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Sample records for airborne laser-induced fluorescence

  1. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF.

  2. Airborne laser-induced oceanic chlorophyll fluorescence: solar-induced quenching corrections by use of concurrent downwelling irradiance measurements.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Wright, C W; Swift, R N; Yungel, J K

    1998-05-20

    Airborne laser-induced (and water Raman-normalized) spectral fluorescence emissions from oceanic chlorophyll were obtained during variable downwelling irradiance conditions induced by diurnal variability and patchy clouds. Chlorophyll fluorescence profiles along geographically repeated inbound and outbound flight track lines, separated in time by approximately 3-6 h and subject to overlying cloud movement, were found to be identical after corrections made with concurrent downwelling irradiance measurements. The corrections were accomplished by a mathematical model containing an exponential of the ratio of the instantaneous-to-average downwelling irradiance. Concurrent laser-induced phycoerythrin fluorescence and chromophoric dissolved organic matter fluorescence were found to be invariant to downwelling irradiance and thus, along with sea-surface temperature, established the near constancy of the oceanic surface layer during the experiment and validated the need for chlorophyll fluorescence quenching corrections over wide areas of the ocean.

  3. In Situ Airborne Measurement of Formaldehyde with a New Laser Induced Fluorescence Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkinson, H.; Hanisco, T. F.; Cazorla, M.; Fried, A.; Walega, J.

    2012-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a highly reactive and ubiquitous compound in the atmosphere that originates from primary emissions and secondary formation by photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds. HCHO is an important precursor to the formation of ozone and an ideal tracer for the transport of boundary layer pollutants to higher altitudes. In situ measurements of HCHO are needed to improve understanding of convective transport mechanisms and the effects of lofted pollutants on ozone production and cloud microphysics in the upper troposphere. The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign addressed the effects of deep, midlatitude continental convective clouds on the upper troposphere by examining vertical transport of fresh emissions and water aloft and by characterizing subsequent changes in composition and chemistry. Observations targeting convective storms were conducted over Colorado, Alabama, and Texas and Oklahoma. We present measurements of the In Situ Airborne Formaldehyde instrument (ISAF), which uses laser induced fluorescence to achieve the high sensitivity and fast time response required to detect low concentrations in the upper troposphere and capture the fine structure characteristic of convective storm outflow. Preliminary results from DC3 indicate that the ISAF is able to resolve concentrations ranging from under 35 ppt to over 35 ppb, spanning three orders of magnitude, in less than a few minutes. Frequent, abrupt changes in HCHO captured by the ISAF are corroborated by similar patterns observed by simultaneous trace gas and aerosol measurements. Primary HCHO emissions are apparent in cases when the DC-8 flew over combustion sources or biomass burning, and secondary HCHO formation is suggested by observations of enhanced HCHO concurrent with other elevated hydrocarbons. Vertical transport of HCHO is indicated by measurements of over 6 ppb from outflow in the upper troposphere. The DC-8 payload also included the

  4. Airborne simultaneous spectroscopic detection of laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence from chlorophyll a and other naturally occurring pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The airborne laser-induced spectral emission bands obtained simultaneously from water Raman backscatter and the fluorescence of chlorophyll and other naturally occurring waterborne pigments are reported here for the first time. The importance of this type data lies not only in its single-shot multispectral character but also in the application of the Raman line for correction or calibration of the spatial variation of the laser penetration depth without the need for in situ water attenuation measurements. The entire laser-induced fluorescence and Raman scatter emissions resulting from each separate 532-nm 10-nsec laser pulse are collected and spectrally dispersed in a diffraction grating spectrometer having forty photomultiplier tube detectors. Results from field experiments conducted in the North Sea and the Chesapeake Bay/Potomac River are presented. Difficulties involving the multispectral resolution of the induced emissions are addressed, and feasible solutions are suggested together with new instrument configurations and future research directions.

  5. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; Mao, J.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Hornbrook, R. S.; Kosciuch, E.; Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Chen, G.; Singh, H. B.

    2012-03-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS), in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS) for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS) for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by UV light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ) for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ) for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ) for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 105 cm-3 with a correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.72 for OH and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol-1) with a correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some similarities for both

  6. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; Mao, J.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Hornbrook, R. S.; Kosciuch, E.; Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Chen, G.; Singh, H. B.

    2012-08-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS) for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS) for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by ultraviolet (UV) light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ) for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ) for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ) for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 104 cm-3 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for OH, and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol-1) with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some

  7. Delineation of estuarine fronts in the German Bight using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence of water column constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The acquisition and application of airborne laser induced emission spectra from German Bight water during the 1979 MARSEN experiment is detailed for the synoptic location of estuarine fronts. The NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) was operated in the fluorosensing mode. A nitrogen laser transmitter at 337.1 nm was used to stimulate the water column to obtain Gelbstoff or organic material fluorescence spectra together with water Raman backscatter. Maps showing the location and relative strength of estuarine fronts are presented. The distribution of the fronts indicates that mixing within the German Bight takes place across a relatively large area. Reasonable agreement between the patterns observed by the AOL and published results are obtained. The limitations and constraints of this technique are indicated and improvements to the AOL fluorosensor are discussed with respect to future ocean mapping applications.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  9. Absolute tracer dye concentration using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The use of simultaneous airborne-laser-induced dye fluorescence and water Raman backscatter to measure the absolute concentration of an ocean-dispersed tracer dye is discussed. Theoretical considerations of the calculation of dye concentration by the numerical comparison of airborne laser-induced fluorescence spectra with laboratory spectra for known dye concentrations using the 3400/cm OH-stretch water Raman scatter as a calibration signal are presented which show that minimum errors are obtained and no data concerning water mass transmission properties are required when the laser wavelength is chosen to yield a Raman signal near the dye emission band. Results of field experiments conducted with an airborne conical scan lidar over a site in New York Bight into which rhodamine dye had been injected in a study of oil spill dispersion are then indicated which resulted in a contour map of dye concentrations, with a minimum detectable dye concentration of approximately 2 ppb by weight.

  10. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  11. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  12. Laser Induced Fluorescence of the Iodine Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargus, William

    2014-10-01

    Iodine (I2) has been considered as a potential electrostatic spacecraft thruster propellant for approximately 2 decades, but has only recently been demonstrated. Energy conversion efficiency appears to be on par with xenon without thruster modification. Intriguingly, performance appears to exceed xenon at high acceleration potentials. As part of a continuing program for the development of non-intrusive plasma diagnostics for advanced plasma spacecraft propulsion, we have identified the I II 5d5D4 o state as metastable, and therefore containing a reservoir of excited state ions suitable for laser probing. The 5d5D4 o - 6p5P3 transition at 695.878 nm is convenient for diode laser excitation with the 5s5S2 o - 6p5P3 transition at 516.12 nm as an ideal candidate for non-resonant fluorescence collection. We have constructed a Penning type iodine microwave discharge lamp optimized for I II production for table-top measurements. This work demonstrates I II laser-induced fluorescence in a representative iodine discharge and will validate our previous theoretical work based on the limited available historical I II spectral data.

  13. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Cobalt Monoboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, H. F.; Ng, Y. W.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectrum of cobalt monoboride (CoB) in the visible region between 465 and 560 nm has been observed. CoB molecule was produced by the reaction of laser ablated cobalt atom and diborane (B_2H_6) seeded in argon. Over twenty five vibronic bands have been recorded, and both Co10B and Co11B isotopic species have been observed and analyzed. Preliminary analysis of the rotational lines showed that the observed vibronic bands belong to two categories namely: the Ω' = 2 - Ω'' = 2 and the Ω' = 3 - Ω'' = 3 transitions, which indicated the ground state of CoB is consistent with an assignment of a ^3Δ_i state predicted from ab initio calculations. Unresolved hyperfine structure arising from the Co nucleus (I = 7/2) causes a broadening of spectral lines. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the spectrum of the CoB molecule. Financial support from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU 701008P) is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  15. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  16. Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul; Jones, Tom; Connell, John; Belvin, Keith; Watson, Kent

    2004-01-01

    surface of the target. The improved method is denoted laser-induced-fluorescence photogrammetry.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection.

    PubMed

    Hybl, John D; Tysk, Shane M; Berry, Shaun R; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors. However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence of space-exposed polyurethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Ralph H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this work was to utilize laser-induced fluorescence technique to characterize several samples of space-exposed polyurethane. These samples were flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), which was in a shuttle-like orbit for nearly 6 years. Because of our present work to develop laser-induced-fluorescence inspection techniques for polymers, space-exposed samples and controls were lent to us for evaluation. These samples had been attached to the outer surface of LDEF; therefore, they were subjected to thermal cycling, solar ultraviolet radiation, vacuum, and atomic oxygen. It is well documented that atomic oxygen and ultraviolet exposure have detrimental effects on many polymers. This was a unique opportunity to make measurements on material that had been naturally degraded by an unusual environment. During our past work, data have come from artificially degraded samples and generally have demonstrated a correlation between laser-induced fluorescence and tensile strength or elasticity.

  20. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  1. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Edwards, Donna H.; Buckley, Paul F., III; DeCosta, Joseph F.; Haggitt, Rodger C.

    1996-04-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether laser-induced fluorescence could detect high grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus. Four-hundred-ten nm laser light was used to induce autofluorescence of Barrett's mucosa in 36 patients during routine endoscopy. The spectra were analyzed using the Differential Normalized Fluorescence (DNF) Index technique to differentiate high grade dysplasia from either low grade or non-dysplastic mucosa. Each spectrum was classified as either premalignant or benign using two different DNF indices. Analyzing the fluorescence spectra from all patients using one DNF Index, 96% of non- dysplastic Barrett's samples classified as benign tissue. All low grade dysplasia samples classified as benign. Ninety percent of high grade dysplasia samples classified as premalignant. Twenty-eight percent of mixed low grade/focal high grade dysplasia samples classified as premalignant. In summary, high grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus patients can be detected by endoscopic laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy using differential normalized fluorescence technique.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence of biochemical for UV LIDAR application.

    PubMed

    Gupta, L; Sharma, R C; Razdan, A K; Maini, A K

    2014-05-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the ultraviolet regime has been used for the detection of biochemical through a fiber coupled CCD detector from a distance of 2 m. The effect of concentration and laser excitation energy on the fluorescence spectra of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been investigated. The signature fluorescence peak of NADH was centred about 460 nm. At lower concentration Raman peak centred at 405 nm was also observed. The origin of this peak has been discussed. Detection limit with the proposed set up is found to be 1 ppm.

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the secondary cataract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, N. A.; Larionov, P. M.; Rozhin, I. A.; Druzhinin, I. B.; Chernykh, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    Excitation-emission matrices of laser-induced fluorescence of lens capsule epithelium, the lens nucleus, and the lens capsule are investigated. A solid-state laser in combination with an optical parametric generator tunable in the range from 210 to 350 nm was used for excitation of fluorescence. The spectra of fluorescence of all three types of tissues exhibit typical features that are specific to them and drastically differ from one another. This effect can be used for intrasurgical control of presence of residual lens capsule epithelium cells in the capsular bag after surgical treatment of a cataract.

  5. Laser induced fluorescence of biochemical for UV LIDAR application.

    PubMed

    Gupta, L; Sharma, R C; Razdan, A K; Maini, A K

    2014-05-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the ultraviolet regime has been used for the detection of biochemical through a fiber coupled CCD detector from a distance of 2 m. The effect of concentration and laser excitation energy on the fluorescence spectra of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been investigated. The signature fluorescence peak of NADH was centred about 460 nm. At lower concentration Raman peak centred at 405 nm was also observed. The origin of this peak has been discussed. Detection limit with the proposed set up is found to be 1 ppm. PMID:24337816

  6. Oil film thickness measurement using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The use of laser-induced water Raman backscatter for remote thin oil film detection and thickness measurement is reported here for the first time. A 337.1-nm nitrogen laser was used to excite the 3400-cm-1 OH stretch band of natural ocean water beneath the oil slick from an altitude of 150 m. The signal strength of the 381-nm water Raman backscatter was always observed to depress when the oil was encountered and then return to its original undepressed value after complete aircraft traversal of the floating slick. After removal of background and oil fluorescence contributions, the ratio of the depressed-to-undepressed airborne water Raman signal intensities, together with laboratory measured oil extinction coefficients, is used to calculate the oil film thickness.

  7. Radioiodine detector based on laser induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Jimmie R.; Baronavski, Andrew P.

    1980-01-01

    The invention involves the measurement of the concentration of the radioisotope .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the presence of a gas. The invention uses a laser to excite a sample of the .sup.129 I.sub.2 in a sample gas chamber and a reference sample of a known concentration of .sup.129 I.sub.2 in a reference gas chamber. The .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the sample and reference gas chamber each gives off fluorescence emissions which are received by photomultipliers which provide signals to a detector. The detector uses a ratioing technique to determine the concentration of .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the sample gas chamber.

  8. Remote sensing of phytoplankton using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Babichenko, S.; Poryvkina, L.; Arikese, V. ); Kaitala, S. ); Kuosa, H. )

    1993-06-01

    The results of remote laser sensing of brackish-water phytoplankton on board a research vessel are presented. Field data of laser-induced fluorescence of phytoplankton obtained during the several cruises in the mouth of tile Gulf of Finland are compared with the results of standard chlorophyll a analysis of water samples and phytoplankton species determination by microscopy. The approach of fluorescence excitation by tunable laser radiation is applied to study the spatial distribution of a natural phytoplankton community. The remote analysis of the pigment composition of a phytoplankton community using the method of selective pigment excitation is described. The possibility of elaborating methods of quantitative laser remote biomonitoring is discussed.

  9. High time resolution laser induced fluorescence in pulsed argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Biloiu, Ioana A.; Sun Xuan; Scime, Earl E.

    2006-10-15

    A submillisecond time resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method for obtaining the temporal evolution of the ion velocity distribution function in pulsed argon plasma is presented. A basic LIF system that employs a continuous laser wave pumping and lock-in aided detection of the subsequent fluorescence radiation is modified by addition of a high frequency acousto-optic modulator to provide measurements of the ion flow velocity and ion temperature in a helicon generated pulsed argon plasma with temporal resolutions as high as 30 {mu}s.

  10. Laser induced fluorescence applied to turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The saturated fluorescence method makes use of the great simplifications which occur when under conditions of intense radiation the excitation process becomes saturated. A description is presented of the saturated fluorescence method, taking into account rate equations and saturation, radiative transfer, the two-level system, a multilevel system, and measurements under saturation conditions. The detectability limits of the method are investigated. Fluorescence trapping is found to place an upper limit on the number density of the fluorescing species that can be measured without signal loss. Turbulence places time and spatial constraints on the measurements, but otherwise poses no difficulties. Saturated laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy appears to be a most promising method for measuring species concentrations in flames.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cip, Ondrej; Buchta, Zdenek; Lesundak, Adam; Randula, Antonin; Mikel, Bretislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverkova, Lenka

    2014-03-01

    The recent effort leads to reliable imaging techniques which can help to a surgeon during operations. The fluorescence spectroscopy was selected as very useful online in vivo imaging method to organics and biological materials analysis. The presented work scopes to a laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to detect tissue local necrosis in small intestine surgery. In first experiments, we tested tissue auto-fluorescence technique but a signal-to-noise ratio didn't express significant results. Then we applied a contrast dye - IndoCyanine Green (ICG) which absorbs and emits wavelengths in the near IR. We arranged the pilot experimental setup based on highly coherent extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) used for stimulating of some critical areas of the small intestine tissue with injected ICG dye. We demonstrated the distribution of the ICG exciter with the first file of shots of small intestine tissue of a rabbit that was captured by high sensitivity fluorescent cam.

  12. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffin, V. L.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from 1 Sep. 1989 to 28 Feb. 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe in supercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  13. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  14. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of combustion chemistry intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) can measure the trace (often free radical) species encountered as intermediates in combustion chemistry; OH, CS, NH, NS, and NCO are typical of the species detected in flames by LIF. Attention is given to illustrative experiments designed to accumulate a quantitative data base for LIF detection in low pressure flow systems and flames, as well as to flame measurements conducted with a view to the detection of new chemical intermediaries that may deepen insight into the chemistry of combustion.

  16. Combined Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography and Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Utzinger, Urs

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are promising modalities for tissue characterization in human patients and animal models. OCT detects coherently backscattered light, whereas LIF detects fluorescence emission of endogenous biochemicals, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), collagen, and fluorescent proteins, or exogenous substances such as cyanine dyes. Given the complementary mechanisms of contrast for OCT and LIF, the combination of the two modalities could potentially provide more sensitive and specific detection of disease than either modality alone. Sample probes for both OCT and LIF can be implemented using small diameter optical fibers, suggesting a particular synergy for endoscopic applications. In this chapter, the mechanisms of contrast and diagnostic capability for both OCT and LIF are briefly examined. Evidence of complementary capability is described. Example published combined OCT-LIF systems are reviewed, one successful commercial instrument is discussed, and example applications are provided.

  17. Application of the method of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateeva, Natalia L.; Matvienko, Gennadii G.

    2004-02-01

    Great attention is now paid to ecology of the environment, in whic plants are of great importance. However the present methods of biophysical analysis of plant states are very labor-intensive and require a lot of time. The structure of protein-pigment complexes is known to break in different dissolvents that results in the shift of maxima of chlorophyll absorption and fluorescence bands. That is why development of methods for remote diagnostics of plants is of great scientific and practical interest. They would make it possible to determine species and state of plants rather quickly and accurately. We have developed a setup and methods for optical diagnostics of the physiological state of plants to investigate the dynamics of the fastest part of fluorescence of plants in vivo. The method of laser-induced fluorescence makes it possible to observe the level of vegetative development of living plants, as well as their state under the impact of some stress factors.

  18. Radioactive contamination screening with laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sheely, R.; Di Benedetto, J.

    1994-06-01

    The ability to induce, detect and discriminate fluorescence of uranium oxides makes available new capabilities for screening the surface of large complex facilities for uranium. This paper will present the results of field tests evaluate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) as a contamination screening tool and report on the progress to produce a field portable instrument for uranium surveys on exposed surfaces. The principal effect is to illuminate the surface of an object or an area with a remotely-located light source, and to evaluate the re-radiated emission energy. A gated intensified CCD camera was used with ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation to discriminate the phosphorescent (persistent) green uranium emission from the prompt background fluorescence which results from excitation of plants, concrete, soils, and other background materials.

  19. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectrum Characteristics of Paddy under Nitrogen Stress].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei; Du, Lin; Zhu, Bo; Ma, Ying-ying; Sun, Jia

    2016-02-01

    Order to guide fertilizing andreduce waste of resources as well as enviro nmental pollution, especially eutrophication, which are caused by excessive fertilization, a system of laser-induced fluorescence(LIF) was built. The system aimed to investigate the correlation between nitrogen(N) content of paddy leaf and the fluorescence intensity. We measuredNcontent and SPAD of paddy leaf (the samples came from the second upper leaves of paddy in tillering stage and the study area was located in Jianghan plain of China) by utilizing the Plant Nutrient (Tester TYS-3N). The fluorescence spectrum was also obtained by using the systembuilt based on theLIFtechnology. Fluorescence spectra of leaf with different N-content were collected and then a fluorescence spectra database wasestablished. It is analyzed that the relationship between the parameters of fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅ is the ratio of fluorescence intensity of 740 nm. dividing that of 685 nm) and the N level of paddy. It is found that the effect of different N-content on the fluorescence spectrum characteristics is significant. The experiment demonstrated the positive correlation between fluorescence parameters and paddy leaf N-content. Results showed a positive linear correlation between the ratio of peak fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅) and N-content The correlation coefficient (r) reached 0.871 8 and the root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.076 82. The experiment demonstrated that LIF spectroscopy detection technology has the advantages of rapidand non-destructive measurement, and it also has the potential to measure plant content of nutrient elements. It will provide a more accurate remote sensing method to rapidly detect the crop nitrogen levels.

  20. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectrum Characteristics of Paddy under Nitrogen Stress].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei; Du, Lin; Zhu, Bo; Ma, Ying-ying; Sun, Jia

    2016-02-01

    Order to guide fertilizing andreduce waste of resources as well as enviro nmental pollution, especially eutrophication, which are caused by excessive fertilization, a system of laser-induced fluorescence(LIF) was built. The system aimed to investigate the correlation between nitrogen(N) content of paddy leaf and the fluorescence intensity. We measuredNcontent and SPAD of paddy leaf (the samples came from the second upper leaves of paddy in tillering stage and the study area was located in Jianghan plain of China) by utilizing the Plant Nutrient (Tester TYS-3N). The fluorescence spectrum was also obtained by using the systembuilt based on theLIFtechnology. Fluorescence spectra of leaf with different N-content were collected and then a fluorescence spectra database wasestablished. It is analyzed that the relationship between the parameters of fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅ is the ratio of fluorescence intensity of 740 nm. dividing that of 685 nm) and the N level of paddy. It is found that the effect of different N-content on the fluorescence spectrum characteristics is significant. The experiment demonstrated the positive correlation between fluorescence parameters and paddy leaf N-content. Results showed a positive linear correlation between the ratio of peak fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅) and N-content The correlation coefficient (r) reached 0.871 8 and the root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.076 82. The experiment demonstrated that LIF spectroscopy detection technology has the advantages of rapidand non-destructive measurement, and it also has the potential to measure plant content of nutrient elements. It will provide a more accurate remote sensing method to rapidly detect the crop nitrogen levels. PMID:27209764

  1. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2} to the 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2}-5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence in diagnosis of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakaki, Eleni A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan; Serafetinides, Alexandros A.

    2003-09-01

    laser induces better discrimination in deep caries diagnosis.

  3. Laser-induced differential fluorescence for cancer diagnosis without biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.; Buckley III, P.

    1997-01-01

    An optical diagnostic procedure based on laser-induced fluorescence was developed for direct {ital in vivo} cancer diagnosis without requiring biopsy. The methodology was applied in a clinical study involving over 100 patients in order to differentiate normal tissue from malignant tumors of the esophagus. Endogenous fluorescence of normal and malignant tissues was measured directly with the use of a fiber-optic probe inserted through an endoscope. The measurements were performed {ital in vivo} during routine endoscopy. Detection of the fluorescence signal from the tissue was performed with the use of laser excitation. This report describes the differential normalized fluorescence (DNF) procedure using the amplified spectral differences between the normalized fluorescence of malignant tissue and normal mucosa. The results of this DNF approach were compared with histopathology results of the biopsy samples and indicated excellent agreement in the classification of normal tissue and malignant tumors for the samples investigated. Data related to various grades of Barrett{close_quote}s esophagus are discussed. The DNF procedure could lead to the development of a rapid and cost-effective technique for cancer diagnosis. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  4. Shot noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; Davis, L. I., Jr.; Guo, C.; James, J. V.; Kakos, S.; Morris, P. T.; Wang, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Nearly shot-noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence is reported. A LIDAR configuration is used to excite fluorescence in a large volume and a narrow-bandwidth interference filter provides spectral discrimination. This arrangement alleviates the effect of ozone interference and facilitates image processing at relatively close distances. The detection limit is determined mainly by the shot-noise of the solar background. Ground-based measurements in Dearborn indicate a detection limit of better than 1 x 10 to the 6th power OH/cubic cm over a forty-minute acquisition period. Under favorable conditions, a comparable detection limit was also observed for airborne measurements.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence of the CH2CFO radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furubayashi, Masashi; Bridier, Isabelle; Inomata, Satoshi; Washida, Nobuaki; Yamashita, Koichi

    1997-04-01

    A new laser-induced fluorescence spectrum has been observed in the region of 307-335 nm. Since this spectrum is observed when reacting oxygen atoms with CH2CHF, or CH2CF2, or CH2CFCl and also by photolysis of CH3CFO, the fluorescing molecule is the CH2CFO (fluoroformyl methyl) radical. From an analysis of the laser-induced single vibronic level fluorescence, some of the vibrational frequencies can be assigned for the ground electronic state ν3=1724 cm-1 (C-O stretch), ν5=1211 cm-1 (C-F stretch), ν6=906 cm-1 (CH2 rock), ν7=847 cm-1 (C-C stretch), ν8=584 cm-1 (FCO bend), and ν9=416 cm-1 (CCO bend), for the excited state ν3=1790, ν5=1253, ν6=911, ν7=874, ν8=537, and ν9=421 cm-1. Ab initio calculations on the CH2CFO radical give a planar geometry with vibrational frequencies that are consistent with the observed fundamental frequencies. The vibrational frequencies show that the structure of the ground state is closer to fluoroformyl methyl (ṡCH2CFO) rather than a vinoxy-type (CH2=CFOṡ) radical. The collision-free radiative lifetimes of the excited state are 49-81 ns depending on excitation energy and vibrational modes. Strong predissociation is observed above v=1, especially in the ν3' mode.

  6. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  7. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  8. OH Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence from Microgravity Droplet Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael; Wegge, Jason; Kang, Kyung-Tae

    1997-01-01

    Droplet combustion under microgravity conditions has been extensively studied, but laser diagnostics have just begun to be employed in microgravity droplet experiments. This is due in part to the level of difficulty associated with laser system size, power and economic availability. Hydroxyl radical (OH) is an important product of combustion, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has proved to be an adequate and sensitive tool to measure OH. In this study, a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser and a doubled dye laser, compact and reliable enough to perform OH PLIF experiments aboard a parabolic flight-path aircraft, has been developed and successfully demonstrated in a methanol droplet flame experiment. Application to microgravity conditions is planned aboard parabolic flight-path aircraft.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence of the CD2CFO radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Furubayashi, Masashi; Imamura, Takashi; Washida, Nobuaki; Yamaguchi, Makoto

    1999-10-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence spectrum of the B˜ 2A″→X˜2A″ transition of the CD2CFO radical has been observed in the region 316-335 nm. The radical was produced by 193 nm photolysis or by fluorine atom reaction with acetyl-d3 fluoride. The spectrum of CD2CFO was similar to that of CH2CFO reported previously except for small isotope shifts in the range 7-343 cm-1. The isotope shifts support the assignment of these spectra to fluorinated vinoxy radicals, and rule out the alternate assignment to FCO proposed by others. The X˜→B˜ electronic transition energy (T0) for CD2CFO was measured to be 29 867 cm-1, which is only 7 cm-1 lower than that for CH2CFO. From an analysis of the laser-induced single vibronic level fluorescence, some of the vibrational frequencies can be assigned for the ground electronic state; ν3(CO str.)=1735; ν4(CD2 sciss.)=1043; ν5 (CF str.)=1248; ν6(CD2 rock.)=774; ν7(CC str.)=863; ν8(CCF bend)=597; and ν9(CCO bend)=370 cm-1. For the B˜ 2A″ state, ν3=1772; ν4=1073; ν5=1241; ν6=783; ν7=827; ν8=530; and ν9=370 cm-1. These assignments are supported by ab initio calculations. Among these fundamental frequencies, the ν4 and ν6 modes showed the largest isotope shifts, although isotope effects were observed in all the above vibrational fundamentals. The radiative lifetimes of the excited CD2CFO and the quantum yield of formation of the CH2CFO radical from photolysis of CH3CFO at 193 nm are also reported.

  10. Characterisation of estuarine intertidal macroalgae by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameiro, Carla; Utkin, Andrei B.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2015-12-01

    The article reports the application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for the assessment of macroalgae communities of estuarine intertidal areas. The method was applied for the characterisation of fifteen intertidal macroalgae species of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, and adjacent coastal area. Three bands characterised the LIF spectra of red macroalgae with emission maxima in the ranges 577-583 nm, 621-642 nm and 705-731 nm. Green and brown macroalgae showed one emission maximum in the red region (687-690 nm) and/or one in the far-red region (726-732 nm). Characteristics of LIF emission spectra were determined by differences in the main fluorescing pigments: phycoerythrin, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a (Chl a). In the green and brown macroalgae groups, the relative significance of the two emission maxima seems to be related to the thickness of the photosynthetic layer. In thick macroalgae, like Codium tomentosum or Fucus vesiculosus, the contribution of the far-red emission fluorescence peak was more significant, most probably due to re-absorption of the emitted red Chl a fluorescence within the dense photosynthetic layer. Similarly, an increase in the number of layers of the thin-blade green macroalgae Ulva rigida caused a shift to longer wavelengths of the red emission maximum and the development of a fluorescence peak at the far-red region. Water loss from Ulva's algal tissue also led to a decrease in the red/far-red Chl fluorescence ratio (F685/F735), indicating an increase in the density of chloroplasts in the shrinking macroalgal tissue during low tide exposure.

  11. APPLICATIONS OF CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION TO GROUND WATER MIGRATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been applied to the determination of groundwater migration based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and traditional spectrofluorimetry. The detection limits of injected dye-fluorescent whitening agent (tinopal) in the low parts per tr...

  12. Visualization of plasma turbulence with laser-induced fluorescence (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, Fred M.; Trintchouk, Fedor

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence is a key factor limiting the performance of fusion devices. Plasma edge turbulence determines the boundary values of the plasma density and temperature, which in turn determine the internal gradients and controls global plasma transport. In recent years, significant progress has been made in modeling turbulence behavior in plasmas and its effect on transport. Progress has also been made in diagnostics for turbulence measurement; however, there is still a large gap in our understanding of it. An approach to improve this situation is to experimentally visualize the turbulence, that is, a high resolution 2-D image of the plasma density. Visualization of turbulence can improve the connection to theory and help validate theoretical models. One method that has been successfully developed to visualize turbulence in gases and fluids is planar laser-induced fluorescence. We have recently applied this technique to visualize turbulence and structures in a plasma. This was accomplished using an Alexandrite laser that is tunable between 700 and 800 nm, and from 350 to 400 nm with second harmonic generation. The fluorescence light from an argon ion transition has been imaged onto an intensified charged coupled device camera that is gated in synchronization with the laser. Images from the plasma show a rotating structure at 30 kHz in addition to small scale turbulence.

  13. Evaluation of immunoglobulins in bovine colostrum using laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Z; Abdel Ghany, Sh; Harith, M A

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to exploit laser induced fluorescence (LIF) as a spectrochemical analytical technique for evaluation of immunoglobulin (IgG) in bovine colostrum. Colostrum samples were collected from different American Holstein cows at different times after calving. Four samples were gathered from each cow; the first three samples were obtained from the first three milkings (colostrum) and the fourth sample (milk) was obtained a week after calving. It has been demonstrated that LIF can be used as a simple, fast, sensitive and less costly spectrochemical analytical technique for qualitative estimation of IgG in colostrum. LIF results have been confirmed via the quantitative evaluation of IgG in the same samples adopting the single radial immunodiffusion conventional technique and a very good agreement has been obtained. Through LIF it was possible to evaluate bovine colostrum after different milking times and to differentiate qualitatively between colostrum from different animals which may reflect their general health status. A fluorescence linear calibration curve for IgG concentrations from 0 up to 120 g L(-1) has been obtained. In addition, it is feasible to adopt this technique for in situ measurements, i.e. in dairy cattle farms as a simple and fast method for evaluation of IgG in bovine colostrum instead of using lengthy and complicated conventional techniques in laboratories. PMID:25127559

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  15. The motional stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is the worldwide standard technique for internal magnetic field pitch angle measurements in magnetized plasmas. Traditionally, it is based on using polarimetry to measure the polarization direction of light emitted from a hydrogenic species in a neutral beam. As the beam passes through the magnetized plasma at a high velocity, in its rest frame it perceives a Lorentz electric field. This field causes the H-alpha emission to be split and polarized. A new technique under development adds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for an MSE measurement that will enable radially resolved magnetic field magnitude as well as pitch angle measurements in even low-field (<1 T) experiments. An MSE-LIF system will be installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It will enable reconstructions of the plasma pressure, q-profile and current as well as, in conjunction with the existing MSE system, measurements of radial electric fields.

  16. Resonance fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Koch, Sandra; Garen, Walter; Neu, Walter; Reuter, Rainer

    2006-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in liquids using a double-pulse Q-switched Nd:YAG laser system has provided reliable results that give trace detection limits in water. Resonant laser excitation has been added to enhance detection sensitivity. A primary laser pulse (at 532 nm), transmitted via an optical fiber, induces a cavitation bubble and shockwave at a target immersed in a 10 mg l(-1)-100 mg l(-1) indium (In) water suspension. The low-pressure rear of the shockwave induces bubble expansion and a resulting reduction in cavity pressure as it extends away from the target. Shortly before the maximum diameter is expected, a secondary laser pulse (also at 532 nm) is fed into the bubble in order to reduce quenching processes. The plasma field generated is then resonantly excited by a fiber-guided dye laser beam to increase detection selectivity. The resulting resonance fluorescence emission is optically detected and processed by an intensified optical multichannel analyzer system.

  17. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained

  18. Laser Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for the ASTRAL Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert; Kamar, Ola; Munoz, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    A Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic is presented in this poster. The ion temperature measurements are made in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source using a diode laser based LIF diagnostic. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and any gas can be used for the discharge. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. A number of diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device (Langmuir Probe, Spectrometer, LIF system). The LIF diagnostic makes use of a diode laser with the following characteristics: 1.5 MHz bandwidth, Littrow external cavity, mode-hop free tuning range up to 16 GHz, total power output of about 15 mW. The wavelength is measured by a precision wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevents wavelength drift. For Ar plasma, a new LIF scheme has been developed. The laser tuned at 686.354 nm, is used to pump the 3d^4F5/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p^4D5/2 state. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p^4D5/2 and the 4s^4P3/2 terms (442.6 nm) is monitored by a PMT.

  19. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION OF FLUORESCEIN AS A GROUNDWATER MIGRATION TRACER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been applied to the determination of the groundwater migration tracer dye fluorescein based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and compared to determinations obtained with traditional spectrofluorimetry. Detection limits of injected d...

  20. Determination of phosphorus in steel by the combined technique of laser induced breakdown spectrometry with laser induced fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Naoya; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-09-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) combined with laser induced fluorescence spectrometry (LIFS) has been applied for detection of trace-level phosphorus in steel. The plasma induced by irradiation of Nd:YAG laser pulse for ablation was illuminated by the 3rd harmonic of Ti:Sapphire laser tuned to one of the resonant lines for phosphorus in the wavelength region of 253-256 nm. An excitation line for phosphorus was selected to give the highest signal-to-noise ratio. Fluorescence signals, P213.62 and P214.91 nm, were observed with high selectivity at the contents as low as several tens µg g - 1 . Fluorescence intensities were in a good linear correlation with the contents. Fluorescence intensity ratio of a collisionally assisted line (213.62 nm) to a direct transition line (214.91 nm) was discussed in terms of the analytical conditions and experimental results were compared with a calculation based on rate equations. Since the fluorescence signal light in the wavelength range longer than 200 nm can be transmitted relatively easily, even through fiber optics of moderate length, LIBS/LIFS would be a versatile technique in on-site applications for the monitoring of phosphorus contents in steel.

  1. Two-dimensional Temperature Measurement in Laser-induced Breakdown (LIB) using Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence (PLIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Ling; Parigger, Christian; Plemmons, David H.; Lewis, J. W. L.

    1996-05-01

    Two-dimensional temperature maps of the spatial profile of NH have been obtained following laser-induced breakdown of NH_3. A focused Nd:YAG laser of nominally 30 mJ and 6 ns pulsewidth was used to obtain laser breakdown of atmospheric pressure, flowing gaseous NH_3. The recombination NH A-X far-ultraviolet spectra was studied over the temporal region of 1 - 100 μs following breakdown. Spontaneous emission and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) spectra were observed using a two dimensional image-intensifier filter combination. The PLIF excitation spetra were achieved using an excimer-pumped dye laser, and temperature were obtained using Boltzmann plots. The results show the spatial profiles of the remnant plasma kernel and the effect of gas-dynamic expansion.

  2. Airborne detection of oceanic turbidity cell structure using depth-resolved laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne laser-induced, depth-resolved water Raman backscatter is useful in the detection and mapping of water optical transmission variations. This test, together with other field experiments, has identified the need for additional field experiments to resolve the degree of the contribution to the depth-resolved, Raman-backscattered signal waveform that is due to (1) sea surface height or elevation probability density; (2) off-nadir laser beam angle relative to the mean sea surface; and (3) the Gelbstoff fluorescence background, and the analytical techniques required to remove it. When converted to along-track profiles, the waveforms obtained reveal cells of a decreased Raman backscatter superimposed on an overall trend of monotonically decreasing water column optical transmission.

  3. A handheld laser-induced fluorescence detector for multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-Xia; Li, Han-Yang; Fang, Pan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Fang, Qun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a compact handheld laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector based on a 450 nm laser diode and quasi-confocal optical configuration with a total size of 9.1 × 6.2 × 4.1 cm(3). Since there are few reports on the use of 450 nm laser diode in LIF detection, especially in miniaturized LIF detector, we systematically investigated various optical arrangements suitable for the requirements of 450 nm laser diode and system miniaturization, including focusing lens, filter combination, and pinhole, as well as Raman effect of water at 450 nm excitation wavelength. As the result, the handheld LIF detector integrates the light source (450 nm laser diode), optical circuit module (including a 450 nm band-pass filter, a dichroic mirror, a collimating lens, a 525 nm band-pass filter, and a 1.0mm aperture), optical detector (miniaturized photomultiplier tube), as well as electronic module (including signal recording, processing and displaying units). This detector is capable of working independently with a cost of ca. $2000 for the whole instrument. The detection limit of the instrument for sodium fluorescein solution is 0.42 nM (S/N=3). The broad applicability of the present system was demonstrated in capillary electrophoresis separation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled amino acids and in flow cytometry of tumor cells as an on-line LIF detector, as well as in droplet array chip analysis as a LIF scanner. We expect such a compact LIF detector could be applied in flow analysis systems as an on-line detector, and in field analysis and biosensor analysis as a portable universal LIF detector. PMID:26838391

  4. Detection and mapping of oil-contaminated soils by remote sensing of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luedeker, Wilhelm; Guenther, Kurt P.; Dahn, Hans-Guenter

    1995-10-01

    The contamination of soil by aromatic mineral hydrocarbons (MHC) (e.g., gasoline, oil, etc.) has become a severe environmental problem because not only men, animals, and plants are threatened but also the water and air. With the unification of Germany a great number of suspected contaminated sites in the new countries were registered. An estimation of the German Federal Ministry of Environment (BMU) counts 180,000 areas contaminated with different pollutants, 55,000 are situated in the former GDR. On military settlements for example more than fifty percent of the chemicals are MHCs. Hence one can get an idea of the importance of soil pollution by hydrocarbons. Other zones contaminated due to carelessness or accidents are civil petrolstations, airports, refineries, pipelines, and traffic disasters. At the present time for most of these areas the contamination is assumed due to recent use. Due to the large extension of the problem an estimation and evaluation of the potential hazard for the environment is difficult and expensive to perform. In the case of an actual endangering the total area must be mapped in detail resulting in increasing costs for the owner. Nevertheless it is necessary to find reliable timesaving areal mapping and monitoring methods. One opportunity presented in this paper is the application of remote sensing by laser induced fluorescence from an airborne platform. It promises to fulfill these requirements in a sufficiently fast manner with very high spatial resolution. The access to the pollutant detection is the specific laser induced fluorescence emitted by the MHC (finger print). The present work shows the requirements for a helicopterborne lidar system for MHC mapping and how the detected signals are to be evaluated and interpreted.

  5. Detection of trace phosphorus in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Wang, H.; Xie, Z. Q.; Gao, Y.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2009-05-01

    Monitoring of light-element concentration in steel is very important for quality assurance in the steel industry. In this work, detection in open air of trace phosphorus (P) in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) combined with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been investigated. An optical parametric oscillator wavelength-tunable laser was used to resonantly excite the P atoms within plasma plumes generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. A set of steel samples with P concentrations from 3.9 to 720 parts in 10{sup 6}(ppm) were analyzed using LIBS-LIF at wavelengths of 253.40 and 253.56 nm for resonant excitation of P atoms and fluorescence lines at wavelengths of 213.55 and 213.62 nm. The calibration curves were measured to determine the limit of detection for P in steel, which is estimated to be around 0.7 ppm. The results demonstrate the potential of LIBS-LIF to meet the requirements for on-line analyses in open air in the steel industry.

  6. Detection of trace phosphorus in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Shen, X K; Wang, H; Xie, Z Q; Gao, Y; Ling, H; Lu, Y F

    2009-05-01

    Monitoring of light-element concentration in steel is very important for quality assurance in the steel industry. In this work, detection in open air of trace phosphorus (P) in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) combined with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been investigated. An optical parametric oscillator wavelength-tunable laser was used to resonantly excite the P atoms within plasma plumes generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. A set of steel samples with P concentrations from 3.9 to 720 parts in 10(6) (ppm) were analyzed using LIBS-LIF at wavelengths of 253.40 and 253.56 nm for resonant excitation of P atoms and fluorescence lines at wavelengths of 213.55 and 213.62 nm. The calibration curves were measured to determine the limit of detection for P in steel, which is estimated to be around 0.7 ppm. The results demonstrate the potential of LIBS-LIF to meet the requirements for on-line analyses in open air in the steel industry. PMID:19412215

  7. Recognition of edible oil by using BP neural network and laser induced fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Tao-tao; Chen, Si-ying; Zhang, Yin-chao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He; Zhang, Hong-yan; Liu, Xiao-hua; Wang, Yuan; Bu, Zhi-chao

    2013-09-01

    In order to accomplish recognition of the different edible oil we set up a laser induced fluorescence spectrum system in the laboratory based on Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, and then collect the fluorescence spectrum of different edible oil by using that system. Based on this, we set up a fluorescence spectrum database of different cooking oil. It is clear that there are three main peak position of different edible oil from fluorescence spectrum chart. Although the peak positions of all cooking oil were almost the same, the relative intensity of different edible oils was totally different. So it could easily accomplish that oil recognition could take advantage of the difference of relative intensity. Feature invariants were extracted from the spectrum data, which were chosen from the fluorescence spectrum database randomly, before distinguishing different cooking oil. Then back propagation (BP) neural network was established and trained by the chosen data from the spectrum database. On that basis real experiment data was identified by BP neural network. It was found that the overall recognition rate could reach as high as 83.2%. Experiments showed that the laser induced fluorescence spectrum of different cooking oil was very different from each other, which could be used to accomplish the oil recognition. Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, combined BP neural network,was fast, high sensitivity, non-contact, and high recognition rate. It could become a new technique to accomplish the edible oil recognition and quality detection.

  8. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edwards; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1991-04-09

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  9. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1996-02-20

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  10. Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra from Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain the information of composition of organic aerosol particles in atmosphere, we developed an instrument using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. To measure the fluorescence from a particle, we employed two lasers. Scattering light signal derived from a single particle upon crossing the 635nm-CW laser triggers the 266nm-pulsed laser to excite the particle. Fluorescence from the particle in the wavelength range 300-600nm is spectrally dispersed by a grating spectrometer and then detected by a 32-Ch photo-multiplier tube(PMT). The aerosol stream is surrounded by a coaxial sheath air flow and delivered to the optical chamber at atmospheric pressure. Using PSL particles with known sizes, we made a calibration curve to estimate particle size from scattering light intensity. With the current setup of the instrument we are able to detect both scattering and fluorescence from particles whose diameters are larger than 0.5um. Our system was able to differentiate particles composed of mono-aromatic species (e.g. Tryptophan) from those of Riboflavin, by their different fluorescence wavelengths. Also, measurements of fluorescence spectra of ambient particles were demonstrated in our campus in Yokosuka city, facing Tokyo bay in Japan. We obtained several types of florescence spectra in the 8 hours. Classification of the measured fluorescence spectra will be discussed in the presentation.

  11. Laser-induced blood serum fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy for cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Wang, Qiuyu; Lin, Junxiu

    1999-09-01

    Laser induced auto-fluorescence and Raman spectra of serum from cancerous and normal people are measured and analyzed. The content of (beta) -carotene in the serum from normal man is higher than that from the cancerous one, this result agrees with other reports.

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source.

  13. Formation of carbon nanotubes: In situ optical analysis using laser-induced incandescence and laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Trétout, B.; Cochon, J.-L.; Foutel-Richard, A.; Loiseau, A.; Krüger, V.; Tsurikov, M.; Scott, C. D.

    2010-04-01

    Gas-phase production of carbon nanotubes in presence of a metal catalyst with a continuous wave CO2 laser is investigated by combining coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and laser-induced incandescence (LII). These in situ techniques provide a unique investigation of the different transformation processes of the primarily carbon and metal vapors issued from the vaporization of the target by the laser and the temperature at which these processes occur. Continuous-wave laser provides with stable continuous vaporization conditions very well suited for such in situ investigations. Temperature profiles inside the reactor are known from CARS measurements and flow calculations. Carbon soot, density, and size of carbon aggregates are determined by LII measurements. LIF measurements are used to study the gas phases, namely, C2 and C3 radicals which are the very first steps of carbon recombination, and metal catalysts gas phase. Spectral investigations allow us to discriminate the signal from each species by selecting the correct pair of excitation/detection wavelengths. Spatial distributions of the different species are measured as a function of target composition and temperature. The comparison of LIF and LII signals allow us to correlate the spatial evolution of gas and soot in the scope of the different steps of the nanotube growth already proposed in the literature and to identify the impact of the chemical nature of the catalyst on carbon condensation and nanotube nucleation. Our study presents the first direct evidence of the nanotube onset and that the nucleation proceeds from a dissolution-segregation process from metal particles as assumed in the well-known vapor-liquid-solid model. Comparison of different catalysts reveals that this process is strongly favored when Ni is present.

  14. Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence on an oscillatory xenon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-11-15

    A novel approach to time-synchronizing laser-induced fluorescence measurements to an oscillating current in a 60 Hz xenon discharge lamp using a continuous wave laser is presented. A sample-hold circuit is implemented to separate out signals at different phases along a current cycle, and is followed by a lock-in amplifier to pull out the resulting time-synchronized fluorescence trace from the large background signal. The time evolution of lower state population is derived from the changes in intensity of the fluorescence excitation line shape resulting from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 6s{sup Prime }[1/2]{sub 1}{sup 0}-6p{sup Prime }[3/2]{sub 2} xenon atomic transition at {lambda}= 834.68 nm. Results show that the lower state population oscillates at twice the frequency of the discharge current, 120 Hz.

  15. Analysis of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of in vitro plant tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Ana Celia; Gutiérrez-Pulido, Humberto; Rodríguez-Domínguez, José Manuel; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín; Cervantes-Martínez, Jesús

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for monitoring the development and stress detection of in vitro tissue cultures in a nondestructive and noninvasive way. The changes in LIF spectra caused by the induction of organogenesis, the increase of the F690/F740 ratio as a result of the stress originated in the organogenic explants due to shoot emergence, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and shoot development were detected by LIF through closed containers of Saintpaulia ionantha.

  16. Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) from plant foliage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Williams, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence induction kinetics of green plants excited at 337 nm by a laser were studied. They correlate with plant type, as well as with changes in the physiology of the plant as the result of stress. The plant types studied include herbaceous dicots, monocots, hardwoods, conifers, and algae. These plant types could be identified on the basis of differences in either the number of fluorescent bands or the relative intensity of the bands. Differences in fluorescent spectra which could be related to vigor status are observed in conifers located in an area of high atmospheric deposition. Changes in the fluorescence spectra and induction kinetics are also seen in plants grown under conditions of nutrient deficiency and drought stress.

  17. Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) from plant foliage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, Emmett W.; Williams, Darrel L.

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence induction kinetics of green plants excited at 337 nm by a laser were studied. They correlate with plant type, as well as with changes in the physiology of the plant as the result of stress. The plant types studied include herbaceous dicots, monocots, hardwoods, conifers, and algae. These plant types could be identified on the basis of differences in either the number of fluorescent bands or the relative intensity of the bands. Differences in fluorescent spectra which could be related to vigor status are observed in conifers located in an area of high atmospheric deposition. Changes in the fluorescence spectra and induction kinetics are also seen in plants grown under conditions of nutrient deficiency and drought stress.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence and dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1-phenylpropargyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Neil J.; Nakajima, Masakazu; Gibson, Bligh A.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Kable, Scott H.

    2009-04-01

    The D1(A2″)-D0(A2″) electronic transition of the resonance-stabilized 1-phenylpropargyl radicalooled discharge of 3-phenyl-1-propyne, has been investigated in detail by laser-induced fluorescence excitation and dispersed single vibronic level fluorescence (SVLF) spectroscopy. The transition is dominated by the origin band at 21 007 cm-1, with weaker Franck-Condon activity observed in a' fundamentals and even overtones and combinations of a″ symmetry. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations of the D0 and D1 geometries and frequencies were performed to support and guide the experimental assignments throughout. Analysis of SVLF spectra from 16 D1 vibronic levels has led to the assignment of 15 fundamental frequencies in the excited state and 19 fundamental frequencies in the ground state; assignments for many more normal modes not probed directly by fluorescence spectroscopy are also suggested. Duschinsky mixing, in which the excited state normal modes are rotated with respect to the ground state modes, is prevalent throughout, in vibrations of both a' and a″ symmetry.

  19. Investigation of Laser Induced Structure formation and resultant fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Otterson, Samantha L.; Bousfield, Douglas W.; Neivandt, David J.; Mason, Michael D.

    2015-04-01

    The formation mechanism of 3D micron-sized fluorescent structures generated in silver nanoparticle containing sodium citrate dihydrate films, during exposure to focused laser radiation, was investigated. Microscopic and thermochemical data indicate that heat accumulates at the nanoparticle surface. The heat causes local melting and an increase in temperature beyond the decomposition point of the immediate surrounding layer. In turn this leads to the rapid release of volatile gases (H2O and CO2). These expanding gases push the melted liquid pool outward, from the center of the focal volume, leaving behind a trough-like structure with elevated edges. It was observed that the edges of the structures were fluorescent. The fluorescence mechanism was investigated using atomic force, scanning electron and Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy. The observed fluorescence was attributed to the decomposition of sodium citrate dihydrate to sodium citrate. The presence of water acts to quench fluorescence in the bulk film, but near regions that experienced heat, the water is driven off.

  20. Teaching laser-induced fluorescence of plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenk, Sándor; Gádoros, Patrik; Kocsányi, László; Barócsi, Attila

    2016-11-01

    Plants convert carbon dioxide into sugars using the energy of sunlight. Absorbed light unused for conversion is dissipated primarily as heat with a small fraction re-emitted as fluorescence at longer wavelengths. One can use the latter to estimate photosynthetic activity. The illumination of intact leaves with strong light after keeping them in dark for tens of minutes results in a rapid increase followed by a slow decay of fluorescence emission from the fluorophore chlorophyll-a, called the Kautsky effect. This paper describes a laboratory practice that introduces students of physics or engineering into this research field. It begins with the spectral measurement of the fluorescence emitted by a plant leaf upon UV excitation. Then it focuses on the red and far-red components of the fluorescence emission spectrum characteristic to the chlorophyll-a molecule and presents an inexpensive demonstration of the Kautsky effect. As researchers use more complex measurement techniques and tools, the practice ends up with the demonstration of an intelligent fluorosensor, a compact tool developed for plant physiological research and horticulture applications together with a brief interpretation of some important fluorescence parameters.

  1. Early diagnosis of gastric cancer with laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, Alexander Y.; Sayenko, Valeriy F.; Denisov, Nikolay A.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Buryi, Alexander N.

    1999-02-01

    Optical biopsy of stomach mucosa was performed afterwards oral administration of encapsulated hyperflav (single dose was chosen to provide 0.1 - 0.15 mg/kg b.w.) A sufficient fluorescence contrast of suspicions versus normal tissue was obtained after incubation time from 4 to 10 hours. Fluorescence was induced by He - Cd laser coupled to fiber optic probe inserted into a biopsy channel of the endoscope. Fluorescent spectra were recorded in the range from 500 nm up to 700 nm with 2 nm resolution. We took two groups of patients with benign and malignant ulcer of the stomach and erosive gastritis. The first group consisted of 59 patients (male/female 36/23) was carried out with optical biopsy of stomach mucosa. The second group consisted of 60 patients (male/female 39/21) was carried out by routine method: gastroscopy and biopsy from 5 - 7 places of macroscopically changed mucosa.

  2. Investigation of the early stages in laser-induced ignition by Schlieren photography and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Maximilian; Charareh, S; Winter, F; Iskra, K; Rüdisser, D; Neger, T; Kopecek, H; Wintner, E

    2004-09-20

    Laser ignition has been discussed widely as a potentially superior ignition source for technical appliances such as internal combustion engines. Ignition strongly affects overall combustion, and its early stages in particular have strong implications on subsequent pollutant formation, flame quenching, and extinction. Our research here is devoted to the experimental investigation of the early stages of laser-induced ignition of CH4/air mixtures up to high pressures. Tests were performed in a 0.9-l combustion cell with initial pressures of up to 25 bar with stoichiometric to fuel-lean mixtures using a 5-ns 50-mJ 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser. Laserinduced fluorescence (LIF) was used to obtain two dimensionally resolved images of the OH radical distribution after the ignition event. These images were used to produce an animation of laser ignition and early flame kernel development. Schlieren photography was used to investigate the laserinduced shock wave, hot core gas, and developing flame ball. We extend existing knowledge to high-pressure regimes relevant for internal combustion engines.

  3. Investigation of the early stages in laser-induced ignition by Schlieren photography and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, Maximilian; Charareh, S.; Winter, F.; Iskra, K. F.; Rüdisser, D.; Neger, T.; Kopecek, H.; Wintner, E.

    2004-09-01

    Laser ignition has been discussed widely as a potentially superior ignition source for technical appliances such as internal combustion engines. Ignition strongly affects overall combustion, and its early stages in particular have strong implications on subsequent pollutant formation, flame quenching, and extinction. Our research here is devoted to the experimental investigation of the early stages of laser-induced ignition of CH4/air mixtures up to high pressures. Tests were performed in a 0.9-l combustion cell with initial pressures of up to 25 bar with stoichiometric to fuel-lean mixtures using a 5-ns 50-mJ 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser. Laserinduced fluorescence (LIF) was used to obtain two dimensionally resolved images of the OH radical distribution after the ignition event. These images were used to produce an animation of laser ignition and early flame kernel development. Schlieren photography was used to investigate the laserinduced shock wave, hot core gas, and developing flame ball. We extend existing knowledge to high-pressure regimes relevant for internal combustion engines.

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence of phosphors for remote cryogenic thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, D. L.; Capps, G. J.; Cates, M. R.; Simmons, C. M.; Schwenterly, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    Remote cryogenic temperature measurements can be made by inducing fluorescence in phosphors with temperature-dependent emissions and measuring the emission lifetimes. The thermographic phosphor technique can be used for making precision, noncontact, cryogenic-temperature measurements in electrically hostile environments, such as high dc electric or magnetic fields. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is interested in using these thermographic phosphors for mapping hot spots on cryogenic tank walls. Europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La2O2S:Eu) and magnesium fluorogermanate doped with manganese (Mg4FGeO6:Mn) are suitable for low-temperature surface thermometry. Several emission lines, excited by a 337-nm ultraviolet laser, provide fluorescence lifetimes having logarithmic dependence with temperature from 4 to above 125 K. A calibration curve for both La2O2S:Eu and Mg4FGeO6:Mn is presented, as well as emission spectra taken at room temperature and 11 K.

  5. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Mark L.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Martin, John C.

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for sizing DNA fragments using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA piece or the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is linearly related to the fragment length. The distribution of DNA fragment sizes forms a characterization of the DNA piece for use in forensic and research applications.

  6. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Soft Tissues of the Oral Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Bernard, Rodney; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Ongole, Ravikiran; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2011-07-01

    The present study deals with the in vivo measurement of auto-fluorescence from different anatomical sites of oral cavities of healthy volunteers, using a homebuilt Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Spectroscopy setup. Excitation wave length of 325 nm from a He-Cd laser was used as the source. From the 7 anatomical sites (say buccal mucosa, tongue, palate etc) of each oral cavity of 113 subjects, 1266 fluorescence spectra were recorded. The spectra were analysed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to see the correlation between different sites.

  7. Laser-based diagnostics for coal gasification instrumentation. [Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.J.; Loree, T.R.; Hartford, A. Jr.; Tiee, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this program the investigators have investigated the suitability of a number of optical diagnostic techniques for nonintrusive real-time measurements of species concentrations and temperatures of coal gasification streams. They have identified and evaluated several promising techniques including coherent Raman spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and laser-induced fluorescence. They emphasize that these are complementary, rather than competing, diagnostic technologies, as each can provide a different class of data for gasifier operation. The results of their gasifier field tests and supporting laboratory work on these diagnostic techniques have been summarized and recommendations for continued work on optical diagnostics for coal gasification streams are presented. 12 references, 17 figures.

  8. Airborne Nanoparticle Detection By Sampling On Filters And Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewalle, Pascale; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Roynette, Audrey; Gensdarmes, François; Golanski, Luana; Motellier, Sylvie

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays, due to their unique physical and chemical properties, engineered nanoparticles are increasingly used in a variety of industrial sectors. However, questions are raised about the safety of workers who produce and handle these particles. Therefore it is necessary to assess the potential exposure by inhalation of these workers. There is thereby a need to develop a suitable instrumentation which can detect selectively the presence of engineered nanoparticles in the ambient atmosphere. In this paper Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to meet this target. LIBS can be implemented on site since it is a fast and direct technique which requires no sample preparation. The approach consisted in sampling Fe2O3 and TiO2 nanoparticles on a filter, respectively a mixed cellulose ester membrane and a polycarbonate membrane, and to measure the surface concentration of Fe and Ti by LIBS. Then taking into account the sampling parameters (flow, duration, filter surface) we could calculate a detection limit in volume concentration in the atmosphere. With a sampling at 10 L/min on a 10 cm2 filter during 1 min, we obtained detection limits of 56 μg/m3 for Fe and 22 μg/m3 for Ti. These figures, obtained in real time, are significantly below existing workplace exposure recommendations of the EU-OSHA and of the NIOSH. These results are very encouraging and will be completed in a future work on airborne carbon nanotube detection.

  9. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.; Hammond, M.L.; Keller, R.A.; Marrone, B.L.; Martin, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    A method is provided for obtaining DNA fingerprints using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a selected sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is directly proportional to the fragment length. Additional dyes can be bound to the DNA piece and DNA fragments to provide information additional to length information. Oligonucleotide specific dyes and/or hybridization probes can be bound to the DNA fragments to provide information on oligonucleotide distribution or probe hybridization to DNA fragments of different sizes.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence of phosphors for remote cryogenic thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beshears, D.L.; Capps, G.J.; Cates, M.R.; Simmons, C.M.; Schwenterly, S.W.

    1990-01-01

    Remote cryogenic temperature measurements can be made by inducing fluorescence in phosphors with temperature-dependent emissions and measuring the emission lifetimes. The thermographic phosphor technique can be used for making precision, non-contact, cryogenic temperature measurements in electrically hostile environments, such as high DC electric or magnetic fields. NASA is interested in utilizing these thermographic phosphors for mapping hot spots on cryogenic tank walls. Europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu) and magnesium fluorogermanate doped with manganese (Mg{sub 4}(F)GeO{sub 6}:Mn) are suitable for low-temperature surface thermometry. Several emission lines, excited by a 337 nm UV laser, provide fluorescence lifetimes having logarithmic dependence with temperatures from 4 to 125 Kelvin. A calibration curve for both La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu and Mg{sub 4}(F)GeO{sub 6}:Mn are presented as well as emission spectra taken at room temperature and 7 Kelvin.

  11. Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence and Raman imaging inside a hydrogen engine.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sascha Ronald; Koch, Peter; Braeuer, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-12-10

    We report on the simultaneous and two-dimensional measurement of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman scattering (Ramanography) applied inside a hydrogen internal combustion (IC) engine. Two different LIF tracer molecules, triethylamine (TEA) and trimethylamine (TMA), were used for the LIF experiments. The LIF and Raman results were found to be in very good agreement. The simultaneous application of Ramanography and LIF imaging indicated that TMA is the more suitable LIF tracer molecule, compared to TEA. PMID:20011004

  12. Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of high-enthalpy free jet flow with nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Jennifer L.; Mcmillin, Brian K.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of property fields in a high-enthalpy, supersonic, underexpanded free jet generated in a reflection-type shock tunnel are reported. PLIF images showing velocity and temperature sensitivity are presented. The inferred radial velocity and relative rotational temperature fields are found to be in agreement with those predicted by a numerical simulation of the flowfield using the method of characteristics.

  13. Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence and Raman imaging inside a hydrogen engine.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sascha Ronald; Koch, Peter; Braeuer, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-12-10

    We report on the simultaneous and two-dimensional measurement of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman scattering (Ramanography) applied inside a hydrogen internal combustion (IC) engine. Two different LIF tracer molecules, triethylamine (TEA) and trimethylamine (TMA), were used for the LIF experiments. The LIF and Raman results were found to be in very good agreement. The simultaneous application of Ramanography and LIF imaging indicated that TMA is the more suitable LIF tracer molecule, compared to TEA.

  14. New energy levels of atomic niobium by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, I. K.; Başar, Gö; Er, A.; Güzelçimen, F.; Başar, Gü; Kröger, S.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy was applied in order to find new energy levels of the niobium atom. A continuous wave tuneable titanium-sapphire laser in the wavelength range from 750 to 865 nm and a hollow-cathode lamp were used. We discovered four energy levels of even parity, three lying levels below 19 000 cm-1 and one at much higher energy. Additionally hyperfine structure data of six levels of odd parity were determined.

  15. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Analysis of Protein-Based Binding Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Cather, S.; Anglos, D.; Fotakis, Costas

    Laser-induced fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores of organic media found in paintings (casein, animal glue and egg proteins) provides a means of characterising general classes of media depending on the amino acid composition and presence of degradation cross-linkages. Wavelength dependence of spectra is investigated for non-destructive and non-invasive analyses of thin films of protein-based binding media.

  16. Standoff detection: distinction of bacteria by hyperspectral laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Arne; Duschek, Frank; Fellner, Lea; Grünewald, Karin M.; Hausmann, Anita; Julich, Sandra; Pargmann, Carsten; Tomaso, Herbert; Handke, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Sensitive detection and rapid identification of hazardous bioorganic material with high sensitivity and specificity are essential topics for defense and security. A single method can hardly cover these requirements. While point sensors allow a highly specific identification, they only provide localized information and are comparatively slow. Laser based standoff systems allow almost real-time detection and classification of potentially hazardous material in a wide area and can provide information on how the aerosol may spread. The coupling of both methods may be a promising solution to optimize the acquisition and identification of hazardous substances. The capability of the outdoor LIF system at DLR Lampoldshausen test facility as an online classification tool has already been demonstrated. Here, we present promising data for further differentiation among bacteria. Bacteria species can express unique fluorescence spectra after excitation at 280 nm and 355 nm. Upon deactivation, the spectral features change depending on the deactivation method.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence of free diamondoid molecules.

    PubMed

    Richter, Robert; Röhr, Merle I S; Zimmermann, Tobias; Petersen, Jens; Heidrich, Christoph; Rahner, Ramon; Möller, Thomas; Dahl, Jeremy E; Carlson, Robert M K; Mitric, Roland; Rander, Torbjörn; Merli, Andrea

    2015-02-14

    We observe the fluorescence of pristine diamondoids in the gas phase, excited using narrow band ultraviolet laser light. The emission spectra show well-defined features, which can be attributed to transitions from the excited electronic state into different vibrational modes of the electronic ground state. We assign the normal modes responsible for the vibrational bands, and determine the geometry of the excited states. Calculations indicate that for large diamondoids, the spectral bands do not result from progressions of single modes, but rather from combination bands composed of a large number of Δv = 1 transitions. The vibrational modes determining the spectral envelope can mainly be assigned to wagging and twisting modes of the surface atoms. We conclude that our theoretical approach accurately describes the photophysics in diamondoids and possibly other hydrocarbons in general. PMID:25588540

  18. DETERMINATION OF ALIPHATIC AMINES IN WATER USING DERIVATIZATION WITH FLUORESCEIN ISOTHIOCYANATE AND CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection-oriented derivatization of aliphatic amines and amine functional groups in coumpounds of environmental interest was studied using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) with separation/determination by capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence. Determinative level...

  19. Anomalous saturation curves in laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkemade, C. Th. J.

    This is partly a tutorial and partly a review paper (with a few original additions) on saturation curves (SC) which describe the dependence of fluorescence intensity on laser intensity in atomic spectroscopy. The interest in SCs stems from applications in analytical chemistry, plasma diagnostics, physical and chemical kinetics, etc., as well as from their fundamental implications. After a brief introduction, some general facts and basic assumptions regarding atom-laser interactions are critically examined (Section 2.1) and the concepts of the "ideal" SC and saturation parameter are defined (Section 2.2). In the following Sections 3-7 various effects are discussed that can distort the SC and shift the (apparent) saturation parameter. The effects of a spatially, a temporally and a spectrally inhomogeneous laser beam, of laser-enhanced chemical reactions and ionization processes, of an optically thick atomic vapour and of various non-steady-state processes are successively reviewed. Atom trapping and polarization effects on the SCs measured recently with an atomic Na beam in vacuo are reported and discussed in some detail. Also, some new observations at high resolution on the spectrum of pulsed and cw multimode dye lasers are reported. In Section 8 some general conclusions are drawn and warnings given, and the possible extension of the concept of SC to multiphoton and multistep excitation processes, as well as to optogalvanic spectroscopy, is suggested.

  20. Simultaneous visualization of water and hydrogen peroxide vapor using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence and photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Olof; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    A concept based on a combination of photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) and two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is for the first time demonstrated for simultaneous detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and water (H2O) vapor. Water detection is based on two-photon excitation by an injection-locked krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser (248.28 nm), which induces broadband fluorescence (400-500 nm) from water. The same laser simultaneously photodissociates H2O2, whereupon the generated OH fragments are probed by LIF after a time delay of typically 50 ns, by a frequency-doubled dye laser (281.91 nm). Experiments in six different H2O2/H2O mixtures of known compositions show that both signals are linearly dependent on respective species concentration. For the H2O2 detection there is a minor interfering signal contribution from OH fragments created by two-photon photodissociation of H2O. Since the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O2 is found to be at least ∼24,000 times higher than the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O at room temperature, this interference is negligible for most H2O/H2O2 mixtures of practical interest. Simultaneous single-shot imaging of both species was demonstrated in a slightly turbulent flow. For single-shot imaging the minimum detectable H2O2 and H2O concentration is 10 ppm and 0.5%, respectively. The proposed measurement concept could be a valuable asset in several areas, for example, in atmospheric and combustion science and research on vapor-phase H2O2 sterilization in the pharmaceutical and aseptic food-packaging industries. PMID:25358016

  1. Novel xenon calibration scheme for two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Drew; Scime, Earl; Short, Zachary

    2016-11-01

    Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) measurements of neutral hydrogen and its isotopes are typically calibrated by performing TALIF measurements on krypton with the same diagnostic system and using the known ratio of the absorption cross sections [K. Niemi et al., J. Phys. D 34, 2330 (2001)]. Here we present the measurements of a new calibration method based on a ground state xenon scheme for which the fluorescent emission wavelength is nearly identical to that of hydrogen, thereby eliminating chromatic effects in the collection optics and simplifying detector calibration. We determine that the ratio of the TALIF cross sections of xenon and hydrogen is 0.024 ± 0.001.

  2. Planar temperature measurement in compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced iodine fluorescence technique that is suitable for the planar measurement of temperature in cold nonreacting compressible air flows is investigated analytically and demonstrated in a known flow field. The technique is based on the temperature dependence of the broadband fluorescence from iodine excited by the 514-nm line of an argon-ion laser. Temperatures ranging from 165 to 245 K were measured in the calibration flow field. This technique makes complete, spatially resolved surveys of temperature practical in highly three-dimensional, low-temperature compressible flows.

  3. Analysis of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of in vitro plant tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Ana Celia; Gutiérrez-Pulido, Humberto; Rodríguez-Domínguez, José Manuel; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín; Cervantes-Martínez, Jesús

    2007-04-10

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for monitoring the development and stress detection of in vitro tissue cultures in a nondestructive and noninvasive way. The changes in LIF spectra caused by the induction of organogenesis, the increase of the F690/F740 ratio as a result of the stress originated in the organogenic explants due to shoot emergence, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and shoot development were detected by LIF through closed containers of Saintpaulia ionantha. PMID:17384731

  4. Measurement of exhaust gas recirculation rate by laser-induced fluorescence in engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, C.; Modica, V.; Guibert, P.

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study is to measure by planar laser-induced fluorescence the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate in the combustion chamber of an optical engine to quantify the stratification phenomena used in the new combustion strategy. From the results obtained in a high pressure-high temperature (HP-HT) facility, the tracer chosen for this aim is 3-pentanone. This paper presents a quantitative measurement of the EGR rate in the engine and a post-processing model with a correction and calibration procedure by considering the influence of temperature and pressure on the absorption cross-section and the 3-pentanone fluorescence quantum yield from the results established in the HP-HT facility. The stratification phenomena are quantified by using 3-pentanone fluorescence for two different configurations of EGR introduction in the engine. The local fluorescence measurements in the HP-HT facility are also compared with planar fluorescence measurements in the optical engine.

  5. Fluorescence quantum yield of carbon dioxide for quantitative UV laser-induced fluorescence in high-pressure flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Bessler, W. G.; Yoo, J.; Schulz, C.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2008-11-01

    The fluorescence quantum yield for ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of CO2 is determined for selected excitation wavelengths in the range 215-250 nm. Wavelength-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of CO2, NO, and O2 are measured in the burned gases of a laminar CH4/air flame ( φ=0.9 and 1.1) at 20 bar with additional NO seeded into the flow. The fluorescence spectra are fit to determine the relative contribution of the three species to infer an estimate of fluorescence quantum yield for CO2 that ranges from 2-8×10-6 depending on temperature and excitation wavelength with an estimated uncertainty of ±0.5×10-6. The CO2 fluorescence signal increases linearly with gas pressure for flames with constant CO2 mole fraction for the 10 to 60 bar range, indicating that collisional quenching is not an important contributor to the CO2 fluorescence quantum yield. Spectral simulation calculations are used to choose two wavelengths for excitation of CO2, 239.34 and 242.14 nm, which minimize interference from LIF of NO and O2. Quantitative LIF images of CO2 are demonstrated using these two excitation wavelengths and the measured fluorescence quantum yield.

  6. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence measurements: Considerations when using Nd:YAG based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabasovic, Maja S.; Sevic, Dragutin; Terzic, Mira; Marinkovic, Bratislav P.

    2012-05-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) and the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) have been shown to be methods which are fast and sensitive to provide information about the constituents in analyzed samples. TR-LIF and LIBS have similar hardware requirements. In this paper, we analyze some characteristics of TR-LIF/LIBS system implemented in our laboratory, considering the fact that the excitation part of the system is based on Nd:YAG laser and Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO). The laser is more than powerful enough (365 mJ at 1064 nm, variable OPO output >5 mJ) for LIBS, but somehow slow (the length of fundamental laser harmonic output pulse is about 5 ns) for fluorescence measurements in our present area of interest, namely plants and food products. Fortunately, the pulse length of tunable OPO output (320-475 nm) is less then 1 ns, so by means of a correct deconvolution procedure it is possible to measure the fluorescence lifetimes in the range as small as a few nanoseconds. The fluorescence detection part of our system is based on picosecond streak camera. Using the fluorescent dyes (Rhodamine B and Fluorescein) ethanol solutions we verified the analyzing capabilities of our TR-LIF system.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence of formaldehyde in combustion using third harmonic Nd:YAG laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Christian; Nygren, Jenny; Bai, Xiao; Li, Zhongshan; Bladh, Henrik; Axelsson, Boman; Denbratt, Ingemar; Koopmans, Lucien; Bengtsson, Per-Erik; Aldén, Marcus

    2003-12-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is an important intermediate species in combustion processes and it can through laser-induced fluorescence measurements be used for instantaneous flame front detection. The present study has focussed on the use of the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as excitation wavelength for formaldehyde, and different dimethyl ether (C2H6O) flames were used as sources of formaldehyde in the experiments. The investigations included studies of the overlap between the laser profile and the absorption lines of formaldehyde, saturation effects and the potential occurrence of laser-induced photochemistry. The technique was applied for detection of formaldehyde in an internal combustion engine operated both as a spark ignition engine and as a homogenous charge compression ignition engine.

  8. Remote imaging laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy using nanosecond pulses from a mobile lidar system.

    PubMed

    Grönlund, Rasmus; Lundqvist, Mats; Svanberg, Sune

    2006-08-01

    A mobile lidar system was used in remote imaging laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments. Also, computer-controlled remote ablation of a chosen area was demonstrated, relevant to cleaning of cultural heritage items. Nanosecond frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser pulses at 355 nm were employed in experiments with a stand-off distance of 60 meters using pulse energies of up to 170 mJ. By coaxial transmission and common folding of the transmission and reception optical paths using a large computer-controlled mirror, full elemental imaging capability was achieved on composite targets. Different spectral identification algorithms were compared in producing thematic data based on plasma or fluorescence light. PMID:16925920

  9. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  10. Laser-induced tissue fluorescence in radiofrequency tissue-fusion characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lei; Fonseca, Martina B.; Arya, Shobhit; Kudo, Hiromi; Goldin, Robert; Hanna, George B.; Elson, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Heat-induced tissue fusion is an important procedure in modern surgery and can greatly reduce trauma, complications, and mortality during minimally invasive surgical blood vessel anastomosis, but it may also have further benefits if applied to other tissue types such as small and large intestine anastomoses. We present a tissue-fusion characterization technology using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, which provides further insight into tissue constituent variations at the molecular level. In particular, an increase of fluorescence intensity in 450- to 550-nm range for 375- and 405-nm excitation suggests that the collagen cross-linking in fused tissues increased. Our experimental and statistical analyses showed that, by using fluorescence spectral data, good fusion could be differentiated from other cases with an accuracy of more than 95%. This suggests that the fluorescence spectroscopy could be potentially used as a feedback control method in online tissue-fusion monitoring.

  11. Early detection of dysplasia in colon and bladder tissue using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rava, Richard P.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Cothren, Robert M., Jr.; Petras, Robert; Sivak, Michael J., Jr.; Levine, Howard H.

    1991-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been explored as an early detection scheme for two clinically important examples of neoplasia: colorectal dysplasia and transitional cell carcinoma in the urinary bladder. In both, it is desirable to detect microscopic and biochemical changes of pre-cancer in order to identify patients at risk for developing invasive carcinoma. This paper will compare the fluorescence obtained from these two pre-cancerous conditions, and discuss the connection between the fluorescence and the morphological/molecular changes occurring in the tissue. The similarities and differences in the fluorescence will be compared to determine the general features of pre-cancerous changes that might be utilized for detection of the disease.

  12. Multispectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging system for large biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2003-07-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence imaging system developed to capture multispectral fluorescence emission images simultaneously from a relatively large target object is described. With an expanded, 355-nm Nd:YAG laser as the excitation source, the system captures fluorescence emission images in the blue, green, red, and far-red regions of the spectrum centered at 450, 550, 678, and 730 nm, respectively, from a 30-cm-diameter target area in ambient light. Images of apples and of pork meat artificially contaminated with diluted animal feces have demonstrated the versatility of fluorescence imaging techniques for potential applications in food safety inspection. Regions of contamination, including sites that were not readily visible to the human eye, could easily be identified from the images.

  13. Laser-induced tissue fluorescence in radiofrequency tissue-fusion characterization.

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Fonseca, Martina B; Arya, Shobhit; Kudo, Hiromi; Goldin, Robert; Hanna, George B; Elson, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Heat-induced tissue fusion is an important procedure in modern surgery and can greatly reduce trauma, complications, and mortality during minimally invasive surgical blood vessel anastomosis, but it may also have further benefits if applied to other tissue types such as small and large intestine anastomoses. We present a tissue-fusion characterization technology using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, which provides further insight into tissue constituent variations at the molecular level. In particular, an increase of fluorescence intensity in 450- to 550-nm range for 375- and 405-nm excitation suggests that the collagen cross-linking in fused tissues increased. Our experimental and statistical analyses showed that, by using fluorescence spectral data, good fusion could be differentiated from other cases with an accuracy of more than 95%. This suggests that the fluorescence spectroscopy could be potentially used as a feedback control method in online tissue-fusion monitoring.

  14. [Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-shuang; Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Guo, Jin-jia; Liu, Yong-xin; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-02-01

    The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimination of different spilled oil, such as diesel, gasoline, and crude oil. However, traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method, which is not adapted to requirement of field detection, is limited to laboratory investigatio ns. The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill. In this paper, a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM) model was introduced to discriminate crude oil samples. In this method, time-resolved spectra data was descended into two dimensions with selecting appropriate range in time and wavelength domains respectively to form a SVM data base. It is found that the classification accurate rate increased with an appropriate selection. With a selected range from 54 to 74 ns in time domain, the classification accurate rate has been increased from 83.3% (without selection) to 88.1%. With a selected wavelength range of 387.00~608.87 nm, the classification accurate rate of suspect oil was improved from 84% (without selection) to 100%. Since the detection delay of fluorescence lidar fluctuates due to wave and platform swing, the identification method with optimizing in both time and wavelength domains could offer a better flexibility for field applications. It is hoped that the developed method could provide some useful reference with data reduction for classification of suspect crude oil in the future development.

  15. Quasi-resonance enhancement of laser-induced-fluorescence diagnosis of endometriosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Ralph H., Jr.; Vancaillie, Thierry G.

    1990-05-01

    Endometriosis, a common disease in women in the reproductive age group, is defined pathologically by the presence of endometrial tissue (inner lining of the uterus) outside the uterus. The displaced tissue is histologically identical to endometrium. In addition to being a highly prevalent disease, this disease is associated with many distressing and debilitating symptoms. Motivated by the need to improve diagnosis by endoscopic imaging instrumentation, we have previously used several drugs to cause selective laser-induced fluorescence of active surgically induced endometriosis in the rabbit model in vivo using ultraviolet-wavelength (351.1 and 363.8 nm) excitation from an argon-ion laser. In the present study we have investigated methods of enhancing differentiation between normal and abnormal tissue by using other excitation wavelengths. In addition to an enhanced capability for detecting abnormal tissue, there are several other advantages associated with using visible-wavelength excitation, such as deeper penetration into the tissue, as well as increased equipment performance, reliability, versatility, and availability. The disadvantage is that because only wavelengths longer than the excitation wavelength can be used for detection, some of the spectral information is lost. Because human endomeiriosis samples were somewhat limited in quantity, as well as specimen size, we used normal ovarian tissue for the laser-induced-fluorescence differentiation-enhancement studies. Positive enhancement of the laser-induced- fluorescence differentiation was found in human ovarian tissue in vitro utilizing 514.5-nm excitation from an argonion laser. Additionally, preliminary verification of this concept was accomplished in active surgically induced endometriosis in the rabbit model in vivo with visible argon-ion laser excitation of two tetracycline-based drugs. Future experiments with other drug treatments and excitation/detection parameters are planned.

  16. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  17. Quantitative characterization of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor flowfield using unified, laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    A calibrated, nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced iodine fluorescence (LIIF) was used to quantify the steady, compressible flowfield of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor. The combustor was configured with single and staged, transverse-air injection into a supersonic-air freestream behind a rearward-facing step. Pressure, temperature, two-velocity components, and injectant mole fraction were measured with high spatial resolution in the three-dimensional flowfields. These experimental results provide a benchmark set of data for validation of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes being developed to model supersonic combustor flowfields.

  18. Two-color planar laser-induced fluorescence thermometry in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, G. Andrew; Lucht, Robert P.; Laurendeau, Normand M

    2008-05-20

    We demonstrate a two-color planar laser-induced fluorescence technique for obtaining two-dimensional temperature images in water. For this method, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm excites a solution of temperature-sensitive rhodamine 560 and temperature-insensitive sulforhodamine 640. The resulting emissions are optically separated through filters and detected via a charged-couple device (CCD) camera system. A ratio of the two images yields temperature images independent of incident irradiance. An uncertainty in temperature of {+-}1.4 deg. C is established at the 95% confidence interval.

  19. Attogram detection limit for aqueous dye samples by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Dovichi, N.J.; Martin, J.C.; Keller, R.A.

    1983-02-18

    A modified flow cytometer has been used to detect attogram quantities of aqueous rhodamine 6G by laser-induced fluorescence analysis. A detection limit of 28 attograms (35,000 molecules) was obtained, nearly two orders of magnitude better than earlier measurements. The detection limit in concentration units was 1.4 x 10/sup -13/ mole per liter. During the 1-second measurement period, the total volume sampled was 0.42 microliter. On average, only half a rhodamine 6G molecule was present in the 6-picoliter probed volume.

  20. Approach to single-molecule detection by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Dovichi, N.J.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    A sheath flow cuvette was evaluated in laser-induced fluorescence determination of aqueous rhodamine 6G. A detection limit of 18 attograms was obtained within a one-second signal integration time. The concentration detection limit was 8.9 x 10/sup -14/ mole per liter. An average of one-half rhodamine 6G molecule was present within the 11 pL excitation volume. However, during the signal integration time a total of 22,000 analyte molecules passed through the excitation in a 0.42 microliter volume.

  1. Feasibility of characterizing laser-ablated carbon plasmas via planar laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, A. S.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Constantin, C. G.; Clark, S. E.; Niemann, C.

    2012-10-15

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging can potentially assess ion distributions and coupling in the context of super-Alfvenic ablation plasma expansions into magnetized background plasmas. In this feasibility study, we consider the application of PLIF to rapidly expanding carbon plasmas generated via energetic laser ablation of graphite. By utilizing hydrodynamic and collisional-radiative simulations, we identify schemes accessible to commercially available tunable lasers for the C I atom, the C II ion, and the C V ion. We then estimate the signal-to-noise ratios yielded by the schemes under reasonable experimental configurations.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence from N2(+) ions generated by a corona discharge in ambient air.

    PubMed

    Konthasinghe, Kumarasiri; Fitzmorris, Kristin; Peiris, Manoj; Hopkins, Adam J; Petrak, Benjamin; Killinger, Dennis K; Muller, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we present the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence from N2(+) ions via the B(2)Σu(+)-X(2)Σg(+) band system in the near-ultraviolet. The ions were generated continuously by a plasma glow discharge in low pressure N2 and by a corona discharge in ambient air. The fluorescence decay time was found to rapidly decrease with increasing pressure leading to an extrapolated decay rate of ≍10(10) s(-1) at atmospheric pressure. In spite of this quenching, we were able to observe laser induced fluorescence in ambient air by means of a time-gated spectral measurement. In the process of comparing the emission signal with that of N2 spontaneous Raman scattering, ion concentrations in ambient air of order 10(8-)10(10) cm(-3) were determined. With moderate increases in laser power and collection efficiency, ion concentrations of less than 10(6) cm(-3) may be measurable, potentially enabling applications in atmospheric standoff detection of ionizing radiation from hazardous radioactive sources. PMID:26414524

  3. Numerical analysis of quantitative measurement of hydroxyl radical concentration using laser-induced fluorescence in flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Chen; Tie, Su; Yao-Bang, Zheng; Li, Chen; Ting-Xu, Liu; Ren-Bing, Li; Fu-Rong, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to quantitatively measure the hydroxyl radical concentration by using LIF (laser-induced fluorescence) in flame. The detailed physical models of spectral absorption lineshape broadening, collisional transition and quenching at elevated pressure are built. The fine energy level structure of the OH molecule is illustrated to understand the process with laser-induced fluorescence emission and others in the case without radiation, which include collisional quenching, rotational energy transfer (RET), and vibrational energy transfer (VET). Based on these, some numerical results are achieved by simulations in order to evaluate the fluorescence yield at elevated pressure. These results are useful for understanding the real physical processes in OH-LIF technique and finding a way to calibrate the signal for quantitative measurement of OH concentration in a practical combustor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272338) and the Fund from the Science and Technology on Scramjet Key Laboratory, China (Grant No. STSKFKT2013004).

  4. Numerical analysis of quantitative measurement of hydroxyl radical concentration using laser-induced fluorescence in flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Chen; Tie, Su; Yao-Bang, Zheng; Li, Chen; Ting-Xu, Liu; Ren-Bing, Li; Fu-Rong, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to quantitatively measure the hydroxyl radical concentration by using LIF (laser-induced fluorescence) in flame. The detailed physical models of spectral absorption lineshape broadening, collisional transition and quenching at elevated pressure are built. The fine energy level structure of the OH molecule is illustrated to understand the process with laser-induced fluorescence emission and others in the case without radiation, which include collisional quenching, rotational energy transfer (RET), and vibrational energy transfer (VET). Based on these, some numerical results are achieved by simulations in order to evaluate the fluorescence yield at elevated pressure. These results are useful for understanding the real physical processes in OH-LIF technique and finding a way to calibrate the signal for quantitative measurement of OH concentration in a practical combustor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272338) and the Fund from the Science and Technology on Scramjet Key Laboratory, China (Grant No. STSKFKT2013004).

  5. Characterization of four potential laser-induced fluorescence tracers for diesel engine applications.

    PubMed

    Trost, Johannes; Zigan, Lars; Leipertz, Alfred; Sahoo, Dipankar; Miles, Paul C

    2013-11-20

    Four potential laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) tracers, 1-phenyloctane, 1-phenyldecane, 1-methylnaphthalene, and 2-methylnaphthalene, are characterized for diesel engine applications. These tracers, embedded in the diesel primary reference fuels n-C₁₆H₃₄ and iso-C₁₆H₃₄, match the relevant physical properties of commercial diesel fuel much better than the commonly used toluene/iso-octane/n-heptane tracer-fuel system does. The temperature and pressure dependencies of the fluorescence intensities and spectra were measured in a flow cell in nitrogen for each candidate tracer molecule. The results show that the signal intensities of the methylnaphthalenes are about two orders of magnitude higher than for 1-phenyloctane and 1-phenyldecane and show a strong temperature but no pressure, dependence. An analysis of the fluorescence spectrum of 1-methylnaphthalene shows that it also can be used for two-color detection LIF thermometry by choosing appropriate optical filters.

  6. Applications of capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection to groundwater migration studies.

    PubMed

    Brumley, W C; Ferguson, P L; Grange, A H; Donnelly, J L; Farley, J W

    1996-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has been applied to the determination of groundwater migration based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and traditional spectrofluorimetry. Detection limits of injected dye-fluorescent whitening agent (tinopal) in the low ppt ranges have been accomplished with both a spectrofluorometer and with CE/LIF based on the HeCd laser. The real-world problem was the determination of groundwater migration between adjacent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Superfund sites. Fluorescent dyes were injected into wells and were discovered in monitoring wells by extracting pads that adsorbed the dye. The methodology based on CE/LIF exhibits increased specificity over existing methodology due to the separation and unique migration time of the dye. Additional studies were aimed at achieving sub-ppt levels in the water directly using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and field-amplified injection techniques.

  7. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of chemo-drugs as biocompatible fluorophores: irinotecan, gemcitabine and navelbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motlagh, N. S. Hosseini; Parvin, P.; Ghasemi, F.; Atyabi, F.; Jelvani, S.; Abolhosseini, S.

    2016-07-01

    The fluorescence nature of chemo-drugs is useful for simultaneous cancer diagnosis and therapy. Here, the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) properties of irinotecan, gemcitabine and navelbine are extensively investigated. The UV photons provoke the desired transitions of the several chemo-drugs by virtue of the XeCl laser at 308 nm. It is shown that LIF spectra are strongly dependent on the fluorophore concentration, while no spectral shift is measured for irinotecan, gemcitabine and navelbine because of a large Stokes shift. On the other hand, doxorubicin is characterized by a large overlapping between absorption and emission spectra giving rise to a sensible red shift. The fluorescence extinction α and self-quenching k coefficients as well as the quantum yield η f of those chemo-drugs are determined accordingly. In fact, irinotecan shows the highest quantum efficiency among the chemo-drugs of interest.

  8. Transient isotachophoretic-electrophoretic separations of lanthanides with indirect laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Church, M N; Spear, J D; Russo, R E; Klunder, G L; Grant, P M; Andresen, B D

    1998-07-01

    Indirect laser-induced fluorescence was used for the detection of several lanthanide species separated by capillary electrophoresis. Quinine sulfate was the fluorescent component of the background electrolyte, and α-hydroxyisobutyric acid was added as a complexing agent to enable the separation of analyte ions that have similar mobilities. The UV lines (333-364 nm) of an argon ion laser were used as the excitation source with a diode array detector for monitoring the fluorescent emission at 442 nm. Electrokinetic injections and transient isotachophoresis were implemented to stack the analyte ions into more concentrated zones. On-line preconcentration factors were determined to be ∼700 and resulted in limits of detection for La(3+), Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), and Eu(3+) in the low-ppb range (6-11 nM).

  9. Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser-induced fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, B; Kim, M S; Chao, K; Lawrence, K; Park, B; Kim, K

    2009-04-01

    Feasibility of fluorescence imaging technique for the detection of diluted fecal matters from various parts of the digestive tract, including colon, ceca, small intestine, and duodenum, on poultry carcasses was investigated. One of the challenges for using fluorescence imaging for inspection of agricultural material is the low fluorescence yield in that fluorescence can be masked by ambient light. A laser-induced fluorescence imaging system (LIFIS) developed by our group allowed acquisition of fluorescence from feces-contaminated poultry carcasses in ambient light. Fluorescence emission images at 630 nm were captured with 415-nm laser excitation. Image processing algorithms including threshold and image erosion were used to identify fecal spots diluted up to 1: 10 by weight with double distilled water. Feces spots on the carcasses, without dilution and up to 1: 5 dilutions, could be detected with 100% accuracy regardless of feces type. Detection accuracy for fecal matters diluted up to 1: 10 was 96.6%. The results demonstrated good potential of the LIFIS for detection of diluted poultry fecal matter, which can harbor pathogens, on poultry carcasses.

  10. Violet diode laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence: a tool for assessing mosaic disease severity in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin; Eghan, Moses J; Asare-Bediako, Elvis; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K

    2012-01-01

    Violet diode laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence was used in agronomical assessment (disease severity and average yield per plant). Because cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is of economic importance, improved cultivars with various levels of affinity for cassava mosaic disease were investigated. Fluorescence data correlated with cassava mosaic disease severity levels and with the average yield per plant.

  11. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry in the diagnostics of alopecia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomorokha, Diana P.; Pigoreva, Yulia N.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of optical biopsy methods has a great interest for medical diagnostics. In clinical and experimental studies it is very important to analyze blood circulation quickly and accurately, thereby laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is widely used. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (UV LIFS) is express highly sensitive and widely-spread method with no destructive impact, high excitation selectivity and the possibility to use in highly scattering media. The goal of this work was to assess a correlation of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry parameters, and a possibility to identify or to differentiate various types of pathological changes in tissues according to their autofluorescence spectra. Three groups of patients with diffuse (symptomatic) alopecia, androgenic alopecia, and focal alopecia have been tested. Each groups consisted of not less than 20 persons. The measurements have been done in the parietal and occipital regions of the sculls. We used the original automated spectrofluorimeter to record autofluorescence spectra, and standard laser Doppler flowmeter BLF-21 (Transonic Systems, Inc., USA) to analyze the basal levels of blood circulation. Our results show that UV LIFS accurately distinguishes the zones with different types of alopecia. We found high correlation of the basal levels of blood circulation and the integrated intensity of autofluorescence in the affected tissue.

  12. Bioaerosol detection and classification using dual excitation wavelength laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Per; Wästerby, Pär.; Gradmark, Per-Åke; Hedborg, Julia; Larsson, Anders; Landström, Lars

    2015-05-01

    We present results obtained by a detection system designed to measure laser-induced fluorescence from individual aerosol particles using dual excitation wavelengths. The aerosol is sampled from ambient air and via a 1 mm diameter nozzle, surrounded by a sheath air flow, confined into a particle beam. A continuous wave blue laser at 404 nm is focused on the aerosol beam and two photomultiplier tubes monitor the presence of individual particles by simultaneous measuring the scattered light and any induced fluorescence. When a particle is present in the detection volume, a laser pulse is triggered from an ultraviolet laser at 263 nm and the corresponding fluorescence spectrum is acquired with a spectrometer based on a diffraction grating and a 32 channel photomultiplier tube array with single-photon sensitivity. The spectrometer measures the fluorescence spectra in the wavelength region from 250 to 800 nm. In the present report, data were measured on different monodisperse reference aerosols, simulants of biological warfare agents, and different interference aerosol particles, e.g. pollen. In the analysis of the experimental data, i.e., the time-resolved scattered and fluorescence signals from 404 nm c.w. light excitation and the fluorescence spectra obtained by a pulsed 263 nm laser source, we use multivariate data analysis methods to classify each individual aerosol particle.

  13. Detection of biological warfare agents using ultra violet-laser induced fluorescence LIDAR.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deepti; Kumar, Deepak; Maini, Anil K; Sharma, Ramesh C

    2013-08-01

    This review has been written to highlight the threat of biological warfare agents, their types and detection. Bacterial biological agent Bacillus anthracis (bacteria causing the disease anthrax) which is most likely to be employed in biological warfare is being discussed in detail. Standoff detection of biological warfare agents in aerosol form using Ultra violet-Laser Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy method has been studied. Range-resolved detection and identification of biological aerosols by both nano-second and non-linear femto-second LIDAR is also discussed. Calculated received fluorescence signal for a cloud of typical biological agent Bacillus globigii (Simulants of B. anthracis) at a location of ~5.0 km at different concentrations in presence of solar background radiation has been described. Overview of current research efforts in internationally available working UV-LIF LIDAR systems are also mentioned briefly. PMID:23719340

  14. Development of the megahertz planar laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic for plasma turbulence visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuritsyn, Aleksey; Levinton, Fred M.

    2004-10-01

    A megahertz laser-induced fluorescence-based diagnostic system for measuring ion density fluctuations in two spatial dimensions is described. Well resolved spatial and temporal two-dimensional (2D) images of turbulent structures will be useful in understanding ion turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas which is a key factor in the performance of fusion experimental devices. A sheet beam of a megahertz repetition rate tunable Alexandrite laser is used to excite ion emission from argon plasma. The fluorescence emitted from the plane of the laser beam is detected with a narrow band interference filter and intensified ultrafast charge coupled device camera providing 2D images of relative ion density fluctuations every microsecond. It is expected that the edge plasma on fusion devices will be accessible to this technique.

  15. Investigation of laser-induced iodine fluorescence for the measurement of density in compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is an attractive nonintrusive approach for measuring molecular number density in compressible flows although this technique does not produce a signal that is directly related to the number density. Saturation and frequency detuned excitation are explored as means for minimizing the quenching effect using iodine as the molecular system because of its convenient absorption spectrum. Saturation experiments indicate that with available continuous wave laser sources of Gaussian transverse intensity distribution only partial saturation could be achieved in iodine at the pressures of interest in gas dynamics. Using a fluorescence lineshape theory, it is shown that for sufficiently large detuning of a narrow bandwidth laser from a molecular transition, the quenching can be cancelled by collisional broadening over a large range of pressures and temperatures. Experimental data obtained in a Mach 4.3 underexpanded jet of nitrogen seeded with iodine for various single mode argon laser detunings from a strong iodine transition at 5145 A are discussed.

  16. Diagnostics of Susabi-nori (Porphyra Yezoensis) by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Yuki; Takahashi, Kunio; Kaneko, Shohei; Shimada, Yuji

    Susabi-nori (Porphyra yezoensis) was diagnosed by means of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method. Fluorescence peaks located at approximately 580, 660, 685 and 720 nm were observed in the LIF spectra of Susabi-nori. In the spectrum of the sample infected with the red rot disease, the intensity of 580 nm peak was relatively high as compared with that of the control sample. On the other hand, the intensities of 580 nm and 660 nm peaks drastically decreased by the influence of the chytrid disease. Furthermore, the intensity of the 580 nm peak increased by dipping into fresh water. These results indicate that LIF spectra of Susabi-nori are affected by the diseases and the stress of fresh water and that the diseases and the stress of Susabi-nori can be diagnosed by the LIF method.

  17. Detection of biological warfare agents using ultra violet-laser induced fluorescence LIDAR.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deepti; Kumar, Deepak; Maini, Anil K; Sharma, Ramesh C

    2013-08-01

    This review has been written to highlight the threat of biological warfare agents, their types and detection. Bacterial biological agent Bacillus anthracis (bacteria causing the disease anthrax) which is most likely to be employed in biological warfare is being discussed in detail. Standoff detection of biological warfare agents in aerosol form using Ultra violet-Laser Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy method has been studied. Range-resolved detection and identification of biological aerosols by both nano-second and non-linear femto-second LIDAR is also discussed. Calculated received fluorescence signal for a cloud of typical biological agent Bacillus globigii (Simulants of B. anthracis) at a location of ~5.0 km at different concentrations in presence of solar background radiation has been described. Overview of current research efforts in internationally available working UV-LIF LIDAR systems are also mentioned briefly.

  18. Detection of biological warfare agents using ultra violet-laser induced fluorescence LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Deepti; Kumar, Deepak; Maini, Anil K.; Sharma, Ramesh C.

    This review has been written to highlight the threat of biological warfare agents, their types and detection. Bacterial biological agent Bacillus anthracis (bacteria causing the disease anthrax) which is most likely to be employed in biological warfare is being discussed in detail. Standoff detection of biological warfare agents in aerosol form using Ultra violet-Laser Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy method has been studied. Range-resolved detection and identification of biological aerosols by both nano-second and non-linear femto-second LIDAR is also discussed. Calculated received fluorescence signal for a cloud of typical biological agent Bacillus globigii (Simulants of B. anthracis) at a location of ˜5.0 km at different concentrations in presence of solar background radiation has been described. Overview of current research efforts in internationally available working UV-LIF LIDAR systems are also mentioned briefly.

  19. Simulation of ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence LIDAR for detecting bioaerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Lan, Tian; Wang, Yuzhao; Qiu, Zongjia; Kong, Weiguo; Ni, Guoqiang

    2009-11-01

    The biological warfare agent (BWA) is a kind of terrible threat during the war or raid from the terrorist. Last decade, the interest in utilizing ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) LIDAR to detect the bioaerosol cloud has risen in order to measure the distribution of the bioaerosol particle. The UV-LIF LIDAR system can remotely detect and classify the bioaerosol agents and it is an active detecting system. As the infrared absorbing in the atmosphere is less, the range of infrared remote sensing is very far. The infrared laser at 1064 nm wavelength firstly begins to work in the UV-LIF LIDAR system and the aerosol cloud can be detected at very long range through the elastic backscattering signal from aerosol irradiated by infrared laser. But the category of aerosol can't be identified yet. If the infrared elastic backscattering level exceeds a threshold, UV laser at 355 nm wavelength will be triggered and induce the fluorescence. The excitated spectra of fluorescence can be used for discrimination of different aerosol species and particle concentration. This paper put forward for a UV-LIF LIDAR system model and the principle of the model is described summarily. Then the system parameters are presented and the simulation and analysis of the infrared elastic backscattering and laser-induced fluorescence are made, which is based on these parameters. Raman backscattering signal of Nitrogen gas in the atmosphere generally is taken to reduce measuring error, so the article also simulates this Raman backscatter signal at 387 nm wavelength. The studies above may provide some valuable instructions to the design of a real UV-LIF LIDAR system.

  20. [Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-shuang; Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Guo, Jin-jia; Liu, Yong-xin; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-02-01

    The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimination of different spilled oil, such as diesel, gasoline, and crude oil. However, traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method, which is not adapted to requirement of field detection, is limited to laboratory investigatio ns. The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill. In this paper, a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM) model was introduced to discriminate crude oil samples. In this method, time-resolved spectra data was descended into two dimensions with selecting appropriate range in time and wavelength domains respectively to form a SVM data base. It is found that the classification accurate rate increased with an appropriate selection. With a selected range from 54 to 74 ns in time domain, the classification accurate rate has been increased from 83.3% (without selection) to 88.1%. With a selected wavelength range of 387.00~608.87 nm, the classification accurate rate of suspect oil was improved from 84% (without selection) to 100%. Since the detection delay of fluorescence lidar fluctuates due to wave and platform swing, the identification method with optimizing in both time and wavelength domains could offer a better flexibility for field applications. It is hoped that the developed method could provide some useful reference with data reduction for classification of suspect crude oil in the future development. PMID:27209747

  1. A laser-induced fluorescence instrument for aircraft measurements of sulfur dioxide in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Andrew W.; Thornberry, Troy D.; Ciciora, Steven J.; McLaughlin, Richard J.; Watts, Laurel A.; Hanisco, Thomas F.; Baumann, Esther; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Bui, Thaopaul V.; Fahey, David W.; Gao, Ru-Shan

    2016-09-01

    This work describes the development and testing of a new instrument for in situ measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on airborne platforms in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT-LS). The instrument is based on the laser-induced fluorescence technique and uses the fifth harmonic of a tunable fiber-amplified semiconductor diode laser system at 1084.5 nm to excite SO2 at 216.9 nm. Sensitivity and background checks are achieved in flight by additions of SO2 calibration gas and zero air, respectively. Aircraft demonstration was performed during the NASA Volcano-Plume Investigation Readiness and Gas-Phase and Aerosol Sulfur (VIRGAS) experiment, which was a series of flights using the NASA WB-57F during October 2015 based at Ellington Field and Harlingen, Texas. During these flights, the instrument successfully measured SO2 in the UT-LS at background (non-volcanic) conditions with a precision of 2 ppt at 10 s and an overall uncertainty determined primarily by instrument drifts of ±(16 % + 0.9 ppt).

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence, dispersed fluorescence and lifetime measurements of jet-cooled chloro-substituted benzyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamatani, Satoshi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2002-07-01

    We measured the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of jet-cooled α-, o- and m-chlorobenzyl radicals after they were generated by the 193 nm photolysis of the corresponding parent molecules. The vibronically resolved spectra were obtained to analyze their D1-D0 transitions. The fluorescence lifetimes of α-, o-, m- and p-chlorobenzyls in the zeroth vibrational levels of the D1 states were measured to estimate the oscillator strengths of a series of benzyl derivatives. It was found that the α-substitution is inefficient to break the `accidental forbiddenness' of the D1-D0 transition of benzyl, while the ring-substitution enhances the oscillator strength by 50%.

  3. Detection of bacterial infection of agave plants by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Martinez, Jesus; Flores-Hernandez, Ricardo; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Santacruz-Ruvalcaba, Fernando

    2002-05-01

    Greenhouse-grown plants of Agave tequilana Weber var. azul were inoculated with Erwinia carotovora, the causal agent of stem soft rot. We investigated the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of agave plants to determine whether LIF can be used as a noninvasive sensing tool for pathological studies. The LIF technique was also investigated as a means of detecting the effect of the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor beta-hydroxyethylhydrazine as a bactericide against the pathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora. A He-Ne laser at 632.8 nm was used as the excitation source, and in vivo fluorescence emission spectra were recorded in the 660-790-range. Fluorescence maxima were at 690 and 740 nm. The infected plants that were untreated with the bactericide showed a definite increase in fluorescence intensity at both maxima within the first three days after infection. Beginning on the fifth day, a steady decrease in fluorescence intensity was observed, with a greater effect at 740 than at 690 nm. After 30 days there was no fluorescence. The infected plants that had been treated with the bactericide showed no significant change in fluorescence compared with that of the uninfected plants. The ratio of fluorescence intensities was determined to be F 690 nm/F 740 nm for all treatments. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of agave plants may be used for the early detection of certain types of disease and for determining the effect of a bactericide on bacteria. The results also showed that fluorescence intensity ratios can be used as a reliable indicator of the progress of disease.

  4. Objective Assessment of Endogenous Collagen In Vivo during Tissue Repair by Laser Induced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Satish B. S.; Fernandes, Edward Mark; Rao, Anuradha C. K.; Prasad, Keerthana; Mahato, Krishna K.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen, a triple helical protein with the primary role of mechanical function, provides tensile strength to the skin, and plays a pivotal task in tissue repair. During tissue regeneration, collagen level increases gradually and therefore, monitoring of such changes in vivo by laser induced fluorescence was the main objective behind the present study. In order to accomplish this, 15 mm diameter excisional wounds were created on six to eight week old Swiss albino mice. The collagen deposition accelerated upon irradiation of single exposure of 2 J/cm2 He-Ne laser dose immediately after wounding was recorded by laser induced autofluorescence in vivo along with un-illuminated and un-wounded controls. Autofluorescence spectra were recorded for each animal of the experimental groups on 0, 5, 10, 30, 45 and 60 days post-wounding, by exciting the granulation tissue/skin with 325 nm He-Cd laser. The variations in the average collagen intensities from the granulation tissue/skin of mice were inspected as a function of age and gender. Further, the spectral findings of the collagen synthesis in wound granulation tissue/un-wounded skin tissues were validated by Picro-Sirius red- polarized light microscopy in a blinded manner through image analysis of the respective collagen birefringence. The in vivo autofluorescence studies have shown a significant increase in collagen synthesis in laser treated animals as compared to the un-illuminated controls. Image analysis of the collagen birefringence further authenticated the ability of autofluorescence in the objective monitoring of collagen in vivo. Our results clearly demonstrate the potential of laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of collegen synthesis during tissue regeneration, which may have clinical implications. PMID:24874229

  5. Objective assessment of endogenous collagen in vivo during tissue repair by laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Satish B S; Fernandes, Edward Mark; Rao, Anuradha C K; Prasad, Keerthana; Mahato, Krishna K

    2014-01-01

    Collagen, a triple helical protein with the primary role of mechanical function, provides tensile strength to the skin, and plays a pivotal task in tissue repair. During tissue regeneration, collagen level increases gradually and therefore, monitoring of such changes in vivo by laser induced fluorescence was the main objective behind the present study. In order to accomplish this, 15 mm diameter excisional wounds were created on six to eight week old Swiss albino mice. The collagen deposition accelerated upon irradiation of single exposure of 2 J/cm2 He-Ne laser dose immediately after wounding was recorded by laser induced autofluorescence in vivo along with un-illuminated and un-wounded controls. Autofluorescence spectra were recorded for each animal of the experimental groups on 0, 5, 10, 30, 45 and 60 days post-wounding, by exciting the granulation tissue/skin with 325 nm He-Cd laser. The variations in the average collagen intensities from the granulation tissue/skin of mice were inspected as a function of age and gender. Further, the spectral findings of the collagen synthesis in wound granulation tissue/un-wounded skin tissues were validated by Picro-Sirius red- polarized light microscopy in a blinded manner through image analysis of the respective collagen birefringence. The in vivo autofluorescence studies have shown a significant increase in collagen synthesis in laser treated animals as compared to the un-illuminated controls. Image analysis of the collagen birefringence further authenticated the ability of autofluorescence in the objective monitoring of collagen in vivo. Our results clearly demonstrate the potential of laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of collegen synthesis during tissue regeneration, which may have clinical implications. PMID:24874229

  6. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration fields near air bubble surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sabita; Duke, Steve R.

    2000-09-01

    This article describes a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for measuring dissolved oxygen concentration gradients in water near the surface of an air bubble. Air bubbles are created at the tip of a needle in a rectangular bubble column filled with water that contains pyrenebutyric acid (PBA). The fluorescence of the PBA is induced by a planar pulse of nitrogen laser light. Oxygen transferring from the air bubble to the deoxygenated water quenches the fluorescence of the PBA. Images of the instantaneous and two-dimensional fluorescence field are obtained by a UV-intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Quenching of fluorescence intensity is determined at each pixel in the CCD image to measure dissolved oxygen concentration. Two-dimensional concentration fields are presented for a series of measurements of oxygen transfer from 1.6 mm bubbles suspended on the tip of a needle in a quiescent fluid. The images show the spatially varying concentration profiles, gradients, and boundary layer thicknesses at positions around the bubble surfaces. These direct and local measurements of concentration behavior within the mass transfer boundary layer show the potential of this LIF technique for the development of general and mechanistic models for oxygen transport across the air-water interface.

  7. Quantitative liquid and vapor distribution measurements in evaporating fuel sprays using laser-induced exciplex fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fansler, Todd D.; Drake, Michael C.; Gajdeczko, Boguslaw; Düwel, Isabell; Koban, Wieland; Zimmermann, Frank P.; Schulz, Christof

    2009-12-01

    Fully quantitative two-dimensional measurements of liquid- and vapor-phase fuel distributions (mass per unit volume) from high-pressure direct-injection gasoline injectors are reported for conditions of both slow and rapid vaporization in a heated, high-pressure spray chamber. The measurements employ the coevaporative gasoline-like fluorobenzene (FB)/diethylmethylamine (DEMA)/hexane exciplex tracer/fuel system. In contrast to most previous laser-induced exciplex-fluorescence (LIEF) experiments, the quantitative results here include regions in which liquid and vapor fuel coexist (e.g. near the injector exit). A unique aspect is evaluation of both vapor- and liquid-phase distributions at varying temperature and pressure using only in situ vapor-phase fluorescence calibration measurements at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. This approach draws on recent extensive measurements of the temperature-dependent spectroscopic properties of the FB-DEMA exciplex system, in particular on knowledge of the quantum efficiencies of the vapor-phase and liquid-phase (exciplex) fluorescence. In addition to procedures necessary for quantitative measurements, we discuss corrections for liquid-vapor crosstalk (liquid fluorescence that overlaps the vapor-fluorescence bandpass), the unknown local temperature due to vaporization-induced cooling, and laser-sheet attenuation by scattering and absorption.

  8. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopic Analysis of Aromatics from One Ring to Four Rings].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hai-feng; Yue, Zong-yu; Chen, Bei-ling; Yao, Ming-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to distinguish small aromatics preferably, a Nd : YAG Laser was used to supply an excitation laser, which was adjusted to 0.085 J x cm(-2) at 266 nm. Benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene and chrysene were used as the representative of different rings aromatics. The fluorescence emission spectra were researched for each aromatic hydrocarbon and mixtures by Laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Results showed that the rings number determined the fluorescence emission spectra, and the structure with same rings number did not affect the emission fluorescence spectrum ranges. This was due to the fact that the absorption efficiency difference at 266 nm resulted in that the fluorescence intensities of each aromatic hydrocarbon with same rings number were different and the fluorescence intensities difference were more apparently with aromatic ring number increasing. When the absorption efficiency was similar at 266 nm and the concentrations of each aromatic hydrocarbon were same, the fluorescence intensities were increased with aromatic ring number increasing. With aromatic ring number increasing, the fluorescence spectrum and emission peak wavelength were all red-shifted from ultraviolet to visible and the fluorescence spectrum range was also wider as the absorption efficiency was similar. The fluorescence emission spectra from one to four rings could be discriminated in the following wavelengths, 275 to 320 nm, 320 to 375 nm, 375 to 425 nm, 425 to 556 nm, respectively. It can be used for distinguish the type of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as it exists in single type. As PAHs are usually exist in a variety of different rings number at the same time, the results for each aromatic hydrocarbon may not apply to the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures. For the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures, results showed that the one- or two-ring PAHs in mixtures could not be detected by fluorescence as three- or four-ring PAHs existed in mixture

  9. Characterization of the respiration of 3T3 cells by laser-induced fluorescence during a cyclic heating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthan, J.; Dressler, C.; Zabarylo, U.; Minet, O.

    2010-04-01

    The use of lasers in the near infrared spectral range for laser-induced tumor therapy (LITT) demands a new understanding of the thermal responses to repetitive heat stress. The analysis of laser-induced fluorescence during vital monitoring offers an excellent opportunity to solve many of the related issues in this field. The laser-induced fluorescence of the cellular coenzyme NADH was investigated for its time and intensity behavior under heat stress conditions. Heat was applied to vital 3T3 cells (from 22°C to 50°C) according to a typical therapeutical time regime. A sharp increase in temperature resulted in non-linear time behavior when the concentration of this vital coenzyme changed. There are indications that biological systems have a delayed reaction on a cellular level. These results are therefore important for further dosimetric investigations.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence and pure rotational spectroscopy of the CH2CHS (vinylthio) radical.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masakazu; Miyoshi, Akira; Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki

    2007-01-28

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation spectra of the B-X (2)A(") electronic transition of the CH(2)CHS radical, which is the sulfur analog of the vinoxy (CH(2)CHO) radical, were observed under room temperature and jet-cooled conditions. The LIF excitation spectra show very poor vibronic structures, since the fluorescence quantum yields of the upper vibronic levels are too small to detect fluorescence, except for the vibrationless level in the B state. A dispersed fluorescence spectrum of jet-cooled CH(2)CHS from the vibrationless level of the B state was also observed, and vibrational frequencies in the X state were determined. Precise rotational and spin-rotation constants in the ground vibronic level of the radical were determined from pure rotational spectroscopy using a Fourier-transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometer and a FTMW-millimeter wave double-resonance technique [Y. Sumiyoshi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 054324 (2005)]. The rotationally resolved LIF excitation spectrum for the vibronic origin band of the jet-cooled CH(2)CHS radical was analyzed using the ground state molecular constants determined from pure rotational spectroscopy. Determined molecular constants for the upper and lower electronic states agree well with results of ab initio calculations.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence reader with a turbidimetric system for sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Lim, H B

    2015-07-01

    A unique laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) reader equipped with a turbidimetric system was developed for a sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles. The system was specifically designed to reduce experimental error caused by particle loss, aggregation and sinking, and to improve analytical performance through ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence with respect to the turbidimetric absorbance. For application to determine the concentration of salinomycin, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and FITC-doped silica nanoparticles (colored balls) immobilized with antibody were synthesized for magnetic extraction and for tagging as a fluorescence probe, respectively. The detection limit of about 39 pg mL(-1) was obtained, which was an improvement of about 2-fold compared to that obtained without employment of the turbidimetric system. Calibration linearity and sensitivity were also improved, with increase from 0.8601 to 0.9905 in the R(2)-coefficient and by 1.92-fold for the curve slope, respectively. The developed LIF reader has the potential to be used for fluorescence measurements using various nanomaterials, such as quantum dots. PMID:26088773

  12. Laser induced fluorescence as a diagnostic tool integrated into a scanning fiber endoscope for mouse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher M.; Maggio-Price, Lillian; Seibel, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) technology has shown promise as a minimally invasive optical imaging tool. To date, it is capable of capturing full-color 500-line images, at 15 Hz frame rate in vivo, as a 1.6 mm diameter endoscope. The SFE uses a singlemode optical fiber actuated at mechanical resonance to scan a light spot over tissue while backscattered or fluorescent light at each pixel is detected in time series using several multimode optical fibers. We are extending the capability of the SFE from a RGB reflectance imaging device to a diagnostic tool by imaging laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in tissue, allowing for correlation of endogenous fluorescence to tissue state. Design of the SFE for diagnostic imaging is guided by a comparison of single point spectra acquired from an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) model to tissue histology evaluated by a pathologist. LIF spectra were acquired by illuminating tissue with a 405 nm light source and detecting intrinsic fluorescence with a multimode optical fiber. The IBD model used in this study was mdr1a-/- mice, where IBD was modulated by infection with Helicobacter bilis. IBD lesions in the mouse model ranged from mild to marked hyperplasia and dysplasia, from the distal colon to the cecum. A principle components analysis (PCA) was conducted on single point spectra of control and IBD tissue. PCA allowed for differentiation between healthy and dysplastic tissue, indicating that emission wavelengths from 620 - 650 nm were best able to differentiate diseased tissue and inflammation from normal healthy tissue.

  13. In vivo Diagnosis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Using 337-nm- Excited Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, N.; Mitchell, M. F.; Mahadevan, A.; Warren, S.; Thomsen, S.; Silva, E.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1994-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence at 337-nm excitation was used in vivo to differentiate neoplastic [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)], nonneoplastic abnormal (inflammation and human papilloma viral infection), and normal cervical tissues. A colposcope (low-magnification microscope used to view the cervix with reflected light) was used to identify 66 normal and 49 abnormal (5 inflammation, 21 human papilloma virus infection, and 23 CIN) sites on the cervix in 28 patients. These sites were then interrogated spectroscopically. A two-stage algorithm was developed to diagnose CIN. The first stage differentiated histologically abnormal tissues from colposcopically normal tissues with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 92%, 90%, and 88%, respectively. The second stage differentiated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues from nonneoplastic abnormal tissues with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 87%, 73%, and 74%, respectively. Spectroscopic differences were consistent with a decrease in the absolute contribution of collagen fluorescence, an increase in the absolute contribution of oxyhemoglobin attenuation, and an increase in the relative contribution of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] fluorescence as tissue progresses from normal to abnormal in the same patient. These results suggest that in vivo fluorescence spectroscopy of the cervix can be used to diagnose CIN at colposcopy.

  14. Near-field measurements of vegetation by laser-induced fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowinska, Malgorzata; Cunin, Bernard; Deruyver, Aline; Heisel, Francine; Miehe, Joseph-Albert; Langsdorf, Gabriele; Lichtenthaler, Hartmut K.

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, a validation of a new UV-A laser-induced fluorescence imaging system implemented in an all-road car for near-field remote sensing of vegetation will be presented. It has been developed as a part of a European Community Program INTERREG II and is consisting of three main parts: excitation, detection and control units. The excitation source is a frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser and the laser spot size is adjusted via a variable beam expander. Fluorescence images are recorded at four characteristic fluorescence bands: 440, 520, 690 and 740 nm with a gated intensified digital CCD camera. The laser head and camera are situated on a directed in site and azimuth platform which can be high up to 6 meters. The platform positioning, localization and distance detection, spot size determination and adjustment, focus, sharpness, selection of the filter, laser and camera synchronization, gain of the intensifier, real time visualization of images, acquisition time are controlled by a newly developed software which allows also image storage, analysis and treatment. Examples of remote sensing fluorescence images from several plant species recorded at a distance of 10 - 30 m will be given and discussed further in this paper.

  15. Laser induced fluorescence measurements and modeling of nitric oxide in high-pressure premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisel, John R.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been applied to the quantitative measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in premixed, laminar, high-pressure flames. Their chemistry was also studied using three current kinetics schemes to determine the predictive capabilities of each mechanism with respect to NO concentrations. The flames studied were low-temperature (1600 less than T less than 1850K) C2H6/O2/N2 and C2H6/O2/N2 flames, and high temperature (2100 less than T less than 2300K) C2H6/O2/N2 flames. Laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) was initially used to measure the NO concentrations. However, while the excitation transition was well saturated at atmospheric pressure, the fluorescence behavior was basically linear with respect to laser power at pressures above 6 atm. Measurements and calculations demonstrated that the fluorescence quenching rate variation is negligible for LIF measurements of NO at a given pressure. Therefore, linear LIF was used to perform quantitative measurements of NO concentration in these high-pressure flames. The transportability of a calibration factor from one set of flame conditions to another also was investigated by considering changes in the absorption and quenching environment for different flame conditions. The feasibility of performing LIF measurements of (NO) in turbulent flames was studied; the single-shot detection limit was determined to be 2 ppm.

  16. Characterization of ammonia two-photon laser-induced fluorescence for gas-phase diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackmann, Christian; Hole, Odd; Zhou, Bo; Li, Zhongshan S.; Aldén, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of ammonia (NH3) with excitation of the C'- X transition at 304.8 nm and fluorescence detection in the 565 nm C'- A band has been investigated, targeting combustion diagnostics. The impact of laser irradiance, temperature, and pressure has been studied, and simulation of NH3-spectra, fitted to experimental data, facilitated interpretation of the results. The LIF-signal showed quadratic dependence on laser irradiance up to 2 GW/cm2. Stimulated emission, resulting in loss of excited molecules, is induced above 10 GW/cm2, i.e., above irradiances attainable for LIF imaging. Maximum LIF-signal was obtained for excitation at the 304.8 nm bandhead; however, lower temperature sensitivity over the range 400-700 K can be obtained probing lines around 304.9 nm. A decrease in fluorescence signal was observed with pressure up to 5 bar absolute and attributed to collisional quenching. A detection limit of 800 ppm, at signal-to-noise ratio 1.5, was identified for single-shot LIF imaging over an area of centimeter scale, whereas for single-point measurements, the technique shows potential for sub-ppm detection. Moreover, high-quality NH3-imaging has been achieved in laminar and turbulent premixed flames. Altogether, two-photon fluorescence provides a useful tool for imaging NH3-detection in combustion diagnostics.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence reader with a turbidimetric system for sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Lim, H B

    2015-07-01

    A unique laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) reader equipped with a turbidimetric system was developed for a sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles. The system was specifically designed to reduce experimental error caused by particle loss, aggregation and sinking, and to improve analytical performance through ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence with respect to the turbidimetric absorbance. For application to determine the concentration of salinomycin, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and FITC-doped silica nanoparticles (colored balls) immobilized with antibody were synthesized for magnetic extraction and for tagging as a fluorescence probe, respectively. The detection limit of about 39 pg mL(-1) was obtained, which was an improvement of about 2-fold compared to that obtained without employment of the turbidimetric system. Calibration linearity and sensitivity were also improved, with increase from 0.8601 to 0.9905 in the R(2)-coefficient and by 1.92-fold for the curve slope, respectively. The developed LIF reader has the potential to be used for fluorescence measurements using various nanomaterials, such as quantum dots.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of benign and malignant cutaneous lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina G.; Troyanova, P. P.; Stoyanova, V. P.; Avramov, Lachezar A.

    2005-04-01

    The goals of this work were investigation of pigmented skin lesions by the method of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectra were obtained from malignant and benign skin lesions after excitation with nitrogen laser at 337 nm, namely: benign nevi, dysplastic nevi, malignant melanoma (MM), keratopapilloma, base-cell papilloma and base-cell carcinoma, as well as from healthy skin areas near to the lesion that were used posteriori to reveal changes between healthy and lesion skin spectra. Initially lesions were classified by ABCD-dermatscopic method. All suspicious lesions were excised and were investigated histologically. Spectrum of healthy skin consists of one main maximum at 470-500 nm spectral region and secondary maxima at in the regions round 400 and 440 nm. In the cases of nevi and melanoma significant decrease of fluorescence intensity, which correlated with the type of pigment lesion was observed. This reduction of the signal is related to the accumulation of melanin in the lesions that re-absorb strongly the fluorescence from native skin fluorophores in whole visible spectral region. In cases of papilloma and base-cell carcinoma an intensity decrease was also observed, related to accumulation of pigments in these cutaneous lesions. An relative increase of the fluorescence peak at 440 nm were registered in the case of base-cell carcinoma, and appearance of green fluorescence, related to increase of keratin content in benign papilloma lesions were detected. The results, obtained in this investigation of the different pigment lesions could be used for better comprehension of the skin optical properties. The fluorescence spectroscopy of the human skin are very prominent for early diagnosis and differentiation of cutaneous diseases and gives a wide range of possibilities related to real-time determination of existing pathological condition.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of hot molecular oxygen in flames using an alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Johannes; Zhou, Bo; Zetterberg, Johan; Li, Zhongshan; Alden, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The use of an alexandrite laser for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and imaging of molecular oxygen in thermally excited vibrational states is demonstrated. The laser radiation after the third harmonic generation was used to excite the B-X (0-7) band at 257 nm in the Schumann-Runge system of oxygen. LIF emission was detected between 270 and 380 nm, revealing distinct bands of the transitions from B(0) to highly excited vibrational states in the electronic ground state, X (v > 7). At higher spectral resolution, these bands reveal the common P- and R-branch line splitting. Eventually, the proposed LIF approach was used for single-shot imaging of the two-dimensional distribution of hot oxygen molecules in flames.

  20. Spatially and temporally resolved gas distributions around heterogeneous catalysts using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Johan; Blomberg, Sara; Gustafson, Johan; Evertsson, Jonas; Zhou, Jianfeng; Adams, Emma C.; Carlsson, Per-Anders; Aldén, Marcus; Lundgren, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing and measuring the gas distribution in close proximity to a working catalyst is crucial for understanding how the catalytic activity depends on the structure of the catalyst. However, existing methods are not able to fully determine the gas distribution during a catalytic process. Here we report on how the distribution of a gas during a catalytic reaction can be imaged in situ with high spatial (400 μm) and temporal (15 μs) resolution using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring, in real-time, the distribution of carbon dioxide during catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide above powder catalysts. Furthermore, we demonstrate the versatility and potential of the technique in catalysis research by providing a proof-of-principle demonstration of how the activity of several catalysts can be measured simultaneously, either in the same reactor chamber, or in parallel, in different reactor tubes. PMID:25953006

  1. Fiber-optic laser-induced fluorescence probe for the detection of environmental pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bublitz, J.; Dickenhausen, M.; Grätz, M.; Todt, S.; Schade, W.

    1995-06-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy in combination with fiber optics is shown to be a powerful tool for qualitative and quantitative diagnostics of environmental pollutants in water and soil. Time-integrated data accumulation of the LIF signals in early and late time windows with respect to the excitation pulse simplifies the method so that it becomes attractive for practical applications. Results from field measurements are reported, as oil contaminations under a gas station and in an industrial sewer system are investigated. A KrF-excimer laser and a hydrogen Raman shifter can be applied for multiwavelength excitation. This allows a discrimination between benzene, toluene, xylene, and ethylbenzene aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in the samples under investigation. For a rough theoretical approach, a computer simulation is developed to describe the experimental results.

  2. Automated detection of fecal contamination of apples by multispectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefcourt, Alan M.; Kim, Moon S.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2003-07-01

    Animal feces are a suspected source of contamination of apples by disease-causing organisms such as Escherichia coli O157. Laser-induced fluorescence was used to detect different amounts of feces from dairy cows, deer, and a dairy pasture applied to Red Delicious apples. One day after application, detection for 1:2 and 1:20 dilutions was nearly 100%, and for 1:200 dilutions (<15 ng of dry matter) detection was >80%. Detection after apples had been washed and brushed was lowest for pasture feces; detection for 1:2, 1:20, and 1:200 dilutions of feces was 100%, 30%, and 0%, respectively. This technology may encourage development of commercial systems for detecting fecal contamination of apples.

  3. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  4. Characterization and Discrimination of Plastic Materials Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Spizzichino, Valeria; Caneve, Luisa; Colao, Francesco; Ruggiero, Ludovica

    2016-06-01

    The most meaningful spectral components in laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra for several different commercial plastics have been individuated and used to automatically discriminate among different plastic materials and between plastics and complex organic materials, such as woods. Starting from LIF measurements on known samples, a number of significant wavelengths have been identified by principal component analysis (PCA). These have been used to produce intensity ratios functional to the discrimination. Threshold values for such ratios have been individuated in order to obtain an automatic recognition of plastics. The work done has been preparatory to the design and development of a multispectral imaging LIF system for fast detection of plastic debris in a post-blast scene.

  5. Tunable ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection of trace plastics and dissolved organic compounds in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K.

    2003-11-01

    We developed a tunable (220-285-nm) UV and fixed 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system using a spectrometer and a cooled CCD imaging detector to measure the excitation-emission matrix spectra of various compounds in water, including quinine sulfate and plastic compound bisphenol-A. The LIF instrument was used for the fast, nonspecific determination of trace amounts of dissolved organic compounds present in natural water supplies and various brand name bottled distilled water and bottled drinking water. Plastic-related compounds that leached out of plastic utensils and containers were also detected with this instrument. The sensitivity of the system was approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude better than that for a commercial system.

  6. Laser induced fluorescence spectra of fluorophenol cations in a Ne matrix

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondybey, V.E.; English, J.H.; Miller, T.A.; Shiley, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence and/or absorption spectra of the cations of 2,3,5,6‐tetrafluorophenol, 2,3,5,6‐tetrafluorothiophenol, and 3,5‐difluorophenol have been obtained in a Ne matrix. The spectra of C6HF4OH+ are much better resolved than in the gas phase. The gas phase congestion is likely caused by the near degeneracy of the and electronic states whose separation is now measured at 207 cm−1. The spectrum of C6H3F2OH+ represents a deperturbed example of the Jahn–Teller distorted sym‐C6F3H3+ ion. C6H3F2SH+ shows only a broad featureless absorption.

  7. Indirect determination of the electric field in plasma discharges using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vaudolon, J. Mazouffre, S.

    2014-09-15

    The evaluation of electric fields is of prime interest for the description of plasma characteristics. In this work, different methods for determining the electric field profile in low-pressure discharges using one- and two-dimensional Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements are presented and discussed. The energy conservation, fluid, and kinetic approaches appear to be well-suited for the electric field evaluation in this region of the plasma flow. However, the numerical complexity of a two-dimensional kinetic model is penalizing due to the limited signal-to-noise ratio that can be achieved, making the computation of the electric field subject to large error bars. The ionization contribution which appears in the fluid model makes it unattractive on an experimental viewpoint. The energy conservation and 1D1V kinetic approaches should therefore be preferred for the determination of the electric field when LIF data are used.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on plasma science experiments at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    Koepke, Mark

    2011-12-20

    Collaborative research between WVU and PPPL was carried out at WVU for the purpose of incorporating the sophisticated diagnostic technique known as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in the Paul-Trap Simulation Experiment (PTSX) at PPPL. WVU assembled a LIF system at WVU, transported it to PPPL, helped make LIF experiments on the PTSX device, participated in PTSX science, and trained PPPL staff in LIF techniques. In summary, WVU refurbished a non-operational LIF system being loaned from University of Maryland to PPPL and, by doing so, provided PPPL with additional diagnostic capability for its PTSX device and other General Plasma Science experiments. WVU students, staff, and faculty will visit PPPL to collaborate on PTSX experiments in the future.

  9. Arcjet nozzle flow-field characterization by laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Storm, P V; Cappelli, M A

    1998-01-20

    Laser-induced fluorescence of the Balmer-alpha (H(alpha)) transition of atomic hydrogen was performed within the nozzle of a 1-kW class radiatively cooled arcjet thruster operating on hydrogen and synthesized-hydrazine propellants. Axial velocities were determined from the Doppler shift of the H(alpha) line center relative to a stationary reference, whereas translational temperatures and electron number densities were determined from a line-shape analysis of the H(alpha) transition. The results are compared with a numerical model and indicate excellent agreement with the velocities, as well as temperatures near the nozzle exit. There are discrepancies, however, in the temperatures far upstream of the exit and in the electron densities, suggesting needed improvements in the modeling of the recombination chemistry.

  10. Velocity and electronic state distributions of sputtered Fe atoms by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    Velocity distributions and relative populations in the fine-structure levels of the a/sup 5/D/sub J/ ground state of Fe atoms, produced by sputtering with 3 keV argon ions, have been investigated by Doppler shifted laser induced fluorescence. The laser system employs a single-mode, scanning ring dye laser, amplified by a sequence of three excimer-pumped flowing-dye cells. Frequency doubling in a KD*P crystal was used to produce high energy (> .5 mJ) pulses of narrowband tunable UV output near 300 nm. Laser power influence on effective velocity bandwidth was investigated. Favorable light-collection geometry minimized distortion of the velocity spectra from apparatus-averaging effects. In impurity flux diagnostic applications in fusion devices, substantial spatial averaging may occur. In the latter case, the narrow velocity bandwidth (70 m/s, transform limit) of the present laser system is particularly useful.

  11. Experimental investigation of a supersonic swept ramp injector using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1990-01-01

    Planar measurements of injectant mole fraction and temperature have been conducted in a nonreacting supersonic combustor configured with underexpanded injection in the base of a swept ramp. The temperature measurements were conducted with a Mach 2 test section inlet in streamwise planes perpendicular to the test section wall on which the ramp was mounted. Injection concentration measurements, conducted in cross flow planes with both Mach 2 and Mach 2.9 free stream conditions, dramatically illustrate the domination of the mixing process by streamwise vorticity generated by the ramp. These measurements, conducted using a nonintrusive optical technique (laser-induced iodine fluorescence), provide an accurate and extensive experimental data base for the validation of computation fluid dynamic codes for the calculation of highly three-dimensional supersonic combustor flow fields.

  12. Arc Jet Flow Properties Determined from Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Atomic Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas; Wercinski, Paul F. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An laser-spectroscopic investigation of the thermocheMical state of arcjet flows is currently being conducted in the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) Circlet at NASA Ames Research Center. Downstream of the nozzle exit, but upstream of the test article, Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of atomic nitrogen is used to assess the nonequilibriuM distribution of flow enthalpy in the free stream. The two-photon LIF technique provides simultaneous measurements of free stream velocity, translational temperature, and nitrogen number density on the flow centerline. Along with information from facility instrumentation, these measurements allow a determination of the free stream total enthalpy, and its apportionment in to thermal, kinetic, and chemical mode contributions. Experimental results are presented and discussed for two different niti-ogen/argon test gas flow runs during which the current is varied while the pressure remains constant .

  13. Average OH density in alternating current dielectric barrier discharge by laser-induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongliang; Feng, Chunlei; Gao, Liang; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-10-01

    The average OH density in atmospheric He-H2O(0.4%) needle-plate dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was measured by the asynchronous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and the fluctuation of OH radical density was measured simultaneously to prove that the average OH density can be obtained by the asynchronous LIF technique. The evolution of the average OH density in four different discharge patterns, namely, negative barrier corona discharge, glow discharge, multi glow discharge, and streamer discharge, was studied, and it was found that the average OH density has an observable increase from corona discharge to streamer discharge. The main mechanism of OH production in the four different discharge patterns was analyzed. It was shown that the main mechanism of OH production in negative barrier corona discharge is electron direct collision dissociation, whereas in the other three discharge patterns the He metastable Penning ionization is the main process.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence temperature measurements in a dc arcjet used for diamond deposition.

    PubMed

    Raiche, G A; Jeffries, J B

    1993-08-20

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) observations of CH and C(2) radicals in a dc-arcjet plasma are reported. A hydrogen and methane gas mixture flows through a dc-arc and expands through an orifice in the anode to form a luminous jet; diamond film grows under this jet on a water-cooled substrate. At the substrate position for best diamond growth, laser excitation spectra determine a rotational population distribution of CH(X) and C(2)(a), which yields Boltzmann gas temperatures of 2100 ±200 K. The C(2) Swan-band emission from the same observation volume yields an excited C(2)(d) rotational and vibrational population distribution well described by a 5000 K temperature. The difference between the LIF and emission temperatures indicates that chemiluminescent reactions are the dominant excitation mechanism for the optical emission from the gas jet.

  15. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Photogrammetry for Dynamic Characterization of Transparent and Aluminized Membrane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorrington, Adrian A.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2003-01-01

    Photogrammetry has proven to be a valuable tool for static and dynamic profiling of membrane based inflatable and ultra-lightweight space structures. However, the traditional photogrammetric targeting techniques used for solid structures, such as attached retro-reflective targets and white-light dot projection, have some disadvantages and are not ideally suited for measuring highly transparent or reflective membrane structures. In this paper, we describe a new laser-induced fluorescence based target generation technique that is more suitable for these types of structures. We also present several examples of non-contact non-invasive photogrammetric measurements of laser-dye doped polymers, including the dynamic measurement and modal analysis of a 1m-by-1m aluminized solar sail style membrane.

  16. Fiber-coupled ultraviolet planar laser-induced fluorescence for combustion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Loccisano, Frank; Joshi, Sachin; Franka, Isaiah S; Yin, Zhiyao; Lempert, Walter R; Yalin, Azer P

    2012-09-20

    Multimode silica step-index optical fibers are examined for use in planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) for combustion diagnostics using ultraviolet (UV) laser sources. The multimode step-index fibers are characterized at UV wavelengths by examining their energy damage thresholds and solarization performance. The beam quality achievable with large clad step-index multimode fibers is also studied. Emphasis is placed on simultaneously achieving high output energy and beam quality (low output M(2)). The use of multimode fibers to deliver UV pulses at 283 nm for PLIF measurements of OH radicals in a Hencken burner is demonstrated. The fiber delivery capability of UV light will benefit combustion diagnostics in hostile environments, such as augmentor and combustor rigs.

  17. High resolution laser induced fluorescence Doppler velocimetry utilizing saturated absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Ogiwara, Kohei; Etoh, Shuzo; Yoshimura, Shinji; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2009-05-15

    A high resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to measure the flow velocity field of neutral particles in an electron-cyclotron-resonance argon plasma. The flow velocity has been determined by the Doppler shift of the LIF spectrum, which is proportional to the velocity distribution function. Very high accuracy in velocity determination has been achieved by installing a saturated absorption spectroscopy unit into the LIF system, where the absolute value and scale of laser wavelength are determined by using the Lamb dip and the fringes of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The minimum detectable flow velocity of a newly developed LIF system is {+-}2 m/s, and this performance remains unchanged in a long-time experiment. From the radial measurements of LIF spectra of argon metastable atoms, it is found that there exists an inward flow of neutral particles associated with neutral depletion.

  18. Validation of Laser-Induced Fluorescent Photogrammetric Targets on Membrane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas W.; Dorrington, Adrian A.; Shortis, Mark R.; Hendricks, Aron R.

    2004-01-01

    The need for static and dynamic characterization of a new generation of inflatable space structures requires the advancement of classical metrology techniques. A new photogrammetric-based method for non-contact ranging and surface profiling has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to support modal analyses and structural validation of this class of space structures. This full field measurement method, known as Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) photogrammetry, has previously yielded promising experimental results. However, data indicating the achievable measurement precision had not been published. This paper provides experimental results that indicate the LIF-photogrammetry measurement precision for three different target types used on a reflective membrane structure. The target types were: (1) non-contact targets generated using LIF, (2) surface attached retro-reflective targets, and (3) surface attached diffuse targets. Results from both static and dynamic investigations are included.

  19. [Design and evaluation of a confocal laser-induced fluorescence detector].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-cheng; Guan, Ya-feng; Huang, Wei-dong; Che, Xun

    2002-07-01

    A portable laser-induced fluorescence detector, based on confocal configuration detection system has been developed. This is assembled from commercially available components. All the components of the detector are domestic, which makes it low cost. The routine alignment procedure is simplified by using a skillful and visual alignment system and requires minimal experience for operation. The module design makes it possible for high performance liquid chromatographic, capillary electrophoretic and microfluid chip applications. The performance of the detector, including the sensitivity, noise, linear range and detection limit, was evaluated by capillary electrophoresis and flow injection analytical technique using a red-absorbing cyanine derivative (Cy5) and Cy5 labeled tryptophan as test samples. The results show that the background signal is very low and the peak-to-peak noise level is 0.002 mV. The detection limit and the linear dynamic range are 3.7 nmol/L and 10(3), respectively.

  20. High repetition rate laser induced fluorescence applied to Surfatron Induced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Palomares, J. M.; Carbone, E. A. D.; Graef, W.; Hübner, S.

    2012-05-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar and the conversion space of Ar-molecule mixtures are explored using a combination of high rep-rate YAG-Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable Surfatron Induced Plasma set-up. Applying the method of Saturation Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence (SaTiRe-LIF), we could trace excitation and conversion channels and determine rates of electron and heavy particle excitation kinetics. The time resolved density disturbances observed in the Ar excitation space, which are initiated by the laser, reveal the excitation channels and corresponding rates; responses of the molecular radiation in Ar-molecule mixtures corresponds to the presence of conversion processes induced by heavy particle excitation kinetics.

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of hot molecular oxygen in flames using an alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Johannes; Zhou, Bo; Zetterberg, Johan; Li, Zhongshan; Alden, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The use of an alexandrite laser for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and imaging of molecular oxygen in thermally excited vibrational states is demonstrated. The laser radiation after the third harmonic generation was used to excite the B-X (0-7) band at 257 nm in the Schumann-Runge system of oxygen. LIF emission was detected between 270 and 380 nm, revealing distinct bands of the transitions from B(0) to highly excited vibrational states in the electronic ground state, X (v > 7). At higher spectral resolution, these bands reveal the common P- and R-branch line splitting. Eventually, the proposed LIF approach was used for single-shot imaging of the two-dimensional distribution of hot oxygen molecules in flames. PMID:25279538

  2. Acetone laser-induced fluorescence for temperature and multiparameter imaging in gaseous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Mark Clinton

    1999-10-01

    Acetone (CH3COCH3) is an excellent tracer for planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging in gaseous flows due to its low toxicity, high vapor pressure, and accessible absorption (225-320 nm) and fluorescence (350-550 nm) features. A fluorescence yield limited by rapid intersystem crossing reduces the importance of collisional effects. Since the initial work of Lozano (1992), acetone PLIF has been applied with quantitative success in studies of gas-phase mixing under isothermal, isobaric conditions. More recently, improved understanding of acetone fluorescence dependences has opened up possibilities for new diagnostics across a range of conditions. Through modeling and experimental measurement of fluorescence dependences, the current work aims to make existing diagnostics more quantitative and to allow development of new diagnostics for other parameters, in particular temperature. To this end, temperature dependences of fluorescence are measured at excitation wavelengths across the acetone absorption spectrum. Fluorescence per unit acetone mole fraction decreases significantly with increasing temperature for short wavelengths (248 and 266 nm) and weakly (308 nm) or not at all (320 nm) for longer wavelengths. These effects are related to changes in absorption cross-section and fluorescence yield with temperature. A quantitative multistep decay model of fluorescence yield explains the observed temperature and wavelength functionalities and also predicts effects of pressure and composition. Measurements of pressure and composition dependences of acetone fluorescence between 0.5 and 16 atm, with excitation at 248, 266, and 308 nm, are found to agree with model predictions. A mild fluorescence quenching effect of oxygen is observed, which the model, with slight modification, can explain as well. Temperature and multiparameter imaging diagnostics are made possible by the improved understanding of acetone photophysical behavior. Excitation at 248 or 266 nm is

  3. Losses in the fluorescent tracer used in hydrodynamic modeling of constructed wetlands studied by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plazas, Lucero; Rosero, Edison; Solarte, Efraín; Sandoval, Jhon; Peña, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Fluorescent tracer trials are performed to obtain useful information for hydrodynamic modeling. Particularly they have been used in constructed wetlands, aimed for residual water treatment, in order to find residence time distribution for particles entering the system and, in general, to know the flux pattern. Nevertheless, it has been reported that some tracers, as Rhodamine WT, exhibit adsorption phenomena over the substrate. This situation has to be considered in the analysis of residence time distribution curves, taking into account advection-dispersion processes which are given by the diffusion modified equation. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) with a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm; 35mW), was used to determine Rhodamine WT accumulated concentration. Through adsorption coefficients obtained experimentally, an advection - dispersion model for solute transport in a subsurface flow constructed wetland was evaluated. Including this phenomenon allows to optimize the model, and another important condition is added in the behavior prediction of these complex ecosystems.

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the dynamics of a pulsed planar sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeckner, M. J.; Malik, Shamim M.; Conrad, J. R.; Breun, R. A.

    1994-04-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) the ion density near the edge of an expanding plasma sheath has been measured. These measurements utilized a transition of N+2 [the P12 component of the X 2Σ+g(ν=0)→B 2Σ+u(ν=0) band] in a N2 plasma. The strength of the laser-induced fluorescence was used as a measure of the temporally and spatially varying ion density. The expanding sheath was produced by applying a -5 kV pulse to a polished planar electrode in the plasma source ion implantation device [J. R. Conrad et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 8, 3146 (1990)]. The laser beam was aligned normal to the surface and was reflected off the center of the electrode. The LIF diagnostic used here is nonperturbing whereas previous researchers have used Langmuir probes, which perturb the plasma, to make their measurements. As such, the data reported here represent a benchmark measurement of pulsed sheaths and allow a better comparison between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions. It has been found that the sheath edge moves approximately 16 times faster than the ion-acoustic velocity during the early part of the pulse, t<1 μs, and then slows to approximately the ion-acoustic velocity after 6 μs. In addition to the LIF measurements, a biased probe was used far from the cathode to determine the sheath edge location. Good agreement is found when the LIF and probe data are compared. The LIF data also are compared to the predictions of a simulation that is based on a time-varying two-fluid model of the sheath [G. A. Emmert and M. A. Henry, J. Appl. Phys. 71, 113 (1992)]. While the predictions of the model show moderate agreement with the data, substantial discrepancies are observed. These discrepancies are attributed to a number of physical phenomena that are not included in the present model.

  5. Laser-induced leaf fluorescence: a tool for vegetation status and stress monitoring and optical-aided agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luedeker, Wilhelm; Guenther, Kurt P.; Dahn, Hans-Guenter

    1997-07-01

    Since the second half of the 1980s several efforts started to establish the laser induced vegetation fluorescence as remote sensing tool to detect the growth and/or stress status of plants. The most extended European project, the EUREKA project LASFLEUR (1989 - 1994), demonstrated the technical feasibility and the significance of the sensed data. Exciting leaves with strong light pulses anywhere in the UV-A region of the electromagnetic spectrum stimulates a broad fluorescence emission from 400 to 750 nm. This emission is separated in two main components, the 'blue-green' (400 - 600 nm) and the red fluorescence region (680 - 750 nm). The blue-green band is originated by polyphenolic compounds of the cell walls, NADPH of the photosynthetic apparatus and possibly by several other plant pigments, except chlorophyll, which is the only emitter of the fluorescence at two bands in the red and in the NIR respectively. On the basis of the photon flux in these channels and with additional information, derived from e.g. the elastic back scattered signal, the time duration of back scatter and fluorescence signal, environmental light conditions, etc. a large set of vegetation parameters could be determined. During several demonstration campaigns status parameters as e.g. the chlorophyll concentration, photosynthetical activity and canopy structure were investigated. Additionally stress conditions as e.g. drought-, UV-stress and infection with different kinds of fungi were examined as well as the differentiation of plant types as e.g. mono-and dicotyledons. Extrapolating the knowledge of the EUREKA project leads to two different main applications. First with an advanced airborne remote sensing system monitoring of the vegetation status and stress conditions may be possible independently of other remote sensing techniques or the data may be used as input parameter for e.g. passive radiometer images. The second application will be a miniaturized sensor for agricultural machines

  6. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chyu, M.K.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu{sup +3}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  7. Development of Krypton Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence for Supersonic Flow Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Ross; Combs, Chris; Clemens, Noel

    2013-11-01

    Experimental work is presented on the development of krypton planar laser-induced fluorescence as a tracer in supersonic flows. Fluorescent tracers commonly used in compressible flowfields, such as nitric oxide, acetone, and toluene, have notable disadvantages when used in specific flow conditions that can include tracer condensation, reactivity, and general toxicity. Krypton, a noble gas, is immune to these deleterious effects over a much broader range of conditions including combustion environments. For these studies, the 5p[3/2]2 <-- 4p61S0 electronic transition of krypton, accessible via two-photon absorption, is excited using a tunable sum-frequency generation (SFG) system set at the peak of the atomic absorption line around 214.7 nm. Data is presented on the fluorescence lifetimes and collisional quenching cross-sections over a broad range of conditions for krypton-air mixtures. The technique is demonstrated in a Mach 3 hypermixing flowfield to showcase its utility in a complex compressible and turbulent flow environment. This work is supported by NASA and the NSF.

  8. Effects of signal corrections on measurements of temperature and OH concentrations using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhiyao; Carter, Campbell D.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2014-07-01

    Temperature and OH concentrations derived from OH laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are known to be susceptible to effects such as collisional quenching, laser absorption, and fluorescence trapping. In this paper, a set of analytical and easy-to-implement methods is presented for treating these effects. The significance of these signal corrections on inferred temperature and absolute OH concentration is demonstrated in an atmospheric-pressure, near-stoichiometric CH4-air flame stabilized on a Hencken burner, for laser excitation of both the A2Σ+←X2Π (0,0) and (1,0) bands. It is found that the combined effect of laser attenuation and fluorescence trapping can cause considerable error in the OH number density and temperature if not accounted for, even with A-X(1,0) excitation. The validity of the assumptions used in signal correction (that the excited-state distribution is either thermalized or frozen) is examined using time-dependent modeling of the ro-vibronic states during and after laser excitation. These assumptions are shown to provide good bounding approximations for treating transition-dependent issues in OH LIF, especially for an unknown collisional environment, and it is noted that the proposed methods are generally applicable to LIF-based measurements.

  9. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of flame heat release rate

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.H.; Najm, H.N.

    1997-12-12

    Local heat release rate represents one of the most interesting experimental observables in the study of unsteady reacting flows. The direct measure of burning or heat release rate as a field variable is not possible. Numerous experimental investigations have relied on inferring this type of information as well as flame front topology from indirect measures which are presumed to be correlated. A recent study has brought into question many of the commonly used flame front marker and burning rate diagnostics. This same study found that the concentration of formyl radical offers the best possibility for measuring flame burning rate. However, primarily due to low concentrations, the fluorescence signal level from formyl is too weak to employ this diagnostic for single-pulse measurements of turbulent reacting flows. In this paper the authors describe and demonstrate a new fluorescence-based reaction front imaging diagnostic suitable for single-shot applications. The measurement is based on taking the pixel-by-pixel product of OH and CH{sub 2}O planar laser-induced fluorescence images to yield an image closely related to a reaction rate. The spectroscopic and collisional processes affecting the measured signals are discussed and the foundation of the diagnostic, as based on laminar and unsteady flame calculations, is presented. The authors report the results of applying this diagnostic to the study of a laminar premixed flame subject to an interaction with an isolated line-vortex pair.

  10. [Study on the deteriorating course of fresh milk by laser-induced fluorescence spectra].

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Yu, C Q; Li, J Z; Yan, J X

    2001-12-01

    Along with the development of living standard, people's demand for food quality and food hygiene also rises. People demand food not only with rich nutrition, inexpensive price, but also with safety. So food hygiene test is paid common attention of society. Milk is a nourishing food and is loved by people. Sour milk goods from milk is also in great demand. But nourishing foods are good for growing many microbes. Fresh milk and sour milk are easy contaminated by microbes and go bad. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology is an important part of modern optics. It is broadly applied in biomedicine, diagnostics, test of food hygiene, environment protecting, owing to its high sensitivity, high speed, automation, untouched testing. In this paper, we attempted to LIF technology to test milk food quality. We used the third harmonics pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355 nm) as the exciting source, and a multi-track spectrometer as the detector and measured the intensities of apply LIF of fresh milk and sour milk during their deteriorating course. Test system and test method are introduced, fluorescence spectra of deteriorating course are also attached. The test result makes clear that there are close connection between deteriorating course and fluorescence spectra.

  11. Laser Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Spectra of Cajanus Cajan L Plant Growing Under Cadmium Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ram; Pandey, J. K.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-induced Chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) spectra of Cajanus cajan L leaves treated with different concentrations of Cd (0.05, 0.5 and 1 mM) are recorded at 10 and 20 days after first treatment of cadmium. LICF spectra are recorded in the region of 650-780 nm using violet diode laser (405 nm). LICF spectra of plant leaves show two maxima near 685 and 730nm. Fluorescence induction kinetics (FIK) curve are recorded at 685 and 730 nm with red diode laser (635 nm) for excitation. The fluorescence intensity ratios (FIR) F685/F730 are calculated from LICF spectra and vitality index (Rfd) are determined from FIK curve. FIR and Rfd value are good stress indicator of plant health. These parameters along with chlorophyll content are used to analyze the effect of Cd on wheat plants. The result indicates that higher concentrations of Cd hazardous for photosynthetic activity and health of Arhar plants. The lower concentration of 0.05 mM shows stimulatory response up to 10 days while after 20 days this concentration also shows inhibitory response. R. Gopal, K. B. Mishra, M. Zeeshan, S. M. Prasad, and M. M. Joshi Curr. Sci., 83, 880, 2002 K. B. Mishra and R. Gopal Int. J. Rem. Sen., 29, 157, 2008 R. Maurya, S. M. Prasad, and R. Gopal J. Photochem. Photobio. C: Photochem. Rev., 9, 29, 2008

  12. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chyu, M.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:EU{sup 3+}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  13. Inherent optical properties of the ocean: retrieval of the absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter from airborne laser spectral fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Vodacek, Anthony; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Blough, Neil V.

    1995-10-01

    The absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) at 355 nm has been retrieved from airborne laser-induced and water Raman-normalized CDOM fluorescence. Four combined airborne and ship field experiments have demonstrated that (1) the airborne CDOM fluorescence-to--water Raman ratio is linearly related to concurrent quinine-sulfate-standardized CDOM shipboard fluorescence measurements over a wide range of water masses (coastal to blue water); (2) the vicarious calibration of the airborne fluorosensor in units traceable to a fluorescence standard can be established and then maintained over an extended time period by tungsten lamp calibration; (3) the vicariously calibrated airborne CDOM fluorescence-to-water Raman ratio can be directly applied to previously developed

  14. Laser ablation laser induced fluorescence for sensitive detection of heavy metals in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwal, Yogesh

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS is a fast non-contact technique for the analysis of the elemental composition using spectral information of the emission from a laser-induced plasma. For the LIBS studies in this thesis the focus has been in using very low energy, microjoule pulses in order to give high spatial resolution and minimize the laser system requirements. This is a regime that we refer to as microLIBS. Under such conditions it is important to maximize the signal detected to give the lowest limit of detection LOD possible. One technique to improve the signal to noise ratios is by coupling LIBS with Laser Induced Fluorescence. This is a technique where the first pulse creates a vapor plume and the second pulse tuned to a resonant absorption line of the species of interest re-excites the plume. We term this technique as Laser ablation Laser Induced Fluorescence LA-LIF. We have been investigating the performance of LA-LIF at low pulse energies (≤ 1 mJ for both pulses) for the detection of elemental contaminants in water. This technique allows reasonable performance compared to high energy single-pulse LIBS, but at a much reduced total energy expenditure. This allows LODs in the parts per billion range ppb range which typically cannot be obtained with low energy single pulse probing of the systems. This approach or exceeds the sensitivities which can be obtained with many shots using much larger energy systems. In this thesis we investigated the performance of LIBS at low pulse energies for the detection of Pb as a contaminant in water. An LOD of 70 ppb was obtained for an accumulation of 100 shots with the ablation laser pulse energy of 250 muJ and an excitation laser pulse energy of 8 muJ. A systematic study of the detector conditions was made for the system for the detection of Pb. Scaling laws for the LOD in terms of the pump and probe energies were measured and also the effect of detector gain, the gate delay and the gate width were studied. In

  15. Capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection of fluorescein as a groundwater migration tracer.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, P L; Grange, A H; Brumley, W C; Donnelly, J R; Farley, J W

    1998-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been applied to the determination of the groundwater migration tracer dye fluorescein based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and compared to determinations obtained with traditional spectrofluorimetry. Detection limits of injected dye in the low parts per trillion (ppt) ranges have been accomplished with both CE/LIF based on the Ar ion laser and with a spectrofluorimeter. This approach was used for a real-world problem in determining groundwater migration between adjacent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Superfund sites by the Environmental Sciences Division in response to regional needs and as application of new analytical tools under development. Fluorescent dye was injected into source wells and then was determined in monitoring wells by extracting pads that adsorbed the dye or by directly determining the dye in the water using solid-phase extraction (SPE), a preconcentration technique. The approaches based on CE/LIF exhibits increased specificity over existing approaches due to the separation and unique migration time of the dye. Additional studies were aimed at achieving sub-ppt levels in the water using solid-phase extraction and field-amplified injection techniques.

  16. Clinical trial for detection of dental caries using laser-induced fluorescence ratio reference standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Shiny Sara; Mohanty, Soumyakant; Jayanthi, J. L.; Varughese, Jolly Mary; Balan, Anitha; Subhash, Narayanan

    2010-03-01

    We present the clinical applicability of fluorescence ratio reference standard (FRRS) to discriminate different stages of dental caries. Toward this, laser-induced autofluorescence emission spectra are recorded in vivo in the 400- to 800-nm spectral range on a miniature fiber optic spectrometer from 65 patients, with a 404-nm diode laser as the excitation source. Autofluorescence spectra of sound teeth consist of a broad emission at 500 nm that is typical of natural enamel, whereas in caries teeth additional peaks are seen at 635 and 680 nm due to emission from porphyrin compounds in oral bacteria. Scatter plots are developed to differentiate sound teeth from enamel caries, sound teeth from dentinal caries, and enamel caries from dentinal caries using the mean fluorescence intensity (FI) and ratios F500/F635 and F500/F680 measured from 25 sites of sound teeth and 65 sites of carious teeth. The sensitivity and specificity of both the FI and FRRS are determined. It is observed that a diagnostic algorithm based on FRRS scatter plots is able to discriminate enamel caries from sound teeth, dentinal caries from sound teeth, and enamel from dentinal caries with overall sensitivities of 85, 100, and 88% and specificities of 90, 100, and 77%, respectively.

  17. A simple dental caries detection system using full spectrum of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha-Cabral, Renata Maciel; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Maldonado, Edison Puig; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-06-01

    Objectives: to develop an apparatus for the detection of early caries lesions in enamel using the full extent of the tooth fluorescence spectrum, through the integration of a laser diode, fiber optics, filters and one portable spectrometer connected to a computer, all commercially available; to evaluate the developed device in clinical and laboratory tests, and compare its performance with commercial equipment. Methods: clinical examinations were performed in patients with indication for exodontics of premolars. After examinations, the patients underwent surgery and the teeth were stored individually. The optical measurements were repeated approximately two months after extraction, on the same sites previously examined, then histological analysis was carried out. Results: the spectral detector has presented high specificity and moderate sensitivity when applied to differentiate between healthy and damaged tissues, with no significant differences from the performance of the commercial equipment. The developed device is able to detect initial damages in enamel, with depth of approximately 300 μm. Conclusions: we successfully demonstrated the development of a simple and portable system based in laser-induced fluorescence for caries detection, assembled from common commercial parts. As the spectral detector acquires a complete recording of the spectrum from each tissue, it is possible to use it for monitoring developments of caries lesions.

  18. Atmospheric ammonia measurement using a VUV/photo-fragmentation laser-induced fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Schendel, J S; Stickel, R E; Vandijk, C A; Sandholm, S T; Davis, D D; Bradshaw, J D

    1990-11-20

    Vacuum ultraviolet/photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence has been demonstrated to be a highly specific and sensitive method for the quantitative measurement of atmospheric ammonia (NH(3)). The fluorescence detected in this approach results from the two 193-nm photon photofragmentation step NH(3)?NH(2)? NH(b(1)Sigma(+)) followed by the excitation of the NH(b(1)Sigma(+)) NH(c(1)Pi) transition via a 450-nm photon with final emission being observed from the NH(c(1) Pi) NH(a(1)Delta) transition at 325 nm. Limits of detection for the instrumentpresented here are < 10 pptv and < 4 pptv for 1- and 5-min integration periods, respectively, in ambient sampling conditions. The technique is free from interferences and system performance does not significantly degrade in adverse sampling conditions (i.e., rain, fog, clouds, haze, etc.). Spectroscopic selectivity in the NH(b(1)Sigma(+))?NH(c(1)Pi) transition is sufficient to resolve (15)NH(3) and (14)NH(3) contributions for use in atmospheric tracer studies. Average ammonia measurements at Stone Mountain, GA, ranged from approximately 110 pptv for air temperatures <5 degrees C to approximately 240 pptv for air temperatures >/=<5 degrees C over the period from Dec. 1987 to the end of Apr. 1988.

  19. Determination of phycobiliproteins by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Viskari, P J; Kinkade, C S; Colyer, C L

    2001-07-01

    Phycobiliproteins are derived from the photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae. They are composed of a protein backbone to which linear tetrapyrrole chromophores are covalently bound. Furthermore, they are water-soluble highly fluorescent, and relatively stable at room temperature and neutral pH. For this reason, capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) seems the idea method for determination of these important proteins. The effects of buffer additives such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)and putrescine on the separation of the three major phycobiliprotein types, namely allophycocyanin, phycocyanin, and phycoerythrin, with excitation and emission maxima at 652/660, 615/647, and 565(494)/575 nm, respectively, are considered. Detection limits for these proteins by CE-LIF are some 60-500 times better than by absorbance detection. The development of a fast and sensitive CE-LIF assay such as this is of potential significance to our understand ing of chemical and biological oceanographic processes.

  20. Portable detection system of vegetable oils based on laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Chen, He; Guo, Pan; Mu, Taotao

    2015-11-01

    Food safety, especially edible oils, has attracted more and more attention recently. Many methods and instruments have emerged to detect the edible oils, which include oils classification and adulteration. It is well known than the adulteration is based on classification. Then, in this paper, a portable detection system, based on laser induced fluorescence, is proposed and designed to classify the various edible oils, including (olive, rapeseed, walnut, peanut, linseed, sunflower, corn oils). 532 nm laser modules are used in this equipment. Then, all the components are assembled into a module (100*100*25mm). A total of 700 sets of fluorescence data (100 sets of each type oil) are collected. In order to classify different edible oils, principle components analysis and support vector machine have been employed in the data analysis. The training set consisted of 560 sets of data (80 sets of each oil) and the test set consisted of 140 sets of data (20 sets of each oil). The recognition rate is up to 99%, which demonstrates the reliability of this potable system. With nonintrusive and no sample preparation characteristic, the potable system can be effectively applied for food detection.

  1. Indirect laser-induced fluorescence detection for capillary electrophoresis using a frequency-doubled diode laser.

    PubMed

    Ragozina, Natalia; Pütz, Michael; Faubel, Werner; Pyell, Ute

    2003-01-01

    A blue (452 nm) frequency-doubled diode laser with a quasi-cw optical output power of 10 microW is used for indirect laser-induced fluorescence detection in combination with the capillary electrophoretic separation of inorganic anions. As fluorescing probe ion the anion of 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS) was selected having an absorption maximum of 454 nm in alkaline medium. Employing a capillary coated with linear acrylamide, baseline separation of eight inorganic anions was possible within 5 min. With a separation buffer containing 50 micromol.L(-1) HPTS and 10 mmol.L(-1) lysine the limits of detection for sulfate, nitrite, nitrate, azide, thiocyanate, and chlorate were between 0.9 and 4.7 micromol.L(-1). Separation of chloride and sulfate was achieved by adding 0.25 mmol.L(-1) calcium hydroxide to the separation buffer. Inorganic anions in several mineral and tap water samples have been determined with the technique developed and results are compared to data obtained by ion chromatography in combination with conductivity detection after conductivity suppression.

  2. Two-Beam multiplexed laser-induced fluorescence measurements of an argon arcjet plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    We describe a multiplexed, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique with which radial and axial profiles of vector velocities of excited propellant species were obtained in the exhaust plume from a 300-W argon arcjet. Although the arcjet is a prototype, and although argon is not an interesting propellant from a propulsion perspective, the technique clearly demonstrates how a narrowband, frequency-stabilized ring-dye laser can be used to obtain simultaneous measurements of two velocity components in an arcjet plume and how a third signal from an optogalvanic cell can be used as a frequency reference. We also show that much information on the flow can be obtained by analyzing the Doppler widths and fluorescence intensities of the LIF data. Specifically, the data identify a boundary layer in the radial direction of the plume and a shock in the downstream region of the flow. Also, some flow anisotropy is observed, consistent with the assumption that the magnitude of the mean flow velocity fluctuates. The peak velocity on centerline remains roughly constant at 3 km/s throughout the expansion.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence imaging of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.G.; Meyer, K.E.; Wachter, E.A.; Perl, D.R.; Kulowitch, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    A simple, fluorescence based imaging system has been developed that is capable of identifying regions of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites (PMCs). These materials are playing an increasingly important role in the production of high performance vehicles and aircraft, where their low weight and high mechanical strength, combined with advancements in manufacturing technology, ensure increased use for a variety of applications. Of particular concern in the aerospace industry is the tendency of some PMC materials to become irreversibly damaged when exposed to elevated temperatures. Traditional nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques are capable of detecting physical anomalies such as cracks and delaminations but cannot detect initial heat damage, which occurs on a molecular scale. Spectroscopic techniques such as laser induced fluorescence provide an attractive means for detecting this type of damage and are amenable to imaging large, irregularly shaped surfaces. In this report the authors describe instrumentation capable of rapidly detecting thermal damage in graphite epoxy components and suggest improvements which will enable this technology to make quantitative judgments concerning the mechanical strength properties of heat damaged specimens.

  4. Refractive Index Matching for Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging of Fluid Mixing in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, E. J.; Tigera, R. G.; Crimaldi, J. P.; Mays, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Research in porous media is often hampered by the difficulty in making pore-scale observations. By selecting porous media that is refractive index matched (RIM) to the pore fluid, the media becomes transparent. This allows optical imaging techniques such as static light scattering (SLS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal microscopy, and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be employed. RIM is particularly useful for research concerning contaminant remediation in the subsurface, permitting visual observation of plume dynamics at the pore scale. The goal of this research is to explore and assess candidate combinations of porous media, fluid, and fluorescent dye. The strengths and weaknesses of each combination will then be evaluated in terms of safety, cost, and optical quality in order to select the best combination for use with PLIF. Within this framework, top-ranked RIM combinations include Pyrex glass beads, water beads, or granular Nafion saturated in vegetable glycerin, deionized water, and an aqueous solution of 48% isopropanol, respectively. This research lays the groundwork for future efforts to build a flow chamber in which the selected RIM porous media, solution, and dye will be used in evaluating subsurface pumping strategies designed to impose chaotic plume spreading in porous media. Though the RIM porous media explored in this research are selected based on the specifications of a particular experiment, the methods developed for working with and evaluating RIM porous media should be of utility to a wide variety of research interests.

  5. A new post-column reactor-laser induced fluorescence detector for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Liling

    1996-01-02

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), a powerful separation method based on the differential migration of charged species under the influence of an electric field, has been widely used for separations covering from small ions to big biomolecules. Chapter 1 describes the method, then discusses detection of the separated analytes by laser induced fluorescence and by chemical derivatization, and the use of O-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) as a post-column reagent. Chapter 2 describes a post-column reactor which uses two narrow bore capillaries connected coaxially. This reactor differs from other coaxial reactors in terms of capillary dimensions, reagent flow control, ease of construction and most importantly, better limits of detection. The derivatization reagent is electroosmotically driven into the reaction capillary and the reagent flow rate is independently controlled by a high voltage power supply. Amino acids, amines and proteins, derivatized by OPA/2-mercaptoethanol using this post-column reactor coupled with LIF detection, show low attomole mass limits of detection, and for the first time, the authors demonstrate single cell capability with a post-column derivatization scheme. The single cell capability shows that this reactor could find applications in assaying non-fluorescent or electrochemically inactive components in individual biological cells in the future.

  6. Bioaerosols laser-induced fluorescence provides specific robust signatures for standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Simard, Jean-Robert; Déry, Bernard; Roy, Gilles; Lahaie, Pierre; Mathieu, Pierre; Ho, Jim; McFee, John

    2006-10-01

    One of today's primary security challenges is the emerging biological threat due to the increased accessibility to biological warfare technology and the limited efficiency of detection against such menace. At the end of the 90s, Defence R&D Canada developed a standoff bioaerosol sensor, SINBAHD, based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) with an excitation at 351 nm. This LIDAR system generates specific spectrally wide fluorescence signals originating from inelastic interactions with complex molecules forming the building blocks of most bioaerosols. This LIF signal is spectrally collected by a combination of a dispersive element and a range-gated ICCD that limits the spectral information within a selected atmospheric cell. The system can detect and classify bioaerosols in real-time, with the help of a data exploitation process based on a least-square fit of the acquired fluorescence signal by a linear combination of normalized spectral signatures. The detection and classification processes are hence directly dependant on the accuracy of these signatures to represent the intrinsic fluorescence of bioaerosols and their discrepancy. Comparisons of spectral signatures acquired at Suffield in 2001 and at Dugway in 2005 of bioaerosol simulants, Bacillius subtilis var globiggi (BG) and Erwinia herbicola (EH), having different origin, preparation protocol and/or dissemination modes, has been made and demonstrates the robustness of the obtained spectral signatures in these particular cases. Specific spectral signatures and their minimum detectable concentrations for different simulants/interferents obtained at the Joint Biological Standoff Detection System (JBSDS) increment II field demonstration trial, Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) in June 2005, are also presented.

  7. Laser-induced Native Fluorescence Detection of Organic Molecules in Hydrothermal Vent Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harju, E.; Kidd, R. D.; Bhartia, R.; Conrad, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed a Multi-channel Deep Ultraviolet Excitation (McDuve) fluorescence detector that has been deployed at several Pacific hydrothermal vent sites [1]. The in situ McDuve detector was able to detect organic molecules at the vent site on rock surfaces and in the water, the signatures being distinguishable one from the other. The McDuve fluorescence detector uses a 224.3 nm helium-silver hollow cathode laser to induce native fluorescence from a sample. Spectral separation is achieved with optical band-pass filters which are coupled to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for detection. Samples were recovered at the vent sites and returned from the expedition for bench-top analysis for correlation of the McDuve observations with standard analytical tools-GCMS and X-ray diffraction (for mineralogical ID), as well as with a bench-top version of the McDuve fluorescence detector. Here we report the corroborative results of the laboratory studies. Several preserved samples were subjected to 224.3 nm ultraviolet excitation under wet and dry conditions. Organic molecules were detected on the wet samples analyzed in the lab, corroborating the in situ McDuve data. The fluorescence emission wavelengths associated with the detected organic molecules suggest they are 3-5 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [2,3]. The samples were also pyrolized at 500 ºC to decompose any organic molecules present and subsequently reanalyzed. This McDuve analysis revealed a significant decrease in laser induced native fluorescence, a result consistent with the pyrolytic decomposition of the organic content of the rock samples. [1] Conrad, P.G., A.L. Lane, R. Bhartia, W. Hug, (March 2004) Optical Detection of Organic Chemical Biosignatures at Hydrothermal Vents 35th Lunar Plan. Sci. XXXV, 2055. [2] Karcher, W. (1985), Spectral Atlas of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds, vol. I, Kluwer Academic Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland. [3] Bhartia, R., McDonald, G.D., Salas, E.C., Hug, W., Reid, R

  8. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Su

    2001-05-25

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sup 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

  9. Laser Induced Fluorescence Studies of Electrostatic Double Layers in an Expanding Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Jerry, Jr.

    We report the first evidence of a laboratory double layer (DL) collapsing in the presence of an instability studied by Chakraborty Thakur et al. 1 with the use of time resolved laser induced fluorescence (LIF) studies. Higher time resolution studies then provided the first statistically validated proof of the correlation between the ion acoustic instability and a DL. Time-frequency analysis in the form of time resolved cross power spectra and continuous wavelet transforms were used to provide insight into beam formation. The implications of this work is that in the creation of strong DLs in expanding plasmas for plasma propulsion or other applications may be self-limited through instability growth. Over the past decade, experimental and theoretical studies have demonstrated the formation of stable, electrostatic, current-free double layers (CFDLs) in plasmas with a strong density gradient; typically a result of a divergent magnetic field. In this work, we present evidence for the formation of multiple double layers within a single divergent magnetic field structure. Downstream of the divergent magnetic field, multiple accelerated ion populations are observed through laser induced fluorescence measurements of the ion velocity distribution function. The formation of the multiple double layer structure is a strong function of the neutral gas pressure in the experiment. The similarity of the accelerated ion populations observed in these laboratory experiments to ion populations observed in reconnection outflow regions in the magnetosphere and in numerical simulations is also described. If ion energization during magnetic reconnection also results solely from acceleration in electric fields, these observations imply a prediction that the ion heating, i.e., the broadening of ion velocity distribution functions, reported in magnetic reconnection experiments is more accurately described by a superposition of differently accelerated ion populations. Therefore, the ion

  10. Study of Sugar Cane Management Systems in Brazil Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Jader; Villas-Boas, Paulino; Carvalho, Camila; Corá, José Eduardo; Milori, Débora

    2014-05-01

    Brazil is the largest producer of cane sugar, consequently, is a leader in the production of bio-ethanol, a clean and renewable energy that fits the model of sustainable economy as discussed and pursued by our society. Our state of São Paulo concentrates 60% of national production, representing a sizeable share in the range of world production. All this economic potential is closely monitored by the scientific community, which develops numerous studies seeking an improvement in production efficiency and reduced environmental impacts caused by the planting. However, the study of soil samples, in plantation areas, demands results about the content and structural forms of organic matter (OM). Also, the soil carbon stocks depend on the type of management. Our goal is to study OM of soil samples from four sugar cane management systems: (i) unburned cane harvest, (ii) preharvest burned, (iii) addition of sugarcane bagasse ash and (iv) addition of residue from the extraction of sucrose, using Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of solid state. All the emission spectra were acquired using the system called LIFS-405, which consists of a diode laser Coherent, model cube with excitation at 405 nm, maximum output power of 50mJ and a mini-spectrometer, Ocean Optics USB2000-high sensitivity, with range of 194-894 nm and a fiber-optic bundle design (six excitation fibers in a circular path and one central fiber the collect the fluorescence). In this work, we will present the preliminary results evolving the humification index (HLIFS) of soil OM and total carbon amount (TC) for the different types of management. HLIFS shows a close correlation with the humification index of humic acid in solution obtained by means 2D conventional fluorescence spectroscopy.

  11. Stereoscopic Imaging in Hypersonics Boundary Layers using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Jones, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    Stereoscopic time-resolved visualization of three-dimensional structures in a hypersonic flow has been performed for the first time. Nitric Oxide (NO) was seeded into hypersonic boundary layer flows that were designed to transition from laminar to turbulent. A thick laser sheet illuminated and excited the NO, causing spatially-varying fluorescence. Two cameras in a stereoscopic configuration were used to image the fluorescence. The images were processed in a computer visualization environment to provide stereoscopic image pairs. Two methods were used to display these image pairs: a cross-eyed viewing method which can be viewed by naked eyes, and red/blue anaglyphs, which require viewing through red/blue glasses. The images visualized three-dimensional information that would be lost if conventional planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging had been used. Two model configurations were studied in NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Wind tunnel. One model was a 10 degree half-angle wedge containing a small protuberance to force the flow to transition. The other model was a 1/3-scale, truncated Hyper-X forebody model with blowing through a series of holes to force the boundary layer flow to transition to turbulence. In the former case, low flowrates of pure NO seeded and marked the boundary layer fluid. In the latter, a trace concentration of NO was seeded into the injected N2 gas. The three-dimensional visualizations have an effective time resolution of about 500 ns, which is fast enough to freeze this hypersonic flow. The 512x512 resolution of the resulting images is much higher than high-speed laser-sheet scanning systems with similar time response, which typically measure 10-20 planes.

  12. Stereoscopic Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging at 500 kHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medford, Taylor L.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Jiang, N.; Webster, M.; Lempert, Walter; Miller, J.; Meyer, T.

    2011-01-01

    A new measurement technique for obtaining time- and spatially-resolved image sequences in hypersonic flows is developed. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) has previously been used to investigate transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hypersonic boundary layers using both planar and volumetric imaging capabilities. Low flow rates of NO were typically seeded into the flow, minimally perturbing the flow. The volumetric imaging was performed at a measurement rate of 10 Hz using a thick planar laser sheet that excited NO fluorescence. The fluorescence was captured by a pair of cameras having slightly different views of the flow. Subsequent stereoscopic reconstruction of these images allowed the three-dimensional flow structures to be viewed. In the current paper, this approach has been extended to 50,000 times higher repetition rates. A laser operating at 500 kHz excites the seeded NO molecules, and a camera, synchronized with the laser and fitted with a beam-splitting assembly, acquires two separate images of the flow. The resulting stereoscopic images provide three-dimensional flow visualizations at 500 kHz for the first time. The 200 ns exposure time in each frame is fast enough to freeze the flow while the 500 kHz repetition rate is fast enough to time-resolve changes in the flow being studied. This method is applied to visualize the evolving hypersonic flow structures that propagate downstream of a discrete protuberance attached to a flat plate. The technique was demonstrated in the NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Different tunnel Reynolds number conditions, NO flow rates and two different cylindrical protuberance heights were investigated. The location of the onset of flow unsteadiness, an indicator of transition, was observed to move downstream during the tunnel runs, coinciding with an increase in the model temperature.

  13. Standoff detection of natural bioaerosol by range-gated laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Simard, Jean-Robert; Roy, Gilles

    2005-11-01

    The biological threat has emerged as one of today's primary security challenges due to the increased accessibility to biological warfare technology and the limited efficiency of detection and protection measures against such menace. Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) has investigated various methods, including the improvement of atmospheric bioaerosol monitoring, to increase the readiness against such threat. By the end of the 90s, DRDC developed a standoff bioaerosol sensor based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This work has showed an important potential of detecting and discriminating in real-time several bioaerosols. The LIDAR system that monitors atmosphere cells from a standoff position induces specific spectrally wide fluorescence signals originating from inelastic interactions with complex molecules forming the building blocks of the bioaerosols. This LIF signal is spectrally collected by a combination of a dispersive element and a range-gated ICCD that records the spectral information within a range-selected atmospheric volume. To assess further the potential of discrimination of such technique, this innovative sensor was used to obtain spectral data of various natural bioaerosols. In order to evaluate the discrimination of biological agent simulants from naturally occurring background fluorescing materials, the obtained results were compared with the ones of bioaerosol simulants (Bacillius subtilis var globiggi (BG) and Erwinia herbicola (EH)) acquired in 2001. The robustness of the spectral data with time was also investigated. From our results, most of the studied natural materials showed a spectral shift of various degrees, and up to 10 nm, to the longer wavelength one year later.

  14. Study of Organic Matter in Soils of the Amazon Region Employing Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadini, Amanda Maria; Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Mounier, Stéphane; Montes, Célia Regina; Marcondes Bastos Pereira Milori, Débora

    2014-05-01

    In the face of climate change and increasing CO2 levels in the atmosphere, the global carbon cycle, soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration, and the role of different world biomes as potential sources and sinks of carbon are receiving increasing attention. Carbon quantification is an important environmental indicator, but the structure of organic matter is also important because is related to carbon stability. The synthesis of soil organic matter (SOM), as presented in soils of forest vegetation, can be originated from condensation polymeric polyphenols and quinones that are responsible for controlling the main physical-chemical properties of soils. These systems are present in humic substances, representing the major fluorophore of SOM[1-3]. Abiotic factors, such as soil texture, use and occupation of soil, can influence on the process of SOM formation, molecular structure and in its humification index[4]. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) have become a promising technique for assessing humification index of SOM (HLIFS). In this context, the aim of this study was to analyze the humification index of the SOM in the region of Barcelos (Amazon) employing LIFS. The study area was the region of Barcelos, close the river Demeni. The whose vegetation distribution in this area, is two biomes the Dense Ombrophylous Forest (DPQD) and Campinarana (DPQT), with areas of edaphic contacts between these two phytophysiognomies, which ranged from Open field (FDE) to closed Depression (DPQ). Preliminary results showed that the area closed Depression (DPQ) there was a continuous gradient of humification with increasing soil depth. A similar behavior was verified for area Forest (DPQD), where the highest values of HLIFS were obtained between the four points analyzed, indicating the magnitude of the molecular recalcitrance this organic matter in this area. The results obtained for area Campinarana (DPQT) and Open field (FDE) showed an opposite behavior. These points there

  15. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Su

    2001-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  16. Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy for applications in chemical sensing and optical refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumi Barimah, Eric

    limit of detection for ClO4, was determined to be 14.7 +/- 0.5 wt%/wt for the given experimental conditions. In the second part of this research, the temperature-dependent absorption and emission properties of Tm doped KPb2Cl5 (KPC) and KPb2Br5 (KPB) were evaluated for applications in laser cooling. A Tm doped Y3Al5O12 (YAG) crystal was also included for comparative studies. Under laser pumping, all crystals exhibited broad IR fluorescence at room temperature with a mean fluorescence wavelength of ˜1.82 mum and bandwidth of 0.14 mum (FWHM) for Tm:KPC/KPB and ˜1.79 mum for Tm:YAG. Initial experiments on laser-induced heating/cooling were performed using a combined IR imaging and fluorescence thermometry setup. Employing a continuous-wave laser operating at 1.907 mum, Tm: KPC and Tm: KPB crystals revealed a very small heat load resulting in temperature increase of ˜ 0.3 ( +/- 0.1)°C. The heat loading in Tm:YAG was signicantly larger and resulted in a temperature increase of ˜0.9 (+/-0.1)°C. The results derived from IR imaging were also conrmed by the fluorescence thermometry experiments, which showed only minimal changes in the FIR intensity ratio of the green Er3+ fluorescence lines from Er:KPC.

  17. Comparison of beetroot extracts originating from several sites using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabasović, M. S.; Šević, D.; Terzić, M.; Marinković, B. P.

    2012-05-01

    Beetroot (Beta vulgaris) juice contains a large number of fluorophores which can fluoresce. There is a growing interest in beetroot extracts analysis. In contrast, there is only limited information about beetroot obtained without sample preparation and/or extraction of components from the sample. In this work, we continue our previous study (Rabasović et al 2009 Acta Phys. Pol. A 116 570-2), analyzing and comparing beetroot extracts from several sites, using the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique to measure the fluorescence of samples at different excitation wavelengths (340-470 nm) and for different sample dilutions.

  18. Three-dimensional analysis of microwave generated plasmas with extended planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Stopper, U; Lindner, P; Schumacher, U

    2007-04-01

    We present the development and application of a diagnostic system for the analysis of microwave generated low-pressure plasmas, which might also be used for the investigation of the edge regions in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Our method uses planar laser-induced fluorescence, which is produced by excitation of neutral metastable atoms through a short, intense, pulsed laser. The beam expansion optics consist of an uncommon setup of four lenses. By controlled shifting of an element of the optics sideways, the location of the laser sheet in the plasma is scanned perpendicular to the excitation plane. Together with a spectrometer observing different observation volumes along the beam path, we are able to map absolute three-dimensional (3D) population density distributions of the metastable ((2)P(12) (o)) 3s[12](0) (o) state of Ne I in an electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) plasma. This optical tomography system was used to study the influence of the microwave power and mode on the spatial structure of the plasma. The results show that the population density of the neutral neon in this metastable state is found to be in the range of 10(16) m(-3), and that its spatial distribution is associated with the 3D structure of the magnetic field. We also report that the spatial distribution strongly varies with the mode structure, which depends on the microwave power.

  19. Visualization of Capsule Reentry Vehicle Heat Shield Ablation using Naphthalene Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combs, Christopher; Clemens, Noel; Danehy, Paul

    2012-11-01

    NASA has continued interest in the study of ablation owing to the need to develop suitable thermal protection systems for spacecraft that undergo planetary entry. Ablation is a complex multi-physics process, and codes that predict it require a number of coupled submodels, each of which requires validation. For example, Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and large-eddy simulation (LES) codes require models of the turbulent transport of ablation products under variable compressibility and pressure gradient conditions. A new technique has been developed at The University of Texas at Austin that uses planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a low-temperature sublimating ablator (naphthalene) to enable visualization of the ablation products as they are transported in a boundary layer. While high temperature ablation is extremely difficult to recreate in a laboratory environment, low temperature ablation creates a limited physics problem that can be used to simulate the ablation process. In the current work a subscale capsule reentry vehicle model with a solid naphthalene heat shield is tested in a Mach 5 wind tunnel. PLIF imaging reveals the distribution of the ablation products as they are transported into the boundary layer and over the capsule shoulders. Work supported by NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship Program under grant NNX11AN55H.

  20. Laser-induced-fluorescence studies of fragment ions: CH/sup +/ and CD/sup +/

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, A.

    1981-08-01

    The dynamics of ion-molecule interactions within a mass selective rf quadrupole ion trap are studied for several ion-molecule systems. Laser induced fluorescence is used as a probe of the internal energy distributions of molecular ions under collision free conditions and under controlled collision conditions. The effects of collisions at near thermal energies (0.3 to 0.5 eV) are easily understood in terms of processes such as charge transfer and other energy transfer mechanisms. The A/sup 1/PI - X/sup 1/..sigma../sup +/ system of CH/sup +/ and CD/sup +/ has been examined under collision free conditions. The ions were produced from methane through electron impact ionization/dissociation. The observed energy distributions reflect the dynamical partitioning of dissociation exothermicity, excepting short lived electronic states. Many new transitions belonging to this electronic system have been observed and a reliable vibrational frequency for the X/sup 1/..sigma../sup +/ state has been obtained. The radiative lifetimes of CH/sup +/ and CD/sup +/ A/sup 1/PI(v = 0) states have been measured and a revised oscillator strength for the A-X transition has been derived from this data.

  1. A 3-level Model for Schumann-Runge O2 Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Glenn S.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    A three level model has been developed for the analysis of Schumann-Runge band (B(sup 3)Sigma(sup -)(sub u ) <- X(sup 3)Sigma(sup -)(sub g)) laser-induced fluorescence of molecular oxygen, O2. Such a model is required due to the severe lower state depletion which can occur when transitions having relatively large absorption cross-sections are excited. Such transitions are often utilized via ArF* or KrF* excimer or dye-laser excitation in high temperature environments. The rapid predissociation of the upper state prevents substantial repopulation of the lower state by collisional processes, and the lower state may be largely depleted, even at laser fluences as low as 10-100 mJ/sq cm. The resulting LIF signal in such cases no longer varies linearly with laser pulse energy, and the extent of the sublinear behavior varies with the particular rovibrational transition of interest. Relating the measured signal to the lower state population, then, necessitates the use of exceedingly low laser fluences. These low fluences in turn lead to the need to compromise spatial resolution in order to generate sufficient signal.

  2. Mixing and stabilization study of a partially premixed swirling flame using laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Galley, D.; Ducruix, S.; Lacas, F.; Veynante, D.

    2011-01-15

    A laboratory-scale swirling burner, presenting many similarities with gas turbines combustors, has been studied experimentally using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) on OH radical and acetone vapor in order to characterize the flame stabilization process. These diagnostics show that the stabilization point rotates in the combustion chamber and that air and fuel mixing is not complete at the end of the mixing tube. Fuel mass fraction decays exponentially along the mixing tube axis and transverse profiles show a gaussian shape. However, radial pressure gradients tend to trap the fuel in the core of the vortex that propagates axially in the mixing tube. As the mixing tube vortex enters the combustion chamber, vortex breakdown occurs through a precessing vortex core (PVC). The axially propagating vortex shows a helicoidal trajectory in the combustion chamber which trace is observed with transverse acetone PLIF. As a consequence, the stabilizing point of the flame in the combustion chamber rotates with the PVC structure. This phenomenon has been observed in the present study with a high speed camera recording spontaneous emission of the flame. The stabilization point rotation frequency tends to increase with mass flow rates. It was also shown that the coupling between the PVC and the flame stabilization occurs via mixing, explaining one possible coupling mechanism between acoustic waves in the flow and the reaction rate. This path may also be envisaged for flashback, an issue that will be more completely treated in a near future. (author)

  3. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry; Brown, Jeff; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Steve; Brubaker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnsons arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  4. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnson's arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  5. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper will document the latest improvements of the LIF system design and demonstrations of the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems.

  6. Three-dimensional analysis of microwave generated plasmas with extended planar laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopper, U.; Lindner, P.; Schumacher, U.

    2007-04-01

    We present the development and application of a diagnostic system for the analysis of microwave generated low-pressure plasmas, which might also be used for the investigation of the edge regions in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Our method uses planar laser-induced fluorescence, which is produced by excitation of neutral metastable atoms through a short, intense, pulsed laser. The beam expansion optics consist of an uncommon setup of four lenses. By controlled shifting of an element of the optics sideways, the location of the laser sheet in the plasma is scanned perpendicular to the excitation plane. Together with a spectrometer observing different observation volumes along the beam path, we are able to map absolute three-dimensional (3D) population density distributions of the metastable (P21/2o)3s[1/2]0o state of Ne I in an electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) plasma. This optical tomography system was used to study the influence of the microwave power and mode on the spatial structure of the plasma. The results show that the population density of the neutral neon in this metastable state is found to be in the range of 1016 m-3, and that its spatial distribution is associated with the 3D structure of the magnetic field. We also report that the spatial distribution strongly varies with the mode structure, which depends on the microwave power.

  7. Fractal analysis of turbulent mixing in fractal-generated turbulence by planar laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroki; Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Hasegawa, Yutaka

    2013-07-01

    The fractal geometry of turbulent mixing of high-Schmidt-number scalars in multiscale, fractal-generated turbulence (FGT) is experimentally investigated. The difference between the fractal geometry in FGT and that in classical grid turbulence (CGT) generated by a biplane, single-scale grid is also investigated. Nondimensional concentration fields are measured by a planar laser-induced fluorescence technique whose accuracy has recently been improved by our research group, and the fractal dimensions are calculated by using the box-counting method. The mesh Reynolds number is 2500 for both CGT and FGT. The Schmidt number is about 2100. It is found that the threshold width ΔCth, when applying the box-counting method, does not affect the evaluation of the fractal dimension at large scales; therefore, the fractal dimensions at large scales have been investigated in this study. The results show that the fractal dimension in FGT is larger than that in CGT. In addition, the fractal dimension in FGT monotonically increases with the onset of time (or with the downstream direction), whereas that in CGT is almost constant with time. The investigation of the number of counted boxes in a unit area, together with the above results, suggests that turbulent mixing is more enhanced in FGT from the viewpoints of fractal geometry and expansion of the mixing interface.

  8. Chiral separation of benzoporphyrin derivative mono- and diacids by laser induced fluorescence-capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuejun; Sternberg, Ethan; Dolphin, David

    2002-01-01

    A method for the separation of benzoporphyrin derivative mono- and diacid (BPDMA, BPDDA) enantiomers by laser induced fluorescence-capillary electrophoresis (LIF-CE) has been developed. By using 300 mM borate buffer, pH 9.2, 25 mM sodium cholate and 10% acetronitrile as electrolyte, +10 kV electrokinetic sampling injection of 2 s and an applied +20 kV voltage across the ends of a 37 cm capillary (30 cm to the detector, 50 microm ID), all six BPD stereoisomers were baseline-separated within 20 min. Formation constants, free electrophoretic and complexation mobilities with borate and cholate were determined based on dynamic complexation capillary electrophoresis theory. The BPD enantiomers can be quantitatively determined in the range of 10(-2)-10(-5) mg mL(-1). The correlation coefficients (r2) of the least-squares linear regression analysis of the BPD enantiomers are in the range of 0.9914-0.9997. Their limits of detection are 2.18-3.5 x 10(-3) mg mL(-1). The relative standard deviations for the separation were 2.90-4.64% (n = 10). In comparison with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), CE has better resolution and efficiency. This separation method was successfully applied to the BPD enantiomers obtained from a matrix of bovine serum and from liposomally formulated material as well as from studies with rat, dog and human microsomes.

  9. Measurements of population densities of metastable and resonant levels of argon using laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolić, M.; Newton, J.; Sukenik, C. I.; Vušković, L.; Popović, S.

    2015-01-14

    We present a new approach to measure population densities of Ar I metastable and resonant excited states in low temperature Ar plasmas at pressures higher than 1 Torr. This approach combines the time resolved laser induced fluorescence technique with the kinetic model of Ar. The kinetic model of Ar is based on calculating the population rates of metastable and resonant levels by including contributions from the processes that affect population densities of Ar I excited states. In particular, we included collisional quenching processes between atoms in the ground state and excited states, since we are investigating plasma at higher pressures. We also determined time resolved population densities of Ar I 2 p excited states by employing optical emission spectroscopy technique. Time resolved Ar I excited state populations are presented for the case of the post-discharge of the supersonic flowing microwave discharge at pressures of 1.7 and 2.3 Torr. The experimental set-up consists of a pulsed tunable dye laser operating in the near infrared region and a cylindrical resonance cavity operating in TE{sub 111} mode at 2.45 GHz. Results show that time resolved population densities of Ar I metastable and resonant states oscillate with twice the frequency of the discharge.

  10. Chiral separation of benzoporphyrin derivative mono- and diacids by laser induced fluorescence-capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuejun; Sternberg, Ethan; Dolphin, David

    2002-01-01

    A method for the separation of benzoporphyrin derivative mono- and diacid (BPDMA, BPDDA) enantiomers by laser induced fluorescence-capillary electrophoresis (LIF-CE) has been developed. By using 300 mM borate buffer, pH 9.2, 25 mM sodium cholate and 10% acetronitrile as electrolyte, +10 kV electrokinetic sampling injection of 2 s and an applied +20 kV voltage across the ends of a 37 cm capillary (30 cm to the detector, 50 microm ID), all six BPD stereoisomers were baseline-separated within 20 min. Formation constants, free electrophoretic and complexation mobilities with borate and cholate were determined based on dynamic complexation capillary electrophoresis theory. The BPD enantiomers can be quantitatively determined in the range of 10(-2)-10(-5) mg mL(-1). The correlation coefficients (r2) of the least-squares linear regression analysis of the BPD enantiomers are in the range of 0.9914-0.9997. Their limits of detection are 2.18-3.5 x 10(-3) mg mL(-1). The relative standard deviations for the separation were 2.90-4.64% (n = 10). In comparison with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), CE has better resolution and efficiency. This separation method was successfully applied to the BPD enantiomers obtained from a matrix of bovine serum and from liposomally formulated material as well as from studies with rat, dog and human microsomes. PMID:11824627

  11. Planar Laser-Induced Iodine Fluorescence Measurements in Rarefied Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Eric; McDaniel, James C.

    2005-01-01

    A planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is discussed and applied to measurement of time-averaged values of velocity and temperature in an I(sub 2)-seeded N(sub 2) hypersonic free jet facility. Using this technique, a low temperature, non-reacting, hypersonic flow over a simplified model of a reaction control system (RCS) was investigated. Data are presented of rarefied Mach 12 flow over a sharp leading edge flat plate at zero incidence, both with and without an interacting jet issuing from a nozzle built into the plate. The velocity profile in the boundary layer on the plate was resolved. The slip velocity along the plate, extrapolated from the velocity profile data, varied from nearly 100% down to 10% of the freestream value. These measurements are compared with results of a DSMC solution. The velocity variation along the centerline of a jet issuing from the plate was measured and found to match closely with the correlation of Ashkenas and Sherman. The velocity variation in the oblique shock terminating the jet was resolved sufficiently to measure the shock wave thickness.

  12. Flow Property Measurement Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Porter, Barry J.; Carballo, Julio Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species has been applied to single-point measurements of velocity and static temperature in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet. Excitation spectra of atomic oxygen and nitrogen were recorded while scanning a tunable dye laser over the absorption feature. Thirty excitation spectra were acquired during 8 arc jet runs at two facility operating conditions; the number of scans per run varied between 2 and 6. Curve fits to the spectra were analyzed to recover their Doppler shifts and widths, from which the flow velocities and static temperatures, respectively, were determined. An increase in the number of independent flow property pairs from each as-measured scan was obtained by extracting multiple lower-resolution scans. The larger population sample size enabled the mean property values and their uncertainties for each run to be characterized with greater confidence. The average plus or minus 2 sigma uncertainties in the mean velocities and temperatures for all 8 runs were plus or minus 1.4% and plus or minus 11%, respectively.

  13. Single-shot volumetric laser induced fluorescence (VLIF) measurements in turbulent flows seeded with iodine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Xu, Wenjiang; Lei, Qingchun; Ma, Lin

    2015-12-28

    This work reports the experimental demonstration of single-shot visualization of turbulent flows in all three spatial dimensions (3D) based on volumetric laser induced fluorescence (VLIF). The measurements were performed based on the LIF signal of iodine (I2) vapor seeded in the flow. In contrast to established planar LIF (PLIF) technique, the VLIF technique excited the seeded I2 vapor volumetrically by a thick laser slab. The volumetric LIF signals emitted were then simultaneously collected by a total of five cameras from five different orientations, based on which a 3D tomographic reconstruction was performed to obtain the 3D distribution of the I2 vapor in the target flow. Single-shot measurements (with a measurement duration of a few ns) were demonstrated in a 50 mm × 50 mm × 50 mm volume with a nominal spatial resolution of 0.42 mm and an actual resolution of ~0.71 mm in all three dimensions (corresponding to a total of 120 × 120 × 120 voxels). PMID:26832005

  14. Subwavenumber charge-coupled device spectrometer calibration using molecular iodine laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Joseph G.; Hernandez-Diaz, Carlos; Williamson, J. Charles

    2010-01-15

    Spectrometers configured with charge-coupled devices (CCD) or other array-based detectors require calibration to convert from the pixel coordinate to a spectral coordinate. A CCD calibration method well suited for Raman spectroscopy has been developed based on the 514.5 nm Ar{sup +} laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum of room-temperature molecular iodine vapor. Over 360 primary and secondary I{sub 2} LIF calibration lines spanning 510-645 nm were identified as calibrant peaks using an instrumental resolution of 1 cm{sup -1}. Two instrument calibration functions were evaluated with these peaks: a second-order polynomial and a function derived from simple optomechanical considerations. The latter function provided better fitting characteristics. Calibration using I{sub 2} LIF was tested with measurements of both laser light scattering and Raman spectra. The I{sub 2} LIF reference spectra and the signal spectra were recorded simultaneously, with no cross talk, by separating the two signals spatially along the vertical axis of the CCD imager. In this way, every CCD image could be independently calibrated. An accuracy and a precision of {+-}0.05 cm{sup -1} were achieved with this calibration technique.

  15. Characterization of the Ã(1A″) state of HCF by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Timothy W.; Bacskay, George B.; Kable, Scott H.

    1999-06-01

    An extensive experimental exploration of the Ã(1A″)←X˜(1A') transition of supersonically cooled fluoromethylene has been performed using laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Several new bending vibrational bands are reported, which provide the harmonic frequency and anharmonicity constant for this vibration and lead to an estimate of the height of the barrier to linearity as 6400±500 cm-1. Assignment of the vibrational hot-band structure leads to the first measurement of the à state CF stretching frequency as ν3'=1260 cm-1 and tentatively the CH stretching frequency as ν1'=2852 cm-1. The A' rotational constant increases strongly with increasing quanta of bending vibration, which indicates that the molecular structure is becoming more linear. Consideration of only the average bond angle, calculated from ab initio data for this state, is insufficient to account for the change in A'. The coupling of a-axis rotation with bending vibration must be included. A number of other dynamical effects were observed in the spectra, including lifetime shortening and disappearance of rotational transitions with K'⩾1. These were explained in terms of the Renner-Teller interaction between the X˜ and à states.

  16. Measurement Of Atmospheric Peroxy Radicals By Chemical Conversion And Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; Naik, C.; Mao, J.; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Lesher, R.; Brune, W. H.

    2005-12-01

    A new method for measuring atmospheric peroxy radicals is described based on chemical conversion and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Peroxy radicals are quantitatively converted into hydroperoxyl radicals (HO2) by the reactions with NO in a low-pressure reactor. The produced HO2 is then detected with an LIF instrument. The characterization and response of this instrument has been evaluated through the laboratory experiments as well as numeric simulations. Relative responses of different organic groups of peroxy radicals to HO2 were measured and the conversion coefficients agree generally well with the model calculations. The dependence of conversion coefficients on different experiment conditions was investigated. For HO2, the LIF signal is calibrated with an HO2 source produced by the photolysis of H2O via a low-pressure mercury lamp. Field measurements of peroxy radicals using this method were conducted at a rural site and preliminary results are presented. The estimated accuracy of the derived HOxROx concentrations is about 40% with a 2σ confidence level. Typical detection limit is about 0.2 pptv for 1-minute averaging times.

  17. Validation and evaluation of a novel time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Durot, C J; Gallimore, A D; Smith, T B

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel technique to measure time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence signals in plasma sources that have a relatively constant Fourier spectrum of oscillations in steady-state operation, but are not periodically pulsed, e.g., Hall thrusters. The technique uses laser modulation of the order of MHz and recovers signal via a combination of band-pass filtering, phase-sensitive detection, and averaging over estimated transfer functions calculated for many different cycles of the oscillation. Periodic discharge current oscillations were imposed on a hollow cathode. Measurements were validated by comparison with independent measurements from a lock-in amplifier and by comparing the results of the transfer function average to an independent analysis technique triggering averaging over many oscillation cycles in the time domain. The performance of the new technique is analyzed and compared to prior techniques, and it is shown that this new technique has a niche in measurements where the analog photomultiplier signal has a nonwhite noise spectral density and cycles of oscillation are not sufficiently repeatable to allow for reliable triggering or a meaningful average waveform in the time domain.

  18. Investigation of Gas Seeding for Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arisman, C. J.; Johansen, C. T.; Bathel, B. F.; Danehy, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the gas-seeding strategies required for planar laser-induced fluorescence in a Mach 10 (approximately Mach 8.2 postshock) airflow were performed. The work was performed to understand and quantify the adverse effects associated with gas seeding and to assess various types of seed gas that could potentially be used in future experiments. In prior experiments, NO and NO2 were injected through a slot near the leading edge of a flatplate wedge model used in NASA Langley Research Center's 31 in. Mach 10 air tunnel facility. In this paper, nitric oxide, krypton, and iodine gases were simulated at various injection rates. Simulations showing the deflection of the velocity boundary layer for each of the cases are presented. Streamwise distributions of velocity and concentration boundary-layer thicknesses, as well as vertical distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass distributions, are presented for each of the cases. A comparison between simulated streamwise velocity profiles and experimentally obtained molecular tagging velocimetry profiles using a nitric oxide seeding strategy is performed to verify the influence of such a strategy on the boundary layer. The relative merits of the different seeding strategies are discussed. The results from a custom solver based on OpenFOAM version 2.2.1 are compared against results obtained from ANSYS® Fluent version 6.3.

  19. Biomedical applications of capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Páez, X; Hernández, L

    2001-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a high-efficiency analytical technique that has had a great impact as a tool in biomedical research, clinical and forensic practice in the last ten years. Only in one of the applications, the DNA analysis, it has had an explosive exponential growth in the last few years. This impact is expressed in an enormous amount of CE articles and many reviews. The CE advantages with respect to other analytical techniques: the required very small sample volume, rapid analysis, great resolution power and low costs, have made this technique ideal for the analysis of a numerous endogenous and exogenous substances present in biological fluids. The different modes of CE have been coupled to different detection techniques such as UV-absorbance, electrochemical, mass spectrometry and laser-induced fluorescence detection (LIFD) to detect different nature and molecular size separated analytes. This review focuses mostly on the applications of CE-LIFD, to measure drugs and endogenous neuroactive substances such as amino acids and monoamines, especially in microdialysis samples from experimental animals and humans. CE-LIFD trends are discussed: automated faster analysis with capillary array systems, resolution power improvement, higher detection sensitivity, and CE systems miniaturization for extremely small sample volume, in order to make CE easier and affordable to the lab bench or the clinical bed.

  20. Multi-Site N-glycan mapping study 1: Capillary electrophoresis – laser induced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Park, SungAe Suhr; Santos, Marcia; Lew, Clarence; Jones, Aled; Haxo, Ted; Kimzey, Michael; Pourkaveh, Shiva; Szabó, Zoltán; Sosic, Zoran; Feng, Peng; Váradi, Csaba; de l'Escaille, François; Falmagne, Jean-Bernard; Sejwal, Preeti; Niedringhaus, Thomas; Michels, David; Freckleton, Gordon; Hamm, Melissa; Manuilov, Anastasiya; Schwartz, Melissa; Luo, Jiann-Kae; van Dyck, Jonathan; Leung, Pui-King; Olajos, Marcell; Gu, Yingmei; Gao, Kai; Wang, Wenbo; Wegstein, Jo; Tep, Samnang; Guttman, András

    2016-01-01

    An international team that included 20 independent laboratories from biopharmaceutical companies, universities, analytical contract laboratories and national authorities in the United States, Europe and Asia was formed to evaluate the reproducibility of sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans using capillary electrophoresis of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans with laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection (16 sites) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC, 12 sites; results to be reported in a subsequent publication). All participants used the same lot of chemicals, samples, reagents, and columns/capillaries to run their assays. Migration time, peak area and peak area percent values were determined for all peaks with >0.1% peak area. Our results demonstrated low variability and high reproducibility, both, within any given site as well across all sites, which indicates that a standard N-glycan analysis platform appropriate for general use (clone selection, process development, lot release, etc.) within the industry can be established. PMID:26466659

  1. Ion dynamics in a DC magnetron microdischarge measured with laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Gascon, Nicolas; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Ito, Tsuyohito; Cappelli, Mark

    2015-11-01

    We present evidence of coherent rotating azimuthal wave structures in a planar DC magnetron microdischarge operated with argon and xenon. The dominant stable mode structure varies with discharge voltage, and high frame rate camera imaging of plasma emission reveals propagating azimuthal waves in the negative E-> × B-> direction. This negative drift direction is attributed to a local field reversal arising from strong density gradients that drive excess ions towards the anode. Observed mode transitions are shown to be consistent with models of gradient drift-wave dispersion in such a field reversal when the fluid representation includes ambipolar diffusion parallel to the magnetic field direction. Time-averaged and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements interrogate xenon ion dynamics under the action of the field reversal. Time resolution is obtained by synchronizing with the coherent azimuthal wave frequency at fixed mode number. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  2. Multi-Site N-glycan mapping study 1: Capillary electrophoresis - laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Park, SungAe Suhr; Santos, Marcia; Lew, Clarence; Jones, Aled; Haxo, Ted; Kimzey, Michael; Pourkaveh, Shiva; Szabó, Zoltán; Sosic, Zoran; Feng, Peng; Váradi, Csaba; de l'Escaille, François; Falmagne, Jean-Bernard; Sejwal, Preeti; Niedringhaus, Thomas; Michels, David; Freckleton, Gordon; Hamm, Melissa; Manuilov, Anastasiya; Schwartz, Melissa; Luo, Jiann-Kae; van Dyck, Jonathan; Leung, Pui-King; Olajos, Marcell; Gu, Yingmei; Gao, Kai; Wang, Wenbo; Wegstein, Jo; Tep, Samnang; Guttman, András

    2016-01-01

    An international team that included 20 independent laboratories from biopharmaceutical companies, universities, analytical contract laboratories and national authorities in the United States, Europe and Asia was formed to evaluate the reproducibility of sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans using capillary electrophoresis of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans with laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection (16 sites) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC, 12 sites; results to be reported in a subsequent publication). All participants used the same lot of chemicals, samples, reagents, and columns/capillaries to run their assays. Migration time, peak area and peak area percent values were determined for all peaks with >0.1% peak area. Our results demonstrated low variability and high reproducibility, both, within any given site as well across all sites, which indicates that a standard N-glycan analysis platform appropriate for general use (clone selection, process development, lot release, etc.) within the industry can be established.

  3. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) investigation of hypersonic flowfields in a Mach 10 wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Wilkes, Jennifer A.; Aderfer, David W.; Jones, Stephen B.; Robbins, Anthony W.; Pantry, Danny P.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide (NO) was used to visualize four different hypersonic flowfields in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air wind tunnel. The four configurations were: (1) the wake flowfield of a fuselage-only X-33 lifting body, (2) flow over a flat plate containing a rectangular cavity, (3) flow over a 70deg blunted cone with a cylindrical afterbody, formerly studied by an AGARD working group, and (4) an Apollo-geometry entry capsule - relevant to the Crew Exploration Vehicle currently being developed by NASA. In all cases, NO was seeded into the flowfield through tubes inside or attached to the model sting and strut. PLIF was used to visualize the NO in the flowfield. In some cases pure NO was seeded into the flow while in other cases a 5% NO, 95% N2 mix was injected. Several parameters were varied including seeding method and location, seeding mass flow rate, model angle of attack and tunnel stagnation pressure, which varies the unit Reynolds number. The location of the laser sheet was as also varied to provide three dimensional flow information. Virtual Diagnostics Interface (ViDI) technology developed at NASA Langley was used to visualize the data sets in post processing. The measurements demonstrate some of the capabilities of the PLIF method for studying hypersonic flows.

  4. Method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainties in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 percent, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  5. A method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations due to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 and 3 percent, respectively, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon-statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  6. Method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O(2) fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Laufer, G; McKenzie, R L; Fletcher, D G

    1990-11-20

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainties in the temperature and density measurements can be <2%, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  7. Jet-Cooled Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of T-Butoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Neil J.; Cheng, Lan; Stanton, John F.; Miller, Terry A.; Liu, Jinjun

    2015-06-01

    The vibrational structures of the tilde A ^2A_1 and tilde X ^2E states of t-butoxy were obtained in jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectroscopic measurements. The observed transitions are assigned based on vibrational frequencies calculated using Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) method and the predicted Franck-Condon factors. The spin-orbit (SO) splitting was measured to be 35(5) cm-1 for the lowest vibrational level of the ground (tilde X ^2E) state and increases with increasing vibrational quantum number of the CO stretch mode. Vibronic analysis of the DF spectra suggests that Jahn-Teller (JT)-active modes of the ground-state t-butoxy radical are similar to those of methoxy and would be the same if methyl groups were replaced by hydrogen atoms. Coupled-cluster calculations show that electron delocalization, introduced by the substitution of hydrogens with methyl groups, reduces the electronic contribution of the SO splittings by only around ten percent, and a calculation on the vibronic levels based on quasidiabatic model Hamiltonian clearly attributes the relatively small SO splitting of the tilde X ^2E state of t-butoxy mainly to stronger reduction of orbital angular momentum by the JT-active modes when compared to methoxy. The rotational and fine structure of the LIF transition to the first CO stretch overtone level of the tilde A^2A_1 state has been simulated using a spectroscopic model first proposed for methoxy, yielding an accurate determination of the rotational constants of both tilde A and tilde X states.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence and phosphoresence of C{sub 60} isolated in solid Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, W.C.; Ho, C.D.; Liu, C.P.; Lee, Y.P.

    1996-03-07

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectrum of C{sub 60} isolated in solid Ne with resolved vibronic lines was recorded with laser excitation at 355 nm or in the 585-645 nm region. The spectrum consists of progressions with spacings nearly 260 cm{sup -1}, each separated by varied intervals from the origin at 15648 cm{sup -1}. The intervals 272, 412, 971, 1452, 1587, 2883, 2924, and 3023 cm{sup -1} correspond to various vibrational levels of g{sub u} and h{sub u} symmetry, or their combination with the a{sub g}(1) level, of the ground electronic state; the nearly 260 cm{sup -1} progression (with 272 cm{sup -1} as the first spacing) corresponds to the Jahn-Teller active h{sub g}(8) mode. When the Ne matrix was doped with Xe (1.2%), phosphorescence of C{sub 60} was greatly enhanced. The spectrum exhibited a single progression with origin at 12773 cm{sup -1} and spacings near 260 cm{sup -1}; its lifetime at 5 K was approximately 90 {mu}s. The fluorescence excitation spectrum revealed progressions of spacings either nearly 180 or nearly 260 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to excitation to two different singlet excited states, respectively. The first excited singlet and triplet states observed in this work are proposed to be A {sup 1}T{sub 2g} and a {sup 3}T{sub 2g}, respectively. The second excited singlet state, proposed to be B {sup 1}T{sub 1g}, lies approximately 200 cm{sup -1} above the A {sup 1}T{sub 2g} state. 48 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Ultrashort Two-Photon-Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Nanosecond-Duration, Repetitively Pulsed Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jacob Brian

    Absolute number densities of atomic species produced by nanosecond duration, repetitively pulsed electric discharges are measured by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). Relatively high plasma discharge pulse energies (=1 mJ/pulse) are used to generate atomic hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen in a variety of discharge conditions and geometries. Unique to this work is the development of femtosecond-laser-based TALIF (fs-TALIF). Fs-TALIF offers a number of advantages compared to more conventional ns-pulse-duration laser systems, including better accuracy of direct quenching measurements in challenging environments, significantly reduced photolytic interference including photo-dissociation and photo-ionization, higher signal and increased laser-pulse bandwidth, the ability to collect two-dimensional images of atomic species number densities with far greater spatial resolution compared with more conventional diagnostics, and much higher laser repetition rates allowing for more efficient and accurate measurements of atomic species number densities. In order to fully characterize the fs-TALIF diagnostic and compare it with conventional ns-TALIF, low pressure (100 Torr) ns-duration pulsed discharges are operated in mixtures of H2, O2, and N2 with different buffer gases including argon, helium, and nitrogen. These discharge conditions are used to demonstrate the capability for two-dimensional imaging measurements. The images produced are the first of their kind and offer quantitative insight into spatially and temporally resolved kinetics and transport in ns-pulsed discharge plasmas. The two-dimensional images make possible comparison with high-fidelity plasma kinetics models of the presented data. The comparison with the quasi-one-dimensional kinetic model show good spatial and temporal agreement. The same diagnostics are used at atmospheric pressure, when atomic oxygen fs-TALIF is performed in an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ). Here, the

  10. Plant abiotic stress diagnostic by laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectral analysis of in vivo leaf tissue of biofuel species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia-Neto, Artur S.; Silva, Elias A., Jr.; Costa, Ernande B.; Bueno, Luciano A.; Silva, Luciana M. H.; Granja, Manuela M. C.; Medeiros, Maria J. L.; Câmara, Terezinha J. R.; Willadino, Lilia G.

    2010-02-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is exploited to evaluate the effect of abiotic stresses upon the evolution and characteristics of in vivo chlorophyll emission spectra of leaves tissues of brazilian biofuel plants species(Saccharum officinarum and Jatropha curcas). The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra of 20 min predarkened intact leaves were studied employing several excitation wavelengths in the UV-VIS spectral region. Red(Fr) and far-red (FFr) chlorophyll fluorescence emission signals around 685 nm and 735 nm, respectively, were analyzed as a function of the stress intensity and the time of illumination(Kautsky effect). The Chl fluorescence ratio Fr/FFr which is a valuable nondestructive indicator of the chlorophyll content of leaves was investigated during a period of time of 30 days. The dependence of the Chl fluorescence ratio Fr/FFr upon the intensity of the abiotic stress(salinity) was examined. The results indicated that the salinity plays a major hole in the chlorophyll concentration of leaves in both plants spieces, with a significant reduction in the chlorophyll content for NaCl concentrations in the 25 - 200 mM range. The laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence analysis allowed detection of damage caused by salinity in the early stages of the plants growing process, and can be used as an early-warning indicator of salinity stress

  11. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs [1, 2]. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions [see 3 for a review]. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique [4] and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examinedReferences[1] F. Salama, E. Bakes, L.J. Allamandola, A.G.G.M. Tielens, Astrophys. J., 458 (1996) p.621[2] F. Salama, The ISO Revolution, EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, France (1999) p.65[3] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press,4, S251,(2008), p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[4

  12. Downsizing of Georgia Tech's Airborne Fluorescence Spectrometer (AFS) for the Measurement of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurements (TTGAMG) endeavors to further downsize and stabilize the Georgia Institute of Technology's Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE). It will mainly address the TTGAMG successes and failures as participants in the summer 1998 Wallops Island test flights on board the P3-B. Due to the restructuring and reorganization of the TTGAMG since the original funding of this grant, some of the objectives and time lines of the deliverables have been changed. Most of these changes have been covered in the preceding annual report. We are anticipating getting back on track with the original proposal's downsizing effort this summer, culminating in the GITALIFE no longer occupying a high bay rack and the loss of several hundred pounds.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of plants using a liquid crystal tunable filter and charge coupled device imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yasunori; Matsubara, Tomohiro; Koga, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Fumitoshi; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Nomura, Akio

    2005-10-01

    We developed a laser-induced fluorescence imaging system for plant monitoring use, with which it was possible to make an image at any wavelength between 430 and 750nm. The excitation source for the fluorescence was a cw ultraviolet laser diode with 398nm, and the detector was an image-intensified charge coupled device. A liquid crystal tunable filter was used as the fluorescence wavelength selection device. All of the system performance including the wavelength tuning was electrically controlled, so that it could be operated with no mechanical vibration noise. The fluorescence images of a coffee tree leaf obtained at 440, 530, 685, and 740nm clearly showed a distribution pattern of the fluorescence intensity over the leaf. The pattern reflected the different physiological statuses of the plant. Advantages of the imaging system were experimentally discussed on a point of detection of inhomogeneous physiological activities over a plant leaf.

  14. Ex vivo optical coherence tomography and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy imaging of murine gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Wade, Norman; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Gerner, Eugene; Barton, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) have separately been found to have clinical potential in identifying human gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, yet their diagnostic capability in mouse models of human disease is unknown. We combine the two modalities to survey the GI tract of a variety of mouse strains and sample dysplasias and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) of the small and large intestine. Segments of duodenum and lower colon 2.5 cm in length and the entire esophagus from 10 mice each of two colon cancer models (ApcMin and AOM treated A/J) and two IBD models (Il-2 and Il-10) and 5 mice each of their respective controls were excised. OCT images and LIF spectra were obtained simultaneously from each tissue sample within 1 hour of extraction. Histology was used to classify tissue regions as normal, Peyer"s patch, dysplasia, adenoma, or IBD. Features in corresponding regions of OCT images were analyzed. Spectra from each of these categories were averaged and compared via the student's t-test. Features in OCT images correlated to histology in both normal and diseased tissue samples. In the diseased samples, OCT was able to identify early stages of mild colitis and dysplasia. In the sample of IBD, the LIF spectra displayed unique peaks at 635nm and 670nm, which were attributed to increased porphyrin production in the proliferating bacteria of the disease. These peaks have the potential to act as a diagnostic for IBD. OCT and LIF appear to be useful and complementary modalities for imaging mouse models.

  15. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Müller, D.; Rieger, S.; Schmidl, G.; Triebel, W.; Paa, W.

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (414 absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure.

  16. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Burkert, A; Müller, D; Rieger, S; Schmidl, G; Triebel, W; Paa, W

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (41 (4) absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure. PMID:26724008

  17. Velocity Field Measurements in Rarefied, Hypersonic Flows of Nitrogen Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Eric

    Velocity fields are measured in the shock layer and boundary layer on a plate with a cylindrical fin immersed in a hypersonic, free jet of nitrogen, using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of iodine. A sheet beam from a single-mode argon laser at 514 nm is used to excite hyperfine components of the P(13), R(15) and P(48), P(103) blended rotational-vibrational lines in the B-X electronic transition for iodine seeded in the flow. The Doppler broadening and shift of these lines, and the relative rotational line strengths are determined for excitation spectra recorded in a planar grid. Using this measurement technique, estimates for iodine of the mass velocity component and kinetic temperature of translation in the direction of laser propagation, rotational temperature, and relative number density are determined at each point. Sectional planes of the flow over the body are investigated at a spatial resolution on the scale of the molecular mean-free-path in the free jet near the plate leading edge. Two directions within each plane are examined, to determine the velocity vector and to investigate translational non-equilibrium. Predictions from two direct simulation Monte Carlo computations of the flow are compared with the measurements. Large values of slip velocity and temperature jump at the plate surface are observed for iodine. Measurements and DSMC predictions indicate strong translational non-equilibrium effects for the iodine in the shock wave and the thick boundary layer on the plate, and are qualitatively consistent with a bimodal velocity distribution function. As a consequence of the ratio of molecular masses, the translational non-equilibrium of iodine is much greater than for nitrogen.

  18. Simultaneous optical coherence tomography and laser induced fluorescence imaging in rat model of ovarian carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Lida P; Liebmann, Erica R; Marion, Samuel L; Hoyer, Patricia B; Davis, John R; Brewer, Molly A

    2010-01-01

    Determining if an ovarian mass is benign or malignant is an ongoing clinical challenge. The development of reliable animal models provides means to evaluate new diagnostic tools to more accurately determine if an ovary has benign or malignant features. Although sex cord-stromal tumors (SCST) account for 0.1–0.5% of ovarian malignancies, they have similar appearances to more aggressive epithelial cancers and can serve as a prototype for developing better diagnostic methods for ovarian cancer. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy are non-destructive optical imaging modalities. OCT provides architectural cross-sectional images at near histological resolutions and LIF provides biochemical information. We utilize combined OCT-LIF to image ovaries in post-menopausal ovarian carcinogenesis rat models, evaluating normal cyclic, acyclic and neoplastic ovaries. Eighty-three female Fisher rats were exposed to combinations of control sesame oil, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) to induce ovarian failure, and/or 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce carcinogenesis. Three or five months post-treatment, 162 ovaries were harvested and imaged with OCT-LIF: 40 cyclic, 105 acyclic and 17 SCST. OCT identified various follicle stages, corpora lutea (CL), CL remnants, epithelial invaginations/inclusions and allowed for characterization of both cystic and solid SCST. Signal attenuation comparisons between CL and solid SCST revealed statistically significant increases in attenuation among CL. LIF characterized spectral differences in cyclic, acyclic and neoplastic ovaries attributed to collagen, NADH/FAD and hemoglobin absorption. We present combined OCT-LIF imaging in a rat ovarian carcinogenesis model, providing preliminary criteria for normal cyclic, acyclic and SCST ovaries which support the potential of OCT-LIF for ovarian imaging. PMID:21108515

  19. Two-Photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Neutral Density in Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galante, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    Neutral particles play a critical role in nearly all plasmas, from the pedestal region of a tokamak fusion plasma to industrial plasma processing systems. In fusion plasmas, neutrals at the edge serve as both a source of particles and also a sink of momentum and energy. Control of the edge plasma density in tokamaks is critical for the transition to H-mode plasmas and the role of neutrals in modifying the plasma rotation in the edge is an area of active research. However, few methods exist to make localized, direct neutral density measurements. We have developed a new diagnostic based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). We use a high intensity (5 MW/cm2), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm-1) laser to probe the ground state of neutral hydrogen, deuterium and krypton with spatial resolution better than 0.2 cm, a time resolution of 10 ns, and a measurement cadence of 20 Hz. In this talk I will describe proof-of-principle measurements in a helicon plasma source that demonstrate the TALIF diagnostic is capable of measuring neutral densities spanning four orders of magnitude; comparable to the edge neutral gradients predicted in the tokamak pedestal. The measurements are performed in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas and absolute calibration is accomplished through TALIF measurements in neutral krypton. The optical configuration employed is confocal, i.e., both light injection and collection are accomplished through a single optical port in the vacuum vessel. The wavelength resolution of the diagnostic is sufficient to separate hydrogen and deuterium spectra and I will present measurements from mixed hydrogen and deuterium plasmas that demonstrate isotopic abundance measurements are feasible with the TALIF system. Time and spatially resolved measurements also allow us to explore the effects of wall recycling and pulse repetition rates on the neutral density profile in the plasma source. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  20. Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements of neutral density in a helicon plasmaa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galante, M. E.; Magee, R. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a new diagnostic based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). We use a high intensity (5 MW/cm2), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm-1) laser to probe the ground state of neutral hydrogen, deuterium and krypton with spatial resolution better than 0.2 cm, a time resolution of 10 ns, and a measurement cadence of 20 Hz. Here, we describe proof-of-principle measurements in a helicon plasma source that demonstrate the TALIF diagnostic is capable of measuring neutral densities spanning four orders of magnitude; comparable to the edge neutral gradients predicted in the DIII-D tokamak pedestal. The measurements are performed in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas and absolute calibration is accomplished through TALIF measurements in neutral krypton. The optical configuration employed is confocal, i.e., both light injection and collection are accomplished with a single lens through a single optical port in the vacuum vessel. The wavelength resolution of the diagnostic is sufficient to separate hydrogen and deuterium spectra and we present measurements from mixed hydrogen and deuterium plasmas that demonstrate isotopic abundance measurements are feasible. Time resolved measurements also allow us to explore the evolution of the neutral hydrogen density and temperature and effects of wall recycling. We find that the atomic neutral density grows rapidly at the initiation of the discharge, reaching the steady-state value within 1 ms. Additionally, we find that neutral hydrogen atoms are born with 0.08 eV temperatures, not 2 eV as is typically assumed.

  1. Measurement of OH reactivity by laser flash photolysis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Daniel; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Edwards, Peter M.; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-07-01

    OH reactivity (k'OH) is the total pseudo-first-order loss rate coefficient describing the removal of OH radicals to all sinks in the atmosphere, and is the inverse of the chemical lifetime of OH. Measurements of ambient OH reactivity can be used to discover the extent to which measured OH sinks contribute to the total OH loss rate. Thus, OH reactivity measurements enable determination of the comprehensiveness of measurements used in models to predict air quality and ozone production, and, in conjunction with measurements of OH radical concentrations, to assess our understanding of OH production rates. In this work, we describe the design and characterisation of an instrument to measure OH reactivity using laser flash photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (LFP-LIF) spectroscopy. The LFP-LIF technique produces OH radicals in isolation, and thus minimises potential interferences in OH reactivity measurements owing to the reaction of HO2 with NO which can occur if HO2 is co-produced with OH in the instrument. Capabilities of the instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements are illustrated by data collected during field campaigns in London, UK, and York, UK. The instrumental limit of detection for k'OH was determined to be 1.0 s-1 for the campaign in London and 0.4 s-1 for the campaign in York. The precision, determined by laboratory experiment, is typically < 1 s-1 for most ambient measurements of OH reactivity. Total uncertainty in ambient measurements of OH reactivity is ˜ 6 %. We also present the coupling and characterisation of the LFP-LIF instrument to an atmospheric chamber for measurements of OH reactivity during simulated experiments, and provide suggestions for future improvements to OH reactivity LFP-LIF instruments.

  2. Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements of neutral density in a helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galante, M. E.; Magee, R. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a new diagnostic based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). We use a high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup −1}) laser to probe the ground state of neutral hydrogen, deuterium and krypton with spatial resolution better than 0.2 cm, a time resolution of 10 ns, and a measurement cadence of 20 Hz. Here, we describe proof-of-principle measurements in a helicon plasma source that demonstrate the TALIF diagnostic is capable of measuring neutral densities spanning four orders of magnitude; comparable to the edge neutral gradients predicted in the DIII-D tokamak pedestal. The measurements are performed in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas and absolute calibration is accomplished through TALIF measurements in neutral krypton. The optical configuration employed is confocal, i.e., both light injection and collection are accomplished with a single lens through a single optical port in the vacuum vessel. The wavelength resolution of the diagnostic is sufficient to separate hydrogen and deuterium spectra and we present measurements from mixed hydrogen and deuterium plasmas that demonstrate isotopic abundance measurements are feasible. Time resolved measurements also allow us to explore the evolution of the neutral hydrogen density and temperature and effects of wall recycling. We find that the atomic neutral density grows rapidly at the initiation of the discharge, reaching the steady-state value within 1 ms. Additionally, we find that neutral hydrogen atoms are born with 0.08 eV temperatures, not 2 eV as is typically assumed.

  3. Measurements of IO in the Tropical Marine Boundary Layer using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, H.; Ingham, T.; Heard, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Halogenated short-lived substances (VSLS) are emitted from the oceans by marine species such as macroalgae and phytoplankton and contribute to halogen loading in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Transport of halogenated VSLS into the stratosphere occurs mainly in the tropics, where ascending warm air carries them aloft, and leads to catalytic depletion of stratospheric ozone on a global scale and formation of the Antarctic ozone hole. The tropical marine environment is therefore an important region in which to study the effects of these short-lived halogen species on ozone depletion. The SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project combines ship-borne, aircraft-based and ground-based measurements in and over the South China Sea and the Sulu Sea, and around the coast of Malaysian Borneo, to reduce uncertainties in the amount of halogenated VSLS reaching the stratosphere, the associated ozone depletion, and the effects of a changing climate on these processes. In this work we present measurements of IO radicals made onboard the German research vessel Sonne during SHIVA, between Singapore and Manila. IO is formed via photolysis of iodine-containing source gases (e.g. I2, CH3I) to produce I atoms, which react with ozone. It is therefore an important species to consider when assessing the impacts of halogen chemistry on ozone depletion. Measurements of IO were made over a two-week period by the University of Leeds Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) instrument, which excites IO radicals at λ ~ 445 nm and detects the resultant fluorescence at λ ~ 512 nm. A suite of supporting gas- and aqueous-phase measurements were also made, including concentrations of halocarbons (e.g. CHBr3, CH3I), trace pollutant gases (e.g. CO, O3, NOx), and biological parameters (e.g. abundance and speciation of phytoplankton). Preliminary data analysis indicates that IO was detected above the instrumental limit of detection (0.3 pptv for a 30 minute averaging

  4. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements and Modeling of Nitric Oxide in Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravikrishna, Rayavarapu V.

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of making quantitative nonintrusive NO concentration ([NO]) measurements in nonpremixed flames has been assessed by obtaining laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of [NO] in counterflow diffusion flames at atmospheric and higher pressures. Comparisons at atmospheric pressure between laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) and linear LIF measurements in four diluted ethane-air counterflow diffusion flames with strain rates from 5 to 48/s yielded excellent agreement from fuel-lean to moderately fuel-rich conditions, thus indicating the utility of a model-based quenching correction technique, which was then extended to higher pressures. Quantitative LIF measurements of [NO] in three diluted methane-air counterflow diffusion flames with strain rates from 5 to 35/s were compared with OPPDIF model predictions using the GRI (version 2.11) chemical kinetic mechanism. The comparisons revealed that the GRI mechanism underpredicts prompt-NO by 30-50% at atmospheric pressure. Based on these measurements, a modified reaction rate coefficient for the prompt-NO initiation reaction was proposed which causes the predictions to match experimental data. Temperature measurements using thin filament pyrometry (TFP) in conjunction with a new calibration method utilizing a near-adiabatic H2-air Hencken burner gave very good comparisons with model predictions in these counterflow diffusion flames. Quantitative LIF measurements of [NO] were also obtained in four methane-air counterflow partially-premixed flames with fuel-side equivalence ratios (phi(sub B)) of 1.45, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0. The measurements were in excellent agreement with model predictions when accounting for radiative heat loss. Spatial separation between regions dominated by the prompt and thermal NO mechanisms was observed in the phi(sub B) = 1.45 flame. The modified rate coefficient proposed earlier for the prompt-NO initiation reaction improved agreement between code predictions and measurements in the

  5. Measurement of gas density and temperature distributions in strongly rotating UF/sub 6/ using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, R.A.; Caldwell, S.E.; White, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A new technique for using Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) signals to measure the distribution of gas density and temperature in strongly rotating UF/sub 6/ gas is presented. An external pulsed laser is used to excite the rotating UF/sub 6/ gas, producing an exponentially decaying fluorescence signal. A multi-channel fiber optics system simultaneously collects the fluorescence signals emanating from a number of points in the gas. The signals from each optical channel are digitized and processed to determine the fluorescence signal intensity and decay lifetime at each of the points of observation by means of a least squares fitting process. Gas densities and temperatures are then determined from the intensity and lifetime data. A recently constructed LIF probe system is described and an analysis of the unfolding techniques necessary to process the signal data is presented. Preliminary data, obtained in tests of the probe system in a laboratory rotor, are presented.

  6. Development of a UV laser-induced fluorescence lidar for monitoring blue-green algae in Lake Suwa.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasunori; Takano, Kengo; Kobayashi, Fumitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Park, Ho-Dong

    2014-10-20

    We developed a UV (355 nm) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) lidar for monitoring the real-time status of blue-green algae. Since the fluorescence spectrum of blue-green algae excited by 355 nm showed the specific fluorescence at 650 nm, the lidar was designed to be able to detect the 650 nm fluorescence as a surveillance method for the algae. The usefulness was confirmed by observation at Lake Suwa over four years (2005-2008). The detection limit of the LIF lidar was 16.65 mg/L for the blue-green algae, which is the range of concentrations in the safe level set by the World Health Organization.

  7. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence. Technical progress report, September 1, 1989--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  8. Laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy in capillary electrophoresis as an possible instrument for extraterrestrial life signs detection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhail, Gorlenko; Cheptcov, Vladimir; Anton, Maydykovskiy; Eugeniy, Vasilev

    The one of a significant aims in extraterrestrial exploration is a seeking for a life traces in a open space and planetary objects. Complex composition and unknown origin of suspected signs of life required у new analytical approaches and technical solutions. The promising assai here can be Laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy methods. The combined instrument developed by our team reveal the advantage of capillary electrophoresis assays in a junction with laser induced fluorescence detection technology. We optimized excitation configuration of fluorescence in capillary electrophoresis to reduce pumping laser power up to 1 mW and decrease background scattering. The improvement of the device sensitivity at poor sample concentration we achieved by incorporating fluorescence flow-through cuvette into spectrometer. That allows to simplify setup, to minimize weight and increase reproducibility of measurements. The device has been tasted in complex organic chemical mixes and microbial strains differentiation tasks. 3d multinational spectra allow us to increase the spectra information loads in comparison with ordinary capillary electrophoresis approaches. Possible updating the device with Raman approach can even furthermore multiple the differentiation power of the instrument. The analytical module developed using this approach can be potentially effectively used in extraterrestrial researches as a payload of the future spacecraft.

  9. Ns-scale time-resolved laser induced fluorescence imaging for detection of fecal contamination on apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2004-11-01

    Our laboratory has been utilizing fluorescence techniques as a potential means for detection of quality and wholesomeness of food products. A system with a short pulse light source such as a laser coupled with a gated detector can be used to harvest fluorescence in ambient light conditions from biological samples with relatively low fluorescence yields. We present a versatile multispectral laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system capable of ns-scale time resolved fluorescence. The system is equipped with a tunable pulse laser system that emits in the visible range from 410 nm to 690 nm. Ns-scale, time-dependent multispectral fluorescence emissions of apples contaminated with a range of diluted cow feces were acquired. Four spectral bands, F670, F680, F685 and F730, centered near the emission peak wavelengths of the major constituents responsible for the red fluorescence emissions from apples artificially contaminated with cow feces were examined to determine a suitable single red fluorescence band and optimal ns-gate window for detection of fecal contamination on apples. The results based on the ns decay curves showed that 670 nm with 10 nm full width at half maximum (FWHM) at a gate-delay of 4 ns from the laser excitation peak provided the greatest differences in time-dependent fluorescence responses between feces contaminated spots and apples surfaces.

  10. Measurements of NO2 in Maritime Atmosphere in Japan by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, J.; Kajii, Y.

    2001-12-01

    NO2 is one of the most important species in tropospheric photochemistry since it plays a key role as a precursor of ozone. Photostationary-state (PSS) between NO and NO2 is a critical factor for ozone production. It is essential to measure NO2 precisely at the level of pptv in the remote, background region. In this study, a compact and sensitive instrument for direct measurement of NO2 has been developed utilizing laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. For the purpose of simple, compact and stable measurement, the single wavelength excitation by a powerful Nd:YAG laser (532.1 nm, 6500 mW at 10 kHz) is adopted. As a result of improvement, the sensitivity, background signal, dark current and the limit of detection are 0.07 cps ppbv-1 mW-1, 70 cps and 4 pptv (60-s, S/N=1), respectively. These specifications suggest the LIF- NO2 instrument can be utilized to measure NO2 at the level of pptv. Two field observations have been successfully carried out under maritime conditions in Japan. The measurements were conducted in Okinawa Island for 10 days and in Rishiri Island for 18 days. The stability of the instrument was confirmed through these observations. In intercomparison with a chemiluminescence-based detector, excellent agreements between two instruments were shown. Thus, the LIF instrument is confirmed to be reasonable for measuring atmospheric NO2. Finally, PSS of NOx in Rishiri Island is considered. As a result, it is suggested that unidentified species such as halogen oxides can be important in the conversion process of NO to NO2. This additional conversion of NO to NO2 can increase the formation rate of nitric acid. In this case, the increase of formation rate can be estimated as 7 %. Consequently, the high-performance LIF instrument realizes precise consideration about NO2 in PSS of NOx. This compact, simple method is promising to be applied conveniently in remote regions over the world.

  11. Laser-induced radiation microbeam technology and simultaneous real-time fluorescence imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Botchway, Stanley W; Reynolds, Pamela; Parker, Anthony W; O'Neill, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The use of nano- and microbeam techniques to induce and identify subcellular localized energy deposition within a region of a living cell provides a means to investigate the effects of low radiation doses. Particularly within the nucleus where the propagation and processing of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage (and repair) in both targeted and nontargeted cells, the latter being able to study cell-cell (bystander) effects. We have pioneered a near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser microbeam to mimic ionizing radiation through multiphoton absorption within a 3D femtoliter volume of a highly focused Gaussian laser beam. The novel optical microbeam mimics both complex ionizing and UV-radiation-type cell damage including double strand breaks (DSBs). Using the microbeam technology, we have been able to investigate the formation of DNA DSB and subsequent recruitment of repair proteins to the submicrometer size site of damage introduced in viable cells. The use of a phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX a marker for DSBs, visualized by immunofluorescent staining) and real-time imaging of fluorescently labeling proteins, the dynamics of recruitment of repair proteins in viable mammalian cells can be observed. Here we show the recruitment of ATM, p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), and RAD51, an integral protein of the homologous recombination process in the DNA repair pathway and Ku-80-GFP involved in the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway as exemplar repair process to show differences in the repair kinetics of DNA DSBs. The laser NIR multiphoton microbeam technology shows persistent DSBs at later times post laser irradiation which are indicative of DSBs arising at replication presumably from UV photoproducts or clustered damage containing single strand breaks (SSBs) that are also observed. Effects of the cell cycle may also be investigated in real time. Postirradiation and fixed cells studies show that in G1 cells a fraction of multiphoton laser-induced DSBs is persistent for >6h

  12. Application of Laser-Induced Fluorescence in AN Atmospheric-Pressure Boron-Seeded Flame.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Greg Richard

    The purpose of this research was to demonstrate the feasibility of using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of boron oxide radicals in atmospheric-pressure flames. Such a demonstration would provide a useful tool with which to probe the detailed combustion chemistry of boron fuels. The radical species sought were BO_2 and BO, both having spectra in the visible region of the spectrum. These two species are believed to play critical roles in the boron combustion process. A CH_4/air/O_2 flame was seeded with BCl_3 producing the green emission characteristic of boron flames. Unfortunately, it also created significant quantities of aerosols of solid boric acid from the reaction of the BCl_3 with the water vapor in the building air used in the flame. The burner was 1 cm in diameter and composed of approximately 60 capillary tubes. The burner could be remotely translated in two directions permitting investigation of different regions of the flame. The flame was first probed using standard emission spectroscopy and exhibited only spectra from BO _2 and CH. The CH spectra dominated everything in its 0-0 band region, which also is the 0-0 band region of BO. Next a tunable pulsed dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser was used to produce a beam of photons tuned to absorption bands of either BO_2 or BO. A strong LIF signal was generated from the pumping of both the R _1 and R_2 branches of the 00^00-00 ^00 transitions of the A-X system of BO _2. The effect was monitored by observing the 00^00-10^00 transition. This is the first known demonstration of LIF of BO_2 at atmospheric pressure. No LIF signal was observed from BO. Certain regions of the flame exhibited strong Mie scattering due to the aerosols. These regions also showed preliminary evidence of resonant Raman scattering although a thorough examination of this effect was not made due to time limitations.

  13. Prospects for single-molecule detection in liquids by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Dovichi, N.J.

    1983-01-01

    A laser-induced fluoresence determination of aqueous solutions of rhodamine 6G resulted in a detection limit of 18 attograms, or 22,000 molecules, of rhodamine 6G. These results allow the projection to single-molecule detection with reasonable improvements in the experimental apparatus.

  14. Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging of feces-contaminated apples by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence imaging system with tunable excitation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren; Kang, Sukwon

    2008-04-01

    We recently developed a time-resolved multispectral laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system capable of tunable wavelengths in the visible region for sample excitation and nanosecond-scale characterizations of fluorescence responses (lifetime imaging). Time-dependent fluorescence decay characteristics and fluorescence lifetime imaging of apples artificially contaminated with a range of diluted cow feces were investigated at 670 and 685 nm emission bands obtained by 418, 530, and 630 nm excitations. The results demonstrated that a 670 nm emission with a 418 nm excitation provided the greatest difference in time-dependent fluorescence responses between the apples and feces-treated spots. The versatilities of the time-resolved LIF imaging system, including fluorescence lifetime imaging of a relatively large biological object in a multispectral excitation-emission wavelength domain, were demonstrated.

  15. Enthalpy Distributions of Arc Jet Flow Based on Measured Laser Induced Fluorescence, Heat Flux and Stagnation Pressure Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Leonard E.; Milhoan, James D.; Oelke, Lance; Godfrey, Dennis; Larin, Maksim Y.; Scott, Carl D.; Grinstead, Jay H.; DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The centerline total enthalpy of arc jet flow is determined using laser induced fluorescence of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. Each component of the energy, kinetic, thermal, and chemical can be determined from LIF measurements. Additionally, enthalpy distributions are inferred from heat flux and pressure probe distribution measurements using an engineering formula. Average enthalpies are determined by integration over the radius of the jet flow, assuming constant mass flux and a mass flux distribution estimated from computational fluid dynamics calculations at similar arc jet conditions. The trends show favorable agreement, but there is an uncertainty that relates to the multiple individual measurements and assumptions inherent in LIF measurements.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence spectrometer based on tunable color center laser for low-impurity-solution diagnostic and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Fedorov, Vladimir V.; Karasik, Alexander Y.; Lin'kov, S. I.; Orlovskii, Yurii V.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Panov, Vitaly A.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.; Vorob'ev, Ivan N.; Zverev, Peter G.

    1996-11-01

    Solid state (SS) tunable LiF:F2 color center laser with second and fourth harmonic generation for visible and ultra violet spectral ranges was developed for the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). The construction and properties of excitation, registration and flame atomization systems for water solution diagnostic are discussed. The testing experiment with low iron concentrated water sample exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity which was estimated to be 0.05 ppb in our set-up. The SS LIFS spectrometer developed is usable to measure more than 42 metal elements in solution on the ppm, ppb level for various medical and biological applications.

  17. Planar measurement of flow field parameters in a nonreacting supersonic combustor using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced iodine fluorescence, has been used to obtain planar measurements of flow field parameters in the supersonic mixing flow field of a nonreacting supersonic combustor. The combustor design used in this work was configured with staged transverse sonic injection behind a rearward-facing step into a Mach 2.07 free stream. A set of spatially resolved measurements of temperature and injectant mole fraction has been generated. These measurements provide an extensive and accurate experimental data set required for the validation of computational fluid dynamic codes developed for the calculation of highly three-dimensional combustor flow fields.

  18. Remote monitoring of 129I and 127I isotopes in the atmosphere using the laser-induced fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.; Suganeev, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and calculation research of the development of the remote laser-induced fluorescence method for the detection of 129I and 127I molecular iodine isotopologues in atmospheric air in real time. As an excitation source we used a frequency-doubled neodymium laser (~532 nm). We estimated the sensitivity of 127I129I and 129I2 detection in the atmosphere. Detection sensitivity of molecular iodine is 4 · 1013 cm-3 for a sensing distance of 6 km.

  19. Remote monitoring of 129I and 127I isotopes in the atmosphere using the laser-induced fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.; Suganeev, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and calculation research of the development of the remote laser-induced fluorescence method for the detection of 129I and 127I molecular iodine isotopologues in atmospheric air in real time. As an excitation source we used a frequency-doubled neodymium laser (~532 nm). We estimated the sensitivity of 127I129I and 129I2 detection in the atmosphere. Detection sensitivity of molecular iodine is 4 · 1013 cm‑3 for a sensing distance of 6 km.

  20. High-speed laser-induced fluorescence and spark plug absorption sensor diagnostics for mixing and combustion studies in engines

    SciTech Connect

    Cundy, Michael; Schucht, Torsten; Thiele, Olaf; Sick, Volker

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneous high-speed in-cylinder measurements of laser-induced fluorescence of biacetyl as a fuel tracer and mid-infrared broadband absorption of fuel and combustion products (water and carbon dioxide) using a spark plug probe are compared in an optical engine. The study addresses uncertainties and the applicability of absorption measurements at a location slightly offset to the spark plug when information about mixing at the spark plug is desired. Absorbance profiles reflect important engine operation events, such as valve opening and closing, mixing, combustion, and outgassing from crevices.

  1. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of various carbon nanostructures (GO, G and nanodiamond) in Rd6G solution

    PubMed Central

    Bavali, A.; Parvin, P.; Mortazavi, S. Z.; Nourazar, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of carbon nanostructures such as graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO) and nanodiamond (ND) on the spectral properties of Rhodamine 6G (Rd6G) emission due to the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated. It is shown that the addition of carbon nano- structures lead to sensible Red/Blue shifts which depend on the optical properties and surface functionality of nanoparticles. The current theories such as resonance energy transfer (RET), fluorescence quenching and photon propagation in scattering media support the experimental findings. Stern-Volmer curves for dynamic and static quenching of Rd6G molecules embedded with G, GO and nanodiamond are correlated with spectral shifts. Furthermore, time evolution of the spectral shift contributes to determine loading/release rates of fluorescent species with large S-parameter on the given nano-carriers. PMID:26137372

  2. Direct visualization of secretion from single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.; Yeung, E.S.

    1998-03-01

    Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved with laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy. By monitoring the native fluorescence of catecholamines excited by the 275 nm laser line with an intensified charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera, we obtained good temporal and spatial resolution simultaneously without using additional fluorescent probes. Large variations were found among individual cells in terms of the amounts of catecholamines secreted and the rates of secretion. Different regions of a cell also behave differently during the secretion process. However, the degree of this local heterogeneity is smaller than in neurons and neuralgia. The influence of deep-ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation on cells is also discussed. This quantitative imaging technique provides a useful noninvasive approach for the study of dynamic cellular changes and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretory processes. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence of green plants. I - A technique for the remote detection of plant stress and species differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Wood, F. M., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Newcomb, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of green plants was evaluated as a means of remotely detecting plant stress and determining plant type. Corn and soybeans were used as representatives of monocots and dicots, respectively, in these studies. The fluorescence spectra of several plant pigments was excited with a nitrogen laser emitting at 337 nm. Intact leaves from corn and soybeans also fluoresced using the nitrogen laser. The two plant species exhibited fluorescence spectra which had three maxima in common at 440, 690, and 740 nm. However, the relative intensities of these maxima were distinctly different for the two species. Soybeans had an additional slight maxima at 525 nm. Potassium deficiency in corn caused an increase in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. Simulated water stress in soybeans resulted in increased fluorescence at 440, 525, 690, and 740 nm. The inhibition of photosynthesis in soybeans by 3-(3-4-dichlorophenyl)-1-1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) gave incresed fluorescence primarily at 690 and 740 nm. Chlorosis as occurring in senescent soybean leaves caused a decrease in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of plants offer the potential for remotely detecting certain types of stress condition and also for differentiating plant species.

  4. Laser induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.): in situ and remote detection of life in Antarctic and Alaskan ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.; Sattler, Birgit

    2009-08-01

    Once thought to be a barren desert devoid of life, it now appears that Earth's cryosphere is an ice ecosystem harbouring a rich community of metabolically active microorganisms inhabiting ice, snow, water, and lithic environments. The ability to rapidly survey this ecosystem during in situ and orbital missions is of considerable interest for monitoring Earth's carbon budget and for efficiently searching for life on Mars or any exoplanet with an analogous cryosphere. Laser induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.) imaging and spectroscopy using excitation in ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths have been proposed as non-destructive astrobiological survey tools to search for amino acids, nucleic acids, microbial life, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) deep in the Mars regolith. However, the technique is easily adapted to search for larger, more complex biomolecular targets using longer wavelength sources. Of particular interest is the ability for excitation at blue, green, and red wavelengths to produce visible and near infrared fluorescence of photosynthetic pigments in cyanobacteria-dominated microbial communities populating the ice of alpine, Arctic, and Antarctic lakes, glaciers, ice sheets, and even the supercooled water-ice droplets of clouds. During the Tawani 2008 International Antarctic Expedition we tested the in situ use of the technique as part of a field campaign in the Dry Valleys of Schirmacher Oasis and Lake Untersee, Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. In the spring of 2009, we performed airborne remote sensing tests of the technology in Alaska. In this paper we review our in situ laser detection experiments and present for the first time preliminary results on our efforts to detect cryosphere L.I.F.E. from an airborne platform.

  5. Does ozone enhance the remineralizing potential of nanohydroxyapatite on artificially demineralized enamel? A laser induced fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Samuelraj; Prabhu, Vijendra; Chandra, Subhash; Koshy, Shalini; Acharya, Shashidhar; Mahato, Krishna K.

    2014-02-01

    The present era of minimal invasive dentistry emphasizes the early detection and remineralization of initial enamel caries. Ozone has been shown to reverse the initial demineralization before the integrity of the enamel surface is lost. Nano-hydroxyapatite is a proven remineralizing agent for early enamel caries. In the present study, the effect of ozone in enhancing the remineralizing potential of nano-hydroxyapatite on artificially demineralized enamel was investigated using laser induced fluorescence. Thirty five sound human premolars were collected from healthy subjects undergoing orthodontic treatment. Fluorescence was recorded by exciting the mesial surfaces using 325 nm He-Cd laser with 2 mW power. Tooth specimens were subjected to demineralization to create initial enamel caries. Following which the specimens were divided into three groups, i.e ozone (ozonated water for 2 min), without ozone and artificial saliva. Remineralization regimen was followed for 3 weeks. The fluorescence spectra of the specimens were recorded from all the three experimental groups at baseline, after demineralization and remineralization. The average spectrum for each experimental group was used for statistical analysis. Fluorescence intensities of Ozone treated specimens following remineralization were higher than that of artificial saliva, and this difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.0001). In a nutshell, ozone enhanced the remineralizing potential of nanohydroxyapatite, and laser induced fluorescence was found to be effective in assessing the surface mineral changes in enamel. Ozone can be considered an effective agent in reversing the initial enamel caries there by preventing the tooth from entering into the repetitive restorative cycle.

  6. Ultra-high-speed pumping of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) for high-speed laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöholm, Johan; Kristensson, Elias; Richter, Mattias; Aldén, Marcus; Göritz, Guido; Knebel, Kai

    2009-02-01

    The feasibility of pumping an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with an ultra-high repetition rate multi:YAG laser system, producing a burst of up to eight high-energy pulses, has been investigated. For this investigation an OPO with a bandwidth around 5 cm-1, together with a frequency doubling crystal, was selected. In some laser-induced fluorescence measurements the large linewidth from the OPO can be advantageous as several lines can be excited simultaneously avoiding the saturation effects of individual lines. The energy output from the OPO as a function of pulse separation was measured down to pulse separations of 400 ns and was found to be completely independent of the pulse separation. The efficiency of the OPO unit, when optimized for single-pulse operation, was measured to be around 25% for all pulses, giving over 80 mJ at 585 nm output when pumped with ~350 mJ at 355 nm. This is similar to the specified efficiency for the OPO. The system was found to give a slightly lower efficiency when double pulsing the Nd:YAG lasers. This is attributed to a somewhat elongated pulse length from the Nd:YAG lasers giving a lower pump energy density. The system was applied for measuring high-speed planar laser-induced fluorescence images of OH radicals in a Bunsen burner.

  7. Quantitative measurement of naphthalene in low-pressure flames by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartel, M.; Pauwels, J.-F.; Desgroux, P.; Mercier, X.

    2010-09-01

    We have recently developed a new laser based set-up (Jet-Cooled Laser-Induced Fluorescence) for the analysis of aromatic compounds generated in flames. This method relies on the extraction of the species from the flame via a thin microprobe and their direct analysis inside a supersonic free jet by Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF). Under the supersonic conditions of the jet, the vibronic spectra of the molecules become structured as the possibility of electronic transitions is reduced, allowing their selective detection by LIF. In addition, due to the very low quenching efficiency inside the jet, LIF signals can be directly related to the population of the probed species and easily calibrated into absolute concentrations. All of the work presented here has been carried out for naphthalene, which is an important PAH involved in soot formation mechanisms. The calibration procedure is described in detail. We also report a detailed study of the quantitative features of the technique, in particular cooling efficiencies and collision rates as well as some additional potential factors that could bias the quantitative aspect of the method. Finally, the possibilities of the technique for the measurement of PAH within flames in the presence of soot particles along with its accuracy and reproducibility are demonstrated by recording naphthalene mole fractions profiles in several rich CH4/O2/N2 flames. A detection limit of the order of a ppb is demonstrated under flame conditions with and without the presence of soot particles.

  8. Distribution of Fe atom density in a dc magnetron sputtering plasma source measured by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibagaki, K.; Nafarizal, N.; Sasaki, K.; Toyoda, H.; Iwata, S.; Kato, T.; Tsunashima, S.; Sugai, H.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetron sputtering discharge is widely used as an efficient method for thin film fabrication. In order to achieve the optimized fabrication, understanding of the kinetics in plasmas is essential. In the present work, we measured the density distribution of sputtered Fe atoms using laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. A dc magnetron plasma source with a Fe target was used. An area of 20 × 2 mm in front of the target was irradiated by a tunable laser beam having a planar shape. The picture of laser-induced fluorescence on the laser beam was taken using an ICCD camera. In this way, we obtained the two-dimensional image of the Fe atom density. As a result, it has been found that the Fe atom density observed at a distance of several centimeters from the target is higher than that adjacent to the target, when the Ar gas pressure was relatively high. It is suggested from this result that some gas-phase production processes of Fe atoms are available in the plasma. This work has been performed under the 21st Century COE Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan.

  9. Determination of glyphosate using off-line ion exchange preconcentration and capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiang; Lucy, Charles A

    2007-04-15

    An enrichment method for the herbicide glyphosate is presented based on ion exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) technique. A 200-mul micro-pipette tip packed with 50mg of Bio-Rad AG1-X8 anion exchanger beads was used for offline extraction of glyphosate from 50ml of spiked river water sample. The retained glyphosate was eluted with 10mM HCl and then converted quantitatively to the corresponding amine (glycine) using hypochlorite. Subsequent fluorescent labeling using naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA)-cyanide allowed micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separation and laser-induced fluorescence detection (LIF) with a violet diode laser. Optimization of the sample clean-up, extraction, elution, conversion and labeling steps enabled analysis of glyphosate in river water in the nanomolar range. Detection limits were 0.04nM glyphosate in standards and 1.6nM in spiked river.

  10. Sub-part-per-billion analysis of aqueous lead colloids by ArF laser induced atomic fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ho, S K; Cheung, N H

    2005-01-01

    Highly sensitive analysis of aqueous lead carbonate colloids was demonstrated by two-pulse laser-induced atomic fluorescence. The first laser pulse at 1064 nm ablated the sample solution to create an expanding plume. The colloids, being heavier, trailed behind and became concentrated. They were then intercepted by an ArF laser pulse that induced prompt atomic fluorescence at 405.8 nm from the lead atoms. The detection limit for lead was 0.24 ppb. Tap water was analyzed, and lead emissions were clearly observed. Time-resolved spectroscopy revealed that the efficient 193-nm excitation of the analytes was more universal than expected. That was confirmed by the successful application of the technique to colloids and alloys other than lead.

  11. Red/blue spectral shifts of laser-induced fluorescence emission due to different nanoparticle suspensions in various dye solutions.

    PubMed

    Bavali, A; Parvin, P; Mortazavi, S Z; Mohammadian, M; Mousavi Pour, M R

    2014-08-20

    Red/blue shifts of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are investigated using several guest dielectric nanoscatterers, such as TiO2, ZnO, Al2O3, and SiO2, in the host Rd6G, RdB, Coumarin 4, and Coumarin 7 ethanolic solutions. A couple of inflection points are identified varying nanoparticle (NP) density into dye solutions based on LIF spectroscopy. The inflection of the spectral shift exhibits that the suspension of NPs in dye solutions significantly involves a couple of competitive chemical and optical mechanisms during photon traveling in scattering media regarding ballistic and diffusive transport. It is shown that the low, medium, and high NP additives in fluorescent suspension induce blue, red, and blue spectral shifts, respectively.

  12. Time-resolved detection of aromatic compounds on planetary surfaces by ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshelman, E.; Daly, M. G.; Slater, G.; Cloutis, E.

    2015-12-01

    Raman spectroscopic instruments are highly capable in the search for organics on Mars due to the potential to perform rapid and nondestructive measurements on unprepared samples. Upcoming and future Raman instruments are likely to also incorporate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) capabilities, which can be added for modest cost and complexity. We demonstrate that it is possible to obtain sub-ns fluorescence lifetime measurements of Mars-relevant organics and minerals if a fast time-gating capability is used with an intensified detector and a short ultraviolet laser pulse. This serves a primary purpose of discriminating mineral from short-lived (less than 10 ns) organic fluorescence, considered a potential biosignature. Additionally, lifetime measurements may assist in determining if more than one fluorescing species is present and provide information concerning the molecular structure as well as the local environment. Fast time-gating is also useful at longer visible or near-IR wavelengths, as this approach increases the sensitivity of the instrument to organic material by removing the majority of the fluorescence background from the Raman signal and reducing the effect of ambient light.

  13. Periodic Evolution of a Xe I Population in an Oscillatory Discharge Captured Through Time-Synchronized Laser Induced Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2014-10-01

    We track the evolution of the Xe I 6 s '[ 1 / 2 ] 1 - 6 p '[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (834.68 nm air) transition lineshape in a plasma discharge oscillating at 60 Hz. Two time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence techniques based on phase sensitive detection of the fluorescence signal are demonstrated, yielding consistent results. One approach used previously involves a sample-and-hold procedure that collects fluorescence signal at a particular phase in the oscillation period and holds the average value until the following sample. The second method is based on fast switching of the fluorescence signal; only the signal collected inside the acquisition gate is sent to a lock-in amplifier for processing. Both methods rely on modulating the exciting laser beam and the latter permits operation at a much higher frequency range with reduced spectral noise density. The maximum observed peak fluorescence intensity occurs at low discharge currents, although the peak intensity drops to zero at zero discharge current. The peak intensity also decreases at the discharge current maximum. Time-varying properties of the xenon neutrals are extracted from a lineshape analysis. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  14. Changes in laser-induced fluorescence responses of 3T3 fibroblasts to repetitive thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthan, J.; Dressler, C.; Zabarylo, U.; Minet, O.

    2009-04-01

    The combined experimental use of laser-induced autofluorescence of cellular metabolites and methodological fundamentals of systems biology will provide access to biological thermal stress analysis on a sub cellular level. A test setup incorporating a pulsed nitrogen laser was realized with which autofluorescence of the coenzyme NADH could be measured in living 3T3 cells. The cells were subjected to different temperature stress at repetitive time intervals. When subjected to a simple mathematical analysis, the NADH concentration change measured through autofluorescence in biological cells exhibited approximate concentration-equivalent balance curves. These results add up to the fundamental know-how about the dosimetry of thermally therapeutic methods.

  15. Spatial Dosimetry with Violet Diode Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Water-Equivalent Radio-Fluorogenic Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwall, Peter A., II

    The following work describes investigations of spatial dosimetry using laser-induced fluorescence of a radio-fluorogenic detector embedded within water-equivalent media. The chemical composition of a gelatin-based coumarin-3-carboxylic acid detector was investigated and dose response characterized. Violet diode (405nm) excitation sources were explored and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) employed to obtain the pattern of fluorescent emission yielding images of the integrated spatial dose distribution. The design of a three-dimensional reader is proposed to provide a foundation for future work. Radio-fluorogenic processes create fluorescent products in response to ionizing radiation. Water radiolysis produced by ionizing radiation yields hydroxyl free radicals that readily hydroxylate coumarin-3-carboxylic acid to 7-hydroxy-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, a derivative of umbelliferone. Umbelliferone is a known fluorophore, exhibiting peak excitation in the UV to near UV range of 365-405nm with a visible 445nm blue emission. Coumarin-3-carboxlyic acid has been studied in an aqueous gelatin matrix. The radio-fluorogenic coumarin-gelatin detector has been shown to respond to an absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in a measureable manner. The detector was studied with respect to concentration of gelatin and coumarin in the presence of pH buffers. Dose response of the detector was investigated with regard to ionizing radiation type, energy, and rate of irradiation. Results demonstrate a functional detector. Patterns of energy deposition were formed in response to ionizing radiation produced by a sealed-source of radioactive Ir-192 embedded in the gelatin matrix of the detector. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose were recorded and analyzed as a function of fluorescent emission. The distribution of energy deposition was imaged with LIF excitation by a divergent beam of 405nm light and determined by analysis of digital image pixel intensity values displaying the 445nm

  16. A Study of Aberrant Glycosylation in Simulated Microgravity Using Laser Induced AutoFluorescence and Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, B. DeSales

    1999-01-01

    A number of pathologies and cellular dysfunctions including neoplasms have been correlated with autofluorescence. The complications of aging and diabetes have been associated with the accumulation of non-enzymatic glycosylations of tissue macromolecules. These products are known as the Advanced Glycosylated End Products (AGEs). A physical property associated with AGEs is the emission of 570 mn or 630 nm light energy (autofluorescence) following the absorption of 448 mm energy associated with the argon laser. This investigation sought to assess the induction of argon-laser induced autofluorescence in a variety of in vitro culture systems. Different fluorescence intensities distinguished tumor lines from normal cell populations. Laser-stimulated autofluorescence discriminated primary cultures of lymphocytes grown in the presence of excess glucose as opposed to normal glucose concentrations. The effects of deglycosylating agents upon laser-induced autofluorescence were also assessed. The studies included studies of cell cycle analysis using Propidium Iodide stained DNA of cells grown in simulated microgravity using NASA Bioreactor Vessels in media of normal and elevated glucose concentrations.

  17. Advanced optical diagnostics of multiphase combustion flow field using OH planar laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kevin Young-jin

    High-repetition-rate (5 kHz, 10 kHz) OH planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to investigate the combustion of liquid, gelled, and solid propellants. For the liquid monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) droplet combustion experiment in N2O/N2 using 5 kHz OH PLIF and visible imaging system, the OH profile and the droplet diameter were measured. The N2O partial pressure was varied by 20% and 40%, and the total pressure was varied by 103, 172, 276, 414, 552 kPa. The OH location indicated that the oxidation flame front is between the visible dual flame fronts. The results showed thicker flame sheet and higher burning rate for increased N2O concentration for a given pressure. The burning rate increased with increased pressure at 20% partial pressure N2O, and the burning rate decreased with increased pressure at 40% partial pressure N2O. This work provides experimental data for validating chemical kinetics models. For the gelled droplet combustion experiment using a 5 kHz OH PLIF system, speeds and locations of fuel jets emanating from the burning gelled droplets were quantified for the first time. MMH was gelled with organic gellant HPC at 3 wt.% and 6 wt.%, and burned in air at 35, 103, 172, 276, and 414 kPa. Different types of interaction of vapor jets and flame front were distinguished for the first time. For high jet speed, local extinction of the flame was observed. By analyzing the jet speed statistics, it was concluded that pressure and jet speed had an inverse relationship and gellant concentration and jet speed had a direct relationship. This work provides more fundamental insight into the physics of gelled fuel droplet combustion. A 3D OH PLIF system was assembled and demonstrated using a 10 kHz OH PLIF system and a galvanometric scanning mirror. This is the first time that a reacting flow field was imaged with a 3D optical technique using OH PLIF. A 3D scan time of 1 ms was achieved, with ten slices generated per sweep with 1000 Hz scan rate. Alternatively

  18. Using violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra for crop yield assessment of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Tetteh, Jonathan P.

    2004-07-01

    The use of violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) emission spectra to monitor the growth of five varieties of cowpea in the University of Cape Coast Botanical Garden is presented. Radiation from a continuous-wave violet laser diode emitting at 396 nm through a fibre is closely incident on in vivo leaves of cowpea to excite chlorophyll fluorescence, which is detected by an integrated spectrometer with CCD readout. The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra with peaks at 683 and 731 nm were used for growth monitoring of the cowpea plants over three weeks and analysed using Gaussian spectral functions with curve fitted parameters to determine the peak positions, area under the spectral curve and the intensity ratio F683/F731. The variation in the intensity ratio of the chlorophyll bands showed sensitive changes indicating the photosynthetic activity of the cowpea varieties. A discussion of the fluorescence result as compared to conventional assessment is presented with regard to discrimination between the cowpea varieties in terms of crop yield performance.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence made simple: implications for the diagnosis and follow-up monitoring of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Drakaki, Eleni; Dessinioti, Clio; Stratigos, Alexander J; Salavastru, Carmen; Antoniou, Christina

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive treatments are increasingly being used for the management of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the predominant type of nonmelanoma skin cancer, making the development of noninvasive diagnostic technologies highly relevant for clinical practice. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy emerges as an attractive diagnostic technique for the diagnosis and demarcation of BCC due to its noninvasiveness, high sensitivity, real-time measurements, and user-friendly methodology. LIF relies on the principle of differential fluorescence emission between abnormal and normal skin tissues (ex vivo and in vivo) in response to excitation by a specific wavelength of light. Fluorescence originates either from endogenous fluorophores (autofluorescence) or from exogenously administered fluorophores (photosensitizers). The measured optical properties and fluorophore contributions of normal skin and BCC are significantly different from each other and correlate well with tissue histology. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the visualization of a fluorophore, with the ability to accumulate in tumor tissue, by the use of fluorescence imaging. PDD may be used for detecting subclinical disease, determining surgical margins, and following-up patients for residual tumor or BCC relapse. In this review, we will present the basic principles of LIF and discuss its uses for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of BCC.

  20. Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection for studying amino acid uptake by yeast during beer fermentation.

    PubMed

    Turkia, Heidi; Sirén, Heli; Penttilä, Merja; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid composition of cultivation broth is known to affect the biomass accumulation, productivity, and vitality of yeast during cultivation. A separation method based on capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection was developed for the determination of amino acid consumption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during beer fermentation. Intraday relative standard deviations were less than 2.1% for migration times and between 2.9% and 9.9% for peak areas. Interday relative standard deviations were less than 2.5% for migration times and between 4.4% and 18.9% for peak areas. The quantification limit was even as low as 62.5 pM which equals to below attomole level detection. The method was applied to study the rate of amino acid utilization during beer fermentation.

  1. Studies of Landé gJ-factors of singly ionized lanthanum by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbowy, S.; Güney, C.; Windholz, L.

    2016-08-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, using a cooled hollow cathode discharge lamp as source of ions, was used to observe the Zeeman splitting of 18 lines of La II in the wavelength range 629.6-680.9 nm, in external intermediate magnetic fields up to 800 G. The recorded hyperfine-Zeeman patterns were analyzed in detail using already known accurate hyperfine structure A- and B-constants. From the recordings the Landé gJ-factors for some levels belonging to the 5d2, 5d6s, 5d6p, 4f5d, 4f6s and 4f6p configurations of La II were determined. The obtained experimental gJ-factors are compared with earlier measurements and theoretical calculations.

  2. Computer-controlled multi-parameter mapping of 3D compressible flowfields using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, James M.; Victor, Kenneth G.; Mcdaniel, James C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-controlled technique, using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence, for measuring complex compressible flowfields is presented. A new laser permits the use of a planar two-line temperature technique so that all parameters can be measured with the laser operated narrowband. Pressure and temperature measurements in a step flowfield show agreement within 10 percent of a CFD model except in regions close to walls. Deviation of near wall temperature measurements from the model was decreased from 21 percent to 12 percent compared to broadband planar temperature measurements. Computer-control of the experiment has been implemented, except for the frequency tuning of the laser. Image data storage and processing has been improved by integrating a workstation into the experimental setup reducing the data reduction time by a factor of 50.

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence of flowing samples as an approach to single-molecule detection in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dovichi, N.J.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.

    1984-03-01

    A flow cytometer system was used to detect aqueous rhodamine 6G by laser-induced fluorescence. Best results were obtained with careful spectral and spatial filtering. At the detection limit, the probability of a rhodamine 6G molecule being present in the detector's probed volume of 11 pL is about 0.6 . With a flow rate of 0.42 ..mu..L/s, a detection limit of 8.9 x 10/sup -14/ M was obtained for a 1-s time constant. At the detection limit, 18 ag or 22,000 molecules of rhodamine 6G flowed through the probed volume during the signal integration period. Signal linearity extends over greater than 5 orders of magnitude limited only by saturation of the detection electronics at high concentration. The results presented here allow a projection to single-molecule detection with reasonable improvements to the apparatus. 25 references, 5 figures, 7 tables.

  4. MHz-rate nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging in a Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Naibo; Webster, Matthew; Lempert, Walter R; Miller, Joseph D; Meyer, Terrence R; Ivey, Christopher B; Danehy, Paul M

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) imaging at repetition rates as high as 1 MHz is demonstrated in the NASA Langley 31 in. Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel. Approximately 200 time-correlated image sequences of between 10 and 20 individual frames were obtained over eight days of wind tunnel testing spanning two entries in March and September of 2009. The image sequences presented were obtained from the boundary layer of a 20° flat plate model, in which transition was induced using a variety of different shaped protuberances, including a cylinder and a triangle. The high-speed image sequences captured a variety of laminar and transitional flow phenomena, ranging from mostly laminar flow, typically at a lower Reynolds number and/or in the near wall region of the model, to highly transitional flow in which the temporal evolution and progression of characteristic streak instabilities and/or corkscrew-shaped vortices could be clearly identified.

  5. An aircraft instrument design for in situ tropospheric OH measurements by laser induced fluorescence at low pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.; Stevens, Philip S.; Mather, James H.

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is important for many processes involved in tropospheric chemistry. For instance, it initiates the photochemical degradation of gases that cause global climate change, such as methane and the chlorofluorocarbon substitutes (HCFCs). Because of its reactivity, its abundances are less than 0.1 pptv. Thus, OH has been very difficult to measure accurately, despite its importance. Techniques have evolved, however, so that good measurements of tropospheric OH abundances are now possible. One of these techniques that is adaptable to aircraft measurements is the laser induced fluorescence detection of the OH radical in a detection chamber at low pressures. The current ground-based instrument, which can be readily adapted to aircraft, can detect OH abundances of 1.4 x 10 exp 5 OH molecules/cu cm with S/N = 2 in 30 sec, and 5 x 10 exp 4/cu cm in 5 min.

  6. Selective enzymatic cleavage and labeling for sensitive capillary electrophoresis laser-induced fluorescence analysis of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Wang, Hailin

    2015-08-01

    Oxidatively generated DNA damage is considered to be a significant contributing factor to cancer, aging, and age-related human diseases. It is important to detect oxidatively generated DNA damage to understand and clinically diagnosis diseases caused by oxidative damage. In this study, using selective enzymatic cleavage and quantum dot (QD) labeling, we developed a novel capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence method for the sensitive detection of oxidized DNA bases. First, oxidized DNA bases are recognized and removed by one DNA base excision repair glycosylase, leaving apurinic and apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) at the oxidized positions. The AP sites are further excised by the AP nicking activity of the chosen glycosylase, generating a nucleotide gap with 5'- and 3'- phosphate groups. After dephosphorylation with one alkaline phosphatase, a biotinylated ddNTP is introduced into the nucleotide space within the DNA strand by DNA polymerase I. The biotin-tagged DNA is further labeled with a QD-streptavidin conjugate via non-covalent interactions. The DNA-bound QD is well-separated from excess DNA-unbound QD by highly efficient capillary electrophoresis and is sensitively detected by online coupled laser-induced fluorescence analysis. Using this method, we can assess the trace levels of oxidized DNA bases induced by the Fenton reaction and UV irradiation. Interestingly, the use of the formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) protein and endonuclease VIII enables the detection of oxidized purine and pyrimidine bases, respectively. Using the synthesized standard DNA, the approach has low limits of detection of 1.1×10(-19)mol in mass and 2.9pM in concentration.

  7. 20 kHz toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of a jet in nearly sonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. A.; Troutman, V. A.; Mungal, M. G.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-10-01

    This manuscript describes continuous, high-repetition-rate (20 kHz) toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging in an expansion tube impulse flow facility. Cinematographic image sequences are acquired that visualize an underexpanded jet of hydrogen in Mach 0.9 crossflow, a practical flow configuration relevant to aerospace propulsion systems. The freestream gas is nitrogen seeded with toluene; toluene broadly absorbs and fluoresces in the ultraviolet, and the relatively high quantum yield of toluene produces large signals and high signal-to-noise ratios. Toluene is excited using a commercially available, frequency-quadrupled (266 nm), high-repetition-rate (20 kHz), pulsed (0.8-0.9 mJ per pulse), diode-pumped solid-state Nd:YAG laser, and fluorescence is imaged with a high-repetition-rate intensifier and CMOS camera. The resulting PLIF movie and image sequences are presented, visualizing the jet start-up process and the dynamics of the jet in crossflow; the freestream duration and a measure of freestream momentum flux steadiness are also inferred. This work demonstrates progress toward continuous PLIF imaging of practical flow systems in impulse facilities at kHz acquisition rates using practical, turn-key, high-speed laser and imaging systems.

  8. Ultrasensitive detection of closely related angiotensin I peptides using capillary electrophoresis with near-infrared laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Baars, M J; Patonay, G

    1999-02-01

    A novel near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye (NN382, LICOR, Inc.) was evaluated as an ultrasensitive peptide-labeling reagent for use with capillary electrophoresis (CE). Six angiotensin I (Ang-I) variants were selected as model peptides for the derivatization and separation studies. The closely related decapeptides were labeled with the NIR dye, separated using CE, and detected by NIR laser-induced fluorescence. Derivatization of the peptides was achieved under aqueous conditions using 2.5-500 pmol of Ang-I in a 50-microL sample (5 x 10(-8)-1 x 10(-5)M), and between 1.3 and 254 amol of the labeled peptides were injected on column. The fluorescence response was linear over a 200-fold range (correlation r > or = 0.9986). The limit of detection (SNR = 3, signal/RMS noise) ranged from 100 to 300 zmol, for the six Ang-I variants. Four of six peptides were resolved from each other and excess dye using capillary zone electrophoresis with a simple 50 mM phosphate run buffer, pH 7.2. Two pairs of coeluting peptides were successfully resolved using micellar electrokinetic chromatography with a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100. The NIR amine-labeling reagent NN382 is a viable alternative to using visible fluorophores for CE methods requiring high sensitivity. PMID:9989384

  9. Simultaneous Laser-induced Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide and Atomic Oxygen in the Hypersonic Materials Environment Test System Arcjet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Craig; Lincoln, Daniel; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer; Danehy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous nitric oxide (NO) and atomic oxygen (O) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in the Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The data serves as an experimental database for validation for chemical and thermal nonequilibrium models used in hypersonic flows. Measurements were taken over a wide range of stagnation enthalpies (6.7 - 18.5 MJ/kg) using an Earth atmosphere simulant with a composition of 75% N2, 20% O2, and 5% Ar (by volume). These are the first simultaneous measurements of NO and O LIF to be reported in literature for the HYMETS facility. The maximum O LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of approximately 12 MJ/kg while the maximum NO LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of 6.7 MJ/kg. Experimental results were compared to simple fluorescence model that assumes equilibrium conditions in the plenum and frozen chemistry in the isentropic nozzle expansion (Mach 5). The equilibrium calculations were performed using CANTERA v2.1.1 with 16 species. The fluorescence model captured the correlation in mean O and NO LIF signal intensities over the entire range of stagnation enthalpies tested. Very weak correlations between single-shot O and NO LIF intensities were observed in the experiments at all of the stagnation enthalpy conditions.

  10. A hyphenated optical trap capillary electrophoresis laser induced native fluorescence system for single-cell chemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cecala, Christine; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Mitchell, Jennifer W.; Gillette, Martha U.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell measurements allow a unique glimpse into cell-to-cell heterogeneity; even small changes in selected cells can have a profound impact on an organism’s physiology. Here an integrated approach to single-cell chemical sampling and assay are described. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) has the sensitivity to characterize natively-fluorescent indoles and catechols within individual cells. While the separation and detection approaches are well established, the sampling and injection of individually selected cells requires new approaches. We describe an optimized system that interfaces a single-beam optical trap with CE and multichannel LINF detection. A cell is localized within the trap and then the capillary inlet is positioned near the cell using a computer-controlled micromanipulator. Hydrodynamic injection allows cell lysis to occur within the capillary inlet, followed by the CE separation and LINF detection. The use of multiple emission wavelengths allows improved analyte identification based on differences in analyte fluorescence emission profiles and migration time. The system enables injections of individual rat pinealocytes and quantification of their endogenous indoles, including serotonin, N-acetyl-serotonin, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, tryptophol and others. The amounts detected in individual cells incubated in 5-hydroxytryptophan ranged from 10−14 mol to 10−16 mol, an order of magnitude higher than observed in untreated pinealocytes. PMID:22543409

  11. Applicability of UV laser-induced solid-state fluorescence spectroscopy for characterization of solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Woltmann, Eva; Meyer, Hans; Weigel, Diana; Pritzke, Heinz; Posch, Tjorben N; Kler, Pablo A; Schürmann, Klaus; Roscher, Jörg; Huhn, Carolin

    2014-10-01

    High production output of solid pharmaceutical formulations requires fast methods to ensure their quality. Likewise, fast analytical procedures are required in forensic sciences, for example at customs, to substantiate an initial suspicion. We here present the design and the optimization of an instrumental setup for rapid and non-invasive characterization of tablets by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (with a UV-laser (λ ex = 266 nm) as excitation source) in reflection geometry. The setup was first validated with regard to repeatability, bleaching phenomena, and sensitivity. The effect on the spectra by the physical and chemical properties of the samples, e.g. their hardness, homogeneity, chemical composition, and granule grain size of the uncompressed material, using a series of tablets, manufactured in accordance with design of experiments, was investigated. Investigation of tablets with regard to homogeneity, especially, is extremely important in pharmaceutical production processes. We demonstrate that multiplicative scatter correction is an appropriate tool for data preprocessing of fluorescence spectra. Tablets with different physical and chemical characteristics can be discriminated well from their fluorescence spectra by subjecting the results to principal component analysis.

  12. Experimental Assessment and Enhancement of Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Nitric Oxide in an Inverse Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, William P.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1997-01-01

    We have experimentally assessed the quantitative nature of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of NO concentration in a unique atmospheric pressure, laminar, axial inverse diffusion flame (IDF). The PLIF measurements were assessed relative to a two-dimensional array of separate laser saturated fluorescence (LSF) measurements. We demonstrated and evaluated several experimentally-based procedures for enhancing the quantitative nature of PLIF concentration images. Because these experimentally-based PLIF correction schemes require only the ability to make PLIF and LSF measurements, they produce a more broadly applicable PLIF diagnostic compared to numerically-based correction schemes. We experimentally assessed the influence of interferences on both narrow-band and broad-band fluorescence measurements at atmospheric and high pressures. Optimum excitation and detection schemes were determined for the LSF and PLIF measurements. Single-input and multiple-input, experimentally-based PLIF enhancement procedures were developed for application in test environments with both negligible and significant quench-dependent error gradients. Each experimentally-based procedure provides an enhancement of approximately 50% in the quantitative nature of the PLIF measurements, and results in concentration images nominally as quantitative as LSF point measurements. These correction procedures can be applied to other species, including radicals, for which no experimental data are available from which to implement numerically-based PLIF enhancement procedures.

  13. Enhancement of airborne shock wave by laser-induced breakdown of liquid column in laser shock cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Deoksuk; Kim, Dongsik; Park, Jin-Goo

    2011-04-01

    In laser shock cleaning (LSC), the shock wave is generated by laser-induced breakdown of the ambient gas. The shock wave intensity has thus been a factor limiting the performance of the LSC process. In this work, a novel method of amplifying a laser-induced plasma-generated shock wave by the breakdown of a liquid column is proposed and analyzed. When the laser beam is focused on a microscale liquid column, a shock wave having a significantly amplified intensity compared to that generated by air breakdown alone can be generated in air. Therefore, substantially amplified cleaning force can be obtained. The dynamics of a shock wave induced by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was analyzed by laser flash shadowgraphy. The peak pressure of the laser-induced shock wave was approximately two times greater than that of air breakdown at the same laser fluence. The proposed method of shock wave generation is expected to be useful in various applications of laser shock processing, including surface cleaning.

  14. Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr.; Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2006-10-01

    Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

  15. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence study on dyes used in DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Kaisyang; Force, R.K. )

    1993-01-01

    Research on the time-resolved fluorescence of fluorescein isothiocyanate, NBD, tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate, and Texas Red - the dyes used for fluorescence-based DNA sequencing - is described. Mean fluorescence lifetiems in both aqueous buffer solution and 5.3%T, 4.8%C polyacrylamide gel were determined as a function of excitation wave-lengths at 337, 470, and 550 nm and were found to be 3.5, 1.1, 2.5, and 4.3 ns; the detection limits are 10, 200, 200 and 200 amol for FITC, NBD, TEMR, and T. Red, respectively. Comparisons of fluorescence parameters between the conjugated dyes and the free dyes are also reported. Results on the optimization of the excitation source wavelengths to improve sensitivity and reduce background scattering in polyacrylamide gel are also reported. Time-resolved fluorescence was successfully applied to resolve spectral overlapping of emissions in both solution and in polyacrylamide gel. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Atomic Emission, Absorption and Fluorescence in the Laser-induced Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J. D.

    2009-01-22

    The main result of our efforts is the development and successful application of the theoretical model of laser induced plasma (LIP) that allows a back-calculation of the composition of the plasma (and the condensed phase) based on the observable plasma spectrum. The model has an immediate experimental input in the form of LIP spectra and a few other experimentally determined parameters. The model is also sufficiently simple and, therefore, practical. It is conveniently interfaced in a graphical user-friendly form for using by students and any laboratory personnel with only minimal training. In our view, the model opens up the possibility for absolute analysis, i.e. the analysis which requires no standards and tedious calibration. The other parts of this proposal (including plasma diagnostics) were somewhat subordinate to this main goal. Plasma diagnostics provided the model with the necessary experimental input and led to better understanding of plasma processes. Another fruitful direction we pursued was the use of the correlation analysis for material identification and plasma diagnostics. Through a number of computer simulations we achieved a clear understanding of how, where and why this approach works being applied to emission spectra from a laser plasma. This understanding will certainly improve the quality of forensic and industrial analyses where fast and reliable material identification and sorting are required.

  17. Intercomparison of OH Radical Measurements by Long-Path Absorption and Laser Induced Fluorescence in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Greif, J.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Rupp, L.

    2003-04-01

    A striking advantage of the SAPHIR chamber is the availability of two spectroscopic detection instruments for OH radicals: Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) and Long-Path Differential Optical Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Both instruments have already been compared in 1994 during the field measurement campaign POPCORN. They agreed well with a correlation coefficient of r=0.90 and a weighted linear fit with a slope of 1.09 +- 0.12. However, OH measurements in the simulation chamber differ significantly from measurements in ambient air. While DOAS measures OH as an integral value along the central longitudinal axis of SAPHIR, LIF samples the air locally and close (2 cm) to the floor of the chamber. Thus, the LIF measurements might be possibly affected by local concentration gradients caused by insufficient mixing of the chamber air or by deposition to the wall. On the other hand, if turbulent mixing of the chamber air is weak and high concentrations of ozone are used in experiments, the DOAS instrument might be subject to artificial formation of OH radicals in the air volume which is illuminated by the detection laser. This interference results from laser induced photolysis of ozone and the subsequent reaction of water vapor with the excited oxygen atoms formed. Thus it is of decisive importance to compare OH measurements from both instruments in order to investigate potential disturbing effects due to the specific sampling properties of both instruments within SAPHIR. We report on OH measurements accomplished simultaneously with both instruments using different trace gas compositions and experimental conditions.

  18. The study of laser induced fluorescence of tooth hard tissues with aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrakhova, D. S.; Kuznetsova, J. O.; Loschenov, V. B.

    2016-08-01

    This work is about the possibility of fluorescence diagnosis application with the use of aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles (nAlPc) in order to detect enamel microdamage. For the investigation, five human teeth samples of various age groups were removed for various reasons. The autofluorescence spectrums of these samples hard tissues and fluorescence spectrums of nAlPc mixed with enamel powder were obtained during the experiment. The research shows that sample pathogenic microflora causes nAlPc fluorescence. This fact will allow detecting enamel microdamage in future studies.

  19. Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy: A powerful technique for elucidating rovibronic structure in electronic transitions of polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Alexander, Ula N.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate the power of high resolution, two dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) spectroscopy for observing rovibronic transitions of polyatomic molecules. The technique involves scanning a tunable laser over absorption features in the electronic spectrum while monitoring a segment, in our case 100 cm-1 wide, of the dispersed fluorescence spectrum. 2D-LIF images separate features that overlap in the usual laser induced fluorescence spectrum. The technique is illustrated by application to the S1-S0 transition in fluorobenzene. Images of room temperature samples show that overlap of rotational contours by sequence band structure is minimized with 2D-LIF allowing a much larger range of rotational transitions to be observed and high precision rotational constants to be extracted. A significant advantage of 2D-LIF imaging is that the rotational contours separate into their constituent branches and these can be targeted to determine the three rotational constants individually. The rotational constants determined are an order of magnitude more precise than those extracted from the analysis of the rotational contour and we find the previously determined values to be in error by as much as 5% [G. H. Kirby, Mol. Phys. 19, 289 (1970), 10.1080/00268977000101291]. Comparison with earlier ab initio calculations of the S0 and S1 geometries [I. Pugliesi, N. M. Tonge, and M. C. R. Cockett, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104303 (2008), 10.1063/1.2970092] reveals that the CCSD/6-311G** and RI-CC2/def2-TZVPP levels of theory predict the rotational constants, and hence geometries, with comparable accuracy. Two ground state Fermi resonances were identified by the distinctive patterns that such resonances produce in the images. 2D-LIF imaging is demonstrated to be a sensitive method capable of detecting weak spectral features, particularly those that are otherwise hidden beneath stronger bands. The sensitivity is demonstrated by observation of the three isotopomers of fluorobenzene

  20. Injectant mole-fraction imaging in compressible mixing flows using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Abbitt, John D., III; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described for imaging the injectant mole-fraction distribution in nonreacting compressible mixing flow fields. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, is induced by a broadband argon-ion laser and collected using an intensified charge-injection-device array camera. The technique eliminates the thermodynamic dependence of the iodine fluorescence in the compressible flow field by taking the ratio of two images collected with identical thermodynamic flow conditions but different iodine seeding conditions.

  1. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence of normal and atherosclerotic coronary artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1999-07-01

    This study investigates the spectro-temporal fluorescence emission of normal and diseased coronary arteries with graded levels of atherosclerosis. Fluorescence emission of 58 excised human coronary artery samples was induced with N2 laser pulses and detected with a MCP-PMT connected to a digital oscilloscope. The samples were H and E and Movat stained and histologically classified in accordance with AHA classification. An algorithm based on Laguerre expansion of kernels was used to deconvolve the intrinsic fluorescence impulse response function from the measured transient pulse. A biexponential function depicted the fluorescence decay characteristics. We noticed 1) in spectral domain: peak fluorescence intensity was at 380 nm for normal and initial lesions samples and blue-shifted for advanced lesions; intensity at 450-480 nm decreased from approximately 65 percent peak intensity for normal samples to approximately 30 percent for Type V lesions; 2) in time domain: longer lasting emission for the advanced lesions. The decay constants varied as a function emission wavelength and lesion type. For instance the time constants for Type V lesions measured at 390 nm were significantly larger that those measured on normal arterial wall. The fast term decay contributed to a higher degree to the impulse response function for normal tissue. These results reveal that the analysis of the temporal characteristics of fluorescence can be used to differentiate between coronary lesion and normal coronary wall. The time domain information complements the spectral domain intensity data for improved differentiation between graded levels of coronary lesions.

  2. Separation and quantitation of phycobiliproteins using phytic acid in capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Viskari, Pertti J; Colyer, Christa L

    2002-10-01

    The similar electrophoretic mobilities and sizes of several of the phycobiliproteins, which are derived from the photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae, render their separation and quantitation a challenging problem. However, we have developed a suitable capillary electrophoresis (CE) method that employs a phytic acid-boric acid buffer and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection with a single 594 nm He-Ne laser. This method takes advantage of the remarkably high quantum yields of these naturally fluorescent proteins, which can be attributed to their linear tetrapyrrole chromophores covalently bound to cysteinyl residues. As such, limits of detection of 1.18 x 10(-14), 5.26 x 10(-15), and 2.38 x 10(-15) mol/l were obtained for R-phycoerythrin, C-phycocyanin, and allophycocyanin proteins, respectively, with a linear dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude in each case. Unlike previously published CE-LIF methods, this work describes the separation of all three major classes of phycobiliproteins in under 5 min. Very good recoveries, ranging from 93.2 to 105.5%, were obtained for a standard mixture of the phycobiliproteins, based on seven-point calibration curves for both peak height and peak area. It is believed that this development will prove useful for the determination of phycobiliprotein content in naturally occurring cyanobacteria populations, thus providing a useful tool for understanding biological and chemical oceanographic processes.

  3. Comparison of light-induced and laser-induced fluorescence methods for the detection and quantification of enamel demineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masatoshi; Analoui, Mostafa; Schemehorn, Bruce R.; Stookey, George K.

    1999-05-01

    The Quantitative Laser-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) technique has been sued for diagnosis of early caries in permanent teeth (PT). The objective of this study was to determine the caries quantification ability of QLF in deciduous teeth (DT). Sixty sound teeth, thirty DT and thirty PT, were used. All teeth were cleaned to remove debris and equally divided into three groups. Lesions were created in small windows (0.8x2.0 mm2) on buccal or labial surface for 48, 72, and 96 hr. Lesion images were made with a 488 nm argon laser (QLF I) and then with a 370 +/- 80 nm violet-blue light (QLF II). Both images were analyzed to determine the mean percent change in fluorescence radiance (ΔF). A center section from the lesions was taken for analysis with microradiography. The lesion depth and loss of mineral content were determined. The correlations between ΔF and lesion depth as well as ΔZ in DT were 0.76 and 0.84 with QLF I, 0.81 and 0.88 with QLF II, respectively. It can be concluded the ability of QLF to quantify white-spots in DT is better than in PT.

  4. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH in the exhaust of a bi-propellant thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Phillip H.; Clemens, N. T.; Makel, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of the hydroxyl radical has been performed on the flow produced by the exhaust of a subscale H2/O2 fueled bi-propellant rocket engine. Measurements were made to test the feasibility of OH (0,0) and (3,0) excitation strategies by using injection seeded XeCl and KrF excimer lasers, respectively. The flow is produced with hydrogen and oxygen reacting at a combustor chamber pressure of 5 atm which then exhausts to the ambient. The hydroxyl concentration in the exhaust flow is approximately 8 percent. Fluorescence images obtained by pumping the Q1(3) transition in the (0,0) band exhibited very high signals but also showed the effect of laser beam absorption. To obtain images when pumping the P1(8) transition in the (3,0) band it was necessary to use exceptionally fast imaging optics and unacceptably high intensifier gains. The result was single-shot images which displayed a signal-to-noise ratio of order unity or less when measured on a per pixel basis.

  5. Determination of flue gas alkali concentrations in fluidized-bed coal combustion by excimer-laser-induced fragmentation fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hartinger, K.T.; Monkhouse, P.B.; Wolfrum, J.; Baumann, H.; Bonn, B.

    1994-12-31

    Gas-phase sodium concentrations were measured for the first time in situ in the flue gas of a fluidized-bed reactor by the excimer-laser-induced fragmentation fluorescence (ELIF) technique. This method involves using ArF-excimer laser light at 193 nm to simultaneously photodissociate the alkali compounds of interest and excite electronically the alkali atoms formed. The resulting fluorescence from Na (3{sup 2}P) atoms can he readily detected at 589 nm. Measured signals were converted to absolute concentrations using a calibration system that monitors alkali compounds under known conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition and rising the same optical setup as at the reactor. Several different coals were investigated under a specific set of reactor conditions at total pressures close to 1 bar. Sodium concentrations ranging from the sub-ppb region to 20 ppb were obtained, and a detection limit for sodium of 0.1 ppb under the present conditions was estimated. Over the course of the reactor program, contrasting concentration histories were observed for the two lignites and the hard coal investigated. In particular, significantly higher sodium concentrations were found for the hard coal, consistent with both the higher chlorine and sodium contents determined in the corresponding coal analysis.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence of cyclohexadienyl (c-C6H7) radical in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Takashi; Zhang, Weijun; Horiuchi, Hiroaki; Hiratsuka, Hiroshi; Kudo, Takako; Obi, Kinichi

    2004-10-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence spectrum was observed in the 500-560 nm region when a mixture of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and oxalyl chloride was photolyzed at 193 nm. The observed excitation spectrum was assigned to the A (2)A(2)<--X (2)B(1) transition of the cyclohexadienyl radical c-C6H7, produced by abstraction of a hydrogen atom from 1,4-cyclohexadiene by Cl atoms. The origin of the A<--X transition of c-C(6)H(7) was at 18 207 cm(-1). From measurements of the dispersed fluorescence spectra and ab initio calculations, the frequencies of several vibrational modes in both the ground and excited states of c-C(6)H(7) were determined: nu(5)(C-H in-plane bend)=1571, nu(8)(C-H in-plane bend)=1174, nu(10)(C-C-C in-plane bend)=981, nu(12)(C-C-C in-plane bend)=559, nu(16)(C-C-C out-of-plane bend)=375, and nu(33)(C-C-C in-plane bend)=600 cm(-1) for the ground state and nu(8)=1118, nu(10)=967, nu(12)=502, nu(16)=172, and nu(33)=536 cm(-1) for the excited states.

  7. Photolytic-interference-free, femtosecond, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence imaging of atomic oxygen in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrashort-pulse lasers are well suited for nonlinear diagnostic techniques such as two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF) because the signals generated scale as the laser intensity squared. Furthermore, the broad spectral bandwidths associated with nearly Fourier-transform-limited ultrashort pulses effectively contribute to efficient nonlinear excitation by coupling through a large number of in-phase photon pairs, thereby producing strong fluorescence signals. Additionally, femtosecond (fs)-duration amplified laser systems typically operate at 1-10 kHz repetition rates, enabling high-repetition-rate imaging in dynamic environments. In previous experiments, we have demonstrated utilization of fs pulses for kilohertz (kHz)-rate, interference-free imaging of atomic hydrogen (H) in flames. In the present study, we investigate the utilization of fs-duration pulses to photolytic-interference-free TPLIF imaging of atomic oxygen (O). In TPLIF of O, photodissociation of vibrationally excited carbon dioxide (CO2) is known to be the prominent interference that produces additional O atoms in the medium. We have found that through the use of fs excitation, such interferences can be virtually eliminated in premixed laminar methane flames, which paves the way for two-dimensional imaging of O at kHz data rates. Such measurements can provide critical data for validating complex, multidimensional turbulent-combustion models as well as for investigating flame dynamics in practical combustion devices.

  8. Laser induced fluorescence in algae: A new technique for remote detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E. J.; Hickman, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the absorption and fluorescence spectra were obtained for four various types of marine and fresh water algae using a pulsed N2/Ne dye laser as the source of excitation. The absorption maxima for the algae ranged from 420 to 675 nm, while their fluorescent spectra ranged from 580 to 685 nm. It appears feasible that various algal species can be identified by detection of their fluorescent signatures using a tunable laser as the excitation source. However, if one is concerned only with detection of chlorophyll a, the optimum excitation is approximately 600 + 50 nm while detection is at 685 nm. An analysis of both calculations and laboratory results indicates that it should be feasible to measure chlorophyll a in concentrations as low as 1.0 mg/m3 using a 100 kW peak pulsed laser from an altitude of 500 meters.

  9. Studies on the effect of mobile phone radiation on DNA using laser induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnu, K.; Nithyaja, B.; Pradeep, C.; Sujith, R.; Mohanan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2011-11-01

    In the present study we have investigated the effect of mobile phone radiation on deoxyribonucleic acid by using fluorescence technique. Absorption spectra shows increase in absorption of DNA after exposure to radiation from mobile phone with different SAR values and microwave frequency which give information about unwinding of the DNA double strand. Fluorescence intensity of dye doped DNA solution is getting reduced suggesting that the absorbed energy is used for unwinding of double strand of DNA after irradiating with microwave radiation. Unwinding of the DNA is very sensitive to power of the microwave radiation.

  10. Synthesis of fluorescent nanocarbons by femtosecond laser induced plasma in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agatsuma, Naoki; Fujimatsu, Yusei; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent Carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) with tunable emission are successfully synthesized from the water suspension of graphene oxide by the femtosecond laser irradiation. The luminescence properties were controllable by doping nitrogen into CNPs in the presence of an ammonia molecule. We have also confirmed that CNPs with diamond structure were directly precipitated from the solvent molecules such as cyclohexane.

  11. Determination of metolcarb in food by capillary electrophoresis immunoassay with a laser-induced fluorescence detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuicui; Fang, Guozhen; Deng, Qiliang; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Jingjing; Wang, Shuo

    2012-05-01

    A capillary electrophoresis immunoassay (CEIA) was developed for the determination of trace metolcarb (MTMC) in food. The method was based on the competitive reactions between fluorescently labeled MTMC tracer and free MTMC with a limited amount of anti-MTMC antibody and the separation and determination by CE with LIF detector. A fluorescent reagent, FITC was labeled on MTMC to construct an immunofluorescent probe. CEIA experimental parameters such as the pH value and concentration of the running buffer and separation voltage as well as incubation time were systematically investigated. Under the optimized conditions, fluorescently labeled antigen and antibody bound could be well separated within 3 min using Na₂B₄O₇/NaH₂PO₄ buffer (20:10 mmol/L, pH 9.0) for background electrolyte, 20 kV for the separation voltage, and 20°C for the column temperature. The linear range of the method was 0.25-50.0 μg/L with LOD 0.07 μg/L. The RSD for relative migration time and relative fluorescence intensity ratio were 2.90% (intraday) and 4.73% (intraday), respectively. The proposed method has been applied to determine the residue of MTMC in food samples with the satisfactory recovery. PMID:22648817

  12. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the Ca dimer deposited on helium and mixed helium/xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gaveau, Marc-André; Pothier, Christophe; Briant, Marc; Mestdagh, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-09

    We study how the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the calcium dimer deposited on pure helium clusters is modified by the addition of xenon atoms. In the wavelength range between 365 and 385 nm, the Ca dimer is excited from its ground state up to two excited electronic states leading to its photodissociation in Ca({sup 1}P)+Ca({sup 1}S): this process is monitored by recording the Ca({sup 1}P) fluorescence at 422.7nm. One of these electronic states of Ca{sub 2} is a diexcited one correlating to the Ca(4s4p{sup 3}P(+Ca(4s3d{sup 3}D), the other one is a repulsive state correlating to the Ca(4s4p1P)+Ca(4s21S) asymptote, accounting for the dissociation of Ca{sub 2} and the observation of the subsequent Ca({sup 1}P) emission. On pure helium clusters, the fluorescence exhibits the calcium atomic resonance line Ca({sup 1}S←{sup 1}P) at 422.7 nm (23652 cm{sup −1}) assigned to ejected calcium, and a narrow red sided band corresponding to calcium that remains solvated on the helium cluster. When adding xenon atoms to the helium clusters, the intensity of these two features decreases and a new spectral band appears on the red side of calcium resonance line; the intensity and the red shift of this component increase along with the xenon quantity deposited on the helium cluster: it is assigned to the emission of Ca({sup 1}P) associated with the small xenon aggregate embedded inside the helium cluster.

  13. Characterisation of an inlet pre-injector laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the measurement of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelli, A.; Hens, K.; Tatum Ernest, C.; Kubistin, D.; Regelin, E.; Elste, T.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Martinez, M.; Lelieveld, J.; Harder, H.

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric measurements of hydroxyl radicals (OH) are challenging due to a high reactivity and consequently low concentration. The importance of OH as an atmospheric oxidant has motivated a sustained effort leading to the development of a number of highly sensitive analytical techniques. Recent work has indicated that the laser-induced fluorescence of the OH molecules method based on the fluorescence assay by gas expansion technique (LIF-FAGE) for the measurement of atmospheric OH in some environments may be influenced by artificial OH generated within the instrument, and a chemical method to remove this interference was implemented in a LIF-FAGE system by Mao et al. (2012). While it is not clear whether other LIF-FAGE instruments suffer from the same interference, we have applied this method to our LIF-FAGE HORUS (Hydroxyl Radical Measurement Unit based on fluorescence Spectroscopy) system, and developed and deployed an inlet pre-injector (IPI) to determine the chemical zero level in the instrument via scavenging the ambient OH radical. We describe and characterise this technique in addition to its application at field sites in forested locations in Finland, Spain and Germany. Ambient measurements show that OH generated within the HORUS instrument is a non-negligible fraction of the total OH signal, which can comprise 30 to 80% during daytime and 60 to 100% during the night. The contribution of the background OH varied greatly between measurement sites and was likely related to the type and concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present at each particular location. Two inter-comparisons in contrasting environments between the HORUS instrument and two different chemical ionisation mass spectrometers (CIMS) are described to demonstrate the efficacy of IPI and the necessity of the chemical zeroing method for our LIF-FAGE instrument in such environments.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence and nonlinear optical properties of ion-implanted fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, K.; Yang, L.; Haglund, R.F. Jr. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Magruder, R.H.; Weeks, R.A. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Zuhr, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    We report absorption, fluorescence and nonlinear optical properties of fused silica implanted with Ti, Cu and Bi and doses of 1{center dot}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} to 6{center dot}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} when irradiated with 532 nm laser light. The fluorescence spectrum is a broad band around 640 nm shows little variation for all ion species. Absorption as function of implanted dose shows a threshold for Ti between 1{center dot}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} and 6{center dot}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The nonlinear optical index is large, n{sub 2} > 10{sup {minus}5} esu. All measured quantities show a strong dependence on the implanted ion dose. The source of the nonlinearity, whether electronic or thermal, remains to be more completely determined. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Environmental effects on laser-induced fluorescence spectra of natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vodacek, Anthony; Philpot, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Laser fluorosensing can be used to monitor dissolved organic carbon (DOC), but analysis of the data can be hindered by several environmental phenomena. These phenomena include attenuation of the laser beam and differential attenuation of the fluorescence by the water column, variability in the molecular weight composition of the DOC, and temperature, pH, and metal ion effects on DOC fluorescence. These factors are discussed in terms of their effect on laboratory and remote field data analysis. Experimental results are provided. Analysis of fluorosensor data of DOC may be improved by compensating for the environmental factors. An improved methodology is discussed, and a suggestion is made for indirect monitoring of pH and metal ion concentration.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence in doped metal oxide planar waveguides deposited from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, N.J.; Exarhos, G.J. ); Wood, S.M. . Shock Dynamics Lab.)

    1991-12-01

    An aqueous route to the deposition of complex metal oxide films is based upton the complexation of the corresponding metal nitrate salts by glycine, followed by spin-casting the concentrated solution onto silica substrates. The presence of glycine serves to frustrate precipitation and leads to the formation of a glassy matrix through which metal cations are homogeneously dispersed. Subsequent heating of coated substrates initiates an oxidation-reduction reaction which removes the organic matrix and residual nitrate leaving behind a film of the desired oxide composition. Using this method, ruby (Cr:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Sm:YAG (Sm:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) films on the order of 150 nm thick have been deposited. The respective phase have been confirmed by XRD data and from the measured fluorescence spectra. The red fluorescence exhibited by these materials under 488 nm excitation is dependent upon the ambient temperature and pressure. A marked shift in wavelength is observed as a function of increasing pressure. Ruby also exhibits a temperature dependent wavelength shift in contrast to Sm:YAG where a negligible shift is seen to temperatures near 1200 K. Fluorescence lifetimes of both materials exhibit a temperature dependence which varies with dopant concentration. This work suggests the possible application of these films as pressure-temperature sensors in a planar waveguide configuration or as a coating material for optical fibers. Details of the deposition process will be reviewed and the fluorescence response of both types of films will be summarized. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Observation of nanosecond laser induced fluorescence of in vitro seawater phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Bensky, Thomas J.; Clemo, Lisa; Gilbert, Chris; Neff, Bryan; Moline, Mark A.; Rohan, Dov

    2008-08-01

    Seawater has been irradiated using a train of 70 ns flashes from a 440 nm laser source. This wavelength is on resonance with the blue absorption peak of Chlorophyll pigment associated with the photosystem of in vitro phytoplankton. The resulting fluorescence at 685 nm is instantaneously recorded during each laser pulse using a streak camera. Delayed fluorescence is observed, yielding clues about initiation of the photosynthetic process on a nanosecond time scale. Further data processing allows for determination of the functional absorption cross section, found to be 0.0095 ?{sup 2}, which is the first reporting of this number for in vitro phytoplankton. Unlike other flash-pump studies of Chlorophyll, using a LED or flashlamp-based sources, the short laser pulse used here does not reveal any pulse-to-pulse hysteresis (i.e., variable fluorescence), indicating that the laser pulses used here are not able to drive the photosynthetic process to completion. This is attributed to competition from a back reaction between the photoexcited photosystem II and the intermediate electron acceptor. The significance of this work as a new type of deployable ocean fluorimeter is discussed, and it is believed the apparatus will have applications in thin-layer phytoplankton research.

  18. Frequency-encoded laser-induced fluorescence for multiplexed detection in infrared-mediated quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Schrell, Adrian M; Roper, Michael G

    2014-06-01

    A frequency-modulated fluorescence encoding method was used as a means to increase the number of fluorophores monitored during infrared-mediated polymerase chain reaction. Laser lines at 488 nm and 561 nm were modulated at 73 and 137 Hz, respectively, exciting fluorescence from the dsDNA intercalating dye, EvaGreen, and the temperature insensitive dye, ROX. Emission was collected in a color-blind manner using a single photomultiplier tube for detection and demodulated by frequency analysis. The resulting frequency domain signal resolved the contribution from the two fluorophores as well as the background from the IR lamp. The detection method was successfully used to measure amplification of DNA samples containing 10(4)-10(7) starting copies of template producing an amplification efficiency of 96%. The utility of this methodology was further demonstrated by simultaneous amplification of two genes from human genomic DNA using different color TaqMan probes. This method of multiplexing fluorescence detection with IR-qPCR is ideally suited as it allows isolation of the signals of interest from the background in the frequency domain and is expected to further reduce the complexity of multiplexed microfluidic IR-qPCR instrumentation.

  19. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) as a Remote Sensing Tool: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Kim, M. S.; Mulchi, C. L.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; McMurtrey, J.; Corp, L.

    1998-01-01

    Vegetational changes are primary indicators of the present and future ecological status of the globe. These are changes which not only impact upon the primary productivity, but the total of the biogeochemical processes occurring on the planet. The impacts of global climatic and other environmental changes on vegetation must be monitored by some means in order to develop models which will allow us to predict long term effects. Large scale monitoring is now possible only with remote sensing systems, primarily passive reflectance, obtained by the use of satellite and aircraft platforms. However, passive reflectance techniques at this time are limited in their ability to detect subtle changes in the concentration and oxidation states of the many compounds involved in the light reactions of photosynthesis. Knowledge of these changes we consider to be fundamental in the remote assessment of both the rate and efficiency of photosynthesis and also the early detection of stress damage. The above factors pointed to the desirability of a sensing technique with the sensitivity and specificity necessary for detecting and quantifying those biological entities involved in photosynthesis. Another optical technique for vegetation monitoring is fluorescence. Previously, the lack of adequate excitation light sources and detector technologies have limited the use of fluorescence on intact plant leaves in the field. It is only recently with the advent of lasers with short pulse duration and advanced detector technologies that fluorescence measurements in the remote mode have become possible in the presence of ambient light.

  20. Rare-earth phosphor laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzak, D. J.; Chyu, M. K.

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the measurement capabilities of a novel, two-dimensional thermal imaging system based on the fluorescence properties of an europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La2O2S:Eu+3) thermographic phosphor. The foundation of the technique (i.e., the fluorescence properties of La2O2S:Eu+3), as well as the design of the thermal imaging system, are also described. The technique that is employed in the design of the system utilizes the tripled output of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to excite the thin phosphor coating applied to a test surface. The resulting fluorescent emission of the temperature sensitive 512-nm radiative transition, along with that of the relatively temperature independent 620-nm transition, is acquired using an image-intensified charge coupled device camera. The ratio of the intensities of these two emissions, integrated during their decay, is then correlated with temperature. Phosphor calibration data that is presented demonstrate the efficacy of the technique, while results of evaluations to assess the spatial resolution and measurement accuracy provide a quantitative measure of system capabilities.

  1. Measurements of Ambient OH and HO2 by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Using FAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanter, S.; Vimal, D.; Stevens, P.

    2005-12-01

    Measurements of OH (hydroxyl) and HO2 (hydroperoxyl) radicals provide a critical test of our understanding of the fast photochemistry of the atmosphere, but are challenging because of their short lifetimes and low concentrations. Several instruments developed during the last decade have successfully made measurements of these important radicals. However, these measurements have shown that there are still gaps in our understanding of OH and HO2 radical chemistry in the atmosphere. Additional measurements of OH and HO2 are needed to constrain and test current models of atmospheric chemistry. We will present a detailed description of our new Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) system and our ongoing work toward an automated field instrument, focusing on its characteristics in terms of sensitivity, limit of detection, selectivity, temporal resolution, stability and calibration. In this technique, ambient air is expanded through a pinhole into a low pressure cell. The OH radicals are then electronically excited using a transition in the (0, 0) band of the A-X system near 308 nm. The resulting fluorescence, which is proportional to the OH concentration, is collected and quantified. HO2 is converted into OH by adding a small flow of NO inside the fluorescence cell. Finally, we will present measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations on the Indiana University, Bloomington campus.

  2. Concentration Measurements in a Cold Flow Model Annular Combustor Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Douglas C.

    1996-01-01

    A nonintrusive concentration measurement method is developed for determining the concentration distribution in a complex flow field. The measurement method consists of marking a liquid flow with a water soluble fluorescent dye. The dye is excited by a two dimensional sheet of laser light. The fluorescent intensity is shown to be proportional to the relative concentration level. The fluorescent field is recorded on a video cassette recorder through a video camera. The recorded images are analyzed with image processing hardware and software to obtain intensity levels. Mean and root mean square (rms) values are calculated from these intensity levels. The method is tested on a single round turbulent jet because previous concentration measurements have been made on this configuration by other investigators. The previous results were used to comparison to qualify the current method. These comparisons showed that this method provides satisfactory results. 'Me concentration measurement system was used to measure the concentrations in the complex flow field of a model gas turbine annular combustor. The model annular combustor consists of opposing primary jets and an annular jet which discharges perpendicular to the primary jets. The mixing between the different jet flows can be visualized from the calculated mean and rms profiles. Concentration field visualization images obtained from the processing provide further qualitative information about the flow field.

  3. Effect of polarization and geometric factors on quantitative laser-induced fluorescence- to-Raman intensity ratios of water samples and a new calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K.

    2003-09-01

    A 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence system was used to study the effect of polarization of the excitation source and geometry of the collection optics on the ratio of the signal from a fluorescence standard, quinine sulfate, and the Raman scatter from water. Although the ratio is sometimes considered to be a constant and is used for intersystem comparisons, our studies showed that the Raman signal and, thus, the ratio can vary by a factor of up to 3.6. These experimental values agree with previous studies by others involving gas and flame Raman spectroscopy and suggest a new calibration method for intersystem comparison of different fluorescence systems.

  4. Measuring OH and HO{sub 2} in the troposphere by laser-induced fluorescence at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H.; Stevens, P.S.; Mather, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    The hydroxyl radical OH oxidizes many trace gases in the atmosphere. It initiates and then participates in chemical reactions that lead to such phenomena as photochemical smog, acid rain, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Because OH is so reactive, its volume mixing ratio is less than 1 part per trillion volume (pptv) throughout the troposphere. Its close chemical cousin, the hydroperoxyl radical HO{sub 2}, participates in many reactions as well. The authors have developed an instrument capable of measuring OH and HO{sub 2} by laser-induced fluorescence in a detection chamber at low pressure. This prototype instrument is able to detect about 1.4 X 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup {minus}3} (0.005 pptv) of OH at the ground in a signal integration time of 30 s with negligible interferences. The absolute uncertainty is a factor of 1.5. This instrument is now being adapted to aircraft use for measurements throughout the troposphere. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Quantitative Temperature Imaging in Gas-Phase Turbulent Thermal Convection by Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Acetone

    SciTech Connect

    KEARNEY,SEAN P.; REYES,FELIPE V.

    2000-12-13

    In this paper, an acetone planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for nonintrusive, temperature imaging is demonstrated in gas-phase (Pr = 0.72) turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection at Rayleigh number, Ra = 1.3 x 10{sup 5}. The PLIF technique provides quantitative, spatially correlated temperature data without the flow intrusion or time lag associated with physical probes and without the significant path averaging that plagues most optical heat-transfer diagnostic tools, such as the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, thus making PLIF an attractive choice for quantitative thermal imaging in easily perturbed, complex three-dimensional flow fields. The instantaneous (20-ns integration time) thermal images presented have a spatial resolution of 176 x 176 x 500 {micro}m and a single-pulse temperature measurement precision of {+-}5.5 K, or 5.4 % of the total temperature difference. These images represent a 2-D slice through a complex, 3-D flow allowing for the thermal structure of the turbulence to be quantified. Statistics such as the horizontally averaged temperature profile, rms temperature fluctuation, two-point spatial correlations, and conditionally averaged plume structures are computed from an ensemble of 100 temperature images. The profiles of the mean temperature and rms temperature fluctuation are in good agreement with previously published data, and the results obtained from the two-point spatial correlations and conditionally averaged temperature fields show the importance of large-scale coherent structures in this turbulent flow.

  7. Naphthalene Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging of Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Heat Shield Ablation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combs, Christopher S.; Clemens, Noel T.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2013-11-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) calls for an ablative heat shield. In order to better design this heat shield and others that will undergo planetary entry, an improved understanding of the ablation process is required. Given that ablation is a multi-physics process involving heat and mass transfer, codes aiming to predict heat shield ablation are in need of experimental data pertaining to the turbulent transport of ablation products for validation. At The University of Texas at Austin, a technique is being developed that uses planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a low-temperature sublimating ablator (naphthalene) to visualize the transport of ablation products in a supersonic flow. Since ablation at reentry temperatures can be difficult to recreate in a laboratory setting it is desirable to create a limited physics problem and simulate the ablation process at relatively low temperature conditions using naphthalene. A scaled Orion MPCV model with a solid naphthalene heat shield has been tested in a Mach 5 wind tunnel at various angles of attack in the current work. PLIF images have shown high concentrations of scalar in the capsule wake region, intermittent turbulent structures on the heat shield surface, and interesting details of the capsule shear layer structure. This work was supported by a NASA Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship (NNX11AN55H).

  8. Selective determination of arginine-containing and tyrosine-containing peptides using capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Cobb, K A; Novotny, M V

    1992-01-01

    The use of two different amino acid-selective fluorogenic reagents for the derivatization of peptides is investigated. One such scheme utilizes a selective reaction of benzoin with the guanidine moiety to derivatize arginine residues occurring in a peptide. The second scheme involves the formylation of tyrosine, followed by reaction with 4-methoxy-1,2-phenylenediamine. The use of capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection allows enhanced efficiencies and sensitivities to be obtained for the separations of either arginine- or tyrosine-containing peptides. A helium-cadmium laser (325 nm) is ideally suited for the laser-based detection system due to a close match of the excitation maxima of derivatized peptides from both reactions. A detection limit of 270 amol is achieved for model arginine-containing peptides, while the detection limit for model tyrosine-containing peptides is measured at 390 amol. Both derivatization reactions are found to be useful for high-sensitivity peptide mapping applications in which only the peptides containing the derivatized amino acids are detected.

  9. Simultaneous measurements of velocity, temperature, and pressure using rapid CW wavelength-modulation laser-induced fluorescence of OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. Y.; Battles, B. E.; Hanson, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    In high speed flows, laser induced fluorescence (LIF) on Doppler shifted transitions is an attractive technique for velocity measurement. LIF velocimetry was applied to combined single-point measurements of velocity, temperature, and pressure and 2-D imaging of velocity and pressure. Prior to recent research using NO, LIF velocimetry in combustion related flows relied largely on the use of seed molecules. Simultaneous, single-point LIF measurements is reported of velocity, temperature, and pressure using the naturally occurring combustion species OH. This experiment is an extension of earlier research in which a modified ring dye laser was used to make time resolved temperature measurements behind reflected shock waves by using OH absorption an in postflame gases by using OH LIF. A pair of fused-silica rhombs mounted on a single galvanonmeter in an intracavity-doubled Spectra-Physics 380 ring laser permit the UV output to be swept continuously over a few wave numbers at an effective frequency of 3kHz.

  10. Aircraft-borne, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Hazen, N. L.; Lapson, L. B.; Allen, N. T.; Hanisco, T. F.; Oliver, J. F.; Lanham, N. W.; Demusz, J. N.; Anderson, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    The odd-hydrogen radicals OH and HO2 are central to most of the gas-phase chemical transformations that occur in the atmosphere. Of particular interest is the role that these species play in controlling the concentration of stratospheric ozone. This paper describes an instrument that measures both of these species at volume mixing ratios below one part in 10(exp 14) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The hydroxyl radical (OH) is measured by laser induced fluorescence at 309 nm. Tunable UV light is used to pump OH to the first electric state near 282 nm. the laser light is produced by a high-repetition rate pulsed dye-laser powered with all solid-state pump lasers. HO2 is measured as OH after gas-phase titration with nitric oxide. Measurements aboard a NASA ER-2 aircraft demonstrate the capability of this instrument to perform reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (greater than 30) achieved in short integration times (less than 20 sec).

  11. Investigation of optical fibers for gas-phase, ultraviolet laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the feasibility of transmitting high-power, ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses through long optical fibers for laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and nitric oxide (NO) in reacting and non-reacting flows. The fundamental transmission characteristics of nanosecond (ns)-duration laser pulses are studied at wavelengths of 283 nm (OH excitation) and 226 nm (NO excitation) for state-of-the-art, commercial UV-grade fibers. It is verified experimentally that selected fibers are capable of transmitting sufficient UV pulse energy for single-laser-shot LIF measurements. The homogeneous output-beam profile resulting from propagation through a long multimode fiber is ideal for two-dimensional planar-LIF (PLIF) imaging. A fiber-coupled UV-LIF system employing a 6 m long launch fiber is developed for probing OH and NO. Single-laser-shot OH- and NO-PLIF images are obtained in a premixed flame and in a room-temperature NO-seeded N(2) jet, respectively. Effects on LIF excitation lineshapes resulting from delivering intense UV laser pulses through long fibers are also investigated. Proof-of-concept measurements demonstrated in the current work show significant promise for fiber-coupled UV-LIF spectroscopy in harsh diagnostic environments such as gas-turbine test beds.

  12. Determining eosin as a groundwater migration tracer by capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence using a multiwavelength laser.

    PubMed

    Brumley, William C; Farley, John W

    2003-07-01

    Measurements for determining of the path of groundwater migration remain an important tool in the overall assessment of environmental processes and transport of pollutants. This paper examines a multiwavelength laser for the determination of eosin, a groundwater tracer, using capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) at excitation wavelength 514.5 nm. Eosin was one of four dyes used in a study of adjacent resource conservation and recovery act (RCRA) and Superfund sites (created by the comprehensive environmental response, compensation, and liability act) that routinely relied on spectrofluorimetry for determination as we have previously reported. However, the improved specificity of CE-LIF is further illustrated in this work applied to the analysis of adsorbent pads placed in monitoring wells after dye injection and flushing from injection wells. The multiwavelength laser provided the capability to analyze for several dyes with one laser. The advantages/disadvantages of CE-LIF versus spectrofluorimetry are discussed. Spectrofluorimetry is fast and sensitive and will likely continue to be the primary workhorse technique. CE-LIF could provide confirmation when greater specificity is needed in a regulatory context.

  13. A comparison of ion beam measurements by retarding field energy analyzer and laser induced fluorescence in helicon plasma devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gulbrandsen, N. Fredriksen, Å.; Carr, J.; Scime, E.

    2015-03-15

    Both Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Retarding Field Energy Analyzers (RFEA) have been applied to the investigation of beams formed in inductively coupled helicon plasmas. While the LIF technique provides a direct measurement of the velocity distribution in the plasma, the RFEA measures ion flux as a function of a retarding potential. In this paper, we present a method to compare the two techniques, by converting the LIF velocity distribution to an equivalent of a RFEA measurement. We applied this method to compare new LIF and RFEA measurements in two different experiments; the Hot Helicon Experiment (HELIX) - Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies (LEIA) at West Virginia University and Njord at University of Tromsø. We find good agreement between beam energies of the two methods. In agreement with earlier observations, the RFEA is found to measure ion beams with densities too low for the LIF to resolve. In addition, we present measurements of the axial development of the ion beam in both experiments. Beam densities drop exponentially with distance from the source, both in LIF and RFEA measurements. The effective quenching cross section from LIF in LEIA is found to be σ{sub b,*}=4×10{sup −19} m{sup 2}, and the effective beam collisional cross sections by RFEA in Njord to be σ{sub b}=1.7×10{sup −18} m{sup 2}.

  14. Simultaneous determination of vigabatrin and amino acid neurotransmitters in brain microdialysates by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Benturquia, Nadia; Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2004-07-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) coupled to in vivo microdialysis sampling was used in order to monitor simultaneously a drug and several neurotransmitters in the brain extracellular fluid. Determination of the antiepileptic drug vigabatrin and the amino acid neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu), l-aspartate (l-Asp) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was performed on low-concentration samples which were derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and separated using a pH 9.2 75 mM sodium borate running buffer containing 60 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 5mM hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD). Glu, l-Asp and vigabatrin derivatized at a concentration of 1.0 x 10(-9) M, and GABA derivatized at a concentration of 5.0 x 10(-9) M, produced peaks with signal-to-noise ratios of 8:1, 8:1, 4:1 and 5:1, respectively. The nature of the neurotransmitter peaks found in rat brain microdialysates was confirmed by both electrophoretic and pharmacological validations. This method was used for monitoring vigabatrin and amino acid neurotransmitters in microdialysates from the rat striatum during intracerebral infusion of the drug and revealed rapid vigabatrin-induced changes in GABA and Glu levels. This original application of CE-LIFD coupled to microdialysis represents a powerful tool for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic investigations.

  15. Measurement of Fuel Concentration Profile at Leading Edge of Lifted Flame with Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Mitsutomo; Sekine, Kazushi; Hashimoto, Kouta; Saiki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hidemi; Masuya, Goro

    This is a study of the leading-edge characteristics of a methane-air triple flame. Few experiment results are available for physical examination of such characteristics, so further experimental investigations are strongly needed to understand the stability mechanism in a mixture with a steep concentration gradient. To this end, we measured concentration profiles at the leading edge of a flame using acetone laser-induced fluorescence (acetone LIF). The results demonstrated that the lifted height of the flame changed when acetone was added to the mixture and correlated well with increased C2 radical behind the flame edge. However, the OH radical luminous intensity, measured with a spectroscope, did not change with addition of acetone. Moreover, the burning velocity obtained by the Bunsen-burner method remained constant when acetone was added to the mixture. Therefore, acetone had little influence on burning intensity. Acetone LIF can thus be employed to measure the local concentration gradient at the leading edge of a flame. The acetone LIF signals could be corrected to consider the thermal effect by using silicone oil vanishing-plane data. From the corrected acetone LIF data, the width between the lean and rich flammability limits (flammability limit width) in the flow upstream of the flame with a steep concentration gradient was clearly observed and could be quantitatively compared with the recent numerical results.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer for analysis of the quality of a DNA double helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregadze, V. G.; Melikishvili, Z. G.; Giorgadze, T. G.; Khutsishvili, I. G.; Khuskivadze, T. B.; Jaliashvili, Z. V.; Sigua, K. I.

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this work is to use the method of the laser-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of electronic excitation in a donor–acceptor pair of intercalators, (acridine orange (AO) as a donor and ethidium bromide (EB) as an acceptor), for the quantitative analysis of the quality of a DNA double helix. This approach obtains a visual picture of the defects of the genetic apparatus of tissue cells, particularly those of skin cells in real time and it can be used for the diagnosis of skin diseases and also in cosmetology. Transition metal (TM) ions such as Cu(II), Cu(I), Ag(I), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), photo- and thermo effects were used to cause double helix defects in DNA. The concentration of DNA sites after exposure to Cu(II), Cu(I), Ag(I) ions, AgNPs impact, as well as laser irradiation (λ  =  457 nm) and temperature, which are applicable for intercalation, were estimated in relative units. The nanoscale FRET method enables the estimation of the concentration of double helix areas with high stability, applicable for intercalation in DNA after it was subjected to stress effect. It provides the opportunity to compare DNA-s of (1) different origin; (2) with various degrees of damage; (3) being in various functional states.

  17. Sensitive determination of glutathione in biological samples by capillary electrophoresis with green (515 nm) laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Hodáková, Júlia; Preisler, Jan; Foret, František; Kubáň, Petr

    2015-04-24

    A new sensitive capillary electrophoretic method with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was developed for quantitation of glutathione (GSH) in biological samples. Eosin-5-maleimide was used to label the GSH molecule and the formed conjugate was separated in a 15 mM 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid electrolyte at pH 7.0 in less than 3 min. The conjugate was detected with an in-house built LIF system, utilizing an inexpensive 515 nm diode laser module. Studies were performed to optimize the derivatization (the ratio of reagent to analyte, the reaction time, pH, etc.) and separation conditions. Sensitive detection of GSH at concentrations as low as 0.18 nM was obtained. The method was applied in the analysis of biological fluids (exhaled breath condensate, saliva) and was found to be suitable for determination of GSH in these samples at trace levels below 1 nM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on determination of GSH in exhaled breath condensate by capillary electrophoresis (CE).

  18. Investigation of optical fibers for gas-phase, ultraviolet laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the feasibility of transmitting high-power, ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses through long optical fibers for laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and nitric oxide (NO) in reacting and non-reacting flows. The fundamental transmission characteristics of nanosecond (ns)-duration laser pulses are studied at wavelengths of 283 nm (OH excitation) and 226 nm (NO excitation) for state-of-the-art, commercial UV-grade fibers. It is verified experimentally that selected fibers are capable of transmitting sufficient UV pulse energy for single-laser-shot LIF measurements. The homogeneous output-beam profile resulting from propagation through a long multimode fiber is ideal for two-dimensional planar-LIF (PLIF) imaging. A fiber-coupled UV-LIF system employing a 6 m long launch fiber is developed for probing OH and NO. Single-laser-shot OH- and NO-PLIF images are obtained in a premixed flame and in a room-temperature NO-seeded N(2) jet, respectively. Effects on LIF excitation lineshapes resulting from delivering intense UV laser pulses through long fibers are also investigated. Proof-of-concept measurements demonstrated in the current work show significant promise for fiber-coupled UV-LIF spectroscopy in harsh diagnostic environments such as gas-turbine test beds. PMID:22722279

  19. Oh where OH where is Oh? Measuring the Elusive Hydroxyl Radical in the Atmosphere Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Philip S.

    2016-06-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays a central role in the chemistry of the atmosphere. In addition to controlling the lifetimes of many trace gases important to issues of global climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion, the OH radical initiates the oxidation of carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds which in the presence of nitrogen oxides can lead to the production of ground-level ozone and secondary organic aerosols, the primary components of photochemical smog. Accurate measurements of OH radical concentrations in the atmosphere can provide critical tests of our understanding of atmospheric chemistry and ground-level ozone production in urban and rural areas. Because of its high reactivity, mixing ratios of OH in the atmosphere are extremely low (typically less than 0.1 parts per trillion) and its chemical lifetime very short (less than 1 second). As a result, measurements of OH present a serious analytical challenge, especially on the timescale necessary to test our understanding of the fast photochemistry of the atmosphere. This presentation will describe the Indiana University laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the sensitive detection of OH radicals in the atmosphere, including recent results from several measurement campaigns in both urban and rural environments.

  20. The measurement of tropospheric OH radicals by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy during the POPCORN Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofzumahaus, A.; Aschmutat, U.; Heßling, M.; Holland, F.; Ehhalt, D. H.

    A highly sensitive OH measurement instrument has been developed. It is based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of OH using the A²Σ+v‧ = 0-X²Π v″ = 0 transition at 308.15 nm at low pressure. The LIF instrument detects OH directly and with high specificity, a fact that was demonstrated by recording laser excitation spectra (Q1(3), Q21(3) and P1(1) lines) of ambient OH. For high time resolution (typ. 60-100 s), the laser wavelength was modulated on-/off- resonance with the P1(1) line. Here, we report some of the OH measurements obtained by this technique during its first application in a tropospheric field campaign (“POPCORN”), which was conducted in August 1994 in a rural environment in the North-East of Germany. These include diurnal OH concentration profiles with maximum OH concentrations up to 1.4×107cm-3at noon. Minimum OH concentrations were measured in the morning and evening down to the detection limit of (3-6) × 105cm-3(SNR=2, measurement time 1 min.). During the day, OH fluctuations were observed on a time scale of minutes and hours. These were highly correlated to the flux of the solar UV radiation which is responsible for the primary OH production by photolysis.

  1. Fiber-coupled, 10 kHz simultaneous OH planar laser-induced fluorescence/particle-image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2013-01-15

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle-image velocimetry (PIV) techniques that employ free-standing optics face severe challenges when implemented in harsh environments associated with practical combustion facilities because of limited optical access and restrictions on operation of sensitive laser systems. To circumvent this problem, we have developed and implemented a fiber-coupled, high-speed ultraviolet (UV) PLIF/PIV system for measuring hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration and velocity in a realistic 4 MW combustion rig. This system permits delivery of high-power, 10 kHz, nanosecond-duration OH-PLIF excitation pulses (283 nm) and PIV pulses (532 nm) through a common 6 m long, 600 μm core, deep-UV-enhanced multimode fiber. Simultaneous OH-PLIF and PIV imaging at a data-acquisition rate of 10 kHz is demonstrated in turbulent premixed flames behind a bluff body. The effects of delivering high-repetition-rate, intense UV and visible beams through a long optical fiber are investigated, and potential system improvements are discussed.

  2. Development of a measurement technique for ion distribution in an extended nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kazoe, Yutaka; Mawatari, Kazuma; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2011-11-01

    Ion behavior confined in extended nanospace (10(1)-10(3) nm) is important for nanofluidics and nanochemistry with dominant surface effects. In this paper, we developed a new measurement technique of ion distribution in the nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy was used to achieve a spatial resolution of 87 nm higher than the diffraction limit. Fluorescein was used for ratiometric measurement of pH with two excitation wavelengths. The pH profile in a 2D nanochannel of 410 nm width and 405 nm depth was successfully measured at an uncertainty of 0.05. The excess protons, showing lower pH than the bulk, nonuniformly distributed in the nanochannel to cancel the negative charge of glass wall, especially when the electric double layer is thick compared to the channel size. The present study first revealed the ion distribution near the surface or in the nanochannel, which is directly related to the electric double layer. In addition, the obtained proton distribution is important to understand the nanoscale water structure between single molecules and continuum phase. This technique will greatly contribute to understanding the basic science in nanoscale and interfacial dynamics, which are strongly required to develop novel miniaturized systems for biochemical analysis and further applications.

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of argon and xenon ion velocities near the sheath boundary in 3 ion species plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Severn, Greg; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2016-05-01

    The Bohm sheath criterion is studied with laser-induced fluorescence in three ion species plasmas using two tunable diode lasers. Krypton is added to a low pressure unmagnetized DC hot filament discharge in a mixture of argon and xenon gas confined by surface multi-dipole magnetic fields. The argon and xenon ion velocity distribution functions are measured at the sheath-presheath boundary near a negatively biased boundary plate. The potential structures of the plasma sheath and presheath are measured by an emissive probe. Results are compared with previous experiments with Ar-Xe plasmas, where the two ion species were observed to reach the sheath edge at nearly the same speed. This speed was the ion sound speed of the system, which is consistent with the generalized Bohm criterion. In such two ion species plasmas, instability enhanced collisional friction was demonstrated [Hershkowitz et al., Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 057102 (2011).] to exist which accounted for the observed results. When three ion species are present, it is demonstrated under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at their individual Bohm velocities. It is also shown that under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at the system sound speed. These observations are also consistent with the presence of the instabilities.

  4. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J.; Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M.; Daniels, S.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic oxygen number density [O] is measured in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Gas flow is fixed at 8 slpm, the RF power coupled into the plasma jet varied between 5 W and 20 W, and the resulting changes in atomic oxygen density measured. Photolysis of molecular oxygen is employed to allow in situ calibration of the TALIF system. During calibration, O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting oxygen atoms are achieved within the same laser pulse. The atomic oxygen density produced by photolysis is time varying and spatially non-uniform which needs to be corrected for to calibrate the TALIF system for measurement of atomic oxygen density in plasma. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I 0(t), wavelength, and focal spot size allows correction factors to be determined using a rate equation model. Atomic oxygen is used for calibration and measurement, so the laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power dependence region without affecting the calibration reliability as the laser power dependence will still be the same for both. The atomic O density results obtained are not directly benchmarked against other known density measurement techniques. The results show that the plasma jet atomic oxygen content increases as the RF power coupled into the plasma increases.

  5. Quantitative measurement of hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration in premixed flat flame by combining laser-induced fluorescence and direct absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuang; Su, Tie; Li, Zhong-Shan; Bai, Han-Chen; Yan, Bo; Yang, Fu-Rong

    2016-10-01

    An accurate and reasonable technique combining direct absorption spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) methods is developed to quantitatively measure the concentrations of hydroxyl in CH4/air flat laminar flame. In our approach, particular attention is paid to the linear laser-induced fluorescence and absorption processes, and experimental details as well. Through measuring the temperature, LIF signal distribution and integrated absorption, spatially absolute OH concentrations profiles are successfully resolved. These experimental results are then compared with the numerical simulation. It is proved that the good quality of the results implies that this method is suitable for calibrating the OH-PLIF measurement in a practical combustor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272338), the Science and Technology on Scramjet Key Laboratory Funding, China (Grant No. STSKFKT 2013004), and the China Scholarship Council.

  6. Characterization of a post-column reaction-laser-induced fluorescence detector for capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, B; Jorgenson, J W

    1989-10-20

    Several modifications have been made to a post-column labeling system for use with capillary zone electrophoresis. Fluorescence excitation is now performed with a helium-cadmium laser rather than an arc lamp. The focusability of the laser beam allows the use of larger diameter capillaries in the post-column reactor without the excessive band broadening observed previously. These larger capillaries can be assembled in the reactor much more easily. Another improvement is that the flow-rate of the labeling reagent can now be accurately controlled and determined. Incorporating these changes, the performances of two reactors with capillaries of the same dimensions are compared.

  7. Feasibility of measuring temperature and density fluctuations in air using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.; Lemon, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A tunable line-narrowed ArF laser can selectively excite several rotation al lines of the Schumann-Runge band system of O2 in air. The resulting ultraviolet fluorescence can be monitored at 90 deg to the laser beam axis, permitting space and time resolved observation of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulence. Experiments and calculations show that + or - 1 K, + or - 1 percent density, 1 cu mm spatial, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously under some conditions.

  8. Development of a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system on the Plasma Material Interaction System (PLAMIS-II) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, I. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, K. I.; Choi, Y.-S.; Cho, S. G.; Bae, M. K.; Lee, D.-H.; Hong, S. H.; Lho, T.; Chung, K.-S.

    2015-12-01

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed for the plasma material interaction system (PLAMIS-II) device, which is equipped with a unique plasma gun composed of a LaB6 cathode and two anodes with electromagnets to generate a focused dense plasma. PLAMIS-II simulates the interactions of plasma with different materials and is to be used for the test of plasma facing components of fusion devices. The LIF system is composed of a seed laser with Littmann/Metcalf cavity and a master oscillator power amplifier to pump 3d4F7/2 metastable argon ion to 4p4D5/2 level at the wavelength of 668.61 nm, which has the following input parameters: laser power = 20 mW, line width < 100 kHz, and a mode-hop free tuning range > 70 GHz. For in-situ measurement of laser wavelength, the wavelength spectrum of an iodine cell was measured by a photo-transistor during LIF measurement. To measure argon ion temperature (Ti) and drift velocity (vd) in PLAMIS-II, the fluorescence light with the wavelength of 442.72 nm, emitted from 4p4D5/2 level to 4s4P3/2 level and passing through 1 nm band-width filter, was collected by the photomultiplier tube combined with a lock-in amplifier and a chopper with frequency of 3 kHz. Initial data of Ti and vd were analysed in terms of gas flow rate and applied power.

  9. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements in a rocket engine plume

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.R.; McKeown, D.; Porter, F.M.; Baker, C.A.; Astill, A.G.; Rawley, K.M. . Combustion Dept. Epsilon Research, Buckinghamshire Defence Research Agency, Fort Halstead, Kent )

    1993-07-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements in the plume of a liquid-fueled rocket engine are compared with the results predicted by a mathematical model of the plume. At most positions, high signal success rates were obtained. Success rates were lower during initial runs, while the system was optimized for operation in the rocket environment, and on axis close to the nozzle where the probing laser beams were severely deflected by the plume. For each position studied, the spectra taken were fitted for temperature and a mean temperature and standard deviation calculated from the results. The mean temperatures were compared with predicted temperature values obtained from a marching procedure parabolic computer program. CARS spectra from water vapor in the plume were also recorded and fitted for temperature and concentration. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. Results showed a strong positive correlation between water vapor concentration and temperature at each measurement position--some contributions to this may arise from similarities of the effects of temperature and concentration on spectral shape. However, shear layer mixing and entrainment of cold gas into the plume may significantly affect the composition and temperature of the plume gases. LIF was used to visualize the plume structure. Imaging of the flow field was performed by detecting sodium fluorescence, after the oxidant was seeded with sodium. Images were obtained without excessively high background levels and large fluctuations in the plume structure were observed. This is consistent with the observations from the CARS experiments.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence thermometry of heating in water from short bursts of high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Al-Qraini, Moath M; Canney, Michael S; Oweis, Ghanem F

    2013-04-01

    Free field experimental measurements of the temperature rise of water in the focal region of a 2 MHz high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer were performed. The transducer was operated in pulse-mode with millisecond bursts, at acoustic intensities of 5 to 18.5 kW/cm(2) at the focus, resulting in non-linear wave propagation and shock wave formation. Pulsed, planar, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used as a fast rise-time, non-intrusive, temperature measurement method of the water present in the focal region. LIF thermometry is based on calibrating the temperature-dependent fluorescence intensity signal emitted by a passive dye dissolved in water when excited by a pulse of laser light. The laser beam was formed into a thin light sheet to illuminate a planar area in the HIFU focal region. The laser light sheet was oriented transverse to the acoustic axis. Cross-sectional, instantaneous temperature field measurements within the HIFU focal volume showed that the water temperature increased steadily with increasing HIFU drive voltage. Heating rates of 4000-7000°C/s were measured within the first millisecond of the HIFU burst. Increasing the length of the burst initially resulted in an increase in the water temperature within the HIFU focal spot (up to ∼3 ms), after which it steadied or slightly dropped. Acoustic streaming was measured and shown to be consistent with the reduction in heating with increased burst length due to convective cooling. LIF thermometry may thus be a viable non-invasive method for the characterization of HIFU transducers at high power intensities.

  11. The reaction of Hg(6 3P1) with hydrogen molecules studied by electron spin resonance and laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Whikun; Satyapal, Sunita; Shafer, Neil; Bersohn, Richard

    1993-09-01

    Mercury atoms were excited to the 6 3P1 state with a pulsed laser and a lamp at 253.7 nm in the presence of H2, D2, HD, and mixtures of these gases. The hydrogen atom reaction products were detected by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser induced fluorescence. The ratio of yields of the two body channel (mercury hydride and a hydrogen atom) and the three body channel [Hg(6 1S0) and two hydrogen atoms] were determined by combining the H/D atom ratios and a literature value of the HgD/HgH ratio from reaction with HD. Assuming that the sum of the two yields is unity, the yield of the two body channel is for H2 0.63±0.15, for D2 0.79±0.11, and for HD 0.10±0.02 (HgH+D) and 0.65±0.03 (HgD+H). The average kinetic energies calculated by combining these yields with the literature data on internal energy release in the mercury hydride molecules agree with the average kinetic energies measured from the Doppler broadened fluorescence excitation curves. When the E vector of the exciting polarized light was rotated there was no effect on the hydrogen atom spectrum proving that the hydrogen atom velocity distribution is isotropic. When the mercury atoms were excited with circularly polarized light to the J=1, MJ=1 state, the hydrogen atoms exhibited no spin polarization. Electron spin resonance (ESR) signals observed when irradiating a mixture of Hg and hydrogen molecules were shown by isotopic effects to be due to hydrogen atoms dissociated from mercury hydride molecules.

  12. Indirect detection of superoxide in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells using microchip electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Richard P S; Siegel, Joseph M; Fresta, Claudia G; Caruso, Giuseppe; da Silva, José A F; Lunte, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    Superoxide, a naturally produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the human body, is involved in many pathological and physiological signaling processes. However, if superoxide formation is left unregulated, overproduction can lead to oxidative damage to important biomolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Superoxide can also lead to the formation of peroxynitrite, an extremely hazardous substance, through its reaction with endogenously produced nitric oxide. Despite its importance, quantitative information regarding superoxide production is difficult to obtain due to its high reactivity and low concentrations in vivo. MitoHE, a fluorescent probe that specifically reacts with superoxide, was used in conjunction with microchip electrophoresis (ME) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection to investigate changes in superoxide production by RAW 264.7 macrophage cells following stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Stimulation was performed in the presence and absence of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitors, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) and 2-metoxyestradiol (2-ME). The addition of these inhibitors resulted in an increase in the amount of superoxide specific product (2-OH-MitoE(+)) from 0.08 ± 0.01 fmol (0.17 ± 0.03 mM) in native cells to 1.26 ± 0.06 fmol (2.5 ± 0.1 mM) after PMA treatment. This corresponds to an approximately 15-fold increase in intracellular concentration per cell. Furthermore, the addition of 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) to the cells during incubation resulted in the production of 0.061 ± 0.006 fmol (0.12 ± 0.01 mM) of 2-OH-MitoE(+) per cell on average. These results demonstrate that indirect superoxide detection coupled with the use of SOD inhibitors and a separation method is a viable method to discriminate the 2-OH-MitoE(+) signal from possible interferences.

  13. A Remote Raman and Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectrometer and its Application for Lidar Remote Sensing of Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Angel, S. M.; Lucey, P. G.; McKay, C. P.; Misra, A. K.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Newsom, H.; Scott, E. R.; Singh, U. N.; Taylor, J. G.; Porter, J. N.

    2005-05-01

    A combined remote Raman and Laser Induced Fluorescence (RLIF) spectrometer was proposed as a mast-mounted instrument for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). This remote RLIF system is capable of conducting reconnaissance of fluorescence materials and minerals with high sensitivity (e.g., carbonates, sulfates, phosphates, quartz, etc.) that can be recorded with a single 532 nm (35 mJ) laser pulse of 8 ns half-width. The RLIF system is also capable of identification of mineral, organic, and biogenic materials and is sitable for atmospheric studies of Mars. This instrument design is based on a prototypes that was developed with partial support from NASA's Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) at the University of Hawaii. This prototype instrument has been modified to operate in the lidar mode to obtain Mie-Rayleigh scattering profiles in the atmosphere for studying meteorological processes in the marine atmosphere. Application of RLIF to obtain range-resolved atmospheric backscattering profiles using the AOTF technique are capable of providing atmospheric backscatter profiles. Data from RLIF can be used to retrieve optical properties of dust aerosols and clouds, including the profiling of scattering intensity, location of cloud base and thickness, atmospheric extinction, and de-polarization. These measurements can be made at high vertical resolution up to altitudes >5 km. Simultaneous measurements can be made of atmospheric CO2 and its variations; surface CO2-ice and water-ice; and surface and subsurface hydrated methane on Mars. Capability of RLIF and examples of atmospheric measurements applicable to RLIF will be presented in this paper.

  14. Greatly Enhanced Detectability of Geothermal Tracers Through Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Rose; Joel Harris; Phaedra Kilbourn; James Kleimeyer; Troy Carter

    2002-10-30

    WE have successfully completed a four-year R and D project to greatly reduce the detection limit of fluorescent tracers through the use of emerging laser-excitation, optical fiber, and CCD-spectroscopy technologies. Whereas the efforts over the first two years were directed at demonstrating a reduction in the detection limit of fluorescent compounds by a factor of 100 and at identifying several new fluorescein-derived tracer candidates, our recent efforts were focused primarily on the field demonstration of new tracers having detection limits in the low parts-per-quadrillion range. During the summer of 2001, we initiated field tests at the Dixie Valley, Nevada and at the Beowawe, Nevada geothermal fields using very small quantities of the fluorescein-derivative 6-carboxyfluorescein. Subsequently, we succeeded in measuring sub-part-per-trillion quantities of that candidate tracer at both the Beowawe and Dixie Valley geothermal reservoirs-using approximately 530 g of tracer at each setting. Our studies indicate that we could have observed a breakthrough using only 0.53 g of 6-carboxyfluorescein. This represents a reduction by a factor of 170,000 below the mass of tracer used in a previous tracer test at Beowawe.

  15. Plant-Stress Measurements Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Excitation: Poland Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gene Capelle; Steve Jones

    1999-05-01

    Bechtel Nevada's Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) has been involved in remote sensing for many years, and in April 1995 STL began to study the use of active remote sensing for detecting plant stress. This work was motivated by the need to detect subsurface contamination, with the supposition that this could be accomplished by remote measurement of optical signatures from the overgrowing vegetation. The project has been a cooperative DOE/Disney effort, in which basic optical signature measurements (primarily fluorescence) were done at the Disney greenhouse facilities at Epcot Center in Florida, using instrumentation developed by STL on DOE funding. The primary instrument is a LIFI system, which had originally been developed for detection of surface uranium contamination at DOE sites. To deal specifically with the plant stress measurements, a LIFS system was built that utilizes the same laser, but captures the complete fluorescence spectrum from blue to red wavelengths. This system had continued to evolve, and the version in existence in September 1997 was sent to Poland, accompanied by two people from STL, for the purpose of making the measurements described in this report.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence and reflected white light imaging for robot-assisted MIS.

    PubMed

    Noonan, David P; Elson, Daniel S; Mylonas, George P; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents an articulated robotic-controlled device to facilitate large-area in vivo tissue imaging and characterization through the integration of miniaturized reflected white light and fluorescence intensity imaging for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). The device is composed of a long, rigid shaft with a robotically controlled distal tip featuring three degrees of in-plane articulation and one degree of rotational freedom. The constraints imposed by the articulated section, coupled with the small footprint available in MIS devices, require a novel optical configuration to ensure effective target illumination and image acquisition. A tunable coherent supercontinuum laser source is used to provide sequential white light and fluorescence illumination through a multimode fiber (200 microm diameter), and the reflected images are transmitted to an image acquisition system using a 10,000 pixel flexible fiber image guide (590 microm diameter). By using controlled joint actuation to trace overlapping trajectories, the device allows effective imaging of a larger field of view than a traditional dual-mode laparoscope. A first-generation prototype of the device and its initial phantom and ex vivo tissue characterization results are described. The results demonstrate the potential of the device to be used as a new platform for in vivo tissue characterization and navigation for MIS.

  17. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown. PMID:19079454

  18. Influence of the gaseous mixture composition on accuracy of molecular iodine on-line detection by laser-induced fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    This paper informs on research into the influence of the composition of gaseous mixtures analyzed on the accuracy of on-line molecular iodine detection by laser-induced fluorescence in various gaseous media—in atmospheric air and in technological mixtures formed during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The paper shows that by considering the composition of buffer media and parts of its components, the accuracy of iodine content measurement may be increased in several times.

  19. Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection of proteins from two types of complex sample matrices: food and biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Medina, Raul; Puerta, Angel; Pelaez-Lorenzo, Cristina; Rivera-Monroy, Zuly; Guttman, Andras; Diez-Masa, Jose Carlos; de Frutos, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Sample preparation and laser-induced fluorescence detection are two key steps of the analytical methodology to determine by capillary electrophoresis low concentrations of proteins in complex sample matrices. In this chapter the options of performing both steps in different ways are shown by detailing the analysis of the allergen β-lactoglobulin in food products for infants and the analysis of the isoforms of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, a potential biomarker, in serum and secretome.

  20. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  1. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  2. Laser Induced Fluorescence Emission (L.I.F.E.): In Situ Non-Destructive Detection of Microbial Life on Supraglacial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, B.; Tilg, M.; Storrie-Lombardi, M.; Remias, D.; Psenner, R.

    2012-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.) is an in situ laser scanning technique to detect photoautotrophic pigments such as phycoerythrin of an ice ecosystem such as supraglacial environments without contamination. The sensitivity of many psychrophiles to even moderate changes in temperature, and the logistical difficulties associated with either in situ analysis or sampling makes it difficult to study microbial metabolism in ice ecosystems in a high resolution. Surface communities of cold ecosystems are highly autotrophic and therefor ideal systems for L.I.F.E examinations. 532nm green lasers excite photopigments in cyanobacteria and produce multiple fluorescence signatures between 550nm and 750nm including carotenoids, phycobiliproteins which would enable a non-invasive in-situ measurement. The sensitivity of many psychrophiles to even moderate changes in temperature, and the logistical difficulties associated with either in situ analysis or sampling makes it difficult to study these cryosphere ecosystems. In general, the ice habitat has to be disrupted using techniques that usually include coring, sawing, and melting. Samples are also often chosen blindly, with little indication of probable biomass. The need for an in situ non-invasive, non-destructive technique to detect, localize, and sample cryosphere biomass in the field is therefore of considerable importance. L.I.F.E has already been tested in remote ecosystems like Antarctica (Lake Untersee, Lake Fryxell), supraglacial environments in the Kongsfjord region in the High Arctic and High Alpine glaciers but until now no calibration was set to convert the L.I.F.E. signal into pigment concentration. Here we describe the standardization for detection of Phycobiliproteins (Phycoerythrine) which are found in red algae, cyanobacteria, and cryptomonads. Similar methods are already used for detection of phytoplankton in liquid systems like oceans and lakes by NASÁs Airborne Oceanographic LIDAR since 1979. The

  3. Development of the Megahertz Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for Plasma Turbulence Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksey Kuritsyn; Fred M. Levinton

    2004-04-27

    A megahertz LIF-based diagnostic system for measuring ion density fluctuations in two spatial dimensions is described. Well resolved spatial and temporal 2D images of turbulent structures will be useful in understanding ion turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas which is a key factor in the performance of fusion experimental devices. A sheet beam of a megahertz repetition rate tunable Alexandrite laser is used to excite ion emission from argon plasma. The fluorescence emitted from the plane of the laser beam is detected with a narrow band interference filter and intensified ultra-fast CCD camera providing 2D images of relative ion density fluctuations every microsecond. It is expected that the edge plasma on fusion devices will be accessible to this technique.

  4. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  5. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  6. The use of vitamins as tracer dyes for laser-induced fluorescence in liquid flow applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zähringer, Katharina

    2014-04-01

    Tracers commonly used in experimental flow studies are mostly nocuous to the environment and human health. Particularly, in large flow installations, this can become a problem. In this study, a solution of this problem is presented, based on using water-soluble vitamins. Five of them are examined here for their applicability in flow studies. Vitamins B2 and B6 turned out to be the most promising candidates, and the dependency of their fluorescence intensity on parameters like concentration, laser energy, temperature, and pH are determined for two commonly used laser excitation wavelengths (532, 355 nm). Two examples of application in a static mixer and a spray flow are shown and demonstrate the applicability of the vitamin tracers.

  7. Analysis of serotonin in brain microdialysates using capillary electrophoresis and native laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Benturquia, Nadia; Couderc, François; Sauvinet, Valérie; Orset, Cyrille; Parrot, Sandrine; Bayle, Christophe; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2005-03-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. In this work, a method for analyzing 5-HT in brain microdialysis samples using a commercially available capillary electrophoresis (CE) system has been developed. A pH-mediated in-capillary preconcentration of samples was performed, and after separation by capillary zone electrophoresis, native fluorescence of 5-HT was detected by a 266 nm solid-state laser. The separation conditions for the analysis of 5-HT in standard solutions and microdialysates have been optimized, and this method has been validated on both pharmacological and analytical bases. Separation of 5-HT was performed using a 80 mmol/L citrate buffer, pH 2.5, containing 20 mmol/L hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) and +30 kV voltage. The detection limit was 2.5 x 10(-10) mol/L. This method allows the in vivo brain monitoring of 5-HT using a simple, accurate CE measurement in underivatized microdialysis samples.

  8. Biochemical Detection and Identification False Alarm Rate Dependence on Wavelength Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, R.; Hug, W. F.; Sala, E. C.; Sijapati, K.; Lane, A. L.; Reid, R. D.; Conrad, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    Most organic and many inorganic materials absorb strongly in specific wavelength ranges in the deep UV between about 220nm and 300nm. Excitation within these absorption bands results in native fluorescence emission. Each compound or composite material, such as a bacterial spore, has a unique excitation-emission fingerprint that can be used to provide information about the material. The sensitivity and specificity with which these materials can be detected and identified depends on the excitation wavelength and the number and location of observation wavelengths.We will present data on our deep ultraviolet Targeted Ultraviolet Chemical Sensors that demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the sensors. In particular, we will demonstrate the ability to quantitatively differentiate a wide range of biochemical agent targets against a wide range of background materials. We will describe the relationship between spectral resolution and specificity in target identification, as well as simple, fast, algorithms to identify materials.Hand-held, battery operated instruments using a deep UV laser and multi-band detection have been developed and deployed on missions to the Antarctic, the Arctic, and the deep ocean with the capability of detecting a single bacterial spore and to differentiate a wide range of organic and biological compounds.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing in Sm2+-doped fluoride glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masanori; Kushida, Takashi

    1994-02-01

    Fluorescence line-narrowing experiments have been made for the Sm2+ ion in fluoride glass at 77 K under cw dye-laser excitation at various energies within the inhomogeneously broadened 7F50-D0 and 7F50-D1 absorption lines. The energies of the three Stark levels of the 7F1 and 5D1 manifolds have been obtained as a function of the 5D70-F0 energy separation. From the analysis of this result, it has been found that the site-to-site variations of the energies of these Stark levels can be explained well only by taking into account the J-mixing effect. The low-energy levels of the 4f55d configuration lie in the vicinity of the 5DJ states in this material. However, no effect of the crystal-field mixing of the 4f55d states on the inhomogeneous distribution of the energies of the 7F1 and 5D1 states has been observed. The origin of the unusually intense 5D70-F0 transition in Sm2+ is also discussed.

  10. Remote Sensing of Chlorophyll Fluorescence by the Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Morgan, F., II; Demajistre, R.; Cook, B. D.; Corp, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the amount of fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or Fraunhofer lines in the reflected solar spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is designed and constructed specifically for airborne and groundbased ChlF measurements using the line fill-in ChlF measurement technique. In this paper, we will present the design of this triple etalon Fabry-Perot imaging instrument and the results of its vegetation fluorescence measurements obtained from the ground in the laboratory and from a NASA Langley King Air during our 2014 airborne campaign over vegetated targets in North Carolina and Virginia.

  11. The saturation of the fluorescence and its consequences for laser-induced fluorescence thermometry in liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaze, William; Caballina, Ophélie; Castanet, Guillaume; Lemoine, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the fluorescence emission of certain organic dyes such as rhodamine B has been widely utilized for measuring the temperature in liquid flows. Measurements are generally based on two assumptions: The fluorescence signal is proportional to the intensity of the laser excitation, and the temperature sensitivity of the dye is not affected by the laser irradiance. In the ratiometric methods, these assumptions allow justifying that the influence of the laser intensity can be totally eliminated in the intensity ratio of two spectral bands of the fluorescence emission and thus that measurements can be taken with no biases under experimental conditions, where the laser propagation is disturbed by the flow. However, when pulsed lasers are used (mainly in planar LIF measurements), the peak irradiance usually compares or exceeds the saturation intensity of the dyes. The present study assesses the consequences of a saturation of the dye emission on temperature measurements. Tests among fluoresceins and rhodamines reveal that the saturation can be accompanied by a significant loss of temperature sensitivity. The dyes, for which this loss of sensitivity is observed, mainly owe their temperature dependence to the fluorescence quantum yield and have a fluorescence signal decreasing with the temperature. The couple fluorescein/sulforhodamine 640 is finally proposed for an implementation of the ratiometric method, since its relatively high temperature dependence (+3 %/° {C}) is not altered at high laser irradiances. The possibility of measuring instantaneous temperature fields with this pair of dyes using a single laser shot is finally demonstrated on a turbulent heated jet injected into quiescent water.

  12. Laser induced fluorescence and resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1-hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Haeng; Huh, Hyun; Kim, Hyung Min; Kim, Choong Ik; Kim, Nam Joon; Kim, Seong Keun

    2005-01-01

    We carried out laser induced fluorescence and resonance enhanced two-color two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1-hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (1-HAQ). The 0-0 band transition to the lowest electronically excited state was found to be at 461.98 nm (21 646 cm-1). A well-resolved vibronic structure was observed up to 1100 cm-1 above the 0-0 band, followed by a rather broad absorption band in the higher frequency region. Dispersed fluorescence spectra were also obtained. Single vibronic level emissions from the 0-0 band showed Stokes-shifted emission spectra. The peak at 2940 cm-1 to the red of the origin in the emission spectra was assigned as the OH stretching vibration in the ground state, whose combination bands with the C=O bending and stretching vibrations were also seen in the emission spectra. In contrast to the excitation spectrum, no significant vibronic activity was found for low frequency fundamental vibrations of the ground state in the emission spectrum. The spectral features of the fluorescence excitation and emission spectra indicate that a significant change takes place in the intramolecular hydrogen bonding structure upon transition to the excited state, such as often seen in the excited state proton (or hydrogen) transfer. We suggest that the electronically excited state of interest has a double minimum potential of the 9,10-quinone and the 1,10-quinone forms, the latter of which, the proton-transferred form of 1-HAQ, is lower in energy. On the other hand, ab initio calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level predicted that the electronic ground state has a single minimum potential distorted along the reaction coordinate of tautomerization. The 9,10-quinone form of 1-HAQ is the lowest energy structure in the ground state, with the 1,10-quinone form lying ˜5000 cm-1 above it. The intramolecular hydrogen bond of the 9,10-quinone was found to be unusually strong, with an estimated bond energy of ˜13 kcal/mol (˜4500 cm-1), probably due to

  13. Infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging and applications to imaging of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Brian James

    This dissertation introduces infrared planar laser- induced fluorescence (IR PLIF) techniques for visualization of species that lack convenient electronic transitions and are therefore unsuitable for more traditional electronic PLIF measurements. IR PLIF measurements can generate high signal levels that scale linearly with both laser energy and species concentration, thereby demonstrating advantages over Raman and multiphoton PLIF techniques. IR PLIF is shown to be a straightforward and effective tool for visualization of CO and CO2 in reactive flows. The slow characteristic times of vibrational relaxation and the large mole fractions of CO and CO2 in typical flows lead to high IR PLIF signal levels, despite the low emission rates typical of vibrational transitions. Analyses of rotational energy transfer (RET) and vibrational energy transfer (VET) show that excitation schemes in either linear (weak) or saturated (strong) limits may be developed, with the fluorescence collected directly from the laser-excited species or indirectly from bath gases in vibrational resonance with the laser-excited species. Use of short (~1 μs) exposures (for CO) or short exposures combined with long-pulse, high-pulse-energy excitation (for CO2) minimizes unwanted signal variation due to spatially-dependent VET rates. Results are presented for flows ranging from room- temperature mixing to a benchmark CH4 laminar diffusion flame. Linear excitation is appropriate for CO due to its slow vibrational relaxation. However, linear excitation is not well-suited for CO2 imaging due to fast H 2O-enhanced VET processes and the attendant difficulty in interpreting the resulting signal. Saturated excitation using a CO2 laser (or combined CO2 laser-OPO) technique is most appropriate for CO 2, as it generates high signal and minimizes spatial variations in fluorescence quantum yield. Since IR PLIF is applicable to most IR-active species, it has a high potential for expanding the diagnostic

  14. On-line molecular iodine isotopologue detection in gaseous media during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing using a laser-induced fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.

    2015-06-01

    The paper reports on on-line measurement of the {}129{{\\text{I}}2}, 127I129I, and {}127{{\\text{I}}2} concentrations during spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing using a laser-induced fluorescence method. A He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) was used as a fluorescence excitation source. The detection limits obtained for molecular iodine isotopologue concentrations demonstrate the possibility of using this method for iodine control both in gaseous technological media generated during SNF reprocessing and after passing through the gas purification system (in atmosphere emission).

  15. Quantitative two-dimensional measurement of oil-film thickness by laser-induced fluorescence in a piston-ring model experiment.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Stefan; Füßer, Hans-Jürgen; Fuhrmann, Daniel; Schulz, Christof; Kaiser, Sebastian A

    2016-01-10

    This paper describes advances in using laser-induced fluorescence of dyes for imaging the thickness of oil films in a rotating ring tribometer with optical access, an experiment representing a sliding piston ring in an internal combustion engine. A method for quantitative imaging of the oil-film thickness is developed that overcomes the main challenge, the accurate calibration of the detected fluorescence signal for film thicknesses in the micrometer range. The influence of the background material and its surface roughness is examined, and a method for flat-field correction is introduced. Experiments in the tribometer show that the method yields quantitative, physically plausible results, visualizing features with submicrometer thickness.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence method for on-line molecular isotopologues of iodine-127, iodine-129, iodine-131 detected in gaseous media using a tunable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.; Sobolevsky, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The letter reports on the development of a laser-induced fluorescence method for on-line selective measurement of 127I2, 129I2, 131I2, 129I127I, 127I131I, 129I131I isotopologue concentrations in gaseous media. The method is based on the excitation of molecular iodine isotopologues’ fluorescence by tunable diode laser (632–637 nm) radiation at three or four wavelengths corresponding to the 127I2, 131I2, 129I127I, 129I131I absorption line centers. Boundary relations for concentrations of simultaneously measured iodine isotopologues is about 10‑5–10‑6.

  17. Applications of capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection to the analysis of trace species: From single cells to single molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Qifeng, X.

    1995-11-01

    This Ph.D. Thesis describes several separation and detection schemes for the analysis of small volume and amount of samples, such as intracellular components and single enzymes developed during research. Indirect Laser-induced fluorescence detection and capillary electrophoresis were used to quantify lactate and pyruvate in single red blood cells. The assay of specific enzyme activities was achieved by monitoring the highly fluorescent enzymatic reaction product, NADH. LDH activity was found not to be a unique marker for diagnosis of leukemia. Reactions of single LDH-1 molecules were investigated by monitoring the reaction product with LIF detection.

  18. Detection of C-reactive protein based on magnetic nanoparticles and capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Jyun; Yang, Jian-Ying; Shu, Ting-Yu; Lin, Ting-Yu; Chen, Yen-Yi; Su, Mei-Yu; Li, Wen-Jie; Liu, Mine-Yine

    2013-11-01

    A simple and fast method based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection was developed for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP). To optimize the CZE conditions, several factors including buffer compositions, buffer ionic strength, buffer pH, applied voltage and capillary temperature have been examined. The optimal separation buffer selected was a 30 mM sodium phosphate (PB) buffer, pH 8.0. The optimal CE applied voltage and temperature selected were 20 kV and 35°C, respectively. The CZE profile of the MNP-1°Ab-CRP-2°Ab/FITC bioconjugates showed good reproducibility. One major peak was observed for the MNP bioconjugates. The quantitative analysis also showed good results. The coefficient of variation (CV%) for the major peak area was 8.7%, and the CV% for the major peak migration time was 2.5%. The linear range for CRP analysis was 10-150 μg/mL, and the concentration limit of detection (LOD) was 9.2 μg/mL. Non-specific interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the system can be prevented by including 10% (v/v) of human plasma in the binding buffers. The CE/LIF method might be helpful for analyzing high concentrations of CRP in a patient's plasma after an acute-phase inflammation. This new method demonstrated the possibility of using MNPs and CE/LIF for the detection of proteins, and provided information for the establishment of appropriate CE conditions.

  19. Developments in laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative in situ measurements of free radicals in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Dwayne

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived free radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH. Chemical oxidation cycles, which also involve peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2), remove natural or anthropogenic emissions (for example methane) and generate a range of secondary products, for example ozone, nitrogen dioxide, acidic and multifunctional organic species, and secondary organic aerosol, which impact on human health and climate. Owing to their short lifetime in the atmosphere, the abundance of radicals is determined solely by their rate of chemical production and loss, and not by transport. Field measurements of the concentrations of radicals and comparison with calculations using a numerical model therefore constitutes one of the very best ways to test whether the chemistry in each of these locations is understood and accurately represented in the model. Validation of the chemistry is important, as the predictions of climate and air quality models containing this chemistry are used to drive the formulation of policy and legislation. However, in situ measurements of radical species, owing to their very low abundance (often sub part per trillion) and short lifetimes (< 1 second for OH), remain extremely challenging. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) has enjoyed considerable success worldwide for the quantitative detection of radicals in a range of environments. The radicals are either excited directly by the laser (e.g. OH, IO) or are first chemically converted to OH prior to detection (e.g. HO2, RO2). Recent developments in the LIF technique for radical detection, which uses a supersonic expansion with detection at low pressure and multi kHz pulse repetition rate tunable laser systems, will be discussed, together with calibration methods to make signals absolute, and identification of potential interferences. LIF instruments have been operated on ground, ship and aircraft platforms at a

  20. Rapid analysis of genetically modified organisms by in-house developed capillary electrophoresis chip and laser-induced fluorescence system.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Pierre J; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C

    2004-03-01

    A microfabricated, inexpensive, reusable glass capillary electrophoresis chip and a laser-induced fluorescence system were developed in-house for the rapid DNA-based analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The 35S promoter sequence of cauliflower mosaic virus and the terminator of the nopaline synthase (NOS) gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens were both detected since they are present in most genetically modified organisms. The detection of genetically modified soybean in the presence of unaltered soybean was chosen as a model. Lectin, a plant-specific gene, was also detected for confirmation of the integrity of extracted DNA. The chip was composed of two glass plates, each 25 x 76 mm, thermally bonded together to form a closed structure. Photomasks with cross-topology were prepared rapidly by using polymeric material instead of chrome plates. The widths of the injection and separation channels were 30 and 70 microm, respectively, the effective separation length 4.5 cm. The glass slide was etched to a depth of 30 microm for both the injection and separation channel. The cost of the chip was less than 1 $ and required 2 days for photomask preparation and microfabrication. The separation and detection of polymerase chain reaction-amplified NOS, 35S, and lectin sequences (180, 195, and 181 bp, respectively) was completed in less than 60 s. As low as 0.1% GMO content was detectable by the proposed system after 35 and 40 amplification cycles for 35S and NOS, respectively, using 25 ng of extracted DNA as starting material. This corresponds to only 20 genome copies of genetically modified soybean.

  1. Strategies of fluorescence staining for trace total ribonucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis with argon ion laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yi-An; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Chang, Po-Ling

    2015-08-01

    In this work, five fluorescent dyes (SYTO-9, SYBR Green I, SYBR Green II, SYBR Safe, and SYBR Gold) were used as both on-column and precolumn stains for total RNA analysis by CE-LIF with Ar ion laser excitation. In the on-column RNA stain, the SYTO-9 provided the highest fluorescence intensity and the lowest detectable concentration, as low as 10 pg/μL, while the SYBR Green II and SYBR Gold were adsorbed on the poly(ethylene oxide) thus affected the separation efficiency. As a precolumn stain, SYBR Gold was the most sensitive among the five dyes due to the strong affinity between the dye and RNA molecules. As a result, a single-cell quantity of RNA (10-30 pg per cell) could be detected by CE-LIF with precolumn staining by SYBR Gold. Because of the great savings of fluorescent dye using precolumn stain (one button dye may use for one million stain), this method is the best strategy for RNA staining in terms of cost-effectiveness and sensitivity.

  2. Indirect detection of superoxide in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells using microchip electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Richard P S; Siegel, Joseph M; Fresta, Claudia G; Caruso, Giuseppe; da Silva, José A F; Lunte, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    Superoxide, a naturally produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the human body, is involved in many pathological and physiological signaling processes. However, if superoxide formation is left unregulated, overproduction can lead to oxidative damage to important biomolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Superoxide can also lead to the formation of peroxynitrite, an extremely hazardous substance, through its reaction with endogenously produced nitric oxide. Despite its importance, quantitative information regarding superoxide production is difficult to obtain due to its high reactivity and low concentrations in vivo. MitoHE, a fluorescent probe that specifically reacts with superoxide, was used in conjunction with microchip electrophoresis (ME) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection to investigate changes in superoxide production by RAW 264.7 macrophage cells following stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Stimulation was performed in the presence and absence of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitors, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) and 2-metoxyestradiol (2-ME). The addition of these inhibitors resulted in an increase in the amount of superoxide specific product (2-OH-MitoE(+)) from 0.08 ± 0.01 fmol (0.17 ± 0.03 mM) in native cells to 1.26 ± 0.06 fmol (2.5 ± 0.1 mM) after PMA treatment. This corresponds to an approximately 15-fold increase in intracellular concentration per cell. Furthermore, the addition of 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) to the cells during incubation resulted in the production of 0.061 ± 0.006 fmol (0.12 ± 0.01 mM) of 2-OH-MitoE(+) per cell on average. These results demonstrate that indirect superoxide detection coupled with the use of SOD inhibitors and a separation method is a viable method to discriminate the 2-OH-MitoE(+) signal from possible interferences. PMID:26159570

  3. Spatially-Resolved Velocity Measurements in Steady, High-Speed Reacting Flows Using Laser-Induced OH Fluorescence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavuhn, Kurt G.

    The theoretical development and calibration of a nonintrusive, high-resolution, optical flowfield-diagnostic technique utilizing OH laser-induced fluorescence (OH LIF) for the measurement of velocity in steady, high-speed, reacting flows is reported. The particular high-speed, reacting flows of interest are those occurring in supersonic combustors for proposed hypersonic flight vehicles. The theory of the OH LIF strategy employed in this work is described, with emphasis on the optimization of the strategy for quantitative velocity measurements. A simplified model is derived for the calculation of expected signal levels from pulsed, narrow-linewidth, (1,0) band excitation of OH in flames when collecting filtered (1,1) and (0,0) band fluorescence with a gated detector. Several illumination techniques are presented for measuring the Doppler shift of the OH LIF while eliminating systematic errors. A unique reacting underexpanded jet was constructed for the calibration of the OH LIF velocity measurement technique over a wide range of flow conditions. A complete analysis of the distribution of flow properties in the jet flowfield is presented, including results from a full Navier-Stokes calculation with finite -rate chemistry. Comparisons of results from pointwise OH LIF velocity measurements along the centerline and planar OH LIF velocity measurements along the central plane of the reacting underexpanded jet with the numerical solution demonstrate the resolution, range, and accuracy of the technique. Measured and calculated velocities in the supersonic jet core agree on average to within +/-1.3% for the pointwise measurements and +/-2.2% for the planar measurements. The uncertainty (2 sigma) in the pointwise velocity measurements in the jet core was on average +/-6.0% for a single measurement and +/-3.5% for the average value of three scans. For the planar velocity measurements in the jet core, the uncertainty (2 sigma) was on average +/-4.9% for a single measurement

  4. Differential Laser-Induced Perturbation Spectroscopy for Analysis of Mixtures of the Fluorophores l-Phenylalanine, l-Tyrosine and l-Tryptophan Using a Fluorescence Probe.

    PubMed

    Oztekin, Erman K; Hahn, David W

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative detection of common endogenous fluorophores is accomplished using differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS) with a 193-nm UV fluorescence probe and various UV perturbation wavelengths. In this study, DLIPS is explored as an alternative to traditional fluorescence spectroscopy alone, with a goal of exploring natural fluorophores pursuant to biological samples and tissue analysis. To this end, aromatic amino acids, namely, l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine and l-tryptophan are mixed with differing mass ratios and then classified with various DLIPS schemes. Classification with a traditional fluorescence probe is used as a benchmark. The results show a 20% improvement in classification performance of the DLIPS method over the traditional fluorescence method using partial least squares (PLS) analysis. Additional multivariate analyses are explored, and the relevant photochemistry is elucidated in the context of perturbation wavelengths. We conclude that DLIPS is a promising biosensing approach with potential for in vivo analysis given the current findings with fluorophores relevant to biological tissues.

  5. Measurements of Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence at 685 nm by Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, F.; Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Corp, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or solar Fraunhofer lines in the reflected spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is a triple etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer designed and optimized specifically for the ChlF sensing from an airborne platform using this line fill-in technique. In this paper, we will present the results of APFS ChlF measurements obtained from a NASA Langley King Air during two airborne campaigns (12/12 in 2014 and 5/20 in 2015) over various land, river, and vegetated targets in Virginia during stressed and growth seasons.

  6. Investigation of potential interferences in the detection of atmospheric ROx radicals by laser-induced fluorescence under dark conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Tan, Zhaofeng; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Broch, Sebastian; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Holland, Frank; Künstler, Christopher; Gomm, Sebastian; Rohrer, Franz; Schrade, Stephanie; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Direct detection of highly reactive, atmospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH) is widely accomplished by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instruments. The technique is also suitable for the indirect measurement of HO2 and RO2 peroxy radicals by chemical conversion to OH. It requires sampling of ambient air into a low-pressure cell, where OH fluorescence is detected after excitation by 308 nm laser radiation. Although the residence time of air inside the fluorescence cell is typically only on the order of milliseconds, there is potential that additional OH is internally produced, which would artificially increase the measured OH concentration. Here, we present experimental studies investigating potential interferences in the detection of OH and peroxy radicals for the LIF instruments of Forschungszentrum Jülich for nighttime conditions. For laboratory experiments, the inlet of the instrument was over flowed by excess synthetic air containing one or more reactants. In order to distinguish between OH produced by reactions upstream of the inlet and artificial signals produced inside the instrument, a chemical titration for OH was applied. Additional experiments were performed in the simulation chamber SAPHIR where simultaneous measurements by an open-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) served as reference for OH to quantify potential artifacts in the LIF instrument. Experiments included the investigation of potential interferences related to the nitrate radical (NO3, N2O5), related to the ozonolysis of alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, α-pinene, limonene, isoprene), and the laser photolysis of acetone. Experiments studying the laser photolysis of acetone yield OH signals in the fluorescence cell, which are equivalent to 0.05 × 106 cm-3 OH for a mixing ratio of 5 ppbv acetone. Under most atmospheric conditions, this interference is negligible. No significant interferences were found for atmospheric concentrations of reactants

  7. Investigation of potential interferences in the detection of atmospheric ROx radicals by laser-induced fluorescence under dark conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Tan, Z.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Broch, S.; Dorn, H.-P.; Holland, F.; Künstler, C.; Gomm, S.; Rohrer, F.; Schrade, S.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2015-11-01

    Direct detection of highly reactive, atmospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH) is widely accomplished by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instruments. The technique is also suitable for the indirect measurement of HO2 and RO2 peroxy radicals by chemical conversion to OH. It requires sampling of ambient air into a low pressure cell, where OH fluorescence is detected after excitation by 308 nm laser radiation. Although the residence time of air inside the fluorescence cell is typically only on the order of milliseconds, there is potential that additional OH is internally produced, which would artificially increase the measured OH concentration. Here, we present experimental studies investigating potential interferences in the detection of OH and peroxy radicals for the LIF instruments of Forschungszentrum Jülich for nighttime conditions. For laboratory experiments, the inlet of the instrument was overflown by excess synthetic air containing one or more reactants. In order to distinguish between OH produced by reactions upstream of the inlet and artificial signals produced inside the instrument, a chemical titration for OH was applied. Additional experiments were performed in the simulation chamber SAPHIR where simultaneous measurements by an open-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) served as reference for OH to quantify potential artifacts in the LIF instrument. Experiments included the investigation of potential interferences related to the nitrate radical (NO3, N2O5), related to the ozonolysis of alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, α-pinene, limonene, isoprene), and the laser photolysis of acetone. Experiments studying the laser photolysis of acetone yield OH signals in the fluorescence cell, which are equivalent to 0.05 × 106 cm-3 OH for a mixing ratio of 5 ppbv acetone. Under most atmospheric conditions, this interference is negligible. No significant interferences were found for atmospheric concentrations of reactants

  8. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  9. Jet-cooled laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy of NiC: Observation of low-lying Ω = 0+ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund, Sheo; Yarlagadda, Suresh; Bhattacharyya, Soumen; Nakhate, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectra of 58Ni12C molecules, produced in a free-jet apparatus, have been studied. A new low-lying Ω = 0+ state has been observed at Te = 5178 (6) cm-1. Based on previous ab initio calculations this state is plausibly assigned as 0+ spin-orbit component of the first excited Π state. The term energies of vibrational levels up to v = 10 for X1Σ+ ground and v = 3 for Ω = 0+ states have been determined. The harmonic and anharmonic wavenumbers respectively equal to 833 (4) and 6.7 (13) cm-1 for Ω = 0+ state have been measured.

  10. REAL-TIME IN SITU DETECTION OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS BY LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE SYSTEM. Final tropical report (Task 1.3).

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; James A. Sorensen; Jaroslav Solc

    1999-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of the field demonstration of a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method for characterization of brownfields and other contaminated sites. The technology was provided and demonstrated by Dakota Technologies, Inc. (DTI), of Fargo, North Dakota. LIF generates continuous data on the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) within the soil profile. The sensor used to record real-time data is deployed into the soil using a modified truck-mounted Geoprobe percussion soil probing device. The summary of observations described in the following text represents an independent evaluation of the performance, usefulness, and economics of the demonstrated technology for characterization at PAH-contaminated sites.

  11. The Use of Laser-Induced Fluorescence to Characterize Discharge Cathode Erosion in a 30 cm Ring-Cusp Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S. (Technical Monitor); Williams, George J., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Relative erosion rates and impingement ion production mechanisms have been identified for the discharge cathode of a 30 cm ion engine using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Mo and W erosion products as well as neutral and singly ionized xenon were interrogated. The erosion increased with both discharge current and voltage and spatially resolved measurements agreed with observed erosion patters. Ion velocity mapping identified back-flowing ions near the regions of erosion with energies potentially sufficient to generate the level of observed erosion. Ion production regions downstream of the cathode were indicated and were suggested as possible sources of the erosion causing ions.

  12. Vibrational Dynamics around the Conical Intersection Resulting from the tilde{A} → tilde{X} Laser Induced Fluorescence of the Methoxy (CH_3O) Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Sibert, Edwin L. Sibert, III

    2011-06-01

    The results of a theoretical calculation of the spectra associated with the laser induced fluorescence tilde{A}^2A_1→ tilde{X}^2E of both the methoxy molecule and CH_2DO are presented and discussed. The form of the vibronic dipole moment is determined by symmetry and the corresponding dipole expansion coefficients are calculated using ab initio methods. The calculated spectra include states up to 3000 Cm-1 above the zero point energy. We describe how the various features of the spectrum are related to coordinate dependent terms in the dipole expansion as well as the spin-orbit couplings, Jahn-Teller couplings, and vibrational anharmonicities.

  13. Protein profile study of clinical samples of ovarian cancer using high-performance liquid chromatography-laser induced fluorescence (HPLC-LIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sameer Kumar; Martis, Remila L.; Sujatha; Bhat, Rani A.; Kushtagi, Pralhad; Rai, Lavanya; Kartha, V. B.; Santhosh, C.

    2006-02-01

    New techniques for the early detection of cancer are fast emerging. This is essential for more effective diagnosis and control of the disease. We have used a High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Laser Induced Fluorescence (HPLCLIF) technique to record chromatograms of proteins in serum and ovarian tissue samples. The recorded chromatograms of normal, benign and malignant samples were analyzed using statistical (Principal Component Analysis) methods. It is shown that chromatograms of the samples can be classified into sets, and a model based on such a classification can be used to analyze protein profiles of test samples of serum and ovarian tissue for the detection of malignancies.

  14. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Translational Temperature and Relative Cycle Number by use of Optically Pumped Trace-Sodium Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.

    1999-01-01

    Sodium fluorescence induced by a narrow-bandwidth tunable laser has been used to measure temperature, pressure, axial velocity, and species concentrations in wind tunnels, rocket engine exhausts, and the upper atmosphere. Optical pumping of the ground states of the sodium, however, can radically alter the shape of the laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating such measurements. Here a straightforward extension of rate equations originally proposed to account for the features of the pumped spectrum is used to make temperature measurements from spectra taken in pumped vapor. Also determined from the spectrum is the relative fluorescence cycle number, which has application to measurement of diffusion rate and transverse flow velocity, The accuracy of both the temperature and the cycle-number measurements is comparable with that of temperature measurements made in the absence of pumping.

  15. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Translational Temperature and Relative Cycle Number by use of Optically Pumped Trace-Sodium Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.

    1998-01-01

    Sodium fluorescence induced by a narrow bandwidth tunable laser has been used to measure temperature, pressure, axial velocity and species concentrations in wind tunnels, rocket engine exhausts and the upper atmosphere. Optical pumping of the ground states of the sodium, however, can radically alter the shape of the laser induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating such measurements. Here a straightforward extension of rate equations originally proposed to account for the features of the pumped spectrum is to make temperature measurements from spectra taken in pumped vapor. Also determined from the spectrum is the relative fluorescence cycle number, which has application to measurement of diffusion rate and transverse flow velocity. The accuracy of both the temperature and cycle-number measurements is comparable with that of temperature measurements made in the absence of pumping.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence for the non-intrusive diagnostics of a fuel droplet burning under microgravity in a drop shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Katsumasa; Segawa, Daisuke; Kadota, Toshikazu

    1999-10-01

    The laser-induced-fluorescence method has been employed for remote, non-intrusive and instantaneous measurements of a fuel droplet burning under microgravity. A fuel droplet was doped with naphthalene and TMPD. The fluorescence emission spectra from a droplet subjected to the incident nitrogen laser beam were measured with an image-intensifying optical multichannel analyser. The microgravity was generated in a capsule of a 100 m drop shaft. The results showed that the newly developed diagnostic system could be applied successfully for the simultaneous measurements of droplet temperature and diameters of the droplet, flame and soot shell under microgravity. The droplet temperature was determined from the measured ratio of fluorescence emission intensities at two different wavelengths. The soot shell was located in the vicinity of the droplet surface deep inside the flame during the early stage of the burning and moved away from the droplet with the elapse of time.

  17. OH and HO2 in Urban Environments. Measurements by Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Comparison With Model Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. D.; Heard, D. E.; Carslaw, N.; Pilling, M. J.; Creasey, D. J.; Carpenter, L. J.

    2001-12-01

    In contrast to remote, unpolluted regions, measurements of OH and HO2 in urban environments are rare. Our understanding of the complex chemical mechanisms in polluted air has not yet been fully evaluated through a comparison of measured HOx and model predictions. We have made measurements of OH and HO2 in the polluted boundary layer at two locations in the UK, in both summer and winter. OH is detected directly by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at reduced pressure, and HO2 by titration with NO followed by LIF detection of OH, with noon detection limits of less than 1e5 molecule cm-3 (OH) and 1e6 molecule cm-3 (HO2). The instrument is equipped with two fluorescence cells and thus is capable of making simultaneous measurements of OH and HO2. The URGENT PUMA campaigns were located around 2 miles west of Birmingham city centre during June 1999 and January 2000, enabling a seasonal comparison of OH and HO2 radicals. During the summer campaign, OH and HO2 displayed distinct diurnal cycles, with maxima occurring at noon in the range (3-8)e6 (OH) and (1-8)e6 (HO2) molecule cm-3. Unexpectedly high concentrations of both OH and HO2 were measured during the winter campaign, with OH concentrations on average only a factor of 2-3 lower compared to summer, much less than the corresponding factor for J(O1D). The results suggest that the oxidising capacity of the urban boundary layer in winter may be underestimated. The PRIME campaign was located around 15 miles west of central London in July - August 1999. On four days the site was downwind of the polluted London plume, and very high concentrations of ozone were generated. In the plume OH, HO2 and O3 concentrations were highly correlated, and were found to peak several hours after local solar noon. On August 11, 1999, OH measurements were made during the nearly total solar eclipse, displaying a rapid and dramatic modulation with light intensity. For both locations, comparisons of the measured radical concentrations and the

  18. Laser Induced Fluorescence Imaging: Searching for Organics from the Dry Valleys of Queen Maud Land Antarctica to the Regolith and Ices of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Sattler, B.; Muller, J.-P.; Fisk, M.; Cousins, C.; Dartnell, L.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence imaging using excitation in ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths has been proposed as a nondestructive astrobiological rapid survey tool to search for amino and nucleic acids [1], microbial life [2], and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) deep in the Mars regolith [3, 4]. However, the technique is easily adapted to search for complex biomolecular targets using longer wavelength sources [5]. Of particular interest is the ability of excitation at 532 nm to detect photosynthetic pigments in cyanobacteria-dominated microbial communities populating the ice of alpine, Arctic, and Antarctic lakes, glaciers, and ice sheets [6-8]. During the months of November and December 2008 we tested the technique as part of an extended international, interdisciplinary field campaign in the Dry Valleys of Schirmacher Oasis and Lake Untersee, Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. In this paper we review our recent laboratory experiments on the use of UV excitation for detection of PAHs doped on Mars analogue soils [9] and chasmo- and epilithic lichen communities within basaltic Iceland lavas. We present for the first time the results of our field experiments conducted during the Tawani 2008 International Antarctic Expedition for in situ detection and quantification of photosynthetic biomass in the ice caps of annual and perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes. We discuss the advantages of using a nondestructive rapid survey photonic tools such as laser induced fluorescence imaging that can be easily implemented from lander, rover, airborne, or orbital platforms. The techniques presented can be utilized to monitor the microbial potential of large, critical ecosystems on Earth, or to facilitate the remote or manned search for organics and photosynthetic life on any terrestrial planet. References 1. Storrie-Lombardi, M.C., Hug, W.F., McDonald, G.D., Tsapin, A.I., and Nealson, K.H. 2001. Hollow cathode ion lasers for deep ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging

  19. The Development and Deployment of a Ground-Based, Laser-Induced Fluorescence Instrument for the In Situ Detection of Iodine Monoxide Radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurlow, M. E.; Co, D. T.; O'Brien, A. S.; Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Hanisco, T. F.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 1012. The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A23/2 (v = 2) ? X23/2 (v = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America.

  20. The development and deployment of a ground-based, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of iodine monoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Thurlow, M. E. Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Anderson, J. G.; Co, D. T.; O'Brien, A. S.; Hanisco, T. F.

    2014-04-15

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 10{sup 12}. The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v{sup ′} = 2) ← X{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v{sup ″} = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America.

  1. The development and deployment of a ground-based, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of iodine monoxide radicals.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, M E; Co, D T; O'Brien, A S; Hannun, R A; Lapson, L B; Hanisco, T F; Anderson, J G

    2014-04-01

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 10(12). The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A(2)Π3/2 (v(') = 2) ← X(2)Π3/2 (v(″) = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America.

  2. Laser induced fluorescence lifetime characterization of Bacillus endospore species using time correlated single photon counting analysis with the multi-exponential fit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clint; Edwards, Jarrod; Fisher, Andmorgan

    2010-04-01

    Rapid detection of biological material is critical for determining presence/absence of bacterial endospores within various investigative programs. Even more critical is that if select material tests positive for bacillus endospores then tests should provide data at the species level. Optical detection of microbial endospore formers such as Bacillus sp. can be heavy, cumbersome, and may only identify at the genus level. Data provided from this study will aid in characterization needed by future detection systems for further rapid breakdown analysis to gain insight into a more positive signature collection of Bacillus sp. Literature has shown that fluorescence spectroscopy of endospores could be statistically separated from other vegetative genera, but could not be separated among one another. Results of this study showed endospore species separation is possible using laser-induce fluorescence with lifetime decay analysis for Bacillus endospores. Lifetime decays of B. subtilis, B. megaterium, B. coagulans, and B. anthracis Sterne strain were investigated. Using the Multi-Exponential fit method data showed three distinct lifetimes for each species within the following ranges, 0.2-1.3 ns; 2.5-7.0 ns; 7.5-15.0 ns, when laser induced at 307 nm. The four endospore species were individually separated using principle component analysis (95% CI).

  3. Study the effect of insecticide dimethoate on photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea: Laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Jitendra Kumar; Dubey, Gunjan; Gopal, R

    2015-10-01

    Pigeon pea is one of the most important legume crops in India and dimethoate is a widely used insecticide in various crop plants. We studied the effect of dimethoate on growth and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea plants over a short and long term exposure. Plant growth parameters, photosynthetic pigment content and chlorophyll fluorescence response of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.) plants treated with various concentrations of the insecticide dimethoate (10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm) have been compared for 30 days at regular intervals of 10 days each. Laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectra and fluorescence-induction kinetics (FIK) curve of dimethoate treated pigeon pea plants were recorded after 10, 20 and 30 days of treatment. Fluorescence intensity ratio at the two fluorescence maxima (F685/F730) was calculated by evaluating curve-fitted parameters. The variable chlorophyll fluorescence decrease ratio (Rfd) was determined from the FIK curves. Our study revealed that after 10 days of treatment, 10 ppm of dimethoate showed stimulatory response whereas 20, 40 and 80 ppm of dimethoate showed inhibitory response for growth and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea plants, but after 20 and 30 days of treatment all the tested concentrations of dimethoate became inhibitory. This study clearly shows that dimethoate is highly toxic to the pigeon pea plant, even at very low concentration (10 ppm), if used for a prolonged duration. Our study may thus be helpful in determining the optimal dose of dimethoate in agricultural practices. PMID:25228224

  4. Study the effect of insecticide dimethoate on photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea: Laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Jitendra Kumar; Dubey, Gunjan; Gopal, R

    2015-10-01

    Pigeon pea is one of the most important legume crops in India and dimethoate is a widely used insecticide in various crop plants. We studied the effect of dimethoate on growth and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea plants over a short and long term exposure. Plant growth parameters, photosynthetic pigment content and chlorophyll fluorescence response of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.) plants treated with various concentrations of the insecticide dimethoate (10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm) have been compared for 30 days at regular intervals of 10 days each. Laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectra and fluorescence-induction kinetics (FIK) curve of dimethoate treated pigeon pea plants were recorded after 10, 20 and 30 days of treatment. Fluorescence intensity ratio at the two fluorescence maxima (F685/F730) was calculated by evaluating curve-fitted parameters. The variable chlorophyll fluorescence decrease ratio (Rfd) was determined from the FIK curves. Our study revealed that after 10 days of treatment, 10 ppm of dimethoate showed stimulatory response whereas 20, 40 and 80 ppm of dimethoate showed inhibitory response for growth and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea plants, but after 20 and 30 days of treatment all the tested concentrations of dimethoate became inhibitory. This study clearly shows that dimethoate is highly toxic to the pigeon pea plant, even at very low concentration (10 ppm), if used for a prolonged duration. Our study may thus be helpful in determining the optimal dose of dimethoate in agricultural practices.

  5. Quantitative two-dimensional measurement of oil-film thickness by laser-induced fluorescence in a piston-ring model experiment.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Stefan; Füßer, Hans-Jürgen; Fuhrmann, Daniel; Schulz, Christof; Kaiser, Sebastian A

    2016-01-10

    This paper describes advances in using laser-induced fluorescence of dyes for imaging the thickness of oil films in a rotating ring tribometer with optical access, an experiment representing a sliding piston ring in an internal combustion engine. A method for quantitative imaging of the oil-film thickness is developed that overcomes the main challenge, the accurate calibration of the detected fluorescence signal for film thicknesses in the micrometer range. The influence of the background material and its surface roughness is examined, and a method for flat-field correction is introduced. Experiments in the tribometer show that the method yields quantitative, physically plausible results, visualizing features with submicrometer thickness. PMID:26835762

  6. In-cylinder crank-angle-resolved imaging of fuel concentration in a firing spark-ignition engine using planar laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Berckmueller, M.; Tait, N.P.; Lockett, R.D.; Greenhalgh, D.A.; Ishii, Kiyoshi; Urata, Yasuhiro; Umiyama, Hidezo; Yoshida, Kazuo

    1994-12-31

    The authors present a quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) method for imaging the in-cylinder fuel concentration in a spark-ignition engine. The method is based on fluorescence from a carbonyl compound added to the iso-octane and excited by an excimer laser at 308 nm. The method has been applied to the study of charge stratification in a lean burn engine equipped with a four-valve pent-roof cylinder head. In this engine, stratification is achieved by fuel injection through an inlet valve, the paths of rich fuel pockets from induction through compression to the point of ignition is shown by a series of crank-angle-resolved air-to-fuel ratio (AFR) images.

  7. Feasibility study of a drug immunoassay based on micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with laser induced fluorescence detection: determination of theophylline in serum.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, L; Caslavska, J; Thormann, W

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents principle and first results of a novel competitive binding immunoassay for monitoring of theophylline in human serum. The assay is based upon short time incubation of a mixture of antiserum, containing the antibody raised against theophylline, fluorescein labelled theophylline (tracer) and serum prior to injection of a few nanoliter of this mixture onto a fused-silica capillary for subsequent separation and analysis of free tracer and the antibody-tracer-complex by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with laser induced fluorescence detection. Quantitation based upon multi-level calibration using the height of the peak produced by the free tracer is shown to provide theophylline serum levels which are in agreement with those obtained by a commercial fluorescence polarization immunoassay and with those determined by micellar elektrokinetic capillary chromatography with direct serum injection and on-column UV absorption detection.

  8. High-Throughput Analysis With 96-Capillary Array Electrophoresis and Integrated Sample Preparation for DNA Sequencing Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gang Xue

    2001-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to improve the fluorescence detection for the multiplexed capillary array electrophoresis, extend its use beyond the genomic analysis, and to develop an integrated micro-sample preparation system for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The authors first demonstrated multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separations in a 96-capillary array system with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Migration times of four kinds of fluoresceins and six polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are normalized to one of the capillaries using two internal standards. The relative standard deviations (RSD) after normalization are 0.6-1.4% for the fluoresceins and 0.1-1.5% for the PAHs. Quantitative calibration of the separations based on peak areas is also performed, again with substantial improvement over the raw data. This opens up the possibility of performing massively parallel separations for high-throughput chemical analysis for process monitoring, combinatorial synthesis, and clinical diagnosis. The authors further improved the fluorescence detection by step laser scanning. A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluorescein is 3 x 10{sup -11} M (S/N = 3) for 5-mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence of ketones at elevated temperatures for pressures up to 20 bars by using a 248 nm excitation laser wavelength: experiments and model improvements.

    PubMed

    Braeuer, Andreas; Beyrau, Frank; Leipertz, Alfred

    2006-07-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence of acetone and 3-pentanone for a 248 nm excitation wavelength was investigated for conditions relevant for internal combustion engines regarding temperature, pressure, and gas composition. An optically accessible calibration chamber with continuous gas flow was operated by using CO2 and air as a bath gas. According to the varying pressure and temperature conditions during the compression stroke of a spark ignition engine, fluorescence experiments were performed under isothermal pressure variations from 1 to 20 bars for different temperatures between 293 and 700 K. The ketone fluorescence behavior predictions, based on a model previously developed by Thurber et al. [Appl. Opt. 37, 4963 (1998)], were found to overestimate the pressure-related fluorescence increase for high temperature and small wavelength excitation at 248 nm. The parameters influencing the model only in the large vibrational energy regime were newly adjusted, which resulted in an improved model with a better agreement with the experiment. The model's validity for excitation at larger wavelengths was not influenced. For the air bath gas an additional collision and vibrational energy sensitive quenching rate was implemented in the model for both tracers, acetone and 3-pentanone. PMID:16807609

  10. Design and daytime performance of laser-induced fluorescence spectrum lidar for simultaneous detection of multiple components, dissolved organic matter, phycocyanin, and chlorophyll in river water.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasunori; Kakuda, Kei; Yokoyama, Mizuho; Kubota, Tomoki; Tomida, Takayuki; Park, Ho-Dong

    2016-08-20

    In this work, we developed mobile laser-induced fluorescence spectrum (LIFS) lidar based on preliminary experiments on the excitation emission matrix of a water sample and a method for reducing solar background light using the synchronous detection technique. The combination of a UV short-pulse laser (355 nm, 6 ns) for fluorescence excitation with a 10-100 ns short-time synchronous detection using a gated image-intensified multi-channel CCD of the fluorescence made the LIFS lidar operation possible even in daytime. The LIFS lidar with this construction demonstrated the potential of natural river/lake water quality monitoring at the Tenryu River/Lake Suwa. Three main components in the fluorescence data of the water, dissolved organic matter, phycocyanin, and chlorophyll, were extracted by spectral analysis using the standard spectral functions of these components. Their concentrations were estimated by adapting experimentally calibrated data. Results of long-term field observations using our LIFS lidar from 2010 to 2012 show the necessity of simultaneous multi-component detection to understand the natural water environment.

  11. Design and daytime performance of laser-induced fluorescence spectrum lidar for simultaneous detection of multiple components, dissolved organic matter, phycocyanin, and chlorophyll in river water.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasunori; Kakuda, Kei; Yokoyama, Mizuho; Kubota, Tomoki; Tomida, Takayuki; Park, Ho-Dong

    2016-08-20

    In this work, we developed mobile laser-induced fluorescence spectrum (LIFS) lidar based on preliminary experiments on the excitation emission matrix of a water sample and a method for reducing solar background light using the synchronous detection technique. The combination of a UV short-pulse laser (355 nm, 6 ns) for fluorescence excitation with a 10-100 ns short-time synchronous detection using a gated image-intensified multi-channel CCD of the fluorescence made the LIFS lidar operation possible even in daytime. The LIFS lidar with this construction demonstrated the potential of natural river/lake water quality monitoring at the Tenryu River/Lake Suwa. Three main components in the fluorescence data of the water, dissolved organic matter, phycocyanin, and chlorophyll, were extracted by spectral analysis using the standard spectral functions of these components. Their concentrations were estimated by adapting experimentally calibrated data. Results of long-term field observations using our LIFS lidar from 2010 to 2012 show the necessity of simultaneous multi-component detection to understand the natural water environment. PMID:27556995

  12. Study on the effects of humic and fulvic acids on quantum dot nanoparticles using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Celiz, Mary Dawn; Colón, Luis A; Watson, David F; Aga, Diana S

    2011-04-01

    The increasing production and use of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles have caused concerns on the possibility of contaminating the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems with wastes that may contain QDs. Therefore, studies on the behavior of QDs upon interaction with components of the natural environment have become of interest. This study investigated the fluorescence and electrophoretic mobility of carboxylic or amine polyethylene glycol (PEG)-functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs in the presence of two aquatic humic substances (HS), Suwannee River humic and fulvic acids, using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Results showed initial enhancement in fluorescence of QDs at the onset of the interaction with HS, followed by fluorescence quenching at longer exposure with HS (>30 min). It was also observed that the electrophoretic mobility of QDs increases with increasing concentration of HS, suggesting an increase in the ratio in charge to hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles. To determine if the QDs degraded upon interaction with HS, the QD-HS mixtures were dialyzed to separate free Cd2+ from intact QDs, followed by analysis of the solutions using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Results suggested that degradation of QDs in the presence of HS did not occur within the period of incubation.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence of ketones at elevated temperatures for pressures up to 20 bars by using a 248 nm excitation laser wavelength: experiments and model improvements.

    PubMed

    Braeuer, Andreas; Beyrau, Frank; Leipertz, Alfred

    2006-07-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence of acetone and 3-pentanone for a 248 nm excitation wavelength was investigated for conditions relevant for internal combustion engines regarding temperature, pressure, and gas composition. An optically accessible calibration chamber with continuous gas flow was operated by using CO2 and air as a bath gas. According to the varying pressure and temperature conditions during the compression stroke of a spark ignition engine, fluorescence experiments were performed under isothermal pressure variations from 1 to 20 bars for different temperatures between 293 and 700 K. The ketone fluorescence behavior predictions, based on a model previously developed by Thurber et al. [Appl. Opt. 37, 4963 (1998)], were found to overestimate the pressure-related fluorescence increase for high temperature and small wavelength excitation at 248 nm. The parameters influencing the model only in the large vibrational energy regime were newly adjusted, which resulted in an improved model with a better agreement with the experiment. The model's validity for excitation at larger wavelengths was not influenced. For the air bath gas an additional collision and vibrational energy sensitive quenching rate was implemented in the model for both tracers, acetone and 3-pentanone.

  14. Evaluation of space charge effects in the second vacuum stage of a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer by planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmund, Alisa J.; Bergeson, Scott D.; Lyon, Mary; Taylor, Nicholas; Kalinitchenko, Iouri; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of matrix on the formation and focusing of a Ca ion beam in the second vacuum stage of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer has been evaluated with the use of planar laser induced fluorescence. A cross section of the beam was imaged near the entrance to the mass analyzer of a commercial instrument. Characteristics of the beam from a solution containing only the Ca analyte closely matched those predicted by simulation software. The individual addition of three matrix species, Mg, Cs, and Pb, had minor effect on beam shape. Cs and Pb both affected the beam trajectory. The most pronounced effect was with the Pb matrix, which caused an order-of-magnitude drop in the Ca signal intensity at the electron multiplier of the mass spectrometer. The loss in signal was due primarily to a shift in the direction and location of the Ca ion beam that caused it to miss the entrance into the mass analyzer.

  15. Investigation of the chemical stability of the laser-induced fluorescence tracers acetone, diethylketone, and toluene under IC engine conditions using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trost, Johannes; Zigan, Lars; Eichmann, Simone C; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the chemical stability of the common laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) tracers acetone, diethylketone, and toluene. Stability is analyzed using linear Raman spectroscopy inside a heated pressure cell with optical access, which is used for the LIF calibration of these tracers. The measurements examine the influence of temperature, pressure, and residence time on tracer oxidation, which occurs without a rise in temperature or pressure inside the cell, highlighting the need for optical detection. A comparison between the three different tracers shows large differences, with diethylketone having the lowest and toluene by far the highest stability. An analysis of the sensitivity of the measurement shows that the detection limit of the oxidized tracer is well below 3% molar fraction, which is typical for LIF applications in combustion devices such as internal combustion (IC) engines. Furthermore, the effect on the LIF signal intensity is examined in an isothermal turbulent mixing study. PMID:24085091

  16. Real-Time Gas-Phase Imaging over a Pd(110) Catalyst during CO Oxidation by Means of Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The gas composition surrounding a catalytic sample has direct impact on its surface structure, which is essential when in situ investigations of model catalysts are performed. Herein a study of the gas phase close to a Pd(110) surface during CO oxidation under semirealistic conditions is presented. Images of the gas phase, provided by planar laser-induced fluorescence, clearly visualize the formation of a boundary layer with a significantly lower CO partial pressure close to the catalytically active surface, in comparison to the overall concentration as detected by mass spectrometry. The CO partial pressure variation within the boundary layer will have a profound effect on the catalysts’ surface structure and function and needs to be taken into consideration for in situ model catalysis studies. PMID:25893136

  17. According theory and experiment in CaH: Laser-induced fluorescence study of new B/B‧-X bands in the UV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kyohei; Yoneyama, Naoya; Uchida, Kanako; Kobayashi, Kaori; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Moriwaki, Yoshiki; Ross, Stephen C.

    2016-07-01

    Despite the astrophysical importance of calcium monohydride (CaH), a long-standing discrepancy exists between the experimental and theoretical analysis of its first two excited 2Σ+ states. In a bid to resolve this discrepancy, we observed the rotationally-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectrum of CaH in the 23,300-27,800 cm-1 region. We assigned all newly observed vibrational levels, and five levels previously assigned to the D state, to the B/B‧ state. The level properties alternate strongly with vibrational excitation and this new assignment brings the experimental vibronic structure into remarkably good agreement with the predictions of Carlsund-Levin et al. (2002).

  18. Direct methods for dynamic monitoring of secretions from single cells by capillary electrophoresis and microscopy with laser-induced native fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.

    1997-10-08

    Microscale separation and detection methods for real-time monitoring of dynamic cellular processes (e.g., secretion) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microscopic imaging were developed. Ultraviolet laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) provides simple, sensitive and direct detection of neurotransmitters and proteins without any derivatization. An on-column CE-LINF protocol for quantification of the release from single cell was demonstrated. Quantitative measurements of both the amount of insulin released from and the amount remaining in the cell ({beta}TC3) were achieved simultaneously. Secretion of catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E)) from individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was determined using the on-column CE-LINF. Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved by LINF imaging microscopy with high temporal and spatial resolution. The secretion of serotonin from individual leech Retzius neurons was directly characterized by LINF microscopy with high spatial resolution.

  19. Quantification of NO A-X (0, 2) laser-induced fluorescence: investigation of calibration and collisional influences in high-pressure flames.

    PubMed

    Schulz, C; Sick, V; Meier, U E; Heinze, J; Stricker, W

    1999-03-20

    Laser-induced-fluorescence techniques have been used successfully for quantitative two-dimensional measurements of nitric oxide. NO A-X(0, 2) excitation at 248 nm recently found applications in internal-combustion engines. We assess the collisional processes that influence quantification of signal intensities in terms of saturation, rotational energy transfer, and line broadening, using laminar high-pressure methane/air and n-heptane/air flames at pressures as high as 80 bars (8 x 10(6) Pa). A calibration method that is applicable in technical combustion systems based on addition of NO to the burning flame is investigated for various air/fuel ratios and pressures and yields information about the influence of NO reburn processes. PMID:18305764

  20. Investigation of the chemical stability of the laser-induced fluorescence tracers acetone, diethylketone, and toluene under IC engine conditions using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trost, Johannes; Zigan, Lars; Eichmann, Simone C; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the chemical stability of the common laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) tracers acetone, diethylketone, and toluene. Stability is analyzed using linear Raman spectroscopy inside a heated pressure cell with optical access, which is used for the LIF calibration of these tracers. The measurements examine the influence of temperature, pressure, and residence time on tracer oxidation, which occurs without a rise in temperature or pressure inside the cell, highlighting the need for optical detection. A comparison between the three different tracers shows large differences, with diethylketone having the lowest and toluene by far the highest stability. An analysis of the sensitivity of the measurement shows that the detection limit of the oxidized tracer is well below 3% molar fraction, which is typical for LIF applications in combustion devices such as internal combustion (IC) engines. Furthermore, the effect on the LIF signal intensity is examined in an isothermal turbulent mixing study.

  1. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence applied to low-pressure hypersonic flow fields for the imaging of mixture fraction.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Tobias; Mungal, M Godfrey; Hanson, Ronald K

    2003-11-20

    The scalar-field imaging of a hypersonic mixing flow is performed in a mixing facility that is shock tunnel driven. The instantaneous mixture-fraction field of a hypersonic two-dimensional mixing layer (M1 = 5.1, M2 = 0.3) is determined with a temperature-insensitive planar laser-induced fluorescence technique with nitric oxide (NO) as the tracer species. Single-shot images are obtained with the broadband excitation of a reduced temperature-sensitivity transition in the A2 sigma+ <-- X2 II(1/2) (0, 0) band of NO near 226 nm. The instantaneous mixture-fraction field at a convective Mach number of 2.64 is shown to be nearly identical to a typical diffusive process, supporting the notion of gradient-transport mixing models for highly compressible mixing layers.

  2. In situ detection of tropospheric OH, HO2, NO2, and NO by laser-induced fluorescence in detection chambers at reduced pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.

    1992-01-01

    This report is a brief summary of the status of work on the grant entitled 'In situ detection of tropospheric OH, HO2, NO2, and NO by laser induced fluorescence in detection chambers at low pressures'. The first version of the instrument is essentially complete and operational for about six months, and we continue to make improvements on the instrument sensitivity and reliability. We are focusing our efforts on improving our understanding of the operating characteristics of the instrument - particularly the inlet transmission for OH and HO2, the exact character of the air flow around and within the instrument, and the efficiency of the chemical conversion of HO2 to OH. We are also in the process of converting this laboratory instrument into a field worthy instrument that we can take to remote sites for measurements.

  3. Speciation studies on DTPA using the complementary nature of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Christophe; Amekraz, Badia; Steiner, Valerie; Plancque, Gabriel; Ansoborlo, Eric

    2003-09-01

    Decorporation of radionuclides is of continuous interest in order to reduce doses in case of occupational or accidental human exposure. In the present study, insights into the non-covalent interactions that hold the well-known chelating agent DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) with inorganic elements of interest, such as europium and strontium, and their ability to form stable complexes, are investigated with two spectroscopic techniques, i.e., electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLIF). First investigations are on DTPA and europium alone and end with a complete study of the Eu-DTPA system. The pH variation allows one to readily investigate whether different species (protonated, hydrolyzed, etc.) exist in the pH range 2-9 and evaluate the stoichiometry and conditional stability constant for the Eu-DTPA complex. Additional experiments by ESI-MS are reported for Sr(II) in interaction with DTPA and EDTA.

  4. Development of a flow injection analysis (FIA) system for the measurement of heavy metals using a fiber optic chemical sensor based on laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Prestel, Harald; Gahr, Achim; Niessner, Reinhard

    2000-05-01

    The development of a fiber optic sensor system is described, for the on-line detection of heavy metal ions in water. This is based on laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of suitable metal-ligand complexes. The sensor system is designed to measure heavy metal ions in the field. Flow injection analysis (FIA) is coupled with the sensor system, to overcome problems of a slow diffusion rate of heavy metals through the membrane of an in situ sensor head. Preliminary experiments show the new FIA system has good reproducibility, a high sample analysis rate and it can measure heavy metal ions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II)) at the ppb level, when using the appropriate ligands.

  5. Comparison of azimuthal ion velocity profiles using Mach probes, time delay estimation, and laser induced fluorescence in a linear plasma device.

    PubMed

    Thakur, S Chakraborty; McCarren, D; Lee, T; Fedorczak, N; Manz, P; Scime, E E; Tynan, G R; Xu, M; Yu, J

    2012-10-01

    We compare measurements of radially sheared azimuthal plasma flow based on time delay estimation (TDE) between two spatially separated Langmuir probes, Mach probes and laser induced fluorescence (LIF). TDE measurements cannot distinguish between ion fluid velocities and phase velocities. TDE and Mach probes are perturbative, so we compare the results against LIF, a non-perturbative, spatially resolved diagnostic technique that provides direct measurements of the ion velocity distribution functions. The bulk ion flow is determined from the Doppler shift of the Argon absorption line at 668.6139 nm. We compare results from all the three diagnostics, at various magnetic fields, which acts as a control knob for development of drift wave turbulence. We find that while Mach probes and LIF give similar profiles, TDE measurements typically overestimate the velocities and are also sensitive to the drift wave modes being investigated.

  6. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, K.; Grozeva, M.; Malcheva, G.; Neykova, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893-972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts.

  7. In situ detection of tropospheric OH, HO2, NO2, and NO by laser-induced fluorescence in detection chambers at reduced pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a brief summary of the status of work on the grant entitled 'In situ detection of tropospheric OH, HO2, NO2, and NO by laser induced fluorescence in detection chambers at low pressures.' The basic instrument characteristics have been established, and have been reported in a manuscript, included as an appendix to this report, that has been accepted by the Journal of Geophysical Research. Currently, two efforts are under way. First, instrument tests and calibrations are continuing. These efforts include field measurements and an informal inter comparison in Colorado last August and September. Second, new technologies in lasers and detectors are being implemented to make the instrument smaller, lighter, and more energy efficient. Such instrument modifications are essential for measurements from aircraft, high scaffolding in forests, and ships.

  8. Development of a two-line OH-laser-induced fluorescence thermometry diagnostics strategy for gas-phase temperature measurements in engines.

    PubMed

    Devillers, R; Bruneaux, G; Schulz, C

    2008-11-01

    This study aims at optimizing two-line OH thermometry strategies for in-cylinder measurement in internal combustion engines. Various aspects are investigated experimentally, such as the selection of suitable OH lines and the possibility of using a single calibration coefficient for variable mixture composition, temperature, and pressure conditions. Two kinds of experimental systems have been investigated. First, a laminar methane-air burner flame at atmospheric pressure, whose stability allowed the determination of OH-laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) intensity ratios from nonsimultaneous imaging. The temperature distribution in the flame is presented for OH-transition pairs with various temperature sensitivities. The burner flame was studied for equivalence ratios from phi=0.93 to 1.30 in order to check for the stability of calibration over various flame conditions. Additionally, OH LIF images were acquired in an optical engine for the chosen OH transitions yielding data about the effect of pressure on OH LIF signals under realistic experimental conditions.

  9. Reaction rates at 297 {plus_minus} 3 K of four benzyl type radicals with O{sub 2}, NO, and NO{sub 2} by discharge flow/laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Goumri, A.; Elmaimouni, L.; Sawerysyn, J.P.; Devolder, P.

    1992-06-25

    The rate constants of 4 benzyl type radicals with O{sub 2}, NO, and NO{sub 2} are measured by discharge flow/laser-induced fluorescence. The ratio of these rate constants with NO and O{sub 2} indicates that tropospheric o- and m-methylbenzyl radicals are scavenged by O{sub 2}. 50 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le; James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E; Redding, Brandon

    2014-04-11

    We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and future developments of this new aerosol analysis technique are also discussed.

  11. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le; James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E; Redding, Brandon

    2014-04-11

    We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and future developments of this new aerosol analysis technique are also discussed. PMID:24745745

  12. Simultaneous imaging of fuel vapor mass fraction and gas-phase temperature inside gasoline sprays using two-line excitation tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zigan, Lars; Trost, Johannes; Leipertz, Alfred

    2016-02-20

    This paper reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on the simultaneous imaging of the gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction distribution in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) spray under engine-relevant conditions using tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF). For measurements in the spray, the fluorescence tracer 3-pentanone is added to the nonfluorescent surrogate fuel iso-octane, which is excited quasi-simultaneously by two different excimer lasers for two-line excitation LIF. The gas-phase temperature of the mixture of fuel vapor and surrounding gas and the fuel vapor mass fraction can be calculated from the two LIF signals. The measurements are conducted in a high-temperature, high-pressure injection chamber. The fluorescence calibration of the tracer was executed in a flow cell and extended significantly compared to the existing database. A detailed error analysis for both calibration and measurement is provided. Simultaneous single-shot gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction fields are processed for the assessment of cyclic spray fluctuations. PMID:26906600

  13. Simultaneous imaging of fuel vapor mass fraction and gas-phase temperature inside gasoline sprays using two-line excitation tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zigan, Lars; Trost, Johannes; Leipertz, Alfred

    2016-02-20

    This paper reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on the simultaneous imaging of the gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction distribution in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) spray under engine-relevant conditions using tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF). For measurements in the spray, the fluorescence tracer 3-pentanone is added to the nonfluorescent surrogate fuel iso-octane, which is excited quasi-simultaneously by two different excimer lasers for two-line excitation LIF. The gas-phase temperature of the mixture of fuel vapor and surrounding gas and the fuel vapor mass fraction can be calculated from the two LIF signals. The measurements are conducted in a high-temperature, high-pressure injection chamber. The fluorescence calibration of the tracer was executed in a flow cell and extended significantly compared to the existing database. A detailed error analysis for both calibration and measurement is provided. Simultaneous single-shot gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction fields are processed for the assessment of cyclic spray fluctuations.

  14. New UV-A laser-induced fluorescence imaging system for near-field remote sensing of vegetation: characteristics and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowinska, Malgorzata; Cunin, Bernard; Heisel, Francine; Miehe, Joseph-Albert

    1999-05-01

    In this paper, a compact, new UV-A laser induced fluorescence imaging system implemented in an all-road car for near-field remote sensing of vegetation will be described. It has been developed as a part of a European Community Program INTERREG II* and is consisting of three main parts: excitation, detection and control units. The excitation light pulses (10 ns) are produced by a frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser emitting at 355 nm with a variable repetition rate up to approximately equals 22 kHz and a pulse energy typically of 40 (mu) J. The laser spot size is adjusted by means of a variable beam expander. Fluorescence images are recorded via entrance lenses and 10 nm bandpass filters with a gated intensified digital CCD camera operating at 50 frames per second. The 'head of the system' (laser and camera) can be directed in site and azimuth, and can be high until a 6 meters height. All the functions like the system positioning, localization and distance detection, spot size adjustment, focus, sharpness, selection of the filter, laser and camera synchronization, gain of the intensifier, real time visualization of images, acquisition time are controlled by a newly developed software which also allows image storage, analysis and treatment. Examples of remote sensing fluorescence images recorded at a distance between 10 and 30 m are presented.

  15. Excitation/Detection Strategies for OH Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements in the Presence of Interfering Fuel Signal and Absorption Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    2011-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) excitation/detection methods have been applied to obtain spatial distributions of the hydroxyl [OH] reacting intermediary and hydrocarbon [HC] primary species in laminar and turbulent combustion reactions. In this report, broadband and narrowband excitation/filtering techniques are explored to identify an optimal experimental configuration yielding significant fluorescent signal with low absorption losses. The combustion environments analyzed include 1) a laminar non-premixed methane/air flame and 2) a turbulent, non-premixed Jet-A/air fueled flame within a lean flame tube combustor. Hydrocarbon-based fuel and OH were excited via the R1 (1), R1(10) and R2(7) transitions of the A(sup 2)Epsilon(+) X(sup 2)pi(1,0) band using a broadband Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and narrowband Nd:YAG/dye laser with ultraviolet frequency extension (UVX) package. Variables tested for influence on fluorescent signal and absorption characteristics were excitation line, laser energy, exciting linewidth, combustion reactants, and test flow conditions. Results are intended to guide the transition from a dye/UVX laser to an OPO system for performing advanced diagnostics of low-emission combustion concepts.

  16. Periodic Evolution of a Xe I Population in an Oscillatory Discharge: Comparison between Time-Synchronized Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Measurements and A Dynamic Collisional-Radiative Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Chris V.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2014-10-01

    We study the evolution of the Xe I 6 s '[ 1 / 2 ] 1 - 6 p '[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (834.68 nm air) transition lineshape in a plasma discharge oscillating at 60 Hz using time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements and a collisional-radiative model. Two different time-synchronized LIF techniques based on phase sensitive detection of the fluorescence signal are applied, yielding consistent results. The maximum observed peak fluorescence intensity occurs at low values of the discharge current, although the peak intensity drops to zero at zero discharge current. The peak intensity also decreases at the discharge current maximum. A dynamic collisional-radiative model of the weakly ionized xenon discharge is also implemented, based on a set of rate equations. The proper electron impact cross-sections and radiative decay rates are identified from the literature and used to compute accurate rate coefficients with the Boltzmann solver Bolsig+, including the time-varying electric field. The time evolution of the probed excited state density predicted by the model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  17. Improving the sensitivity of confocal laser induced fluorescence detection to the sub-picomolar scale for round capillaries by laterally shifting the laser focus point.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Chen, Niannian; Li, Qi; Fang, Qun

    2013-08-21

    This paper describes a simple and efficient approach to reduce the background level of confocal laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection for round capillaries by laterally shifting the laser focus point. A phenomenon of spontaneous separation of the fluorescence and reflected laser beams at the pinhole of a confocal LIF system when the laser focus point deviates from the center of a capillary channel to the sides was observed for the first time. On the basis of this phenomenon, the reflected laser light from the capillary-air interfaces could be mostly eliminated with a spatial filtering pinhole. A comprehensive study on the phenomenon and optimization of the shift distance was carried out using both experimental and simulation methods. A best shift distance of ±20 μm was obtained, with which background intensity could be significantly reduced by 98.9%, while fluorescence intensity was only reduced by 25.7%, resulting in an improvement of signal-to-noise ratio of 8.3 times, compared with that at a shift distance of 0 μm usually used in most of the confocal LIF systems for round capillaries. A limit of detection of 66 fM was obtained for sodium fluorescein. To demonstrate its potential as an on-column sensitive detector for microscale separation systems, the present system was coupled with a capillary electrophoresis system for separation of four fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled amino acids with concentrations of 100 pM.

  18. Designing the method for optical in vitro monitoring of the cell-mediated scaffold technology for bone regeneration based on laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, P. M.; Maslov, N. A.; Papaeva, E. O.; Tereshchenko, V. P.; Khlestkin, V. K.; Bogachev, S. S.; Proskurina, A. S.; Titov, A. T.; Filipenko, M. L.; Pavlov, V. V.; Kudrov, G. A.; Orishich, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    One of the main unsolved problems in traumatology and orthopedics is reconstruction of critical-sized segmental bone defects. We believe that implementation of noninvasive monitoring of the bioengineering stages for cell-mediated bone scaffold by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) can become a positive aspect in mastering this technique. An electrospun scaffold model (parameters: 10 wt. % polycaprolactone; 5% wt type A gelatin; mean fiber diameter 877.1 ± 169.1, and contact angle 45.3°) seeded with BHK IR cell culture (182 ± 38 cells/mm2) was used to show the principal possibility of differentiating between the scaffold seeded and unseeded with cells. First of all, the fluorescence spectra of the cell-seeded scaffold contain a peak at 305 nm for the excitation range of 230-290 nm, which can be used to differentiate between the samples. An increase in fluorescence intensity of the cell-seeded scaffold in the range of 400- 580 nm upon excitation at 230-340 nm is also noticeable. The wavelength of 250 nm is characterized by high signal intensity and is most suitable for differentiation between the samples.

  19. Flame front imaging in an internal-combustion engine simulator by laser-induced fluorescence of acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Arnold, A; Becker, H; Suntz, R; Monkhouse, P; Wolfrum, J; Maly, R; Pfister, W

    1990-08-01

    Acetaldehyde has been used as a fluorescent dopant for two-dimensional imaging of the flame front in an internalcombustion-engine simulator. The molecule was excited with a XeCl-laser-light sheet at 308 nm, and broadband fluorescence centered at 400 nm was detected. In this way, the flame front could be marked by mapping regions of unburned gas. Also, the intake process into the engine could be followed.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously. PMID:18794943

  2. Two-dimensional spatial resolution of concentration profiles in catalytic reactors by planar laser-induced fluorescence: NO reduction over diesel oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zellner, Alexander; Suntz, Rainer; Deutschmann, Olaf

    2015-02-23

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) enables noninvasive in situ investigations of catalytic flow reactors. The method is based on the selective detection of two-dimensional absolute concentration maps of conversion-relevant species in the surrounding gas phase inside a catalytic channel. Exemplarily, the catalytic reduction of NO with hydrogen (2 NO+5 H2 →2 H2 O+2 NH3 ) is investigated over a Pt/Al2 O3 coated diesel oxidation catalyst by NO PLIF inside an optically accessible channel reactor. Quenching-corrected 2D concentration maps of the NO fluorescence above the catalytic surface are obtained under both, nonreactive and reactive conditions. The impact of varying feed concentration, temperature, and flow velocities on NO concentration profiles are investigated in steady state. The technique presented has a high potential for a better understanding of interactions of mass transfer and surface kinetics in heterogeneously catalyzed gas-phase reactions.

  3. OH Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) Measurements for the Study of High Pressure Flames: An Evaluation of a New Laser and a New Camera System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah; Hicks, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) is used by the Combustion Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA Glenn) to assess the characteristics of the flowfield produced by aircraft fuel injectors. To improve and expand the capabilities of the PLIF system new equipment was installed. The new capabilities of the modified PLIF system are assessed by collecting OH PLIF in a methane/air flame produced by a flat flame burner. Specifically, the modifications characterized are the addition of an injection seeder to a Nd:YAG laser pumping an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and the use of a new camera with an interline CCD. OH fluorescence results using the injection seeded OPO laser are compared to results using a Nd:YAG pumped dye laser with ultraviolet extender (UVX). Best settings of the new camera for maximum detection of PLIF signal are reported for the controller gain and microchannel plate (MCP) bracket pulsing. Results are also reported from tests of the Dual Image Feature (DIF) mode of the new camera which allows image pairs to be acquired in rapid succession. This allows acquisition of a PLIF image and a background signal almost simultaneously. Saturation effects in the new camera were also investigated and are reported.

  4. Detection of DNA adducts of benzo[a]pyrene using immunoelectrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence. Analysis of A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, W G; Carnelley, T J; Murphy, P; Wang, H; Lee, J; Barker, S; Weinfeld, M; Le, X C

    2001-07-27

    Detection of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)-damaged DNA in a human lung carcinoma cell line (A549) has been performed using free zone affinity capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Using BPDE as a model carcinogenic compound, the speed, sensitivity and specificity of this technique was demonstrated. Under free zone conditions, an antibody bound adduct was baseline-resolved from an unbound adduct in less than 2 min. The efficiencies of separation were in excess of 6 x 10(5) and 1 x 10(6) plates per meter for the antibody-bound and unbound adducts, respectively. Separation using a low ionic strength buffer permitted the use of a high electric field (830 V/cm) without the loss of resolving power. Using LIF detection, a concentration detection limit of roughly 3 x 10(-10) M was achieved for a 90-mer oligonuleotide containing a single BDPE. The use of formamide in the incubation buffer to enhance denaturing of DNA did not affect the stability of the complex between the antibody and the adducts. Using a fluorescently labeled BPDE-modified DNA adduct probe, a competitive assay was established to determine the levels of BPDE-DNA adducts in A549 cells.

  5. Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH(i)-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Christof; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker D.

    2001-12-14

    In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded with ammonia in the fuel stream. We have performed numerical simulations with detailed chemistry as well as laser-induced fluorescence imaging measurements for a range of ammonia injection rates. For comparison with the experimental data, synthetic LIF images are calculated based on the numerical data accounting for temperature and fluorescence quenching effects. We demonstrate good agreement between measurements and computations. The LIF corrections inferred from the simulation are then used to calculate absolute NO mole fractions from the measured signal.The NO formation in both doped and undoped flames occurs in the flame sheet. In the undoped flame, four different mechanisms including thermal and prompt NO appear to contribute to NO formation. As the NH3 seeding level increases, fuel-NO becomes the dominant mechanism and N2 shifts from being a net reactant to being a net product. Nitric oxide in the undoped flame as well as in the core region of the doped flames are underpredicted by the model; we attribute this mainly to inaccuracies in the NO recycling chemistry on the fuel-rich side of the flame sheet.

  6. Complex formation of neptunium(V) with 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy with ultra-short laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Vulpius, D; Geipel, G; Baraniak, L; Bernhard, G

    2006-03-01

    The complex formation of neptunium(V) with 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid (vanillic acid) was studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy with ultra-short laser pulses using the fluorescence properties of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid. A 2:1 complex of neptunium(V) with 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid was found. The stability constant of this complex was determined to be logbeta(210) = 7.33 +/- 0.10 at an ionic strength of 0.1 mol/l (NaClO(4)) and at 21 degrees C. The determination of the stability constant required an investigation of the excited-state proton transfer of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid over the whole pH range. It was realized that 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid undergoes excited-state reactions only at pH values below 5. At pH values above 5 stability constants can be determined without kinetic calculation of the proton transfer.

  7. Analysis of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in single K562 cells by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hua; Yang, Lisong; Zou, Hanfa; Yang, Ling; Le, X Chris

    2007-01-01

    Short oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) were derivatized with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). Capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) was then used to separate and detect the fluorescently labeled carbon-nanotube probes (CNTP) in multidrug-resistant cells (K562A) and the parent cells (K562S). Greater expression of P-glycoprotein in K562A cells than in K562S cells was confirmed by use of anti-P-glycoprotein antibody and flow-cytometric analysis. Analyses of CNTP in both cell lines using both CE-LIF and flow cytometry showed that CNTP could traverse the cellular membrane without being pumped out by P-glycoprotein. The CNTP distributed in both cell lines was analyzed at the single cell level and the results were compared with those from analysis of ten cells and of the lysate from bulk cells. The results revealed the CE-LIF method could be used for quantitative analysis of CNT in single cells in studies of drug delivery and multidrug resistance.

  8. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis of Glu-1 high-molecular-mass glutenin genes from wheat by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Salmanowicz, Boleslaw P; Moczulski, Marcin

    2004-04-01

    The unique bread-making properties of wheat are closely correlated with composition and quantity of high-molecular-mass (HMW) glutenin subunits encoded by the Glu-1 genes. We report the development of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to identify bread wheat genotypes carrying HMW glutenin allele composition of Glu-1 complex loci (Glu-A1, Glu-B1 and Glu-D1) by capillary electrophoresis(CE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Two triplex primer sets of HMW glutenin subunit genes were examined. An automated and rapid CE-LIF technique is helpful in the multiplex PCR optimization process. Two fluorescent intercalating dyes (EnhanCE, and YO-PRO-1) are compared for detection of DNA fragments. Amplified DNA fragments of HMW glutenin Glu-1 genes were well separated both by agarose slab-gel electrophoresis and CE, and revealed minor differences between the sequences of 1Ax2*, 1Axnull, 1Bx6, 1Bx7, 1Bx17 and 1Dx5 genes. Moreover, CE technique requires samples of smaller volumes in comparison to slab-gel electrophoresis, and data can be obtained in less than 20 min. There was a very high concordance in the assessment of the molecular size of PCR-generated DNA markers. Fast and accurate identification of molecular markers of Glu-1 genes by CE-LIF can be an efficient alternative to standard procedure separation for early selection of useful wheat genotypes with good bread-making quality.

  9. A radiative transfer model for remote sensing of laser induced fluorescence of phytoplankton in non-homogeneous turbid water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    A semi-analytic Monte Carlo simulation methodology (SALMON) was discussed. This simulation technique is particularly well suited for addressing fundamental radiative transfer problems in oceanographic LIDAR (optical radar), and also provides a framework for investigating the effects of environmental factors on LIDAR system performance. The simulation model was extended for airborne laser fluorosensors to allow for inhomogeneities in the vertical distribution of constituents in clear sea water. Results of the simulations for linearly varying step concentrations of chlorophyll are presented. The SALMON technique was also employed to determine how the LIDAR signals from an inhomogeneous media differ from those from homogeneous media.

  10. Short- and long-path laser-induced fluorescence in the water column for the detection of dissolved chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinn, Gert; Mittenzwey, Klaus-Henrik; Harsdorf, Stefan; Reuter, Rainer

    1997-05-01

    Lidar monitoring of surface waters has usually been applied to fluorescent and nonfluorescent soluble chemicals can be investigated. Two signals have to be measured, the total fluorescence lidar intensity L, which is characterized by long path-lengths of the laser radiation in the water column, and the fluorescence F, which originates from the first layers immediately below the water surface. The ratio of both intensities F/L yields the total attenuation coefficient at the laser wavelength considering also nonfluorescent substances besides fluorescent ones. A simple experiment in the laboratory was performed using a nitrogen laser. Water samples containing algae and a defined amount of humic acid were polluted with fluorescent quinine sulphate and nonfluorescent azobencene and p-nitrophenol down to ppb-concentrations. Synchronously, the attenuation coefficients were measured by conventional absorption spectroscopy. Good correlations between the conventional and the lidar-derived attenuation coefficients were achieved, described by squared correlation coefficients of r2 > 0.95. The F/L ratio seems to be a good tool in lidar monitoring of dissolved chemicals in waters.

  11. Determination of nicotinyl pesticide residues in vegetables by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with quantum dot indirect laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Hua; Sun, Juan; Dai, Yong-Jia; Dong, Min

    2012-07-01

    A new assay was developed by use of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with indirect LIF fluorescence for the determination of thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, and imidacloprid residues in vegetables, in which the cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDs) synthesized in aqueous phase were used as fluorescent background substance and their excitation and emission wavelengths matched with LIF detector by engineering their size. The factors that affected the peak height and the resolution were optimized. The running buffer was composed of 4.4 μM cadmium telluride QDs as fluorescent background substance, 40 mM borate and 60 mM SDS, and its pH was adjusted to 8.0. The separation voltage was 25 kV. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits were 0.05, 0.01, and 0.009 mg/kg; the linear dynamic ranges were 0.5-30, 0.1-30, and 0.1-30 mg/L; and the average recoveries of spiked samples were 72.0-101.2, 74.0-106.7, and 77.8-105.1% for thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, and imidacloprid, respectively. The assay can meet the requirement of maximum residue limits to these three pesticides in the regulations of European Union and Japan, and has been applied for determining their residues in vegetables. PMID:22821497

  12. Aquatic and terrestrial optical measurements - laser induced fluorescence technique (ATOM-LIFT): Summer 1997 field measurement campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrey, James E., III; Cecchi, Giovanna; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Kim, Moon S.; Bazzani, Marco; Corp, Lawrence A.

    1998-07-01

    A joint IROE-CNR, NASA/GSFC, and USDA/ARS measurement campaign was conducted in Italy for a three week period in July, 1997. The campaign was split into two parts: the first part for aquatic vegetation studies and the second part for terrestrial vegetation studies. The main objective of the campaign was to study optical properties of intact plant material as it relates to photosynthetic activity of living vegetation. The aquatic studies were carried out at an aquarium-laboratory in the seashore city of Livorno on the West coast of Italy. The investigations involved an important sea grass species that is native to the Mediterranean Sea. The terrestrial studies were carried out Northeast of the Town of St. Stefano di Cadore (Belluno), Italy. Measurements were taken in a wooded site at an Italian Department of Forestry Station on species of natural alpine vegetation. Instrumentation available for the studies were the Italian Fluorescence Light Detection And Ranging (FLIDAR) System, the NASA/USDA Fluorescence Imaging System (FIS), the Perkin Elmer Spectrofluorometer and LI-COR 6400 infrared gas exchange analyzer for photosynthesis measurements. Preliminary evaluations, analysis, and summaries were made by personnel from both Italian and United Sates groups on data collected during the measurement campaign. The joint Italian/American data collection effort with Aquatic and Terrestrial Optical Measurements produced a range of data for characterizing the relationships between fluorescence and the photosynthetic potentials of vegetative scenes.

  13. A New Airborne Lidar for Remote Sensing of Canopy Fluorescence and Vertical Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ounis, A.; Bach, J.; Mahjoub, A.; Daumard, F.; Moya, I.; Goulas, Y.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of a new lidar system for airborne remote sensing of chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) and vertical profile of canopies. By combining laserinduced fluorescence (LIF), sun-induced fluorescence (SIF) and canopy height distribution, the new instrument will low the simultaneous assessment of gross primary production (GPP), photosynthesis efficiency and above ground carbon stocks. Technical issues of the lidar development are discussed and expected performances are presented.

  14. Development of a two-line OH-laser-induced fluorescence thermometry diagnostics strategy for gas-phase temperature measurements in engines.

    PubMed

    Devillers, R; Bruneaux, G; Schulz, C

    2008-11-01

    This study aims at optimizing two-line OH thermometry strategies for in-cylinder measurement in internal combustion engines. Various aspects are investigated experimentally, such as the selection of suitable OH lines and the possibility of using a single calibration coefficient for variable mixture composition, temperature, and pressure conditions. Two kinds of experimental systems have been investigated. First, a laminar methane-air burner flame at atmospheric pressure, whose stability allowed the determination of OH-laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) intensity ratios from nonsimultaneous imaging. The temperature distribution in the flame is presented for OH-transition pairs with various temperature sensitivities. The burner flame was studied for equivalence ratios from phi=0.93 to 1.30 in order to check for the stability of calibration over various flame conditions. Additionally, OH LIF images were acquired in an optical engine for the chosen OH transitions yielding data about the effect of pressure on OH LIF signals under realistic experimental conditions. PMID:19122729

  15. Evaluation of high-performance liquid chromatography laser-induced fluorescence for serum protein profiling for early diagnosis of oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Prabhu, Vijendra; Choudhari, K. S.; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; George, Sajan D.; Ongole, Ravikiran; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Shetty, Jayarama K.; Bhat, Sujatha; Kartha, Vasudevan Bhaskaran; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2010-11-01

    The present work deals with the evaluation of a high-performance liquid chromatography laser-induced fluorescence (HPLC-LIF) technique developed in our laboratory for early detection of oral cancer from protein profiles of body fluids. The results show that protein profiles of serum samples from a given class of samples, say, normal, premalignant, or malignant, are statistically very close to each other, while profiles of members of any class are significantly different from other classes. The performance of the technique is evaluated by the use of sensitivity and specificity pairs, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and Youden's Index. The technique uses protein profile differences in serum samples, registered by the HPLC-LIF technique. The study is carried out using serum samples from volunteers diagnosed as normal or premalignant clinically, and as malignant by histopathology. The specificities and sensitivities of the HPLC-LIF method at an ideal threshold (M-distance = 2) for normal, malignant, and premalignant classes are 100, 69.5, and 61.5%, and 86.5, 87.5, and 87.5% respectively.

  16. Planar Sauter Mean Diameter measurements in liquid centered swirl coaxial injector using Laser Induced Fluorescence, Mie scattering and laser diffraction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kamalakannan; Banda, Manoj Venkata Krishna; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2016-06-01

    An experimental technique is carried out to demonstrate the measurement of planar Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD or D32) distribution in a liquid centered swirl coaxial injector (LCSC) using simultaneous measurements of Mie scattering, Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and Laser diffraction technique (LDT). Here water is used as the test fluid with addition of optimized quantities of the organic dye (Rhodamine 6 g) for PLIF measurements. Experiments are carried out at three experimental conditions with momentum flux ratios of 6.25, 12.14, and 19.95 respectively. Experiments are carried out to study the effect of dye concentration in LDT. LDT (line of sight) is corrected for multiple scattering effects. The SMD distribution obtained from Liquid Sheet Drop Sizing (LSDS) technique is calibrated using LDT (Malvern particle analyzer) that utilizes the principle of diffraction; the results obtained from both the methods are compared and analyzed using the respective histograms. The variations in the distribution of droplet diameter along the axial and radial locations in the spray field are also studied in detail.

  17. Capillary electrophoresis investigations of pET3aPAI-1 DNA involving optimized restriction digestion, laser-induced fluorescence detection, and micropreparative separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepaniak, Michael J.; Stebbins, Michael; Todd, April; Gibson, Timothy; Peterson, Cynthia; Diack, Moustopha

    1998-05-01

    This work centers around developing methodologies to isolate the PAI-1 coding sequence of the DNA plasmid pET3a-PAI-1. Size Selective Capillary Electrophoresis (SSCE), using entangled polymer filled small i.d. capillaries, is used to develop digestion conditions (time and enzyme concentration) that provide single cuts (at variable positions) of the plasmid using BstYI restriction enzyme. After obtaining optimum partial digest conditions for this enzyme, digestion with Ndel will produce a mixture of fragments that includes the fragment (1354 bp) which contains the intact region of interest. Sensitive detection is achieved via laser induced fluorescence using running buffers containing intercalating dye. Using small i.d. capillary conditions as a starting point, the SSCE system is increased to the micro-preparative scale using various larger i.d. capillaries. The effects of capillary diameter, applied voltage, injection amount, and sample buffer concentration on separation performance are studied. Subsequently, single or limited numbers of injections of the single cut sample using a relatively large i.d. capillary should prove adequate material for digestion with Ndel prior to PCR amplification of the 1354 bp fragment.

  18. Direct measurements of classical and enhanced gradient-aligned cross-field ion flows in a helicon plasma source using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, M. Umair Thompson, Derek S.; McIlvain, Julianne M.; Short, Zachary D.; Scime, Earl E.

    2015-12-15

    Direct laser induced fluorescence measurements are shown of cross-field ion flows normal to an absorbing boundary that is aligned parallel to the axial magnetic field in a helicon plasma. We show Langmuir and emissive probe measurements of local density and plasma potential in the same region, as well as floating probe spectra near the boundary. With these measurements, we investigate the influence of ion-neutral collisionality on radial ion transport by varying the ratio of the ion gyro-radius, ρ{sub i}, to the ion-neutral collision length, λ, over the range 0.34 ≤ ρ{sub i}λ{sup −1} ≤ 1.60. Classical drift-diffusion transport along density and potential gradients is sufficient to describe flow profiles for most cases. For two parameter regimes (ρ{sub i}λ{sup −1} = 0.65 and 0.44), low-frequency electrostatic fluctuations (f < 10 kHz) and enhanced cross-field bulk ion flow to the boundary are observed.

  19. Portable, real-time alloy identification of metallic wear debris from machinery lubrication systems: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy versus x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Pooja

    2014-05-01

    Alloy identification of oil-borne wear debris captured on chip detectors, filters and magnetic plugs allows the machinery maintainer to assess the health of the engine or gearbox and identify specific component damage. Today, such identification can be achieved in real time using portable, at-line laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Xray fluorescence (XRF) instruments. Both techniques can be utilized in various industries including aviation, marine, railways, heavy diesel and other industrial machinery with, however, some substantial differences in application and instrument performance. In this work, the performances of a LIBS and an XRF instrument are compared based on measurements of a wide range of typical aerospace alloys including steels, titanium, aluminum and nickel alloys. Measurement results were analyzed with a staged correlation technique specifically developed for the purposes of this study - identifying the particle alloy composition using a pre-recorded library of spectral signatures. The analysis is performed in two stages: first, the base element of the alloy is determined by correlation with the stored elemental spectra and then, the alloy is identified by matching the particle's spectral signature using parametric correlation against the stored spectra of all alloys that have the same base element. The correlation analysis has achieved highly repeatable discrimination between alloys of similar composition. Portable LIBS demonstrates higher detection accuracy and better identification of alloys comprising lighter elements as compared to that of the portable XRF system, and reveals a significant reduction in the analysis time over XRF.

  20. Analysis of heterogeneous gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF).

    PubMed

    Jaswal, Brij Bir S; Kumar, Vinay; Sharma, Jitendra; Rai, Pradeep K; Gondal, Mohammed A; Gondal, Bilal; Singh, Vivek K

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, no specific sample preparation requirements, non-destructiveness, and versatility. It has been proven to be a robust elemental analysis tool attracting interest because of being applied to a wide range of materials including biomaterials. In this paper, we have performed spectroscopic studies on gallstones which are heterogeneous in nature using LIBS and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) techniques. It has been observed that the presence and relative concentrations of trace elements in different kind of gallstones (cholesterol and pigment gallstones) can easily be determined using LIBS technique. From the experiments carried out on gallstones for trace elemental mapping and detection, it was found that LIBS is a robust tool for such biomedical applications. The stone samples studied in the present paper were classified using the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. WD-XRF spectroscopy has been applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of major and trace elements present in the gallstone which was compared with the LIBS data. The results obtained in the present paper show interesting prospects for LIBS and WD-XRF to study cholelithiasis better. PMID:26886588

  1. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  2. Development of core ion temperature gradients and edge sheared flows in a helicon plasma device investigated by laser induced fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, S. C.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-08-01

    We report experimental observation of ion heating and subsequent development of a prominent ion temperature gradient in the core of a linear magnetized plasma device, and the controlled shear de-correlation experiment. Simultaneously, we also observe the development of strong sheared flows at the edge of the device. Both the ion temperature and the azimuthal velocity profiles are quite flat at low magnetic fields. As the magnetic field is increased, the core ion temperature increases, producing centrally peaked ion temperature profiles and therefore strong radial gradients in the ion temperature. Similarly, we observe the development of large azimuthal flows at the edge, with increasing magnetic field, leading to strong radially sheared plasma flows. The ion velocities and temperatures are derived from laser induced fluorescence measurements of Doppler resolved velocity distribution functions of argon ions. These features are consistent with the previous observations of simultaneously existing radially separated multiple plasma instabilities that exhibit complex plasma dynamics in a very simple plasma system. The ion temperature gradients in the core and the radially sheared azimuthal velocities at the edge point to mechanisms that can drive the multiple plasma instabilities, that were reported earlier.

  3. Determination of herbicides and its metabolite in soil and water samples by capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection using microwave-assisted derivatization.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liwei; Deng, Tao; Liang, Siliu; Tan, Xiaofang; Meng, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Methods were developed to determine glufosinate (GLUF), glyphosate (GLYP) and its metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) by capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection using 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinylamino) fluorescein (DTAF) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as the derivatizing reagents. To accelerate the labeling speed, a microwave-assisted derivatization method was adopted. The derivatizing reaction time was reduced to 180 and 150 s for DTAF and FITC, whose reaction time for conventional labeling was 50 min and 5 h, respectively. The optimum separation conditions for derivatives were as follows: a back ground electrolyte (BGE) of 30 mmol L(-1) sodium tetraborate containing 15 mmol L(-1) brij-35, hydrodynamic injection 15 s and a 10 kV separation voltage. Under these conditions, the LODs (S/N = 3) for DTAF derivatives were 0.32, 0.19 and 0.15 nmol L(-1) for GLUF, GLYP, and AMPA, respectively. The LODs (S/N = 3) for FITC derivatives were 2.60, 3.88 and 2.42 nmol L(-1) for GLUF, GLYP, and AMPA, respectively. The applicability of the developed method was demonstrated by the detection of the above herbicides and metabolite in water and soil samples.

  4. Phase-locked two-line OH planar laser-induced fluorescence thermometry in a pulsating gas turbine model combustor at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Giezendanner-Thoben, Robert; Meier, Ulrich; Meier, Wolfgang; Heinze, Johannes; Aigner, Manfred

    2005-11-01

    Two-line OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) thermometry was applied to a swirling CH4/air flame in a gas turbine (GT) model combustor at atmospheric pressure, which exhibited self-excited combustion instability. The potential and limitations of the method are discussed with respect to applications in GT-like flames. A major drawback of using OH as a temperature indicator is that no temperature information can be obtained from regions where OH radicals are missing or present in insufficient concentration. The resulting bias in the average temperature is addressed and quantified for one operating condition by a comparison with results from laser Raman measurements applied in the same flame. Care was taken to minimize saturation effects by decreasing the spectral laser power density to a minimum while keeping an acceptable spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. In order to correct for the influence of laser light attenuation, absorption measurements were performed on a single-shot basis and a correction procedure was applied. The accuracy was determined to 4%-7% depending on the location within the flame and on the temperature level. A GT model combustor with an optical combustion chamber is described, and phase-locked 2D temperature distributions from a pulsating flame are presented. The temperature variations during an oscillation cycle are specified, and the general flame behavior is described. Our main goals are the evaluation of the OH PLIF thermometry and the characterization of a pulsating GT-like flame.

  5. Production mechanism of atomic nitrogen in atmospheric pressure pulsed corona discharge measured using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2012-06-01

    To study the production mechanism of atomic nitrogen, the temporal profile and spatial distribution of atomic nitrogen are measured in atmospheric pressure pulsed positive corona discharge using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. The absolute atomic nitrogen density in the streamer filaments is estimated from decay rate of atomic nitrogen in N{sub 2} discharge. The results indicate that the absolute atomic nitrogen density is approximately constant against discharge energy. When the discharge voltage is 21.5 kV, production yield of atomic nitrogen produced by an N{sub 2} discharge pulse is estimated to be 2.9 - 9.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} atoms and the energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production is estimated to be about 1.8 - 6.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} atoms/J. The energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production in N{sub 2} discharge is constant against the discharge energy, while that in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} discharge increases with discharge energy. In the N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} discharge, two-step process of N{sub 2} dissociation plays significant role for atomic nitrogen production.

  6. Laser-induced Fluorescence and Optical Emission Spectroscopy for the Determination of Reactive Species in the Effluent of Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xuekai; Razavi, Hamid; Lu, Xinpei; Laroussi, Mounir

    2014-10-01

    OH radicals and O atoms are important active species in various applications of room temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jet (RT-APPJ). So the determination of absolute density of OH radicals and O atoms in RT-APPJs is necessary. In this work, the time and spatially resolved OH radicals density of a RT-APPJ are measured using the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology. In addition, the spatial distribution of the emitting species along the axial direction of the jet is of interest and is measured using optical emission spectroscopy. The absolute OH density of the RT-APPJ is about 2.0 × 1013 cm-3 at 5 mm away from the plasma jet nozzle and 1 μs after the discharge. The OH density reaches a maximum when H2O concentration in helium gas flow is about 130ppm. In order to control the OH density, the effect of voltage polarity, applied voltage magnitude, pulse frequency, pulse width on the OH density are also investigated and discussed. O atoms are investigated by TA-LIF. It is demonstrated that the O atoms density reaches a maximum when O2 percent is about 0.3% in pure He and the lifetime of O atoms in RT-APPJ is much longer (up to dozens of ms) than OH radicals.

  7. Characterization of a two-dimensional temperature field within a rapid compression machine using a toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Camille; Sotton, Julien; Mura, Arnaud; Bellenoue, Marc

    2009-12-01

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process is an advanced operating mode for automotive engines. The self-ignition mechanisms that occur within the combustion chamber exhibit extreme temperature dependence. Therefore, the thorough understanding of corresponding phenomena requires the use of diagnostic methods featuring a sufficient thermal sensitivity, applicable in severe conditions similar to those encountered within engines. In this respect, toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is applied to the inert compression flow generated within an optical rapid compression machine (RCM). A relatively simple diagnostic system is retained: a single wavelength excitation device (266 nm) and a single (filtered) collection system. This diagnostic system is associated with an image processing strategy specifically adapted to RCM devices. Despite the severe conditions under consideration (40 bar, 700-950 K), the method allows us to obtain relatively large two-dimensional temperature fields that display a level of description seldom achieved in such devices. In particular the temperature gradients, which play a crucial role in HCCI combustion processes, can be estimated. The present experimental results confirm the good reliability and accuracy of the method. The information gathered with this toluene PLIF method puts in evidence its high potentialities for the study of aero-thermal-reactive processes as they take place in real engine conditions. The retained strategy also brings new possibilities of non-intrusive analysis for flows practically encountered within industrial devices.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.): in situ nondestructive detection of microbial life in the ice covers of Antarctic lakes.

    PubMed

    Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C; Sattler, Birgit

    2009-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.) images were obtained in situ following 532 nm excitation of cryoconite assemblages in the ice covers of annual and perennially frozen Antarctic lakes during the 2008 Tawani International Expedition to Schirmacher Oasis and Lake Untersee in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. Laser targeting of a single millimeter-scale cryoconite results in multiple neighboring excitation events secondary to ice/air interface reflection and refraction in the bubbles surrounding the primary target. Laser excitation at 532 nm of cyanobacteria-dominated assemblages produced red and infrared autofluorescence activity attributed to the presence of phycoerythrin photosynthetic pigments. The method avoids destruction of individual target organisms and does not require the disruption of either the structure of the microbial community or the surrounding ice matrix. L.I.F.E. survey strategies described may be of interest for orbital monitoring of photosynthetic primary productivity in polar and alpine glaciers, ice sheets, snow, and lake ice of Earth's cryosphere. The findings open up the possibility of searching from either a rover or from orbit for signs of life in the polar regions of Mars and the frozen regions of exoplanets in neighboring star systems.

  9. Quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid in the heads of houseflies (Musca domestica) and diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella (L.)), using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xueyan; Liang, Pei; Song, Dunlun; Yang, Wenling; Gao, Xiwu

    2012-02-01

    A novel method was developed for quantifying the levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the heads of houseflies (Musca domestica) and diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella (L.)), using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF). The GABA in sample was derivatized with 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) prior to CE-LIF analysis. In total, 32 mmol/L borate buffer, at pH 9.2 and containing 5.3 mmol/L β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and 10.4 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), was determined to be the optimum CE background electrolyte (BGE) for GABA analysis. The detection limit of GABA was 0.016 μmol/L. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the migration time and peak area of GABA were 1.78 and 4.93%, respectively. The average recoveries of 0.97, 3.88, and 5.83 μmol/L of GABA, each added to the head sample of housefly, ranged from 88.9 to 110.5%. This method is simple and applicable to GABA assays of the heads of insects. With this newly developed CE-LIF method, the amounts of GABA in the heads of houseflies (M. domestica) and diamondback moths (P. xylostella (L.)) were measured. The results are relevant to the understandings of some insecticides and insecticide-resistance mechanisms in pests.

  10. Comparison of field portable measurements of ultrafine TiO2: X-ray fluorescence, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Arthur L.; Stipe, Christopher; Brown, Jonathan; Murphy, Nate; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B.

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of ultrafin0e titanium dioxide (TiO2) particulate matter loaded on filters were made using three field portable methods (X-ray fluorescence (XRF), laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) to assess their potential for determining end-of-shift exposure. Ultrafine TiO2 particles were aerosolized and collected onto 37 mm polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) filters in the range of 3 to 578 µg titanium (Ti). Limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), and calibration fit were determined for each measurement method. The LOD's were 11.8, 0.032, and 108 µg Ti per filter, for XRF, LIBS, and FTIR, respectively and the LOQ's were 39.2, 0.11, and 361 µg Ti per filter, respectively. The XRF calibration curve was linear over the widest dynamic range, up to the maximum loading tested (578 µg Ti per filter). LIBS was more sensitive but, due to the sample preparation method, the highest loaded filter measurable was 252 µg Ti per filter. XRF and LIBS had good predictability measured by regressing the predicted mass to the gravimetric mass on the filter. XRF and LIBS produced overestimations of 4% and 2%, respectively, with coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.995 and 0.998. FTIR measurements were less dependable due to interference from the PCTE filter media and overestimated mass by 2% with an R2 of 0.831. PMID:23632878

  11. Analysis of heterogeneous gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF).

    PubMed

    Jaswal, Brij Bir S; Kumar, Vinay; Sharma, Jitendra; Rai, Pradeep K; Gondal, Mohammed A; Gondal, Bilal; Singh, Vivek K

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, no specific sample preparation requirements, non-destructiveness, and versatility. It has been proven to be a robust elemental analysis tool attracting interest because of being applied to a wide range of materials including biomaterials. In this paper, we have performed spectroscopic studies on gallstones which are heterogeneous in nature using LIBS and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) techniques. It has been observed that the presence and relative concentrations of trace elements in different kind of gallstones (cholesterol and pigment gallstones) can easily be determined using LIBS technique. From the experiments carried out on gallstones for trace elemental mapping and detection, it was found that LIBS is a robust tool for such biomedical applications. The stone samples studied in the present paper were classified using the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. WD-XRF spectroscopy has been applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of major and trace elements present in the gallstone which was compared with the LIBS data. The results obtained in the present paper show interesting prospects for LIBS and WD-XRF to study cholelithiasis better.

  12. Quantitative measurements of one-dimensional OH absolute concentration profiles in a methane/air flat flame by bi-directional laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin; Yang, Zhen; Peng, Jiang-Bo; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Yu-Fei; Yang, Chao-Bo; Li, Xiao-Hui; Sun, Rui

    2015-11-01

    The one-dimensional (1D) spatial distributions of OH absolute concentration in methane/air laminar premixed flat flame under different equivalence ratios at atmospheric pressure are investigated by using bi-directional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection scheme combined with the direct absorption spectroscopy. The effective peak absorption cross section and the average temperature at a height of 2 mm above the burner are obtained by exciting absorption on the Q1(8) rotational line in the A2Σ+ (ʋ‧ = 0) ← X2Π (ʋ″ = 0) at 309.240 nm. The measured values are 1.86×10-15 cm2 and 1719 K, respectively. Spatial filtering and frequency filtering methods of reducing noise are used to deal with the experimental data, and the smoothing effects are also compared using the two methods. The spatial distribution regularities of OH concentration are obtained with the equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 1.3. The spatial resolution of the measured result is 84 μm. Finally, a comparison is made between the experimental result of this paper and other relevant study results. Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Projects of China (Grant No. 2012YQ040164), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61275127 and 91441130), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M560262), and the Postdoctoral Fellowship in Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. LBH-Z14074).

  13. Isomer discrimination of PAHs formed in sooting flames by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence: application to the measurement of pyrene and fluoranthene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouton, Thomas; Mercier, Xavier; Desgroux, Pascale

    2016-05-01

    Jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence is a spectroscopic method, specifically developed for the study of PAHs formed in flames. This technique has already been used to measure different aromatic species in sooting low-pressure methane flames such as benzene, naphthalene, and pyrene. The use of the LIF technique to excite PAHs drastically cooled down inside a supersonic jet offers the possibility to get selective and quantitative profiles of PAHs sampled from sooting flames. In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of this experimental method to separate the contribution of two mass isomers generated in sooting flames which are the pyrene and the fluoranthene. The selectivity of the method is demonstrated by studying the spectral properties of these species. The method is then applied to the measurement of both these species in two sooting flames with different equivalence ratios and stabilized at 200 torr (26.65 kPa). The sensitivity of the technique has been found to reach a few ppb in the case of fluoranthene measurements.

  14. Determination of the beta-glucosidase activity in different soils by pre capillary enzyme assay using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Stege, Patricia W; Messina, Germán A; Bianchi, Guillermo; Olsina, Roberto A

    2010-03-01

    Enzyme activities can provide indication for quantitative changes in soil organic matter (SOM). It is known that the activities of most enzymes increase as native SOM content reflecting larger microbial communities and stabilization of enzymes on humic materials. Beta-glucosidase (beta-Glu) activities have been frequently used as indicators of changes in quantity and quality of SOM. In this study we propose a simple and very sensitive method, which has lower limit of detection compared with classic spectrophotometric method with the aim of determinate the beta-Glu activity in soil samples using Fluorescein mono-beta-D-glucopyranoside (FMGlc) as a substrate. The fluorescein released by the enzymatic reaction was quantified by capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) method. The background electrolyte (BGE) consisted in 40 mM phosphate buffer, pH 6. The LOD and LOQ for fluorescein were 1.3 10(-7) mg mL(-1) and 6.4 10(-6) mg mL(-1), respectively. This work deals with the minimization of the mixture for the enzymatic reaction and with the optimization conditions of CE separation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that an enzymatic activity was detected in soil using CE-LIF system.

  15. Laser induced fluorescence studies of iodine oxide chemistry. Part II. The reactions of IO with CH3O2, CF3O2 and O3.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Terry J; Tucceri, María E; Crowley, John N

    2006-11-28

    The technique of pulsed laser photolysis was coupled to laser induced fluorescence detection of iodine oxide (IO) to measure rate coefficients, k for the reactions IO + CH(3)O(2)--> products (R1, 30-318 Torr N(2)), IO + CF(3)O(2)--> products (R2, 70-80 Torr N(2)), and IO + O(3)--> OIO + O(2) (R3a). Values of k(1) = (2 +/- 1) x 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), k(2) = (3.6 +/- 0.8) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and k(3a) <5 x 10(-16) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) were obtained at T = 298 K. In the course of this work, the product yield of IO from the reaction of CH(3)O(2) with I was determined to be close to zero, whereas CH(3)OOI was formed efficiently at 70 Torr N(2). Similarly, no evidence was found for IO formation in the CF(3)O(2) + I reaction. An estimate of the rate coefficients k(CH(3)O(2) + I) = 2 x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k(CH(3)OOI + I) = 1.5 x 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was also obtained. The results on k(1)-k(3) are compared to the limited number of previous investigations and the implications for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer are briefly discussed.

  16. Measurements of He metastable atom density profile in front of substrate in ECR plasma flow by laser-induced fluorescence technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, H.; Takiyama, K.; Oda, T.

    1998-10-01

    Metastable atoms of rare gases affect on the etching processes and the radical formation processes in a reactive plasma because of their high internal energy. Fundamental understanding is required of the creation and annihilation mechanisms of the metastable atoms in the plasma, especially in the boundary region between plasma and substrate. We have measured spatial profile of He metastable (2^1S) atom density in plasma flow from an ECR plasma source by polarized laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy [1]. It has been shown that the metastable atoms near the outlet of the plasma flow are created by collisional-radiative processes. However, the remarkable decrease near the substrate placed in the downstream has not been clearly understood. Observation of the polarized LIF due to forbidden excitation is made with high spatial resolution in the vicinity of the substrate to obtain the detailed density profile. Based on these results, possible annihilation mechanism of the metastable atoms will be briefly discussed. [1] H. Toyota et al.; Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 36 (1997) 4670.

  17. The use of laser-induced fluorescence or ultraviolet detectors for sensitive and selective analysis of tobramycin or erythropoietin in complex samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Hytham M.; Ebeid, Wael B.

    2015-05-01

    Complex samples analysis is a challenge in pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical analysis. In this work, tobramycin (TOB) analysis in human urine samples and recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) analysis in the presence of similar protein were selected as representative examples of such samples analysis. Assays of TOB in urine samples are difficult because of poor detectability. Therefore laser induced fluorescence detector (LIF) was combined with a separation technique, micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), to determine TOB through derivatization with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). Borate was used as background electrolyte (BGE) with negative-charged mixed micelles as additive. The method was successively applied to urine samples. The LOD and LOQ for Tobramycin in urine were 90 and 200 ng/ml respectively and recovery was >98% (n = 5). All urine samples were analyzed by direct injection without sample pre-treatment. Another use of hyphenated analytical technique, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) connected to ultraviolet (UV) detector was also used for sensitive analysis of rhEPO at low levels (2000 IU) in the presence of large amount of human serum albumin (HSA). Analysis of rhEPO was achieved by the use of the electrokinetic injection (EI) with discontinuous buffers. Phosphate buffer was used as BGE with metal ions as additive. The proposed method can be used for the estimation of large number of quality control rhEPO samples in a short period.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence of CN/X2 Sigma +/ produced by photolysis of C2N2 at 160 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, R. J.; Sabety-Dzvonik, M. J.; Jackson, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the initial product state distributions of CN(X2 Sigma +) produced during the photolysis of C2N2 at a wavelength of 160 nm. The parent molecules were photodissociated by an argon flash lamp, and saturated solutions of BBD in p-dioxane were used as a laser dye to produce radiation that excited CN radicals in the (upsilon-double-prime, N-prime) vibrational-rotational sublevels of the X state to the B-state sublevels. Spectral-line identification is discussed along with the observed rotational, electronic, and vibrational energy partitionings. The effect of added buffer gas (N2 or He) on the observed product state distributions is examined in order to monitor collisional energy transfer from CN(A2 Pi, upsilon = 0) to CN(X2 Sigma +, upsilon-double-prime = 4). It is found that both buffer gases produce population inversion between the upsilon-double-prime = 4 and upsilon-double-prime = 3 levels of the X state.

  19. Recent Results on the Study of Transverse Beam Dynamics Using the Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Diagnostic on the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Gilson, Erik; Davidson, Ronald; Efthimion, Philip; Majeski, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact Paul trap that simulates the nonlinear transverse dynamics of an intense charged particle beam propagating through an equivalent kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) focusing system. The recently developed laser- induced-fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic allowed us to measure the time dependent, transverse phase space profiles of the charge bunch and better understand critical issues in charged particle beam dynamics including emittance growth, and halo particle formation. The LIF diagnostic system includes an excimer laser, a dye laser, a CCD camera system and a stable high-density barium ion source. The measurements of the radial density profiles of the barium ion source using the LIF diagnostic are calibrated and compared to measurements using a charge collector. The design of the new barium ion source and the LIF diagnostic system will be discussed. The initial results of the radial density profiles measured by the LIF diagnostic will be presented. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Simultaneous measurements of velocity, temperature, and pressure using rapid cw wavelength-modulation laser-induced fluorescence of OH

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A.Y.; Battles, B.E.; Hanson, R. )

    1990-06-15

    The beam from a rapid-tuning single-frequency laser was used to probe the {ital R}{sub 1}(7) and {ital R}{sub 1}(11) {ital A} {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} {l arrow} {ital X} {sup 2}{Pi} (0, 0) line pair of OH at a 45{degree} incident angle in a combustion-driven, supersonic free jet. Absorption line shapes were recorded in spatially resolved, single-point fluorescence. The Doppler shift, intensity ratio, and collisional broadening of the measured line pair were used to determine velocity, temperature, and pressure. The repetition rate of the measurement was 3 kHz.