introduce the return glider radiosonde (RGR), which enables flying and retrieving valuable in situ upper-air instruments. The RGR is lifted with weather balloons similar to traditional radiosondes to a preset altitude, at which time a release mechanism cuts the tether string, and a built-in autopilot flies the glider autonomously back to the launch site or a desired preprogrammed location. Once the RGR reaches the landing coordinates it circles down and releases a parachute 100 m above ground for landing. The motivation for this project was to measure radiation profiles throughout the atmosphere with the same instrument multiple times and with a rapid turn-around time. The paper describes technical aspects of the return glider radiosonde and the built-in radiation instruments and shows test flights up to 24 km altitude that are analyzed in terms of flight performance and maximal distances covered. Several successive flights measuring radiation profiles demonstrate the reliability and the operational readiness of the RGR, allowing new ways for atmospheric in situ research and monitoring with payloads up to several kg depending on the specific size of the glider.

  1. A load-lock compatible system for in situ electrical resistivity measurements during thin film growth.

    PubMed

    Colin, J J; Diot, Y; Guerin, Ph; Lamongie, B; Berneau, F; Michel, A; Jaouen, C; Abadias, G

    2016-02-01

    An experimental setup designed for in situ electrical resistance measurement during thin film growth is described. The custom-built sample holder with a four-point probe arrangement can be loaded into a high-vacuum magnetron sputter-deposition chamber through a load-lock transfer system, allowing measurements on series of samples without venting the main chamber. Electrical contact is ensured with circular copper tracks inserted in a Teflon plate on a mounting holder station inside the deposition chamber. This configuration creates the possibility to measure thickness-dependent electrical resistance changes with sub-monolayer resolution and is compatible with use of sample rotation during growth. Examples are presented for metallic films with high adatom mobility growing in a Volmer-Weber mode (Ag and Pd) as well as for refractory metal (Mo) with low adatom mobility. Evidence for an amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition at a film thickness of 2.6 nm is reported during growth of Mo on an amorphous Si underlayer, supporting previous findings based on in situ wafer curvature measurements.

  2. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; ...

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well asmore » a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.« less

  3. A load-lock compatible system for in situ electrical resistivity measurements during thin film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, J. J.; Diot, Y.; Guerin, Ph.; Lamongie, B.; Berneau, F.; Michel, A.; Jaouen, C.; Abadias, G.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental setup designed for in situ electrical resistance measurement during thin film growth is described. The custom-built sample holder with a four-point probe arrangement can be loaded into a high-vacuum magnetron sputter-deposition chamber through a load-lock transfer system, allowing measurements on series of samples without venting the main chamber. Electrical contact is ensured with circular copper tracks inserted in a Teflon plate on a mounting holder station inside the deposition chamber. This configuration creates the possibility to measure thickness-dependent electrical resistance changes with sub-monolayer resolution and is compatible with use of sample rotation during growth. Examples are presented for metallic films with high adatom mobility growing in a Volmer-Weber mode (Ag and Pd) as well as for refractory metal (Mo) with low adatom mobility. Evidence for an amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition at a film thickness of 2.6 nm is reported during growth of Mo on an amorphous Si underlayer, supporting previous findings based on in situ wafer curvature measurements.

  4. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well as a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.

  5. In situ methods for measuring thermal properties and heat flux on planetary bodies

    PubMed Central

    Kömle, Norbert I.; Hütter, Erika S.; Macher, Wolfgang; Kaufmann, Erika; Kargl, Günter; Knollenberg, Jörg; Grott, Matthias; Spohn, Tilman; Wawrzaszek, Roman; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Seweryn, Karoly; Hagermann, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of planetary surface and subsurface layers control to a high extent in which way a body interacts with its environment, in particular how it responds to solar irradiation and how it interacts with a potentially existing atmosphere. Furthermore, if the natural temperature profile over a certain depth can be measured in situ, this gives important information about the heat flux from the interior and thus about the thermal evolution of the body. Therefore, in most of the recent and planned planetary lander missions experiment packages for determining thermo-mechanical properties are part of the payload. Examples are the experiment MUPUS on Rosetta's comet lander Philae, the TECP instrument aboard NASA's Mars polar lander Phoenix, and the mole-type instrument HP3 currently developed for use on upcoming lunar and Mars missions. In this review we describe several methods applied for measuring thermal conductivity and heat flux and discuss the particular difficulties faced when these properties have to be measured in a low pressure and low temperature environment. We point out the abilities and disadvantages of the different instruments and outline the evaluation procedures necessary to extract reliable thermal conductivity and heat flux data from in situ measurements. PMID:21760643

  6. CO2 variability from in situ and vertical column measurements in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylon, J. L.; Grutter, M.; Stremme, W.; Bezanilla, A.; Plaza, E.

    2014-12-01

    UNAM started a program to measure, among many other atmospheric parameters, greenhouse gas concentrations at six stations in the Mexican territory as part of the "Red Universitaria de Observatorios Atmosfericos", RUOA (www.ruoa.unam.mx). In this work we present recent time series of CO2 measured at the station located in the university campus in Mexico City, and compare them to total vertical columns of this gas measured at the same location. In situ measurements are continuously carried out with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (Picarro Inc., G2401) since July 2014 and the columns are retrieved from solar absorption measurements taken with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Bruker, Vertex 80) when conditions allow. The retrieval method is described and results of the comparison of both techniques and a detailed analysis of the variability of this important greenhouse gas is presented. Simultaneous surface and column CO2 data are useful to constrain models and estimate emissions.

  7. Development of a Flight Instrument for in situ Measurements of Ethane and Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, J. P.; Sayres, D. S.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions data for natural gas and oil fields have high uncertainty. Better quantifying these emissions is crucial to establish an accurate methane budget for the United States. One obstacle is that these emissions often occur in areas near livestock facilities where biogenic methane abounds. Measuring ethane, which has no biogenic source, along with methane can tease these sources apart. However, ethane is typically measured by taking whole-air samples. This tactic has lower spatial resolution than making in situ measurements and requires the measurer to anticipate the location of emission plumes. This leaves unexpected plumes uncharacterized. Using Re-injection Mirror Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (RIM-ICOS), we can measure both methane and ethane in flight, allowing us to establish more accurate fugitive emissions data that can more readily distinguish between different sources of this greenhouse gas.

  8. Using an A-10 Aircraft for Airborne measurements of TGFs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.; Christian, Hugh, J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Grove, J. Eric; Chektman, Alexandre; Jonsson, Haflidi; Detwiler, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Plans are underway to convert an A-10 combat attack aircraft into a research aircraft for thunderstorm research. This aircraft would be configured and instrumented for flights into large, convective thunderstorms. It would have the capabilities of higher altitude performance and protection for thunderstorm conditions that exceed those of aircraft now in use for this research. One area of investigation for this aircraft would be terrestrial gamma ]ray flashes (TGFs), building on the pioneering observations made by the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) project several years ago. A new and important component of the planned investigations are the continuous, detailed correlations of TGFs with the electric fields near the aircraft, as well as detailed measurements of nearby lightning discharges. Together, the x-and gamma-radiation environments, the electric field measurements, and the lightning observations (all measured on microsecond timescales) should provide new insights into this TGF production mechanism. The A -10 aircraft is currently being modified for thunderstorm research. It is anticipated that the initial test flights for this role will begin next year.

  9. Rapid In-Situ Measurement of Gamma Activity in Soil for Environmental Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, T. K.

    2003-12-01

    In-situ measurements of gamma radiation in soil are used as a rapid, low-cost, non-intrusive alternative to conventional sampling and analysis methods in the preliminary assessment of environmental impacts to watersheds at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The method resolves the ambient gamma-radiation field near ground surface into background and residual components and provides radionuclide-specific soil activity determination. The efficacy of the method has been evaluated and compares favorably with conventional gamma-PHA soil analyses and aerial survey data. The method has garnered regulatory approval and is being successfully deployed to evaluate the impact of Cs-137 contamination from CERCLA sites.

  10. In situ measurement of osmium concentrations in iron meteorites by resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.; Pellin, M. J.; Calaway, W. F.; Young, C. E.; Gruen, D. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1990-03-01

    Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for in situ quantitative measurement of Os with a spatial resolution of about 70 microns. A linear correlation between Os(+) signal intensity and the known Os concentration was observed over a range of nearly 10,000 in Os concentration with an accuracy of about + or - 10 percent, a minimum detection limit of 7 parts per billion atomic, and a useful yield of 1 percent. Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms samples the dominant neutral-fraction of sputtered atoms and utilizes multiphoton resonance ionization to achieve high sensitivity and to eliminate atomic and molecular interferences.

  11. In situ measurements constraining the role of sulphate aerosols in mid-latitude ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Tin, P.; Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Borrmann, S.; Toohey, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of stratospheric sulphate aerosol, reactive nitrogen and chlorine concentrations at middle latitudes confirm the importance of aerosol surface reactions that convert active nitrogen to a less active, reservoir form. This makes mid-latitude stratospheric ozone less vulnerable to active nitrogen and more vulnerable to chlorine species. The effect of aerosol reactions on active nitrogen depends on gas phase reaction rates, so that increases in aerosol concentration following volcanic eruptions will have only a limited effect on ozone depletion at these latitudes.

  12. MEASURING THE PLASTIC RESPONSE IN POLYCRSYTALLINE MATERIALS USING IN-SITU X-RAY DIFFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hawreliak, J; Butterfield, M; El-Dasher, B; McNaney, J; Lorenzana, H

    2008-10-01

    The insight provided by ultra-fast lattice level measurements during high strain rate high pressure experiments is key to understanding kinetic material properties like plasticity. In-situ x-ray diffraction provides a diagnostic technique which can be used to study the governing physical phenomena of plasticity at the relevant time and spatial scale. Here we discuss the recent development of a geometry capable of investigating plasticity in polycrystalline foils. We also present some preliminary data of investigations into shock compressed rolled copper foils.

  13. F4TCNQ-Induced Exciton Quenching Studied by Using in-situ Photoluminescence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Lu, Min; Wu, Bo; Hou, Xiao-Yuan

    2012-09-01

    The role of F4TCNQ as an exciton quenching material in thin organic light-emitting films is investigated by means of in situ photoluminescence measurements. C60 was used as another quenching material in the experiment for comparison, with Alq3 as a common organic light-emitting material. The effect of the growth sequence of the materials on quenching was also examined. It is found that the radius of Förster energy transfer between F4TCNQ and Alq3 is close to 0 nm and Dexter energy transfer dominates in the quenching process.

  14. In Situ, Time-Resolved Accelerator Grid Erosion Measurements in the NSTAR 8000 Hour Ion Engine Wear Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved, in situ measurements of the charge exchange ion erosion pattern on the downstream face of the accelerator grid have been made during an ongoin wear test of the NSTAR 30 cm ion thruster.

  15. Carbon monoxide total column retrievals by use of the measurements of pollution in the troposphere airborne test radiometer.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jianguo; Deeter, Merritt N; Gille, John C; Edwards, David P; Ziskin, Daniel C; Francis, Gene L; Hills, Alan J; Smith, Mark W

    2004-08-20

    The Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) Airborne Test Radiometer (MATR) uses gas correlation filter radiometry from high-altitude aircraft to measure tropospheric carbon monoxide. This radiometer is used in support of the ongoing validation campaign for the MOPITT instrument aboard the Earth Observation System Terra satellite. A recent study of MATR CO retrievals that used data from the autumn of 2001 in the western United States is presented. Retrievals of the CO total column were performed and compared to in situ sampling with less than 10% retrieval error. Effects that influence retrieval, such as instrument sensitivity, retrieval sensitivity, and the bias between observations and the radiative transfer model, are discussed. Comparisons of MATR and MOPITT retrievals show promising consistency. A preliminary interpretation of MATR results is also presented.

  16. Airborne measurements of HC(O)OH in the European Arctic: A winter - summer comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Benjamin T.; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; O'Shea, Sebastian J.; Bacak, Asan; Le Breton, Michael; Bannan, Thomas J.; Leather, Kimberley E.; Booth, A. Murray; Illingworth, Sam; Bower, Keith; Gallagher, Martin W.; Allen, Grant; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Bauguitte, Stephane J.-B.; Pyle, John A.; Percival, Carl J.

    2014-12-01

    This study represents the first airborne, in-situ measurements of HC(O)OH in the European Arctic, across the winter and summer seasons. HC(O)OH concentrations are under predicted at present, particularly in the mid to high northern latitudes. Data presented here probe unconfirmed sources of HC(O)OH in the Arctic, and would suggest an ocean source of HC(O)OH is more significant than proposed land sources in both winter and summer environments. A maximum concentration of 420 ppt was recorded over the ocean during the July 2012 campaign. This was more than 1.7 times greater than the maximum land concentration reported. Calculated estimates on HC(O)OH production would suggest diiodomethane photolysis could represent a significant source of HC(O)OH in marine environments in the European Arctic. Enhanced HC(O)OH concentrations observed at altitudes greater than 2 km particularly during the March campaign highlight the significance of long range transport on the European Arctic budget. In addition, two HC(O)OH vertical profiles between the altitudes 0.3-6.6 km are presented to provide a more representative vertical profile for this latitude which may be used to improve forthcoming regional and global modelling of the HC(O)OH budget.

  17. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Ramanathan, Anand; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Weaver, Clark; Browell, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to greater than 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the Iidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected -linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes greater than 6 km the random errors were approximately 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as wen as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly

  18. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Ramanathan, A.; Hasselbrack, W.; Mao, J.; Weaver, C. J.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to > 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected ~linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes > 6 km the random errors were ~ 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as well as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity

  19. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Column CO2 Concentration to Cloud Tops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Globally distributed atmospheric CO2 measurements with high precision, low bias and full seasonal sampling are crucial to advance carbon cycle sciences. However, two thirds of the Earth's surface is typically covered by clouds, and passive remote sensing approaches from space, e.g., OCO-2 and GOSAT, are limited to cloud-free scenes. They are unable to provide useful retrievals in cloudy areas where the photon path-length can't be well characterized. Thus, passive approaches have limited global coverage and poor sampling in cloudy regions, even though some cloudy regions have active carbon surface fluxes. NASA Goddard is developing a pulsed integrated-path, differential absorption (IPDA) lidar approach to measure atmospheric column CO2 concentrations from space as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Measurements of time-resolved laser backscatter profiles from the atmosphere also allow this technique to estimate column CO2 and range to cloud tops in addition to those to the ground with precise knowledge of the photon path-length. This allows retrievals of column CO2 concentrations to cloud tops, providing much higher spatial coverage and some information about vertical structure of CO2. This is expected to benefit atmospheric transport process studies, carbon data assimilation in models, and global and regional carbon flux estimation. We show some preliminary results of the all-sky retrieval capability using airborne lidar measurements from the 2011, 2013 and 2014 ASCENDS airborne campaigns on the NASA DC-8. These show retrievals of atmospheric CO2 over low-level marine stratus clouds, cumulus clouds at the top of planetary boundary layer, some mid-level clouds and visually thin high-level cirrus clouds. The CO2 retrievals from the lidar are validated against in-situ measurements and compared to Goddard PCTM model simulations. Lidar cloud slicing to derive CO2 abundance in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere also has been demonstrated. The

  20. Testing coordinate measuring arms with a geometric feature-based gauge: in situ field trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, E.; Alvarez, B. J.; Patiño, H.; Telenti, A.; Barreiro, J.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes in detail the definition of a procedure for calibrating and evaluating coordinate measuring arms (AACMMs or CMAs). CMAs are portable coordinate measuring machines that have been widely accepted in industry despite their sensitivity to the skill and experience of the operator in charge of the inspection task. The procedure proposed here is based on the use of a dimensional gauge that incorporates multiple geometric features, specifically designed for evaluating the measuring technique when CMAs are used, at company facilities (workshops or laboratories) and by the usual operators who handle these devices in their daily work. After establishing the procedure and manufacturing the feature-based gauge, the research project was complemented with diverse in situ field tests performed with the collaboration of companies that use these devices in their inspection tasks. Some of the results are presented here, not only comparing different operators but also comparing different companies. The knowledge extracted from these experiments has allowed the procedure to be validated, the defects of the methodologies currently used for in situ inspections to be detected, and substantial improvements for increasing the reliability of these portable instruments to be proposed.

  1. Image correlation method for measuring flow and diameter changes in contracting mesenteric microlymphatics in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. Brandon; Cote, Gerard; Gashev, Anatoly; Greiner, Steven; Moore, James; Zawieja, David

    2006-02-01

    Collecting microlymphatics play a vital role in promoting lymph flow from the initial lymphatics in the interstitial spaces to the large transport lymph ducts. In most tissues, the primary mechanism for producing this flow is the spontaneous contractions of the lymphatic wall. Individual units, known as lymphangion, are separated by valves that help prevent backflow when the vessel contracts, thus promoting flow through the lymphatic network. Lymphatic contractile activity is inhibited by flow in isolated lymphatics, however there are virtually no in situ measurements of lymph flow in these vessels. One of the difficulties associated with obtaining such measurements is the time consuming methods of manual particle tracking used previously by our group. Using an in situ preparation with mesenteric microlymphatics (~ 100 μm in diameter) and a high speed imaging system (500 fps), we have developed an image correlation method to measure lymphatic flow with a standard error of prediction of 0.3 mm/sec when compared with manual particle tracking.

  2. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; ...

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  3. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  4. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, Arnold; Lu, Sha; Segers, Arjo; Weber, Konradin; Lin, Hai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  5. Airborne Double Pulsed 2-Micron IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Singh, Upendra

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an airborne 2-micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurements. The double pulsed, high pulse energy lidar instrument can provide high-precision CO2 column density measurements.

  6. In situ roughness measurements for the solar cell industry using an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    González-Jorge, Higinio; Alvarez-Valado, Victor; Valencia, Jose Luis; Torres, Soledad

    2010-01-01

    Areal roughness parameters always need to be under control in the thin film solar cell industry because of their close relationship with the electrical efficiency of the cells. In this work, these parameters are evaluated for measurements carried out in a typical fabrication area for this industry. Measurements are made using a portable atomic force microscope on the CNC diamond cutting machine where an initial sample of transparent conductive oxide is cut into four pieces. The method is validated by making a comparison between the parameters obtained in this process and in the laboratory under optimal conditions. Areal roughness parameters and Fourier Spectral Analysis of the data show good compatibility and open the possibility to use this type of measurement instrument to perform in situ quality control. This procedure gives a sample for evaluation without destroying any of the transparent conductive oxide; in this way 100% of the production can be tested, so improving the measurement time and rate of production.

  7. Airborne Measurements of Aerosol Size Distributions During PACDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Gandrud, B.; Campos, T.; Kok, G.; Stith, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Pacific Dust Experiment (PACDEX) is an airborne project that attempts to characterize the indirect aerosol effect by tracing plumes of dust and pollution across the Pacific Ocean. This project occurred during April-May 2007 and used the NSF/NCAR HIAPER research aircraft. When a period of strong generation of dust particles and pollution was detected by ground-based and satellite sensors, then the aircraft was launched from Colorado to Alaska, Hawaii, and Japan. Its mission was to intercept and track these plumes from Asia, across the Pacific Ocean, and ultimately to the edges of North America. For more description, see the abstract by Stith and Ramanathan (this conference) and other companion papers on PACDEX. The HIAPER aircraft carried a wide variety of sensors for measuring aerosols, cloud particles, trace gases, and radiation. Sampling was made in several weather regimes, including clean "background" air, dust and pollution plumes, and regions with cloud systems. Altitude ranges extended from 100 m above the ocean to 13.4 km. This paper reports on aerosol measurements made with a new Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), a Radial Differential Mobility Analyzer (RDMA), a water-based CN counter, and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP). These cover the size range 10 nm to 10 um diameter. In clear air, dust was detected with the UHSAS and CDP. Polluted air was identified with high concentrations of carbon monoxide, ozone, and CN. Aerosol size distributions will be presented, along with data to define the context of weather regimes.

  8. Airborne-Measured Spatially-Averaged Temperature and Moisture Turbulent Structure Parameters Over a Heterogeneous Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platis, Andreas; Martinez, Daniel; Bange, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent structure parameters of temperature and humidity can be derived from scintillometer measurements along horizontal paths of several 100 m to several 10 km. These parameters can be very useful to estimate the vertical turbulent heat fluxes at the surface (applying MOST). However, there are many assumptions required by this method which can be checked using in situ data, e.g. 1) Were CT2 and CQ2 correctly derived from the initial CN2 scintillometer data (structure parameter of density fluctuations or refraction index, respectively)? 2) What is the influence of the surround hetereogeneous surface regarding its footprint and the weighted averaging effect of the scintillometer method 3) Does MOST provide the correct turbulent fluxes from scintillometer data. To check these issues, in situ data from low-level flight measurements are well suited, since research aircraft cover horizontal distances in very short time (Taylor's hypothesis of a frozen turbulence structure can be applyed very likely). From airborne-measured time series the spatial series are calculated and then their structure functions that finally provide the structure parameters. The influence of the heterogeneous surface can be controlled by the definition of certain moving-average window sizes. A very useful instrument for this task are UAVs since they can fly very low and maintain altitude very precisely. However, the data base of such unmanned operations is still quite thin. So in this contribution we want to present turbulence data obtained with the Helipod, a turbulence probe hanging below a manned helicopter. The structure parameters of temperature and moisture, CT2 and CQ2, in the lower convective boundary layer were derived from data measured using the Helipod in 2003. The measurements were carried out during the LITFASS03 campaign over a heterogeneous land surface around the boundary-layer field site of the Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory-Richard-Aßmann-Observatory (MOL) of the

  9. In situ calibrated defocusing PTV for wall-bounded measurement volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, T.; Hain, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    In many situations, 3D velocity measurements in thin (∼1 mm) but wide (∼100  ×  100 mm2) flow channels is an important task. To resolve the in-plane and out-of-plane velocity gradients properly, a precise calibration is required, since 3D measurement approaches rely strongly on the accuracy of the calibration procedure. It is likely that calibration targets do not fit domains with small depths, due to their size. Furthermore, in fields where such measurements are of interest, the accessibility of the measurement volume is often limited or even impossible. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper introduces an in situ calibrated defocusing particle tracking velocimetry approach for wall-bounded measurement domains with depths in the low millimeter range. The calibration function for the particle depth location is directly derived from the particle image geometries and their displacements between two frames. Employing only a single camera, this defocusing approach is capable of measuring the air flow between two parallel glass plates at a distance of 1 mm with an average uncertainty of 2.43% for each track, relative to the maximum velocity. A tomographic particle tracking velocimetry measurement, serving as a benchmark for the single camera technique, reaches an average uncertainty of 1.59%. Altogether, with its straightforward set-up and without requiring a calibration target, this in situ calibrated defocusing approach opens new areas of application for optical flow velocimetry. In particular, for measurement domains with small optical windows and a lack of accessibility.

  10. A Nanoplasmonic Strategy for Precision in-situ Measurements of Tip-enhanced Raman and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingyan; Sun, Mengtao; Chen, Jianing; Yang, Zhilin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate an optimized tip-film system that supports in-situ measurement of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and tip-enhanced fluorescence (TEF) of dye molecules. A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is proposed to precisely control the tip-film distance, and thus in-situ measurement of TERS and TEF can be realized utilizing the specific surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties of the tip-film system. Our calculations show that the optimized tip-film distance of 2 nm suggests a possibility of efficient acquisition of TERS and TEF in-situ. The calculated spatial resolution of TERS and spectral resolution of TEF can be down to 6.5 nm and 10 nm, respectively. Our theoretical results may find promising application in developing multiple functional nano-spectroscopy through which Raman and fluorescence can be measured in-situ at the nanoscale level. PMID:26780882

  11. Pulsed Airborne Lidar measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C. J.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Sun, X.

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA’s planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser’s wavelength across a selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, laser pulse energy is 25 uJ and laser pulse widths are 1 usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during October and December 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin and broken clouds. Atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the DOE SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These flights were coordinated with DOE investigators who flew an in-situ CO2 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The

  12. Airborne flux measurements of Biogenic Isoprene over California

    SciTech Connect

    Misztal, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Weber, Robin; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-10-10

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK+MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ~10,000-km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z/zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently 1 at 400 m ±50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  13. Theoretical and Experimental Errors for In Situ Measurements of Plant Water Potential 1

    PubMed Central

    Shackel, Kenneth A.

    1984-01-01

    Errors in psychrometrically determined values of leaf water potential caused by tissue resistance to water vapor exchange and by lack of thermal equilibrium were evaluated using commercial in situ psychrometers (Wescor Inc., Logan, UT) on leaves of Tradescantia virginiana (L.). Theoretical errors in the dewpoint method of operation for these sensors were demonstrated. After correction for these errors, in situ measurements of leaf water potential indicated substantial errors caused by tissue resistance to water vapor exchange (4 to 6% reduction in apparent water potential per second of cooling time used) resulting from humidity depletions in the psychrometer chamber during the Peltier condensation process. These errors were avoided by use of a modified procedure for dewpoint measurement. Large changes in apparent water potential were caused by leaf and psychrometer exposure to moderate levels of irradiance. These changes were correlated with relatively small shifts in psychrometer zero offsets (−0.6 to −1.0 megapascals per microvolt), indicating substantial errors caused by nonisothermal conditions between the leaf and the psychrometer. Explicit correction for these errors is not possible with the current psychrometer design. PMID:16663701

  14. Using continuous in-situ measurements to adaptively trigger urban storm water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, B. P.; Kerkez, B.

    2015-12-01

    Until cost-effective in-situ sensors are available for biological parameters, nutrients and metals, automated samplers will continue to be the primary source of reliable water quality measurements. Given limited samples bottles, however, autosamplers often obscure insights on nutrient sources and biogeochemical processes which would otherwise be captured using a continuous sampling approach. To that end, we evaluate the efficacy a novel method to measure first-flush nutrient dynamics in flashy, urban watersheds. Our approach reduces the number of samples required to capture water quality dynamics by leveraging an internet-connected sensor node, which is equipped with a suite of continuous in-situ sensors and an automated sampler. To capture both the initial baseflow as well as storm concentrations, a cloud-hosted adaptive algorithm analyzes the high-resolution sensor data along with local weather forecasts to optimize a sampling schedule. The method was tested in a highly developed urban catchment in Ann Arbor, Michigan and collected samples of nitrate, phosphorus, and suspended solids throughout several storm events. Results indicate that the watershed does not exhibit first flush dynamics, a behavior that would have been obscured when using a non-adaptive sampling approach.

  15. In-situ Stress Measurement of MOVPE Growth of High Efficiency Lattice-Mismatched Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.; Levander, A. X.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.; Romero, M. J.

    2007-04-01

    We have recently reported high efficiencies in a monolithic III-V triple-junction solar cell design that is grown inverted with a metamorphic 1.0 eV bottom In{sub .27}Ga{sub .73}As junction. The biaxial stress and strain grown into this highly lattice-mismatched junction can be controlled by varying the design of a step-graded Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P buffer layer, in which most, but not all, of the 1.9% misfit strain is relieved. A multi-beam optical stress sensor (MOSS) is a convenient tool for in situ measurement of stress during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) for the optimization of solar cell performance. The analysis of stress from curvature data is complicated by significant temperature effects due to relatively small thermal gradients in our atmospheric-pressure MOVPE reactor. These temperature effects are discussed and approximations made to allow practical analysis of the data. The results show excellent performance of inverted In{sub .27}Ga{sub .73}. As solar cells grown with slight compressive stress, but degradation under tensile stress. The best devices had a V{sub oc} of 0.54 V and a dislocation density in the low 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}. The in situ stress data is also compared with ex situ strain data derived from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  16. Spatial-frequency analysis algorithm for in-situ measurement of wavefront

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Yang; Ji, Fang; He, Jianguo

    2015-05-01

    To apply phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) to in-situ measurement, we have proposed an algorithm to detect and suppress phase-shifting error and contrast fluctuation. The phase shift and contrast are analyzed in spatial-frequency domain. The strength of baseband and sideband implies the pattern contrast. The position and phase angle of the sideband indicates the tilt gradients and translational value of phase shift. Thus, the phase shift error and contrast fluctuation could be extracted. A contrast-compensated equation is established to calculate the wavefront phase. The proposed algorithm was applied to the interferograms subjecting to vibration and wavefront phase was calculated. The experimental results show that, under vibration of one micron amplitude and 60Hz frequency, the error of wavefront PV value is less than 0.01wave and the 2σ repeatability is less than 0.01wave. For no hardware is required, the proposed algorithm provides a cost-effective method for wavefront in-situ measurement with PSI.

  17. Analysis of a vortex precipitation event over Southwest China using AIRS and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Chengcheng; Li, Guoping; Xiong, Xiaozhen

    2017-04-01

    A strong precipitation event caused by the southwest vortex (SWV), which affected Sichuan Province and Chongqing municipality in Southwest China on 10-14 July 2012, is investigated. The SWV is examined using satellite observations from AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), in situ measurements from the SWV intensive observation campaign, and MICAPS (Marine Interactive Computer-Aided Provisioning System) data. Analysis of this precipitation process revealed that: (1) heavy rain occurred during the development phase, and cloud water content increased significantly after the dissipation of the SWV; (2) the area with low outgoing longwave radiation values from AIRS correlated well with the SWV; (3) variation of the temperature of brightness blackbody (TBB) from AIRS reflected the evolution of the SWV, and the values of TBB reduced significantly during the SWV's development; and (4) strong temperature and water vapor inversions were noted during the development of the SWV. The moisture profile displayed large vertical variation during the SWV's puissant phase, with the moisture inversion occurring at low levels. The moisture content during the receding phase was significantly reduced compared with that during the developing and puissant phases. The vertical flux of vapor divergence explained the variation of the moisture profile. These results also indicate the potential for using AIRS products in studying severe weather over the Tibetan Plateau and its surroundings, where in situ measurements are sparse.

  18. Reconciling Spectroscopic Electron Temperature Measurements in the Solar Corona with In Situ Charge State Observations.

    PubMed

    Esser; Edgar

    2000-03-20

    It has been a puzzle for quite some time that spectroscopic measurements in the inner corona indicate electron temperatures far too low to produce the ion fractions observed in situ in the solar wind. In the present Letter, we show that in order to reconcile the two sets of measurements, a number of conditions have to exist in the inner corona: (1) The electron distribution function has to be Maxwellian or close to Maxwellian at the coronal base, (2) the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution has to develop rapidly as a function of height and has to reach close to interplanetary properties inside of a few solar radii, and (3) ions of different elements have to flow with significantly different speeds to separate their "freezing-in" distances sufficiently so that they can encounter different distribution functions. We choose two examples to demonstrate that these conditions are general requirements if both coronal electron temperatures and in situ ion fractions are correct. However, these two examples also show that the details of the required distribution functions are very sensitive to the exact electron temperature, density, and ion flow speed profiles in the region of the corona where the ions predominantly form.

  19. Inferring immobile and in-situ water saturation from laboratory and field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Belen, Rodolfo P., Jr.

    2000-06-01

    Analysis of experimental data and numerical simulation results of dynamic boiling experiments revealed that there is an apparent correlation between the immobile water saturation and the shape of the steam saturation profile. An elbow in the steam saturation profile indicates the sudden drop in steam saturation that marks the transition from steam to two-phase conditions inside the core during boiling. The immobile water saturation can be inferred from this elbow in the steam saturation profile. Based on experimental results obtained by Satik (1997), the inferred immobile water saturation of Berea sandstone was found to be about 0.25, which is consistent with results of relative permeability experiments reported by Mahiya (1999). However, this technique may not be useful in inferring the immobile water saturation of less permeable geothermal rocks because the elbow in the steam saturation profile is less prominent. Models of vapor and liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that were developed based on Darcy's law and material and energy conservation equations proved to be useful in inferring the in-situ and immobile water saturations from field measurements of cumulative mass production, discharge enthalpy, and downhole temperature. Knowing rock and fluid properties, and the difference between the stable initial, T{sub o}, and dry-out, T{sub d}, downhole temperatures, the in-situ and immobile water saturations of vapor-dominated reservoirs can be estimated. On the other hand, the in-situ and immobile water saturations, and the change in mobile water content of liquid-dominated reservoirs can be inferred from the cumulative mass production, {Delta}m, and enthalpy, h{prime}, data. Comparison with two-phase, radial flow, numerical simulation results confirmed the validity and usefulness of these models.

  20. MAX200x: In-situ X-ray Measurements at High Pressure and High Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathe, C.; Mueller, H. J.; Wehber, M.; Lauterjung, J.; Schilling, F. R.

    2009-05-01

    Twenty years ago geoscientists from all over the world launched in-situ X-ray diffraction experiments under extreme pressure and temperature conditions at synchrotron beamlines. One of the first apparatus was installed at HASYLAB, MAX80, a single-stage multi-anvil system. MAX80 allows in-situ diffraction studies in conjunction with the simultaneous measurement of elastic properties up to 12 GPa and 1600 K. This very successful experiment, unique in Europe, is operated by Helmholtz Centre Potsdam and is used by more than twenty groups from different countries every year. Experiments for both, applied and basic research are conducted, ranging from life-sciences, chemistry, physics, over material sciences to geosciences. Today new materials and the use of high brilliant synchrotron sources allow constructing double-stage multi-anvil systems for X-ray diffraction to reach much higher pressures. The newly designed high-flux hard wiggler (HARWI-II) beamline is an ideal X-ray source for this kind of experiments. As only the uppermost few kilometres of the Earth (less than 0.1% of its radius) are accessible for direct observations (e.g. deep drilling), sophisticated techniques are required to observe and to understand the processes in the deep interior of our planet. In-situ studies are an excellent tool to investigate ongoing geodynamic processes within the laboratory. One of the fundamental regions to study geodynamic processes seems to be the so-called transition zone, the boundary between upper and lower Earth's mantle between 410 and 670 km depth. Mineral reactions, phase transitions, as wheel as fluid rock interaction in this area might have the potential to strongly influence and control the dynamic motions within our whole planet. Around 25 GPa and 2 000 K are required to simulate these processes in the laboratory. The new MAX200x will be an excellent tool for these ambitious experiments.

  1. In situ measurements of KZ and ɛ compared to numerical models in the Gulf of Lion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Andrea; Doglioli, Andrea; Dekeyser, Ivan; Jullion, Loic; Malengros, Deny; Petrenko, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Vertical diffusivity and turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate play an essential role in the parametrization of physical and biogeochemical models. Coastal environment is particularly important because expected to contribute in a substantial way to the balance of kinetic energy in the ocean. In situ measurements have a crucial importance in driving the models. We present a multi-annual dataset performed with SCAMP (Self Contained Autonomous Profiler) field measurements of KZ and ɛ in a variety of meteorological and oceanic conditions in the Gulf of Lion (Mediterranean Sea). The results are compared with respect to similar measurements in coastal waters described in literature. Moreover, a comparison to numerical circulation models is proposed in order to show the dependency of the depth of the mixing layer on the wind forcing.

  2. In Situ Stress Measurements in the NPR Hole, Volume I - Results and Interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, D.

    2001-10-15

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the magnitudes and orientations of the in situ stresses in basement rocks beneath the Savannah River Site (SRS). Stress magnitudes were measured using the hydraulic fracturing technique. Stress orientations were obtained from the orientation of stress-induced wellbore breakouts and hydraulically-induced fractures. The measurements reported here were carried out in the New Production Reactor (NPR) hole, drilled to a total depth of 4000 feet near the center of the Savannah River Site, at roughly the location of the proposed NPR. The results obtained in this study are compared to previous stress measurements made using the same techniques in a series of shallower holes on the SRS, and discussed in the context of the regional stress field and potential seismic hazard.

  3. Note: In situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Andreas; Alt, Wolfgang; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    We present an in situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence Δn at the level of 10(-8) and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses.

  4. Note: In situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Andreas; Alt, Wolfgang; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-12-15

    We present an in situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence Δn at the level of 10{sup −8} and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses.

  5. Development of a Cone Penetrometer for Measuring Spectral Characteristics of Soils in Situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Landris T., Jr.; Malone, Philip G.

    1993-01-01

    A patent was recently granted to the U.S. Army for an adaptation of a soil cone penetrometer that can be used to measure the spectral characteristics (fluorescence or reflectance) of soils adjacent to the penetrometer rod. The system can use a variety of light sources and spectral analytical equipment. A laser induced fluorescence measuring system has proven to be of immediate use in mapping the distribution of oil contaminated soil at waste disposal and oil storage areas. The fiber optic adaptation coupled with a cone penetrometer permits optical characteristics of the in-situ soil to be measured rapidly, safely, and inexpensively. The fiber optic cone penetrometer can be used to gather spectral data to a depth of approximately 25 to 30 m even in dense sands or stiff clays and can investigate 300 m of soil per day. Typical detection limits for oil contamination in sand is on the order of several hundred parts per million.

  6. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, A.; Silevitch, D. M.; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  7. Development of an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system for exploration of the shallow subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirila, Marian Andrei; Christoph, Benjamin; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempted to develop an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system that can be used for subsurface thermal exploration. A new thermal probe was developed for mapping both the spatial and temporal variability of thermal conductivity, via direct push methods in the unconsolidated shallow subsurface. A robust, hollow cylindrical probe was constructed and its performance was tested by carrying out thermal conductivity measurements on materials with known properties. The thermal conductivity of the investigated materials can be worked out by measuring the active power consumption (in alternating current system) and temperature of the probe over fixed time intervals. A calibration method was used to eliminate any undesired thermal effects regarding the size of the probe, based on mobile thermal analyzer thermal conductivity values. Using the hollow cylindrical probe, the thermal conductivity results obtained had an error of less than 2.5% for solid samples (such as Teflon, Agar Jelly and Nylatron).

  8. Quantifying Stratospheric Ozone in the Upper Troposphere Using in situ Measurements of HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, C S; Bergmann, D J; Marcy, T P; Fahey, D W; Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Richard, E C; Thompson, T L; Rosenlof, K H; Ray, E A; Salawitch, R J; Ridley, B A; . Weinheimer, A J; Loewenstein, M; Weinstock, E M; Mahoney, M J

    2004-03-08

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) technique has been developed for precise in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from a high-altitude aircraft. In measurements at subtropical latitudes, minimum HCl values found in the upper troposphere (UT) are often near or below the 0.005-ppbv detection limit of the measurements, indicating that background HCl values are much lower than a global mean estimate. However, significant abundances of HCl were observed in many UT air parcels as a result of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport events. A method for diagnosing the amount of stratospheric ozone in these UT parcels was developed using the compact linear correlation of HCl with ozone found throughout the lower stratosphere (LS). Expanded use of this method will lead to improved quantification of cross-tropopause transport events and validation of global chemical transport models.

  9. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability.

    PubMed

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R; Banerjee, A; Ren, Y; Rosenbaum, T F

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  10. In situ measurements of contributions to the global electrical circuit by a thunderstorm in southeastern Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.N.; Holzworth, R.H.; McCarthy, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The global electrical circuit, which maintains a potential of about 280??kV between the earth and the ionosphere, is thought to be driven mainly by thunderstorms and lightning. However, very few in situ measurements of electrical current above thunderstorms have been successfully obtained. In this paper, we present dc to very low frequency electric fields and atmospheric conductivity measured in the stratosphere (30-35??km altitude) above an active thunderstorm in southeastern Brazil. From these measurements, we estimate the mean quasi-static conduction current during the storm period to be 2.5 ?? 1.25??A. Additionally, we examine the transient conduction currents following a large positive cloud-to-ground (+ CG) lightning flash and typical - CG flashes. We find that the majority of the total current is attributed to the quasi-static thundercloud charge, rather than lightning, which supports the classical Wilson model for the global electrical circuit.

  11. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Y; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure–field–temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  12. Quantifying stratospheric ozone in the upper troposphere with in situ measurements of HCl.

    PubMed

    Marcy, T P; Fahey, D W; Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Richard, E C; Thompson, T L; Rosenlof, K H; Ray, E A; Salawitch, R J; Atherton, C S; Bergmann, D J; Ridley, B A; Weinheimer, A J; Loewenstein, M; Weinstock, E M; Mahoney, M J

    2004-04-09

    We have developed a chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique for precise in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from a high-altitude aircraft. In measurements at subtropical latitudes, minimum HCl values found in the upper troposphere (UT) were often near or below the detection limit of the measurements (0.005 parts per billion by volume), indicating that background HCl values are much lower than a global mean estimate. However, significant abundances of HCl were observed in many UT air parcels, as a result of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport events. We developed a method for diagnosing the amount of stratospheric ozone in these UT parcels using the compact linear correlation of HCl with ozone found throughout the lower stratosphere (LS). Expanded use of this method will lead to improved quantification of cross-tropopause transport events and validation of global chemical transport models.

  13. Recent achievements for In-situ measurement: applications to an actual decommissioning project

    SciTech Connect

    Lamadie, F.; Girones, P.; Le Goaller, C.; Mahe, C.; Kohler, J.Y.; Risser, M.A.

    2007-07-01

    Decommissioning a nuclear facility implies a policy of limiting the waste volume and its chemical - and especially radiological - toxicity. It is therefore important to determine the activity level contained in each component that will be dismantled. A variety of methods and analysis techniques are used for this purpose, ranging from simple dose rate measurements to {gamma} spectrometry and {gamma} imaging. The results of several measurement campaigns in a reactor currently in operation but for which decommissioning studies have now been undertaken are discussed. The measurements provide additional radiological data for the waste inventory, which is one of the first issues to be examined. This discussion focuses on the methods used ({gamma} imaging, in situ {gamma} spectrometry, etc.), the results obtained, and their implications for the project, as well as the technological and methodological innovations implemented during these campaigns. (authors)

  14. In situ measurement of the reinforcement modulus in a metal matrix composite by acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Canumalla, S.; Gordon, G.A.; Pangborn, R.N.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanical properties of metal-matrix composites have been observed to be a strong function of the content of non-fiber inclusions. Shot particles, with the nominal composition of the reinforcement, have been found to crack prematurely, thus representing prefer-red failure initiation sites under mechanical and thermal fatigue of discontinuous, alumina-silicate fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites. To better understand the differences between the responses of the shot and fibers to loading, the Young`s modulus of the shot is measured and compared to that of the fibers. Scanning acoustic microscopy is used to nondestructively measure the modulus of the shot in situ, and the fiber modulus is obtained from the previously measured composite response. The shot, with a modulus of 131.5 GPa, has a Young`s modulus that is approximately 40% lower than that of the fibers. The influence of this on the composite response will be discussed.

  15. Vertical Profiles of Light Scattering, Light Absorption, and Single Scattering Albedo during the Dry, Biomass Burning Season in Southern Africa and Comparisons of In Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, Brian I.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Schmid, Beat; Redermann, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Airborne in situ measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol light scattering, light absorption, and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0)) are presented for a number of locations in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season. Features of the profiles include haze layers, clean air slots, and marked decreases in light scattering in passing from the boundary layer into the free troposphere. Frequency distributions of omega (sub 0) reflect the strong influence of smoke from biomass burning. For example, during a period when heavy smoke was advected into the region from the north, the mean value of omega (sub 0) in the boundary layer was 0.81 +/- 0.02 compared to 0.89 +/- 0.03 prior to this intrusion. Comparisons of layer aerosol optical depths derived from the in situ measurements with those measured by a Sun photometer aboard the aircraft show excellent agreement.

  16. Satellite (Timed, Aura, Aqua) and In Situ (Meteorological Rockets, Balloons) Measurement Comparability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Goldberg, Richard A.; Feofilov, A.; Rose, R.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements using the inflatable falling sphere often are requested to provide density data in support of special sounding rocket launchings into the mesosphere and thermosphere. To insure density measurements within narrow time frames and close in space, the inflatable falling sphere is launched within minutes of the major test. Sphere measurements are reliable for the most part, however, availability of these rocket systems has become more difficult and, in fact, these instruments no longer are manufactured resulting in a reduction of the meager stockpile of instruments. Sphere measurements also are used to validate remotely measured temperatures and have the advantage of measuring small-scale atmospheric features. Even so, with the dearth of remaining falling spheres perhaps it is time to consider whether the remote measurements are mature enough to stand alone. Presented are two field studies, one in 2003 from Northern Sweden and one in 2010 from the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll that compare temperature retrievals between satellite and in situ failing spheres. The major satellite instruments employed are SABER, MLS, and AIRS. The comparisons indicate that remotely measured temperatures mimic the sphere temperature measurements quite well. The data also confirm that satellite retrievals, while not always at the exact location required for individual studies, are adaptable enough and highly useful. Although the falling sphere will provide a measurement at a specific location and time, satellites only pass a given location daily or less often. This report reveals that averaged satellite measurements can provide temperatures and densities comparable to the falling sphere.

  17. In-situ soil composition and moisture measurement by surface neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, C.; Smith, C.; Marks, A.

    2009-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis is widely known as a laboratory technique dependent upon a nuclear reactor to provide the neutron flux and capable of precise elemental analysis. Less well known in-situ geochemical analysis is possible with isotopic (252Cf & 241Am) or compact accelerator (D-T, D-D fusion reaction) neutron sources. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) geophysical borehole logging has been applied to mining issues for >15 years (CSIRO) using isotopic neutron sources and more recently to environmental and hydro-geological applications by ANSTO. Similarly, sophisticated geophysical borehole logging equipment based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS) has been applied in the oil and gas industry by large oilfield services companies to measure oil saturation indices (carbon/oxygen) using accelerator neutron sources. Recent advances in scintillation detector spectral performance has enabled improved precision and detection limits for elements likely to be present in soil profiles (H, Si, Al, Fe, Cl) and possible detection of many minor to trace elements if sufficiently abundant (Na, K, Mg, Ca, S, N, + ). To measure carbon an accelerator neutron source is required to provide fast neutrons above 4.8 MeV. CSIRO and ANSTO propose building a soil geochemical analysis system based on experience gained from building and applying PGNA borehole logging equipment. A soil geochemical analysis system could effectively map the 2D geochemical composition of the top 50cm of soil by dragging the 1D logging equipment across the ground surface. Substituting an isotopic neutron source for a D-T accelerator neutron source would enable the additional measurement of elemental carbon. Many potential ambiguities with other geophysical proxies for soil moisture may be resolved by direct geochemical measurement of H. Many other applications may be possible including time series in-situ measurements of soil moisture for differential drainage, hydrology, land surface

  18. A review of uncertainty in in situ measurements and data sets of sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, John J.

    2014-03-01

    Archives of in situ sea surface temperature (SST) measurements extend back more than 160 years. Quality of the measurements is variable, and the area of the oceans they sample is limited, especially early in the record and during the two world wars. Measurements of SST and the gridded data sets that are based on them are used in many applications so understanding and estimating the uncertainties are vital. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the various components that contribute to the overall uncertainty of SST measurements made in situ and of the data sets that are derived from them. In doing so, it also aims to identify current gaps in understanding. Uncertainties arise at the level of individual measurements with both systematic and random effects and, although these have been extensively studied, refinement of the error models continues. Recent improvements have been made in the understanding of the pervasive systematic errors that affect the assessment of long-term trends and variability. However, the adjustments applied to minimize these systematic errors are uncertain and these uncertainties are higher before the 1970s and particularly large in the period surrounding the Second World War owing to a lack of reliable metadata. The uncertainties associated with the choice of statistical methods used to create globally complete SST data sets have been explored using different analysis techniques, but they do not incorporate the latest understanding of measurement errors, and they want for a fair benchmark against which their skill can be objectively assessed. These problems can be addressed by the creation of new end-to-end SST analyses and by the recovery and digitization of data and metadata from ship log books and other contemporary literature.

  19. Galileo in-situ dust measurements and the sculpting of Jupiter's gossamer rings by its shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Grün, Eberhard

    2008-09-01

    Galileo was the first articfiial satellite to orbit Jupiter. During its late orbital mission the spacecraft made two passages through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The highly sensitive impact-ionization dust detector on board successfully recorded dust impacts during both ring passages and provided the first in-situ measurements from a dusty planetary ring. During the first passage { on 5 November 2002 while Galileo was approaching Jupiter - dust measurements were collected until a spacecraft anomaly at 2:33RJ (Jupiter radii) just 16 min after a close flyby of Amalthea put the spacecraft into a safing mode. The second ring passage on 21 September 2003 provided ring dust measurements down to about 2:5RJ and the Galileo spacecraft was destroyed shortly thereafter in a planned impact with Jupiter. In all, a few thousand dust impacts were counted with the instrument accumulators during both ring passages, but only a total of 110 complete data sets of dust impacts were transmitted to Earth (Krüger et al, Icarus, submitted). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 5 μm, extending the known size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2008). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller particles and shows an excess of these tiny motes in the Amalthea gossamer ring compared to the Thebe ring. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in-situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one obtained from images for large grains. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are approximately 5 μm in radius, in agreement with imaging results. The measurements indicate a large drop in particle ux immediately interior to Thebe's orbit and some detected particles seem to be on highly-tilted orbits with inclinations up to 20°. Finally, the faint Thebe ring extension was detected out to

  20. In-Situ Measurement of Hall Thruster Erosion Using a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt; Korman, Valentin

    2009-01-01

    One potential life-limiting mechanism in a Hall thruster is the erosion of the ceramic material comprising the discharge channel. This is especially true for missions that require long thrusting periods and can be problematic for lifetime qualification, especially when attempting to qualify a thruster by analysis rather than a test lasting the full duration of the mission. In addition to lifetime, several analytical and numerical models include electrode erosion as a mechanism contributing to enhanced transport properties. However, there is still a great deal of dispute over the importance of erosion to transport in Hall thrusters. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of discharge channel erosion is useful in addressing both the lifetime and transport concerns. An in-situ measurement would allow for real-time data regarding the erosion rates at different operating points, providing a quick method for empirically anchoring any analysis geared towards lifetime qualification. Erosion rate data over a thruster s operating envelope would also be useful in the modeling of the detailed physics inside the discharge chamber. There are many different sensors and techniques that have been employed to quantify discharge channel erosion in Hall thrusters. Snapshots of the wear pattern can be obtained at regular shutdown intervals using laser profilometry. Many non-intrusive techniques of varying complexity and sensitivity have been employed to detect the time-varying presence of erosion products in the thruster plume. These include the use quartz crystal microbalances, emission spectroscopy, laser induced flourescence, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. While these techniques can provide a very accurate picture of the level of eroded material in the thruster plume, it is more difficult to use them to determine the location from which the material was eroded. Furthermore, none of the methods cited provide a true in-situ measure of erosion at the channel surface while

  1. Using airborne LIDAR to measure tides and river slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talke, S. A.; Hudson, A.; Chickadel, C. C.; Farquharson, G.; Jessup, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial variability of tides and the tidally-averaged water-level is often poorly resolved in shallow waters, despite its importance in validating models and interpreting dynamics. In this contribution we explore using airborne LIDAR to remotely observe tides and along-river slope in the Columbia River estuary (CRE). Using an airplane equipped with LIDAR, differential GPS, and an infra-red camera, we flew 8 longitudinal transects over a 50km stretch of the CRE over a 14 hour period in June 2013. After correcting for airplane elevation, pitch and roll and median filtering over 1km blocks, a spatially-resolved data set of relative water level was generated. Results show the tide (amplitude 2m) propagating upstream at the expected phase velocity. A sinusoid with 2 periods (12.4 and 24 hours) was next fit to data to produce a smooth tide and extract the mean slope. Comparison with 4 tide gauges indicates first order agreement with measured tides (rms error 0.1m), and confirms that a substantial sub-tidal gradient exists in the CRE. This proof-of-concept experiment indicates that remote sensing of tides in coastal areas is feasible, with possible applications such as improving bathymetric surveys or inferring water depths.

  2. Mapping methane emission sources over California based on airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T.; Guha, A.; Peischl, J.; Misztal, P. K.; Jonsson, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2011-12-01

    The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) has created a need to accurately characterize the emission sources of various greenhouse gases (GHGs) and verify the existing state GHG inventory. Methane (CH4) is a major GHG with a global warming potential of 20 times that of CO2 and currently constitutes about 6% of the total statewide GHG emissions on a CO2 equivalent basis. Some of the major methane sources in the state are area sources where methane is biologically produced (e.g. dairies, landfills and waste treatment plants) making bottom-up estimation of emissions a complex process. Other potential sources include fugitive emissions from oil extraction processes and natural gas distribution network, emissions from which are not well-quantified. The lack of adequate field measurement data to verify the inventory and provide independently generated estimates further contributes to the overall uncertainty in the CH4 inventory. In order to gain a better perspective of spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, a real-time measurement instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) was installed in a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements during eight unique flights which covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. The coincident VOC measurements, obtained through a high frequency proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTRMS), aid in CH4 source identification. High mixing ratios of CH4 (> 2000 ppb) are observed consistently in all the flight transects above the Central Valley. These high levels of CH4 are accompanied by high levels of methanol which is an important

  3. Alexandrite laser transmitter development for airborne water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas H.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    In the DIAL technique, the water vapor concentration profile is determined by analyzing the lidar backscatter signals for laser wavelengths tuned 'on' and 'off' a water vapor absorption line. Desired characteristics of the on-line transmitted laser beam include: pulse energy greater than or equal to 100 mJ, high-resolution tuning capability (uncertainty less than 0.25 pm), good spectral stability (jitter less than 0.5 pm about the mean), and high spectral purity (greater than 99 percent). The off-line laser is generally detuned less than 100 pm away from the water vapor line. Its spectral requirements are much less stringent. In our past research, we developed and demonstrated the airborne DIAL technique for water vapor measurements in the 720-nm spectral region using a system based on an alexandrite laser as the transmitter for the on-line wavelength and a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser for the off-line wavelength. This off-line laser has been replaced by a second alexandrite laser. Diode lasers are used to injection seed both lasers for frequency and linewidth control. This eliminates the need for the two intracavity etalons utilized in our previous alexandrite laser and thereby greatly reduces the risk of optical damage. Consequently, the transmitted pulse energy can be substantially increased, resulting in greater measurement range, higher data density, and increased measurement precision. In this paper, we describe the diode injection seed source, the two alexandrite lasers, and the device used to line lock the on-line seed source to the water vapor absorption feature.

  4. Seagrass biomass and productivity in the Florida Keys, USA: ground-level and airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarbro, L.; Carlson, P. R., Jr.; McHan, C.; Carlson, D. F.; Hu, C.; Danielson, T.; Durnan, B.; English, D. C.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Yates, K. K.; Herwitz, S.; Merrill, J.; Mewes, T.

    2013-12-01

    Seagrass communities serve as essential habitat for fish and shellfish, and recent research indicates that they can play a significant role in reducing ocean acidification. As part of a collaborative project funded by the NASA ROSES program and administered by the NASA UAV Collaborative, we collected hyperspectral imagery of seagrass beds and measured productivity of Thalassia testudinum at Sugarloaf Key, Florida, in May 2012, October 2012, and May 2013. Our primary goal was to evaluate the utility of hyperspectral sensors, in general, and UAV platforms, in specific, to measure seagrass health and productivity. Airborne measurements using the AISA Eagle hyperspectral imaging system were carried out simultaneously with ground measurements of Thalassia fluorescence, oxygen metabolism, growth, and biomass, as well as remote sensing reflectance and several in situ optical properties. Water depths at the study site ranged from less than 1 m to 5 m. Phytoplankton chlorophyll-a concentrations (0.09-0.72 ug l-1), ag(440) (0-0.02 m-1), and turbidity (0.12-4.1 ntu) were relatively low for all three deployments, facilitating the collection of excellent imagery and application of water-column radiative-transfer corrections. Aboveground Thalassia and macroalgal biomass, at 18 sites in the study area, ranged from 210 to 690 and 11 to 590 gDW m-2, respectively. One-sided green leaf area index of Thalassia ranged from 0.7 to 3.0. Preliminary findings show that the sensitivity of relationships between seagrass productivity and biomass parameters and remotely-sensed habitat spectra is reduced with increasing water depth and, even in shallow water, is complicated by epiphytic algae and sediment coverage of leaf surfaces.

  5. Spectral aerosol direct radiative forcing from airborne radiative measurements during CalNex and ARCTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Samuel E.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Redemann, J.; Hostetler, C.; Ferrare, R.; Hair, J.; Langridge, J. M.; Lack, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    This study presents the aerosol radiative forcing derived from airborne measurements of shortwave spectral irradiance during the 2010 Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex). Relative forcing efficiency, the radiative forcing normalized by aerosol optical thickness and incident irradiance, is a means of comparing the aerosol radiative forcing for different conditions. In this study, it is used to put the aerosol radiative effects of an air mass in the Los Angeles basin in context with case studies from three field missions that targeted other regions and aerosol types, including a case study from the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS). For CalNex, we relied on irradiance measurements onboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft during a flight on 19 May 2010 over a ground station. CalNex presented a difficulty for determining forcing efficiency since one of the input parameters, optical thickness, was not available from the same aircraft. However, extinction profiles were available from a nearby aircraft. An existing retrieval algorithm was modified to use those measurements as initial estimate for the missing optical thickness. In addition, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (secondary products of the method), were compared with CalNex in situ measurements. The CalNex relative forcing efficiency spectra agreed with earlier studies that found this parameter to be constrained at each wavelength within 20% per unit of aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm regardless of aerosol type and experiment, except for highly absorbing aerosols sampled near Mexico City. The diurnally averaged below-layer forcing efficiency integrated over the wavelength range of 350-700 nm for CalNex is estimated to be -58.6 ± 13.8 W/m2, whereas for the ARCTAS case it is -48.7 ± 11.5 W/m2.

  6. Measurement of airborne particle concentrations near the Sunset Crater volcano, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Benke, Roland R; Hooper, Donald M; Durham, James S; Bannon, Donald R; Compton, Keith L; Necsoiu, Marius; McGinnis, Ronald N

    2009-02-01

    Direct measurements of airborne particle mass concentrations or mass loads