Science.gov

Sample records for airborne magnetic survey

  1. Airborne electromagnetic and magnetic survey data of the Paradox and San Luis Valleys, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Bloss, Benjamin R.; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Smith, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    In October 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracted airborne magnetic and electromagnetic surveys of the Paradox and San Luis Valleys in southern Colorado, United States. These airborne geophysical surveys provide high-resolution and spatially comprehensive datasets characterizing the resistivity structure of the shallow subsurface of each survey region, accompanied by magnetic-field information over matching areas. These data were collected to provide insight into the distribution of groundwater brine in the Paradox Valley, the extent of clay aquitards in the San Luis Valley, and to improve our understanding of the geologic framework for both regions. This report describes these contracted surveys and releases digital data supplied under contract to the USGS.

  2. Airborne full tensor magnetic gradiometry surveys in the Thuringian basin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queitsch, M.; Schiffler, M.; Goepel, A.; Stolz, R.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, H.; Kukowski, N.

    2013-12-01

    In this contribution we introduce a newly developed fully operational full tensor magnetic gradiometer (FTMG) instrument based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) and show example data acquired in 2012 within the framework of the INFLUINS (Integrated Fluid Dynamics in Sedimentary basins) project. This multidisciplinary project aims for a better understanding of movements and interaction between shallow and deep fluids in the Thuringian Basin in the center of Germany. In contrast to mapping total magnetic field intensity (TMI) in conventional airborne magnetic surveys for industrial exploration of mineral deposits and sedimentary basins, our instrument measures all components of the magnetic field gradient tensor using highly sensitive SQUID gradiometers. This significantly constrains the solutions of the inverse problem. Furthermore, information on the ratio between induced and remanent magnetization is obtained. Special care has been taken to reduce motion noise while acquiring data in airborne operation. Therefore, the sensors are mounted in a nonmagnetic and aerodynamically shaped bird made of fiberglas with a high drag tail which stabilizes the bird even at low velocities. The system is towed by a helicopter and kept at 30m above ground during data acquisition. Additionally, the system in the bird incorporates an inertial unit for geo-referencing and enhanced motion noise compensation, a radar altimeter for topographic correction and a GPS system for high precision positioning. Advanced data processing techniques using reference magnetometer and inertial unit data result in a very low system noise of less than 60 pT/m peak to peak in airborne operation. To show the performance of the system we present example results from survey areas within the Thuringian basin and along its bordering highlands. The mapped gradient tensor components show a high correlation to existing geologic maps. Furthermore, the measured gradient components indicate

  3. Airborne electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data of the Yukon Flats and Fort Wainwright areas, central Alaska, June 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Smith, Bruce D.; Minsley, Burke J.; Abraham, Jared D.; Voss, Clifford I.; Astley, Beth N.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Cannia, James C.

    2011-01-01

    In June 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted airborne electromagnetic and magnetic surveys of the Yukon Flats and Fort Wainwright study areas in central Alaska. These data were collected to estimate the three-dimensional distribution of permafrost at the time of the survey. These data were also collected to evaluate the effectiveness of these geophysical methods at mapping permafrost geometry and to better define the physical properties of the subsurface in discontinuous permafrost areas. This report releases digital data associated with these surveys. Inverted resistivity depth sections are also provided in this data release, and data processing and inversion methods are discussed.

  4. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  5. Semi-automated structural analysis of high resolution magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry airborne surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debeglia, N.; Martelet, G.; Perrin, J.; Truffert, C.; Ledru, P.; Tourlière, B.

    2005-08-01

    A user-controlled procedure was implemented for the structural analysis of geophysical maps. Local edge segments are first extracted using a suitable edge detector function, then linked into straight discontinuities and, finally, organised in complex boundary lines best delineating geophysical features. Final boundary lines may be attributed by a geologist to lithological contacts and/or structural geological features. Tests of some edge detectors, (i) horizontal gradient magnitude (HGM), (ii) various orders of the analytic signal ( An), reduced to the pole or not, (iii) enhanced horizontal derivative (EHD), (iv) composite analytic signal (CAS), were performed on synthetic magnetic data (with and without noise). As a result of these comparisons, the horizontal gradient appears to remain the best operator for the analysis of magnetic data. Computation of gradients in the frequency domain, including filtering and upward continuation of noisy data, is well-suited to the extraction of magnetic gradients associated to deep sources, while space-domain smoothing and differentiation techniques is generally preferable in the case of shallow magnetic sources, or for gamma-ray spectrometry analysis. Algorithms for edge extraction, segment linking, and line following can be controlled by choosing adequate edge detector and processing parameters which allows adaptation to a desired scale of interpretation. Tests on synthetic and real case data demonstrate the adaptability of the procedure and its ability to produce basic layer for multi-data analysis. The method was applied to the interpretation of high-resolution airborne magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry data collected in northern Namibia. It allowed the delineation of dyke networks concealed by superficial weathering and demonstrated the presence of lithological variations in alluvial flows. The output from the structural analysis procedure are compatible with standard GIS softwares and enable the geologist to (i) compare

  6. Insights into the Structure and Surface Geology of Isla Socorro, Mexico, from Airborne Magnetic and Gamma-Ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, V.; Gruber, S.; Varley, N.; D'Antonio, M.; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.

    2016-05-01

    The island of Socorro is located in the eastern Pacific Ocean, 650 km off the coast of Mexico. It is a rare example of an oceanic volcanic island whose above sea level volume is made up mostly of peralkaline trachytes and rhyolites, with subordinate mafic rocks. Subaerial volcanism started several hundred thousand years ago and continues until recent times. We present an investigation of surface and subsurface geology of the island, based on the first detailed extensive geophysical survey on the island. Acquired airborne magnetic and gamma-ray data were compared to existing geological information and supplemented with field investigations and satellite imagery. Magnetic data show a wide minimum in the central part of the island, possibly connected to a high-temperature zone in the deeper central portion of the volcano, likely to be due to a still hot magma body. The data also depict two parallel edges possibly suggesting the existence of a nested caldera. Analysis on upward continued magnetic data by recent imaging techniques highlighted two deep sources located around 5 km b.s.l., interpreted as feeding structures that are now filled with crystalline rocks. Gamma-ray data have been interpreted through integration with the geological survey results. Several previously known volcanic deposits have been identified based on radioelement distribution, and others have been redefined based on field evidence. A new succession of volcanic members is proposed, to be verified through more detailed geological mapping, geochemical analyses of rock samples and radiometric dating.

  7. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  8. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

  9. The use of high resolution ground and airborne magnetic surveys to evaluate the geometry of hydrothermal alteration zones over volcanic provinces (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouligand, C.; Glen, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical methods can provide critical constraints on the distribution and volume of hydrothermal alteration, important parameters in understanding the evolution of geothermal systems. Because hydrothermal alteration modifies the magnetic properties of the volcanic substratum, magnetic surveys can be used to provide constraints on the distribution of hydrothermal alteration at depth. Using Yellowstone caldera as an example, we show that both ground and airborne magnetic surveys can be used to map and assess the volume of hydrothermal alteration. Ground magnetic surveys over unaltered volcanic terranes display high-amplitude, short-wavelength anomalies, in contrast to smooth, subdued magnetic anomalies over volcanic substrata demagnetized by hydrothermal alteration. We use this contrast to map areas of hydrothermal alteration in detail. Inverse methods applied to high-resolution airborne and ground magnetic data can be used to create three-dimensional models of the distribution of magnetization and thus illuminate the geometry of hydrothermal alteration. Because of the non-uniqueness of potential fields, the construction of inverse models requires simplifying assumptions on the distribution of magnetization, knowledge of induced and remanent magnetization of fresh and altered geological units, and detailed geological and geophysical data. Within the three hydrothermal sites that we investigated in Yellowstone National Park, subdued short-wavelength signal indicates pervasive demagnetization (alteration) of the shallow substratum that extends over larger areas than initially mapped by geology. These data also reveal that the largest degree of demagnetization (alteration) and maximum thicknesses of demagnetized (altered) substratum, reaching a few hundred meters, are associated with hydrothermal vents and with superficial hydrothermal alteration. Our three dimensional models of magnetization provide estimates of the volume of buried hydrothermal alteration ranging

  10. Magnetic characterization of airborne particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Doh, S.; Yu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Burning fossil fuels from vehicles, domestics, industries and power plants in the large urban or industrial areas emit significant quantity of anthropogenic particulates which become a potential threat to human health. Here, we present temporal variability of particulate pollution associated with compositional differences, using magnetic measurements and electron microscopic observations. Six different grain-sizes of airborne particulates have been collected by filtering from 10 precipitation events in Seoul, Korea from February 2009 to June 2009. Magnetic concentration proxies show relatively better (R2 >0.6) and poorer correlations (R2 <0.3) with the masses of samples filtered by >0.45 μm and <0.45 μm sizes, respectively, suggesting the usefulness of magnetic characterization for the >0.45 μm particulates. Temporally, magnetic concentrations are higher in the cold season than the warm season. In particular, a significant increase of magnetic concentration is observed in 3 μm and 1 μm filters after the Chinese wind-blown dust events, indicating additional influx of fine-grained anthropogenic particulates into Seoul. Microscopic observations identify that increase of magnetic concentration is highly linked with the frequent occurrence of combustion derived particulates (i.e., carbon and/or sulfur mixed particles) than natural alumino-silicates. Overall, the present study demonstrates that magnetic measurements efficiently reflect the concentration of particulates produced from fossil-fuel combustion among the airborne particles from various sources.

  11. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, El Dorado quadrangle, Louisiana and Arkansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The El Dorado quadrangle lies south of the Ouachita Mountains in the Gulf Coastal Province. Underlying Mesozoic sediments are relatively thick in the north, but thin considerably over the tops of the Sabine and Monroe Uplifts. Exposed sediments are largely Mesozoic in the north, and Cenozoic over the uplifted areas. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits in this area. The concentrations of uranium in this quadrangle are extremely low. Seventy-six uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. None had any significance, and all appeared to have cultural origins. Magnetic data appears to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region.

  12. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Blytheville quadrangle, Tennessee, Arkansas, Alabama, and Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The Blytheville quadrangle covers a region east of the Mississippi River in the northernmost Gulf Coastal Province. The Tertiary Mississippi Embayment and the older Black Warrior - Arkoma Basins all shoal to the northeast in this area. Surficial exposures are dominantly Cretaceous or younger. Older strata are exposed in the northeast. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. Ninety uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. Few were considered significant,and almost all appear to relate to some cultural feature. Magnetic data appears, for the most part, to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region.

  13. Airborne geophysical surveys over the eastern Adirondacks, New York State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Anjana K.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne geophysical surveys were conducted in the eastern Adirondacks from Dec. 7, 2015 - Dec. 21, 2015, by Goldak Airborne Surveys. The area was flown along a draped surface with a nominal survey height above ground of 200 meters. The flight line spacing was 250 meters for traverse lines and 2500 meters for control lines. Here we present downloadable magnetic and radiometric (gamma spectrometry) data from those surveys as image (Geotiff) and flight line data (csv format).BackgroundThe Eastern Adirondacks region was known for iron mining in the 1800's and 1900's but it also contains deposits of rare earth minerals. Rare earth minerals are used in advanced technology such as in cell phones, rechargeable batteries and super-magnets. In many areas rare earth minerals appear to be associated with iron ore.The surveys were flown in order to map geologic variations in three dimensions. Magnetic surveys measure subtle changes in Earth's magnetic field that reflect different types of buried rock, such as iron-rich ore bodies. Radiometric methods detect naturally occurring gamma particles. The energy spectra of these particles can be used to estimate relative amounts of potassium, uranium and thorium (also referred to as gamma ray spectrometry), which are sometimes associated with rare earth elements. Together, these data provide insights into the regional tectonic and magmatic history as well as mineral resources in the area.

  14. Airborne Geophysical Surveys Applied to Hydrocarbon Resource Development Environmental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Ball, L. B.; Finn, C.; Kass, A.; Thamke, J.

    2014-12-01

    Application of airborne geophysical surveys ranges in scale from detailed site scale such as locating abandoned well casing and saline water plumes to landscape scale for mapping hydrogeologic frameworks pertinent to ground water and tectonic settings relevant to studies of induced seismicity. These topics are important in understanding possible effects of hydrocarbon development on the environment. In addition airborne geophysical surveys can be used in establishing baseline "snapshots", to provide information in beneficial uses of produced waters, and in mapping ground water resources for use in well development. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has conducted airborne geophysical surveys over more than 20 years for applications in energy resource environmental studies. A majority of these surveys are airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys to map subsurface electrical conductivity related to plumes of saline waters and more recently to map hydrogeologic frameworks for ground water and plume migration. AEM surveys have been used in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to characterize the near surface geologic framework for siting produced water disposal ponds and for beneficial utilization in subsurface drip irrigation. A recent AEM survey at the Fort Peck Reservation, Montana, was used to map both shallow plumes from brine pits and surface infrastructure sources and a deeper concealed saline water plume from a failed injection well. Other reported applications have been to map areas geologically favorable for shallow gas that could influence drilling location and design. Airborne magnetic methods have been used to image the location of undocumented abandoned well casings which can serve as conduits to the near surface for coproduced waters. They have also been used in conjunction with geologic framework studies to understand the possible relationships between tectonic features and induced earthquakes in the Raton Basin. Airborne gravity as well as developing deeper

  15. Infrared airborne spectroradiometer survey results in the western Nevada area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W.; Chang, S. H.; Kuo, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark II airborne spectroradiometer system was flown over several geologic test sites in western Nevada. The infrared mineral absorption bands were observed and recorded for the first time using an airborne system with high spectral resolution in the 2.0 to 2.5 micron region. The data show that the hydrothermal alteration zone minerals, carbonates, and other minerals are clearly visible in the airborne survey mode. The finer spectral features that distinguish the various minerals with infrared bands are also clearly visible in the airborne survey data. Using specialized computer pattern recognition methods, it is possible to identify mineralogy and map alteration zones and lithologies by airborne spectroradiometer survey techniques.

  16. Airborne Expendable Bathythermogragh Surveys, 1981, Western Tasman Sea.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    No. 2/82 AIRBORNE EXPENDABLE BATHYTHERMOGRAGH SURVEYS, 1981, WESTERN TASMAN SEA BY P.J. MULHEARN APPROVED DTIC ELECTE FOR PUTBLI I ~LT -i~ COPY• N. 7...NO. 2/82 AIRBORNE EXPENDABLE BATHYTHERMOGRAPH SURVEYS, 1981, WESTERN TASMAN SEA P.J. MULHEARN ABSTRACT On four occasions in 1981 AXBT surveys were...conducted in the western Tasman Sea in support of the RAN’s ocean analysis scheme. The results of these surveys show that the limited number of probes

  17. Airborne radioactivity survey in the vicinity of Grants, McKinley and Valencia Counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stead, Frank W.

    1951-01-01

    An airborne radioactivity survey in the vicinity of Grants, New Mexico, was made on May 28. 1951; aeromagnetic measurements were made concurrently with the radioactivity measurements. Several radioactivity anomalies were noted in conjunction with negative magnetic anomalies; this association is unusual and may reflect a genetic relationship between the uranium mineralization and the geologic structure causing the negative magnetic effect. Further investigation of the vicinity of the anomalies near the Haystack area, including ground magnetometer survey, seems warranted.

  18. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Lithospheric Magnetic Field Using Satellite and Airborne Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kother, L. K.; Hammer, M. D.; Finlay, C. C.; Olsen, N.

    2014-12-01

    We present a technique for modelling the lithospheric magnetic field based on estimation of equivalent potential field sources. As a first demonstration we present an application to magnetic field measurements made by the CHAMP satellite during the period 2009-2010. Three component vector field data are utilized at all latitudes. Estimates of core and large-scale magnetospheric sources are removed from the satellite measurements using the CHAOS-4 model. Quiet-time and night-side data selection criteria are also employed to minimize the influence of the ionospheric field. The model for the remaining lithospheric magnetic field consists of magnetic point sources (monopoles) arranged in an icosahedron grid with an increasing grid resolution towards the airborne survey area. The corresponding source values are estimated using an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm that includes model regularization (either quadratic or maximum entropy) and Huber weighting. Data error covariance matrices are implemented, accounting for the dependence of data error variances on quasi-dipole latitudes. Results show good consistency with the CM5 and MF7 models for spherical harmonic degrees up to n = 95. Advantages of the equivalent source method include its local nature and the ease of transforming to spherical harmonics when needed. The method can also be applied in local, high resolution, investigations of the lithospheric magnetic field, for example where suitable aeromagnetic data is available. To illustrate this possibility, we present preliminary results from a case study combining satellite measurements and local airborne scalar magnetic measurements of the Norwegian coastline.

  19. Television camera on RMS surveys insulation on Airborne Support Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The television camera on the end effector of the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) is seen surveying some of the insulation on the Airborne Support Equipment (ASE). Flight controllers called for the survey following the departure of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) and its Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS).

  20. Evaluation of airborne thermal, magnetic, and electromagnetic characterization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.

    1992-03-01

    The identification of Buried Structures (IBS) or Aerial Surveillance Project was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development to demonstrate airborne methods for locating and identifying buried waste and ordnance at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Two technologies were demonstrated: (a) a thermal infrared imaging system built by Martin Marietta Missile Systems and (b) a magnetic and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical surveying system operated by EBASCO Environmental. The thermal system detects small differences in ground temperature caused by uneven heating and cooling of the ground by the sun. Waste materials on the ground can be detected when the temperature of the waste is different than the background temperature. The geophysical system uses conventional magnetic and EM sensors. These sensors detect disturbances caused by magnetic or conductive waste and naturally occurring magnetic or conductive features of subsurface soils and rock. Both systems are deployed by helicopter. Data were collected at four INEL sites. Tests at the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area (NODA) were made to evaluate capabilities for detecting ordnance on the ground surface. Tests at the Cold Simulated Waste Demonstration Pit were made to evaluate capabilities for detecting buried waste at a controlled site, where the location and depth of buried materials are known. Tests at the Subsurface Disposal Area and Stationary Low-Power Reactor-1 burial area were made to evaluate capabilities for characterizing hazardous waste at sites that are typical of DOE buried waste sites nationwide.

  1. MTADS Airborne and Vehicular Survey of Target S1 at Isleta Pueblo, Albuquerque, NM, 17 February-2 March 2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    analysis teams (NRL and ORNL ) chose 20 targets from the list of “no finds” for reinvestigation and an additional 10 as backups. On January 18th 2004...remenant magnetization .....................35 Fig. 18 – Location performance of the two systems for the vehicular area remediated targets ....36 Fig...three survey teams (MTADS vehicular, MTADS airborne, and ORNL airborne) analysts from the Institute for Defense Analyses, IDA, selected targets for

  2. AIRBORNE INERTIAL SURVEYING USING LASER TRACKING AND PROFILING TECHNIQUES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cyran, Edward J.; ,

    1986-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey through a contract with the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory has developed the Aerial Profiling of Terrain System. This is an airborne inertial surveying system designed to use a laser tracker to provide position and velocity updates, and a laser profiler to measure terrain elevations. The performance characteristics of the system are discussed with emphasis placed on the performance of the laser devices. The results of testing the system are summarized for both performance evaluation and applications.

  3. Alternative analysis of airborne laser data collected within conventional multi-parameter airborne geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl, Andreas; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.; Schattauer, I.

    2010-05-01

    For the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry as well as airborne electromagnetics it is of great importance to determine the distance between the geophysical sensor and the ground surface. Since radar altimeters do not penetrate vegetation, laser altimeters became popular in airborne geophysics over the past years. Currently the airborne geophysical platform of the Geological Survey of Austria (GBA) is equipped with a Riegl LD90-3800VHS-FLP high resolution laser altimeter, measuring the distances according to the first and the last reflected pulse. The goal of the presented study was to explore the possibilities of deriving additional information about the survey area from the laser data and to determine the accuracy of such results. On one hand the difference between the arrival time of the first and the last reflected pulse can be used to determine the height of the vegetation. This parameter is for example important for the correction of damping effects on airborne gamma-ray measurements caused by vegetation. Moreover especially for groundwater studies at catchment scale, this parameter can also be applied to support the spatial assessment of evapotranspiration. In combination with the altitude above geoid, determined by a GPS receiver, a rough digital elevation model of the survey area can be derived from the laser altimetry. Based on a data set from a survey area in the northern part of Austria, close to the border with the Czech Republic, the reliability of such a digital elevation model and the calculated vegetation height was tested. In this study a mean deviation of -1.4m, with a standard deviation of ±3.4m, between the digital elevation model from Upper Austria (25m spatial resolution) and the determined elevation model was determined. We also found an obvious correlation between the calculated vegetation heights greater 15m and the mapped forest published by the ‘Department of Forest Inventory' of the ‘Federal Forest Office' of Austria

  4. The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Asner, David M.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Day, Anthony R.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Jordan, David V.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Morris, Scott J.; Mullen, O Dennis; Myers, Allan W.; Pitts, W. Karl; Rohrer, John S.; Runkle, Robert C.; Seifert, Allen; Shergur, Jason M.; Stave, Sean C.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Thompson, Robert C.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; Willett, Jesse A.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2013-01-11

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gama ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach, we found, is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. Moreover, the system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications, including airborne and maritime operations.

  5. The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. E.; Aalseth, C. E.; Asner, D. M.; Bonebrake, C. A.; Day, A. R.; Dorow, K. E.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Jensen, J. L.; Johnson, K. I.; Jordan, D. V.; Morgen, G. P.; Morris, S. J.; Mullen, O. D.; Myers, A. W.; Pitts, W. K.; Rohrer, J. S.; Runkle, R. C.; Seifert, A.; Shergur, J. M.; Stave, S. C.; Tatishvili, G.; Thompson, R. C.; Todd, L. C.; Warren, G. A.; Willett, J. A.; Wood, L. S.

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gama ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. The system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications, including airborne and maritime operations.

  6. Investigation of coastal areas in Northern Germany using airborne geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miensopust, Marion; Siemon, Bernhard; Wiederhold, Helga; Steuer, Annika; Ibs-von Seht, Malte; Voß, Wolfgang; Meyer, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Since 2000, the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) carried out several airborne geophysical surveys in Northern Germany to investigate the coastal areas of the North Sea and some of the North and East Frisian Islands. Several of those surveys were conducted in cooperation with the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG). Two helicopter-borne geophysical systems were used, namely the BGR system, which collects simultaneously frequency-domain electromagnetic, magnetic and radiometric data, and the SkyTEM system, a time-domain electromagnetic system developed by the University of Aarhus. Airborne geophysical surveys enable to investigate huge areas almost completely with high lateral resolution in a relatively short time at economic cost. In general, the results can support geological and hydrogeological mapping. Of particular importance are the airborne electromagnetic results, as the surveyed parameter - the electrical conductivity - depends on both lithology and groundwater status. Therefore, they can reveal buried valleys and the distribution of sandy and clayey sediments as well as salinization zones and fresh-water occurrences. The often simultaneously recorded magnetic and radiometric data support the electromagnetic results. Lateral changes of Quaternary and Tertiary sediments (shallow source - several tens of metres) as well as evidences of the North German Basin (deep source - several kilometres) are revealed by the magnetic results. The radiometric data indicate the various mineral compositions of the soil sediments. This BGR/LIAG project aims to build up a geophysics data base (http://geophysics-database.de/) which contains all airborne geophysical data sets. However, the more significant effort is to create a reference data set as basis for monitoring climate or man-made induced changes of the salt-water/fresh-water interface at the German North Sea coast. The significance of problems for groundwater extraction

  7. Airborne magnetic mapping of volcanic areas - state-of-the-art and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supper, Robert; Paoletti, Valeria; Okuma, Shigeo

    2015-04-01

    Traditionally airborne magnetics surveys in volcanology are used for mapping regional geological features, fault zones and to develop a magnetic model of the volcanic subsurface. Within an Austrian-Italian-Japanese cooperation, several volcanic areas including Mt. Vesuvius, Ischia, Campi Flegreii and Aeolian Islands in Italy and Socorro Island in Mexico were mapped by high-resolution magnetic mapping during the last 15 years. In this paper, general conclusions from this long-term cooperation project on airborne magnetics in volcanic areas will be summarised. Basically the results showed the results from airborne magnetics could be used for three major purposes: 1. Developing a rough model for the magnetisation below the volcano down to several kilometres by applying advanced magnetic inversion algorithms helped to define the possible depth of the current or past magma chamber. Due to the complexity of the subsurface of volcanic areas, inversion of data was much dependent on constraints coming from other geoscientific disciplines. 2. After applying certain steps of reduction (topographic correction, field transformation) and a combination of source selective filtering, important regional structural trends could be derived from the alignment of the residual magnetic anomalies. 3. On the other hand during recent years, research has also focused on repeated measurements of the magnetic field of volcanic areas (differential in respect of time = differential magnetic measurements - DMM) using airborne sensors. Long-term temporal magnetic field variations in active volcanic areas can be caused by a changing size of the magma chamber or a general rise in temperature. This is caused by the fact that magnetization disappears, when a magnetic material is warmed up over a certain temperature (Curie- temperature). In consequence the resulting total magnetic field changes. Therefore, determining areas showing changes in the magnetic field could help to select areas where a

  8. Airborne infrared mineral mapping survey of Marysvale, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W.; Chang, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared spectroradiometer survey results from flights over the Marysvale, Utah district show that hydrothermal alteration mineralogy can be mapped using very rapid and effective airborne techniques. The system detects alteration mineral absorption band intensities in the infrared spectral region with high sensitivity. The higher resolution spectral features and high spectral differences characteristic of the various clay and carbonate minerals are also readily identified by the instrument allowing the mineralogy to be mapped as well as the mineralization intensity.

  9. The alpine Swiss-French airborne gravity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdun, Jérôme; Klingelé, Emile E.; Bayer, Roger; Cocard, Marc; Geiger, Alain; Kahle, Hans-Gert

    2003-01-01

    In February 1998, a regional-scale, airborne gravity survey was carried out over the French Occidental Alps within the framework of the GéoFrance 3-D research program.The survey consisted of 18 NS and 16 EW oriented lines with a spacing of 10 and 20 km respectively, covering the whole of the Western French Alps (total area: 50 000 km2; total distance of lines flown: 10 000 km). The equipment was mounted in a medium-size aircraft (DeHavilland Twin Otter) flowing at a constant altitude of 5100 m a.s.l, and at a mean ground speed of about 280 km h-1. Gravity was measured using a LaCoste & Romberg relative, air/sea gravimeter (type SA) mounted on a laser gyro stabilized platform. Data from 5 GPS antennae located on fuselage and wings and 7 ground-based GPS reference stations were used to determine position and aircraft induced accelerations.The gravimeter passband was derived by comparing the vertical accelerations provided by the gravimeter with those estimated from the GPS positions. This comparison showed that the gravimeter is not sensitive to very short wavelength aircraft accelerations, and therefore a simplified formulation for computing airborne gravity measurements was developed. The intermediate and short wavelength, non-gravitational accelerations were eliminated by means of digital, exponential low-pass filters (cut-off wavelength: 16 km). An important issue in airborne gravimetry is the reliability of the airborne gravity surveys when compared to ground surveys. In our studied area, the differences between the airborne-acquired Bouguer anomaly and the ground upward-continued Bouguer anomaly of the Alps shows a good agreement: the rms of these differences is equal to 7.68 mGal for a spatial resolution of 8 km. However, in some areas with rugged topography, the amplitudes of those differences have a striking correlation with the topography. We then argue that the choice of an appropriate density (reduction by a factor of 10 per cent) for computing the

  10. Salinity surveys using an airborne microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.; Droppleman, J. D.; Evans, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Barnes PRT-5 infrared radiometer and L-band channel of the multifrequency microwave radiometer are used to survey the distribution of surface water temperature and salinity. These remote sensors were flown repetitively in November 1971 over the outflow of the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico. Data reduction parameters were determined through the use of flight data obtained over a known water area. With these parameters, the measured infrared and microwave radiances were analyzed in terms of the surface temperature and salinity.

  11. The position and orientation system (POS) for airborne survey applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.; Scherzinger, B.; Lithopoulos, E.

    1996-10-01

    The Position and Orientation System (POS) is an integrated inertial/GPS system that generates accurate position (latitude, longitude, altitude) and orientation (roll, pitch, heading) for airborne survey/mapping applications as well as various other land and marine applications. POS is a GPS-aided strapdown inertial navigator that uses a Kalman filter and a closed-loop error controller to provide an optimally blended position and orientation solution from inertial data from an IMU and aiding data from a GPS receiver. This paper gives a brief description of POS and compares it to other available technologies. It then describes the various application areas of POS for airborne vehicles (POS/AV). Some applications from other POS variants, POS/LV for Land Vehicles, POS/MV for Marine Vessels, are also described. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Airborne geophysical surveys conducted in western Nebraska, 2010: contractor reports and data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2014-01-01

    This report contains three contractor reports and data files for an airborne electromagnetic survey flown from June 28 to July 7, 2010. The first report; “SkyTEM Survey: Nebraska, USA, Data” describes data aquisition and processing from a time-domain electromagnetic and magnetic survey performed by SkyTEM Canada, Inc. (the North American SkyTEM subsidiary), in western Nebraska, USA. Digital data for this report are given in Appendix 1. The airborne geophysical data from the SkyTEM survey subsequently were processed and inverted by Aarhus Geophysics ApS, Aarhus, Denmark, to produce resistivity depth sections along each flight line. The result of that processing is described in two reports presented in Appendix 2, “Processing and inversion of SkyTEM data from USGS Area UTM–13” and “Processing and inversion of SkyTEM data from USGS Area UTM–14.” Funding for these surveys was provided by the North Platte Natural Resources District, the South Platte Natural Resources District, and the Twin Platte Natural Resources District, in Scottsbluff, Sidney, and North Platte, Nebraska, respectively. Any additional information concerning the geophysical data may be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, Denver Colorado.

  13. Airborne detection of asperities: Linking aerogravimetry surveys and earthquake studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, U.; Boedecker, G.

    2003-04-01

    During the last decade, airborne gravimetric surveys have become a reliable and useful geophysical method to explore mid to large scale geologic settings. Ocean continent boundaries down to seamounts are detectable using conventional scalar, platform stabilized airborne gravimetry systems. New systems such as 3-D strap-down instruments promise a better spatial resolution recovering the gravity vector. Airborne gravimetric gradiometer systems are already able to detect small scale gradients in high spatial resolution. Following this trend in aerogravimetry, new research applications are emerging. One of the most challenging and interesting new aspects of airborne gravimetry is the systematic search for asperity structures. Asperities are patches of the oceanic or continental crust that are able to store more stress than the surrounding material. If due to stress overload or other mechanic forces the asperity breaks, up to mega-thrust earthquakes are triggered. The character of an asperity to carry more stress than the weaker environment must be related to its physical properties such as composition, thickness and density. Questions connected to define and detect an asperity are: How large is an asperity? Do asperities have sharp boundaries? Are asperities isolated structures? Do asperities have special gravimetric signatures? Wells et al. (2000) found that off southern Chile slip maxima from earthquakes coincide with forearc gravity lows. It is well accepted that in this region seismicity is a product of the subduction on the active continental margin. It is still debated whether subducted asperities from the oceanic plate are individual earthquake sources or if they i.e. trigger the break of asperities in the continental crust. Apart from this, very few investigations have been made trying to connect gravimetry and asperities. Therefore, the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam in collaboration with Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften in Munich , FU Berlin

  14. INTERPRETATION OF AIRBORNE ELECTROMAGNETIC AND MAGNETIC DATA IN THE 600 AREA

    SciTech Connect

    CUMMINS GD

    2010-11-11

    As part of the 200-PO-1 Phase I geophysical surveys, Fugro Airborne Surveys was contracted to collect airborne electromagnetic (EM) and magnetic surveys of the Hanford Site 600 Area. Two helicopter survey systems were used with the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} time domain portion flown between June 19th and June 20th, 2008, and the RESOLVE{reg_sign} frequency domain portion was flown from June 29th to July 1st, 2008. Magnetic data were acquired contemporaneously with the electromagnetic surveys using a total-field cesium vapor magnetometer. Approximately 925 line kilometers (km) were flown using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} II system and 412 line kilometers were flown using the RESOLVE{reg_sign} system. The HeliGEOTEM system has an effective penetration of roughly 250 meters into the ground and the RESOLVE system has an effective penetration of roughly 60 meters. Acquisition parameters and preliminary results are provided in SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site. Airborne data are interpreted in this report in an attempt to identify areas of likely preferential groundwater flow within the aquifer system based on the presence of paleochannels or fault zones. The premise for the interpretation is that coarser-grained intervals have filled in scour channels created by episodic catastrophic flood events during the late Pleistocene. The interpretation strategy used the magnetic field anomaly data and existing bedrock maps to identify likely fault or lineament zones. Combined analysis of the magnetic, 60-Hz noise monitor, and flight-altitude (radar) data were used to identify zones where EM response is more likely due to cultural interference and or bedrock structures. Cross-sectional and map view presentations of the EM data were used to identify more electrically resistive zones that likely correlate with coarser-grained intervals. The resulting interpretation identifies one major northwest-southeast trending

  15. Airborne survey of major air basins in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloria, H. R.; Bradburn, G.; Reinisch, R. F.; Pitts, J. N., Jr.; Behar, J. V.; Zafonte, L.

    1974-01-01

    An instrumented aircraft was used to study the chemical and transport properties of air pollution in two major urban centers in California and to survey certain aspects of air pollution within this state. State-of-the-art measurement techniques and sampling procedures are discussed. It is found that meteorological transport mechanisms are better portrayed by vertical pollutant profiles. Airborne measurements define the nature of the mixing layer for atmospheric pollutants. Results show that the pollutants are found to be concentrated in distinct layers up to at least 18,000 feet and the O3 buildup occurring in advected air masses is a result of a continuous photochemical aging of air mass.

  16. Airborne gravity gradiometer surveying of petroleum systems under Lake Tanganyika, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Doug; Chowdhury, Priyanka Roy; Lowe, Sharon Jenny; Christensen, Asbjorn Norlund

    2016-02-01

    The Lake Tanganyika South petroleum exploration block covers the southern portion of the Tanzanian side of Lake Tanganyika and is located within the East African Rift System. The rifting process has formed rotated fault blocks which provide numerous play types in the resulting basins. Interpretation of 2D seismic data from 1984 indicated that sufficient sediment thickness is present for hydrocarbon generation. The prospectivity of the lake sediment sequence is enhanced by large oil discoveries further north along the rift system at Lake Albert in Uganda. Airborne gravity gradiometry (AGG) has been used in the Lake Albert region to delineate the structural framework of sedimentary basins. Based on this analogy, in 2010 Beach Energy commissioned CGG to fly a FALCON AGG and high-resolution airborne magnetic survey over the Lake Tanganyika South block to provide data for mapping the basin architecture and estimating the depth to magnetic basement. A total of nearly 28000 line kilometres of data were acquired. The subsequent interpretation incorporated the AGG and magnetic data with available 2D seismic data, elevation model data, bathymetry, Landsat and regional geology information. The integrated data interpretation revealed that the Lake Tanganyika rifting structures occur as half-grabens that were formed through reactivation of Precambrian fault structures. Two major depocentres were identified in the magnetic depth-to-basement map in the north and in the west-central part of the survey area with sediment thicknesses in excess of 4 km and 3 km, respectively. Smaller, shallower depocentres (with less than 3 km of sediment) occur in the south-western region. This information was used to plan a 2100 km 2D marine seismic survey that was recorded in 2012. An interpretation of the results from the seismic survey confirmed a rifting structure similar to that encountered further north at Lake Albert in Uganda. Several targets were identified from the seismic sections for

  17. Automatic Searching Radioactive Sources by Airborne Radioactive Survey Using Multicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, H.; Eun, S. B.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Jung, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to prepare emergency situation lost a dangerous radioelement source in advance and to search a radioactive source automatically, we develop airborne radioelement survey system by multicopter. This multicopter radioelement survey system consists of a small portable customized BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) detector, video recording part, wireless connecting part to ground pilot, GPS, and several equipments for automatic flight. This system is possible to search flight by preprogramed lines. This radioactive detecting system are tested to find intentional hidden source, The performance of detecting a source is well proved with very low flight altitude in spite of depending on the magnitude of radioelement sources. The advantage of multicopter system, one of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle), is to avoid the potential of close access to a dangerous radioactive source by using fully automatic searching capability. In this paper, we introduce our multicopter system for detecting radioactive source and synthetic case history for demonstrating this system.

  18. Final report. Electro-Seise, Inc., Airborne Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-06-01

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of an airborne microgravity and electric field sensing technology developed by Electro-Seise, Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas. The test involved the use of a single engine airplane to gather data over the Teapot Dome oil field along a tight grid spacing and along thirty (30) survey lines. The resultant gravity structure maps, based on the field data, were found to overlay the known structure of Teapot Dome. In addition, fault maps, based on the field data, were consistent with the known fault strike at Teapot Dome. Projected hydrocarbon thickness maps corresponded to some of the known production histories at RMOTC. Exceptions to the hydrocarbon thickness maps were also found to be true.

  19. Airborne laser altimetry survey of Glaciar Tyndall, Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Kristian; Casassa, Gino; Rivera, Andrés; Forsberg, Rene; Gundestrup, Niels

    2007-10-01

    The first airborne laser altimetry measurements of a glacier in South America are presented. Data were collected in November of 2001 over Glaciar Tyndall, Torres del Paine National Park, Chilean Patagonia, onboard a Twin Otter airplane of the Chilean Air Force. A laser scanner with a rotating polygon-mirror system together with an Inertial Navigation System (INS) were fixed to the floor of the aircraft, and used in combination with two dual-frequency GPS receivers. Together, the laser-INS-GPS system had a nominal accuracy of 30 cm after data processing. On November 23rd, a total of 235 km were flown over the ablation area of Glaciar Tyndall, with 5 longitudinal tracks with a mean swath width of 300 m, which results in a point spacing of approximately 2 m both along and across track. A digital elevation model (DEM) generated using the laser altimetry data was compared with a DEM produced from a 1975 map (1:50,000 scale — Instituto Geográfico Militar (IGM), Chile). A mean thinning of - 3.1 ± 1.0 m a - 1 was calculated for the ablation area of Glaciar Tyndall, with a maximum value of - 7.7 ± 1.0 m a - 1 at the calving front at 50 m a.s.l. and minimum values of between - 1.0 and - 2.0 ± 1.0 m a - 1 at altitudes close to the equilibrium line altitude (900 m a.s.l.). The thinning rates derived from the airborne survey were similar to the results obtained by means of ground survey carried out at ˜ 600 m of altitude on Glaciar Tyndall between 1975 and 2002, yielding a mean thinning of - 3.2 m a - 1 [Raymond, C., Neumann, T.A., Rignot, E., Echelmeyer, K.A., Rivera, A., Casassa, G., 2005. Retreat of Tyndall Glacier, Patagonia, over the last half century. Journal of Glaciology 173 (51), 239-247.]. A good agreement was also found between ice elevation changes measured with laser data and previous results obtained with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data. We conclude that airborne laser altimetry is an effective means for accurately detecting glacier elevation

  20. A 0.4 to 10 GHz airborne electromagnetic environment survey of USA urban areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Hill, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    An airborne electromagnetic-environment survey of some U.S. metropolitan areas measured terrestrial emissions within the broad frequency spectrum from 0.4 to 10 GHz. A Cessna 402 commercial aircraft was fitted with both nadir-viewing and horizon-viewing antennas and instrumentation, including a spectrum analyzer, a 35 mm continuous film camera, and a magnetic tape recorder. Most of the flights were made at a nominal altitude of 10,000 feet, and Washington, D. C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and Chicago were surveyed. The 450 to 470 MHz land-mobile UHF band is especially crowded, and the 400 to 406 MHz space bands are less active. This paper discusses test measurements obtained up to 10 GHz. Sample spectrum analyzer photograhs were selected from a total of 5,750 frames representing 38 hours of data.

  1. 0.4- to 10-GHz airborne electromagnetic-environment survey of United States urban areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Hill, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    An airborne electromagnetic-environment survey of some U.S. metropolitan areas measured terrestrial emissions within the broad-frequency spectrum from 0.4 to 10 GHz. A Cessna 402 commercial aircraft was fitted with both nadir-viewing and horizon-viewing antennas and instrumentation, including a spectrum analyzer, a 35-mm continuous-film camera, and a magnetic-tape recorder. Most of the flights were made at a nominal altitude of 10,000 ft, and Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and Chicago were surveyed. The 450- to 470-MHz land-mobile UHF band is especially crowded, and the 400- to 406-MHz space bands are less active. Test measurements obtained up to 10 GHz are discussed. Sample spectrum-analyzer photographs were selected from a total of 5750 frames representing 38 hours of data.

  2. Application of airborne thermal imagery to surveys of Pacific walrus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burn, D.M.; Webber, M.A.; Udevitz, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted tests of airborne thermal imagery of Pacific walrus to determine if this technology can be used to detect walrus groups on sea ice and estimate the number of walruses present in each group. In April 2002 we collected thermal imagery of 37 walrus groups in the Bering Sea at spatial resolutions ranging from 1-4 m. We also collected high-resolution digital aerial photographs of the same groups. Walruses were considerably warmer than the background environment of ice, snow, and seawater and were easily detected in thermal imagery. We found a significant linear relation between walrus group size and the amount of heat measured by the thermal sensor at all 4 spatial resolutions tested. This relation can be used in a double-sampling framework to estimate total walrus numbers from a thermal survey of a sample of units within an area and photographs from a subsample of the thermally detected groups. Previous methods used in visual aerial surveys of Pacific walrus have sampled only a small percentage of available habitat, resulting in population estimates with low precision. Results of this study indicate that an aerial survey using a thermal sensor can cover as much as 4 times the area per hour of flight time with greater reliability than visual observation.

  3. Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices for the Detection of Magnetic Flux and Application to Airborne High Frequency Direction Finding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    SUPERCONDUCTING QUANTUM INTERFERENCE DEVICES FOR THE DETECTION OF MAGNETIC FLUX AND APPLICATION TO AIRBORNE HIGH FREQUENCY DIRECTION FINDING THESIS...SUPERCONDUCTING QUANTUM INTERFERENCE DEVICES FOR THE DETECTION OF MAGNETIC FLUX AND APPLICATION TO AIRBORNE HIGH FREQUENCY DIRECTION FINDING THESIS Presented to the...SUPERCONDUCTING QUANTUM INTERFERENCE DEVICES FOR THE DETECTION OF MAGNETIC FLUX AND APPLICATION TO AIRBORNE HIGH FREQUENCY DIRECTION FINDING THESIS Travis

  4. Magnetic Approaches to Measuring and Mitigating Airborne Particulate Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, B.

    2014-12-01

    Human exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) generates adverse human health impacts at all life stages from the embryonic to the terminal, including damage to respiratory and cardiovascular health, and neurodevelopment and cognitive function. Detailed understanding of the causal links between PM exposure and specific health impacts, and possible means to reduce PM exposure require knowledge of PM concentrations, compositions and sources at the fine-scale; i.e. beyond the current resolution of spatially-sparse conventional PM monitoring, non-unique elemental analyses, or poorly-validated PM modelling. Magnetically-ordered iron oxide minerals appear to be a ubiquitous component of urban PM. These minerals derive partly from the presence of iron impurities in fuels, which form, upon combustion, a non-volatile residue, often dominated by magnetite, within glassy, spherical condensates. Iron-rich, magnetic PM also arises from abrasion from vehicle components, including disk brakes, and road dust. The ubiquity and diversity of these magnetic PM phases, and the speed and sensitivity of magnetic analyses (down to trace concentrations), makes possible rapid, cost-effective magnetic characterization and quantification of PM, a field of study which has developed rapidly across the globe over the last 2 decades. Magnetic studies of actively-sampled PM, on filters, and passively-sampled PM, on tree leaves and other depositional surfaces, can be used to: monitor and map at high spatial resolution ambient PM concentrations; address the controversial issue of the efficacy of PM capture by vegetation; and add a new, discriminatory dimension to PM source apportionment.

  5. Digital data from the Great Sand Dunes airborne gravity gradient survey, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drenth, B.J.; Abraham, J.D.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Labson, V.F.; Hodges, G.

    2013-01-01

    This report contains digital data and supporting explanatory files describing data types, data formats, and survey procedures for a high-resolution airborne gravity gradient (AGG) survey at Great Sand Dunes National Park, Alamosa and Saguache Counties, south-central Colorado. In the San Luis Valley, the Great Sand Dunes survey covers a large part of Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve. The data described were collected from a high-resolution AGG survey flown in February 2012, by Fugro Airborne Surveys Corp., on contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. Scientific objectives of the AGG survey are to investigate the subsurface structural framework that may influence groundwater hydrology and seismic hazards, and to investigate AGG methods and resolution using different flight specifications. Funding was provided by an airborne geophysics training program of the U.S. Department of Defense's Task Force for Business & Stability Operations.

  6. SURVEY OF CULTURABLE AIRBORNE BACTERIA AT FOUR DIVERSE LOCATIONS IN OREGON: URBAN, RURAL, FOREST, AND COASTAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the risks of microbial air pollution from microorganisms used for pesticides and bioremediation, or emanating from composting, fermentation tanks, or other agricultural and urban sources, airborne microbial levels must be evaluated. This study surveyed the atmospheri...

  7. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Jamestown quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    During the months of June through October, 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. This report discusses the results obtained over the Jamestown map area of North Dakota. The final data are presented in four different forms: on magnetic tape; on microfiche; in graphic form as profiles and histograms; and in map form as anomaly maps, flight path maps, and computer printer maps.

  8. Survey of subsurface geophysical exploration technologies adaptable to an airborne platform

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.A.

    1992-12-01

    This report has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a Research Development Demonstration Testing and Evaluation (RDDT E) project by EG G Energy Measurement's (EG G/EM) Remote Sensing Laboratory. It examines geophysical detection techniques which may be used in Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) surveys to locate buried waste, waste containers, potential waste migratory paths, and aquifer depths. Because of the Remote Sensing Laboratory's unique survey capabilities, only those technologies which have been adapted or are capable of being adapted to an airborne platform were studied. This survey describes several of the available subsurface survey technologies and discusses the basic capabilities of each: the target detectability, required geologic conditions, and associated survey methods. Because the airborne capabilities of these survey techniques have not been fully developed, the chapters deal mostly with the ground-based capabilities of each of the technologies, with reference made to the airborne capabilities where applicable. The information about each survey technique came from various contractors whose companies employ these specific technologies. EG G/EM cannot guarantee or verify the accuracy of the contractor information; however, the data given is an indication of the technologies that are available.

  9. Survey of subsurface geophysical exploration technologies adaptable to an airborne platform

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.A.

    1992-12-01

    This report has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a Research Development Demonstration Testing and Evaluation (RDDT&E) project by EG&G Energy Measurement`s (EG&G/EM) Remote Sensing Laboratory. It examines geophysical detection techniques which may be used in Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) surveys to locate buried waste, waste containers, potential waste migratory paths, and aquifer depths. Because of the Remote Sensing Laboratory`s unique survey capabilities, only those technologies which have been adapted or are capable of being adapted to an airborne platform were studied. This survey describes several of the available subsurface survey technologies and discusses the basic capabilities of each: the target detectability, required geologic conditions, and associated survey methods. Because the airborne capabilities of these survey techniques have not been fully developed, the chapters deal mostly with the ground-based capabilities of each of the technologies, with reference made to the airborne capabilities where applicable. The information about each survey technique came from various contractors whose companies employ these specific technologies. EG&G/EM cannot guarantee or verify the accuracy of the contractor information; however, the data given is an indication of the technologies that are available.

  10. An interpretation of the 1997 airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey, Fort Huachuca vicinity, Cochise County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bultman, Mark W.; Gettings, Mark E.; Wynn, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    In March of 1997, an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey of the Fort Huachuca Military Reservation and immediate surrounds was conducted. This survey was sponsored by the U.S. Army and contracted through the Geologic Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Data were gathered by Geoterrex-Dighem Ltd. of Ottawa, Canada. The survey aircraft is surrounded by a coil through which a large current pulse is passed. This pulse induces currents in the Earth which are recorded by a set of three mutually perpendicular coils towed in a "bird" about 100 m behind and below the aircraft. The bird also records the Earth's magnetic field. The system samples the Earth response to the electromagnetic pulse about every 16 m along the aircraft flight path. For this survey, the bulk of the flightpaths were spaced about 400 m apart and oriented in a northeast-southwest direction extending from bedrock over the Huachuca Mountains to bedrock over the Tombstone Hills. A preliminary report on the unprocessed data collected in the field was delivered to the U.S. Army by USGS in July 1997 (USGS Open-File Report 97–457). The final data were delivered in March, 1998 by the contractor to USGS and thence to the U.S. Army. The present report represents the final interpretive report from USGS. The objectives of the survey were to: 1) define the structure of the San Pedro basin in the Sierra Vista-Fort Huachuca-Huachuca City area, including the depth and shape of the basin, and to delineate large faults that may be active within the basin fill and therefore important in the hydrologic regime; 2) define near surface and subsurface areas that contain a large volume fraction of silt and clay in the basin fill and which both reduce the volume of available storage for water and reduce the permeability of the aquifer; and 3) to evaluate the use of the time domain electromagnetic method in the southwest desert setting as a means of mapping depth to water.

  11. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS). Topical report, October 1993--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a geophysical sensor system based on a remotely operated model helicopter (ROH) and to evaluate the efficacy of the system for characterization of hazardous environmental sites. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is a geophysical survey system that uses a ROH as the survey vehicle. We have selected the ROH because of its advantages over fixed wing and ground based vehicles. Lower air speed and superior maneuverability of the ROH make it better suited for geophysical surveys than a fixed wing model aircraft. The ROH can fly close to the ground, allowing detection of weak or subtle anomalies. Unlike ground based vehicles, the ROH can traverse difficult terrain while providing a stable sensor platform. ROH does not touch the ground during the course of a survey and is capable of functioning over water and surf zones. The ROH has been successfully used in the motion picture industry and by geology companies for payload bearing applications. The only constraint to use of the airborne system is that the ROH must remain visible to the pilot. Obstructed areas within a site can be characterized by relocating the base station to alternate positions. GAUSS consists of a ROH with radio controller, a data acquisition and processing (DAP) system, and lightweight digital sensor systems. The objective of our Phase I research was to develop a DAP and sensors suitable for ROH operation. We have constructed these subsystems and integrated them to produce an automated, hand-held geophysical surveying system, referred to as the ``pre-prototype``. We have performed test surveys with the pre-prototype to determine the functionality of the and DAP and sensor subsystems and their suitability for airborne application. The objective of the Phase II effort will be to modify the existing subsystems and integrate them into an airborne prototype. Efficacy of the prototype for geophysical survey of hazardous sites will then be determined.

  12. Airborne Gravity Survey and Ground Gravity in Afghanistan: A Website for Distribution of Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abraham, Jared D.; Anderson, Eric D.; Drenth, Benjamin J.; Finn, Carol A.; Kucks, Robert P.; Lindsay, Charles R.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Sweeney, Ronald E.

    2008-01-01

    Afghanistan?s geologic setting suggests significant natural resource potential. Although important mineral deposits and petroleum resources have been identified, much of the country?s potential remains unknown. Airborne geophysical surveys are a well- accepted and cost-effective method for remotely obtaining information of the geological setting of an area. A regional airborne geophysical survey was proposed due to the security situation and the large areas of Afghanistan that have not been covered using geophysical exploration methods. Acting upon the request of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Ministry of Mines, the U.S. Geological Survey contracted with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory to jointly conduct an airborne geophysical and remote sensing survey of Afghanistan. Data collected during this survey will provide basic information for mineral and petroleum exploration studies that are important for the economic development of Afghanistan. Additionally, use of these data is broadly applicable in the assessment of water resources and natural hazards, the inventory and planning of civil infrastructure and agricultural resources, and the construction of detailed maps. The U.S. Geological Survey is currently working in cooperation with the U.S. Agency of International Development to conduct resource assessments of the country of Afghanistan for mineral, energy, coal, and water resources, and to assess geologic hazards. These geophysical and remote sensing data will be used directly in the resource and hazard assessments.

  13. Distribution of buried hydrothermal alteration deduced from high-resolution magnetic surveys in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouligand, Claire; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2014-04-01

    Yellowstone National Park (YNP) displays numerous and extensive hydrothermal features. Although hydrothermal alteration in YNP has been extensively studied, the volume, geometry, and type of rock alteration at depth remain poorly constrained. In this study, we use high-resolution airborne and ground magnetic surveys and measurements of remanent and induced magnetization of field and drill core samples to provide constraints on the geometry of hydrothermal alteration within the subsurface of three thermal areas in YNP (Firehole River, Smoke Jumper Hot Springs, and Norris Geyser Basin). We observe that hydrothermal zones from both liquid- and vapor-dominated systems coincide with magnetic lows observed in aeromagnetic surveys and with a decrease of the amplitude of short-wavelength anomalies seen in ground magnetic surveys. This suggests a strong demagnetization of both the shallow and deep substratum within these areas associated with the removal of magnetic minerals by hydrothermal alteration processes. Such demagnetization is confirmed by measurements of rock samples from hydrothermal areas which display significantly decreased total magnetization. A pronounced negative anomaly is observed over the Lone Star Geyser and suggests a significant demagnetization of the substratum associated with areas displaying large-scale fluid flow. The ground and airborne magnetic surveys are used to evaluate the distribution of magnetization in the subsurface. This study shows that significant demagnetization occurs over a thickness of at least a few hundred meters in hydrothermal areas at YNP and that the maximum degree or maximum thickness of demagnetization correlates closely with the location of hydrothermal activity and mapped alteration.

  14. Inference of lithologic distributions in an alluvial aquifer using airborne transient electromagnetic surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Pool, D.R.; Groom, R.W.; Davis, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    An airborne transient electromagnetic (TEM) survey was completed in the Upper San Pedro Basin in southeastern Arizona to map resistivity distributions within the alluvial aquifer. This investigation evaluated the utility of 1D vertical resistivity models of the TEM data to infer lithologic distributions in an alluvial aquifer. Comparisons of the resistivity values and layers in the 1D resistivity models of airborne TEM data to 1D resistivity models of ground TEM data, borehole resistivity logs, and lithologic descriptions in drill logs indicated that the airborne TEM identified thick conductive fine-grained sediments that result in semiconfined groundwater conditions. One-dimensional models of ground-based TEM surveys and subsurface lithology at three sites were used to determine starting models and constraints to invert airborne TEM data using a constrained Marquardt-styleunderparameterized method. A maximum structural resolution of six layers underlain by a half-space was determined from the resistivity structure of the 1D models of the ground TEM data. The 1D resistivity models of the airborne TEM data compared well with the control data to depths of approximately 100 m in areas of thick conductive silt and clay and to depths of 200 m in areas of resistive sand and gravel. Comparison of a 3D interpolation of the 1D resistivity models to drill logs indicated resistive (mean of 65 ohm-m ) coarse-grained sediments along basin margins and conductive (mean of 8 ohm-m ) fine-grained sediments at the basin center. Extents of hydrologically significant thick silt and clay were well mapped by the 1D resistivity models of airborne TEM data. Areas of uncertain lithology remain below conductive fine-grained sediments where the 1D resistivity structure is not resolved: in areas where multiple lithologies have similar resistivity values and in areas of high salinity.

  15. Airborne Geophysical Surveys Illuminate the Geologic and Hydrothermal Framework of the Pilgrim Springs Geothermal Area, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, D. K.; Glen, J. M.; Bedrosian, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    An airborne magnetic and frequency-domain electromagnetic (EM) survey of the Pilgrim Springs geothermal area, located on the Seward Peninsula in west-central Alaska, delineates key structures controlling hydrothermal fluid flow. Hot springs, nearby thawed regions, and high lake temperatures are indicative of high heat flow in the region that is thought to be related to recent volcanism. By providing a region-wide geologic and geophysical framework, this work will provide informed decisions regarding drill-site planning and further our understanding of geothermal systems in active extensional basins. Helicopter magnetic and EM data were acquired using a Fugro RESOLVE system equipped with a high sensitivity cesium magnetometer and a multi-coil, multi-frequency EM system sensitive to the frequency range of 400-140,000 Hz. The survey was flown ~40 m above ground along flight lines spaced 0.2-0.4 km apart. Various derivative and filtering methods, including maximum horizontal gradient of the pseudogravity transformation of the magnetic data, are used to locate faults, contacts, and structural domains. A dominant northwest trending anomaly pattern characterizes the northeastern portion of the survey area between Pilgrim Springs and Hen and Chickens Mountain and may reflect basement structures. The area south of the springs, however, is dominantly characterized by east-west trending, range-front-parallel anomalies likely caused by late Cenozoic structures associated with the north-south extension that formed the basin. Regionally, the springs are characterized by a magnetic high punctuated by several east-west trending magnetic lows, the most prominent occurring directly over the springs. The lows may result from demagnetization of magnetic material along range-front parallel features that dissect the basin. We inverted in-phase and quadrature EM data along each profile using the laterally-constrained inversion of Auken et al. (2005). Data were inverted for 20-layer

  16. Mapping Groundwater in an Alpine Drainage with Airborne Electromagnetic Methods and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, A.; Armstrong, R. S.; Holbrook, W. S.; Parsekian, A.

    2015-12-01

    The rivers that supply water to most of the West rise in the Rocky Mountains. As drought increases across the country, understanding the hydrology of these alpine regions becomes important to assuring water supplies in the future. Near surface geophysics can help in this effort. In this study, resistivity data from an airborne electromagnetic survey in the Snowy Range was analyzed to map groundwater distribution. The EM survey covered an area of approximately 60 km2 to a depth of around 150 m. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) point soundings provided ground truthing by testing whether water was present, at what depth, and how much. The survey area contained vertically dipping metasedimentary rocks, covered in places by unconsolidated glacial and fluvial deposits. The resistivity data showed horizontal variation in water content much more clearly than vertical changes, which were best detected by NMR. To allow for comparisons across different lithologies and depths, resistivity measurements were first log transformed to produce a more normal distribution, then classed by depth and formation and assigned standardized scores using the mean and standard deviation for those classes. To determine the typical appearance of wet areas, points in the near surface were classed as wet or dry based on proximity to surface water. Logistic regression was used to determine the probability that points with a given standardized score were wet. Where a relationship existed between proximity to surface water and conductivity, this information was translated into a map of groundwater distribution at greater depths. NMR soundings provided quantitative measurements of water content, which were used as known points within these horizontal maps to determine the actual water levels being detected.

  17. An interpretation of the 1997 airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey, Fort Huachuca vicinity, Cochise County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bultman, M.W.; Gettings, M.E.; Wynn, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    Executive Summary -- In March of 1997, an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey of the Fort Huachuca Military Reservation and immediate surrounds (location map, http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of99-007-b/index.jpg) was conducted. This survey was sponsored by the U.S. Army and contracted through the Geologic Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Data were gathered by Geoterrex-Dighem Ltd. of Ottawa, Canada. The survey aircraft is surrounded by a coil through which a large current pulse is passed. This pulse induces currents in the Earth which are recorded by a set of three mutually perpendicular coils towed in a 'bird' about 100 m behind and below the aircraft. The bird also records the Earth's magnetic field. The system samples the Earth response to the electromagnetic pulse about every 16 m along the aircraft flight path. For this survey, the bulk of the flightpaths were spaced about 400 m apart and oriented in a northeast-southwest direction extending from bedrock over the Huachuca Mountains to bedrock over the Tombstone Hills. A preliminary report on the unprocessed data collected in the field was delivered to the U.S. Army by USGS in July 1997 (USGS Open-File Report 97?457). The final data were delivered in March, 1998 by the contractor to USGS and thence to the U.S. Army. The present report represents the final interpretive report from USGS. The objectives of the survey were to: 1) define the structure of the San Pedro basin in the Sierra Vista-Fort Huachuca-Huachuca City area, including the depth and shape of the basin, and to delineate large faults that may be active within the basin fill and therefore important in the hydrologic regime; 2) define near surface and subsurface areas that contain a large volume fraction of silt and clay in the basin fill and which both reduce the volume of available storage for water and reduce the permeability of the aquifer; and 3) to evaluate the use of the time domain electromagnetic method in the southwest

  18. Determining a pre-mining radiological baseline from historic airborne gamma surveys: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bollhöfer, Andreas; Beraldo, Annamarie; Pfitzner, Kirrilly; Esparon, Andrew; Doering, Che

    2014-01-15

    Knowing the baseline level of radioactivity in areas naturally enriched in radionuclides is important in the uranium mining context to assess radiation doses to humans and the environment both during and after mining. This information is particularly useful in rehabilitation planning and developing closure criteria for uranium mines as only radiation doses additional to the natural background are usually considered 'controllable' for radiation protection purposes. In this case study we have tested whether the method of contemporary groundtruthing of a historic airborne gamma survey could be used to determine the pre-mining radiological conditions at the Ranger mine in northern Australia. The airborne gamma survey was flown in 1976 before mining started and groundtruthed using ground gamma dose rate measurements made between 2007 and 2009 at an undisturbed area naturally enriched in uranium (Anomaly 2) located nearby the Ranger mine. Measurements of (226)Ra soil activity concentration and (222)Rn exhalation flux density at Anomaly 2 were made concurrent with the ground gamma dose rate measurements. Algorithms were developed to upscale the ground gamma data to the same spatial resolution as the historic airborne gamma survey data using a geographic information system, allowing comparison of the datasets. Linear correlation models were developed to estimate the pre-mining gamma dose rates, (226)Ra soil activity concentrations, and (222)Rn exhalation flux densities at selected areas in the greater Ranger region. The modelled levels agreed with measurements made at the Ranger Orebodies 1 and 3 before mining started, and at environmental sites in the region. The conclusion is that our approach can be used to determine baseline radiation levels, and provide a benchmark for rehabilitation of uranium mines or industrial sites where historical airborne gamma survey data are available and an undisturbed radiological analogue exists to groundtruth the data.

  19. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: north/south tieline. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Data from an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey along the 99/sup 0/ longitude meridian from the Canadian border southward to the Mexican border are presented. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the US. (DMC)

  20. Basis and methods of NASA airborne topographic mapper lidar surveys for coastal studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Krabill, William B.; Swift, Robert N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the basic principles of airborne laser altimetry for surveys of coastal topography, and describes the methods used in the acquisition and processing of NASA Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) surveys that cover much of the conterminous US coastline. This form of remote sensing, also known as "topographic lidar", has undergone extremely rapid development during the last two decades, and has the potential to contribute within a wide range of coastal scientific investigations. Various airborne laser surveying (ALS) applications that are relevant to coastal studies are being pursued by researchers in a range of Earth science disciplines. Examples include the mapping of "bald earth" land surfaces below even moderately dense vegetation in studies of geologic framework and hydrology, and determination of the vegetation canopy structure, a key variable in mapping wildlife habitats. ALS has also proven to be an excellent method for the regional mapping of geomorphic change along barrier island beaches and other sandy coasts due to storms or long-term sedimentary processes. Coastal scientists are adopting ALS as a basic method in the study of an array of additional coastal topics. ALS can provide useful information in the analysis of shoreline change, the prediction and assessment of landslides along seacliffs and headlands, examination of subsidence causing coastal land loss, and in predicting storm surge and tsunami inundation.

  1. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Marysvale detail survey, Richfield National Topographic Map sheet, Utah. Volume III. Magnetic and ancillary stacked profile data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analyses of a systematic airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic survey for the area identified as Marysvale, located in southwestern Utah, is presented in Volumes I-IV of this report. The airborne data gathered is reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the equivalent uranium, thorium and potassium gamma radiation intensities, the ratios of these intensities, the total gamma radiation counting rate and the earth's residual magnetic field intensity. Profile plots of the aircraft's altitude above the earth's surface, the ambient temperature and pressure, and the magnetic field data measured by a base station magnetometer is presented also. An evaluation of the distribution of the radiometric data in terms of its established geochemical map units, which were derived via geochemical analysis methods, for the entire survey area has been prepared and is included. The determination of the geochemical units presented has been established principally from the analysis of the radiometric and magnetic contour maps and, more importantly, the multi-variate analysis map. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic and geochemical units, is included within the text. This volume contains the 5-variable residual magnetic and ancillary stacked profile data for the entire survey area.

  2. An airborne gamma-ray spectrometry survey of nuclear sites in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, D C W; Cresswell, A J; Hardeman, F; Debauche, A

    2004-01-01

    As part of a wider study to define the existing background levels in Belgium an airborne gamma-ray survey was conducted in two areas associated with nuclear sites. In the Mol area, the survey zone included areas surrounding the SCK-CEN nuclear research centre, and its associated neighbourhood which includes radioactive waste stores, fuel manufacture and fabrication facilities and an international accelerator laboratory. In the vicinity of Fleurus, the survey included the IRE complex with radiochemical laboratories, irradiation facilities and stores, and isotope production accelerators. The survey was conducted using a twin engined helicopter equipped with a combined scintillation and semiconductor spectrometer. The system was installed and tested in the UK, and then transferred to Belgium for operations. The complete survey was conducted successfully within 1 week. The results provide a comprehensive record of the radiation environment of the nuclear sites at time of survey, and show a range of signals associated with the types of activity present in each area. They confirm that radiation fields are largely confined to the operational sites, and provide a traceable record against which future changes could be assessed. The demonstration of efficient deployment between two European countries, coupled with rapid mapping of many different radiometric signals around these sites confirms the utility of the airborne gamma spectrometry approach for accurate definition of enhanced radiation fields. This has important implications for emergency response.

  3. A comparison of the use of sodium iodide and lanthanum bromide scintillation crystals for airborne surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Derek M.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Aerial Spectral Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) program performs aerial radiological and chemical characterization of geographical regions of interest. Airborne surveys are performed to characterize environmental radionuclide content, for mineral exploration, as well as for emergency scenarios such as major releases or lost sources. Two radiological detection systems are used by the ASPECT team for gamma-ray detection and characterization: lanthanum bromide [LaBr 3(Ce)] and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation systems. An aerial survey of a uranium mine in the western United States was performed using both NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) detection systems. Analyses of the survey data were performed with RadAssist software and applying International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) airborne gamma ray mapping guidelines. The data for the survey were corrected for cross-over, which is spectral interference from higher energy photons as a result of Compton scattering, height attenuation, cosmic ray contribution to signal, and Radon contribution to signal. Two radiation survey contours were generated from each discrete data set. Based on analysis of the uranium mine survey results, LaBr3(Ce) produced a product comparable to that of NaI(Tl). The LaBr3(Ce) detection system contained 1/16th the scintillating volume and had a total system weight that was 1/4th that of the NaI(Tl) system. LaBr3(Ce) demonstrated a clear advantage over NaI(Tl) detectors in system mobility, and weight factors in airborne gamma ray spectroscopy.

  4. Airborne Hyperspectral Infrared Imaging Survey of the Southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, D. K.; Tratt, D. M.; Buckland, K. N.; Johnson, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) between Desert Hot Springs and Bombay Beach has been surveyed with Mako, an airborne hyperspectral imager operating across the wavelength range 7.6-13.2 μm in the thermal-infrared (TIR) spectral region. The data were acquired with a 4-km swath width centered on the SAF, and many tectonic features are recorded in the imagery. Spectral analysis using diagnostic features of minerals can identify rocks, soils and vegetation. Mako imagery can also locate rupture zones and measure slip distances. Designed and built by The Aerospace Corporation, the innovative and highly capable airborne imaging spectrometer used for this work enables low-noise performance (NEΔT ≲ 0.1 K @ 10 μm) at small pixel IFOV (0.55 mrad) and high frame rates, making possible an area-coverage rate of 20 km2 per minute with 2-m ground resolution from 12,500 ft (3.8 km) above-ground altitude. Since its commissioning in 2010, Mako has been used in numerous studies involving other earthquake fault systems (Hector Mine, S. Bristol Mts.), mapping of surface geology, geothermal sources (fumaroles near the Salton Sea), urban surveys, and the detection, quantification, and tracking of natural and anthropogenic gaseous emission plumes. Mako is available for airborne field studies and new applications are of particular interest. It can be flown at any altitude below 20,000 ft to achieve the desired GSD.

  5. 2002 Testing of Airborne Vertical Magnetic Gradiometer System. Revision 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    results demonstrate uncompensated maneuver noise accentuated by grid splining. ................................ 26 Figure 4-9: Power spectra of the...Figure 4-6. Line-line deflections in the total field-based results demonstrate uncompensated maneuver noise accentuated by grid splining. 27...the survey altitude (offset distance) is assumed to be 2m and the survey speed is 20m/s. When flying lower and faster, this problem is accentuated

  6. Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region, Kern, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.

    1952-01-01

    Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region Kern, Riverside, and Bernardino counties were made in five areas recommended as favorable for the occurrence of radioactive raw materials: (1) Rock Corral area, San Bernardino County. (2) Searles Station area, Kern county. (3) Soledad area, Kern County. (4) White Tank area, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. (5) Harvard Hills area, San Bernardino County. Anomalous radiation was detected in all but the Harvard Hills area. The radioactivity anomalies detected in the Rock Corral area are of the greatest amplitude yet recorded by the airborne equipment over natural sources. The activity is apparently attributable to the thorium-beating mineral associated with roof pendants of crystalline metamorphic rocks in a granitic intrusive. In the Searles Station, Soledad, and White Tank area, several radioactivity anomalies of medium amplitude were recorded, suggesting possible local concentrations of radioactive minerals.

  7. Airborne Surveys of Snow Depth over Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.; Panzer, B.; Leuschen, C.; Pang, S.; Markus, T.; Holt, B.; Gogineni, S.

    2011-01-01

    During the spring of 2009, an ultrawideband microwave radar was deployed as part of Operation IceBridge to provide the first cross-basin surveys of snow thickness over Arctic sea ice. In this paper, we analyze data from three approx 2000 km transects to examine detection issues, the limitations of the current instrument, and the regional variability of the retrieved snow depth. Snow depth is the vertical distance between the air \\snow and snow-ice interfaces detected in the radar echograms. Under ideal conditions, the per echogram uncertainty in snow depth retrieval is approx 4 - 5 cm. The finite range resolution of the radar (approx 5 cm) and the relative amplitude of backscatter from the two interfaces limit the direct retrieval of snow depths much below approx 8 cm. Well-defined interfaces are observed over only relatively smooth surfaces within the radar footprint of approx 6.5 m. Sampling is thus restricted to undeformed, level ice. In early April, mean snow depths are 28.5 +/- 16.6 cm and 41.0 +/- 22.2 cm over first-year and multiyear sea ice (MYI), respectively. Regionally, snow thickness is thinner and quite uniform over the large expanse of seasonal ice in the Beaufort Sea, and gets progressively thicker toward the MYI cover north of Ellesmere Island, Greenland, and the Fram Strait. Snow depth over MYI is comparable to that reported in the climatology by Warren et al. Ongoing improvements to the radar system and the utility of these snow depth measurements are discussed.

  8. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Hobbs National Topographic Map, New Mexico/Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the Hobbs National Topographic Map NI13-12 are presented in this report. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included also.

  9. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: San Antonio National Topographic Map, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the San Antonio National Topographic Map NH14-8 are presented. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium, and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included also.

  10. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Perryton National Topographic Map, Texas/Oklahoma/Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the Perryton National Topographic Map NJ14-10 are presented. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included also.

  11. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey, San Angelo National Topographic Map: Texas, West Texas Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the San Angelo National Topographic Map NH14-1 are presented. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium, and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included.

  12. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Quincy National Topographic map, Illinois/Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the Quincy National Topographic Map NJ15-3 is presented in this report. The airborne data gathered is reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnet field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included also.

  13. Do rainfalls wash out anthropogenic airborne magnetic particulates?

    PubMed

    Baatar, Amarjargal; Ha, Raegyung; Yu, Yongjae

    2017-03-01

    We separated dust particles from the mesh-filtered sets of rainwaters collected on rainy days with daily precipitations exceeding 10 mm per day. A total of 136 rainwaters (or snow during the winter season) samples collected from February 2009 to February 2013 were analyzed. In particular, 33 out of 136 rainwaters were collected during or just after the Asian dust storm (ADS) events. Values of pH were relatively higher during warmer seasons. During ADS events, precipitations were alkaline, possibly due to abundant supply of alkaline minerals from the deserts source area to the precipitation. Compositional analysis on particulate matter (PM) indicated that Fe (and Al, K, and Mg) enriched the dusts collected during ADS, with respect to events than those without ADS. We found that ADS rainfall events are effective in selectively eliminating dust particles. However, high rainfall does not necessarily indicate more dilution of dusts. On microscopic examination, we observed natural soils, natural dust of pedogenesis or weathering origin, anthropogenic C-Fe-rich particles, and anthropogenic C-rich particles. Because of its small size, the stoichiometry of ADS-related, Fe-rich dust particles was inferred from the magnetic analysis. Presence of Verwey transition near 100-120 K and experimental determination of Curie points near 580 °C indicate that magnetic mineral responsible for the magnetic properties of ADS-related dusts was magnetite.

  14. High spatial resolution observations of 137Cs in northern Britain and Ireland from airborne geophysical survey.

    PubMed

    Scheib, Cathy; Beamish, David

    2010-09-01

    This study reports the (137)Cs data derived from three regional and national scale High Resolution Airborne Resource and Environmental Surveys (HiRES) in northern Britain and Ireland. The detailed spatial resolution, combined with the large areas these surveys collectively cover, gives insight into large-scale deposition patterns and possible subsequent re-distribution of (137)Cs on a level that was previously not possible. The largest survey area considered covers the whole of Northern Ireland. All three data sets display some clustering of higher (137)Cs activities on high ground together with regional scale NNW-SSE and NW-SE banding features. We interpret these as representing a series of rainfall interceptions of the repeated passage of the Chernobyl plume. Our observations, obtained at 200 m flight line intervals, appear to provide significant detail in relation to existing knowledge of large scale along-wind deposition of (137)Cs.

  15. EMAG2: A 2-arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, and marine magnetic measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maus, S.; Barckhausen, U.; Berkenbosch, H.; Bournas, N.; Brozena, J.; Childers, V.; Dostaler, F.; Fairhead, J.D.; Finn, C.; von Frese, R.R.B; Gaina, C.; Golynsky, S.; Kucks, R.; Lu, Hai; Milligan, P.; Mogren, S.; Muller, R.D.; Olesen, O.; Pilkington, M.; Saltus, R.; Schreckenberger, B.; Thebault, E.; Tontini, F.C.

    2009-01-01

    A global Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) has been compiled from satellite, ship, and airborne magnetic measurements. EMAG2 is a significant update of our previous candidate grid for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. The resolution has been improved from 3 arc min to 2 arc min, and the altitude has been reduced from 5 km to 4 km above the geoid. Additional grid and track line data have been included, both over land and the oceans. Wherever available, the original shipborne and airborne data were used instead of precompiled oceanic magnetic grids. Interpolation between sparse track lines in the oceans was improved by directional gridding and extrapolation, based on an oceanic crustal age model. The longest wavelengths (>330 km) were replaced with the latest CHAMP satellite magnetic field model MF6. EMAG2 is available at http://geomag.org/models/EMAG2 and for permanent archive at http://earthref.org/ cgi-bin/er.cgi?s=erda.cgi?n=970. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Toward the Direct Measurement of Coronal Magnetic Fields: An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samra, J.; DeLuca, E. E.; Golub, L.; Cheimets, P.

    2014-12-01

    The solar magnetic field enables the heating of the corona and provides its underlying structure. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) and provides the ultimate source of energy for space weather. Therefore, direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of coronal field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind. While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, a proposed airborne spectrometer will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. The targeted lines are four forbidden magnetic dipole transitions between 2 and 4 μm. The airborne system will consist of a telescope, grating spectrometer, and pointing/stabilization system to be flown on the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during the August 2017 total solar eclipse. The project incorporates several optical engineering challenges, centered around maintaining adequate spectral and spatial resolution in a compact and inexpensive package and on a moving platform. Design studies are currently underway to examine the tradeoffs between various optical geometries and control strategies for the pointing/stabilization system. The results will be presented and interpreted in terms of the consequences for the scientific questions. In addition, results from a laboratory prototype and simulations of the final system will be presented.

  17. Recovery and reanalysis of archived airborne gamma spectrometry data from the 1991 Dounreay survey.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A J

    2012-01-01

    Archived Airborne Gamma Spectrometry (AGS) data from the 1991 NIREX characterisations of Caithness have been recovered. The separate gamma spectrometry and positional data streams for approximately 120,000 measurements have been combined into a single data stream using the European Radiometrics and Spectrometry (ERS) data format. An analysis using working calibration coefficients and spectral stripping procedure has verified that the original survey recorded high quality data. The converted data stream is in a format more accessible to future research use, including evaluation of environmental change in the Caithness region.

  18. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: north/south tieline. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted along the 99/sup 0/ longitude meridian from the Canadian border southward to the Mexican border. A total of 1555 line miles of geophysical data were acquired and, subsequently, compiled. The north-south tieline was flown as part of the National Uranium Resources Evaluation. NURE is a program of the US Department of Energy's Grand Junction, Colorado, office to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  19. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS). Topical report, October 1993--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This document is a Final Technical Report that describes the results of the Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) research project. The objectives were to construct a geophysical data acquisition system that uses a remotely operated unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and to evaluate its effectiveness for characterization of hazardous environmental sites. The GAUSS is a data acquisition system that mitigates the potential risk to personnel during geophysical characterization of hazardous or radioactive sites. The fundamental basis of the GAUSS is as follows: (1) an unmanned survey vehicle carries geophysical sensors into a hazardous location, (2) the pilot remains outside the hazardous site and operates the vehicle using radio control, (3) geophysical measurements and their spatial locations are processed by an automated data-acquisition system which displays data on an off-site monitor in real-time, and (4) the pilot uses the display to direct the survey vehicle for complete site coverage. The objective of our Phase I research was to develop a data acquisition and processing (DAP) subsystem and geophysical sensors suitable for UAV deployment. We integrated these two subsystems to produce an automated, hand-held geophysical surveying system. The objective of the Phase II effort was to modify the subsystems and integrate them into an airborne prototype. The completed GAUSS DAP system consists of a UAV platform, a laser tracking and ranging subsystem, a telemetry subsystem, light-weight geophysical sensors, a base-station computer (BC), and custom-written survey control software (SCS). We have utilized off-the-shelf commercial products, where possible, to reduce cost and design time.

  20. NASA IceBridge: Scientific Insights from Airborne Surveys of the Polar Sea Ice Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter-Menge, J.; Farrell, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Operation IceBridge (OIB) airborne sea ice surveys are designed to continue a valuable series of sea ice thickness measurements by bridging the gap between NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), which operated from 2003 to 2009, and ICESat-2, which is scheduled for launch in 2017. Initiated in 2009, OIB has conducted campaigns over the western Arctic Ocean (March/April) and Southern Oceans (October/November) on an annual basis when the thickness of sea ice cover is nearing its maximum. More recently, a series of Arctic surveys have also collected observations in the late summer, at the end of the melt season. The Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) laser altimeter is one of OIB's primary sensors, in combination with the Digital Mapping System digital camera, a Ku-band radar altimeter, a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) snow radar, and a KT-19 infrared radiation pyrometer. Data from the campaigns are available to the research community at: http://nsidc.org/data/icebridge/. This presentation will summarize the spatial and temporal extent of the OIB campaigns and their complementary role in linking in situ and satellite measurements, advancing observations of sea ice processes across all length scales. Key scientific insights gained on the state of the sea ice cover will be highlighted, including snow depth, ice thickness, surface roughness and morphology, and melt pond evolution.

  1. Airborne Hyperspectral Survey of Afghanistan 2007: Flight Line Planning and HyMap Data Collection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, K. Eric

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data were acquired over Afghanistan with the HyMap imaging spectrometer (Cocks and others, 1998) operating on the WB-57 high altitude NASA research aircraft (http://jsc-aircraft-ops.jsc.nasa.gov/wb57/index.html). These data were acquired during the interval of August 22, 2007 to October 2, 2007, as part of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) project 'Oil and Gas Resources Assessment of the Katawaz and Helmand Basins'. A total of 218 flight lines of hyperspectral remote sensing data were collected over the country. This report describes the planning of the airborne survey and the flight lines that were flown. Included with this report are digital files of the nadir tracks of the flight lines, including a map of the labeled flight lines and corresponding vector shape files for geographic information systems (GIS).

  2. Automated planimetric quality control in high accuracy airborne laser scanning surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosselman, George

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing point densities of airborne laser scanning surveys, the applications of the generated point clouds have evolved from the production of digital terrain models to 3D modelling of a wide variety of objects. Likewise in quality control procedures criteria for height accuracy are extended with measures to describe the planimetric accuracy. This paper introduces a measure for the potential accuracy of outlining objects in a point cloud. It describes how this accuracy can be verified with the use of ridge lines of gable roofs in strip overlaps. Because of the high accuracy of modern laser scanning surveys, the influence of roof tiles onto the estimation of ridge lines is explicitly modelled. New selection criteria are introduced that allow an automated, reliable and accurate extraction of ridge lines from point clouds. The applicability of the procedure is demonstrated in a pilot project in an area covering 100,000 ha with around 20 billion points.

  3. DATA ACQUISITION AND APPLICATIONS OF SIDE-LOOKING AIRBORNE RADAR IN THE U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, John Edwin; Kover, Allan N.

    1985-01-01

    The Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) program encompasses a multi-discipline effort involving geologists, hydrologists, engineers, geographers, and cartographers of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). Since the program began in 1980, more than 520,000 square miles of aerial coverage of SLAR data in the conterminous United States and Alaska have been acquired or contracted for acquisition. The Geological Survey has supported more than 60 research and applications projects addressing the use of this technology in the earth sciences since 1980. These projects have included preparation of lithographic reproductions of SLAR mosaics, research to improve the cartographic uses of SLAR, research for use of SLAR in assessing earth hazards, and studies using SLAR for energy and mineral exploration through improved geologic mapping.

  4. Airborne Electromagnetic Surveys for Baseline Permafrost Mapping and Potential Long-Term Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Walvoord, M. A.; Cannia, J. C.; Voss, C. I.

    2010-12-01

    Concerns over the impacts of climate change have recently energized research on permafrost and the potential impacts that thawing permafrost may have on groundwater flow, infrastructure, ecosystems, and contaminant transport. There is typically little known at watershed or regional scales about the three-dimensional distribution of permafrost, including its thickness and the distribution of taliks (unfrozen zones), and other permafrost features thereby impeding the assessment of consequences of permafrost degradation. Airborne remote sensing methods for mapping permafrost are attractive, particularly in arctic and subarctic studies where ground access is difficult and ecosystems are fragile. As part of its Climate Effect Network (CEN) research and observation effort in the Yukon River Basin, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has initiated an effort to map permafrost using airborne geophysics to complement hydrologic and biogeochemical studies in the study area. Interpretation of airborne geophysical data will be integrated with other remotely sensed data to supply critical hydrogeologic information needed for refining groundwater flow models in the Yukon Flats Basin. Airborne surveys also provide baseline data for estimating 3D permafrost distribution that can be compared to future permafrost surveys to estimate a volumetric change over time. In June 2010, the USGS conducted a helicopter frequency domain electromagnetic (HFEM) survey in the area of Fort Yukon, Alaska to map permafrost distribution. Flight line data processing has been completed that includes data leveling and a simple transformation to resistivity-depth along the flight lines. Preliminary resistivity-depth images from the survey can be qualitatively compared with known permafrost features and used to establish new permafrost features. Electrical properties of earth materials are impacted by temperature and the presence of ice causing them to become substantially more resistive when frozen. The area

  5. Autonomous and Remote-Controlled Airborne and Ground-Based Robotic Platforms for Adaptive Geophysical Surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spritzer, J. M.; Phelps, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Low-cost autonomous and remote-controlled robotic platforms have opened the door to precision-guided geophysical surveying. Over the past two years, the U.S. Geological Survey, Senseta, NASA Ames Research Center, and Carnegie Mellon University Silicon Valley, have developed and deployed small autonomous and remotely controlled vehicles for geophysical investigations. The purpose of this line of investigation is to 1) increase the analytical capability, resolution, and repeatability, and 2) decrease the time, and potentially the cost and map-power necessary to conduct near-surface geophysical surveys. Current technology has advanced to the point where vehicles can perform geophysical surveys autonomously, freeing the geoscientist to process and analyze the incoming data in near-real time. This has enabled geoscientists to monitor survey parameters; process, analyze and interpret the incoming data; and test geophysical models in the same field session. This new approach, termed adaptive surveying, provides the geoscientist with choices of how the remainder of the survey should be conducted. Autonomous vehicles follow pre-programmed survey paths, which can be utilized to easily repeat surveys on the same path over large areas without the operator fatigue and error that plague man-powered surveys. While initial deployments with autonomous systems required a larger field crew than a man-powered survey, over time operational experience costs and man power requirements will decrease. Using a low-cost, commercially available chassis as the base for autonomous surveying robotic systems promise to provide higher precision and efficiency than human-powered techniques. An experimental survey successfully demonstrated the adaptive techniques described. A magnetic sensor was mounted on a small rover, which autonomously drove a prescribed course designed to provide an overview of the study area. Magnetic data was relayed to the base station periodically, processed and gridded. A

  6. Low and room temperature magnetic features of the traffic related urban airborne PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, A.; Sagnotti, L.

    2012-04-01

    We used magnetic measurements and analyses - such as hysteresis loops and FORCs both at room temperature and at 10K, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) vs temperature curves (from 10K to 293K) and IRM vs time decay curves - to characterize the magnetic properties of the traffic related airborne particulate matter (PM) in Rome. This study was specifically addressed to the identification of the ultrafine superparamagnetic (SP) particles, which are particularly sensitive to thermal relaxation effects, and on the eventual detection of low temperature phase transitions which may affect various magnetic minerals. We compared the magnetic properties at 10K and at room temperature of Quercus ilex leaves, disk brakes, diesel and gasoline exhaust pipes powders collected from vehicles circulating in Rome. The magnetic properties of the investigated powders significantly change upon cooling, and no clear phase transition occurs, suggesting that the thermal dependence is mainly triggered by the widespread presence of ultrafine SP particles. The contribution of the SP fraction to the total remanence of traffic related PM samples was quantified at room temperature measuring the decay of a IRM 100 s after the application of a saturation magnetic field. This same method has been also tested at 10K to investigate the temperature dependence of the observed time decay.

  7. Error analysis of a new planar electrostatic gravity gradiometer for airborne surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douch, Karim; Panet, Isabelle; Pajot-Métivier, Gwendoline; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Lequentrec-Lalancette, Marie-Françoise; Diament, Michel

    2015-12-01

    Moving-base gravity gradiometry has proven to be a convenient method to determine the Earth's gravity field. The ESA mission GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) has enabled to map the Earth gravity field and its gradients with a resolution of 80 km, leading to significant advances in physical oceanography and solid Earth physics. At smaller scales, airborne gravity gradiometry has been increasingly used during the past decade in mineral and hydrocarbon exploration. In both cases the sensitivity of gradiometers to the short wavelengths of the gravity field is of crucial interest. Here, we quantify and characterize the error on the gravity gradients estimated from measurements performed with a new instrument concept, called GREMLIT, for typical airborne conditions. GREMLIT is an ultra-sensitive planar gravitational gradiometer which consists in a planar acceleration gradiometer together with 3 gyroscopes. To conduct this error analysis, a simulation of a realistic airborne survey with GREMLIT is carried out. We first simulate realistic GREMLIT synthetic data, taking into account the acceleration gradiometer and gyroscope noises and biases and the variation of orientation of the measurement reference frame. Then, we estimate the gravity gradients from these data. Special attention is paid to the processing of the gyroscopes measurements whose accuracy is not commensurate with the ultra-sensitive gradiometer. We propose a method to calibrate the gyroscopes biases with a precision of the order 10^{-8} rad/s. In order to transform the tensor from the measurement frame to the local geodetic frame, we estimate the error induced when replacing the non-measured elements of the gravity gradient tensor by an a priori model. With the appropriate smoothing, we show that it is possible to achieve a precision better than 2E for an along-track spatial resolution of 2 km.

  8. Correlation of haemoglobin-acrylamide adducts with airborne exposure: an occupational survey.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kate; Garfitt, Sarah; Emms, Vicky; Warren, Nick; Cocker, John; Farmer, Peter

    2006-04-10

    This paper reports an occupational hygiene survey of exposure to acrylamide comparing acrylamide haemoglobin adduct measurements with personal air monitoring and glove liner analysis. The air monitoring data showed that exposure to acrylamide was well-controlled with all samples below the UK maximum exposure limit (MEL) of 300 microg/m(3) with mean exposure about one tenth of the MEL. Each worker provided two blood samples approximately 3 months apart. These samples were well correlated (r=0.61) with a slope of 0.74, indicating that exposure was reasonably constant. Mean personal airborne acrylamide levels and mean acrylamide haemoglobin adduct levels were well correlated (r=0.72, N=46) and using the calculated linear correlation, exposure at the MEL would be expected to give rise to a haemoglobin adduct level of 1,550 pmol/g globin. Smoking status did not affect the correlation. There was also a correlation between levels of acrylamide detected on gloves and haemoglobin adduct levels. A combined regression model between haemoglobin adducts, airborne acrylamide and acrylamide glove contamination was significant for both airborne acrylamide and gloves with a regression coefficient of 0.89. The study showed that haemoglobin adduct level was a good biomarker of acrylamide exposure which correlated to both inhaled and potentially skin absorbed acrylamide estimates. There was excellent discrimination between well-controlled occupational levels and environmental levels from diet and smoking, allowing haemoglobin adduct measurement to be used to determine even low level exposures. Due to the complexity of the current methodology, new techniques would be useful in making haemoglobin adducts more widely applicable.

  9. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of the Atlantic Ocean beach, North and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.; Bortner, T.E.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Atlantic Ocean beach between Edisto Island, South Carolina and Cape Fear, North Carolina. The survey was made May 20, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude, parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varies with areal extent and intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1400 feet. The accompanying maps show the approximate locations of the areas of greater-than-average radioactivity (at left) and the location of the traverse flown (at right). The abnormal radioactivity is apparently caused by radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits which occur locally along the beach in this region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given in the accompanying map showing the localities of greater-than-average radioactivity therefore, suggests areas in which uranium and thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  10. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Gulf of Mexico beach between Sanibel Island and Caladesi Island, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.; Bortner, T.E.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Gulf of Mexico beach between Sanibel Island and Caladesi Island in Florida. This survey was made May 4, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude , parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varies with the areal extent and intensity of the radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1400 feet. The accompanying map and index map show the approximate locations of the areas of greater-than-average radioactivity and the location of the traverse flown. The abnormal radioactivity is apparently caused by radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits which occur locally along the beach in the region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given in the accompanying map showing the localities of greater-than-average radioactivity therefore, suggests area in which uranium or thorium deposits are more likely to occur.

  11. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Atlantic Ocean beach, Virginia to Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, R.M.; Johnson, R.W.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying maps show the results of an airborne radioactivity survey along the Atlantic Ocean beach from Cape Henry, Virginia to Cape Fear, North Carolina and from Savannah Bach Georgia to Miami Beach, Florida. The survey was made March 23-24, 1953, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft and consisted of one flight line, at a 500-foot altitude, parallel to the beach. The vertical projection of the flight line coincided approximately with the landward limit of the modern beach. The width of the zone on the ground from which anomalous radiation is measured at the normal 500 foot flight altitude varies with the areal extent radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone would be as much as 1,400 feet. The location of the flight lines is shown on the index map below. No abnormal radioactivity was detected along the northern flight line between Cape Henry, Virginia and Cape Fear, North Carolina. Along the southern flight line fourteen areas of abnormal radioactivity were detected between Savannah Beach, Georgia and Anastasia Island, Florida as shown on the map on the left. The abnormal radioactivity is apparently due to radioactive minerals associated with "black sand" deposits with occur locally along the beach in this region. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity sue to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. It is not possible to determine the extent or radioactive content of the materials responsible for the abnormal radioactivity. The information given on the accompanying map indicates only those localities of greater-than-average radioactivity and, therefore suggest areas in which uranium and thorium deposits are more

  12. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Miller Hill area, Carbon county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 65 square miles northwest of Miller Hill, Carbon county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomalies shown on the accompanying map cannot be interpreted in terms of either the radioactive content or the extent of the source materials. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to uranium, or to thorium, or to a combination of uranium and thorium. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. Any particular anomaly

  13. COLLECTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICLES BY A HIGH-GRADIENT PERMANENT MAGNETIC METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Allman, Steve L; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Avens, Larry R

    2014-01-01

    We report on the use of magnetic force in collection of airborne particles by a high- gradient permanent magnetic separation (HGPMS) device. Three aerosol particles of different magnetic susceptibility (NaCl, CuO, and Fe2O3) were generated in the electrical mobility size range of 10 to 200 nm and were used to study HGPMS collection. One HGPMS matrix element, made of stainless steel wool, was used in the device configuration. Three flow rates were selected to simulate the environmental wind speeds of interest to the study. Magnetic force was found to exhibit an insignificant effect on the separation of NaCl particles, even in the HGPMS configuration. Diffusion was a major mechanism in the removal of the diamagnetic particles; however, diffusion is insignificant under the influence of a high-gradient magnetic field for paramagnetic or ferromagnetic particles. The HGPMS showed high-performance collection (> 99%) of paramagnetic CuO and ferromagnetic Fe2O3 particles for particle sizes greater than or equal to 60 nm. As the wind speed increases, the influence of the magnetic force weakens, and the capability to remove particles from the gas stream diminishes. The results suggest that the HGPMS principle could be explored for development of an advanced miniaturized passive aerosol collector.

  14. Surveying Students' Conceptual Knowledge of Electricity and Magnetism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, David P.; O'Kuma, Thomas L.; Hieggelke, Curtis J.; Van Heuvelen, Alan

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) which was developed to assess students' knowledge of topics in electricity and magnetism. Reports on the number of student difficulties in electricity and magnetism. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

  15. NASA IceBridge: Airborne surveys of the polar sea ice covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter-Menge, J.; Farrell, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Operation IceBridge (OIB) airborne sea ice surveys are designed to continue a valuable series of sea ice thickness measurements by bridging the gap between NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), which operated from 2003 to 2009, and ICESat-2, which is scheduled for launch in 2017. Initiated in 2009, OIB has conducted campaigns over the western Arctic Ocean (March/April) and Southern Oceans (October/November) on an annual basis. Primary OIB sensors being used for sea ice observations include the Airborne Topographic Mapper laser altimeter, the Digital Mapping System digital camera, a Ku-band radar altimeter, a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) snow radar, and a KT-19 infrared radiation pyrometer. Data from the campaigns are available to the research community at: http://nsidc.org/data/icebridge/. This presentation will summarize the spatial and temporal extent of the campaigns and highlight key scientific accomplishments, which include: • Documented changes in the Arctic marine cryosphere since the dramatic sea ice loss of 2007 • Novel snow depth measurements over sea ice in the Arctic • Improved skill of April-to-September sea ice predictions via numerical ice/ocean models • Validation of satellite altimetry measurements (ICESat, CryoSat-2, and IceSat-2/MABEL)

  16. Development and Evaluation of an Airborne Superconducting Quantum Interference Device-Based Magnetic Gradiometer Tensor System for Detection, Characterization and Mapping of Unexploded Ordnance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    FINAL REPORT Development and Evaluation of an Airborne Superconducting Quantum Interference Device-Based Magnetic Gradiometer Tensor System...Airborne Superconducting Quantum Interference Device-Based Magnetic Gradiometer Tensor System for Detection, Characterization and Mapping of Unexploded...Demonstration of the difference between a single component total field magnetometer and intrinsic gradiometer . (From Clarke, 1994). 4 Figure 3

  17. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Huron quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Huron map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1459 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  18. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Mitchell map area. The purpose of this program is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1479 line miles are in this quadrangle.

  19. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, New Rockford Quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the New Rockford map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1397 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  20. Regional-scale airborne electromagnetic surveying of the Yucatan karst aquifer (Mexico): geological and hydrogeological interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondwe, Bibi R. N.; Ottowitz, David; Supper, Robert; Motschka, Klaus; Merediz-Alonso, Gonzalo; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Geometry and connectivity of high-permeability zones determine groundwater flow in karst aquifers. Efficient management of karst aquifers requires regional mapping of preferential flow paths. Remote-sensing technology provides tools to efficiently map the subsurface at such scales. Multi-spectral remote sensing imagery, shuttle radar topography data and frequency-domain airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey data were used to map karst-aquifer structure on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Anomalous AEM responses correlated with topographic features and anomalous spectral reflectance of the terrain. One known preferential flow path, the Holbox fracture zone, showed lower bulk electrical resistivity than its surroundings in the AEM surveys. Anomalous structures delineated inland were sealed above by a low-resistivity layer (resistivity: 1-5 Ωm, thickness: 5-6 m). This layer was interpreted as ejecta from the Chicxulub impact (Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary), based on similar resistivity signatures found in borehole logs. Due to limited sensitivity of the AEM survey, the subsurface configuration beneath the low-resistivity layer could not be unambiguously determined. AEM measurements combined with remote-sensing data analysis provide a potentially powerful multi-scale methodology for structural mapping in karst aquifers on the Yucatan Peninsula and beyond.

  1. Recent airborne magnetic data prefer SWEAT reconstruction of Laurentia with Antarctica and Australia to others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C. A.; Pisarevsky, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne magnetic data provide a means for guiding reconstructions of Rodinia, in particular the hotly debated western continuations of Laurentia, such that the magnetic data tie existing isolated interpretations of geologic units through continuous data coverage, provide plate scale views of geology and tectonics and extend interpretations of units buried beneath cover. Recently released digital continental-scale aeromagnetic compilations, as well as new aeromagnetic data from Antarctica that provide a glimpse of the sub-ice Precambrian geology in critical areas for reconstructions, are useful for plate-tectonic scale reconstructions. Compiling digital magnetic data to map hidden Precambrian basement was a specialty of Tom Hildenbrand, which we apply to global plate reconstructions. We combine magnetic data, plate reconstructions and regional geologic mapping to help constrain the SWEAT (southwest US /East Antarctica), AUSWUS (Australia-Western US) and Sears-Price reconstructions of the Laurentian portion of the 1100-750 Ma Rodinia supercontinent. 'Piercing points' have been used to match Precambrian cratonic blocks and orogenic belts thought to be pieces of the same ancient continent. We identify sources of magnetic anomalies associated with key piercing points in each continent and then match anomalies across continental boundaries within each of the three reconstructions. The only reconstruction in which similar magnetic anomalies can be matched with similar sources in the adjacent continent is the SWEAT reconstruction. Magnetic highs associated with 1.4 Ga A-type granites in the southwestern US correspond to similar magnetic highs in East Antarctica. Although the sources of the magnetic anomalies in Antarctica are buried, a strong signature of 1.4 Ga material in detrital zircon populations along the Antarctic margin and discovery of a glacial clast of A-type granite whose age and geochemical signature match the 1.4 Ga Laurentian granites, suggest that these

  2. The United States Army Special Forces--Walter Reed Army Institute of Research Field Epidemiologic Survey Team (Airborne).

    PubMed

    Dorogi, Louis Theodore

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Army Special Forces--Walter Reed Army Institute of Research Field Epidemiological Survey Team (Airborne) was formed in late 1965 and later deployed to Vietnam in 1966. Funded by Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and staffed by highly trained Special Forces qualified medical personnel from Fort Bragg, North Carolina, the team was attached to the 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne) while in Vietnam. During its short existence, the team conducted extensive and important field studies on diseases of military medical importance, often under combat conditions.

  3. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Devils Tower area, Crook county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 45 square miles northwest of Devils Tower, Crook County, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey on September 4, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the

  4. Airborne radioactivity survey of the West Lonetree area, Uinta county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 154 square miles in Uinta county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 23, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area

  5. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 700 square miles in the Aspen Mountain area, Sweetwater county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 22, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils

  6. Airborne radioactivity survey of the Tabernacle Buttes area, Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 670 square miles in Sublette and Fremont counties, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 20, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the

  7. Three decades of BGR airborne geophysical surveys over the polar regions - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaske, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    The Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) has been conducting geological polar research since 1979. A few years later BGR engaged in airborne geophysical projects. Investigation of the lithosphere of the continent and the continental margins was one of the key issues for BGR. Right from the beginning geophysical research was closely associated with the geological activities. The GANOVEX (German Antarctic North Victoria Land Expedition) program combined geological research with geophysical (mainly airborne) investigations. This proved to be a fruitful approach to many of the open questions regarding the tectonic development of the Ross Sea region. Aeromagnetic surveys evolved into a powerful tool for identifying geological structures and following them underneath the ice covered areas - not accessible to direct geological investigations. To achieve this aim it was essential to lay out these surveys with a relatively closely spaced line separation on the expense of covering large areas at the same time. Nevertheless, over many years of continues research areas of more than a just regional extent could be covered. This was, however, only possible through international collaboration. During the first years, working in the Ross Sea area, the cooperation with the US and Italian programs played a significant role, especially the GITARA (German-Italian Aeromagnetic Research in Antarctica) program has to be mentioned. GEOMAUD (Geoscientific Expedition to Dronning Maud Land) and the German-Australian joint venture PCMEGA (Prince Charles Mountains Expedition of Germany & Australia) expanded research activities to the East Antarctic shield area. In the International Polar Year (IPY), BGR played a leading role in the international project AGAP (Antarctica's GAmburtsev Province) as part of the main topic "Venture into Unknown Regions". AGAP was jointly conducted by the USA, Great Britain, Australia, China and Germany. While in the Ross Sea area even

  8. Relationships between ground and airborne gamma-ray spectrometric survey data, North Ras Millan, Southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Mohamed A S

    2016-02-01

    In the last decades of years, there was considerable growth in the use of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry. With this growth, there was an increasing need to standardize airborne measurements, so that they can be independent of survey parameters. Acceptable procedures were developed for converting airborne to ground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of total-count intensity as well as, potassium, equivalent uranium and equivalent thorium concentrations, due to natural sources of radiation. The present study aims mainly to establish relationships between ground and airborne gamma-ray spectrometric data, North Ras Millan, Southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. The relationships between airborne and ground gamma-ray spectrometric data were deduced for the original and separated rock units in the study area. Various rocks in the study area, represented by Quaternary Wadi sediments, Cambro-Ordovician sandstones, basic dykes and granites, are shown on the detailed geologic map. The structures are displayed, which located on the detailed geologic map, are compiled from the integration of previous geophysical and surface geological studies.

  9. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Medford Quadrangle Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Medford, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 2925 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  10. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Ukiah quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Ukiah, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1517 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  11. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Susanville quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Susanville, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1642.8 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  12. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Roseburg Quadrangle, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Roseburg, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1596 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  13. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Chico quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Chico, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 3026.4 line miles are in the quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  14. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey Coos Bay, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    During the months of August, September, and October of 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Coos Bay, Oregon, map area. Line spacing was generally six miles for east/west traverses and eighteen miles for north/south tie lines over the northern one-half of the area. Traverses and tie lines were flown at three miles and twelve miles respectively over the southern one-half of the area. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 863.8 line miles are in this quadrangle.

  15. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Alturas quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Alturas, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1631.6 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  16. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Eureka quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Eureka/Crescent City, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were aquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 349.5 line miles are in this area. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  17. Magnetic properties and element concentrations in lichens exposed to airborne pollutants released during cement production.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Winkler, Aldo; Guttová, Anna; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Grassi, Alice; Lackovičová, Anna; Senko, Dušan; Loppi, Stefano

    2016-02-15

    The content of selected elements (Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, S, Ti, V and Zn) was measured in samples of the lichen Evernia prunastri exposed for 30, 90 and 180 days around a cement mill, limestone and basalt quarries and urban and agricultural areas in SW Slovakia. Lichens transplanted around the investigated quarries and the cement mill rapidly (30 days) reflected the deposition of dust-associated elements, namely Ca (at the cement mill and the limestone quarry) and Fe, Ti and V (around the cement mill and the basalt quarry), and their content remained significantly higher throughout the whole period (30-180 days) with respect to the surrounding environment. Airborne pollutants (such as S) progressively increased in the study area from 30 to 180 days. The magnetic properties of lichen transplants exposed for 180 days have been characterized and compared with those of native lichens (Xanthoria parietina) and neighbouring bark, soil and rock samples, in order to test the suitability of native and transplanted samples as air pollution magnetic biomonitors. The magnetic mineralogy was homogeneous in all samples, with the exception of the samples from the basalt quarry. The transplants showed excellent correlations between the saturation remanent magnetization (Mrs) and the content of Fe. Native samples had a similar magnetic signature, but the values of the concentration-dependent magnetic parameters were up to two orders of magnitude higher, reflecting higher concentrations of magnetic particles. The concentrations of As, Ca and Cr in lichens correlated with Mrs values after neglecting the samples from the basalt quarry, which showed distinct magnetic properties, suggesting the cement mill as a likely source. Conversely, Ti and Mn were mostly (but not exclusively) associated with dust from the basalt quarry. It is suggested that the natural geological characteristics of the substrate may strongly affect the magnetic properties of lichen thalli

  18. Contribution of the airborne geophysical survey to the study of the regolith : A case study in southern Paris Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prognon, Francois; Lacquement, Fréderic; Deparis, Jacques; Martelet, Guillaume; Perrin, José

    2010-05-01

    Studies of soil and subsoil, also called regolith, are at the crossroads of scientific new challenging questions as well as new environmental needs. Historically, geological maps were focussed on solid geology. Present societal needs increasingly require knowledge of regolith properties: superficial studies combining geology, geochemistry and geophysics become essential to better understand the natural processes which govern the repartition and evolution of subsoil formations. Such progress is critical to better orient the use and management of natural and groundwater resources. Among other techniques, airborne geophysics is appropriate to provide information on near surface, because of i) its high spatial coverage ii) the rapidity of acquisition and iii) the variety of available sensors (magnetic, spectral radiometry, electromagnetic …). We illustrate the results of an airborne geophysical survey carried out in France, in "Région Centre" administrative region in the southern part of the Paris Basin. Spectral radiometry data were collected throughout "Région Centre" with a line spacing of 1 km. This method provides maps of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) which are the only naturally occurring elements with direct or indirect radioisotopes that produce gamma rays of sufficient intensity to be measured at airborne survey heights. Gamma-rays emitted from the Earth surface are related to the primary mineralogy and geochemistry of the bedrock and/or the nature of secondary weathering including regolith materials. Obtained images are confronted with former geological investigations (1:50 000e geological maps). Geophysical data and geological maps are generally consistent on most of the covered area since the first-rate information delivered by the spectrometry derives from the geochemistry of the solid geology. Second-rate gamma-ray responses come from superimposed allochtonous deposits as well as in situ geochemical modifications. For instance

  19. Spatial Correlation of Airborne Magnetic Anomalies with Reservoir Temperatures of Geothermal Fields, Western Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertekin, Can; Ekinci, Yunus Levent

    2013-04-01

    Geothermal areas in Western Anatolia are remarkably located throughout Büyük Menderes Graben (BMG) and Gediz Graben (GG). These E-W trending grabens have been subjected to N-E stretching since Miocene. Except for these major outcomes of the extensional forces, NE-SW oriented and relatively short grabens take place in Western Anatolia as well. Among them, BMG and GG are remarkable with topographic escarpments that reveal footwall of steeply-dipping active normal faults. They manifest themselves via numerous earthquakes and geothermal activity (fluid discharges from springs and wells). Geothermal discharges are aligned along the rims of E-W trending normal faults trending over detachment faults. Concerning BMG, geothermal manifestations extend along the northern sector of the graben. Geothermal reservoirs inside BMG are the limestone and conglomerate units within Neogene sediments and the marble-quartzite units within The Menderes Massif rocks. The main high and low enthalpy geothermal fields along BMG and their reservoir temperatures are as follows: Kızıldere (242°C), Germencik (232°C), Aydın-Ilıcabası (101°C), Yılmazköy (142°C), Salavatlı (171°C), Söke (26°C), Pamukkale (36°C), Karahayıt (59°C), Gölemezli (101°C) and Yenice (70°C). Through GG, reservoir temperatures decrease from east to west. Geothermal reservoirs inside GG are metamorphics and granodiorite of the Menderes Massif rocks. The Neogene sediments act as cap rock of the geothermal reservoirs. Geothermal fields inside the graben and their reservoir temperatures are as follows: Alaşehir (215°C), Salihli (155°C), Urganlı (85°C), Kurşunlu (135°C), Caferbey (150°C), Sart (100°C). In order to investigate the spatial correlation of magnetic anomalies and the reservoir temperatures of geothermal fields in the region, we analysed airborne magnetic data which were collected by General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA) of Turkey. Airborne magnetic data were taken

  20. Marine magnetic survey and onshore gravity and magnetic survey, San Pablo Bay, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, David A.; Denton, Kevin M.; Watt, Janet T.

    2016-09-12

    IntroductionFrom November 2011 to August 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected more than 1,000 line-kilometers (length of lines surveyed in kilometers) of marine magnetic data on San Pablo Bay, 98 onshore gravity stations, and over 27 line-kilometers of ground magnetic data in northern California. Combined magnetic and gravity investigations were undertaken to study subsurface geologic structures as an aid in understanding the geologic framework and earthquake hazard potential in the San Francisco Bay Area. Furthermore, marine magnetic data illuminate local subsurface geologic features in the shallow crust beneath San Pablo Bay where geologic exposure is absent.Magnetic and gravity methods, which reflect contrasting physical properties of the subsurface, are ideal for studying San Pablo Bay. Exposed rock units surrounding San Pablo Bay consist mainly of Jurassic Coast Range ophiolite, Great Valley sequence, Franciscan Complex rocks, Miocene sedimentary rocks, and unconsolidated alluvium (Graymer and others, 2006). The contrasting magnetic and density properties of these rocks enable us to map their subsurface extent.

  1. Airborne electromagnetic surveys in support of groundwater models in western Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. D.; Viezzoli, A.; Cannia, J. C.; Smith, B. D.; Brown, W.; Peterson, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    The USGS, SkyTEM, Aarhus Geophysics, North Platte, South Platte and Twin Platte Natural Resource Districts have collaborated to collect airborne time domain geophysical surveys over selected of areas of western Nebraska. The objective of the surveys was to map the aquifers and bedrock topography of the area to help improve the understanding of groundwater-surface water relations to be used in water management decisions. The base of aquifer in many of these areas is in excess of 100 meters deep and little detailed information of the configuration of the bedrock exits. Many of the aquifers exist as alluvial fills in paleochannels upon complex bedrock topography. Controlling factors for groundwater flow are the variations of the hydraulic properties of the fill and the boundary geometry of the paleochannels. Results from groundwater modeling efforts prior to the addition of the airborne data revealed the hydrogeologic framework was sufficient for the regional scale models, but when these models were reduced to 40 acres cell size, the lack of detail adversely affected model results. The SkyTEM system is a helicopter-borne time-domain electromagnetic system capable of detecting small changes in resistivity from the near-surface down to depths of up to 300 m and is well-suited for aquifer mapping. An innovative design of the receiver coils and transmitter pattern eliminates the self response that is characteristic of airborne systems and spatial measurement sensors mounted on a rigid frame enable rigorous quantitative interpretation of the EM data. The ability to quickly collect and deliver high quality, high resolution geophysical data contributes significantly to modeling efforts and further understanding of subsurface hydrological systems. The raw AEM data have to be edited to exclude data that have been affected by coupling with man made infrastructures. For resistivity data to be related to lithologic information to refine groundwater model inputs, and to make the

  2. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Marysvale detail survey, Richfield National Topographic Map sheet, Utah. Volume II. Radiometric multi-variable stacked profile data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analyses of a systematic airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic survey for the area identified as Marysvale, located in southwestern Utah, is presented in Volumes I-IV of this report. The airborne data gathered is reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the equivalent uranium, thorium and potassium gamma radiation intensities, the ratios of these intensities, the total gamma radiation counting rate and the earth's residual magnetic field intensity. Profile plots of the aircraft's altitude above the earth's surface, the ambient temperature and pressure, and the magnetic field data measured by a base station magnetometer is presented also. An evaluation of the distribution of the radiometric data in terms of its established geochemical map units, which were derived via geochemical analysis methods, for the entire survey area has been prepared and is included. The determination of the geochemical units presented has been established principally from the analysis of the radiometric and magnetic contour maps and, more importantly, the multi-variate analysis map. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic and geochemical units, is included within the text. Volume II contains the 10-variable radiometric stacked profile data for the entire survey area.

  3. Imaging a 3D geological structure from HEM, airborne magnetic and ground ERT data in Kalat-e-Reshm area, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Bastani, Mehrdad; Oskooi, Behrooz

    2011-11-01

    A set of geophysical data collected in an area in Iran are analyzed to check the validity of a geological map that was prepared in connection to a mineral prospecting project and also to image the spatial electrical resistivity distribution. The data set includes helicopter electromagnetic (HEM), airborne magnetic and ground electrical resistivity measurement. Occam approach was used to invert the HEM data to model the resistivity using a layered earth model with fixed thicknesses. The algorithm is based on a nonlinear inverse problem in a least-squares sense. The algorithm was tested on a part of an HEM dataset acquired with a DIGHEM helicopter EM system at Kalat-e-Reshm, Semnan in Iran. The area contains a resistive porphyry andesite that is covered by Eocene sedimentary units. The results are shown as resistivity sections and maps confirming the existence of an arc like resistive structure in the survey area. The resistive andesite seems to be thicker than it is indicated in the geological maps. The results are compared with the reduced to the pole (RTP) airborne magnetic anomaly field data as well as with two ground resistivity profiles. We found reasonable correlations between the HEM 1D resistivity models and 2D models from electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) inversions. A 3D visualization of the 1D models along all flight lines provided a useful tool for the study of spatial variations of the resistivity structure in the investigation area.

  4. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Marysvale detail survey, Richfield National Topographic Map sheet, Utah. Volume IV. Graphic data maps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analyses of a systematic airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic survey for the area identified as Marysvale, located in southwestern Utah, is presented in Volumes I-IV of this report. The airborne data gathered is reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the equivalent uranium, thorium and potassium gamma radiation intensities, the ratios of these intensities, the total gamma radiation counting rate and the earth's residual magnetic field intensity. Profile plots of the aircraft's altitude above the earth's surface, the ambient temperature and pressure, and the magnetic field data measured by a base station magnetometer is presented also. An evaluation of the distribution of the radiometric data in terms of its established geochemical map units, which were derived via geochemical analysis methods, for the entire survey area has been prepared and is included. The determination of the geochemical units presented has been established principally from the analysis of the radiometric and magnetic contour maps and, more importantly, the multi-variate analysis map. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic and geochemical units, is included within the text. Volume IV contains the following maps at a scale of 1:62,500/sup 0/; flight line base maps; radiometric and magnetic contour maps; multi-variate analysis maps; geochemical analysis maps; geochemical composite maps.

  5. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data, Swedeburg and Sprague study areas, eastern Nebraska, May 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, B.D.; Abraham, J.D.; Cannia, J.C.; Minsley, B.J.; Ball, L.B.; Steele, G.V.; Deszcz-Pan, M.

    2011-01-01

    This report is a release of digital data from a helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey conducted by Fugro Airborne Surveys in areas of eastern Nebraska as part of a joint hydrologic study by the Lower Platte North and Lower Platte South Natural Resources Districts, and the U.S. Geological Survey. The survey flight lines covered 1,418.6 line km (882 line mile). The survey was flown from April 22 to May 2, 2009. The objective of the contracted survey was to improve the understanding of the relation between surface water and groundwater systems critical to developing groundwater models used in management programs for water resources. The electromagnetic equipment consisted of six different coil-pair orientations that measured resistivity at separate frequencies from about 400 hertz to about 140,000 hertz. The electromagnetic data were converted to georeferenced electrical resistivity grids and maps for each frequency that represent different approximate depths of investigation for each survey area. The electrical resistivity data were input into a numerical inversion to estimate resistivity variations with depth. In addition to the electromagnetic data, total field magnetic data and digital elevation data were collected. Data released in this report consist of flight line data, digital grids, digital databases of the inverted electrical resistivity with depth, and digital maps of the apparent resistivity and total magnetic field. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow aquifers. The survey areas, Swedeburg and Sprague, were chosen based on results from test flights in 2007 in eastern Nebraska and needs of local water managers. The geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies are being used by resource managers to develop groundwater resource plans for the area.

  6. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Marysvale detail survey, Richfield National Topographic Map sheet, Utah. Volume I. General narrative report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analyses of a systematic airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic survey for the area identified as Marysvale, located in southwestern Utah, is presented in Volumes I-IV of this report. The airborne data gathered is reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the equivalent uranium, thorium and potassium gamma radiation intensities, the ratios of these intensities, the total gamma radiation counting rate and the earth's residual magnetic field intensity. Profile plots of the aircraft's altitude above the earth's surface, the ambient temperature and pressure, and the magnetic field data measured by a base station magnetometer is presented also. An evaluation of the distribution of the radiometric data in terms of its established geochemical map units, which were derived via geochemical analysis methods, for the entire survey area has been prepared and is included. The determination of the geochemical units presented has been established principally from the analysis of the radiometric and magnetic contour maps and, more importantly, the multi-variate analysis map. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic and geochemical units, is included within the text. Volume I contains the following: flight operations; data acquisition and processing; synopsis of surface geology; geochemical data interpretation; geologic-geochemical analogy; summary and recommendations for geochemical units.

  7. Airborne Grid Sea-Ice Surveys for Comparison with CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozena, J. M.; Gardner, J. M.; Liang, R.; Hagen, R. A.; Ball, D.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory is engaged in a study of the changing Arctic with a particular focus on ice thickness and distribution variability. The purpose is to optimize computer models used to predict sea ice changes. An important part of our study is to calibrate/validate CryoSat-2 ice thickness data prior to its incorporation into new ice forecast models. The large footprint of the CryoSat-2 altimeter over sea-ice is a significant issue in any attempt to ground-truth the data. Along-track footprints are reduced to ~ 300 m by SAR processing of the returns. However, the cross-track footprint is determined by the topography of the surface. Further, the actual return is the sum of the returns from individual reflectors within the footprint making it difficult to interpret the return, and optimize the waveform tracker. We therefore collected a series of grids of airborne scanning lidar and nadir pointing radar on sub-satellite tracks over sea-ice that would extend far enough cross-track to capture the illuminated area. One difficulty in the collection of grids comprised of adjacent overlapping tracks is that the ice moves as much as 300 m over the duration of a single track (~ 10 min). With a typical lidar swath width of 500m we needed to adjust the survey tracks in near real-time for the ice motion. This was accomplished by a photogrammetric method of ice velocity determination (RTIME) reported in another presentation. Post-processing refinements resulted in typical track-to-track miss-ties of ~ 1-2 m, much of which could be attributed to ice deformation over the period of the survey. An important factor is that we were able to reconstruct the ice configuration at the time of the satellite overflight, resulting in an accurate representation of the surface illuminated by CryoSat-2. Our intention is to develop a model of the ice surface using the lidar grid which includes both snow and ice using radar profiles to determine snow thickness. In 2013 a set of 6

  8. Airborne radar surveys of snow depth over Antarctic sea ice during Operation IceBridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzer, B.; Gomez-Garcia, D.; Leuschen, C.; Paden, J. D.; Gogineni, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    comparison of snow depths with two weeks elapsed between passes. [1] Farrell, S.L., et al., "A First Assessment of IceBridge Snow and Ice Thickness Data Over Arctic Sea Ice," IEEE Tran. Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 50, No. 6, pp. 2098-2111, June 2012. [2] Kwok, R., and G. F. Cunningham, "ICESat over Arctic sea ice: Estimation of snow depth and ice thickness," J. Geophys. Res., 113, C08010, 2008. [3] Kwok, R., et al., "Airborne surveys of snow depth over Arctic sea ice," J. Geophys. Res., 116, C11018, 2011. [4] Panzer, B., et al., "An ultra-wideband, microwave radar for measuring snow thickness on sea ice and mapping near-surface internal layers in polar firn," Submitted to J. Glaciology, July 23, 2012. [5] Wingham, D.J., et al., "CryoSat: A Mission to Determine the Fluctuations in Earth's Land and Marine Ice Fields," Advances in Space Research, Vol. 37, No. 4, pp. 841-871, 2006. [6] Zwally, H. J., et al., "ICESat's laser measurements of polar ice, atmosphere, ocean, and land," J. Geodynamics, Vol. 34, No. 3-4, pp. 405-445, Oct-Nov 2002. [7] Zwally, H. J., et al., "ICESat measurements of sea ice freeboard and estimates of sea ice thickness in the Weddell Sea," J. Geophys. Res., 113, C02S15, 2008.

  9. Mapping Ground Water in Three Dimensions - An Analysis of Airborne Geophysical Surveys of the Upper San Pedro River Basin, Cochise County, Southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of two airborne geophysical surveys conducted in the upper San Pedro Valley of southeastern Arizona in 1997 and 1999. The combined surveys cover about 1,000 square kilometers and extend from the Huachuca Mountains on the west to the Mule Mountains and Tombstone Hills on the east and from north of the Babocomari River to near the Mexican border on the south. The surveys included the acquisition of high-resolution magnetic data, which were used to map depth to the crystalline basement rocks underlying the sediments filling the basin. The magnetic inversion results show a complex basement morphology, with sediment thickness in the center of the valley ranging from ~237 meters beneath the city of Sierra Vista to ~1,500 meters beneath Huachuca City and the Palominas area near the Mexican border. The surveys also included acquisition of 60-channel time-domain electromagnetic (EM) data. Extensive quality analyses of these data, including inversion to conductivity vs. depth (conductivity-depth-transform or CDT) profiles and comparisons with electrical well logs, show that the electrical conductor mapped represents the subsurface water-bearing sediments throughout most of the basin. In a few places (notably the mouth of Huachuca Canyon), the reported water table lies above where the electrical conductor places it. These exceptions appear to be due to a combination of outdated water-table information, significant horizontal displacement between the wells and the CDT profiles, and a subtle calibration issue with the CDT algorithm apparent only in areas of highly resistive (very dry) overburden. These occasional disparities appear in less than 5 percent of the surveyed area. Observations show, however, that wells drilled in the thick unsaturated zone along the Huachuca Mountain front eventually intersect water, at which point the water rapidly rises high into the unsaturated zone within the wellbore. This rising of water in a wellbore implies

  10. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) airborne gamma spectrometry system for environmental and emergency response surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, John, II; Thomas, Mark; Curry, Timothy

    2010-08-01

    The EPA Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) Program provides airborne ortho-rectified imagery, video, chemical and now radiological information directly to emergency response personnel via a commercial satellite link onboard the aircraft. EPA initiated the ASPECT Gamma Emergency Mapper GEM Project in 2008 to improve its airborne gamma-screening and mapping capability for monitoring any ground-based gamma contamination. This paper will provide an overview of the system, which can be configured to carry six 2"x4"x16" NaI(Tl) detectors and two 3"x3" LaBr3(Ce) detectors or eight 2"x4"x16" NaI(Tl) detectors. The paper will provide an overview of the analysis of gamma radiation spectra, system limitations, and emergency response applications.

  11. Chemical speciation of size-segregated floor dusts and airborne magnetic particles collected at underground subway stations in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, BoWha; Malek, Md Abdul; Koo, Yong Sung; Jung, Jong Hoon; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Kim, HyeKyoung; Ro, Chul-Un

    2012-04-30

    Previous studies have reported the major chemical species of underground subway particles to be Fe-containing species that are generated from wear and friction processes at rail-wheel-brake and catenaries-pantographs interfaces. To examine chemical composition of Fe-containing particles in more details, floor dusts were collected at five sampling locations of an underground subway station. Size-segregated floor dusts were separated into magnetic and non-magnetic fractions using a permanent magnet. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), iron metal, which is relatively harmless, was found to be the dominating chemical species in the floor dusts of the <25 μm size fractions with minor fractions of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, S, and C. From SEM analysis, the floor dusts of the <25 μm size fractions collected on railroad ties appeared to be smaller than 10 μm, indicating that their characteristics should somewhat reflect the characteristics of airborne particles in the tunnel and the platform. As most floor dusts are magnetic, PM levels at underground subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. In addition, airborne subway particles, most of which were smaller than 10 μm, were collected using permanent magnets at two underground subway stations, namely Jegi and Yangjae stations, in Seoul, Korea. XRD and SEM/EDX analyses showed that most of the magnetic aerosol particles collected at Jegi station was iron metal, whereas those at Yangjae station contained a small amount of Fe mixed with Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, and C. The difference in composition of the Fe-containing particles between the two subway stations was attributed to the different ballast tracks used.

  12. Airborne geophysical survey of ice caps in the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, S. J.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Christoffersen, P.; Benham, T. J.; Young, D. A.; Blankenship, D. D.; Richter, T.; Ng, G.; Grima, C.; Habbal, F.; Sharp, M. J.; Rutishauser, A.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that between 2003 and 2009, 60 ± 6 Gt of ice was lost each year from the Canadian Arctic (Gardner et al., 2013), making the region the largest cryospheric contributor to global sea level rise outside of the great ice sheets. Glacier ice in the Queen Elizabeth Islands (QEI) currently covers more than 100,000 km2, representing 20% of Earth's ice-covered land area outside of Greenland and Antarctica. The vast majority of this ice is stored within six ice caps located on Ellesmere, Devon and Axel Heiberg islands. Recent satellite observations of the outlet glaciers draining these ice caps have revealed significant velocity variability on inter-annual and multi-year timescales (Van Wychen et al., 2014), though the drivers of these dynamics are not yet understood. Here we present results obtained in May 2014 during an airborne geophysical survey of the ice caps of Axel Heiberg, Ellesmere and Devon islands, including Agassiz Ice Cap (17,300 km2), Prince of Wales Icefield (19,300 km2) and Devon Ice Cap (14,000 km2). We used a Basler BT-67 aircraft equipped with a suite of geophysical instruments, including a phase-coherent VHF ice-penetrating radar, to measure ice thickness and investigate ice basal conditions along outlet glacier flow lines and in the interior of the ice caps. We reveal that the glaciers draining the ice caps of the QEI exhibit diverse characteristics over short spatial scales, and that fast-flowing tidewater glaciers are located adjacent to previously fast-flowing areas that have subsequently stagnated. Our results show that many ice cap outlet glaciers on Ellesmere and Devon islands are between 700 and 1000 m thick and flow through deep bedrock troughs whose beds lie below sea-level. Some of the outlet glaciers also have floating tongues of ice which extend into the adjacent fjord waters. We intend to use our results to characterize the substrate beneath the ice, and to reveal any variations in conditions at the ice

  13. Project MAGNET High-level Vector Survey Data Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Rachel J.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1951, the U.S. Navy, under its Project MAGNET program, has been continuously collecting vector aeromagnetic survey data to support the U.S. Defense Mapping Agency's world magnetic and charting program. During this forty-year period, a variety of survey platforms and instrumentation configurations have been used. The current Project MAGNET survey platform is a Navy Orion RP-3D aircraft which has been specially modified and specially equipped with a redundant suite of navigational positioning, attitude, and magnetic sensors. A review of the survey data collection procedures and calibration and editing techniques applied to the data generated by this suite of instrumentation will be presented. Among the topics covered will be the determination of its parameters from the low-level calibration maneuvers flown over geomagnetic observatories.

  14. 20. View of magnetic compass; "bigeyes," used for surveying ships ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View of magnetic compass; "bigeyes," used for surveying ships and shore; and signal lights (covered). - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter BRAMBLE, Waterfront at Lincoln Avenue, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  15. Performance metrics for state-of-the-art airborne magnetic and electromagnetic systems for mapping and detection of unexploded ordnance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, William E.; Bell, David T.; Gamey, T. Jeffrey; Beard, Les P.; Sheehan, Jacob R.; Norton, Jeannemarie

    2010-04-01

    Over the past decade, notable progress has been made in the performance of airborne geophysical systems for mapping and detection of unexploded ordnance in terrestrial and shallow marine environments. For magnetometer systems, the most significant improvements include development of denser magnetometer arrays and vertical gradiometer configurations. In prototype analyses and recent Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) assessments using new production systems the greatest sensitivity has been achieved with a vertical gradiometer configuration, despite model-based survey design results which suggest that dense total-field arrays would be superior. As effective as magnetometer systems have proven to be at many sites, they are inadequate at sites where basalts and other ferrous geologic formations or soils produce anomalies that approach or exceed those of target ordnance items. Additionally, magnetometer systems are ineffective where detection of non-ferrous ordnance items is of primary concern. Recent completion of the Battelle TEM-8 airborne time-domain electromagnetic system represents the culmination of nearly nine years of assessment and development of airborne electromagnetic systems for UXO mapping and detection. A recent ESTCP demonstration of this system in New Mexico showed that it was able to detect 99% of blind-seeded ordnance items, 81mm and larger, and that it could be used to map in detail a bombing target on a basalt flow where previous airborne magnetometer surveys had failed. The probability of detection for the TEM-8 in the blind-seeded study area was better than that reported for a dense-array total-field magnetometer demonstration of the same blind-seeded site, and the TEM-8 system successfully detected these items with less than half as many anomaly picks as the dense-array total-field magnetometer system.

  16. Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Survey Data and Maps, Seco Creek Area, Medina and Uvalade Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Smith, David V.; Hill, Patricia L.; Labson, Victor F.

    2003-01-01

    A helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic (HEM) survey was completed of a 209 square kilometer (81 square miles) area of the central Edwards aquifer. This open-file report is a release of the airborne geophysical data and a summary of the hydrologic application. The survey area was centered on the Valdina Farms sinkhole along the Seco Creek drainage in western Medina County, Texas. Flight lines were flown north south with three east west tie lines to aid in leveling the magnetic data. Additional lines were flown on each side of the Seco and Little Seco Creek drainages. A five kilometer (4 mile) extension of 15 lines was flown north of the main survey block centered on Seco Creek. This digital data release contains the flight line data, grids, and maps of the HEM survey data. The Edwards aquifer in this area consists of three hydrologic zones: catchment, recharge, and confined. The Glen Rose Formation is exposed in the catchment area. The recharge zone is situated in the Balcones fault zone where the Devils River Group of the Edwards aquifer has been exposed by normal faults. The magnetic data is not discussed in depth here, but does have high amplitude closed anomalies caused by shallow igneous intrusives. The Woodard Cave Fault that separates the recharge and catchment zones is in places associated with a weak linear magnetic low. The HEM data has been processed to produce apparent resistivities for each of the six EM coil pairs and frequencies. Maps of the apparent resistivity for the five horizontal coil pairs show that the catchment, recharge, and confined zones all have numerous linear features that are likely caused by structures, many of which have not been mapped. The distribution of high resistivity areas reflects the lithologic differences within the Trinity and Edwards aquifers.

  17. Interpretation of an airborne geophysical survey in southern Paris Basin: towards a lithological cartography, key tool for the management of shrinking/swelling clay problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prognon, F.; Tourliere, B.; Perrin, J.; Lacquement, F.; Martelet, G.; Deparis, J.; Gourdier, S.; Drufin, S.

    2011-12-01

    Regolith formations support a full spectrum of human activities. Among others, they provide a source of extractable materials and form the substratum of soils. As such, they should be considered as a capital to be managed and protected. Moreover, one of the main challenges for present and future land settlement is to prevent house building programs from being planned inside shrink-swell risky areas which is only possible thanks to an complete lithological mapping of the french regolith. We illustrate here the results of the geological interpretation of an airborne geophysical survey carried out in "Région Centre" administrative region in the southern part of the Paris Basin, in France. Among other techniques, airborne geophysics is appropriate to quickly provide information on near surface, because of i) its high spatial coverage ii) the rapidity of acquisition and iii) the variety of available sensors (magnetic, spectral radiometry, electromagnetic...). Spectral radiometry data were collected with a line spacing of 1 km. This method provides maps of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) which are the only naturally occurring elements with direct or indirect radioisotopes that produce gamma rays of sufficient intensity to be measured at airborne survey heights. On the radiometric data we applied the HAC (Hierarchical Ascendant Classification) computation procedure: taking into account several variables, the statistical HAC method groups individuals based on their resemblance. Also in this study, calibrated Total Count channel (TCm) is compared to an estimated dose rate (TCe) computed from the measured radioelement abundances: TCe = 13.078 * K + 5.675 * U + 2.494 * Th. Our results show that the ratio TCe/TCm came out to be a good indicator of ground property changes within Sologne mixed sandy-clay environment. Processed geophysical data are cross-checked with geological data (from field observations) and field or laboratory measurements of mineralogical data

  18. Airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly signatures of serpentinite in relation to soil geochemistry, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, A.E.; Van Gosen, B. S.

    2009-01-01

    Serpentinized ultramafic rocks and associated soils in northern California are characterized by high concentrations of Cr and Ni, low levels of radioelements (K, Th, and U) and high amounts of ferrimagnetic minerals (primarily magnetite). Geophysical attributes over ultramafic rocks, which include airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly data, are quantified and provide indirect measurements on the relative abundance of radioelements and magnetic minerals, respectively. Attributes are defined through a statistical modeling approach and the results are portrayed as probabilities in chart and map form. Two predictive models are presented, including one derived from the aeromagnetic anomaly data and one from a combination of the airborne K, Th and U gamma-ray data. Both models distinguish preferential values within the aerogeophysical data that coincide with mapped and potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks. The magnetic predictive model shows positive probabilities associated with magnetic anomaly highs and, to a lesser degree, anomaly lows, which accurately locate many known ultramafic outcrops, but more interestingly, locate potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks, possible extensions of ultramafic bodies that dip into the shallow subsurface, as well as prospective buried ultramafic rocks. The airborne radiometric model shows positive probabilities in association with anomalously low gamma radiation measurements over ultramafic rock, which is similar to that produced by gabbro, metavolcanic rock, and water bodies. All of these features share the characteristic of being depleted in K, Th and U. Gabbro is the only rock type in the study area that shares similar magnetic properties with the ultramafic rock. The aerogeophysical model results are compared to the distribution of ultramafic outcrops and to Cr, Ni, K, Th and U concentrations and magnetic susceptibility measurements from soil samples. Analysis of the soil data indicates high positive correlation between

  19. Surveying techniques with a solid-state magnetic multishot device

    SciTech Connect

    Thorogood, J.L. ); Knott, D.R. )

    1990-09-01

    An electronic magnetic multishot instrument was introduced in 1985 to overcome accuracy and reliability limitations associated with conventional photomechanical multishot systems. This paper describes the survey system and the instrument's performance capabilities. Our aim is to develop a tool-performance model for general application to the management of surveying operations. Accuracy is considered in two parts: sensor errors are considered in detail, and external effects on accuracy- e.g., axial misalignment, bottom-hole-assembly (BHA) deflection, geomagnetic influences, and drillstring-induced interference- are analyzed and quantified. The authors found that geomagnetic influences and drillstring-induced interference dominate the ultimate performance of all magnetic tools, particularly this electronic multishot instrument. This paper also describes in-hole referencing, a method of eliminating these errors that involves surveying the first part of an openhole section with a high-accuracy gyroscope and aligning data derived from subsequent magnetic surveys with it.

  20. A refined biomonitoring study of airborne particulate matter pollution in Rome, with magnetic measurements on Quercus Ilex tree leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szönyi, Michael; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Hirt, Ann M.

    2008-04-01

    Elevated levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) are a current problem for air quality in many major metropolitan areas. Many European cities have tightened the PM limits in the air, due to advances in monitoring PM levels. In order to establish guidelines for monitoring and curbing anthropogenic PM output, a better understanding of its origin, composition and diffusion is required. Biomonitoring of magnetic properties of tree leaves has been suggested previously to be a good approach to measure pollution levels in cities both in space and time. We report on a magnetic biomonitoring study of PM in the city of Rome, conducted from 2005 October to December. We collected approximately 180 different sample sets of tree leaves of Quercus ilex, an evergreen oak widely distributed in Rome, at 112 different locations. Specific magnetic susceptibility χ of the leaf is used as a fast, easy and cost-effective proxy to assess levels of primary anthropogenic airborne PM pollution. Highly polluted areas correlate with high traffic areas, with an average susceptibility value of χ = 3.2 × 10-7 m3 kg-1. Low traffic zones are characterized by values more than an order of magnitude lower at χ = 1.4 × 10-8 m3 kg-1, and the background magnetic susceptibility is around χ = 2.6 × 10-9 m3 kg-1. The data show that distance dependence from the source is the most significant factor for the concentration of magnetic PM, and that pollution levels and sources can be reliably delineated by measuring magnetic susceptibility values on tree leaf samples of Q. ilex. A new protocol for magnetic susceptibility measurements is proposed, in order to account for changes due to water evaporation in the leaves as a function of time after collection of the samples. Additional magnetic analyses, such as acquisition of artificial remanences and hysteresis properties, were used to characterize the mineralogy and grain size of the magnetic PM. The results indicate that the population of ferrimagnetic

  1. Comparison of Precision of Biomass Estimates in Regional Field Sample Surveys and Airborne LiDAR-Assisted Surveys in Hedmark County, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naesset, Erik; Gobakken, Terje; Bollandsas, Ole Martin; Gregoire, Timothy G.; Nelson, Ross; Stahl, Goeran

    2013-01-01

    Airborne scanning LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) has emerged as a promising tool to provide auxiliary data for sample surveys aiming at estimation of above-ground tree biomass (AGB), with potential applications in REDD forest monitoring. For larger geographical regions such as counties, states or nations, it is not feasible to collect airborne LiDAR data continuously ("wall-to-wall") over the entire area of interest. Two-stage cluster survey designs have therefore been demonstrated by which LiDAR data are collected along selected individual flight-lines treated as clusters and with ground plots sampled along these LiDAR swaths. Recently, analytical AGB estimators and associated variance estimators that quantify the sampling variability have been proposed. Empirical studies employing these estimators have shown a seemingly equal or even larger uncertainty of the AGB estimates obtained with extensive use of LiDAR data to support the estimation as compared to pure field-based estimates employing estimators appropriate under simple random sampling (SRS). However, comparison of uncertainty estimates under SRS and sophisticated two-stage designs is complicated by large differences in the designs and assumptions. In this study, probability-based principles to estimation and inference were followed. We assumed designs of a field sample and a LiDAR-assisted survey of Hedmark County (HC) (27,390 km2), Norway, considered to be more comparable than those assumed in previous studies. The field sample consisted of 659 systematically distributed National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots and the airborne scanning LiDAR data were collected along 53 parallel flight-lines flown over the NFI plots. We compared AGB estimates based on the field survey only assuming SRS against corresponding estimates assuming two-phase (double) sampling with LiDAR and employing model-assisted estimators. We also compared AGB estimates based on the field survey only assuming two-stage sampling (the NFI

  2. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Durango A, B, C, and D, Colorado. Volume I. Detail area. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the Durango A, Durango B, Durango C, and Durango D Detail Areas of southwestern Colorado. The Durango A Detail Area is within the coverage of the Needle Mountains and Silverton 15' map sheets, and the Pole Creek Mountain, Rio Grande Pyramid, Emerald Lake, Granite Peak, Vallecito Reservoir, and Lemon Reservoir 7.5' map sheets of the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS). The Durango B Detail Area is within the coverage of the Silverton 15' map sheet and the Wetterhorn Peak, Uncompahgre Peak, Lake City, Redcloud Peak, Lake San Cristobal, Pole Creek Mountain, and Finger Mesa 7.5' map sheets of the NTMS. The Durango C Detail Area is within the coverage of the Platoro and Wolf Creek Pass 15' map sheets of the NTMS. The Durango D Detail Area is within the coverage of the Granite Lake, Cimarrona Peak, Bear Mountain, and Oakbrush Ridge 7.5' map sheets of the NTMS. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, gridded, and contoured to produce maps of the radiometric variables, uranium, potassium, and thorium; their ratios; and the residual magnetic field. These maps have been analyzed in order to produce a multi-variant analysis contour map based on the radiometric response of the individual geological units. A geochemical analysis has been performed, using the radiometric and magnetic contour maps, the multi-variant analysis map, and factor analysis techniques, to produce a geochemical analysis map for the area.

  3. Elemental composition of airborne particulates and source identification - An extensive one year survey. [in Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Antoine, A. C.; Leibecki, H. F.; Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Concentrations of 60 chemical elements in the airborne particulate matter were measured at 16 sites in Cleveland, OH over a 1 year period during 1971 and 1972 (45 to 50 sampling days). Analytical methods used included instrumental neutron activation, emission spectroscopy, and combustion techniques. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, the analytical methods, the use of several analytical facilities, and samples with concentrations below the detection limits are evaluated in detail. The data are discussed in relation to other studies and source origins. The trace constituent concentrations as a function of wind direction are used to suggest a practical method for air pollution source identification.

  4. Payload-Directed Control of Geophysical Magnetic Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ritchie; Yeh, Yoo-Hsiu; Ippolito, Corey; Spritzer, John; Phelps, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    Using non-navigational (e.g. imagers, scientific) sensor information in control loops is a difficult problem to which no general solution exists. Whether the task can be successfully achieved in a particular case depends highly on problem specifics, such as application domain and sensors of interest. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using magnetometer data for control feedback in the context of geophysical magnetic surveys. An experimental system was created and deployed to (a) assess sensor integration with autonomous vehicles, (b) investigate how magnetometer data can be used for feedback control, and (c) evaluate the feasibility of using such a system for geophysical magnetic surveys. Finally, we report the results of our experiments and show that payload-directed control of geophysical magnetic surveys is indeed feasible.

  5. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Weed quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Volume II contains the flight path, radiometric multi-parameter stacked profiles, magnetic and ancillary parameter stacked profiles, histograms, and anomaly maps for the Weed Quadrangle in California.

  6. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  7. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Carbon and Sweetwater counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 151 square miles of Baggs SW and Baggs SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of twelve radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The radioactivity

  8. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Sand Creek SW and Sand Creek SE quadrangles, Sweetwater county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 125 square miles of Sand Creek SW and Sand Creek SE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater counties by the U.S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation detection equipment mounted in a C-47 aircraft and consisted of parallel east-west flight lines spaced at quarter mile intervals, flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyrostabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. The width of the zone on the ground form which the anomalous radiation is measured at the nominal 500 foot flight altitude varied with the areal extent and the intensity of radioactivity of the source. For strong sources of radioactivity the width of the zone may be as much as 1,400 feet. Thus, quarter mile spacing of the flight lines would be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity; however, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight lines may not be noted. The approximate locations of nine radioactivity anomalies are shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of the anomalies may be in error by as much as a quarter mile owing to the errors in available base maps or to the existence of areas on the base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The present technique of airborne radioactivity measurement does not permit distinguishing between activity due to thorium and that due to uranium. An anomaly, therefore, may represent radioactivity due entirely to one or to a combination of these elements. The

  9. Magnetic white dwarf stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, I.; Jordan, S.; Kleinman, S. J.; Koester, D.; Külebi, B.; Peçanha, V.; Castanheira, B. G.; Nitta, A.; Costa, J. E. S.; Winget, D. E.; Kanaan, A.; Fraga, L.

    2013-03-01

    To obtain better statistics on the occurrence of magnetism among white dwarfs, we searched the spectra of the hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf stars (DAs) in the Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for Zeeman splittings and estimated the magnetic fields. We found 521 DAs with detectable Zeeman splittings, with fields in the range from around 1 to 733 MG, which amounts to 4 per cent of all DAs observed. As the SDSS spectra have low signal-to-noise ratios, we carefully investigated by simulations with theoretical spectra how reliable our detection of magnetic field was.

  10. Deep crustal structure of magma-rich passive margin as revealed by the Northeast GreenlandSPAN 2D seismic survey and airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Stanislaw; Rippington, Stephen; Silva, Mercia; Houghton, Phill; Helwig, Jim

    2014-05-01

    The objective of our project was to integrate the results from the Northeast GreenlandSPAN™ 2D seismic survey with newly acquired airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (FTG) and Magnetic potential field data over the Danmarkshaven Ridge area, NE Greenland. The potential field data were constrained by 32 long offset pre stack depth migrated seismic profiles selected from the Northeast GreenlandSPAN™ survey. The results provide a new insight in the deep crustal architecture of the Greenland passive margin. They also shed a new light on crustal-scale deformation and igneous activity in a magma-rich continental margin. The structural data set is based on the integrated interpretation of 2D seismic data and FTG data, which was further supplemented by the airborne magnetic data plus the gravity and magnetic shipborne data. 2D gravity and magnetic forward modelling was used for testing geological/seismic models against the potential field data. A regional Moho grid derived from 3D gravity inversion was as a starting point and reference for the 2D modelling. The resultant horizons from the 2D potential fields models were subsequently gridded to help create a 3D structural model. The computed residual signal from the 3D model, the difference between the observed gravity and the forward calculated model response, allowed the accuracy of the structural interpretation to be tested. The area is dominated by three structural trends: (1) N-S to NNE-SSW, (2) WNW-ESE, and (3) NW-SE. The first trend is represented by Early Cretaceous normal faults defining the Danmarkshaven Ridge whereas the second set of structures corresponds to the WNW-ESE oriented right-lateral strike slip faults. The third structural trend is delineated by the NW-SE oriented Greenland Fracture Zone (GFZ). Importantly, a distinct step in the COB suggests post-break-up reactivation of the GFZ with left-lateral kinematics. There is a good match between the modelled Moho and the GFZ suggesting its continuation

  11. Multi-trophic invasion resistance in Hawaii: bioacoustics, field surveys, and airborne remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Boelman, Natalie T; Asner, Gregory P; Hart, Patrick J; Martin, Roberta E

    2007-12-01

    We used airborne imaging spectroscopy and scanning light detection and ranging (LiDAR), along with bioacoustic recordings, to determine how a plant species invasion affects avian abundance and community composition across a range of Hawaiian submontane ecosystems. Total avian abundance and the ratio of native to exotic avifauna were highest in habitats with the highest canopy cover and height. Comparing biophysically equivalent sites, stands dominated by native Metrosideros polymorpha trees hosted larger native avian communities than did mixed stands of Metrosideros and the invasive tree Morella faya. A multi-trophic analysis strongly suggests that native avifauna provide biotic resistance against the invasion of Morella trees and exotic birds, thus slowing invasion "meltdowns" that disrupt the functioning of native Hawaiian ecosystems.

  12. Development of a laser fluorosensor for airborne surveying of the aquatic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, M. P. F.; Houston, W. R.; Measures, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    A field based laser fluorosensor, employing a pulsed nitrogen laser and telescope photomultiplier detector system, has been successfully tested at night from a cliff top site overlooking Lake Ontario providing target ranges greater than 274 meters. Remotely sensed spectra and amplitude changes in the fluorescence emission of natural waters have shown potential as a water quality indicator. In this connection, a convenient internal reference standard with which to gauge the amplitude of the fluorescence signal is realized in the form of the concurrent water Raman emission. Remote measurements of oil fluorescence emission spectra suggest that airborne laser fluorosensors are capable of detecting and characterizing the oil in a given slick and that environmental aging of these slicks does not significantly alter their fluorescence emission signature.

  13. Crustal structure beneath the Paleozoic Parnaíba Basin revealed by airborne gravity and magnetic data, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de Castroa, David L.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Vidotti, Roberta M.; Bezerra, Francisco H. R.; Dantas, Elton L.

    2014-01-01

    The Parnaíba Basin is a large Paleozoic syneclise in northeastern Brazil underlain by Precambrian crystalline basement, which comprises a complex lithostructural and tectonic framework formed during the Neoproterozoic–Eopaleozoic Brasiliano–Pan African orogenic collage. A sag basin up to 3.5 km thick and 1000 km long formed after the collage. The lithologic composition, structure, and role in the basin evolution of the underlying basement are the focus of this study. Airborne gravity and magnetic data were modeled to reveal the general crustal structure underneath the Parnaíba Basin. Results indicate that gravity and magnetic signatures delineate the main boundaries and structural trends of three cratonic areas and surrounding Neoproterozoic fold belts in the basement. Triangular-shaped basement inliers are geophysically defined in the central region of this continental-scale Neoproterozoic convergence zone. A 3-D gravity inversion constrained by seismological data reveals that basement inliers exhibit a 36–40.5 km deep crustal root, with borders defined by a high-density and thinner crust. Forward modeling of gravity and magnetic data indicates that lateral boundaries between crustal units are limited by Brasiliano shear zones, representing lithospheric sutures of the Amazonian and São Francisco Cratons, Tocantins Province and Parnaíba Block. In addition, coincident residual gravity, residual magnetic, and pseudo-gravity lows indicate two complex systems of Eopaleozoic rifts related to the initial phase of the sag deposition, which follow basement trends in several directions.

  14. A survey of natural aggregate properties and characteristics important in remote sensing and airborne geophysics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, D.H.; Langer, W.H.; Miller, S.

    1995-01-01

    Natural aggregate is vital to the construction industry. Although natural aggregate is a high volume/low value commodity that is abundant, new sources are becoming increasingly difficult to find and develop because of rigid industry specifications, political considerations, development and transportation costs, and environmental concerns. There are two primary sources of natural aggregate: (1) exposed or near-surface bedrock that can be crushed, and (2) deposits of sand and gravel. Remote sensing and airborne geophysics detect surface and near-surface phenomena, and may be useful for detecting and mapping potential aggregate sources; however, before a methodology for applying these techniques can be developed, it is necessary to understand the type, distribution, physical properties, and characteristics of natural aggregate deposits. The distribution of potential aggregate sources is closely tied to local geologic history. Conventional exploration for natural aggregate deposits has been largely a ground-based operation, although aerial photographs and topographic maps have been extensively used to target possible deposits. Today, the exploration process also considers factors such as the availability of the land, space and water supply for processing, political and environmental factors, and distance from the market; exploration and planning cannot be separated. There are many physical properties and characteristics by which to judge aggregate material for specific applications; most of these properties and characteristics pertain only to individual aggregate particles. The application of remote sensing and airborne geophysical measurements to detecting and mapping potential aggregate sources, however, is based on intrinsic bulk physical properties and extrinsic characteristics of the deposits that can be directly measured, mathematically derived from measurement, or interpreted with remote sensing and geophysical data. ?? 1995 Oxford UniversityPress.

  15. The Spokane fault, Washington, Imaged with High-Resolution Airborne Magnetic Data—Implications for the 2001 Spokane Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, R. J.; Sherrod, B. L.; Weaver, C. S.; Stephenson, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    A newly acquired, high-resolution aeromagnetic survey provides insights into the near-surface lithology and tectonic structure throughout the greater Spokane area of northeastern Washington and northwestern Idaho. The region has a diverse array of magnetic lithologies, ranging from highly magnetic flood basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) to weakly magnetic Mesozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks. Faults within these magnetic lithologies produce linear magnetic anomalies that permit mapping of geologic structures over tens of kilometers. A high-amplitude, linear magnetic anomaly overlies the NW- striking Cheney fracture zone 37 km southwest of Spokane and is interpreted as a basaltic dike swarm intruded during the extensional event that opened the fractures, possibly feeder dikes for overlying CRBG flows. A sub-parallel anomaly near the town of Cheney reflects another dike swarm, likely formed during the same extensional event. The Latah fault is seen as a discontinuous alignment of magnetic anomalies extending north-northwestward from south of Spokane to the northern edge of the magnetic survey, a distance of 44 km. An arcuate, north-striking magnetic lineament ~20 km northeast of Spokane may mark the Newport fault, the detachment that promoted exhumation of the Priest River metamorphic complex. A subtle northeast-striking magnetic lineament passes through downtown Spokane and may indicate the trace of the Spokane fault, suspected of producing more than 105 small (M≤4), shallow earthquakes within Spokane city limits in 2001, accompanied by 15 mm of vertical uplift. This magnetic lineament extends 22 km and, to the northwest, merges with the lineament interpreted as the Newport fault. The Spokane fault may represent a reactivated section of the Newport fault that otherwise is not known to be active today. New LiDAR data from the Spokane area does not show distinct fault scarps associated with these magnetic anomalies, but a more comprehensive

  16. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  17. Magnetic reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail: A comprehensive magnetic field survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. W.; Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process throughout the solar system, significantly shaping and modulating the magnetospheres of the magnetized planets. Within planetary magnetotails reconnection can be responsible for energizing particles and potentially changing the total flux and mass contained within the magnetosphere. The Kronian magnetosphere is thought to be a middle ground between the rotationally dominated Jovian magnetosphere and the solar wind driven terrestrial magnetosphere. However, previous studies have not been able to find a statistical reconnection x-line, as has been possible at both Jupiter and Earth. Additionally the standard picture of magnetotail reconnection at Saturn, developed by Cowley et al. [2004], suggests a potential asymmetry between the dawn and dusk flanks, caused by different reconnection processes dominating. This work centers on the development of an algorithm designed to find reconnection related events in spacecraft magnetometer data, aiming to reduce the bias that manual searches could inherently introduce, thereby ensuring the validity of any statistical analysis. The algorithm primarily identifies the reconnection related events from deflections in the north-south component of the magnetic field, allowing an almost uninterrupted in-situ search (when the spacecraft is situated within the magnetotail). The new catalogue of candidate reconnection events, produced by the algorithm, enables a more complete statistical view of reconnection in the Kronian magnetotail. Well-studied data encompassing the deep magnetotail and dawn flank (particularly from orbits in 2006) were used to train the algorithm and develop reasonable criteria. The algorithm was then applied to data encompassing the dusk flank (including orbits from 2009, for which plasma data have been examined by Thomsen et al. [2014]). This combination enables a robust, and global, comparison of reconnection rates, signatures and properties in the Kronian magnetotail.

  18. Magnetic resonance elastography hardware design: a survey.

    PubMed

    Tse, Z T H; Janssen, H; Hamed, A; Ristic, M; Young, I; Lamperth, M

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an emerging technique capable of measuring the shear modulus of tissue. A suspected tumour can be identified by comparing its properties with those of tissues surrounding it; this can be achieved even in deep-lying areas as long as mechanical excitation is possible. This would allow non-invasive methods for cancer-related diagnosis in areas not accessible with conventional palpation. An actuating mechanism is required to generate the necessary tissue displacements directly on the patient in the scanner and three different approaches, in terms of actuator action and position, exist to derive stiffness measurements. However, the magnetic resonance (MR) environment places considerable constraints on the design of such devices, such as the possibility of mutual interference between electrical components, the scanner field, and radio frequency pulses, and the physical space restrictions of the scanner bore. This paper presents a review of the current solutions that have been developed for MRE devices giving particular consideration to the design criteria including the required vibration frequency and amplitude in different applications, the issue of MR compatibility, actuation principles, design complexity, and scanner synchronization issues. The future challenges in this field are also described.

  19. Magnetic reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail: A comprehensive magnetic field survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. W.; Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2016-04-01

    Reconnection within planetary magnetotails is responsible for locally energizing particles and changing the magnetic topology. Its role in terms of global magnetospheric dynamics can involve changing the mass and flux content of the magnetosphere. We have identified reconnection related events in spacecraft magnetometer data recorded during Cassini's exploration of Saturn's magnetotail. The events are identified from deflections in the north-south component of the magnetic field, significant above a background level. Data were selected to provide full tail coverage, encompassing the dawn and dusk flanks as well as the deepest midnight orbits. Overall 2094 reconnection related events were identified, with an average rate of 5.0 events per day. The majority of events occur in clusters (within 3 h of other events). We examine changes in this rate in terms of local time and latitude coverage, taking seasonal effects into account. The observed reconnection rate peaks postmidnight with more infrequent but steady loss seen on the dusk flank. We estimate the mass loss from the event catalog and find it to be insufficient to balance the input from the moon Enceladus. Several reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. The reconnection X line location appears to be highly variable, though a statistical separation between events tailward and planetward of the X line is observed at a radial distance of between 20 and 30RS downtail. The small sample size at dawn prevents comprehensive statistical comparison with the dusk flank observations in terms of flux closure.

  20. The use of geomagnetic field models in magnetic surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, R. D.; Gain, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The importance of global geomagnetic field models for the reduction of magnetic surveys is discussed. It is demonstrated that a numerical model with adequate secular variation correction, provides a suitable representation of the regional field. The limitations of the presently available models are reported, with emphasis on the International Geomagnetic Reference Field.

  1. High Resolution Marine Magnetic Survey of Shallow Water Littoral Area

    PubMed Central

    Ginzburg, Boris; Cohen, Tsuriel Ram; Zafrir, Hovav; Alimi, Roger; Salomonski, Nizan; Sharvit, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a system developed for detection and accurate mapping of ferro-metallic objects buried below the seabed in shallow waters. The system comprises a precise magnetic gradiometer and navigation subsystem, both installed on a non-magnetic catamaran towed by a low-magnetic interfering boat. In addition we present the results of a marine survey of a near-shore area in the vicinity of Atlit, a town situated on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about 15 km south of Haifa. The primary purpose of the survey was to search for a Harvard airplane that crashed into the sea in 1960. A magnetic map of the survey area (3.5 km2 on a 0.5 m grid) was created revealing the anomalies at sub-meter accuracy. For each investigated target location a corresponding ferro-metallic item was dug out, one of which turned to be very similar to a part of the crashed airplane. The accuracy of location was confirmed by matching the position of the actual dug artifacts with the magnetic map within a range of ± 1 m, in a water depth of 9 m.

  2. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Jamestown quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Volume II contains the flight path map, radiometric multiple-parameter stacked profiles, magnetic and ancillary parameter stacked profiles, histograms, anomaly maps for uranium, thorium, potassium, uranium/thorium, thorium/potassium, and uranium/potassium.

  3. GTE: a new FFT based software to compute terrain correction on airborne gravity surveys in spherical approximation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, Martina; Sampietro, Daniele; Sansò, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The computation of the vertical attraction due to the topographic masses (Terrain Correction) is still a matter of study both in geodetic as well as in geophysical applications. In fact it is required in high precision geoid estimation by the remove-restore technique and it is used to isolate the gravitational effect of anomalous masses in geophysical exploration. This topographical effect can be evaluated from the knowledge of a Digital Terrain Model in different ways: e.g. by means of numerical integration, by prisms, tesseroids, polyedra or Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques. The increasing resolution of recently developed digital terrain models, the increasing number of observation points due to extensive use of airborne gravimetry and the increasing accuracy of gravity data represents nowadays major issues for the terrain correction computation. Classical methods such as prism or point masses approximations are indeed too slow while Fourier based techniques are usually too approximate for the required accuracy. In this work a new software, called Gravity Terrain Effects (GTE), developed in order to guarantee high accuracy and fast computation of terrain corrections is presented. GTE has been thought expressly for geophysical applications allowing the computation not only of the effect of topographic and bathymetric masses but also those due to sedimentary layers or to the Earth crust-mantle discontinuity (the so called Moho). In the present contribution we summarize the basic theory of the software and its practical implementation. Basically the GTE software is based on a new algorithm which, by exploiting the properties of the Fast Fourier Transform, allows to quickly compute the terrain correction, in spherical approximation, at ground or airborne level. Some tests to prove its performances are also described showing GTE capability to compute high accurate terrain corrections in a very short time. Results obtained for a real airborne survey with GTE

  4. Stream Morphologic Measurements from Airborne Laser Swath Mapping: Comparisons with Field Surveys, Traditional DEMs, and Aerial Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, N. P.; Schultz, L. L.

    2005-12-01

    Precise measurement of stream morphology over entire watersheds is one of the great research opportunities provided by airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM). ALSM surveys allow for rapid quantification of factors, such as channel width and gradient, that control stream hydraulic and ecologic properties. We compare measurements from digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from ALSM data collected by the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) to field surveys, traditional DEMs (rasterized from topographic maps), and aerial photographs. The field site is in the northern Black Mountains in arid Death Valley National Park (California). The area is unvegetated, and therefore is excellent for testing DEM analysis methods because the ALSM data required minimal filtering, and the resulting DEM contains relatively few unphysical sinks. Algorithms contained in geographic information systems (GIS) software used to extract stream networks from DEMs yield best results where streams are steep enough for resolvable pixel-to-pixel elevation change, and channel width is on the order of pixel resolution. This presents a new challenge with ALSM-derived DEMs because the pixel size (1 m) is often an order of magnitude or more smaller than channel width. We find the longitudinal profile of Gower Gulch in the northern Black Mountains (~4 km total length) extracted using the ALSM DEM and a flow accumulation algorithm is 14% longer than a traditional 10-m DEM, and 13% longer than a field survey. These differences in length (and therefore gradient) are due to the computed channel path following small-scale topographic variations within the channel bottom that are not relevant during high flows. However, visual analysis of shaded-relief images created from high-resolution ALSM data is an excellent method for digitizing channel banks and thalweg paths. We used these lines to measure distance, elevation, and width. In Gower Gulch, the algorithm-derived profile is 10% longer than that

  5. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data, portions of the North Platte and South Platte Natural Resources Districts, western Nebraska, May 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, B.D.; Abraham, J.D.; Cannia, J.C.; Minsley, B.J.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Ball, L.B.

    2010-01-01

    This report is a release of digital data from a helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey that was conducted during June 2009 in areas of western Nebraska as part of a joint hydrologic study by the North Platte Natural Resource District (NRD), South Platte NRD, and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Flight lines for the survey totaled 937 line kilometers (582 line miles). The objective of the contracted survey, conducted by Fugro Airborne, Ltd., is to improve the understanding of the relation between surface-water and groundwater systems critical to developing groundwater models used in management programs for water resources. A unique aspect of the survey is the flight line layout. One set of flight lines was flown in a zig-zag pattern extending along the length of the previously collected airborne data. The success of this survey design depended on a well-understood regional hydrogeologic framework and model developed by the Cooperative Hydrologic Study of the Platte River Basin and the airborne geophysical data collected in 2008. Resistivity variations along lines could be related to this framework. In addition to these lines, more traditional surveys consisting of parallel flight lines, separated by about 400 meters were carried out for three blocks in the North Platte NRD, the South Platte NRD and in the area of Crescent Lakes. These surveys helped to establish the spatial variations of the resistivity of hydrostratigraphic units. An additional survey was flown over the Crescent Lake area. The objective of this survey, funded by the USGS Office of Groundwater, was to map shallow hydrogeologic features of the southwestern part of the Sand Hills that contain a mix of fresh to saline lakes.

  6. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer amd magnetometer survey: San Francisco quadrangle (California). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Ten uranium anomalies meet the minimum statistical requirements as defined in Volume I. These anomalies are tabulated and are shown on the Uranium Anomaly Interpretation Map, together with the interpretation of the magnetic data. Potassium (%K), equivalent Uranium (ppM eU), equivalent Thorium (ppM eT), eU/eT, eU/K, eT/K, and Magnetic Pseudo Contour Maps are presented in Appendix E. Stacked Profiles showing geologic strips maps along each flight line together with sensor data, and ancillary data are presented in Appendix F. All maps and profiles were prepared on a scale of 1:150,000, but have been reduced to 1:500,000 for presentation in Volume II. A number of short-wavelength magnetic anomalies are associated with ultrabasic intrusives. These intrusives crop out along the major northwest-trending fault zones that traverse the map area, and thus form a magnetic expression of the faults. Part of a long-wavelength anomaly that extends off the map area is present in the northeast corner of the quadrangle. The source of this anomaly is interpreted as a large, deep-seated magnetic body - possibly gabbro.

  7. On the magnetic characterization and quantification of the superparamagnetic fraction of traffic-related urban airborne PM in Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnotti, Leonardo; Winkler, Aldo

    2012-11-01

    The magnetic properties of traffic-related airborne particulate matter (PM) in the city of Rome, Italy, have been previously analyzed and interpreted as suitable proxies to discriminate between different vehicular sources. In this study, we carried out a new set of measurements and analyses specifically devoted to the identification and evaluation of the contribution of ultrafine superparamagnetic (SP) particles to the overall magnetic assemblage of traffic-related PM in Rome. In particular, the presence and the concentration of SP particles have been estimated on powders collected from disk brakes and gasoline exhaust pipes of circulating vehicles and from Quercus ilex leaves grown along high-traffic roads, measuring their hysteresis parameters in a range of temperatures from 293 K to 10 K and measuring the time decay of their saturation remanent magnetization (MRS) at room temperature. The SP fraction contributes for the 10-15% to the overall room temperature MRS and causes the observed changes in the hysteresis properties measured upon cooling down to 10 K. In all the analyzed samples the SP fraction is associated to a generally prevailing population of larger ferrimagnetic multidomain (MD) particles and we suppose that in traffic-related PM the SP fraction mainly occurs as coating of MD particles and originated by localized stress in the oxidized outer shell surrounding the unoxidized core of magnetite-like grains. Under this hypothesis, the estimate of SP content in traffic-related PM cannot be considered a robust proxy to estimate the overall concentration of nanometric particles.

  8. Non-Destructive Survey of Archaeological Sites Using Airborne Laser Scanning and Geophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poloprutský, Z.; Cejpová, M.; Němcová, J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the non-destructive documentation of the "Radkov" (Svitavy district, Czech Republic) archaeological site. ALS, GPR and land survey mapping will be used for the analysis. The fortified hilltop settlement "Radkov" is an immovable historical monument with preserved relics of anthropogenic origin in relief. Terrain reconnaissance can identify several accentuated objects on site. ALS enables identification of poorly recognizable archaeological objects and their contexture in the field. Geophysical survey enables defunct objects identification. These objects are hidden below the current ground surface and their layout is crucial. Land survey mapping provides technical support for ALS and GPR survey. It enables data georeferencing in geodetic reference systems. GIS can then be used for data analysis. M. Cejpová and J. Němcová have studied this site over a long period of time. In 2012 Radkov was surveyed using ALS in the project "The Research of Ancient Road in Southwest Moravia and East Bohemia". Since 2015 the authors have been examining this site. This paper summarises the existing results of the work of these authors. The digital elevation model in the form of a grid (GDEM) with a resolution 1 m of 2012 was the basis for this work. In 2015 the survey net, terrain reconnaissance and GPR survey of two archaeological objects were done at the site. GDEM was compared with these datasets. All datasets were processed individually and its results were compared in ArcGIS. This work was supported by the Grant Agency of the CTU in Prague, grant No. SGS16/063/OHK1/1T/11.

  9. Results of magnetic HGI and radiometric surveys in W. Canada

    SciTech Connect

    LeSchack, L.A.

    1997-05-19

    This article presents four case histories in which ground-based magnetic horizontal gradient intensity (HGI) and radiometric surveys were used in Western Canada for cost-effective geochemical exploration for hydrocarbons. The authors has developed these two surface exploration techniques from published studies and adapted them for use on the prairies the past 7 years. These surveys are used in conjunction with the usual geologic and seismic studies for: (1) evaluating prospects and land; (2) verifying seismic anomalies and inexpensively locating areas for conducting expensive 3D seismic surveys. Occasionally, as in two of the case histories discussed, these surveys were used successfully as stand-alone exploration methods where seismic exploration is not effective. The HGI and radiometric surveys measure, by geophysical methods, those effects associated with geochemical alterations due to vertical microseepage of hydrocarbons. The total cost, including permitting, data acquisition, data processing, and interpretation of the combination HGI and radiometric surveys is about 15% the total cost of a 3D seismic survey. Because of this, the author finds them an attractive and rapid survey adjunct to traditional exploration. They substantially reduce finding costs and significantly raise the probability of financial success.

  10. HPMSS(High Precision Magnetic Survey System) and InterRidge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isezaki, N.; Sayanagi, K.

    2012-12-01

    From the beginning of 1990s to the beginning of 2000s, the Japanese group of IntreRidge conducted many cruises for three component magnetic survey using Shipboard Three Component Magnetometer (STCM) and Deep Towed Three Component Magnetometer (DTCM) in the world wide oceans. We have been developing HPMSS during this time with support of Dr.Tamaki(the late representative of InterRidge Japan) who understood the advantages of three component geomagnetic anomalies (TCGA). TCGA measured by STCM determines the direction of geomagnetic anomaly lineations precisely at every point where TCGA were observed, which playes the important role in magnetic anomaly lineation analysis. Even in the beginning of 2000s, almost all marine magnetic scientists believed that the total intensity anomly (TIA) is the better data than TCGA for analysis because the scalar magnetometers (e.g. proton precession magnetometer) have the better accuracy than any other magnetometers (e.g.flux gate magnetometer (FGM)). We employed the high accrate gyroscope (e.g.ring lase gyroscope (RLG)/optical fiber gyroscope (OFG)) to improve the accuracy of STCM/DTCM equipped with FGM. Moreover we employed accurate and precise FGM which was selected among the market. Finally we developed the new magnetic survey system with high precision usable as airborn, shipboard and dee-ptowed magnetometers which we call HPMSS(High Precision Magnetic Survey System). As an optional equipment, we use LAN to communicate between a data aquisiitin part and a data logging part, and GPS for a position fix. For the deep-towed survey, we use the acoustic position fix (super short base line method) and the acoustic communication to monitor the DTCM status. First we used HPMSS to obtain the magnetization structure of the volcanic island, Aogashima located 300km south of Tokyo using a hellcopter in 2006 and 2009. Next we used HPMSS installed in DTCM in 2010,2011 and 2012 using R/V Bosei-maru belonging to Tokai University. Also we used

  11. Airborne Hydromapping - How high-resolution bathymetric surveys will change the research and work focused on waterbody-related topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, Frank; Baran, Ramona; Dobler, Wolfgang; Aufleger, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Repetitive surveying of inshore waters and coastal zones is becoming more and more essential in order to evaluate water-level dynamics, structural and zonal variations of rivers and riparian areas, river degradation, water flow, reservoir sedimentation, delta growth, as well as coastal processes. This can only be achieved in an effective manner by employing hydrographic airborne laser scanning (hydromapping). A new laser scanner is introduced, which has been specifically designed for the acquisition of high-resolution hydrographic data in order to survey and monitor inland waters and shallow coastal zones. Recently, this scanner has been developed within the framework of an Austrian research cooperation between Riegl LMS and the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck. We present exemplary measurement results obtained with the compact airborne laser-scanning system during our project work. Along the Baltic Sea coast northeast of Kiel city, northern Germany, we obtained measurement depths up to 8 m under clear-water conditions. Moreover, we detect underwater dune-structures and the accumulation of sediment within groin structures. In contrast, under turbid water conditions we obtained depths of approximately 3 m along the Rhine River at Rheinfelden, German-Swiss border east of Basel city. Nevertheless, we were able to map small-scale and complex morphologic features within a fish ramp or bedrock cliffs. The laser data had been combined with sonar measurements displaying the bathymetry at depths of ca. 2-25 m in order to document comprehensively the actual hydrographic setting after the new construction of the hydropower plant Rheinfelden. In summary, a high-resolution spatial view on the ground of various waterbodies is now possible for the first time with point densities in the usual range of approximately 10-20 points/m². However, the combination of these data with high-resolution aerial (approximately < 5 cm/pixel) or spectral images offers

  12. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, R. W.

    2006-12-28

    subtle mine pool anomalies. However, post-survey modeling suggested that thicker, more conductive mine pools might be detected at a more suitable location. The current study sought to identify the best time domain electromagnetic sensor for detecting mine pools and to test it in an area where the mine pools are thicker and more conductive that those in southwestern Virginia. After a careful comparison of all airborne time domain electromagnetic sensors (including both helicopter and fixed-wing systems), the SkyTEM system from Denmark was determined to be the best technology for this application. Whereas most airborne time domain electromagnetic systems were developed to find large, deep, highly conductive mineral deposits, the SkyTEM system is designed for groundwater exploration studies, an application similar to mine pool detection.

  13. A survey of airborne radar systems for deployment on a High Altitude Powered Platform (HAPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Leung, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    A survey was conducted to find out the system characteristics of commercially available and unclassified military radars suitable for deployment on a stationary platform. A total of ten domestic and eight foreign manufacturers of the radar systems were identified. Questionnaires were sent to manufacturers requesting information concerning the system characteristics: frequency, power used, weight, volume, power radiated, antenna pattern, resolution, display capabilities, pulse repetition frequency, and sensitivity. A literature search was also made to gather the system characteristics information. Results of the survey are documented and comparisons are made among available radar systems.

  14. Detailed magnetic survey at Dahshour archeological sites Southwest Cairo, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekkawi, Mahmoud; Arafa-Hamed, Tarek; Abdellatif, Tareq

    2013-06-01

    Dahshour area has recently shown a great potential of archeological findings. This was remarkable from the latest discovery of the causeway and the mortuary temple of the Pyramid of Amenemhat III using geophysical data. The main objective of the present work is to locate the buried archeological remains in the area of Dahshour, Southwest Cairo using magnetic survey for shallow investigations. Land magnetic data is acquired using proton magnetometer (two sensors) with a sensor separation of 0.8 m; i.e. gradiometer survey. The study area is located nearby the two known pyramids of Dahshour. The field data is processed and analyzed using Oasis Montaj Geosoft™ software. The processed data is presented in order to delineate the hidden artifacts causing the magnetic anomalies. The results indicated a distribution of the buried archeological features within the study area. These archeological features are detected according to the magnetic contrast between the magnetic archeological sources (such as mud bricks, basalt and granite) and the surroundings; mainly sandy soil. The delineated archeological features at Dahshour are probably dated back to the old kingdom having a depth reach up to 3.0 m. Consequently it is highly recommended to carry out excavation to precisely classify them and high light their nature and value.

  15. Aeromagnetic survey of Howard Pass quadrangle and the East half of Misheguk Mountain quadrangle, Alaska—a Web site for the distribution of data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey Open-File-Report 2009-1256 is for the preliminary release of magnetic data (and associated contractor reports) for an airborne survey in the Brooks Range, northwest of Bettles, Alaska.

  16. Using spectral approaches to magnetic field survey analyses to characterize marine sedimentary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. K.; Saltus, R. W.; Vogt, P. R.; Newell, W. L.

    2009-12-01

    Marine sediments have historically been omitted from airborne and shipboard magnetic survey analyses because their contribution to the observed field is usually very weak, and thus difficult to distinguish from survey noise. Even when higher susceptibility sediments are present, associated anomalies are often of such limited spatial extent that they do not persist from one survey trackline to the next, and are thus filtered or removed during gridding. In such cases, the resulting magnetic field maps indicate mostly basement rock variations. However, in areas where magnetic sediments have significant lateral extent, the upper stratigraphic units can make a distinguishable contribution to the short-wavelength components of the observed magnetic field. We present a spectral approach to processing magnetic trackline data that highlights magnetic source contrasts within the shallowest sedimentary layers. We apply the approach to several areas including Chesapeake Bay, MD, where watersheds include metamorphic Piedmont rocks rich in Fe- and Ti-rich minerals such as magnetite and ilmenite; Cook Inlet, AK, where magnetite and other Fe- and Ti-rich sediments have accumulated from nearby igneous rocks in the Alaska Range; and the sections of the Oregon coast south of Newport, where magnetite-rich sediments from nearby volcanic rocks have accumulated and developed into littoral marine placer deposits. For each data trackline, we calculate the frequency spectrum for moving windows of length 50 to 600 m, with window length depending on the along-track survey sampling density. We then sum spectral power over shorter wavelengths, excluding both the highest frequencies which most likely represent survey noise, and lower frequencies representing deeper features. Areas with greatest variation in short wavelength anomalies thus exhibit the highest spectral power. Shipboard magnetic field data from Chesapeake Bay near the mouth of the Choptank River exhibit concentrations of anomalies

  17. Airborne Resistivity and Magnetometer Survey in Northern Maine for Obtaining Information on Bedrock Geology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    data indicated a normally expected degree of magnetic mineralization associated with the granodiorite and syenite in the test area, which can contain...resistivity samples (il-m) ^_£] (Qrm) Seboomook slate 94 Granodiorite Section A 22 Granodiorite Section B 35 Syenite 8 5481 (0.89) 23.93...Inlfutive» ( Syenite and Granodiorile) 65 Samples RMiltivitv ClatMt, 10 ohm-meten Figure 4. Normalized distribution of the ground data showing a

  18. OSSE impact analysis of airborne ocean surveys for improving upper-ocean dynamical and thermodynamical forecasts in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliwell, George R.; Kourafalou, Vassiliki; Le Hénaff, Matthieu; Shay, Lynn K.; Atlas, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A prototype, rigorously validated ocean Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) system is used to evaluate the impact of different sampling strategies for rapid-response airborne ocean profile surveys in the eastern interior Gulf of Mexico. Impacts are assessed with respect to improving ocean analyses, and forecasts initialized from those analyses, for two applications: improving oil spill forecasts and improving the ocean model response to tropical cyclone (TC) forcing. Rapid model error growth in this region requires that repeat surveys be conducted frequently in time, with separation of less than 4 days required to approach maximum error reduction in model analyses. Substantial additional error reduction in model dynamical fields is achieved by deploying deep (1000 m) AXCTDs instead of shallow (400 m) AXBTs. Shallow AXBTs constrain the ocean thermal field over the upper 400 m nearly as well as deep AXCTDs. However, in addition to constraining ocean fields over a greater depth range, AXCTDs also measure salinity profiles and more accurately constrain upper-ocean density than AXBTs, leading to a more accurate representation of upper ocean pressure and velocity fields. Sampling AXCTD profiles over a one-half degree array compared to one degree leads to substantial additional error reduction by constraining variability with horizontal scales too small to be corrected by satellite altimetry assimilation. A 2-day lag in availability of airborne profiles does not increase errors in dynamical ocean fields, but it does increase errors in upper-ocean thermal field including Tropical Cyclone Heat Potential (TCHP), demonstrating that these profiles must be rapidly made available for assimilation to improve TC forecasts. The additional error reduction in ocean analyses achieved by assimilation of airborne surveys translates into significantly improved forecasts persisting over time intervals ranging between 1 and 2 weeks for most model variables but several weeks for

  19. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Concrete quadrangle (Washington). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-five uranium anomalies meet the minimum statistical requirements as defined. These anomalies are tabulated and are shown on the Uranium Anomaly Interpretation Map. Potassium (%K), equivalent Uranium (ppM eU), equivalent Thorium (ppM eT), eU/eT, eU/K, eT/K, and magnetic pseudo-contour maps are presented. Stacked Profiles showing geologic strips maps along each flight-line, together with sensor data, and ancillary data are presented. All maps and profiles were prepared on a scale of 1:250,000, but have been reduced to 1:500,000 for presentation.

  20. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Cape Flattery quadrange (Washington). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    No uranium anomalies meet the minimum statistical requirements as defined. There is no Uranium Anomaly Interpretation Map for the Cape Flattery quadrangle. Potassium (%K), equivalent Uranium (ppM eU), equivalent Thorium (ppM eT), eU/eT, eU/K, eT/K, and magnetic pseudo-contour maps are presented in Appendix E. Stacked Profiles showing geologic strip maps along each flight-line, together with sensor data, and ancillary data are presented in Appendix F. All maps and profiles were prepared on a scale of 1:250,000, but have been reduced to 1:500,000 for presentation.

  1. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Copalis Beach quadrangle (Washington). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    No uranium anomalies meet the minimum statistical requirements as defined. There is no Uranium Anomaly Interpretation Map for the Copalis Beach quadrangle. Potassium (%K), equivalent Uranium (ppM eU), equivalent Thorium (ppM eT), eU/eT, eU/K, eT/K, and magnetic pseudo-contour maps are presented in Appendix E. Stacked Profiles showing geologic strip maps along each flight-line, together with sensor data, and ancillary data are presented in Appendix F. All maps and profiles were prepared on a scale of 1:250,000, but have been reduced to 1:500,000 for presentation.

  2. Magnetic Gradiometer and Vector Magnetometer Survey of the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, R.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the fundamental tectonic problems of the Eastern Mediterranean remain unresolved due to the extremely thick sedimentary cover (~15 km) and the lack of accurate magnetic anomaly data. We conducted a magnetic survey of the Herodotus and Levant Basins (Eastern Mediterranean) to study the nature and age of the underlying igneous crust. The towed magnetometer array consisted of two Overhauser sensors recording the total magnetic field in a longitudinal gradiometer mode, and a marine vector magnetometer. Accurate navigation together with the gradiometer data allows the separation of the magnetic signature of the lithosphere from the contributions of the external magnetic field and the geomagnetic field. Total field data in the Herodotus Basin reveal a sequence of long-wavelength NE-SW lineated anomalies (~80 nT) suggesting a deep (~20 km) 2D magnetic source layer. Analysis of the vector data shows a steady azimuth of lineations that is generally consistent with the total field anomalies. The sequence of anomalies is rather short and does not allow a unique identification. However, the continuous northward motion of the African Plate during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic result in predictable anomaly skewness patterns for the different time periods. Forward magnetic modeling best fit the observed anomalies when using Early Permian remanence directions. Altogether, these observations and analysis suggest that a Neo-Tethyan Permian oceanic crust underlies the Herodotus Basin. Two short-wavelengths and strong (~400 nT) anomalies are found in the Levant Basin, proposing rather shallow (~7 km) magnetic sources there. These anomalies spatially coincide with Mesozoic uplifted continental structures (Eratosthenes and Jonah Highs).

  3. Magnetic Survey of the Hydroflouric Acid Spill Area

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.

    1994-11-04

    A magnetic survey was conducted at the Hydroflouric Acid Spill Area to evaluate the possibility of buried metal containers or other ferric objects. A proton precession gradiometer with the bottom sensor 2 ft and the top sensor 4 ft from the ground surface was used to sample the survey area on a grid defined by 1 meter grid nodes in a square array. The survey area was surrounded on three sides by a metal fence and metal recycling facility. The fence and metal objects adjacent to the fence, in addition to metal associated with hydrologic monitoring well heads, waste unit marker balls and metal signs caused significant magnetic field and gradient anomalies that extended throughout most of the survey area. In addition to these easily explained anomalies, several anomalies were detected which probably result from buried ferric objects. Some of these anomalies are of limited aerial extent and magnitude and probably represent small shallow objects. However, at least one of the anomalies is of sufficient magnitude and extent that it may represent a large metal container such as a metal drum.

  4. Comparison of Magnetic Anomalies of Lithospheric Origin Measured by Satellite and Airborne Magnetometers over Western Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Coles, R. L.; Mayhew, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomaly data from the OGO 2, 4 and 6 (Pogo) satellites are compared with upward-continued aeromagnetic data between 50 deg -85 deg N latitude and 220 deg - 260 deg E longitude. Agreement is good both in anomaly location and in amplitude, giving confidence that it is possible to proceed with the derivation and interpretation of satellite anomaly maps in all parts of the globe. The data contain a magnetic high over the Alpha ridge suggesting continental composition and a magnetic low over the southern Canada basin and northern Canadian Arctic islands (Sverdrup basin). The low in the Sverdrup basin corresponds to a region of high heat flow, suggesting a shallow Curie isotherm. A ridge of high field, with two distinct peaks in amplitude, is found over the northern portion of the platform deposits and a relative high is located in the central portion of the Churchill province. No features are present to indicate a magnetic boundary between Slave and Bear provinces, but a trend change is evident between Slave and Churchill provinces. South of 60 deg latitude a broad magnetic low is located over very thick (40-50 km) crust, interpreted to be a region of low magnetization.

  5. Test plan and preliminary report of airborne electromagentic environment survey over USA urban areas 0.4 to 18.0 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Hill, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    An airborne electromagnetic environment survey is described of five urban areas where terrestrially-generated radio-frequency interference was measured over the frequency range from 0.4 to 18.0 GHz. A chartered Cessna 402 aircraft contained necessary measurement test equipment, including the receiving antennas mounted beneath the fuselage. Urban areas including Washington, D.C.; Baltimore, MD; Philadelphia, PA; New York, NY; Chicago, ILL; and Palestine, TX were surveyed. A flight test plan and preliminary test results for the 0.4 to 1.4 GHz frequency range, are included; a final test report describes more detailed results.

  6. Constraining primordial magnetic fields with future cosmic shear surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Fedeli, C.; Moscardini, L. E-mail: lauro.moscardini@unibo.it

    2012-11-01

    The origin of astrophysical magnetic fields observed in galaxies and clusters of galaxies is still unclear. One possibility is that primordial magnetic fields generated in the early Universe provide seeds that grow through compression and turbulence during structure formation. A cosmological magnetic field present prior to recombination would produce substantial matter clustering at intermediate/small scales, on top of the standard inflationary power spectrum. In this work we study the effect of this alteration on one particular cosmological observable, cosmic shear. We adopt the semi-analytic halo model in order to describe the non-linear clustering of matter, and feed it with the altered mass variance induced by primordial magnetic fields. We find that the convergence power spectrum is, as expected, substantially enhanced at intermediate/small angular scales, with the exact amplitude of the enhancement depending on the magnitude and power-law index of the magnetic field power spectrum. Specifically, for a fixed amplitude, the effect of magnetic fields is larger for larger spectral indices. We use the predicted statistical errors for a future wide-field cosmic shear survey, on the model of the ESA Cosmic Vision mission Euclid, in order to forecast constraints on the amplitude of primordial magnetic fields as a function of the spectral index. We find that the amplitude will be constrained at the level of ∼ 0.1 nG for n{sub B} ∼ −3, and at the level of ∼ 10{sup −7} nG for n{sub B} ∼ 3. The latter is at the same level of lower bounds coming from the secondary emission of gamma-ray sources, implying that for high spectral indices Euclid will certainly be able to detect primordial magnetic fields, if they exist. The present study shows how large-scale structure surveys can be used for both understanding the origins of astrophysical magnetic fields and shedding new light on the physics of the pre-recombination Universe.

  7. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Wenatchee quadrangle (Washington). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Four uranium anomalies meet the minimum statistical requirements as defined. These anomalies are tabulated and are shown on the Uranium Anomaly Interpretation Map. Potassium (%K), equivalent Uranium (ppM eU), equivalent Thorium (ppM eT), eU/eT, eU/K, eT/K, and magnetic pseudo-contour maps are presented in Appendix E. Stacked Profiles showing geologic strip maps along each flight-line, together with sensor data, and ancillary data are presented in Appendix F. All maps and profiles were prepared on a scale of 1:250,000, but have been reduced to 1:500,000 for presentation. Anomalies number 1 and number 2 are over areas underlain by Tertiary Yakima basalt flows (Ty). Anomaly number 3 is over an area underlain by Tertiary nonmarine shales (Tsh) and Recent alluvium (Qal). Anomaly number 4 is over an area underlain by pre-Jurassic gneiss (pJgn).

  8. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Seattle quadrangle (Washington). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    One uranium anomaly meets the minimum statistical requirements as defined. This anomaly is over the potassium (%K) contact area between undifferentiated Tertiary rocks and Pleistocene glacial deposits. Equivalent uranium (ppM eU), equivalent thorium (ppM eT), eU/eT, eU/eK, eT,K, and magnetic pseudo-contour maps are presented in Appendix E. Stacked profiles showing geologic strip maps along each flight-line, together with sensor data, and ancillary data are presented in Appendix F. All maps and profiles were prepared on a scale of 1:250,000, but have been reduced to 1:500,000 for presentation in this report.

  9. Developing a magnetism conceptual survey and assessing gender differences in student understanding of magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Singh, Chandralekha

    2012-02-01

    We discuss the development of a research-based conceptual multiple-choice survey of magnetism. We also discuss the use of the survey to investigate gender differences in students' difficulties with concepts related to magnetism. We find that while there was no gender difference on the pre-test. However, female students performed significantly worse than male students when the survey was given as a post-test in traditionally taught calculus-based introductory physics courses with similar results in both the regular and honors versions of the course. In the algebra-based courses, the performance of female and male students has no statistical difference on the pre-test or the post-test.

  10. Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Geophysical Survey Data for Portions of the North Platte River and Lodgepole Creek, Nebraska, June 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Abraham, Jared D.; Cannia, James C.; Hill, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This report is a release of digital data from a helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey that was conducted during June 2008 in areas of western Nebraska as part of a joint hydrologic study by the North Platte Natural Resource District, South Platte Natural Resource District, and U.S. Geological Survey. The objective of the contracted survey, conducted by Fugro Airborne, Ltd., was to improve the understanding of the relationship between surface water and groundwater systems critical to developing groundwater models used in management programs for water resources. The survey covered 1,375 line km (854 line mi). A unique aspect of this survey is the flight line layout. One set of flight lines were flown paralleling each side of the east-west trending North Platte River and Lodgepole Creek. The survey also included widely separated (10 km) perpendicular north-south lines. The success of this survey design depended on a well understood regional hydrogeologic framework and model developed by the Cooperative Hydrologic Study of the Platte River Basin. Resistivity variations along lines could be related to this framework. In addition to these lines, more traditional surveys consisting of parallel flight lines separated by about 270 m were carried out for one block in each of the drainages. These surveys helped to establish the spatial variations of the resistivity of hydrostratigraphic units. The electromagnetic equipment consisted of six different coil-pair orientations that measured resistivity at separated frequencies from about 400 Hz to about 140,000 Hz. The electromagnetic data along flight lines were converted to electrical resistivity. The resulting line data were converted to geo-referenced grids and maps which are included with this report. In addition to the electromagnetic data, total field magnetic data and digital elevation data were collected. Data released in this report consist of data along flight lines, digital grids, and digital maps of the

  11. Magnetic character of a large continental transform: an aeromagnetic survey of the Dead Sea Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Rybakov, Michael; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah S.; Rotstein, Yair

    2007-01-01

    New high-resolution airborne magnetic (HRAM) data along a 120-km-long section of the Dead Sea Transform in southern Jordan and Israel shed light on the shallow structure of the fault zone and on the kinematics of the plate boundary. Despite infrequent seismic activity and only intermittent surface exposure, the fault is delineated clearly on a map of the first vertical derivative of the magnetic intensity, indicating that the source of the magnetic anomaly is shallow. The fault is manifested by a 10–20 nT negative anomaly in areas where the fault cuts through magnetic basement and by a

  12. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Madison quadrangle (WI). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Five uranium anomalies meet the minimum statistical requirements as defined in Volume I. These anomalies are tabulated and are shown on the Uranium Anomaly Interpretation Map. Potassium (%K), equivalent Uranium (ppM eU), equivalent Thorium (ppM eTh), eU/eTh, eU/K, eTh/K, and magnetic pseudo-contour maps are presented in Appendix E. Stacked Profiles showing geologic strip maps along each flight-line, together with sensor data, and ancillary data are presented in Appendix F. All maps and profiles were prepared on a scale of 1:250,000, but have been reduced to 1:500,000 for presentation in Volume II. Anomaly No. 1 is over an area underlain by the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone (Osp). Anomaly No. 2 is over an area underlain by Ordovician Galena Black River Dolomite (Og). Anomalies No. 3 to No. 5 are over areas underlain by undifferentiated Pleistocene ground moraines (Qug).

  13. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey. Canyon City quadrangle (Oregon). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Fourteen uranium anomalies meet the minimum statistical requirements as defined in Volume I. These anomalies are listed and are shown on the Uranium Anomaly Interpretation Map. Potassium (%K), equivalent Uranium (ppM eU), equivalent Thorium (eT), eU/eT, eU/K, eT/K, and Magnetic Pseudo Contour Maps are presented in Appendix E. Stacked Profiles showing geologic strip maps along each flight-line, together with sensor data, and ancillary data are presented in Appendix F. All maps and profiles were prepared on a scale of 1:250,000, but have been reduced to 1:500,000 for presentation in Volume II. Anomaly No. 1 is over mainly sedimentary rocks of undifferentitatd Paleozoic/Mesozoic age (MzPza). Anomaly No. 2 is over a fault contact between Strawberry volcanics (Ts), and volcanic rocks of the Clarno (Tc). Anomaly No. 3 is over an intensely faulted block of Strawberry volcanics (Ts). Anomaly No. 4 is over the contact area between Strawberry volcanic rocks (Ts) and a basalt plug of Tertiary age (Tbi). Anomaly No. 5 is over the contact area between volcanic rocks of the Clarno formation (Tc) and undivided sedimentary rocks of Jurassic/Triassic age. Part of the anomaly is over landslide debris (Q1). Anomalies No. 6 and No. 7 are over a fault contact between volcanic rocks of the Clarno formation (Tc) and undivided sedimentary rocks of Jurassic/Triassic age (JTru).

  14. Airborne Grid Sea-Ice Surveys for Comparison with Cryosat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozena, J. M.; Gardner, J. M.; Liang, R.; Hagen, R. A.; Ball, D.; Newman, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is studying of the changing Arctic with a focus on ice thickness and distribution variability. The goal is optimization of computer models used to predict sea ice changes. An important part of our study is to calibrate/validate Cryosat-2 ice thickness data prior to its incorporation into new ice forecast models. The footprint of the altimeter over sea-ice is a significant issue in any attempt to ground-truth the data. Along-track footprints are reduced to ~ 300 m by SAR processing of the returns. However, the cross-track footprint is determined by the topography of the surface. Further, the actual return is the sum of the returns from individual reflectors within the footprint making it difficult to interpret the return, and optimize the waveform tracker. We therefore collected a series of grids of scanning LiDAR and radar on sub-satellite tracks over sea-ice that would extend far enough cross-track to capture the illuminated area. The difficulty in the collection of such grids, which are comprised of adjacent overlapping tracks is ice motion of as much as 300 m over the duration of a single flight track (~ 20 km) of data collection. With a typical LiDAR swath width of < 500m adjustment of the survey tracks in near real-time for the ice motion is necessary for a coherent data set. This was accomplished by a an NRL devised photogrammetric method of ice velocity determination. Post-processing refinements resulted in typical track-to-track miss-ties of ~ 1-2 m, much of which could be attributed to ice deformation over the period of the survey. This allows us to reconstruct the ice configuration to the time of the satellite overflight, resulting in a good picture of the surface actually illuminated by the radar. The detailed 2-d LiDAR image is the snow surface, not the underlying ice presumably illuminated by the radar. Our hope is that the 1-D radar profiles collected along the LiDAR swath centerlines will be sufficient to correct the

  15. Lithological discrimination and structural trends in W-Rwanda (Africa) on images of airborne radiometric and aeromagnetic surveys, coregistered to a Landsat TM scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Alonso, M.; Tahon, A.

    Processing and interpretation of an airborne gamma-ray and aeromagnetic survey, combined with Thematic Mapper imagery, enables the successful discrimination of lithological units and their geological and structural interpretation in a complex area, where weathering and a dense vegetation cover make traditional mapping extremely difficult. The visual inspection of RGB color-composites reveals the differentiation of the area in distinct colored domains, each of which has been related to existing units. The aeromagnetic data not only reveal superficial structures, but also show deeper structural detail inside the tectonometamorphic complexes of the area, adding weight to existing hypotheses on the evolution of the Kibaran orogeny.

  16. Survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1991-09-01

    This report documents the results of a survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) undertaken with the support of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconductivity Pilot Center. Each survey entry includes the following: Name, address, and other telephone and facsimile numbers of the principal investigator and other staff members; funding for fiscal year 1991, 1992, 1993; brief descriptions of the program, the technical progress to date, and the expected technical progress; a note on any other collaboration. Included with the survey are recommendations intended to help DOE decide how best to support SMES research and development (R D). To summarize, I would say that important elements of a well-rounded SMES research program for DOE are as follows. (1) Construction of a large ETM. (2) Development of SMES as an enabling technology for solar and wind generation, especially in conjunction with the ETM program, if possible. (3) Development of small SMES units for electric networks, for rapid transit, and as noninterruptible power supplies (uses (2), (3), and (4) above). In this connection, lightweight, fiber-reinforced polymer structures, which would be especially advantageous for space and transportation applications, should be developed. (4) Continued study of the potential impacts of high-temperature superconductors on SMES, with construction as soon as feasible of small SMES units using high-temperature superconductors (HTSs).

  17. A moving hum filter to suppress rotor noise in high-resolution airborne magnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Doll, W.E.; Miller, R.D.; Gamey, T.J.; Emond, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A unique filtering approach is developed to eliminate helicopter rotor noise. It is designed to suppress harmonic noise from a rotor that varies slightly in amplitude, phase, and frequency and that contaminates aero-magnetic data. The filter provides a powerful harmonic noise-suppression tool for data acquired with modern large-dynamic-range recording systems. This three-step approach - polynomial fitting, bandpass filtering, and rotor-noise synthesis - significantly reduces rotor noise without altering the spectra of signals of interest. Two steps before hum filtering - polynomial fitting and bandpass filtering - are critical to accurately model the weak rotor noise. During rotor-noise synthesis, amplitude, phase, and frequency are determined. Data are processed segment by segment so that there is no limit on the length of data. The segment length changes dynamically along a line based on modeling results. Modeling the rotor noise is stable and efficient. Real-world data examples demonstrate that this method can suppress rotor noise by more than 95% when implemented in an aeromagnetic data-processing flow. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  18. Using airborne magnetic data to map folding and faulting in sedimentary layers: implications for seismic hazard (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Jachens, R. C.; Phelps, G. A.; Simpson, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    Aeromagnetic surveys are increasingly used to map structure within sedimentary rocks important for seismic assessment as better magnetometers, positioning, and techniques are developed. We present three examples in which aeromagnetic data are used to map folding and faulting within Cenozoic sedimentary rocks and deposits. In the Salton Trough, detailed aeromagnetic data collected in 1990 suffered from leveling problems that obscured low-amplitude (less than 2-3 nT) magnetic anomalies arising from Tertiary sedimentary rocks. Decorrugation and subtraction of a regional field (upward continuation of 100 m) isolated and enhanced these low-amplitude anomalies, some of which extend the length of the Clark fault, a major strand of the San Jacinto fault zone in southern California, another 20-25 km southwest of its termination point. Other anomalies point to distributed deformation confirmed by detailed surficial mapping by geologists. Detailed aeromagnetic data in the San Ramon Valley, California area show curvilinear anomalies that arise from folding and faulting of the Neroly sandstone, a Miocene unit whose magnetization is due to andesitic detritus. Detailed geologic maps and drillholes locally constrain the geometry of the Neroly Formation at the surface and subsurface, but constrained inversion of aeromagnetic data identified folds not earlier seen. In northern California (e.g. Ukiah), similar long (up to 50 km), curvilinear magnetic anomalies also occur, but in an area where drillholes are absent and geologic mapping is limited by dense vegetation, steep slopes, abundant landsliding, and thick soils. Magnetic susceptibility measurements from sparse outcrops show that the anomalies arise from lithic, volcanic-rich graywacke and metabasalt within the Franciscan Complex. The similarity in anomaly characteristics between the San Ramon and Ukiah areas suggests that the graywackes are folded, coherent bodies within an assemblage that at the surface is termed

  19. Modelling an arbitrarily oriented magnetic dipole over a homogeneous half-space for a rapid topographic correction of airborne EM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemoteau, Julien; Sailhac, Pascal; Behaegel, Mickael

    2015-10-01

    Most airborne electromagnetic (EM) processing programs assume a flat ground surface. However, in mountainous areas, the system can be at an angle with regard to the ground. As the system is no longer parallel to the ground surface, the measured magnetic field has to be corrected and the ground induced eddy current has to be modelled in a better way when performing a very fine interpretation of the data. We first recall the theoretical background for the modelling of a magnetic dipole source and study it in regard to the case of an arbitrarily oriented magnetic dipole. We show in particular how transient central loop helicopter borne data are influenced by this inclination. The result shows that the effect of topography on airborne EM is more important at early time windows and for systems using a short cut-off source. In this paper, we suggest that an estimate be made off the locally averaged inclination of the system to the ground and then to correct the data for this before inverting it (whether the inversion assumes a flat 1D, 2D or 3D sub-surface). Both 1D and 2D inversions are applied to synthetic and real data sets with such a correction. The consequence on the ground imaging is small for slopes with an angle less than 25° but the correction factor can be useful for improving the estimation of depths in mountainous areas.

  20. Airborne geophysical surveys in the north-central region of Goias (Brazil): implications for radiometric characterization of tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Suze Nei P; Hamza, Valiya M; da Silva, Joney Justo

    2013-02-01

    Progress obtained in analysis aerogammaspectrometric and aeromagnetic survey data for the north-central region of the state of Goias (Brazil) are presented. The results obtained have allowed not only determination of the abundances of naturally radioactive elements but also new insights into the processes that determine the radiometric characteristics of the main soil types. There are indications that the radioelement abundances of soils are not only related to their physical properties, but also chemical characteristics of source rocks from which they are derived. For example, oxisol soils derived from the felsic source rocks of the Mara Rosa and Green stone belts have equivalent uranium (eU) values higher than 1.7 ppm, while those derived from source rocks of the relatively more basic Uruaçu Group and sediment sequences of Proterozoic age are characterized by eU contents of less than 1 ppm. Oxisol soils of the Median massif, ultisol soils of the Paranoá, Canastra and Araxá Groups, cambisol soils of the Araí Group and plintosol soils of the Bambuí Group constitute an intermediate class with eU contents in the range of 1-1.3 ppm. Equivalent thorium abundances of soil types display similar trends, the range of variation being 4-16 ppm. Potassium abundances on the other hand are rather uniform with values in the range of 1-1.3%, the only exception being the sedimentary sequences of Proterozoic age, which has a mean value of 0.7%. These observations have been considered as indicative of characteristic features of tropical soils in the study area. In this context, we point out the possibility of using results of aerogammaspectrometry surveys as a convenient complementary tool in identifying geochemical zoning of soils in tropical environments. The ratios of eU/K are found to fall in the range of 1-1.7, which is typical of common soils. The ratios of eTh/K exhibit a relatively wide interval, with values in the range of 4-16. The ratios of eTh/eU are found to have

  1. Making Carbon Emissions Remotely Sensible: Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL), its Near-Surface Survey of Carbon Gases and Isotopologues on Alaska's North Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E. J.; Sayres, D. S.; Healy, C. E.; Munster, J. B.; Baker, B.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed process-oriented study of the mechanisms of conversion in the Arctic of fossil carbon to atmospheric gas is progressing, but necessarily limited to a few point locations and requiring detailed subsurface measurements inaccessible to remote sensing. Airborne measurements of concentration, transport and flux of these carbon gases at sufficiently low altitude to reflect surface variations can tie such local measurements to remotely observable features of the landscape. Carbon dioxide and water vapor have been observable for over 20 years from low-altitude small aircraft in the Arctic and elsewhere. Methane has been more difficult, requiring large powerful aircraft or limited flask samples. Recent developments in spectroscopy, however, have reduced the power and weight required to measure methane at rates suitable for eddy-covariance flux estimates. The Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL) takes advantage of Integrated Cavity-Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, and water vapor in a new airborne system. The system, moreover, measures these gases' stable isotopologues every two seconds or faster helping to separate thermogenic from biogenic emissions. Paired with the Best Airborne Turbulence (BAT) probe developed for small aircraft by NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory and a light twin-engine aircraft adapted by Aurora Flight Sciences Inc., the FOCAL measures at 6 m spacing, covering 100 km in less than 30 minutes. It flies between 10 m and 50 m above ground interspersed with profiles to the top of the boundary layer and beyond. This presentation gives an overview of the magnitude and variation in fluxes and concentrations of CH4, CO2, and H2O with space, time, and time of day in a spatially extensive survey, more than 7500 km total in 15 flights over roughly a 100 km square during the month of August 2013. An extensive data set such as this at low altitude with high-rate sampling addresses features that repeat on 1 km scale

  2. Reject the ridiculous and explore the plausible: A Bayesian McMC approach to model assessment and uncertainty analysis for airborne electromagnetic surveys (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsley, B. J.; Brodie, R. C.; Bedrosian, P.; Esfahani, A.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical data are typically used to infer a single ';best' model consistent with observations and prior information. However, because of non-uniqueness, limited resolution, and data errors, many models satisfy both the data and reasonable prior assumptions. Instead of seeking to describe the properties of any single model, we developed a trans-dimensional Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) algorithm for the analysis of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys that assesses the characteristics of models that are consistent with observations and prior assumptions. This is a powerful tool for model assessment and uncertainty analysis, and provides a wealth of information that can be used to make inferences about plausible subsurface properties. For example, we can estimate the likelihood of geological interfaces as a function of depth, quantify the probability that resistivity is above or below a certain threshold within a given depth range, assess model resolution and depth of investigation, or query subsets of models that are consistent with auxiliary datasets. Model assessment and uncertainty analysis is compounded by the large volume of data that are typically acquired for AEM surveys. Here, we discuss the mechanics of a McMC algorithm developed for the analysis of time- or frequency-domain airborne electromagnetic data, along with examples where this algorithm has been used to add new insight into model uncertainty and geological interpretations. Specific aspects of the algorithm that will be discussed include: the trans-dimensional nature of the program, which allows the number of layers to be a free parameter; the capability to assess random and/or systematic data errors as unknown parameters; the use of parallel computing tools to run multiple chains for a single dataset in order to assess convergence, and to analyze many datasets simultaneously; the use of stochastic Newton sampling to optimize sampling efficiency; and the ability to integrate multiple

  3. Extensive 1-year survey of trace elements and compounds in the airborne suspended particulate matter in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Antoine, A. C.; Leibecki, H. F.; Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Concentrations of 75 chemical constituents in the airborne particulate matter were measured in Cleveland, Ohio, during 1971 and 1972. Values covering a 1-year period (45 to 50 sampling days) at each of 16 sites are presented for 60 elements. A lesser number of values is given for sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, acidity, 10 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, and the aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds as a group. Methods used included instrumental neutron activation, emission spectroscopy, gas chromatography, combustion techniques, and colorimetry. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, the analysis methods, the use of several analytical facilities, and samples with concentrations below the detection limits are evaluated in detail. The data is discussed in relation to other studies and source origins. The trace constituent concentrations as a function of wind direction are used to suggest a practical method for air pollution source identification.

  4. Observations of the Earth's magnetic field from the shuttle: Using the Spartan carrier as a magnetic survey tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, W. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The shuttle-deployed and recovered Spartan shows promise as an inexpensive and simple support module for potential field measurements. The results of a preliminary engineering study on the applications of the Spartan carrier to magnetic measurements shows: (1) Extension of the mission duration to as long as 7 days is feasible but requires more reconfiguration of the internal systems; (2) On-board recording of Global Positioning System signals will provide position determination with an accuracy consistent with the most severe requirements; and (3) Making Spartan a magnetically clean spacecraft is straight forward but requires labor-intensive modifications to both the data and power systems. As a magnetic survey tool, Spartan would allow surveys at regularly spaced intervals and could make quick-reaction surveys at times of instability in the secular variation.

  5. A BCool survey of the magnetic fields of planet-hosting solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengel, M. W.; Marsden, S. C.; Carter, B. D.; Horner, J.; King, R.; Fares, R.; Jeffers, S. V.; Petit, P.; Vidotto, A. A.; Morin, J.; BCool Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We present a spectropolarimetric snapshot survey of solar-type planet-hosting stars. In addition to 14 planet-hosting stars observed as part of the BCool magnetic snapshot survey, we obtained magnetic observations of a further 19 planet-hosting solar-type stars in order to see if the presence of close-in planets had an effect on the measured surface magnetic field (|Bℓ|). Our results indicate that the magnetic activity of this sample is congruent with that of the overall BCool sample. The effects of the planetary systems on the magnetic activity of the parent star, if any, are too subtle to detect compared to the intrinsic dispersion and correlations with rotation, age and stellar activity proxies in our sample. Four of the 19 newly observed stars, two of which are subgiants, have unambiguously detected magnetic fields and are future targets for Zeeman-Doppler mapping.

  6. On background radiation gradients--the use of airborne surveys when searching for orphan sources using mobile gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kock, Peder; Rääf, Christopher; Samuelsson, Christer

    2014-02-01

    Systematic background radiation variations can lead to both false positives and failures to detect an orphan source when searching using car-borne mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. The stochastic variation at each point is well described by Poisson statistics, but when moving in a background radiation gradient the mean count rate will continually change, leading to inaccurate background estimations. Airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) surveys conducted on the national level, usually in connection to mineral exploration, exist in many countries. These data hold information about the background radiation gradients which could be used at the ground level. This article describes a method that aims to incorporate the systematic as well as stochastic variations of the background radiation. We introduce a weighted moving average where the weights are calculated from existing AGS data, supplied by the Geological Survey of Sweden. To test the method we chose an area with strong background gradients, especially in the thorium component. Within the area we identified two roads which pass through the high-variability locations. The proposed method is compared with an unweighted moving average. The results show that the weighting reduces the excess false positives in the positive background gradients without introducing an excess of failures to detect a source during passage in negative gradients.

  7. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  8. Survey of whole air data from the second airborne Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yunsoo; Elliott, Scott; Simpson, Isobel J.; Blake, Donald R.; Colman, Jonah J.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Meinardi, Simone; Rowland, F. Sherwood; Shirai, Tomoko; Smith, Felisa A.

    2003-03-01

    Hydrocarbon and halocarbon measurements collected during the second airborne Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment (BIBLE-B) were subjected to a principal component analysis (PCA), to test the capability for identifying intercorrelated compounds within a large whole air data set. The BIBLE expeditions have sought to quantify and understand the products of burning, electrical discharge, and general atmospheric chemical processes during flights arrayed along the western edge of the Pacific. Principal component analysis was found to offer a compact method for identifying the major modes of composition encountered in the regional whole air data set. Transecting the continental monsoon, urban and industrial tracers (e.g., combustion byproducts, chlorinated methanes and ethanes, xylenes, and longer chain alkanes) dominated the observed variability. Pentane enhancements reflected vehicular emissions. In general, ethyl and propyl nitrate groupings indicated oxidation under nitrogen oxide (NOx) rich conditions and hence city or lightning influences. Over the tropical ocean, methyl nitrate grouped with brominated compounds and sometimes with dimethyl sulfide and methyl iodide. Biomass burning signatures were observed during flights over the Australian continent. Strong indications of wetland anaerobics (methane) or liquefied petroleum gas leakage (propane) were conspicuous by their absence. When all flights were considered together, sources attributable to human activity emerged as the most important. We suggest that factor reductions in general and PCA in particular may soon play a vital role in the analysis of regional whole air data sets, as a complement to more familiar methods.

  9. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  10. Interpretation of magnetic surveys in intermontane valleys of Nevada and southern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bath, G.D.

    1976-01-01

    An evaluation of the magnetic method of geophysical exploration in intermontane valleys is made through examples of magnetic properties, magnetic surveys, reduction of data, and analysis of magnetic anomalies from some valley areas. Measurements of magnetic properties of samples collected along valley margins or from drill holes indicate that the anomaly-producing rocks are mostly Tertiary volcanic flows in Nevada and mostly Cretaceous-Tertiary intrusives in southern New Mexico. Aeromagnetic data were compiled as both observed and residual anomalies from surveys at various flight-line spacings and intervals from ground surface. Theoretical anomalies from known models were analyzed to recover data on depth, width, and magnetization of models and thereby establish reliability of methods used by certain investigators. These methods were then applied to measured anomalies to obtain information about the igneous rock structures that are buried beneath nonmagnetic valley alluvium. Recommendations made for future valley studies include aeromagnetic surveys flown 150 m above ground surface and at 800 m spacing; measurement of magnetic properties from outcrop samples, drill-core samples, and magnetometer logging of uncased drill holes; and use of the interpretation from gravity surveys in the same area.

  11. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  12. Deep sea three component magnetic survey using ROV in the hydrothermal vent of the Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.; Park, C.

    2011-12-01

    We conducted magnetic survey at Apr., 2011 in the western slope of the caldera of TA25, the Lau Basin, the southwestern Pacific using IBRV(Ice Breaker Research Vessel) ARAON of KORDI(Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute), ROV(Remotely Operated Vehicle) of Oceaneering Co. and three component magnetometer(Fig. 1,Fig. 2). The deep-sea three component magnetic survey lines are the 13 N-S lines(100 m spacing) and the 2 E-W lines(Fig. 2). The depth ranges of the survey area are from about 900 m to 1200 m, below sea level. For the magnetic survey, the magnetometer sensor and the data logger was attached with the upper part and lower part of ROV, respectively(Fig. 2). We wanted to make the distance between the magnetometer sensor and ROV over 2 m long to reduce the noise effect of ROV. But, for the safe of deployment and recovery of ROV, the distance between the magnetometer sensor and ROV was 126 cm(Fig. 2). In the magnetic survey, ROV followed the planning tracks at 25~30 m above seafloor using the altimeter and USBL(Ultra Short Base Line) of ROV. IBRV ARAON accompanied ROV on the magnetic survey. The three component magnetometer measure the X(North), Y(East) and Z(Vertical) vector components of a magnetic field. A motion sensor(Oxtans) provided us the data of pitch, roll, yaw for the correction of the magnetic data to the motion of ROV. The data of the magnetometer sensor and the motion sensor were recorded on a notebook through the optical cable of ROV and the network of ARON using magnetometer software. The precision positions of magnetic data were merged by the post-processing of USBL of ROV. Hydrothermal fluids over Curie temperature can quickly alter or replace the iron-rich magnetic minerals, reducing the magnetic remanence of the crustal rocks, in some cases to near 0A/m magnetization. So, the obtained three component magnetic data are fully utilized by finding possible hydrothermal vents of the survey area.

  13. Airborne geophysical surveys used to delineate geological features associated with the M5.8 August 23, 2011 earthquake in Louisa County, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. K.; Horton, J. W.; Gilmer, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    The M5.8 August 23, 2011 Louisa County, VA intraplate earthquake was felt by more people than any other in U.S. history not only because of population density, but also because of the associated geology. However, because limited bedrock exposures pose a challenge to geologic mapping efforts and the earthquake hypocenter is located at a depth of ~6 km, many questions remain. Potential field and gamma-ray spectrometry data thus provide key tools for imaging and understanding both shallow and deep subsurface geologic features. In July 2012, the USGS commissioned a high-resolution magnetic, gravity, and radiometric (gamma-ray spectrometry) survey over a 20 km x 25 km area covering the epicenters of the Louisa County earthquake and its aftershocks. The surveys were flown with 200-m line spacing from an altitude of ~120 m above ground, providing up to a 20-fold improvement over regional magnetic and radiometric coverage. Gravity was measured using Sander Geophysics' AIRGrav system, capable of resolving anomalies as narrow as 800 m for the given survey configuration; in most parts of the survey area the spacing of ground stations is ~10-20 stations per 100 km2. Preliminary magnetic and radiometric data show numerous NE-trending linear anomalies within this part of the Appalachian Piedmont Province. These metamorphic and igneous rocks exhibit 200-500 nT magnetic anomalies of width 300-1000 km that are likely to be generated by contrasts between various metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks such as magnetite-bearing quartzites and felsic to mafic gneisses. Magnetic lows and radiometric highs are observed over several granitoid intrusive bodies such as the Ellisville pluton, the Falmouth Intrusive Suite, and a Paleozoic pegmatite belt. Derivative magnetic maps delineate numerous thin (< 250 m wide) N- NNW-trending linear anomalies, suggesting that Jurassic diabase dikes are much more common in this area than previously mapped. Radiometric data mostly correlate with mapped

  14. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Sioux Falls quadrangle, South Dakota. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Computer printer maps of the magnetic total intensity and the six radiometric parameters have been prepared in addition to the radiometric anomaly maps for this area. The magnetic total intensity map displays a rather subdued response pattern of broad low amplitude anomalies over much of the area with an average magnetic intensity of approximately 58,900 gammas. The radiometric response over much of the area is relatively low. Equivalent concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium only rarely exceed 3.2 ppM, 7.5 ppM and 1.4% respectively. A number of these zones of increased concentrations show corresponding anomalous responses on the uranium/potassium and/or uranium/thorium pseudo-contour maps. Based on this set of computer printer maps alone however, it is, at times, difficult to discern the contribution of coinciding local decreases in the potassium and thorium parameters to these ratio anomalies. Based on the criteria stated in the general section on interpretation, a total of seven uranium and seven thorium anomalies have been outlined on the interpretation map. All of these features, described in Appendix B, exhibit only weakly to moderately anomalous responses. Due to the generally low radiometric levels encountered throughout the quadrangle along with the lack of any favorable indications for enriched accumulation of either uranium or thorium as seen in their radioelement distributions when correlated with the mapped geology and the weak, at best, evidence of preferential accumulations of either parameter, no follow-up work is recommended.

  15. The MiMeS survey of Magnetism in Massive Stars: magnetic analysis of the O-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunhut, J. H.; Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.; Oksala, M. E.; Petit, V.; Alecian, E.; Bohlender, D. A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Henrichs, H. F.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Kochukhov, O.; MiMeS Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    We present the analysis performed on spectropolarimetric data of 97 O-type targets included in the framework of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) Survey. Mean least-squares deconvolved Stokes I and V line profiles were extracted for each observation, from which we measured the radial velocity, rotational and non-rotational broadening velocities, and longitudinal magnetic field Bℓ. The investigation of the Stokes I profiles led to the discovery of two new multiline spectroscopic systems (HD 46106, HD 204827) and confirmed the presence of a suspected companion in HD 37041. We present a modified strategy of the least-squares deconvolution technique aimed at optimizing the detection of magnetic signatures while minimizing the detection of spurious signatures in Stokes V. Using this analysis, we confirm the detection of a magnetic field in six targets previously reported as magnetic by the MiMeS collaboration (HD 108, HD 47129A2, HD 57682, HD 148937, CPD-28 2561, and NGC 1624-2), as well as report the presence of signal in Stokes V in three new magnetic candidates (HD 36486, HD 162978, and HD 199579). Overall, we find a magnetic incidence rate of 7 ± 3 per cent, for 108 individual O stars (including all O-type components part of multiline systems), with a median uncertainty of the Bℓ measurements of about 50 G. An inspection of the data reveals no obvious biases affecting the incidence rate or the preference for detecting magnetic signatures in the magnetic stars. Similar to A- and B-type stars, we find no link between the stars' physical properties (e.g. Teff, mass, and age) and the presence of a magnetic field. However, the Of?p stars represent a distinct class of magnetic O-type stars.

  16. The First Martian Magnetic Survey Satellite: Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Connerney, J. E.; Lin, R. P.; Mitchell, D.; Reme, H.; Ness, N. F.

    2001-05-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor Mission was designed to replace the ill fated Mars Observer Mission which failed to achieve orbit around Mars in 1993. Due to resource limitations the mission was designed to use aerobraking as a primary strategy to circularize its orbit by dragging the spacecraft solar panels against the planet's atmosphere. This orbit geometry was highly favorable to the magnetic mapping objectives of MGS since it brought the spacecraft to less than 100km above the surface of Mars during peripasis. The highly elliptical orbits associated with aerobraking resulted in non-ideal coverage of the planet but were instrumental in the discovery of intensely magnetized regions of the Martian crust and the determination that the Martian dynamo had ceased to exist very early in the history of the planet. Crustal magnetism at Mars exceeds by an order of magnitude that observed at Earth and has significant implications for our knowledge of the planet's thermal evolution, its interaction with the solar wind, and the possible role of the magnetic field in the loss of volatiles from the atmosphere.This talk will present details of the MGS mission, its orbits, the unique accommodation of the magnetic field instruments and highlights of the scientific results achieved to date.

  17. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  18. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  19. Comparison of ground-based measurements of natural radiation to airborne radiation survey data on transects from coastal California to the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffer, P. W.; Hernández, L.; Messina, P.; Dearaujo, J.; Li, A.; Hicks, A.; White, L.

    2008-12-01

    Natural gamma radiation measurements were collected with a hand-held Geiger counter at nearly 400 locations on two general transects across the southwestern United States. The data are used to provide ground-truth comparison to published airborne radiation surveys of the region. The first transect was collected by high school students in the SF-ROCKS program at San Francisco State University in the summer of 2008 starting in San Francisco. Data were collected across the Sierra Nevada Range on I-80, and across Highway 50 in Nevada, and I-70 in Utah. Data were collected in and around Great Basin, Arches, Capitol Reef, Bryce, and Zion National Parks, and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. A second transect extends from San José, California to Flagstaff, Arizona and includes the Mojave National Reserve, Death Valley region, and locations throughout the Navajo Reservation region in northern Arizona and western New Mexico. Radiation data (with GPS reference) were collected from all the major sedimentary rock formations and igneous rocks of the Colorado Plateau and from many igneous and metamorphic rocks throughout the Great Basin and southern California deserts. Anomalously high localized levels were noted in selected sedimentary units associated with uranium exploration targets in the Colorado Plateau region, and in caverns and rock fissures where radon gas (and accumulation of derivative fission products) are the inferred sources.

  20. Estimating and interpretation of radioactive heat production using airborne gamma-ray survey data of Gabal Arrubushi area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mohamed A. S.

    2016-02-01

    The present work deals with mapping of radioactive heat production from rocks in the Gabal Arrubushi area in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt based on airborne spectral gamma-ray survey data. The results show that the radioactive heat production in the areas ranges from 0.01 μWm-3 to 5.2 μWm-3. Granites, muscovite and sericite schists in the western part of Gabal Arrubushi area have abnormally high radioactive heat production values from 2.57 μWm-3 to 4.44 μWm-3. Meanwhile, the higher averages of radioactive heat production of these rock units change from 1.21 μWm-3 to 1.5 μWm-3. The intermediate averages of heat production of felsitic mylonite schist, chlorite schist, felsites, amphibolites and Hammamat sediments are below the crustal average value range, i.e., from 0.8 μWm-3 to 1.2 μWm-3. The lowest averages of heat production values are less than 0.8 μWm-3 and found in the following rock units: Wadi sediments, rhyolites, andesites, gabbro and serpentinites.

  1. Mapping permafrost with airborne electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsley, B. J.; Ball, L. B.; Bloss, B. R.; Kass, A.; Pastick, N.; Smith, B. D.; Voss, C. I.; Walsh, D. O.; Walvoord, M. A.; Wylie, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost is a key characteristic of cold region landscapes, yet detailed assessments of how the subsurface distribution of permafrost impacts the environment, hydrologic systems, and infrastructure are lacking. Data acquired from several airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys in Alaska provide significant new insight into the spatial extent of permafrost over larger areas (hundreds to thousands of square kilometers) than can be mapped using ground-based geophysical methods or through drilling. We compare several AEM datasets from different areas of interior Alaska, and explore the capacity of these data to infer geologic structure, permafrost extent, and related hydrologic processes. We also assess the impact of fires on permafrost by comparing data from different burn years within similar geological environments. Ultimately, interpretations rely on understanding the relationship between electrical resistivity measured by AEM surveys and the physical properties of interest such as geology, permafrost, and unfrozen water content in the subsurface. These relationships are often ambiguous and non-unique, so additional information is useful for reducing uncertainty. Shallow (upper ~1m) permafrost and soil characteristics identified from remotely sensed imagery and field observations help to constrain and aerially extend near-surface AEM interpretations, where correlations between the AEM and remote sensing data are identified using empirical multivariate analyses. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) measurements quantify the contribution of unfrozen water at depth to the AEM-derived electrical resistivity models at several locations within one survey area. AEM surveys fill a critical data gap in the subsurface characterization of permafrost environments and will be valuable in future mapping and monitoring programs in cold regions.

  2. The predictive power of airborne gamma ray survey data on the locations of domestic radon hazards in Norway: A strong case for utilizing airborne data in large-scale radon potential mapping.

    PubMed

    Smethurst, M A; Watson, R J; Baranwal, V C; Rudjord, A L; Finne, I

    2017-01-01

    It is estimated that exposure to radon in Norwegian dwellings is responsible for as many as 300 deaths a year due to lung cancer. To address this, the authorities in Norway have developed a national action plan that has the aim of reducing exposure to radon in Norway (Norwegian Ministries, 2010). The plan includes further investigation of the relationship between radon hazard and geological conditions, and development of map-based tools for assessing the large spatial variation in radon hazard levels across Norway. The main focus of the present contribution is to describe how we generate map predictions of radon potential (RP), a measure of radon hazard, from available airborne gamma ray spectrometry (AGRS) surveys in Norway, and what impact these map predictions can be expected to have on radon protection work including land-use planning and targeted surveying. We have compiled 11 contiguous AGRS surveys centred on the most populated part of Norway around Oslo to produce an equivalent uranium map measuring 180 km × 102 km that represents the relative concentrations of radon in the near surface of the ground with a spatial resolution in the 100 s of metres. We find that this map of radon in the ground offers a far more detailed and reliable picture of the distribution of radon in the sub-surface than can be deduced from the available digital geology maps. We tested the performances of digital geology and AGRS data as predictors of RP. We find that digital geology explains approximately 40% of the observed variance in ln RP nationally, while the AGRS data in the Oslo area split into 14 bands explains approximately 70% of the variance in the same parameter. We also notice that there are too few indoor data to characterise all geological settings in Norway which leaves areas in the geology-based RP map in the Oslo area, and elsewhere, unclassified. The AGRS RP map is derived from fewer classes, all characterised by more than 30 indoor measurements, and the

  3. Survey of residential magnetic field sources. Volume 2, Protocol, data analysis, and management: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zallanella, L.E.

    1993-09-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has conducted a nationwide survey to collect engineering data on the sources and the levels of power frequency magnetic fields that exist inside residences. Approximately 1000 residences were randomly selected for the survey. The goals of this program were: (1) to identify all significant sources of 60 Hz magnetic field in residences, (2) to estimate for each source the percentage of residences where magnetic fields exceed specified levels, (3) to determine the relationship between magnetic field and source parameters, and (4) to characterize the field variations in space and time. The survey was not intended to measure exposure of people to magnetic fields and cannot be interpreted as such. To a great degree, exposure of people is dependent on their activity throughout a period of time. The intent of the program was to identity magnetic field sources. This was accomplished by hiking measurements at specific locations. To quantify personal exposure would have required the knowledge of the position of people with respect to magnetic field sources. The following sources of residential 60 Hz magnetic fields were idenfified: electrical appliances, grounding system of residences, overhead and underground power distribution lines, overhead power transmission lines, ground connections at electrical subpanels, and special wiring situations. Magnetic field from electrical appliances were measured separately while in the residences. The fields from other source were measured intentionally away from the influence of appliance fields, which is limited to areas close to appliances. Special techniques were used to determine how the field varied within the living space of the house and over a 24-hour period. Volume 1 describes program objectives and reports results and conclusions; Volume 2 describes study design, measurement protocol, data analysis, and data management.

  4. Developing and validating a conceptual survey to assess introductory physics students’ understanding of magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-03-01

    Development of validated physics surveys on various topics is important for investigating the extent to which students master those concepts after traditional instruction and for assessing innovative curricula and pedagogies that can improve student understanding significantly. Here, we discuss the development and validation of a conceptual multiple-choice survey related to magnetism suitable for introductory physics courses. The survey was developed taking into account common students’ difficulties with magnetism concepts covered in introductory physics courses found in our investigation and the incorrect choices to the multiple-choice questions were designed based upon those common student difficulties. After the development and validation of the survey, it was administered to introductory physics students in various classes in paper-pencil format before and after traditional lecture-based instruction in relevant concepts. We compared the performance of students on the survey in the algebra-based and calculus-based introductory physics courses before and after traditional lecture-based instruction in relevant magnetism concepts. We discuss the common difficulties of introductory physics students with magnetism concepts we found via the survey. We also administered the survey to upper-level undergraduates majoring in physics and PhD students to benchmark the survey and compared their performance with those of traditionally taught introductory physics students for whom the survey is intended. A comparison with the base line data on the validated magnetism survey from traditionally taught introductory physics courses and upper-level undergraduate and PhD students discussed in this paper can help instructors assess the effectiveness of curricula and pedagogies which is especially designed to help students integrate conceptual and quantitative understanding and develop a good grasp of the concepts. In particular, if introductory physics students’ average

  5. Gravity and Magnetic Surveys Over the Santa Rita Fault System, Southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hegmann, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Gravity and magnetic surveys were performed in the northeast portion of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, in southeastern Arizona, to identify faults and gain a better understanding of the subsurface geology. A total of 234 gravity stations were established, and numerous magnetic data were collected with portable and truck-mounted proton precession magnetometers. In addition, one line of very low frequency electromagnetic data was collected together with magnetic data. Gravity anomalies are used to identify two normal faults that project northward toward a previously identified fault. The gravity data also confirm the location of a second previously interpreted normal fault. Interpretation of magnetic anomaly data indicates the presence of a higher-susceptibility sedimentary unit located beneath lowersusceptibility surficial sediments. Magnetic anomaly data identify a 1-km-wide negative anomaly east of these faults caused by an unknown source and reveal the high variability of susceptibility in the Tertiary intrusive rocks in the area.

  6. Application of airborne gamma spectrometric survey data to estimating terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates: an example in California.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, H A; Revzan, K L; Smith, A R

    1994-01-01

    We examined the applicability of radioelement data from the National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance, an element of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation, to estimate terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates, by comparing dose rates calculated from aeroradiometric surveys of uranium, thorium, and potassium concentrations with dose rates calculated from a radiogeologic data base and the distribution of lithologies in California. Gamma-ray dose rates increase generally from north to south following lithological trends, with low values of 25-30 nGy h-1 in the northernmost 1 x 2 degrees quadrangles between 41 and 42 degrees N to high values of 75-100 nGy h-1 in southeastern California. Lithologic-based estimates of mean dose rates in the quadrangles generally match those from aeroradiometric data, with statewide means of 63 and 60 nGy h-1, respectively. These are intermediate between a population-weighted global average of 51 nGy h-1 reported in 1982 by UNSCEAR and a weighted continental average of 70 nGy h-1, based on the global distribution of rock types. The concurrence of lithologically and aeroradiometrically determined dose rates in California, with its varied geology and topography encompassing settings representative of the continents, indicates that the National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance data are applicable to estimates of terrestrial absorbed dose rates from natural gamma emitters.

  7. Absolute Magnetization Distribution on Back-arc Spreading Axis Hosting Hydrothermal Vents; Insight from Shinkai 6500 Magnetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Okino, K.; Honsho, C.; Mochizuki, N.; Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.

    2013-12-01

    Near-bottom magnetic profiling using submersible, deep-tow, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) make possible to conduct high-resolution surveys and depict detailed magnetic features reflecting, for instance, the presence of fresh lavas or hydrothermal alteration, or geomagnetic paleo-intensity variations. We conducted near-bottom three component magnetic measurements onboard submersible Shinkai 6500 in the Southern Mariana Trough, where five active hydrothermal vent fields (Snail, Yamanaka, Archean, Pica, and Urashima sites) have been found in both on- and off-axis areas of the active back-arc spreading center, to detect signals from hydrothermally altered rock and to distinguish old and new submarine lava flows. Fourteen dives were carried out at an altitude of 1-40 m during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-10 and YK10-11 cruises in 2010. We carefully corrected the effect of the induced and permanent magnetizations of the submersible by applying the correction method for the shipboard three-component magnetometer measurement modified for deep-sea measurement, and subtracted the IGRF values from the corrected data to obtain geomagnetic vector anomalies along the dive tracks. We then calculated the synthetic magnetic vector field produced by seafloor, assumed to be uniformly magnetized, using three dimensional forward modeling. Finally, values of the absolute magnetizations were estimated by using a linear transfer function in the Fourier domain from the observed and synthetic magnetic anomalies. The distribution of estimated absolute magnetization generally shows low values around the five hydrothermal vent sites. This result is consistent with the equivalent magnetization distribution obtained from previous AUV survey data. The areas of low magnetization are also consistent with hydrothermal deposits identified in video records. These results suggest that low magnetic signals are due to hydrothermal alteration zones where host rocks are

  8. A new magnetic white dwarf discovered during the Large Bright Quasar Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, C.B.; Latter, W.B.; Hewett, P.C.; Weymann, R.J.; Morris, S.L.; Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ; Cambridge Univ.; Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1989-08-01

    A previously unknown magnetic white dwarf has been discovered as part of the Large, Bright Quasar Survey (Foltz et al., 1988). The absorption features are identified with transitions of hydrogen and are analyzed in the context of high-field Zeeman models to derive a polar dipole field strength of 24 x 10 to the 6th G at the stellar surface. 11 refs.

  9. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications.

  10. First high-resolution near-seafloor survey of magnetic anomalies of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Xu, X.; Li, C.; Sun, Z.; Zhu, J.; Zhou, Z.; Qiu, N.

    2013-12-01

    We successfully conducted the first high-resolution near-seafloor magnetic survey of the Central, Southwest, and Northern Central Basins of the South China Sea (SCS) during two cruises on board Chinese R/V HaiYangLiuHao in October-November 2012 and March-April 2013, respectively. Measurements of magnetic field were made along four long survey lines, including (1) a NW-SE across-isochron profile transecting the Southwest Basin and covering all ages of the oceanic crust (Line CD); (2) a N-S across-isochron profile transecting the Central Basin (Line AB); and (3) two sub-parallel NE-SW across-isochron profiles transecting the Northern Central Basin of the SCS (Lines D and E). A three-axis magnetometer was mounted on a deep-tow vehicle, flying within 0.6 km above the seafloor. The position of the tow vehicle was provided by an ultra-short baseline navigation system along Lines D and E, while was estimated using shipboard GPS along Lines AB and CD. To investigate crustal magnetization, we first removed the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) of 2010 from the measured magnetic data, and then downward continued the resultant magnetic field data to a horizontal plane at a water depth of 4.5 km to correct for variation due to the fishing depth of the deep-tow vehicle. Finally, we calculated magnetic anomalies at various water depths after reduction-to-the-pole corrections. We also constructed polarity reversal block (PRB) models of crustal magnetization by matching peaks and troughs of the observed magnetic field anomaly. Our analysis yielded the following results: (1) The near-bottom magnetic anomaly showed peak-to-trough amplitudes of more than 2,500 nT, which are several times of the anomaly amplitudes at the sea surface, illustrating that deep-tow measurements acquired much higher spatial resolutions. (2) The deep-tow data revealed several distinctive magnetic anomalies with wavelengths of 5-15 km and amplitudes of several hundred nT. These short

  11. Detailed Gravity and Magnetic Survey of the Taylorsville Triassic Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Leftwich, John; Nowroozi, Ali, A.

    1999-10-01

    This work reports the progress on collecting existing gravity data in a rectangular area covering the Richmond and Taylorsville Basins and its vicinity. The area covers one-degree latitude and one degree longitude, starting at 37 North, 77 West and ending at 38 North, 78 West. Dr. David Daniels of the United State Geological Survey supplied us with more than 4900 Bouguer gravity anomalies in this area. The purpose of this report is to present the data in form of several maps and discuss its relation to the geology of the Triassic Basins and its vicinity. Johnson and others (1985) also presented a map of the Bouguer gravity anomaly of this area. However, their map covers a smaller area, and it is based on smaller number of observations.

  12. Detailed Gravity and Magnetic Survey of the Taylorsville Triassic Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ali A. Nowroozi; John Leftwich

    1997-12-31

    Our research to date has involved the Interpretation of the Bouguer Gravity Anomaly Associated with the Richmond and Taylorsville Triassic Basins and its Vicinity. Continental rift basins around the world contain about 5% of the earth's sedimentary layers and produce about 20% of the total hydrocarbon production of the world (Ziegler (1983). Nearly 30 large basins of this type are reported by Manspeizer and Cousminer (1988) in eastern North America and northwestern Africa. There are eleven exposed basins of this type in the state of Virginia, from which nine are totally and two partially within the state's border. The number of unexposed basin's is not known. Exploration and drilling have been hampered largely because surface data are insufficient for even evaluation of those basins which are partly or completely exposed in the Piedmont Province. Generation of data through random exploratory drilling and seismic exploration is much too expensive and, therefore, these methods have not been widely used. In order to remedy this situation, we have used a geophysical method and completed a detailed and dense ground gravity surveys of the Richmond (Nowroozi and Wong, 1989, Daniels and Nowroozi, 1987). In this work we report our progress on collecting existing gravity data in a rectangular area covering the Richmond and Taylorsville Basins and its vicinity. The area covers one degree latitude and one degree longitude, starting at 37 North, 77 West and ending at 38 North, 78 West. Dr. David Daniels of the United State Geological Survey supplied us with more than 4900 Bouguer gravity anomalies in this area. The purpose of this progress report is to present the data in form of several maps and discuss its relation to the geology of the Triassic Basins and its vicinity. Johnson and others (1985) also presented a map of the Bouguer gravity anomaly of this area. However, their map covers a smaller area, and it is based on smaller number of observations.

  13. Airborne electromagnetic data and processing within Leach Lake Basin, Fort Irwin, California: Chapter G in Geology and geophysics applied to groundwater hydrology at Fort Irwin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedrosian, Paul A.; Ball, Lyndsay B.; Bloss, Benjamin R.

    2014-01-01

    From December 2010 to January 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted airborne electromagnetic and magnetic surveys of Leach Lake Basin within the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California. These data were collected to characterize the subsurface and provide information needed to understand and manage groundwater resources within Fort Irwin. A resistivity stratigraphy was developed using ground-based time-domain electromagnetic soundings together with laboratory resistivity measurements on hand samples and borehole geophysical logs from nearby basins. This report releases data associated with the airborne surveys, as well as resistivity cross-sections and depth slices derived from inversion of the airborne electromagnetic data. The resulting resistivity models confirm and add to the geologic framework, constrain the hydrostratigraphy and the depth to basement, and reveal the distribution of faults and folds within the basin.

  14. Marine magnetic survey between Cabo da Roca and Cabo Espichel (near Lisbon, Portugal): first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neres, Marta; Terrinha, Pedro; Calado, António; Miranda, Miguel; Madureira, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    We present a magnetic survey conducted in the offshore region between Cabo da Roca and Sesimbra (mouth of Tagus River, Portugal). Strong magnetic anomalies are recognized in this area since a first marine survey in 1958 (Allan, 1965) and by further aeromagnetic survey (c.f. Silva et al, 2000). The anomalies have been linked to Cretaceous magmatic events related to the Upper Cretaceous Sintra magmatic complex and Lisbon volcanic complex, but their geometry and extension has yet not been resolved. The aim of the present survey was to unravel the location, geometry and type of the magnetic sources, thus contributing for the characterization of the main magmatic and tectonic features in the region. The survey was conducted in two legs (October 2014 and June 2015), consisting of 27 lines and 6 tielines, extending up to 40 km from the coast. The line spacing was 1 mile for the main lines and 5-6 miles for the tielines. The bathymetry of the surveyed area varies from very shallow (about 10 m) to near 3000 m. Total field was measured with a G-882 Cesium marine magnetometer of Geometrics (self-oscillating split-beam Cesium vapor), with frequency of acquisition of 10 Hz. Layback was real-time corrected using the acquisition software. Noise was removed by despike in Magpick software (Geometrics), and further processing was done using Oasis montaj (Geosoft) software. Data were subtracted of IGRF values and levelled by tielines to retrieve the final map of anomalies. Several punctual and linear anomalies with varying amplitude and wavenumber were identified, which cannot be explained by bathymetric variation; therefore they must then be due to the presence of higher susceptibility, likely volcanic rocks, and to structural inheritance associated with rifting and Alpine orogeny. The highest anomaly corresponds to the Cabo Raso positive magnetic anomaly, with maximum and minimum of 2800 nT and -1350 nT, respectively. This anomaly, already surveyed in 1958, has been compared to a

  15. Use of airborne electromagnetic methods for resource mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacky, G. J.

    1993-11-01

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods complement spaceborne remote sensing techniques. AEM surveys carried out from low flying aircraft are capable of detecting geological structures not visible on the surface. The flight height of AEM systems above the ground ranges from 30 to 120 m. Most systems generate primary EM fields by using a loop transmitter; conducting coils are used as antenna to measure the secondary magnetic field caused by conductive inhomogeneities in the ground. The frequency used in AEM surveys (100 Hz to 50 kHz) allows ground penetration in excess of 100 m. At present, two types of AEM systems are widely used: helicopter, frequency-domain, and fixed-wing, towed-bird, time-domain. The most common survey products are apparent conductivity maps. AEM methods are extensively used in prospecting for base and precious metal deposits, kimberlites, uranium, and also in geological mapping, groundwater exploration and environmental investigations.

  16. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in

  17. The next generation Antarctic digital magnetic anomaly map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Frese, R.R.B; Golynsky, A.V.; Kim, H.R.; Gaya-Piqué, L.; Thébault, E.; Chiappinii, M.; Ghidella, M.; Grunow, A.; ,

    2007-01-01

    S (Golynsky et al., 2001). This map synthesized over 7.1 million line-kms of survey data available up through 1999 from marine, airborne and Magsat satellite observations. Since the production of the initial map, a large number of new marine and airborne surveys and improved magnetic observations from the Ørsted and CHAMP satellite missions have become available. In addition, an improved core field model for the Antarctic has been developed to better isolate crustal anomalies in these data. The next generation compilation also will likely represent the magnetic survey observations of the region in terms of a high-resolution spherical cap harmonic model. In this paper, we review the progress and problems of developing an improved magnetic anomaly map to facilitate studies of the Antarctic crustal magnetic field

  18. Close-range airborne Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry for high-resolution beach morphometric surveys: Examples from an embayed rotating beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Fleury, Jules; Anthony, Edward J.; Gardel, Antoine; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The field of photogrammetry has seen significant new developments essentially related to the emergence of new computer-based applications that have fostered the growth of the workflow technique called Structure-from-Motion (SfM). Low-cost, user-friendly SfM photogrammetry offers interesting new perspectives in coastal and other fields of geomorphology requiring high-resolution topographic data. The technique enables the construction of topographic products such as digital surface models (DSMs) and orthophotographs, and combines the advantages of the reproducibility of GPS surveys and the high density and accuracy of airborne LiDAR, but at very advantageous cost compared to the latter. Three SfM-based photogrammetric experiments were conducted on the embayed beach of Montjoly in Cayenne, French Guiana, between October 2013 and 2014, in order to map morphological changes and quantify sediment budgets. The beach is affected by a process of rotation induced by the alongshore migration of mud banks from the mouths of the Amazon River that generate spatial and temporal changes in wave refraction and incident wave angles, thus generating the reversals in longshore drift that characterise this process. Sub-vertical aerial photographs of the beach were acquired from a microlight aircraft that flew alongshore at low elevation (275 m). The flight plan included several parallel flight axes with an overlap of 85% between pictures in the lengthwise direction and 50% between paths. Targets of 40 × 40 cm, georeferenced by RTK-DGPS, were placed on the beach, spaced 100 m apart. These targets served in optimizing the model and in producing georeferenced 3D products. RTK-GPS measurements of random points and cross-shore profiles were used to validate the photogrammetry results and assess their accuracy. We produced dense point clouds with 150 to 200 points/m², from which we generated DSMs and orthophotos with respective resolutions of 10 cm and 5 cm. Compared to the GPS control

  19. Interactive interpretation of airborne gravity, magnetic, and drill-hole data within the crustal framework of the northern Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Haby S.; Senosy, Mahmoud. M.; Abdel Zaher, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    The northern part of Western Desert represents the second most important oil-producing and gas provinces in Egypt. The aim of the present study is to highlight the subsurface structures, tectonic framework, and variation of the crust and upper mantle of the northern Western Desert. Geophysical data in the form of airborne gravity and magnetic maps as well as drill-hole data were used to achieve the objectives of the study. 2D interactive sequential modeling of aerogravity and aeromagnetic data was done along some selected profiles with constraints of the existing deep drill-holes at the study area. From these models, three maps for the depths to Precambrian basement, Conrad, and Moho surfaces were constructed. The results of this study indicate that the depth to the basement surface (thickness of the sedimentary section) ranges between 900 m at the southern parts and more than 5500 m at the northern parts. Meanwhile, the depth of Conrad discontinuity which reflect thickness of the upper crust; varies approximately between 10,000 m at the central and northern parts and 17,000 m at the southern parts of the area. While the Moho depth which represents the crustal thickness ranges from 27,000 m at the northern parts to 39,000 m southward. Integrating the results shows that the main compressive stress which influenced the studied area is in N55°W direction that supposed to cause primary shear in N25°W and N85°W directions with right and left lateral movements, respectively.

  20. High-resolution digital elevation model of lower Cowlitz and Toutle Rivers, adjacent to Mount St. Helens, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of October 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the Toutle River basin, which drains the northern and western flanks of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and lower Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, continues to monitor and mitigate excess sediment in North and South Fork Toutle River basins to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From October 22–27, 2007, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 273 square kilometers (105 square miles) of lower Cowlitz and Toutle River tributaries from the Columbia River at Kelso, Washington, to upper North Fork Toutle River (below the volcano's edifice), including lower South Fork Toutle River. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at

  1. High-resolution digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens crater and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the North Fork Toutle River basin, which drains the northern flank of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, built a sediment retention structure on the North Fork Toutle River in 1989 to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From September 16–20, 2009, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 214 square kilometers (83 square miles) of Mount St. Helens and the upper North Fork Toutle River basin from the sediment retention structure to the volcano's crater. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at Castle, Coldwater, and Spirit Lakes. Final results averaged about five laser last

  2. Magnetization distribution of hydrothermal deposits from three component magnetometer survey using ROV in the Lau Basin, the southwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.; Choi, S.; Park, C.

    2013-12-01

    Deep sea three component magnetic surveys, using ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle), were conducted at Apr., 2011 and Jan., 2012 in TA25 and TA26 seamounts, the Lau Basin, the southwestern Pacific. At 2011, the survey area was only the western slope of the caldera of TA25 using IBRV(Ice Breaker Research Vessel) ARAON of KIOST (Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology) and ROV of Oceaneering Co. And, at Jan. 2012, the magnetic survey was conducted in the western (site A) and eastern (site B) slopes of the caldera of TA25 and the summit area of TA26 using German R/V SONNE and ROV of ROPOS Co. The 2011 and 2012 three component magnetic survey lines were the 13 N-S lines and the 29 N-S lines (TA25-East : 12 lines, TA25-West : 11 lines, TA26 : 6 lines) with about 100 m spacing, respectively. Also, we conducted the 8 figure circle rotation survey of ROV for magnetic calibration at 2011 and 2012. For the magnetic survey, the magnetometer sensor was attached with the line frame of ROV and the data logger and motion sensor in ROV. The three component magnetometer measure the X (North), Y (East) and Z (Vertical) vector components of a magnetic field. A motion sensor (Octans) provided us the data of pitch, roll, yaw for the correction of the magnetic data to the motion of ROV. In the survey, ROV followed the tracks of the plan at 50 m above seafloor. The data of the magnetometer and motion sensors and the USBL(Ultra Short Base Line) data of the position of ROV were recorded on a notebook through the optical cable of ROV. Hydrothermal fluids over Curie temperature can quickly alter or replace the iron-rich magnetic minerals, reducing the magnetic remanence of the crustal rocks, in some cases to near 0 A/m magnetization. Low magnetization zones occur in the south-western and northern parts of TA25 site A and the south-south-western, north-western and central parts of TA25 site B. TA26 has low magnetization zones in the central part. The low magnetization zones of the survey

  3. Particle acceleration in relativistic magnetized collisionless pair shocks: a survey of magnetic inclination angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    We investigate particle acceleration in relativistic magnetized collisionless pair shocks with two-dimensional particle-in-cell numerical simulations. For fixed upstream bulk Lorentz factor γ0 = 15 and magnetic to kinetic energy fraction σ = 0.1, we explore a range of inclination angles θ between the magnetic field and the shock normal. The inclination is measured in the downstream rest frame and the magnetic field lies in a plane perpendicular to the simulation plane. The downstream energy spectrum for subluminal shocks consists of a relativistic Maxwellian and a high-energy power-law tail modified by an exponential cutoff. For parallel shocks (θ = 0° ), the tail accounts for ˜ 1% of the downstream particle number and ˜ 5% of the energy, and its energy spectral index is -2.7 ± 0.1. Accelerated particles bounce between the upstream and the downstream, and the upstream scattering is provided by oblique filaments, which have both an electromagnetic and an electrostatic component. Such filaments propagate towards the shock and are generated by the accelerated particles that escape upstream. For larger inclination angles the acceleration efficiency increases, and particles are efficiently boosted by the motional upstream electric field when gyrating across the shock. Close to the superluminality threshold θ ≈ 30° , the number and energy fractions of downstream accelerated particles are ˜ 3% and ˜ 12% respectively; the spectral index of the corresponding power-law tail is -2.4 ± 0.1. When the shock becomes superluminal (θ 30° ), the acceleration efficiency abruptly drops. Our results show that the range of upstream-frame inclination angles suitable for efficient acceleration in relativistic magnetized pair shocks is indeed very small 30° /γ0 , as suggested by previous Monte-Carlo simulations. Self-generated shock turbulence is shown to be not large enough to overcome the kinematic constraints for superluminal shocks. These findings place constraints

  4. Uncovering star formation feedback and magnetism in galaxies with radio continuum surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies show the importance of the star formation feedback in changing the energetic and structure of galaxies. Dissecting the physics of the feedback is hence crucial to understand the evolution of galaxies. Full polarization radio continuum surveys can be ideally performed to trace not only star formation but also the energetic components of the interstellar medium (ISM), the magnetic fields and cosmic ray electrons. Using the SKA precursors, we investigate the effect of the massive star formation on the ISM energy balance in nearby galaxies. Our multi-scale and multi-frequency surveys show that cosmic rays are injected in star forming regions and lose energy propagating away from their birth place. Due to the star formation feedback, cosmic ray electron population becomes younger and more energetic. Star formation also amplifies the turbulent magnetic field inserting a high pressure which is important in energy balance in the ISM and structure formation in the host galaxy.

  5. High Resolution Magnetic and Gravity Surveys to Constrain Maar Geometry and Eruption Mechanisms, Rattlesnake Crater, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, A. M.; Kruse, S. E.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Abdollahzadeh, M.; Harburger, A.; Richardson, J. A.; Courtland, L. M.; Farrell, A. K.; Kiflu, H. G.; Malservisi, R.; McNiff, C. M.; Njoroge, M.; Nushart, N.; Rookey, K.

    2013-12-01

    Located 25 kilometers east of Flagstaff, Arizona, Rattlesnake Crater is an oblong phreatomagmatic feature in the San Francisco Volcanic Field. The shallow crater is approximately 1.4 kilometers at its widest point, and surrounded by an uneven tuff ring which is overlapped by a scoria cone volcano on the southeastern side. Improved understanding of its formation and evolution requires geophysical study because there are very few outcrops, and no digging is permitted on site. Geologic features related to the crater are further obscured by deposits from the overlapping scoria cone, as well as tephra from eruptions at nearby Sunset Crater. We present the results of a detailed magnetic and gravity survey in and around Rattlesnake Crater. A substantial NW-SE trending elongate magnetic anomaly (1400 nT) and a smaller similarly trending anomaly are observed inside the crater, as well as a longer wavelength positive gravitational anomaly (+1.0-1.5 mGal) across the crater. The magnetic survey was completed on foot with a 50 meter line spacing inside the crater, and 100 meter line spacing across a portion of the surrounding area outside the crater. The gravity survey was done on two intersecting survey lines - one running west to east, and another roughly north to south, with recordings every 100 meters extending at least 1000 meters outside the crater in all four directions. 2D models of the magnetic and gravity data are presented illustrating the possible geometry of the diatreme, and the approximate size and shape of the major intrusive features. Eruption estimates based on the models are calculated, and the models are favorably compared to the size and depth estimates given in a recent publication (Valentine 2012) that used xenolith content to estimate the size and depth of the diatreme.

  6. Near-bottom magnetic surveys around hydrothermal sites in the southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogi, Y.; Mochizuki, N.; Okino, K.; Asada, M.

    2011-12-01

    Near-bottom magnetic survey is an effective method to reveal detailed magnetic anomaly features of seafloor. The measurements of three-components of the geomagnetic field by using AUV "URASHIMA" were conducted during the YK-09-08 cruise in the southern Mariana Trough in order to detect signals of hydrothermally altered rocks. During the cruise, vector geomagnetic field are successfully obtained along the all dive tracks with the information of the vehicle's attitude. Total intensities of geomagnetic field by the overhauser magnetometer were also conducted, but the data are only collected along almost E-W oriented observation lines due to the sensitivity of the sensor. The distribution of crustal magnetization are estimated using downward component of magnetic anomalies by the inversion method. The distribution of low crustal magnetization are almost coincide with the area around hydrothermal vent sites from on ridge to off ridge area, and most likely indicate signs of hydrothermally altered rocks. The distribution of low crustal magnetization on ridge are almost parallel to the the strike of ridge axis implying tectonic control of hydrothermal vent sites.

  7. Integrating geochemical survey and magnetic prospection on an archaeological site in SW-Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirix, Katrijn; Muchez, Philippe; Degryse, Patrick; Mušič, Branko; Poblome, Jeroen

    2013-04-01

    In this study, geochemical and magnetic survey data from an archaeological site are combined, aiming to explore the potential of both techniques to complement each other. The site under study comprises a suburban area of 6 ha, situated in the Roman to Byzantine city of Sagalassos (Taurus Mountains, SW-Turkey). For the geochemical survey, a total of 120 soil samples were collected in two grids, with cell sizes of respectively 100 x 100 m and 20 x 20 m. After Aqua Regia destruction, Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cu, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Mn, Mg, Na, Ni, Pb, P, Sr, Ti, V and Zn were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), using a Varian 720-ES apparatus. The magnetic survey was performed using a Geometrics G-858 magnetometer in gradient mode, along 0.5 m spaced transects. Results indicate that large scale chemical prospection with cell sizes of 100 x 100 m is capable of detecting human influence on soils by anomalous values of Cu, K, P and Zn, although the data are too coarse to aid geophysical interpretation. In the more detailed grid with cell sizes of 20 x 20 m, geochemical enrichments of Co, Cr, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni and V were detected on a location displaying strong magnetic anomalies. These anomalies were found to result from a local change towards a more mafic lithology. In an area where magnetic readings displayed high-frequency magnetic noise, soil samples contained distinct concentrations of P, Cu, K and Zn, suggesting that the soils at this location were strongly altered by human processes, which resulted in enhanced magnetic susceptibilities of the soils. An uphill zone, lacking the strongly contrasting magnetic anomalies found elsewhere, was shown to spatially correspond with enrichments of As, Al, Ba and Pb. The association of Al, Ba and Pb was identified as tracer signature for weathered limestone material in the territory of Sagalassos. Therefore, it is thought that the observed changes reflect the presence of a limestone hill in this zone

  8. Rationale and operational plan for a U.S. high-altitude magnetic survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Acuna, Mario; Bracken, Robert E.; Hardwick, Doug; Hinze, William J.; Keller, Gordon R.; Phillips, Jeff; Roest, Walter

    2002-01-01

    On August 8, 2002, twenty-one scientists from the federal, private and academic sectors met at a workshop in Denver, Co., to discuss the feasibility of collecting magnetic anomaly data on a Canberra aircraft (Figure 1). The need for this 1-day workshop arose because of an exciting and cost-effective opportunity to collect invaluable magnetic anomaly data during a Canberra mission over the U.S. in 2003 and 2004. High Altitude Mapping Missions (HAMM) is currently planning a mission to collect Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) imagery at an altitude of about 15 km and with a flight-line spacing of about 18 km over the conterminous U.S. and Alaska. The additional collection of total and vector magnetic field data would represent a secondary mission objective (i.e., a "piggy-back" magnetometer system). Because HAMM would fund the main flight costs of the mission, the geomagnetic community would obtain invaluable magnetic data at a nominal cost. These unique data would provide new insights on fundamental tectonic and thermal processes and give a new view of the structural and lithologic framework of the crust and possibly the upper mantle. This document highlights: (1) the reasons to conduct this national survey and (2) a preliminary operational plan to collect high-altitude magnetic data of a desired quality and for the expected resources. Although some operational plan issues remain to be resolved, the important conclusions of the workshop are that the Canberra is a very suitable platform to measure the magnetic field and that the planned mission will result in quality high-altitude magnetic data to greatly expand the utility of our national magnetic database.

  9. Abandoned underground storage tank location using fluxgate magnetic surveying: A case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Biersel, T. P.; Bristoll, B.C.; Taylor, R.W.; Rose, J.

    2002-01-01

    In 1993, during the removal of a diesel and a gasoline underground storage tank at the municipal garage of the Village of Kohler, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, soil testing revealed environmental contamination at the site. A site investigation revealed the possibility of a second on-site source of petroleum contamination. Limited historical data and the present usage of structures within the suspected source area precluded the use of most invasive sampling methods and most geophysical techniques. A fluxgate magnetometer survey, followed by confirmatory excavation, was conducted at the site. The fluxgate magnetometer survey identified nine possible magnetic anomalies within the 18 ?? 25 m area. The subsequent excavation near the anomalies revealed the presence of five paired and two individual 2000 L underground storage tanks. The fluxgate magnetometer survey, although affected by the proximity of buildings, was able to detect the buried tanks within 3 m of the brick structures, using a 1.5 ?? 1.5 m sampling array.

  10. Aerial Magnetic, Electromagnetic, and Gamma-ray Survey, Berrien County, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, Joseph S.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Daniels, David L.; Mars, John L.; Webring, Michael W.; Hildenbrand, Thomas G.

    2002-01-01

    This publication includes maps, grids, and flightline databases of a detailed aerial survey and maps and grids of satellite data in Berrien County, Michigan. The purpose of the survey was to map aquifers in glacial terrains. This was accomplished by using a DIGHEMVRES mufti-coil, mufti-frequency electromagnetic system supplemented by a high sensitivity cesium magnetometer and 256-channel spectrometer. The information from these sensors was processed to produce maps, which display the conductive, magnetic and radioactive properties of the survey area. A GPS electronic navigation system ensured accurate positioning of the geophysical data. This report also includes data from the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection (ASTER) radiometer. ASTER measures thermal emission and reflection data for 14 bands of the spectrum.

  11. An airborne magnetometry study across Zagros collision zone along Ahvaz-Isfahan route in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskooi, Behrooz; Abedi, Maysam

    2015-12-01

    Convergence between the Eurasian and Arabian plates formed the Zagros orogenic belt between Late Cretaceous and Pliocene as a relatively young and active fold-thrust belt in Iran. The structural geology along Ahvaz to Isfahan route across Zagros is investigated employing magnetic data in order to determine the crustal structure in the collision zone of the two Palaeo-continents. Airborne magnetometry data with a line space of survey of 7.5 km have been used to image the variations of the apparent magnetic susceptibility along this route. At first the airborne data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance subtle changes of the Earth's magnetic field. Then 3D inverse modeling of magnetic data was implemented, while the cross section of the magnetic susceptibility variations along the route was mapped down to a depth of 100 km. The acquired magnetic susceptibility model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data as well. In addition, the analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole magnetic data leading to the determination of active faults in Zagros fold-thrust belt (ZFTB) structural zone based upon the generated peaks. Some probable locations of fault events were also suggested in Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ). The locations of faults correspond well to the magnetic susceptibility variations on the inverted section. Probable direction, slope and depth extension of these faults were also plotted on the magnetic susceptibility model, showing an intensively tectonized zone of the SSZ. The main difference between two domains is that the Eurasian plate seems to contain high magnetic susceptible materials compared to the Arabian plate. The recovered model of the apparent magnetic susceptibility values indicated that the average thickness of the non-magnetic sedimentary units is about 11 km and the Curie depth locates approximately at depth of 24 km for the whole studied area.

  12. Electric, Magnetic and Ionospheric Survey of Seismically Active Regions with SWARM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, Marius M.; Moldovan, Iren; Voiculescu, Mirela; Balasis, George; Lichtenberger, Janos; Heilig, Balazs; Kovacs, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We present a project devoted to the scientific exploitation of SWARM multi-point measurements of the magnetic and electric field, of the electron temperature and density in the ionosphere. These data provide unique opportunities to study in-situ and remotely the electromagnetic and plasma variability due to ionospheric forcing from above and below. The project "Electric, Magnetic and Ionospheric Survey of Seismically Active Regions with SWARM (EMISSARS)" focus on coordinated studies between SWARM and ground based observatories to survey electromagnetic and ionospheric variability at medium latitudes and look for possible correlations with the seismic activity in central Europe. The project is coordinated by the Institute for Space Sciences (INFLPR-ISS) and the National Institute for Earth Physics (INFP) in Bucharest, Romania. In addition to SWARM data the project benefits from support of dedicated ground based measurements provided by the MEMFIS network coordinated by INFP, the MM100 network of magnetic observatories coordinated by the Geological and Geophysical Institute of Hungary (MFGI) in Budapest. Seismic data are provided by INFP and the European Mediterranean Seismological Center. The mission of the project is to monitor from space and from ground the ionospheric and electromagnetic variability during time intervals prior, during and after seismic activity in (i) the seismic active regions of the central Europe and (ii) in regions unaffected by the seismic activity. The latter will provide reference measurements, free from possible seismogenic signals. The scientific objectives of the project are: (1) Observation of electric, magnetic and ionospheric (electron temperature, density) variability in the ionosphere above or in the close vicinity of seismic active regions, in conjunction with ground based observations from dedicated networks; (2) Investigation of the coupling between the litosphere - atmosphere - ionosphere, during Earthquakes; (3) Quantitative

  13. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data, Hunton anticline, south-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Smith, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maryla; Blome, Charles D.; Hill, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    This report is a digital data release for multiple geophysical surveys conducted in the Hunton anticline area of south-central Oklahoma. The helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys were flown on March 16–17, 2007, in four areas of the Hunton anticline in south-central Oklahoma. The objective of this project is to improve the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The electromagnetic sensor for the helicopter electromagnetic survey consisted of six different transmitter-receiver orientations that measured the earth's electrical response at six distinct frequencies from approximately 500 Hertz to approximately 115,000 Hertz. The electromagnetic measurements were converted to electrical resistivity values, which were gridded and plotted on georeferenced maps. The map from each frequency represents a different depth of investigation for each area. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow groundwater. The four areas selected for the helicopter electromagnetic study, blocks A–D, have different geologic and hydrologic settings. Geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies are being used by modelers and resource managers to develop groundwater resource plans for the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer.

  14. A Field Evaluation of Airborne Techniques for Detection of Unexploded Ordnance

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, D.; Doll, W.E.; Hamlett, P.; Holladay, J.S.; Nyquist, J.E.; Smyre, J.; Gamey, T.J.

    1999-03-14

    US Defense Department estimates indicate that as many as 11 million acres of government land in the U. S. may contain unexploded ordnance (UXO), with the cost of identifying and disposing of this material estimated at nearly $500 billion. The size and character of the ordnance, types of interference, vegetation, geology, and topography vary from site to site. Because of size or composition, some ordnance is difficult to detect with any geophysical method, even under favorable soil and cultural interference conditions. For some sites, airborne methods may provide the most time and cost effective means for detection of UXO. Airborne methods offer lower risk to field crews from proximity to unstable ordnance, and less disturbance of sites that maybe environmentally sensitive. Data were acquired over a test site at Edwards AFB, CA using airborne magnetic, electromagnetic, multispectral and thermal sensors. Survey areas included sites where trenches might occur, and a test site in which we placed deactivated ordnance, ranging in size from small ''bomblets'' to large bombs. Magnetic data were then acquired with the Aerodat HM-3 system, which consists of three cesium magnetometers within booms extending to the front and sides of the helicopter, and mounted such that the helicopter can be flown within 3m of the surface. Electromagnetic data were acquired with an Aerodat 5 frequency coplanar induction system deployed as a sling load from a helicopter, with a sensor altitude of 15m. Surface data, acquired at selected sites, provide a comparison with airborne data. Multispectral and thermal data were acquired with a Daedelus AADS 1268 system. Preliminary analysis of the test data demonstrate the value of airborne systems for UXO detection and provide insight into improvements that might make the systems even more effective.

  15. Air and shipborne magnetic surveys of the Antarctic into the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golynsky, A.; Bell, R.; Blankenship, D.; Damaske, D.; Ferraccioli, F.; Finn, C.; Golynsky, D.; Ivanov, S.; Jokat, W.; Masolov, V.; Riedel, S.; von Frese, R.; Young, D.

    2013-02-01

    The Antarctic geomagnetics' community remains very active in crustal anomaly mapping. More than 1.5 million line-km of new air- and shipborne data have been acquired over the past decade by the international community in Antarctica. These new data together with surveys that previously were not in the public domain significantly upgrade the ADMAP compilation. Aeromagnetic flights over East Antarctica have been concentrated in the Transantarctic Mountains, the Prince Charles Mountains - Lambert Glacier area, and western Dronning Maud Land (DML) — Coats Land. Additionally, surveys were conducted over Lake Vostok and the western part of Marie Byrd Land by the US Support Office for Aerogeophysical Research projects and over the Amundsen Sea Embayment during the austral summer of 2004/2005 by a collaborative US/UK aerogeophysical campaign. New aeromagnetic data over the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (120,000 line-km), acquired within the IPY Antarctica's Gamburtsev Province project reveal fundamental geologic features beneath the East Antarctic Ice sheet critical to understanding Precambrian continental growth processes. Roughly 100,000 line-km of magnetic data obtained within the International Collaboration for Exploration of the Cryosphere through Aerogeophysical Profiling promises to shed light on subglacial lithology and identify crustal boundaries for the central Antarctic Plate. Since the 1996/97 season, the Alfred Wegener Institute has collected 90,000 km of aeromagnetic data along a 1200 km long segment of the East Antarctic coast over western DML. Recent cruises by Australian, German, Japanese, Russian, British, and American researchers have contributed to long-standing studies of the Antarctic continental margin. Along the continental margin of East Antarctica west of Maud Rise to the George V Coast of Victoria Land, the Russian Polar Marine Geological Research Expedition and Geoscience Australia obtained 80,000 and 20,000 line-km, respectively, of

  16. The MiMeS survey of magnetism in massive stars: introduction and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Grunhut, J. H.; Petit, V.; Batz, B. de; Bohlender, D. A.; Cohen, D. H.; Henrichs, H. F.; Kochukhov, O.; Landstreet, J. D.; Manset, N.; Martins, F.; Mathis, S.; Oksala, M. E.; Owocki, S. P.; Rivinius, Th.; Shultz, M. E.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Townsend, R. H. D.; ud-Doula, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Braithwaite, J.; Briquet, M.; Carciofi, A. C.; David-Uraz, A.; Folsom, C. P.; Fullerton, A. W.; Leroy, B.; Marcolino, W. L. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Nazé, Y.; Louis, N. St; Aurière, M.; Bagnulo, S.; Bailey, J. D.; Barbá, R. H.; Blazère, A.; Böhm, T.; Catala, C.; Donati, J.-F.; Ferrario, L.; Harrington, D.; Howarth, I. D.; Ignace, R.; Kaper, L.; Lüftinger, T.; Prinja, R.; Vink, J. S.; Weiss, W. W.; Yakunin, I.

    2016-02-01

    The MiMeS (Magnetism in Massive Stars) project is a large-scale, high-resolution, sensitive spectropolarimetric investigation of the magnetic properties of O- and early B-type stars. Initiated in 2008 and completed in 2013, the project was supported by three Large Program allocations, as well as various programmes initiated by independent principal investigators, and archival resources. Ultimately, over 4800 circularly polarized spectra of 560 O and B stars were collected with the instruments ESPaDOnS (Echelle SpectroPolarimetric Device for the Observation of Stars) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, Narval at the Télescope Bernard Lyot and HARPSpol at the European Southern Observatory La Silla 3.6 m telescope, making MiMeS by far the largest systematic investigation of massive star magnetism ever undertaken. In this paper, the first in a series reporting the general results of the survey, we introduce the scientific motivation and goals, describe the sample of targets, review the instrumentation and observational techniques used, explain the exposure time calculation designed to provide sensitivity to surface dipole fields above approximately 100 G, discuss the polarimetric performance, stability and uncertainty of the instrumentation, and summarize the previous and forthcoming publications.

  17. Geophysical Surveying of Shallow Magnetic Anomalies Using the iPhone Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opdyke, P.; Dudley, C.; Louie, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    This investigation examined whether the 3-axis Hall-effect magnetometer in the Apple iPhone 3GS can function as an effective shallow magnetic survey instrument. The xSensor Pro app from Crossbow Systems allows recoding of all three sensor components along with the GPS location, at a frequency of 1.0, 4.0, 16.0, and 32.0 Hz. If the iPhone proves successful in collecting useful magnetic data, then geophysicists and especially educators would have a new tool for high-density geophysical mapping. No-contract iPhones that can connect with WiFi can be obtained for about $400, allowing deployment of large numbers of instruments. iPhones with the xSensor Pro app surveyed in parallel with an Overhauser GEM system magnetometer (1 nT sensitivity) to test this idea. Anderson Bay, located on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, provided a rural survey location free from cultural interference. xSensor Pro, logged each component's intensity and the GPS location at a frequency of four measurements per second. Two Overhauser units functioned as a base unit and a roving unit. The roving unit collected total field at set points located with a handheld GPS. Comparing the total field computed from the iPhone components against that collected by the Overhauser establishes the level of anomalies that the iPhone can detect. iPhone total-field measurements commonly vary by 200 nT from point to point, so a spatial-temporal average over 25 seconds produces a smoothed signal for comparison. Preliminary analysis of the iPhone results show that the data do not accurately correlate to the total field collected by the Overhauser for any anomaly of less than 200 nT.

  18. Modern geodetic methods for high-accuracy survey coordination on the example of magnetic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoperov, R. I.; Sidorov, R. V.; Soloviev, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The purposes and problems of the international network of geomagnetic observatories INTERMAGNET are briefly described in the work. The importance of the development of the Russian segment of the network as a part of a system for monitoring and estimating geomagnetic conditions on the Russian territory is emphasized. An example of the use of modern high-precision geodetic equipment for coor-dinate referencing of field geophysical observation is described. Factors that distort the referencing of field observations in problems of survey, engineering, and technical geophysics are listed, as well as those related to detail and high-resolution geophysical surveying and those that require a corresponding accuracy of observation point coordination. The magnetic exploration at the site of the Yamal INTERMAGNET-standard observatory serves an example to describe a technique for geodetic provision of a detailed geophysical survey by means of joint use of differential GNSS measurements and electronic tacheometry. The main advantages and disadvantages of the technique suggested are listed.

  19. Analysis of EM dataset with several sensor configurations obtained by the loop-loop EM survey on magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHOI, J.; Yi, M. J.; Sasaki, Y.; Son, J.; Nam, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Most of mineral mines in Korea are located in rugged mountain area embedding small-scale anomalies. Loop-loop EM survey system can be a better choice for exploring those mines because no ground contact is required and portable loops are freely positioned. Survey design is very important for detecting small amount of mineral deposits efficiently and spatial limits of survey lines should be considered. Along a same survey line, surveys with different separations between a transmitter and a receiver are applicable. EM responses are calculated in a layered-earth model embedding magnetic anomalies and analyses considering electric conductivity and magnetic permeability are made for the loop-loop EM survey data. Combining EM dataset with multi-frequency and multi-separation slightly enhanced a reconstructed image. Loop-loop EM survey using PROMOIS system was conducted on a small magnetite mine. Inversion with and without considering magnetic permeability was conducted for EM data with multi-frequency and multi-separation between a transmitter and a receiver.

  20. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as proxy method to monitor soil pollution: development of experimental protocols for field surveys.

    PubMed

    D'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Chianese, Domenico; Coppola, Rosa; Macchiato, Maria; Ragosta, Maria

    2007-02-01

    In the framework of the development of new methods for measuring and monitoring soil pollution, this paper deals with the use of magnetic methodologies to monitor the heavy metals presence in soils. In particular it shows a procedure for collecting magnetic susceptibility measurements in order to interpret them as proxy variable for monitoring heavy metals in soils. Magnetic measurements are carried out using a magnetic susceptibility meter with two different probes for in situ field surveys. The experimental procedure is divided in two parts. In the first part we carry out laboratory tests aimed to evaluate, for both the probes, the effective investigation depth for soil, the measurement reproducibility under different conditions, and the influence of water content. We complete this part comparing in situ measurements obtained by means of two probes with different characteristics. In the second part we carry out tests to evaluate the relationships between heavy metal levels and magnetic susceptibility values of soil samples. We investigate the variability of the magnetic susceptibility measurements contaminating different soil samples with well known concentration of heavy metals. Moreover we study the correlation between magnetic susceptibility values and metal concentrations, determined by means of AAS, in soil samples collected during a field survey. Results suggest that a careful check of the experimental procedure play a crucial role for using magnetic susceptibility measurements for heavy metals in situ monitoring. This is very helpful both for improving the quality of data and for making simpler data interpretation.

  1. Magnetic Properties of Lunar Samples: an Exhaustive Survey of the Apollo Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattacceca, J.; Andrade Lima, E.; Rochette, P.; Weiss, B. P.; Uehara, M.; Quesnel, Y.; Baratchart, L.; Leblond, J.; Chevillard, S.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed paleomagnetic studies of lunar samples shed light on the existence and timing of the ancient lunar dynamo, with insights to the inner structure and thermal evolution of the Moon, as well as constraints for the lunar dynamo models [e.g., 1-6]. However these studies are usually performed on small cm-scale samples, typically below 100 mg. Such a small size, combined with anisotropy and other spurious effects have been shown to be the source of additional complexity [7]. We measured the natural remanent magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of 105 large Apollo samples (mass range 40 g to 2.9 kg, median mass 350 g). For this, following the approach utilized for the initial paleomagnetic evaluation of Apollo 11 samples [8], we developed a dedicated magnetometer using a fluxgate sensor and a rotating stage, which allowed measuring the bulk samples in their original Teflon and aluminum packaging under nitrogen atmosphere. Despite a number of caveats (no demagnetization steps, existence of viscous magnetization and other soft secondary magnetization), the ratio of natural remanent magnetization to susceptibility gives a rough estimate of the paleointensity. The evolution of the paleointensity with the estimated age of the samples will provide a broad picture of the evolution of the lunar dynamo. Susceptibility, as a proxy to the bulk metal content in lunar rocks [9], is also a valuable source of information per se but is currently available only for a small fraction of the Apollo collection. Our survey will allow identification of rocks with unusual magnetic properties, and therefore potentially unusual petrogenesis. References: [1] Fuller & Cisowski 1987. In Jacobs (Ed.) Geomagnetism, 307-455 [2] Garrick-Bethell et al. 2009. Science 323:356-359 [3] Cournède et al. 2012. EPSL 33:31-42 [4] Shea et al. 2012. Science 335:453-456 [5] Suavet et al. 2013. PNAS 110:8453-8456 [6] Tikoo et al. 2014. EPSL in press [7] Tikoo et al. 2012. EPSL 337:93-103 [8] Doell & Gromm

  2. Magnetic and GPR surveys of a former munitions foundry site at the Denver Federal Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, David L.; Beanland, Shay; Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Powers, Michael H.

    2000-01-01

    We made magnetometer and ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys over part of the foundation of a World War II-era foundry located on the Denver Federal Center. The site contains a number of highly magnetic source bodies, concrete foundation walls, and underground openings, buried under a clay cap. The cap is several feet thick and has a conductivity of about 35 mS/m, making the features underneath it a poor target for conventional GPR. Indeed, the raw data look unlike typical GPR data, but rather show reverberation (?) bands under sidewalks and other shallow buried sources. Using a newly-written computer package, we made plan maps of the GPR response at different time slices. The sliced GPR data did not outline buried foundry foundations, as we had hoped it might. The resulting plan maps of the sliced data show sidewalks and other blobby features, some of which correspond to magnetometer highs.

  3. Operation of U.S. Geological Survey unmanned digital magnetic observatories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    The precision and continuity of data recorded by unmanned digital magnetic observatories depend on the type of data acquisition equipment used and operating procedures employed. Three generations of observatory systems used by the U.S. Geological Survey are described. A table listing the frequency of component failures in the current observatory system has been compiled for a 54-month period of operation. The cause of component failure was generally mechanical or due to lightning. The average percentage data loss per month for 13 observatories operating a combined total of 637 months was 9%. Frequency distributions of data loss intervals show the highest frequency of occurrence to be intervals of less than 1 h. Installation of the third generation system will begin in 1988. The configuration of the third generation observatory system will eliminate most of the mechanical problems, and its components should be less susceptible to lightning. A quasi-absolute coil-proton system will be added to obtain baseline control for component variation data twice daily. Observatory data, diagnostics, and magnetic activity indices will be collected at 12-min intervals via satellite at Golden, Colorado. An improvement in the quality and continuity of data obtained with the new system is expected. ?? 1990.

  4. Studying Autism Spectrum Disorder with Structural and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Marwa M. T.; Keynton, Robert S.; Mostapha, Mahmoud M. M. O.; ElTanboly, Ahmed H.; Casanova, Manuel F.; Gimel'farb, Georgy L.; El-Baz, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities have emerged as powerful means that facilitate non-invasive clinical diagnostics of various diseases and abnormalities since their inception in the 1980s. Multiple MRI modalities, such as different types of the sMRI and DTI, have been employed to investigate facets of ASD in order to better understand this complex syndrome. This paper reviews recent applications of structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to study autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Main reported findings are sometimes contradictory due to different age ranges, hardware protocols, population types, numbers of participants, and image analysis parameters. The primary anatomical structures, such as amygdalae, cerebrum, and cerebellum, associated with clinical-pathological correlates of ASD are highlighted through successive life stages, from infancy to adulthood. This survey demonstrates the absence of consistent pathology in the brains of autistic children and lack of research investigations in patients under 2 years of age in the literature. The known publications also emphasize advances in data acquisition and analysis, as well as significance of multimodal approaches that combine resting-state, task-evoked, and sMRI measures. Initial results obtained with the sMRI and DTI show good promise toward the early and non-invasive ASD diagnostics. PMID:27242476

  5. Nutrition Survey of Two Consecutive Training Cycles of the Airborne Training BN, CO. ’G’, Fort Benning, Georgia, October-November 1953

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The primary purpose of this survey was to determine (a) the total food consumption from all sources by these trainees, (b) the nutrient composition...a comparison of the various methods of computing food consumption and food losses.

  6. Extending airborne electromagnetic surveys for regional active layer and permafrost mapping with remote sensing and ancillary data, Yukon Flats ecoregion, central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Minsley, Burke J.; Ji, Lei; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Smith, Bruce D.; Abraham, Jared D.; Rose, Joshua R.

    2013-01-01

    Machine-learning regression tree models were used to extrapolate airborne electromagnetic resistivity data collected along flight lines in the Yukon Flats Ecoregion, central Alaska, for regional mapping of permafrost. This method of extrapolation (r = 0.86) used subsurface resistivity, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) at-sensor reflectance, thermal, TM-derived spectral indices, digital elevation models and other relevant spatial data to estimate near-surface (0–2.6-m depth) resistivity at 30-m resolution. A piecewise regression model (r = 0.82) and a presence/absence decision tree classification (accuracy of 87%) were used to estimate active-layer thickness (ALT) (< 101 cm) and the probability of near-surface (up to 123-cm depth) permafrost occurrence from field data, modelled near-surface (0–2.6 m) resistivity, and other relevant remote sensing and map data. At site scale, the predicted ALTs were similar to those previously observed for different vegetation types. At the landscape scale, the predicted ALTs tended to be thinner on higher-elevation loess deposits than on low-lying alluvial and sand sheet deposits of the Yukon Flats. The ALT and permafrost maps provide a baseline for future permafrost monitoring, serve as inputs for modelling hydrological and carbon cycles at local to regional scales, and offer insight into the ALT response to fire and thaw processes.

  7. On the use of L-band multipolarization airborne SAR for surveys of crops, vineyards, and orchards in a California irrigated agricultural region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The airborne L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) collected multipolarization calibrated image data over an irrigated agricultural test site near Fresno, CA, on March 6, 1984. The conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) the effects of incidence angle on the measured backscattering coefficients could be removed by using a correction factor equal to the secant of the angle raised to the 1.4 power, (2) for this scene and time of year, the various polarization channels were highly correlated such that the use of more than one polarization added little to the ability of the radar to discriminate vegetation type or condition; the exception was barley which separated from vineyards only when a combination of like and cross polarization data were used (polarization was very useful for corn identification in fall crops), (3) an excellent separation between herbaceous vegetation (alfalfa, barley, and oats) or bare fields and trees in orchards existed in brightness was well correlated to alfalfa height or biomass, especially for the HH polarization combination, (5) vineyards exhibited a narrow range of brightnesses with no systematic effects of type or number of stakes nor of number of wires in the trellises nor of the size of the vines, (6) within the orchard classes, areal biomass characterized by basal area differences caused radar image brightness differences for small to medium trees but not for medium to large trees.

  8. Clean enough for industry? An airborne geophysical case study

    SciTech Connect

    Nyquist, J.E.; Beard, L.P.

    1996-11-01

    Data from two airborne geophysical surveys of the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were extremely valuable in deciding whether a 1000-acre (400 hectare) parcel of the ORR should be leased to the City of Oak Ridge for industrial development. Our findings, based on electromagnetic and magnetic data, were incorporated in the federally mandated Environmental Assessment Statement (EAS), and in general supported claims that this land was never used as a hazardous waste disposal site. We estimated the amount of iron required to produce each anomaly using a simple dipole model. All anomalies with equivalent sources greater than approximately 1000 kg of iron were checked in the field, and the source of all but one identified as either a bridge, reinforced concrete debris, or a similarly benign object. Additionally, some smaller anomalies (equivalent sources of roughly 500 kg) have been checked; thus far, these also have innocuous sources. Airborne video proved invaluable in identifying logging equipment as the source of some of these anomalies. Geologic noise may account for some of the remaining anomalies. Naturally occurring accumulations of magnetic minerals in the soil on the ORR have been shown to produce anomalies which, at a sensor height of 30 in, are comparable to the anomaly produced by about 500 kg of iron. By comparison, the electronic noise of the magnetic gradiometer, 0.01- 0.02 nT/m, is equivalent to only about 50-100 kg of iron at a 30 m sensor height. The electromagnetic data, combined with field mapping of karst structures, provided evidence of a northeast-southwest striking conduit spanning the parcel. The possible existence of a karst conduit led the EAS authors to conclude that this is a {open_quotes}sensitive hydrologic setting.{close_quotes} We conclude that aerial geophysics is an extremely cost-effective, and efficient technique for screening large tracts of land for environmental characterization.

  9. Clean enough for industry? An airborne geophysical case study

    SciTech Connect

    Nyquist, J.E.; Beard, L.P.

    1996-02-01

    Data from two airborne geophysical surveys of the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were extremely valuable in deciding whether a 1000-acre (400 hectare) parcel of the ORR should be released to the City of Oak Ridge for industrial development. Our findings, based on electromagnetic and magnetic data, were incorporated in the federally mandated Environmental Assessment Statement (EAS), and in general supported claims that this land was never used as a hazardous waste disposal site. We estimated the amount of iron required to produce each anomaly using a simple dipole model. All anomalies with equivalent sources greater than approximately 1000 kg of iron were checked in the field, and the source of all but one identified as either a bridge, reinforced concrete debris, or a similarly benign object. Additionally, some smaller anomalies (equivalent sources of roughly 500 kg) have been checked; thus far, these also have innocuous sources. Airborne video proved invaluable in identifying logging equipment as the source of some of these anomalies. Geologic noise may account for some of the remaining anomalies. Naturally occurring accumulations of magnetic minerals in the soil on the ORR have been shown to produce anomalies which, at a sensor height of 30 m, are comparable to the anomaly produced by about 500 kg of iron. By comparison, the electronic noise of the magnetic gradiometer, 0.01--0.02 nT/m, is equivalent to only about 50--100 kg of iron at a 30 m sensor height. The electromagnetic data, combined with field mapping of karst structures, provided evidence of a northeast-southwest striking conduit spanning the parcel. The possible existence of a karst conduit led the EAS authors to conclude that this is a ``sensitive hydrologic setting.`` We conclude that aerial geophysics is an extremely cost-effective, and efficient technique for screening large tracts of land for environmental characterization.

  10. Sampling for Airborne Radioactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    compared to betas, gammas and neutrons. For an airborne radioactivity detection system, it is most important to be able to detect alpha particles and... Airborne radioactive particles may emit alpha, beta, gamma or neutron radiation, depending on which radioisotope is present. From a health perspective...

  11. Electromagnetic, magnetic, and gravimetric surveys at the Bi'r Jarbuah gold prospect, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C.H.; Showail, A.A.; Bazzari, M.A.; Khoja, J.A.; Hajour, M.O.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed search for gold and associated minerals was begun in the Bi'r Jarbuah area in 1988. Crone electromagnetic (CEM), magnetic, and gravimetric surveys were run in the areas of greatest interest. Anomalous areas are most interesting in the southern part of the area where linear magnetic and gravity anomalies trend east-northeast and overlap in large part. They are most prominent at or near the south end of a diorite pluton where some quartz veins mined by the ancients also trend northeast. A second area, at the extreme southern end of the survey, contains a large CEM anomaly that coincides with northeast-trending magnetic and gravity anomalies. Although this second area is largely overlain by alluvium, a major quartz vein strikes to the northeast in the adjacent bedrock.

  12. Advances and perspectives in bathymetry by airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Wang, Chenxi; Li, Mingyan; Wang, Yuefeng; Ye, Siqi; Han, Caiyun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the history of the airborne lidar and the development stages of the technology are reviewed. The basic principle of airborne lidar and the method of processing point-cloud data were discussed. At present, single point laser scanning method is widely used in bathymetric survey. Although the method has high ranging accuracy, the data processing and hardware system is too much complicated and expensive. For this reason, this paper present a kind of improved dual-frequency method for bathymetric and sea surface survey, in this method 176 units of 1064nm wavelength laser has been used by push-broom scanning and due to the airborne power limits still use 532nm wavelength single point for bathymetric survey by zigzag scanning. We establish a spatial coordinates for obtaining the WGS-84 of point cloud by using airborne POS system.

  13. The State of the Industry and Research in Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, G.

    2007-12-01

    Development of airborne geophysical methods has tended to proceed in rushes of energy, when many new systems are developed for the same application simultaneously along many pathways. The tremendous growth of airborne EM through the '50s to '70s was followed by natural selection in the '80s and '90s down to two styles: fixed-wing aircraft with high-powered time domain systems (FTEM) offering depth of exploration but poor spatial resolution, and helicopter-borne frequency-domain systems (HFEM) offering the best resolution but poor depth of exploration. At the end of the '90s there was an incredible spurt of energy toward helicopter time domain development, spurred technological advances in electronics and materials. By 2007 there were 8 systems operational. Perhaps the most daring current research is toward airborne EM systems utilizing ambient EM fields as sources. Magnetic sensors are almost universally cesium-vapor total field sensors (0.01nT sampled at 0.1s). Because the limitation on target detection is ambient, in-band noise, there is little to gain from producing higher-sensitivity meters. Data quality improvements are being sought by measuring horizontal and vertical gradients more accurately. The new wave of research for magnetic surveys is the measurement of vector or tensor magnetic data with directional sensors, generally either fluxgates or SQUIDS. Magnetometers on autonomous aircraft are newly available. Gamma Ray Spectrometry surveys with sodium-iodide crystal detectors give good performance, and the low cost allows for large volumes to make up for the relatively low sensitivity. The last few years have seen development of new systems in which each crystal in the detector array is monitored, calibrated and stabilized individually using natural radiation. Airborne gravity systems available use the LaCoste zero-length pendulum, or orthogonal accelerometers. Separation of gravity from acceleration is generally done with platforms stabilized for both

  14. Compliance with Standard Guidelines for the Prevention of Occupational Transmission of Bloodborne and Airborne Pathogens: A Survey of Postanesthesia Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, Alan R.; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Tuttle, Dale B.; Malviya, Shobha

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 34 nurses found that 81% always complied with guidelines for caring for patients with human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B; only 31% complied when patients were low risk. Reasons for noncompliance were "no anticipated blood contact" (53%) or "too busy" (25%). (SK)

  15. Ages and magnetic structures of the South China Sea constrained by deep tow magnetic surveys and IODP Expedition 349

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Feng; Xu, Xing; Lin, Jian; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Jian; Yao, Yongjian; Zhao, Xixi; Liu, Qingsong; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Wang, Jian; Song, Taoran; Zhao, Junfeng; Qiu, Ning; Guan, Yongxian; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Williams, Trevor; Bao, Rui; Briais, Anne; Brown, Elizabeth A.; Chen, Yifeng; Clift, Peter D.; Colwell, Frederick S.; Dadd, Kelsie A.; Ding, Weiwei; Almeida, Iván. Hernández; Huang, Xiao-Long; Hyun, Sangmin; Jiang, Tao; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Li, Qianyu; Liu, Chuanlian; Liu, Zhifei; Nagai, Renata H.; Peleo-Alampay, Alyssa; Su, Xin; Tejada, Maria Luisa G.; Trinh, Hai Son; Yeh, Yi-Ching; Zhang, Chuanlun; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Guo-Liang

    2014-12-01

    analyses of deep tow magnetic anomalies and International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 349 cores show that initial seafloor spreading started around 33 Ma in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS), but varied slightly by 1-2 Myr along the northern continent-ocean boundary (COB). A southward ridge jump of ˜20 km occurred around 23.6 Ma in the East Subbasin; this timing also slightly varied along the ridge and was coeval to the onset of seafloor spreading in the Southwest Subbasin, which propagated for about 400 km southwestward from ˜23.6 to ˜21.5 Ma. The terminal age of seafloor spreading is ˜15 Ma in the East Subbasin and ˜16 Ma in the Southwest Subbasin. The full spreading rate in the East Subbasin varied largely from ˜20 to ˜80 km/Myr, but mostly decreased with time except for the period between ˜26.0 Ma and the ridge jump (˜23.6 Ma), within which the rate was the fastest at ˜70 km/Myr on average. The spreading rates are not correlated, in most cases, to magnetic anomaly amplitudes that reflect basement magnetization contrasts. Shipboard magnetic measurements reveal at least one magnetic reversal in the top 100 m of basaltic layers, in addition to large vertical intensity variations. These complexities are caused by late-stage lava flows that are magnetized in a different polarity from the primary basaltic layer emplaced during the main phase of crustal accretion. Deep tow magnetic modeling also reveals this smearing in basement magnetizations by incorporating a contamination coefficient of 0.5, which partly alleviates the problem of assuming a magnetic blocking model of constant thickness and uniform magnetization. The primary contribution to magnetic anomalies of the SCS is not in the top 100 m of the igneous basement.

  16. Airborne Laser/GPS Mapping of Beaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Swift, R. N.; Fredrick, E. B.; Manizade, S. S.; Martin, C. F.; Sonntag, J. G.; Duffy, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented from topographic surveys of the Assateague National Seashore Park using recently developed airborne laser and Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. During November, 1995, and again in May, 1996, the NASA Arctic Ice Mapping (AIM) group from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility conducted surveys as a part of technology enhancement activities or warm-up missions prior to conducting elevation measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet as part of NASA's Global Climate Change program. The resulting data are compared to surface surveys using standard techniques. The goal of these projects is to make these measurements to an accuracy of 10 cm. The measurements were made from NASA's 4-engine P-3 Orion aircraft using the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), a scanning laser system. The necessary high accuracy vertical as well as horizontal positioning are provided by Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers located both on board the aircraft and at a fixed site at Wallops Island.

  17. Self-Organizing Maps: A Data Mining Tool for the Analysis of Airborne Geophysical Data Collected over the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, C.; Fraser, S. J.; Crosta, A. P.; Silva, A.; Barros, C.

    2011-12-01

    Regional airborne geophysical data sets are being collected worldwide to promote mineral exploration and resource development. These data sets often are collected over highly prospective terranes, where access is limited or there are environmental concerns. Such regional surveys typically consist of two or more sensor packages being flown in an aircraft over the survey area and vast amounts of near-continuous data can be acquired in a relatively short time. Increasingly, there is also a need to process such data in a timely fashion to demonstrate the data's value and indicate the potential return or value of the survey to the funding agency. To assist in the timely analysis of such regional data sets, we have used an exploratory data mining approach: the Self Organizing Map (SOM). Because SOM is based on vector quantization and measures of vector similarity, it is an ideal tool to analyze a data set consisting of disparate geophysical input parameters to look for relationships and trends. We report on our use of SOM to analyze part of a regional airborne geophysical survey collected over the prospective Anapu-Tuere region of the Brazilian Amazon. Magnetic and spectrometric gamma ray data were used as input to our SOM analysis, and the results used to discriminate and identify various rock types and produce a "pseudo" geological map over the study area. The ability of SOM to define discrete domains of rock-types with similar properties allowed us to expand upon existing geological knowledge of the area for mapping purposes; and, often it was the combination of the magnetic and radiometric responses that identified a lithology's unique response. One particular unit was identified that had an association with known gold mineralization, which consequently highlighted the prospectivity of that unit elsewhere in the survey area. Our results indicate that SOM can be used for the semi-automatic analysis of regional airborne geophysical data to assist in geological mapping

  18. Airborne Gravimetry and Downward Continuation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jekeli, C.; Yang, H.; Kwon, J.

    2009-12-01

    Measuring the Earth’s gravity field using airborne instrumentation is fully operational and has been widely practiced for nearly three decades since its official debut in the early 1980s (S. Hammer: “Airborne Gravity is Here!”) coinciding with the precision kinematic positioning capability of GPS. Airborne gravimetry is undertaken for both efficient geophysical exploration purposes, as well as the determination of the regional geoid to aid in the modernization of height systems. Especially for the latter application, downward continuation of the data and combination with existing terrestrial gravimetry pose theoretical as well as practical challenges, which, on the other hand, create multiple processing possibilities. Downward continuation may be approached in various ways from the viewpoint of potential theory and the boundary-value problem to using gradients either estimated locally or computed from existing models. Logistical constraints imposed by the airborne survey, instrumental noise, and the intrinsic numerical instability of downward continuation all conspire to impact the final product in terms of achievable resolution and accuracy. In this paper, we review the theory of airborne gravimetry and the methodology of downward continuation, and provide a numerical comparison of possible schemes and their impact on geoid determination.

  19. User definition and mission requirements for unmanned airborne platforms, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhner, M. B.; Mcdowell, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The airborne measurement requirements of the scientific and applications experiment user community were assessed with respect to the suitability of proposed strawman airborne platforms. These platforms provide a spectrum of measurement capabilities supporting associated mission tradeoffs such as payload weight, operating altitude, range, duration, flight profile control, deployment flexibility, quick response, and recoverability. The results of the survey are used to examine whether the development of platforms is warranted and to determine platform system requirements as well as research and technology needs.

  20. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I. Processing procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Tinnel, E.P.; Hinze, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation.

  1. Statistical survey of nighttime midlatitude magnetic fluctuations: Their source location and Poynting flux as derived from the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeheung; Lühr, Hermann; Stolle, Claudia; Rodriguez-Zuluaga, Juan; Knudsen, David J.; Burchill, Johnathan K.; Kwak, Young-Sil

    2016-11-01

    This is the first statistical survey of field fluctuations related with medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs), which considers magnetic field, electric field, and plasma density variations at the same time. Midlatitude electric fluctuations (MEFs) and midlatitude magnetic fluctuations (MMFs) observed in the nighttime topside ionosphere have generally been attributed to MSTIDs. Although the topic has been studied for several decades, statistical studies of the Poynting flux related with MEF/MMF/MSTID have not yet been conducted. In this study we make use of electric/magnetic field and plasma density observations by the European Space Agency's Swarm constellation to address the statistical behavior of the Poynting flux. We have found that (1) the Poynting flux is directed mainly from the summer to winter hemisphere, (2) its magnitude is larger before midnight than thereafter, and (3) the magnitude is not well correlated with fluctuation level of in situ plasma density. These results are discussed in the context of previous studies.

  2. Airborne Infrared Spectrograph for Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, L.; Cheimets, P.; DeLuca, E. E.; Samra, J.; Judge, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field have significant potential to enhance our understanding of coronal dynamics, and improve forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of coronal field lines in the Transition Corona, the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on eruptive instabilities and on the origin of the slow solar wind. While current instruments routinely observe the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, the proposed airborne spectrometer will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. The targeted lines are five forbidden magnetic dipole transitions between 1.4 and 4 um. The airborne system will consist of a telescope, grating spectrometer and pointing/stabilization system to be flown on the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during the 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse. We will discuss the scientific objectives of the 2017 flight, describe details of the instrument design, and present the observing program for the eclipse.

  3. Passive airborne EM and ground IP\\resistivity results over the Romero intermediate sulphidation epithermal gold deposits, Dominican Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legault, Jean M.; Niemi, Jeremy; Brett, Jeremy S. Zhao, Shengkai; Han, Zihao; Plastow, Geoffrey C.

    2016-04-01

    The Romero gold-copper-zinc-silver deposits are located in the Province of San Juan, Dominican Republic, ~165 km west-north-west of Santo Domingo. Romero and Romero South orebodies contain stratabound gold mineralisation with copper, silver and zinc of intermediate sulphidation (IS), epithermal style. The gold mineralisation is associated with disseminated to semi-massive sulphides, sulphide veinlets and quartz-sulphide veins within quartz-pyrite, quartz-illite-pyrite and illite-chlorite-pyrite alteration. Ground direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarisation (IP) supported by ground magnetics remain the preferred geophysical targeting tools for drill follow-up along with geologic mapping and geochemistry. However, Z-axis tipper electromagnetics (ZTEM) passive airborne electromagnetics (AEM) and magnetics have recently also been applied with success for reconnaissance mapping of deep alteration and fault structures regionally. The airborne ZTEM-magnetic surveys, supported by three-dimensional (3D) inversions, show good correlation with the ground IP\\resistivity surveys in the Romero and Romero South gold-copper-zinc-silver IS deposit area. The results have provided targets for ground follow-up and deep targeted drilling, and were successful in identifying a previously unknown deep (>500 m) continuity between the Romero and Romero South deposits.

  4. Demonstration and Validation of an Improved Airborne Electromagnetic System for UXO Detection and Mapping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    basalt flows or other iron-bearing soils and rocks impede the performance of magnetometer systems. Although this is not a universal problem, it occurs...sensors at less than 0.5 m above ground level (AGL). Airborne and ground magnetometer systems are susceptible to interference from magnetic rocks and...where magnetite bearing basaltic rocks are problematic. The airborne TEM-8 system demonstrates a similar advantage over airborne magnetometer systems

  5. Airborne Next: Rethinking Airborne Organization and Applying New Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    structures since its employment on a large scale during World War II. It is puzzling to consider how little airborne organizational structures and employment...future potential of airborne concepts by rethinking traditional airborne organizational structures and employment concepts. Using a holistic approach in... structures of airborne forces to model a “small and many” approach over a “large and few” approach, while incorporating a “swarming” concept. Utilizing

  6. Latest Advancement In Airborne Relative Gravity Instrumentation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, N.

    2011-12-01

    Airborne gravity surveying has been performed with widely varying degrees of success since early experimentation with the Lacoste and Romberg dynamic meter in the 1950s. There are a number of different survey systems currently in operation including relative gravity meters and gradiometers. Airborne gravity is ideally suited to rapid, wide coverage surveying and is not significantly more expensive in more remote and inhospitable terrain which makes airborne measurements one of the few viable options available for cost effective exploration. As improved instrumentation has become available, scientific applications have also been able to take advantage for use in determining sub surface geologic structures, for example under ice sheets in Antarctica, and more recently direct measurement of the geoid to improve the vertical datum in the United States. In 2004, Lacoste and Romberg (now Micro-g Lacoste) decided to build on their success with the newly developed AirSea II dynamic meter and use that system as the basis for a dedicated airborne gravity instrument. Advances in electronics, timing and positioning technology created the opportunity to refine both the hardware and software, and to develop a truly turnkey system that would work well for users with little or no airborne gravity experience as well as those with more extensive experience. The resulting Turnkey Airborne Gravity System (TAGS) was successfully introduced in 2007 and has since been flown in applications from oil, gas and mineral exploration surveys to regional gravity mapping and geoid mapping. The system has been mounted in a variety of airborne platforms including depending on the application of interest. The development experience with the TAGS enabled Micro-g Lacoste to embark on a new project in 2010 to completely redesign the mechanical and electronic components of the system rather than continuing incremental upgrades. Building on the capabilities of the original TAGS, the objectives for the

  7. Airborne Magnetic and Electromagnetic Data map Rock Alteration and Water Content at Mount Adams, Mount Baker and Mount Rainier, Washington: Implications for Lahar Hazards and Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C. A.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Horton, R.; Breit, G.; John, D.

    2007-12-01

    High resolution helicopter-borne magnetic and electromagnetic (EM) data flown over the rugged, ice-covered, highly magnetic and mostly resistive volcanoes of Mount Rainier, Mount Adams and Mount Baker, along with rock property measurements, reveal the distribution of alteration, water and hydrothermal fluids that are essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards and understanding hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermally altered rocks, particularly if water saturated, can weaken stratovolcanoes, thereby increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far-traveled, destructive debris flows. Intense hydrothermal alteration significantly reduces the magnetization and resistivity of volcanic rock resulting in clear recognition of altered rock by helicopter magnetic and EM measurements. Magnetic and EM data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of appreciable thicknesses of hydrothermally altered rock west of the modern summit of Mount Rainier in the Sunset Amphitheater region, in the central core of Mount Adams north of the summit, and in much of the central cone of Mount Baker. We identify the Sunset Amphitheater region and steep cliffs at the western edge of the central altered zone at Mount Adams as likely sources for future debris flows. In addition, the EM data identified water-saturated rocks in the upper 100-200 m of the three volcanoes. The water-saturated zone could extend deeper, but is beyond the detection limits of the EM data. Water in hydrothermal fluids reacts with the volcanic rock to produce clay minerals. The formation of clay minerals and presence of free water reduces the effective stress, thereby increasing the potential for slope failure, and acts, with entrained melting ice, as a lubricant to transform debris avalanches into lahars. Therefore, knowing the distribution of water is also important for hazard assessments. Finally, modeling requires extremely low

  8. The Precambrian Singo Igneous Complex (SIC), Uganda Revealed As a Mineralized Nested Ring Complex Using High Resolution Airborne Radiometric and Magnetic Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E. A.; LePera, A.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Katumwehe, A. B.; Achang, M.

    2014-12-01

    We used high-resolution radiometrics and aeromagnetic data to investigate the Precambrian Singo Igneous Complex (SIC) in Uganda. The SIC covers an area of about 700 km² and is host to hydrothermally formed economic minerals such as Gold and Tungsten. The distribution of the ore deposits is not well known and current mine workings are limited to the western margins of the complex. Our objectives were to (1) provide a detailed geological map of the SIC and surrounding, (2) investigate relationships between preserved intrusive bodies and Precambrian tectonic structures to provide insight into emplacement of the complex, (3) examine links between magma emplacement, discontinuities and hydrothermal alteration (4) generate two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) models of the complex to understand its subsurface geometry, (5) investigate the relationship between the structure of the SIC and mineral occurrences as an aid to future exploration programs. Edge enhancement filters such as the analytical signal, vertical and tilt derivatives were applied to the magnetic data. In addition, 2-D and 3-D models were produced using Geosoft's GM-SYS 2-D and Voxi modules. The filtered data provided unprecedented structural details of the complex and revealed the following: (1) the edge of the SIC is characterized by higher magnetic susceptibility and Thorium content than its interior, (2) the SIC is characterized by eight to nine nested ring complexes with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 14 km, (3) the 3-D inversion suggests near vertical walls for the ring complexes extending to a depth of about 7 km, (4) the SIC was emplaced within a Precambrian folded basement and was traversed by numerous NW-trending dykes and (5) present day mining activities are concentrated within the folded basement units although occurrences of Tungsten and Gold are found associated with the highly magnetized edge of the ring complexes. We interpret the highly magnetized edges of the nested ring

  9. High-resolution AUV-based near bottom magnetic surveys at Palinuro volcanic complex (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchi, L.; Plunkett, S.; Augustin, N.; Petersen, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present the preliminary results of new near bottom magnetic datasets collected during the recent POS442 cruise using the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Abyss. The Southern Tyrrhenian basin is characterized by deep seafloor interspersed with huge volcanic seamounts (e.g Vavilov and Marsili and those associated to the Aeolian volcanic arc), which were formed during eastward roll back of the Apennine subduction system. These submarine edifices often are affected by significant hydrothermal activity and associated mineral deposits such as those observed at Marsili, Palinuro and Panarea. The western part of the Palinuro volcanic complex is characterized by a half rim of a caldera-like structure and hosts hydrothermal barite-pyrite deposits. Until recently, the full extent of the hydrothermal system remained poorly defined, as exploration has been limited to a few specific sites. In November 2012, a set of high resolution near seafloor geophysical surveys were carried out using GEOMAR's AUV Abyss to attempt to better define the hydrothermal mineralization at Palinuro. Five AUV dives were performed, mapping a total area of 3.7 km2 over the western part of Palinuro. Geomar's Abyss AUV (a Remus6000 class vehicle) was equipped with an Applied Physics Systems flux gate magnetometer, writing to a stand alone data logger, powered by the AUV's main batteries. The 5 dives were performed within the same area but with different primary geophysical sensors (multibeam, sidescan sonar, subbottom profiler), survey altitudes above seafloor (100m, 40m) and line spacing (150m, 100m, 20m). Magnetic data was collect on all five dives. At the beginning of each dive, the AUV performed a set of calibration manoeuvres, involving a 360 degree heading variation, a set of three upwards/downwards pitches, and three port and starboard yaws. This magnetic data reveals the magnetization features of the seafloor in unprecedented detail, highlighting a complex pattern mostly due to

  10. Sensitivity of magnetic field gradients over Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykiev, Eldar; Ebbing, Jörg; Brönner, Marco; Fabian, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields from forward calculations of global crustal or lithospheric models cannot be compared easily with spherical harmonic (SH) crustal field models derived from the satellite observations. The reason for this is, that the lithospheric field has a significant part in the low-degree spherical harmonics (n<14) that are dominated by the core field. These low-degree harmonics are commonly zeroed out to retrieve the lithospheric magnetic field. In addition, at satellite height far-field effects from sources outside a regional study affect the long-wavelength part of the magnetic field. Because magnetic field gradients are less sensitive to the long wavelength anomalies, they are also less affected by the far field. However, the gradients still contain information about deep lithospheric structures. We present sensitivity tests based on a synthetic model of the Fennoscandian lithosphere to validate the influence of induced and remanent magnetization in magnetic data at the height of airborne surveys and satellite missions. The use of airborne data and satellite data is complementary because, due to their different height, they are sensitive to different depth domains. To correctly account for global and local aspects of the lithospheric field, our analysis is based on surface discretization by tesseroids (spherical prisms).

  11. Surveying the South Pole-Aitken basin magnetic anomaly for remnant impactor metallic iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahill, Joshua T.S.; Hagerty, Justin J.; Lawrence, David M.; Klima, Rachel L.; Blewett, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon has areas of magnetized crust ("magnetic anomalies"), the origins of which are poorly constrained. A magnetic anomaly near the northern rim of South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin was recently postulated to originate from remnant metallic iron emplaced by the SPA basin-forming impactor. Here, we remotely examine the regolith of this SPA magnetic anomaly with a combination of Clementine and Lunar Prospector derived iron maps for any evidence of enhanced metallic iron content. We find that these data sets do not definitively detect the hypothesized remnant metallic iron within the upper tens of centimeters of the lunar regolith.

  12. Thick sections of layered ultramafic cumulates in the Oman ophiolite revealed by an airborne hyperspectral survey: Petrogenesis and relationship to mantle diapirism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clénet, Harold; Ceuleneer, Georges; Pinet, Patrick; Abily, Bénédicte; Daydou, Yves; Harris, Esther; Amri, Isma; Dantas, Céline

    2010-02-01

    Using the HyMap instrument, we have acquired visible and near infrared hyperspectral data over the Maqsad area of the Oman ophiolite (~ 15 × 60 km). This survey allowed us to identify and map the distribution of clinopyroxene-rich cumulates (inter-layered clinopyroxenites and wehrlites) whose occurrence was previously undocumented in this area. The cumulates reach several hundred meters in thickness and crop out at distances exceeding 15 km on both sides of the Maqsad former spreading centre. They occur either in mantle harzburgites, as km-sized layered intrusions surrounded by fields of pegmatitic dykes consisting of orthopyroxene-rich pyroxenite and gabbronorites, or at the base of the crustal section where they are conformably overlain by cumulate gabbros. These ultramafic cumulates crystallized from silica- and Mg-rich melts derived from a refractory mantle source (e.g. high Cr#, low [Al 2O 3], low [TiO 2]). These melts are close to high-Ca boninites, although, strictly speaking, not perfect equivalents of present-day, supra-subduction zone, boninites. Chemical stratigraphy reveals cycles of replenishment, mixing and fractional crystallization from primitive (high Mg#) melts, typical of open magma chambers and migration of inter-cumulus melts. The TiO 2 content of clinopyroxene is always low (≤ 0.2 wt.%) but quite variable compared to the associated pegmatites that are all derived from a source ultra-depleted in high field strength elements (HFSE). This variability is not caused by fractional crystallization alone, and is best explained by hybridization between the ultra-depleted melts (parent melts of the pegmatites) and the less depleted mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) parent of the dunitic-troctolitic-gabbroic cumulates making up the crustal section above the Maqsad diapir. We propose that, following a period of magma-starved spreading, the Maqsad mantle diapir, impregnated with tholeiitic melts of MORB affinity, reached shallow depths beneath the ocean

  13. Close-range airborne photogrammetry: an effective tool for high-resolution sandy beach morphometric surveys. Examples from embayed beaches in French Guyana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Fleury, Jules; Anthony, Edward; Gardel, Antoine; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    have a mean vertical accuracy less than +/- 5 cm compared to the GPS control points, with a maximum of 20 cm in marginal sectors near vegetation and in the swash zone in low-water conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first time a poorly textured surface composed of sand is reconstructed by photogrammetry, contrast in the studied object being necessary for this method. Our highly accurate photo resolution and pre-processing permitted imaging enough texture to proceed. Morphological features in the upper surf zone such as rip channels, and subaerial features, such as erosion scarps and aeolian forms, clearly appear. The comparison between the DSM validates the estimation of sediment transfers and the rotation process on this beach, unlike traditional beach monitoring with GPS, which involves large uncertainty linked to sparse point acquisition. It can be claimed that photogrammetry is low-cost, user-friendly, and offers new perspectives for non-specialist users in geomorphology and other fields recquiring high-resolution topographic data. It combines the advantages of the reproducibility of GPS topographic surveys and the high density and accuracy of LIDAR, but at very advantageous cost compared to the latter.

  14. Survey and assessment of electric and magnetic field (EMF) public exposure in the transportation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F.M.; Jacobs, W.L.

    1999-03-01

    This research, conducted under the support of the Federal Electric and Magnetic Field Research and Public Information Dissemination (EMF RAPID) Engineering Program, characterized the extreme-low-frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields (EMF) which a traveler might encounter while using various forms of transportation. Extensive measurement of field level, frequency, temporal variability and spatial variability are reported for: conventional internal-combustion cars, trucks and buses; electric cars, trucks and buses; commuter trains; ferry boats; jetliners; airport shuttle trams; and escalators and moving sidewalks. Static magnetic field levels are also reported. Where possible, the source of the fields is identified. This effort extends extensive past work which investigated field in electrified trains, subways, light rail vehicles, and a magnetically levitated train by using similar protocols to characterize the complex ELF (3 Hz to 3000 Hz) electric and magnetic fields found in virtually all transportation systems.

  15. Gravity and Magnetic Survey of the Oaxaca-Juarez Terrane Boundary (Oaxaca Fault), Southern Mexico: Evidence for three Half Grabens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Belmonte-Jimenez, S. I.; Ortega-Gutierrez, F.; Keppie-Moorhouse, J. D.; Martinez-Silva, J.; Martinez-Serrano, R.

    2007-05-01

    A geophysical survey of the Oaxaca Fault boundary between the Oaxaca (Oaxaquia) (Zapoteco) and Juarez (Cuicateco) terranes along the Etla and Zaachila valleys area, southern Mexico shows a series of NW-SE Bouguer and magnetic anomalies with stronger gradients towards the east. The basement from the Oaxaca terrane has a high density (2.8 gr/cm3 ) and magnetic susceptibility of up to 0.0051 cgs units, which contrast with the Juarez basement that has a lower density (2.67 gr/cm3) and a higher magnetic susceptibility (values ranging between 0.0025 to 0.0045 cgs units). The magnetic susceptibility is similar south of the Donaji fault. Interpretation of six combined gravity and magnetic NE-SW profiles perpendicular to the valleys indicates the presence of a composite depression comprising three N-S sub-basins with the Etla and Zachila sub-basins located at the northern and southern portions, respectively, separated by a third sub-basin relatively displaced westwards. They are bounded on the east by the steeply W-dipping Oaxaca master fault, and on the west by the gently E-dipping Huitzo-Zimatlan fault. Two interpretations are suggested for the southward continuation of the Oaxaca Fault: 1) it continues southwards at depth with the same strike. Together the Bouguer and total field magnetic anomalies suggest that the Oaxaca fault is continuous from Etla via Oaxaca City and Ocotlán de Morelos probably to Miahuatlán de Porfirio Díaz, and 2) it continues with the same strike but is displaced eastwards ~20 km along a sinistral transfer fault, which forms the northern boundary of the Zaachila sub-basin.

  16. Airborne electromagnetics (EM) as a three-dimensional aquifer-mapping tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Pool, Don; Bultman, Mark; Gettings, Mark; Lemieux, Jean

    2000-01-01

    The San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona hosts a major migratory bird flyway, and was declared a Riparian Conservation Area by Congress in 1988. Recharge of the adjacent Upper San Pedro Valley aquifer was thought to come primarily from the Huachuca Mountains, but the U. S. Army Garrison of Fort Huachuca and neighboring city of Sierra Vista have been tapping this aquifer for many decades, giving rise to claims that they jointly threatened the integrity of the Riparian Conservation Area. For this reason, the U. S. Army funded two airborne geophysical surveys over the Upper San Pedro Valley (see figure 1), and these have provided us valuable information on the aquifer and the complex basement structure underlying the modern San Pedro Valley. Euler deconvolution performed on the airborne magnetic data has provided a depth-to-basement map that is substantially more complex than a map obtained earlier from gravity data, as would be expected from the higher-resolution magnetic data. However, we found the output of the Euler deconvolution to have "geologic noise" in certain areas, interpreted to be post-Basin-and-Range Tertiary volcanic flows in the sedimentary column above the basement but below the ground surface.

  17. Efficacy of magnetic capture in comparison with conventional DNA isolation in a survey of Toxoplasma gondii in wild house mice.

    PubMed

    Juránková, Jana; Hůrková-Hofmannová, Lada; Volf, Jiří; Baláž, Vojtech; Piálek, Jaroslav

    2014-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic parasite with a world-wide distribution. House mice (Mus musculus) play an important role as a reservoir host in the parasite life cycle. However, their detection in mouse brain is limited because the host potentially harbours only a few tissue cysts. In order to improve the diagnosis, we tested a novel protocol for T. gondii detection in mice and compared this technique to a standard PCR-based protocol using a commercial kit for DNA isolation. Efficacy of magnetic capture for isolation of T. gondii DNA from whole host brains was tested in brain samples of laboratory mice spiked with 1 up to 10(4) tachyzoites. Real-time PCR revealed that even 1-5 tachyzoites can be detected after magnetic capture. Also this method is suitable to quantify parasite numbers in mouse brains with more than 10 tachyzoite equivalents. To assess the two techniques in wild mice, we employed a dataset consisting of 243 individuals. The prevalence of T. gondii detected by magnetic capture and qPCR and by commercial isolation and PCR was 1.2% and 0%, respectively. The magnetic capture and quantitative PCR seems to be a highly sensitive and specific diagnostic method for both laboratory research and wild population surveys.

  18. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  19. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  20. Accuracies of Positioning and Geodata Using Helicopters for Geodetic and Geophysical Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielenberg, O.; Meyer, U.; Vasterling, M.

    2010-12-01

    : Helicopters are frequently used for airborne surveys in geodesy and geophysics. The range of accuracies needed for proper data reconstruction is wide spread from some meters for airborne magnetics to centimeters for laser scanner measurements. This study lists up to date methods of online and offline positioning, discusses their accuracies that may be achieved and relates them to different geodetic as geophysical surveys in different types of terrain. The goal is to match helicopter positioning methods with the given survey task to optimize results and work efficiency. Some fundamental studies have been conducted on helicopter work during the DESIRE (Dead Sea Integrated Research) project in Israel and Jordan which have been continued in Germany. These studies include the impact of vibrations on INS, IMU and gravity meter systems as well as the choice of antenna locations on the shell of the helicopter.

  1. Joint inversions of two VTEM surveys using quasi-3D TDEM and 3D magnetic inversion algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Vlad; Di Massa, Domenico; Viezzoli, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    In the current paper, we present results of a joint quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) inversion of two versatile time domain electromagnetic (VTEM) datasets, as well as a joint 3D inversion of associated aeromagnetic datasets, from two surveys flown six years apart from one another (2007 and 2013) over a volcanogenic massive sulphide gold (VMS-Au) prospect in northern Ontario, Canada. The time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were inverted jointly using the spatially constrained inversion (SCI) approach. In order to increase the coherency in the model space, a calibration parameter was added. This was followed by a joint inversion of the total magnetic intensity (TMI) data extracted from the two surveys. The results of the inversions have been studied and matched with the known geology, adding some new valuable information to the ongoing mineral exploration initiative.

  2. Test techniques: A survey paper on cryogenic tunnels, adaptive wall test sections, and magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.; Dress, David A.; Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to get good experimental data in wind tunnels is often compromised by things seemingly beyond our control. Inadequate Reynolds number, wall interference, and support interference are three of the major problems in wind tunnel testing. Techniques for solving these problems are available. Cryogenic wind tunnels solve the problem of low Reynolds number. Adaptive wall test sections can go a long way toward eliminating wall interference. A magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) completely eliminates support interference. Cryogenic tunnels, adaptive wall test sections, and MSBS are surveyed. A brief historical overview is given and the present state of development and application in each area is described.

  3. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  4. 3D modelling of an aero-gravity and -magnetic survey as an first exploration step in a frontier basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köther, Nils; Eckard, Marcel; Götze, Hans-Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    The West African Taoudeni basin covers a desert area of about 1.8 million km² and is one of the last frontier basins worldwide. Here Wintershall Holding AG holds acreage of about 68000 km². During 2005-2007 geological surveys and an aero-gravity and -magnetic survey were conducted in this area. The potential field modelling should contribute first insight about the subsurface to plan an economic seismic survey. 2D models lead to poor results. 2008 the results of an internship (NK) were 3D subsurface models, which were enhanced during the following diploma thesis (Köther, 2009). Complex igneous rocks and sparsely distributed constraints lead to an ambiguous interpretation. Therefore, several simple 3D models were compiled with the in-house software IGMAS+, which base on geological ideas of the underground and fit well the measured data. These basic models allow a geophysical evaluation of different geological theories about the subsurface. Also, for a thorough interpretation field transformations (Euler, Curvature, and Derivatives) were calculated. These results led to new constraints for further interpretation of the basin structures and therefore they are important contributions for future exploration e.g. the planning of seismic surveys.

  5. Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Geophysical Survey Data, Oakland, Ashland, and Firth Study Areas, Eastern Nebraska, March 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Abraham, Jared D.; Cannia, James C.; Steele, Gregory V.; Hill, Patricia L.

    2008-01-01

    This report is a digital data release for a helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey that was conducted during March 2007 in three 93-square-kilometer (36-square-mile) areas of eastern Nebraska as part of a joint State of Nebraska and U.S. Geological Survey study. The objective of the survey is to improve the understanding of the relationship between surface-water and ground-water systems critical to developing water resource management programs. The electromagnetic equipment consisted of six different coil-pair orientations that measured electrical resistivity at separate frequencies from about 400 hertz to about 115,000 hertz. The electromagnetic data were converted to electrical resistivity geo-referenced grids and maps, each representing different approximate depths of investigation for each area. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow aquifers. The three areas selected for the study, Ashland, Firth, and Oakland, have glacial terrains and bedrock that typify different hydrogeologic settings for surface water and ground water in eastern Nebraska. The geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies are being used by resource managers to develop ground-water resource plans for the area.

  6. GREATEM survey in coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd allah, S.; Mogi, T.; Femonko, E.

    2014-12-01

    To determine the electric-resistivity structure in coastal areas, airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys have been used many places. These results showed AEM can reveal seawater depth, sediment thickness, and depth to bedrock. However, until now, AEM could only reveal the resistivity structure to a depth of ˜200 m in coastal areas. Conventional AEM, using an airborne inductive source limits the depth of exploration because the presence of a conductor, such as saline surface water, decreases the penetration of the AEM signal. In order to enhance the depth of exploration, we used a grounded electrical source aligned parallel to the coast line and towed a magnetic receiver in the air. The method, called grounded-electrical-source airborne transient electromagnetics, or GREATEM (Mogi et al., 1998), should enhance survey depth in coastal areas, since this method galvanically injects electric current into the ground. The method has increased the depth of exploration to 800 m in on-shore areas (Mogi et al., 2009, Ito et al. 2014). We have carried out a GREATEM survey at Kujukuri beach in central Japan, where an alluvial plain is dominated by sedimentary rocks and shallow water. Another GREATEM survey was performed at northwestern Awaji Island, where granitic rocks crop out onshore. In these studies, we faced issues how do we evaluate an effect of sea water on the data. To circumvent this problem, we used a three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic (EM) modeling scheme based on the staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) method (Fomenko and Mogi, 2002) to study the effects of oceanic saltwater on GREATEM survey data at coastal areas. The models consisted of two adjacent layers where sea is a conductive thin sheet placed on top of a unifirm half space ( 100 Ohm-m). Then, we performed numerical forward modeling using the SFD method to generate a 3-D resistivity structure models from GREATEM field survey data at both of Kujukuri beach and the Nojima fault. As a result, we have

  7. Application of a terrain model in the interpretation and evaluation of a magnetic survey carried out for archaeological purposes in Porolissum, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovics, T.; Petrovszki, J.; Kudó, I.; Pánczél, Sz.; Dobos, A.; Vass, L.; Lenkey, L.; Bajusz, I.

    2009-04-01

    Presently, both geophysical surveying and archeological excavation requires precise determination of local coordinates and occasionally, the creation of a Digital Terrain Map. Besides topography implies essential information for archeology in itself, combination of topography with geophysical data is able to give further knowledge about the archeological objects. We carried out a high-resolution magnetic survey over the Roman-age ruins of the ancient town, Porolissum located in NW Romania. We surveyed an area of 100 m x 120 m with grid spacing of 0.5 m. We measured the total magnetic field and its vertical gradient. In this case study we present how joint application of magnetic and geodetic data can be used for topographic correction and interpretation of the magnetic anomaly map. Magnetic topographic correction is defined here as the removal of disturbing magnetic signals caused by the topography. In this procedure the induced magnetic field is calculated using the geomagnetic field of the Earth and the magnetic susceptibility of the soil. The induced magnetic field is subtracted from the measured data. We also investigate the magnitude of the induced field considering different susceptibility values of the soil. In the correction the remanent magnetization of the soil is neglected. The correction was made for both the total field and the gradient. With the help of the topographic correction the obtained anomaly maps contain more details and they are easier to interpret. The corrected magnetic gradient map shows streets and foundations of houses like a present day city map. In some places two generations of houses built on top of each other's foundation can be recognized as the walls of different ages have different directions. The magnetic maps proved to be very useful in reconstructing the structure of the ancient city.

  8. Magnetic HGI, radiometric surveys prove cost-effective in W. Canada

    SciTech Connect

    LeSchack, L.A.

    1997-05-26

    The Rumsey Leduc reef (Late Devonian) in Central Alberta is an after-the-fact case history that illustrates the congruence of horizontal gradient intensity and seismic anomalies. The Rumsey reef is situated on the Feen-Big Valley Shoal near Stettler, Alberta. The geology of that shoal was described by Andrichuk. Andrichuk observed that at least 30 m of secondary dolomites indicative of subsequent Leduc reef formation can be seen underlying the Erskine, Stettler, Fenn, and Big Valley Leduc reef fields on the shoal. They further suggested that because this dolomitic trend extends about 7 miles southwest of Big Valley field, that area to the southwest may well contain productive reef buildups as yet undiscovered (in 1958). The Rumsey reef, discovered in that are in 1982, is the most significant new productive Leduc build-up discovered on the shoal since 1958. Subsequent to the Rumsey discovery, Gulf conducted a 3D seismic survey to determine the full extent of the reef. In 1994 Gulf participated in a joint project with the author to share and make public the 3D survey in exchange for the author`s HGI and DRAD survey of the same area. Gulf provided the 3D survey only after the author presented his survey results. The paper discusses results from these surveys as well as survey costs.

  9. A 2-dimensional MHD code & survey of the ``buckling'' phenomenon in cylindrical magnetic flux compression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Wang, Ganghua; Gu, Zhuowei; Computational Physics Team

    2015-11-01

    We made a 2-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamics Lagrangian code. The code handles two kinds of magnetic configuration, a (x-y) plane with z-direction magnetic field Bz and a (r-z) plane with θ-direction magnetic field Bθ. The solving of the MHD equations is split into a pure dynamical step (i.e., ideal MHD) and a diffusion step. In the diffusion step, the Joule heat is calculated with a numerical scheme based on an specific form of the Joule heat production equation, ∂eJ/∂t = ∇ . (η/μ0 º × (∇ × º)) -∂/∂t (1/2μ0 B2) , where the term ∂/∂t (1/2μ0 B2) is the magnetic field energy variation caused solely by diffusion. This scheme insures the equality of the total Joule heat produced and the total electromagnetic energy lost in the system. Material elastoplasticity is considered in the code. An external circuit is coupled to the magneto-hydrodynamics and a detonation module is also added to enhance the code's ability for simulating magnetically-driven compression experiments. As a first application, the code was utilized to simulate a cylindrical magnetic flux compression experiment. The origin of the ``buckling'' phenomenon observed in the experiment is explored.

  10. Airborne Gravity Data Enhances NGS Experimental Gravimetric Geoid in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, S. A.; Childers, V. A.; Li, X.; Roman, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Geodetic Survey [NGS], through their Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum [GRAV-D] program, continues to update its gravimetry holdings by flying new airborne gravity surveys over a large fraction of the USA and its territories. By 2022, NGS intends that all orthometric heights in the USA will be determined in the field by using a reliable national gravimetric geoid model to transform from geodetic heights obtained from GPS. Several airborne campaigns have already been flown over Alaska and its coastline. Some of this Alaskan coastal data have been incorporated into a new NGS experimental geoid model - xGEOID14. The xGEOID14 model is the first in a series of annual experimental geoid models that will incorporate NGS GRAV-D airborne data. This series provides a useful benchmark for assessing and improving current techniques by which the airborne and land-survey data are filtered and cleaned, and then combined with satellite gravity models, elevation data (etc.) with the ultimate aim of computing a geoid model that can support a national physical height system by 2022. Here we will examine the NGS GRAV-D airborne data in Alaska, and assess its contribution to xGEOID14. Future prospects for xGEOID15 will also be considered.

  11. Airborne UXO Surveys Using the MTADS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    GPS navigation, employing the latest real time kinematic ( RTK ) technology, which provides a real-time position update (at 20 Hz) with an accuracy in...Sensitivity 0.01 nT Sensor Data Rate 100 Hz GPS Navigation Data Rate 20 Hz GPS Sensor Position Accuracy 5 cm Data Acquisition System (DAQ) Compatible with...satellite clock time is used to time-stamp both position and sensor data information for later correlation. Dual GPS antennas (Trimble Zephyrs), deployed on

  12. Airborne Multi-Spectral Minefield Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Quality Control . An important methodological aspect of the selected approach is the pyramidal information structure, which is reflected in the use of...the image interpreter to manually assign ground control points. After AGM processing for each individual image the results are stored in GEOTIFF file...comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 01 MAY 2005 2. REPORT TYPE N/A

  13. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  14. Exposure to static and time-varying magnetic fields from working in the static magnetic stray fields of MRI scanners: a comprehensive survey in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Crozier, Stuart; De Vocht, Frank; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Clinical and research staff who work around magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed to the static magnetic stray fields of these scanners. Although the past decade has seen strong developments in the assessment of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from MRI scanners, there is insufficient insight into the exposure variability that characterizes routine MRI work practice. However, this is an essential component of risk assessment and epidemiological studies. This paper describes the results of a measurement survey of shift-based personal exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) (B) and motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields (dB/dt) among workers at 15 MRI facilities in the Netherlands. With the use of portable magnetic field dosimeters, >400 full-shift and partial shift exposure measurements were collected among various jobs involved in clinical and research MRI. Various full-shift exposure metrics for B and motion-induced dB/dt exposure were calculated from the measurements, including instantaneous peak exposure and time-weighted average (TWA) exposures. We found strong correlations between levels of static (B) and time-varying (dB/dt) exposure (r = 0.88-0.92) and between different metrics (i.e. peak exposure, TWA exposure) to express full-shift exposure (r = 0.69-0.78). On average, participants were exposed to MRI-related SMFs during only 3.7% of their work shift. Average and peak B and dB/dt exposure levels during the work inside the MRI scanner room were highest among technical staff, research staff, and radiographers. Average and peak B exposure levels were lowest among cleaners, while dB/dt levels were lowest among anaesthesiology staff. Although modest exposure variability between workplaces and occupations was observed, variation between individuals of the same occupation was substantial, especially among research staff. This relatively large variability between workers with the same job suggests that exposure classification

  15. Airborne Intercept Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Primary mirror of Zerodur with Pilkington 747 coating • FOV = 0.104 degrees Airborne Intercept Monitoring RTO-MP-SET-105 16 - 3 UNCLASSIFIED...Pointing System (SPS). The STS is a 0.75 meter aperture Mersenne Cassegrain telescope and the SAT is a 0.34 meter aperture 3- mirror anastigmat telescope...UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED • Air Flow to Mitigate Thermal “Seeing” Effects • Light weighted primary mirror to reduce mass The SAT

  16. Airborne Infrared Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.

    2017-01-01

    A unique program of infrared astronomical observations from aircraft evolved at NASA’s Ames Research Center, beginning in the 1960s. Telescopes were flown on a Convair 990, a Lear Jet, and a Lockheed C-141 - the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) - leading to the planning and development of SOFIA: a 2.7 m telescope now flying on a Boeing 747SP. The poster describes these telescopes and highlights of some of the scientific results obtained from them.

  17. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D [Menan, ID; Schmitt, Michael J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Warren F [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  18. Discovery of new magnetic early-B stars within the MiMeS HARPSpol survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, E.; Kochukhov, O.; Petit, V.; Grunhut, J.; Landstreet, J.; Oksala, M. E.; Wade, G. A.; Hussain, G.; Neiner, C.; Bohlender, D.; MiMeS Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Context. The Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project aims at understanding the origin of the magnetic fields in massive stars as well as their impact on stellar internal structure, evolution, and circumstellar environment. Aims: One of the objectives of the MiMeS project is to provide stringent observational constraints on the magnetic fields of massive stars; however, identification of magnetic massive stars is challenging, as only a few percent of high-mass stars host strong fields detectable with the current instrumentation. Hence, one of the first objectives of the MiMeS project was to search for magnetic objects among a large sample of massive stars, and to build a sub-sample for in-depth follow-up studies required to test the models and theories of fossil field origins, magnetic wind confinement and magnetospheric properties, and magnetic star evolution. Methods: We obtained high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a large number of OB stars thanks to three large programs (LP) of observations that have been allocated on the high-resolution spectropolarimeters ESPaDOnS, Narval, and the polarimetric module HARPSpol of the HARPS spectrograph. We report here on the methods and first analysis of the HARPSpol magnetic detections. We identified the magnetic stars using a multi-line analysis technique. Then, when possible, we monitored the new discoveries to derive their rotation periods, which are critical for follow-up and magnetic mapping studies. We also performed a first-look analysis of their spectra and identified obvious spectral anomalies (e.g., surface abundance peculiarities, Hα emission), which are also of interest for future studies. Results: In this paper, we focus on eight of the 11 stars in which we discovered or confirmed a magnetic field from the HARPSpol LP sample (the remaining three were published in a previous paper). Seven of the fields were detected in early-type Bp stars, while the last field was detected in the Ap companion of

  19. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  20. Air-borne fungi in the air of Barcelona (Spain). IV. Various isolated genera.

    PubMed

    Calvo, M A; Guarro, J; Suarez, G; Ramírez, C

    1980-07-01

    During a two-year survey on the air-borne fungi in the atmosphere of Barcelona (Spain), the following genera were isolated in decreasing order: Aureobasidium, Rhizopus, Mucor, Arthrinium, Phoma, Fusarium, Trichoderma, and Botrytis.

  1. Identification of mafic-ultramafic rocks using fuzzy logic classification of airborne geophysical data in the Anapu-Tuer" region, Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de C. Carneiro, Cleyton; Crósta, Alvaro P.; Silva, Adalene M.; de M. Barros, Carlos Eduardo

    2008-10-01

    The Anapu-Tuer" region, in the Brazilian Amazon, is known for the occurrence of mineral deposits associated with mafic-ultramafic rocks. The spatial distribution of these rocks was investigated by integrating airborne magnetic and gamma ray spectrometry data using Geographic Information System (GIS) and fuzzy logic classification. Highest values of relevance fuzzy were associated with mafic-ultramafic rocks mapped regionally by the Brazilian Geological Survey (CPRM). Furthermore, mineral occurrences mapped by the CPRM showed good spatial correlation with the higher values of relevance fuzzy presented in this paper.

  2. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  3. Magnetic and ground penetrating radar surveys for the research of Medieval settlements in the inland of the Marche Region (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavusi, M.; Giocoli, A.; Balasco, M.; Favulli, G.; Moscatelli, U.; Minguzzi, S.; Gnesi, D.; Virgili, S.

    2009-04-01

    This work was carried out in the framework of the R.I.M.E.M. project (Research on Medieval settlements in the inland of the Marche Region, Italy.) leaded by the Universities of Macerata and Udine and having the aim to produce a significant contribution for the comprehension of the settlement process in the Central and Southern Italy during the Late Roman Period and Early Middle Ages. Then, an extensive gradiometric survey were carried out, by using a vapour caesium magnetometer, in the area included amongst the municipal districts of Caldarola, Cessapalombo and San Ginesio, sited in the area closed to Macerata between the valleys of Chienti and Fiastra rivers. Moreover, in the most interesting areas, a 400 MHz 3D ground penetrating radar (GPR)survey was carried out in order to get the precise overlapping with the magnetic method. The Magnetic method is now a standard practice in the archaeological research taken into great consideration for its non-destructivity and quickness and its capability of mapping wide areas in quite a short lapse of time (Bavusi et al., 2008). Moreover the method provides an information well correlable with remote sensing data (Gallo et al, 2008). The GPR method is extremely useful for archaeologists thanks to its non-destructivity and capability of giving real-time and high-resolution data (Basile et al., 2000). Today the effectiveness of this method was improved by powerful 3D visualisation methods as well as 3D space, time or depth slices and iso-amplitude surfaces, too (Nuzzo et al., 2002). The integrations of several geophysical methods are usual (Sambuelli et al.1999, De Domenico et al., 2001; Chianese et al., 2004) particularly when a simple comparison in cross section along the same profiles can be performed. In this work the overlapping between two kinds of data was complicated by different outputs coming from two methods: maps for the magnetic method and cross sections for the GPR one. The 3D survey design for the GPR survey and

  4. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  5. Geothermal Potential of the Siǧacik Gulf (Seferihisar) and Preliminary investigations with Seismic and Magnetic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakak, Özde; Özel, Erdeniz; Ergün, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    The Aegean region, including both W. Turkey and Central Greece, is one of the world's most rapidly-deforming regions of continental crust and has a seismic rate is exceptional on a world scale. SW Turkey is one of the most rapidly extending regions in the world where the extension appears to have commenced in middle or late Miocene time. Paleomagnetic work in W Turkey and Aegean islands has revealed the horizontal rotation of some crustal blocks. In W Turkey clockwise rotation on Karaburun peninsula west of Izmir by 44° in the last few Ma is detected, and anticlockwise rotation of 37° for the Seferihisar region. The area of W Turkey and the Aegean islands has very strong geothermal gradient in the world scale. Sığacık Gulf is located on south of Karaburun Peninsula, and it is restricted by two important ridges as Karaburun and Seferihisar Ridges. Recent geological and geophysical studies suggested that this area is both E-W trending normal and NE-SW trending strike-slip faulting caused deformation. The Seferihisar earthquake series were occurred here during 17-20 October 2005. For investigation of geothermal potential and hot water outlets on the seafloor, shallow seismic and magnetic surveys are preferred, which were carried out onboard Dokuz Eylül-1 vessel belongs to Dokuz Eylül University, in 2011. Approximately 250km seismic reflection data was collected along 27 lines. During seismic method used Sparker system which has 1 channel and 12 hydrophone with 17 m long streamer, as a seismic source used SIG Seismic Marine ELC 80 (4 kV & 3.2 KV DC). Seismic data processing (band pass filter, bottom mute, top mute, true amplitude recovery, time migration) was made using Promax program in the Seismic Laboratory in the Institute of Marine Science and Technology. The basement topography map was prepared using Kingdom Suite program drawing seabed line on these sections. Sea floor topography changes between 30-120 m, and this increases towards Ikaria Basin

  6. Survey of Trapped Plasmas at the Earth’s Magnetic Equator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    not sampled for ions in this survey). This local time dependence appears to reflect the L versus local time dependance of the plasmapause. The regions...versus local time dependance of the plasmapause. The regions of peak occurrence probability for trapped ions were mutually exclusive with the high...4 Figure 2. Plasma D...sity L Dependance

  7. Magnetic, chemically peculiar (CP2) stars in the SuperWASP survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, K.; Hümmerich, S.; Paunzen, E.

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic chemically peculiar (CP2) stars of the upper main sequence are well-suited for investigating the impact of magnetic fields on the surface layers of stars, which leads to abundance inhomogeneities (spots) resulting in photometric variability. The light changes are explained in terms of the oblique rotator model; the derived photometric periods thus correlate with the rotational periods of the stars. CP2 stars exhibiting this kind of variability are classified as α2 Canum Venaticorum (ACV) variables. We have analysed around 3 850 000 individual photometric WASP measurements of magnetic chemically peculiar (CP2) stars and candidates selected from the catalogue of Ap, HgMn, and Am stars, with the ultimate goal of detecting new ACV variables. In total, we found 80 variables, from which 74 are reported here for the first time. The data allowed us to establish variability for 23 stars which had been reported as probably constant in the literature before. Light curve parameters were obtained for all stars by a least-squares fit with the fundamental sine wave and its first harmonic. Because of the scarcity of Strömgren uvbyβ measurements and the lack of parallax measurements with an accuracy better than 20%, we are not able to give reliable astrophysical parameters for the investigated objects.

  8. Airborne Electromagnetic Mapping of Subsurface Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. D.; Minsley, B. J.; Cannia, J. C.; Smith, B. D.; Walvoord, M. A.; Voss, C. I.; Jorgenson, T. T.; Wylie, B. K.; Anderson, L.

    2011-12-01

    Concerns over the impacts of climate change have recently energized research on the potential impacts thawing permafrost may have on groundwater flow, infrastructure, forest health, ecosystems, energy production, CO2 release, and contaminant transport. There is typically little knowledge about subsurface permafrost distributions, such as thickness and where groundwater-surface-water connections may occur through taliks. In June of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey in the area of Fort Yukon, Alaska in order to map the 3-D distribution of permafrost and provide information for the development of groundwater models within the Yukon River Basin. Prior to the development of these models, information on areas of groundwater-surface water interaction was extremely limited. Lithology determined from a borehole drilled in Fort Yukon in 1994 agrees well with the resistivity depth sections inferred from the airborne survey. In addition to lithology, there a thermal imprint appears on the subsurface resistivity values. In the upper 20-50 m, the sections show continuous areas of high electrical resistivity, consistent with alluvial gravel deposits that are likely frozen. At depth, unfrozen gravel deposits have intermediate-to-high resistivity; frozen silts have intermediate resistivity; and unfrozen silts have low resistivity. Under the Yukon River and lakes where the subsurface is not frozen, zones of moderate resistivity intermix with areas of low resistivity. The areas of loess hills on the margins of the Yukon Flats have very-high electrical resistivity, indicating higher ice content, and are associated with the some of the greatest thickness of permafrost in the survey area. This work provides the first look into the 3-D distribution of permafrost in the areas around Fort Yukon and is a demonstration of the application of AEM to permafrost mapping. The AEM survey provides unprecedented 3-D images of subsurface electrical

  9. The fate of airborne polycyclic organic matter.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, T; Ramdahl, T; Bjørseth, A

    1983-01-01

    Biological tests have shown that a significant part of the mutagenicity of organic extracts of collected airborne particulate matter is not due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It is possible that part of these unknown compounds are transformation products of PAH. This survey focuses on the reaction of PAH in the atmosphere with other copollutants, such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, ozone and free radicals and their reaction products. Photochemically induced reactions of PAH are also included. The reactivity of particle-associated PAH is discussed in relation to the chemical composition and the physical properties of the carrier. Recommendations for future work are given. PMID:6825615

  10. Profiles of gamma-ray and magnetic data from aerial surveys over the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, Joseph S.; Riggle, Frederic E.

    1999-01-01

    This publication contains images for the conterminous U.S. generated from geophysical data, software for displaying and analyzing the images, and software for displaying and examining the profile data from the aerial surveys flown as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The images included are of gamma-ray data (uranium, thorium, and potassium channels), Bouguer gravity data, isostatic residual gravity data, aeromagnetic anomalies, topography, and topography with bathymetry.

  11. A JVLA survey of the high-frequency radio emission of the massive magnetic B- and O-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurapati, Sushma; Chandra, Poonam; Wade, Gregg; Cohen, David H.; David-Uraz, Alexandre; Gagne, Marc; Grunhut, Jason; Oksala, Mary E.; Petit, Veronique; Shultz, Matt; Sundqvist, Jon; Townsend, Richard H. D.; ud-Doula, Asif

    2017-02-01

    We conducted a survey of seven magnetic O-type stars and eleven B-type stars with masses above 8 M⊙ using the Very Large Array in the 1, 3 and 13 cm bands. The survey resulted in a detection of two O- and two B-type stars. While the detected O-type stars - HD 37742 and HD 47129 - are in binary systems, the detected B-type stars, HD 156424 and ALS 9522, are not known to be in binaries. All four stars were detected at 3 cm, whereas three were detected at 1 cm and only one star was detected at 13 cm. The detected B-type stars are significantly more radio luminous than the non-detected ones, which is not the case for O-type stars. The non-detections at 13 cm are interpreted as due to thermal free-free absorption. Mass-loss rates were estimated using 3 cm flux densities and were compared with theoretical mass-loss rates, which assume free-free emission. For HD 37742, the two values of the mass-loss rates were in good agreement, possibly suggesting that the radio emission for this star is mainly thermal. For the other three stars, the estimated mass-loss rates from radio observations were much higher than those expected from theory, suggesting either a possible contribution from non-thermal emission from the magnetic star or thermal or non-thermal emission due to interacting winds of the binary system, especially for HD 47129. All the detected stars are predicted to host centrifugal magnetospheres except HD 37742, which is likely to host a dynamical magnetosphere. This suggests that non-thermal radio emission is favoured in stars with centrifugal magnetospheres.

  12. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  13. A spectral line survey from 17.5-250 nm of plasmas created in a magnetic confinement device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Hollmann, E. M.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; TJ-II Team1, the

    2016-11-01

    Spectral emission lines continue to be a powerful tool for studying astrophysical, process, laser-produced, and magnetically confined plasmas, among others. Hence, numerous spectroscopy-based plasma diagnostics, from the x-ray to the infrared, make use of the relative intensity, width, displacement in wavelength, or temporal evolution of such emission lines emitted by the atoms and ions present in such plasmas. In this work, a spectral line survey, from 17.5-250 nm, is presented for electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) and neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas created and maintained in the TJ-II stellarator, a medium-sized magnetically confined plasma device. In these plasmas, for which hydrogen, deuterium or helium have been used as the working gas, central electron temperatures and densities up to 1 keV and 5 × 1019 m-3, respectively, are achieved. This work is a compilation of the identified spectral emission lines emitted by the working gas as well by the intrinsic and injected impurity ions in the above wavelength range. For this, spectra were recorded, over the past fifteen years of TJ-II operation, using a 1 m focal length normal incidence spectrometer equipped with a charge-coupled detector at its output focal plane. In total, almost 400 spectral emission lines from eighteen different elements have been identified using a number of atomic line emission databases.

  14. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  15. Airborne bathymetric charting using pulsed blue-green lasers.

    PubMed

    Kim, H H

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory and airborne experiments have proven the feasibility and demonstrated the techniques of an airborne pulsed laser system for rapidly mapping coastal water bathymetry. Water depths of 10 +/- 0.25 m were recorded in waters having an effective attenuation coefficient of 0.175 m(-1). A2-MW peak power Nd:YAG pulsed laser was flown at an altitude of 600 m. An advanced system, incorporating a mirror scanner, a high pulsed rate laser, and a good signal processor, could survey coastal zones at the rate of several square miles per hour.

  16. Airborne gamma spectrometry--towards integration of European operational capability.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Harri

    2004-01-01

    Airborne gamma spectrometry is an excellent tool for finding out in a timely manner the extent and magnitude of the dispersion of radioactive materials resulting from a nuclear disaster. To utilise existing European airborne monitoring capabilities for multilateral assistance in an accident is a complex administrative and technical matter. Several international exercises have been organised demonstrating the capability to cooperate. However, efficient mutual assistance between European countries requires conceptual work, standards and harmonisation of software. A unified radiological vocabulary and data exchange format in XML need to be developed. A comprehensive database is essential for data assimilation. An operations centre is needed for management and planning of surveys.

  17. Airborne bathymetric charting using pulsed blue-green lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory and airborne experiments have proven the feasibility and demonstrated the techniques of an airborne pulsed laser system for rapidly mapping coastal water bathymetry. Water depths of 10 plus or minus 0.25 m were recorded in waters having an effective attenuation coefficient of 0.175 m. A 2-MW peak power Nd:YAG pulsed laser was flown at an altitude of 600 m. An advanced system, incorporating a mirror scanner, a high pulsed rate laser, and a good signal processor, could survey coastal zones at the rate of several square miles per hour.

  18. On the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolkas, Dimitrios; Fotopoulos, Georgia; Braun, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    In gravity field modeling, fused models that utilize satellite, airborne and terrestrial gravity observations are often employed to deal with erroneous terrestrially derived gravity datasets. These terrestrial datasets may suffer from long-wavelength systematic errors and inhomogeneous data coverage, which are not prevalent in airborne and satellite datasets. Airborne gravity acquisition plays an essential role in gravity field modeling, providing valuable information of the Earth's gravity field at medium and short wavelengths. Thus, assessing the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models is important for identifying problematic regions. Six study regions that represent different gravity field variability and terrestrial data point-density characteristics are investigated to quantify the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models. The numerical assessments of these representative regions resulted in predictions of airborne gravity impact for individual states and provinces in the USA and Canada, respectively. Prediction results indicate that, depending on the terrestrial data point-density and gravity field variability, the expected impact of airborne gravity can reach up to 3mGal (in terms of standard deviation) in Canada and Alaska (over areas of 1° × 1°). However, in the mainland US region, small changes are expected (0.2-0.4 mGal over areas of 1° × 1°) due to the availability of high spatial resolution terrestrial data. These results can serve as a guideline for setting airborne gravity data acquisition priorities and for improving future planning of airborne gravity surveys.

  19. NURE aerial gamma ray and magnetic detail survey of portions of northeast Washington. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The Northeast Washington Survey was performed under the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, which is designed to provide radioelement distribution information to assist in assessing the uraniferous material potential of the United States. The radiometric and ancilliary data were digitally recorded and processed. The results are presented in the form of stacked profiles, contour maps, flight path maps, statistical tables and frequency distribution histograms. These graphical outputs are presented at a scale of 1:62,500 and are contained in the individual Volume 2 reports.

  20. Cavity Detection and Delineation Research. Report 1. Microgravimetric and Magnetic Surveys: Medford Cave Site, Florida.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    be made, where appropriate, without detailed discussion of the field procedures or results of the other surveys, leaving detailed discussions to...zoning maps for the Medford site based on resistivity, acoustic resonance, seismic methods, etc., will be presented. 75. Figures 45 and 46 are " shades ...LEVATI04ON NNO EATEIN None DEl TIOFONOLE I0. DATE NOLIE R/7Q 811Q =VERTCAL. flIMLIINED D"". PfOS VENAT . __9727/7__________ R177179_______ 1 1. ELEVATION

  1. The New Airborne Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Community air pollution is the new airborne disease of our generation's communities. It is caused by the increasing use of fuel, associated with both affluence and careless waste. Photochemical air pollution of the California type involves newly defined atmospheric reactions, is due mostly to motor vehicle exhaust, is oxidizing, and produces ozone, plant damage, impairment of visibility and eye and respiratory symptoms. Aggravation of asthma, impairment of lung function among persons with chronic respiratory disease and a possible causal role, along with cigarette smoking in emphysema and chronic bronchitis, are some of the effects of photochemical pollution. More subtle effects of pollution include impairment of oxygen transport by the blood due to carbon monoxide and interference with porphyrin metabolism due to lead. Carbon monoxide exposures may affect survival of patients who are in hospitals because of myocardial infarction. While many uncertainties in pollution-health reactions need to be resolved, a large number of people in California have health impairment due to airborne disease of this new type. PMID:5485227

  2. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Gainesville and Daytona Beach quadrangles, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The Gainesville and Daytona Beach quadrangles cover 9250 square miles of land in north-central Florida. The area includes moderately thick sections of platform sediments covering the pre-Cretaceous Peninsular Arch. Surficial materials are composed of Tertiary or more recent deposits. A search of available literature revealed no known significant uranium deposits. Sixty-four uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly in this report. All appear to be related to culture. One well-defined group of anomalies appear to have higher uranium concentrations and are closely associated with the Hawthorne Formation. These few anomalies are considered significant and suggest that more detailed local resource studies should concentrate in this area. Magnetic data appear to suggest complexities in the Paleozoic and older basement material. While some linear features appear related to known diabase dikes, several isolated features are not accounted for by known information.

  3. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Huntington quadrangle: Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The Huntington quadrangle of Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia covers 7250 square miles of the easternmost Midwestern Physiographic Province. Paleozoic exposures dominate the surface. These Paleozoics deepen toward the east from approximately 500 feet to a maximum depth of 8000 feet. Precambrian basement is thought to underlie the entire area. No known uranium deposits exist in the area. One hundred anomalies were found using the standard statistical analysis. Some high uranium concentration anomalies that may overlie the stratigraphic equivalent of the Devonian-Mississippian New Albany or Chattanooga Shales may represent significant levels of naturally occurring uranium. Future studies should concentrate on this unit. Magnetic data are largely in concurrence with existing structural interpretations but suggest some complexities in the underlying Precambrian.

  4. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Montrose detail Area 4, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The Montrose Detail Area No. 4 comprises approximately 215 square miles in the Central Sawatch Mountains in a region dominated by outcrops of Precambrian basement, Tertiary and Cretaceous intrusives, and glacial cover. A single uranium prospect lies in Precambrian rocks west of the Taylor Park. Other mining activity in the area appears to be limited to extensive prospecting for molybdenum in the Tertiary rocks in the Winfield area. A total of 26 groups of uranium samples constitute anomalies as defined in Volume I. the largest group of anomalies lies over the Windfield area. Other significant anomalies overlie certain Precambrian rocks, as in the Three Apostles area and over the single uranium prospect. Magnetic data outline some Precambrian and Tertiary rock units, but are largely uninterpretable in the scope of this report. There is little apparent correlation with the geology as mapped, or with the radiometric data. Three geochemical units were defined on the basis of the radiometric criteria set forth in Volume I.

  5. Geometric survey on magnetic resonance imaging of growth hormone producing pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Yuriz; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Hirano, Hirofumi; Oyoshi, Tatsuki; Fujio, Shingo; Bohara, Manoj; Arita, Kazunori

    2014-04-01

    Apart from the radiologic features regarding size and invasiveness, we had noticed some differences in morphology among types of pituitary adenomas. We conducted this study to verify the differences in radiologic morphology between growth hormone producing pituitary adenomas (GHoma) and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFoma). Pre-surgical magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were assessed in 50 cases of GHoma and 50 cases of NFoma. Geometric parameters on MRI were set in accordance with sellar anatomy. Intensity of T1-weighted image was not different between the two groups, but hypo-intensity of T2-weighted image was more frequently seen in GHoma. Predominant inferior extension of tumor was seen mostly in GHoma (88 vs. 38%). Extension of the tumor to the superior compartment of cavernous sinus was more frequent in NFoma. Pituitary gland was generally located superior to GHoma and postero-superior to NFoma. Growth characteristics of pituitary adenoma were confirmed to differ between GHoma and NFoma.

  6. The unusual magnetic properties of kuramite-stannite pseudobinary series: a SQUID and EPR survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Benedetto, F.; Evstigneeva, T.; Borgheresi, M.; Caneschi, A.; Romanelli, M.

    2009-06-01

    The magnetic properties of the synthetic Cu3SnS4 (kuramite)-Cu2FeSnS4 (stannite) pseudobinary series were investigated by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, at room temperature, and by magnetometry, in the range 2-300 K. The system is particularly complex, from both chemical and crystal chemical points of view, in particular with respect to the metal valence states and the local ordering in the different terms of the series. Nevertheless, recent successes in synthesising nanostructured kuramite foster the interest to ascertain the bulk magnetic properties of these important semiconducting phases. The obtained results allowed to ascertain that a variable lack of local ordering in the Cu3- x Fe x SnS4 ( x < 0.85) samples induce the raise of strong metal-sulphur-metal superexchange interactions, that result in the appearance of marked deviations from the single-ion behaviour, typical for pure stannite. Ferro- and antiferromagnetic interactions are in fact observed at relatively high temperatures (~150 K). A possible role played by Cu(I)-Fe(III) was revealed by the EPR measurements. The Cu-rich terms of the series ( x < 0.1) are characterised by dynamic resonant disorder (i.e. time-evolving delocalisation of the formally divalent valence state for Cu among the nearest neighbouring Cu-sites), in addition to the Cu-Fe-Sn static disorder verified along the whole series. Both factors concurring to a non-periodic arrangement of paramagnetic ions in the lattice have the main effect to drastically broaden the EPR lines.

  7. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  8. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  9. Crisp clustering of airborne geophysical data from the Alto Ligonha pegmatite field, northeastern Mozambique, to predict zones of increased rare earth element potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Detlef G.; Daudi, Elias X. F.; Muiuane, Elônio A.; Nyabeze, Peter; Pontavida, Alfredo M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Geology Directorate of Mozambique (DNG) and Maputo-based Eduardo-Mondlane University (UEM) entered a joint venture with the South African Council for Geoscience (CGS) to conduct a case study over the meso-Proterozoic Alto Ligonha pegmatite field in the Zambézia Province of northeastern Mozambique to support the local exploration and mining sectors. Rare-metal minerals, i.e. tantalum and niobium, as well as rare-earth minerals have been mined in the Alto Ligonha pegmatite field since decades, but due to the civil war (1977-1992) production nearly ceased. The Government now strives to promote mining in the region as contribution to poverty alleviation. This study was undertaken to facilitate the extraction of geological information from the high resolution airborne magnetic and radiometric data sets recently acquired through a World Bank funded survey and mapping project. The aim was to generate a value-added map from the airborne geophysical data that is easier to read and use by the exploration and mining industries than mere airborne geophysical grid data or maps. As a first step towards clustering, thorium (Th) and potassium (K) concentrations were determined from the airborne geophysical data as well as apparent magnetic susceptibility and first vertical magnetic gradient data. These four datasets were projected onto a 100 m spaced regular grid to assemble 850,000 four-element (multivariate) sample vectors over the study area. Classification of the sample vectors using crisp clustering based upon the Euclidian distance between sample and class centre provided a (pseudo-) geology map or value-added map, respectively, displaying the spatial distribution of six different classes in the study area. To learn the quality of sample allocation, the degree of membership of each sample vector was determined using a-posterior discriminant analysis. Geophysical ground truth control was essential to allocate geology/geophysical attributes to the six classes

  10. A STEREO Survey of Magnetic Cloud Coronal Mass Ejections Observed at Earth in 2008-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Wu, Chin-Chun; Lepping, Ronald P.; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Howard, Russell A.; Linton, Mark G.; Socker, Dennis G.

    2017-04-01

    We identify coronal mass ejections (CMEs) associated with magnetic clouds (MCs) observed near Earth by the Wind spacecraft from 2008 to mid-2012, a time period when the two STEREO spacecraft were well positioned to study Earth-directed CMEs. We find 31 out of 48 Wind MCs during this period can be clearly connected with a CME that is trackable in STEREO imagery all the way from the Sun to near 1 au. For these events, we perform full 3D reconstructions of the CME structure and kinematics, assuming a flux rope (FR) morphology for the CME shape, considering the full complement of STEREO and SOHO imaging constraints. We find that the FR orientations and sizes inferred from imaging are not well correlated with MC orientations and sizes inferred from the Wind data. However, velocities within the MC region are reproduced reasonably well by the image-based reconstruction. Our kinematic measurements are used to provide simple prescriptions for predicting CME arrival times at Earth, provided for a range of distances from the Sun where CME velocity measurements might be made. Finally, we discuss the differences in the morphology and kinematics of CME FRs associated with different surface phenomena (flares, filament eruptions, or no surface activity).

  11. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  12. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  13. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  14. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  15. Unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV): Flight testing and evaluation of two-channel E-field very low frequency (VLF) instrument

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Using VLF frequencies, transmitted by the Navy`s network, for airborne remote sensing of the earth`s electrical, magnetic characteristics was first considered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) around the mid 1970s. The first VLF system was designed and developed by the USGS for installation and operation on a single engine, fixed wing aircraft used by the Branch of Geophysics for geophysical surveying. The system consisted of five channels. Two E-field channels with sensors consisting of a fixed vertical loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on top of the fuselage and a gyro stabilized horizontal loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on a tail boom. The three channel magnetic sensor consisted of three orthogonal coils mounted on the same gyro stabilized platform as the horizontal E-field antenna. The main features of the VLF receiver were: narrow band-width frequency selection using crystal filters, phase shifters for zeroing out system phase variances, phase-lock loops for generating real and quadrature gates, and synchronous detectors for generating real and quadrature outputs. In the mid 1990s the Branch of Geophysics designed and developed a two-channel E-field ground portable VLF system. The system was built using state-of-the-art circuit components and new concepts in circuit architecture. Small size, light weight, low power, durability, and reliability were key considerations in the design of the instrument. The primary purpose of the instrument was for collecting VLF data during ground surveys over small grid areas. Later the system was modified for installation on a Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV). A series of three field trips were made to Easton, Maryland for testing and evaluating the system performance.

  16. Xyz Airborne Time Domain Em: P-Them Test in Reid Mahaffy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrov, A.

    2012-12-01

    The vertical axis transmitter loop and receiver coil combination is widely used in Airborne Time-Domain EM systems. In such configurations the largest portion of the transmitter magnetic moment, which is distributed in a vertical direction, is transmitted to the subsurface, and the strongest vertical response from underground conductors is acquired with a vertical axis (Z) receiver coil. However, the horizontal axis (X and Y) components carry valuable information about target body geometry and their borders/edges. Most Airborne Time Domain systems currently in use are configured such that the X component is aligned with the flight direction. At typical survey speeds (60 to 80 kph) towed bird systems may expect to be subject to vibration that results in movement of horizontal and vertical receiver's axis from its desired nominal position. The mechanical design of the P-THEM transmitter and receiver is based on Bernard Kremer's (THEM Geophysics) developments finished and improved by Pico Envirotec Inc. The P-THEM system consists of a loop-transmitter assembly, powered by a motor generator and a 3-axis (XYZ) coil receiver attached at the midpoint of a tow cable between transmitter and a helicopter. The suspension system of the receiver coils assembly allows the Z-coil to remain horizontal at all the time during the flight. Pico Envirotec has developed methodology to recalculate the data from three axis of the receiver that allows mechanical vibration influence to be eliminated from the acquired data. The recalculated X-component gives very useful information for interpretation of the observation results. The P-THEM system has been test flown over the Reid Mahaffy geological test site located in Northern Ontario in Canada. The test site, created by the Ontario Geological Survey, contains the main conductor formed with three sub-vertical sliced conductive bodies. Three lines (L30, L40 and L50) over the test site have been flown in North and South direction with the P

  17. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry in uranium exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuwanshi, S. S.

    1992-07-01

    Uranium exploration is of paramount importance to India to maximize the indigeneous resources to meet the ever increasing demand for energy. Comprehensive regional and local zones of uranium mineralization are needed to be resolved. Such data comprise information on radioactivity in various energy ranges and on lithological knowledge. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometric techniques are particularly suited to provide spatial information. This review briefly discusses the conventional data presentation, statistically significant maps and the schemes suitable for classification of mineralized zones. A brief introduction is provided to airborne gamma-ray data, their acquisition, analysis, processing and interpretation to bring out their role in designing suitable models of uranium resources. State-of-the-art in uranium exploration covers radiometric mapping through airborne gamma-ray surveys. Through the examples of the Indian work done during this decade, the state-of-the-art and its usefulness in the country has been illustrated. It is concluded that the high sensitivity airborne gamma-ray spectrometric surveys coupled with modern methods of data analysis can further narrow down the targets.

  18. Machine learning from hard x-ray surveys: applications to magnetic cataclysmic variable studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, Simone

    2009-11-01

    Within this thesis are discussed two main topics of contemporary astrophysics. The first is that of machine learning algorithms for astronomy whilst the second is that of magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs). To begin, an overview is given of ISINA: INTEGRAL Scouce Identifiction Network Algorithm. This machine learning algorithm, using random forests, is applied to the IBIS/ISGRI data set in order to ease the production of unbiased future soft gamma-ray source catalogues. The feature extraction process on an initial candidate list is described together with feature merging. Three trainng and testing sets are created in order to deal with the diverse time-scales encountered when dealing with the gamma-ray sky: one dealing with faint persistent source recognition, one dealing with strong persistent sources and a final one dealing with transients. For the latter, a new transient detection technique is introduced and described: the transient matrix. Finally the performance of the network is assessed and discussed using the testing set and some illustrative source examples. ISINA is also compared to the more conventional approach of visual inspection. Next mCVs are discussed, and in particular the properties arising from a hard X-ray selected sample which has proven remarkably efficient in detecting intermediate polars and asynchronous polars, two of the rarest type of cataclysmic variables (CVs). This thesis focuses particularly on the link between hard X-ray properties and spin/orbital periods. To this end, a new sample of these objects is constructed by cross-corelating candidate sources detected in INTEGRAL/IBIS observations against catalogues of known CVs. Also included in the analysis are hard X-ray Observations from Swift/BAT and SUZAKU/HXD in order to make the study more complete. It is found that most hard X-ray detected mCVs have Pspin/Porb<0.1 above the period gap. In this respect, attention is given to the very low number of detected systems in any ban

  19. Market applications of Resistivity, Induced Polarisation, Magnetic Resonance and Electromagnetic methods for Groundwater Investigations, Mining Exploration, Environmental and Engineering Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Manufacturers of geophysical instruments have been facing these past decades the fast evolution of the electronics and of the computer sciences. More automatisms have been introduced into the equipment and into the processing and interpretation software which may let believe that conducting geophysical surveys requires less understanding of the method and less experience than in the past. Hence some misunderstandings in the skills that are needed to make the geophysical results well integrated among the global information which the applied geologist needs to acquire to be successful in his applications. Globally, the demand in geophysical investigation goes towards more penetration depth, requiring more powerful transmitters, and towards a better resolution, requiring more data such as in 3D analysis. Budgets aspects strongly suggest a high efficiency in the field associated to high speed data processing. The innovation is required in all aspects of geophysics to fit with the market needs, including new technological (instruments, software) and methodological (methods, procedures, arrays) developments. The structures in charge of the geophysical work can be public organisations (institutes, ministries, geological surveys,…) or can come from the private sector (large companies, sub-contractors, consultants, …), each one of them getting their own constraints in the field work and in the processing and interpretation phases. In the applications concerning Groundwater investigations, Mining Exploration, Environmental and Engineering surveys, examples of data and their interpretation presently carried out all around the world will be presented for DC Resistivity (Vertical Electrical Sounding, 2D, 3D Resistivity Imaging, Resistivity Monitoring), Induced Polarisation (Time Domain 2D, 3D arrays for mining and environmental), Magnetic Resonance Sounding (direct detection and characterisation of groundwater) and Electromagnetic (multi-component and multi

  20. Aeromagnetic Survey of Taylor Mountains Area in Southwest Alaska, A Website for the Distribution of Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    USGS Data Series Report for the release of aeromagnetic data collected in the Taylor Mountains Area of Southwest Alaska and associated contractor reports. Summary: An airborne high-resolution magnetic and coincidental horizontal magnetic gradiometer survey was completed over the Taylor Mountains area in southwest Alaska. The flying was undertaken by McPhar Geosurveys Ltd. on behalf of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). First tests and calibration flights were completed by April 7, 2004, and data acquisition was initiated on April 17, 2004. The final data acquisition and final test/calibrations flight was completed on May 31, 2004. Data acquired during the survey totaled 8,971.15 line-miles.

  1. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  2. Comparison of airborne lidar measurements with 420 kHz echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Churnside, James H; Thorne, Richard E

    2005-09-10

    Airborne lidar has the potential to survey large areas quickly and at a low cost per kilometer along a survey line. For this reason, we investigated the performance of an airborne lidar for surveys of zooplankton. In particular, we compared the lidar returns with echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Data from eight regions of the Sound were compared, and the correlation between the two methods was 0.78. To obtain this level of agreement, a threshold was applied to the lidar return to remove the effects of scattering from phytoplankton.

  3. Airborne Laser/GPS Mapping of Assateague National Seashore Beach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kradill, W. B.; Wright, C. W.; Brock, John C.; Swift, R. N.; Frederick, E. B.; Manizade, S. S.; Yungel, J. K.; Martin, C. F.; Sonntag, J. G.; Duffy, Mark; Hulslander, William

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented from topographic surveys of the Assateague Island National Seashore using recently developed Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and kinematic Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. In November, 1995, and again in May, 1996, the NASA Arctic Ice Mapping (AIM) group from the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility conducted the topographic surveys as a part of technology enhancement activities prior to conducting missions to measure the elevation of extensive sections of the Greenland Ice Sheet as part of NASA's Global Climate Change program. Differences between overlapping portions of both surveys are compared for quality control. An independent assessment of the accuracy of the ATM survey is provided by comparison to surface surveys which were conducted using standard techniques. The goal of these projects is to mdke these measurements to an accuracy of +/- 10 cm. Differences between the fall 1995 and 1996 surveys provides an assessment of net changes in the beach morphology over an annual cycle.

  4. Laboratory analysis and airborne detection of materials stimulated to luminesce by the sun

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemphill, W.R.; Theisen, A.F.; Tyson, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) is an airborne electro-optical device used to image materials which have been stimulated to luminesce by the Sun. Such materials include uranium-bearing sandstone, sedimentary phosphate rock, marine oil seeps, and stressed vegetation. Prior to conducting an airborne survey, a fluorescence spectrometer may be used in the laboratory to determine the spectral region where samples of the target material exhibit maximum luminescence, and to select the optimum Fraunhofer line. ?? 1984.

  5. Airborne rescue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The airborne rescue system includes a boom with telescoping members for extending a line and collar to a rescue victim. The boom extends beyond the tip of the helicopter rotor so that the victim may avoid the rotor downwash. The rescue line is played out and reeled in by winch. The line is temporarily retained under the boom. When the boom is extended, the rescue line passes through clips. When the victim dons the collar and the tension in the line reaches a predetermined level, the clips open and release the line from the boom. Then the rescue line can form a straight line between the victim and the winch, and the victim can be lifted to the helicopter. A translator is utilized to push out or pull in the telescoping members. The translator comprises a tape and a rope. Inside the telescoping members the tape is curled around the rope and the tape has a tube-like configuration. The tape and rope are provided from supply spools.

  6. Short-Term Temporal Variability in Airborne Bacterial and Fungal Populations▿

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Noah; Liu, Zongzhi; Rodríguez-Hernández, Mari; Knight, Rob; Henn, Matthew; Hernandez, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Airborne microorganisms have been studied for centuries, but the majority of this research has relied on cultivation-dependent surveys that may not capture all of the microbial diversity in the atmosphere. As a result, our understanding of airborne microbial ecology is limited despite the relevance of airborne microbes to human health, various ecosystem functions, and environmental quality. Cultivation-independent surveys of small-subunit rRNA genes were conducted in order to identify the types of airborne bacteria and fungi found at a single site (Boulder, CO) and the temporal variability in the microbial assemblages over an 8-day period. We found that the air samples were dominated by ascomycete fungi of the Hypocreales order and a diverse array of bacteria, including members of the proteobacterial and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides groups that are commonly found in comparable culture-independent surveys of airborne bacteria. Bacterium/fungus ratios varied by 2 orders of magnitude over the sampling period, and we observed large shifts in the phylogenetic diversity of bacteria present in the air samples collected on different dates, shifts that were not likely to be related to local meteorological conditions. We observed more phylogenetic similarity between bacteria collected from geographically distant sites than between bacteria collected from the same site on different days. These results suggest that outdoor air may harbor similar types of bacteria regardless of location and that the short-term temporal variability in airborne bacterial assemblages can be very large. PMID:17981945

  7. Shipboard surveys track magnetic sources in marine sediments--geophysical studies of the Stono and North Edisto Inlets near Charleston, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Anjana K.; Harris, M. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic field data are traditionally used to analyze igneous and metamorphic rocks, but recent efforts have shown that magnetic sources within sediments may be detectable, suggesting new applications for high-resolution magnetic field surveys. Candidates for sedimentary sources include heavy mineral sand concentrations rich in magnetite or hematite, alteration-induced glauconite, or biogenic magnetite. Magnetic field surveys can be used to map the distributions of such sources with much denser and more widespread coverage than possible by sampling. These data can then provide constraints on the composition history of local sediments. Mapping such sediments requires the sensor to be relatively close to the source, and filtering approaches may be needed to distinguish signals from both system noise and deeper basement features. Marine geophysical surveys conducted in July, 2010, over the Stono and North Edisto River inlets and their riverine inputs south of Charleston, South Carolina, showed 10- to 40-m-wide, 1- to 6-nT magnetic anomalies associated with shallow, sand-covered seabed. These anomalies are distinct from system noise but are too narrow to represent basement features. The anomalies are present mostly in shallow areas where river sediments originating from upland areas enter the inlets. Surface grab samples from the North Edisto River contain trace amounts of heavy mineral sediments including hematite, maghemite, ilmenite, and magnetite, as well as garnet, epidote, zircon, and rutile. Previous stream sediment analyses show enhanced titanium over much of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The combined data suggest that the anomalies are generated by titanium- and iron-rich heavy mineral sands ultimately originating from the Piedmont and Blue Ridge provinces, which are then reworked and concentrated by tidal currents.

  8. Investigating subglacial landscapes and crustal structure of the Gamburtsev Province in East Antarctica with the aid of new airborne gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. A.; Ferraccioli, F.; Studinger, M.; Bell, R. E.; Damaske, D.; Elieff, S.; Finn, C.; Braaten, D. A.; Corr, H.

    2009-12-01

    The AGAP project was undertaken as part of the 2008\\09 field season and explored the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM) province in East Antarctica. AGAP collected >120, 000 line km of new airborne radar, aerogravity and aeromagnetic data. Here we focus on the airborne gravity part of the survey. The airborne gravity data were collected from two Twin Otters operating from remote field camps either side of Dome A. A high-resolution Sander Geophysics AIRGrav system was used for the first time in Antarctica and was mounted in the US plane. A more traditional L&R airborne gravity meter modified by ZLS was installed on the British Antarctic Survey aircraft. The AIRGrav system was flown in draped mode, which proved ideal for the simultaneous acquisition of radar and magnetic data, while the L&R system required flying along constant elevation survey blocks. The processed free-air gravity anomalies exhibit low cross-over errors of 1 mGal over the southern sector of the GSM, where the AIRGrav system was primarily used, and a spatial resolution of 3.5 km. Larger cross-over errors of 3.5 mGal and a coarser spatial resolution of 8 km characterise the northern part of the GSM and the adjacent Lambert Glacier, where the L&R meter was mainly flown. The merged free-air gravity anomaly grid primarily reflects the subglacial topography of the GSM province. The contrast between the Pensacola-Pole and Lambert Glacier basins and the rugged alpine-type relief of the GSM is clearly imaged. A dentritic system of subglacial valleys is mapped in the GSM, in good agreement with independent radar data. Inversion of the free-air gravity data assists in tracing the bedrock under several km-thick and fast-flowing crevassed ice of the Lambert Glacier. Using the ice thickness and bedrock topography data derived from airborne radar we compiled a new Bouguer anomaly map for the GSM province. The new gravity anomaly data can be used to estimate crustal thickness variations under the GSM and

  9. The MiMeS survey of magnetism in massive stars: CNO surface abundances of Galactic O stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Hervé, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Marcolino, W.; Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Grunhut, J.; Petit, V.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The evolution of massive stars is still partly unconstrained. Mass, metallicity, mass loss, and rotation are the main drivers of stellar evolution. Binarity and the magnetic field may also significantly affect the fate of massive stars. Aims: Our goal is to investigate the evolution of single O stars in the Galaxy. Methods: For that, we used a sample of 74 objects comprising all luminosity classes and spectral types from O4 to O9.7. We relied on optical spectroscopy obtained in the context of the MiMeS survey of massive stars. We performed spectral modelling with the code CMFGEN. We determined the surface properties of the sample stars, with special emphasis on abundances of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Results: Most of our sample stars have initial masses in the range of 20 to 50 M⊙. We show that nitrogen is more enriched and carbon and oxygen are more depleted in supergiants than in dwarfs, with giants showing intermediate degrees of mixing. CNO abundances are observed in the range of values predicted by nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. More massive stars, within a given luminosity class, appear to be more chemically enriched than lower mass stars. We compare our results with predictions of three types of evolutionary models and show that for two sets of models, 80% of our sample can be explained by stellar evolution including rotation. The effect of magnetism on surface abundances is unconstrained. Conclusions: Our study indicates that in the 20-50 M⊙ mass range, the surface chemical abundances of most single O stars in the Galaxy are fairly well accounted for by stellar evolution of rotating stars. Based on observations obtained at 1) the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut

  10. Estimating Antarctic Near-Surface Magnetic Anomalies from Oersted and CHAMP Satellite Magnetometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Gaya-Pique, Luis R.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Golynsky, Alexander V.; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2004-01-01

    Significant improvement in predicting near-surface magnetic anomalies can result from the highly accurate magnetic observations of the CHAMP satellite that is orbiting at about 400 km altitude. In general, regional magnetic signals of the crust are strongly masked by the core field and its secular variations due to wavelength coupling in the spherical harmonic representation and thus are difficult to isolate in the satellite measurements. However, efforts to isolate the regional lithospheric from core field components can exploit the correlations between the CHAMP magnetic anomalies and the pseudo magnetic effects inferred from gravity-derived crustal thickness variations. In addition, we can use spectral correlation theory to filter the static lithospheric field components from the dynamic external field effects. Employing these procedures, we processed the CHAMP magnetic conservations for an improved magnetic anomaly map of the Antarctic crust. Relative to the much higher altitude Oersted and noisier Magsat observations, CHAMP magnetic anomalies at 400 km altitude reveal new details on the effects of intra-crustal magnetic features and crustal thickness variations of the Antarctic. Moreover, these results greatly facilitate predicting magnetic anomalies in the regional coverage gaps of the ADMAP compilation of Antarctic magnetic anomalies from shipborne, airborne and ground surveys. Our analysis suggests that considerable new insights on the magnetic properties of the lithosphere may be revealed by a further order-of-magnitude improvement in the accuracy of the magnetometer.

  11. Comprehensive clues provided by popular free remote sensing imagery to interpretation of geophysical studies explained by example cases of magnetic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafa-Hamed, Tarek

    2013-12-01

    State-of-the-art remote sensing technologies for imaging the earth and its shallow subsurface are invaluable tools for sophisticated geophysical subsurface investigations. However, such type of remote sensing products remains inaccessible for most of geophysicists. On the other hand free simple satellite imagery has been commonly available since mid-last decade. Google Earth™ is a popular free Internet application through which users can view landscapes and maps. In this work it is shown how easy and efficient it is to access the open-source of remote sensing in geophysical surveys to provide a quick overview for survey plans and comprehensive keys for interpretation based on cases of magnetic measurements. A dry well that has been drilled in an aquifer few tens of meters away from a productive water well in Dahshour has been preliminary explained by considering Google Earth images. The images of the area show clear differentiation of surface lithology into 2 zones with a sharp interface. Magnetic anomaly map of Dahshour fault raised two unclear features that might be interpreted by a curvature in Dahshour fault plane and an additional perpendicular fault trending N-S. The Google Earth imagery gives clues to basaltic intrusions to be the cause of the suspected gradients. A continuous boat-born magnetic survey carried out in Nasser Lake, southern High Dam, reveals several characteristic anomalies. Visual inspection of Google-Earth images at various altitudes (zooms) indicates a relation between the anomalies and major faulting structures.

  12. Curved PVDF airborne transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Toda, M

    1999-01-01

    In the application of airborne ultrasonic ranging measurement, a partially cylindrical (curved) PVDF transducer can effectively couple ultrasound into the air and generate strong sound pressure. Because of its geometrical features, the ultrasound beam angles of a curved PVDF transducer can be unsymmetrical (i.e., broad horizontally and narrow vertically). This feature is desired in some applications. In this work, a curved PVDF air transducer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Two resonances were observed in this transducer. They are length extensional mode and flexural bending mode. Surface vibration profiles of these two modes were measured by a laser vibrometer. It was found from the experiment that the surface vibration was not uniform along the curvature direction for both vibration modes. Theoretical calculations based on a model developed in this work confirmed the experimental results. Two displacement peaks were found in the piezoelectric active direction of PVDF film for the length extensional mode; three peaks were found for the flexural bending mode. The observed peak positions were in good agreement with the calculation results. Transient surface displacement measurements revealed that vibration peaks were in phase for the length extensional mode and out of phase for the flexural bending mode. Therefore, the length extensional mode can generate a stronger ultrasound wave than the flexural bending mode. The resonance frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the two modes strongly depend on the structure parameters as well as the material properties. For the transducer design, the theoretical model developed in this work can be used to optimize the ultrasound performance.

  13. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  14. NASA Airborne Science Program: NASA Stratospheric Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducts a wide variety of remote sensing projects using several unique aircraft platforms. These vehicles have been selected and modified to provide capabilities that are particularly important for geophysical research, in particular, routine access to very high altitudes, long range, long endurance, precise trajectory control, and the payload capacity to operate multiple, diverse instruments concurrently. While the NASA program has been in operation for over 30 years, new aircraft and technological advances that will expand the capabilities for airborne observation are continually being assessed and implemented. This presentation will review the current state of NASA's science platforms, recent improvements and new missions concepts as well as provide a survey of emerging technologies unmanned aerial vehicles for long duration observations (Global Hawk and Predator). Applications of information technology that allow more efficient use of flight time and the ability to rapidly reconfigure systems for different mission objectives are addressed.

  15. Helicopter Based Magnetic Detection Of Wells At The Teapot Dome (Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Oilfield: Rapid And Accurate Geophysical Algorithms For Locating Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, W.; Hammack, R.; Veloski, G.; Hodge, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this study Airborne magnetic data was collected by Fugro Airborne Surveys from a helicopter platform (Figure 1) using the Midas II system over the 39 km2 NPR3 (Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3) oilfield in east-central Wyoming. The Midas II system employs two Scintrex CS-2 cesium vapor magnetometers on opposite ends of a transversely mounted, 13.4-m long horizontal boom located amidships (Fig. 1). Each magnetic sensor had an in-flight sensitivity of 0.01 nT. Real time compensation of the magnetic data for magnetic noise induced by maneuvering of the aircraft was accomplished using two fluxgate magnetometers mounted just inboard of the cesium sensors. The total area surveyed was 40.5 km2 (NPR3) near Casper, Wyoming. The purpose of the survey was to accurately locate wells that had been drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood to enhance oil recovery, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells that are missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The well location method used combined an input dataset (for example, leveled total magnetic field reduced to the pole), combined with first and second horizontal spatial derivatives of this input dataset, which were then analyzed using focal statistics and finally combined using a fuzzy combination operation. Analytic signal and the Shi and Butt (2004) ZS attribute were also analyzed using this algorithm. A parameter could be adjusted to determine sensitivity. Depending on the input dataset 88% to 100% of the wells were located, with typical values being 95% to 99% for the NPR3 field site.

  16. Airborne laser mapping of Assateague National Seashore Beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krabill, W.B.; Wright, C.W.; Swift, R.N.; Frederick, E.B.; Manizade, S.S.; Yungel, J.K.; Martin, C.F.; Sonntag, J.G.; Duffy, Mark; Hulslander, William; Brock, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Results are presented from topographic surveys of the Assateague Island National Seashore using an airborne scanning laser altimeter and kinematic Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. The instrument used was the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), developed by the NASA Arctic Ice Mapping (AIM) group from the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. In November, 1995, and again in May, 1996, these topographic surveys were flown as a functionality check prior to conducting missions to measure the elevation of extensive sections of the Greenland Ice Sheet as part of NASA's Global Climate Change program. Differences between overlapping portions of both surveys are compared for quality control. An independent assessment of the accuracy of the ATM survey is provided by comparison to surface surveys which were conducted using standard techniques. The goal of these projects is to make these measurements to an accuracy of ± 10 cm. Differences between the fall 1995 and 1996 surveys provides an assessment of net changes in the beach morphology over an annual cycle.

  17. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  18. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  19. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  20. Discovery of kimberlite in a magnetically noisy environment: a case study of the Syferfontein and Goedgevonden kimberlites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S. J.; Van Buren, R.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne geophysical methods play an important role in the exploration for kimberlites. As regions become more intensively explored, smaller kimberlites, which can be extremely difficult to find, are being targeted. These smaller kimberlites, as evidenced by the M-1 Maarsfontein pipe in the Klipspringer cluster in South Africa, can be highly profitable. The Goedgevonden and Syferfontein pipes are small kimberlites (~0.2 ha) ~25 km NNE of Klerksdorp in South Africa. The Goedgevonden pipe has been known since the 1930s and is diamondiferous, but not commercially viable due to small stone size and low quality of stones. In the early 1990s, Gold Fields used this pipe as a typical kimberlite to collect example geophysical data. The nearby (~1 km to the east) Syferfontein pipe is not diamondiferous but was discovered in 1994 as part of a speculative airborne EM survey conducted by Gold Fields and Geodass (now CGG) as part of their case study investigations. Both kimberlites have had extensive ground geophysical survey data collected and have prominent magnetic, gravity and EM responses that aided in the delineation of the pipes. These pipes represent a realistic and challenging case study target due to their small size and the magnetically noisy environment into which they have been emplaced. The discovery of the Syferfontein pipe in 1994 stimulated further testing of airborne methods, especially as the surface was undisturbed. These pipes are located in a region that hosts highly variably magnetized Hospital Hill shales, dolerite dykes and Ventersdorp lavas, a 2-3 m thick resistive ferricrete cap and significant cultural features such as an electric railroad and high tension power line. Although the kimberlites both show prominent magnetic anomalies on ground surveys, the airborne data are significantly noisy and the pipes do not show up as well determined targets. However, the clay-rich weathered zone of the pipes provides an ideal target for the EM method, and both

  1. Mismatch in aeroallergens and airborne grass pollen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, M. P.; Alcázar, P.; Hernández-Ceballos, M. A.; Galán, C.

    2016-11-01

    An accurate estimation of the allergen concentration in the atmosphere is essential for allergy sufferers. The major cause of pollinosis all over Europe is due to grass pollen and Phl p 5 has the highest rates of sensitization (>50%) in patients with grass pollen-induced allergy. However, recent research has shown that airborne pollen does not always offer a clear indicator of exposure to aeroallergens. This study aims to evaluate relations between airborne grass pollen and Phl p 5 concentrations in Córdoba (southern Spain) and to study how meteorological parameters influence these atmospheric records. Monitoring was carried out from 2012 to 2014. Hirst-type volumetric spore trap was used for pollen collection, following the protocol recommended by the Spanish Aerobiology Network (REA). Aeroallergen sampling was performed using a low-volume cyclone sampler, and allergenic particles were quantified by ELISA assay. Besides, the influence of main meteorological factors on local airborne pollen and allergen concentrations was surveyed. A significant correlation was observed between grass pollen and Phl p 5 allergen concentrations during the pollen season, but with some sporadic discrepancy episodes. The cumulative annual Pollen Index also varied considerably. A significant correlation has been obtained between airborne pollen and minimum temperature, relative humidity and precipitation, during the three studied years. However, there is no clear relationship between allergens and weather variables. Our findings suggest that the correlation between grass pollen and aeroallergen Phl p 5 concentrations varies from year-to-year probably related to a complex interplay of meteorological variables.

  2. Evaluation of airborne topographic lidar for quantifying beach changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H.; Krabill, W.B.; Swift, R.N.; Brock, J.; List, J.; Hansen, M.; Holman, R.A.; Manizade, S.; Sontag, J.; Meredith, A.; Morgan, K.; Yunkel, J.K.; Frederick, E.B.; Stockdon, H.

    2003-01-01

    A scanning airborne topographic lidar was evaluated for its ability to quantify beach topography and changes during the Sandy Duck experiment in 1997 along the North Carolina coast. Elevation estimates, acquired with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), were compared to elevations measured with three types of ground-based measurements - 1) differential GPS equipped all-terrain vehicle (ATV) that surveyed a 3-km reach of beach from the shoreline to the dune, 2) GPS antenna mounted on a stadia rod used to intensely survey a different 100 m reach of beach, and 3) a second GPS-equipped ATV that surveyed a 70-km-long transect along the coast. Over 40,000 individual intercomparisons between ATM and ground surveys were calculated. RMS vertical differences associated with the ATM when compared to ground measurements ranged from 13 to 19 cm. Considering all of the intercomparisons together, RMS ??? 15 cm. This RMS error represents a total error for individual elevation estimates including uncertainties associated with random and mean errors. The latter was the largest source of error and was attributed to drift in differential GPS. The ??? 15 cm vertical accuracy of the ATM is adequate to resolve beach-change signals typical of the impact of storms. For example, ATM surveys of Assateague Island (spanning the border of MD and VA) prior to and immediately following a severe northeaster showed vertical beach changes in places greater than 2 m, much greater than expected errors associated with the ATM. A major asset of airborne lidar is the high spatial data density. Measurements of elevation are acquired every few m2 over regional scales of hundreds of kilometers. Hence, many scales of beach morphology and change can be resolved, from beach cusps tens of meters in wavelength to entire coastal cells comprising tens to hundreds of kilometers of coast. Topographic lidars similar to the ATM are becoming increasingly available from commercial vendors and should, in the future

  3. Airborne transmission of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Jason M; Beren, Joel; Merkel, Tod J

    2012-09-15

    Pertussis is a contagious, acute respiratory illness caused by the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Although it is widely believed that transmission of B. pertussis occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets, no controlled study has ever documented airborne transmission of pertussis. We set out to determine if airborne transmission occurs between infected and naive animals, utilizing the baboon model of pertussis. Our results showed that 100% of exposed naive animals became infected even when physical contact was prevented, demonstrating that pertussis transmission occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets.

  4. The use of airborne geophysics for levee classification and assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Joseph B.

    2011-12-01

    This research is the first known application into using airborne geophysical methods to evaluate and classify levees. This research is an important step toward developing new technologies and methods to rapidly screen and evaluate earthen flood control levees for safety against flooding. An investigation of airborne geophysical methods was conducted on levees in the lower Rio Grande Valley and involved electromagnetic induction, magnetometer, and LiDAR surveys of the levee system. Airborne EM signatures were analyzed by geologic mapping of floodplain depositional environments, examination of published soils data, and drilling of borings. A geographic information system was developed to manage the various data sets and evaluate historic land use changes and development of the flood control systems to better understand the signatures using airborne methods. This research presents information about the historic basis for evaluating and classifying levees, which is based primarily on the federal perspective and flood control experiences in the lower Mississippi River Valley, where national floodplain engineering methods and standards were developed. This research examines the evolution of today's flood control policy, and the development of engineering assessment procedures, and the application of geophysical methods to provide critical information about levee failure mechanisms and assessment of flood control systems. This research demonstrates that topographic base maps and Sengpiel sections showing the results of electrical conductivity or resistivity surveys at different frequencies along the levee corridor provide accurate and valuable information to determine the composition of floodplain soils and the foundation stratigraphy to assess modes of levee failure, to aid in the placement of borings to obtain material properties of the levee and foundation, and to determine the extent of levee reaches with similar properties for the engineering analysis. The main

  5. The Cosmic Large-Scale Structure in X-rays (CLASSIX) Cluster Survey. I. Probing galaxy cluster magnetic fields with line of sight rotation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Kronberg, Philipp P.

    2016-11-01

    To search for a signature of an intracluster magnetic field, we compare measurements of Faraday rotation of polarised extragalactic radio sources in the line of sight of galaxy clusters with those outside. To this end, we correlated a catalogue of 1383 rotation measures of extragalactic polarised radio sources with galaxy clusters from the CLASSIX survey (combining REFLEX II and NORAS II) detected by their X-ray emission in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. The survey covers 8.25 ster of the sky at | bII | ≥ 20°. We compared the rotation measures in the line of sight of clusters within their projected radii of r500 with those outside and found a significant excess of the dispersion of the rotation measures in the cluster regions. Since the observed rotation measure is the result of Faraday rotation in several presumably uncorrelated magnetised cells of the intracluster medium, the observations correspond to quantities averaged over several magnetic field directions and strengths. Therefore the interesting quantity is the dispersion or standard deviation of the rotation measure for an ensemble of clusters. In the analysis of the observations we found a standard deviation of the rotation measure inside r500 of about 120 (± 21) rad m-2. This compares to about 56 (± 8) rad m-2 outside. Correcting for the effect of the Galaxy with the mean rotation measure in a region of 10 deg radius in the outskirts of the clusters does not change the outcome quoted above. We show that the most X-ray luminous and thus most massive clusters contribute most to the observed excess rotation measure. Modelling the electron density distribution in the intracluster medium with a self-similar model based on the REXCESS Survey, we found that the dispersion of the rotation measure increases with the column density, and we deduce a magnetic field value of about 2-6 (l/ 10 kpc)- 1/2μG assuming a constant magnetic field strength, where l is the size of the coherently magnetised intracluster medium

  6. Subglacial Geology of the Thwaites Glacier Catchment, West Antarctica: Airborne Gravity Reduction and Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, T. M.; Blankenship, D. D.; Holt, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    The Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is one of the most vulnerable areas of the continent to global warming, based on the behavior of its two major glaciers: Thwaites and Pine Island. These glaciers are among the fastest moving and highest discharge in West Antarctica and they lack protective, buttressing ice shelves. Warm ocean currents around Antarctica are diverted away from the Siple Coast ice streams by the Ross Ice Shelf. The ASE is not so fortunate and is exposed to these warm currents because the glaciers lack any sizable ice shelves. However, modeling the response of the ASE glaciers to climate-induced melting requires understanding the ASE subglacial environment. Based on the Siple Coast ice streams, we know that the character of subglacial geology, especially the availability of basal sediment, can greatly influence ice flow. Yet despite the ASE's recognized potential of being an access point of ocean waters to the interior of the WAIS, very little data has been collected in the area until recently. The University of Texas, in conjunction with the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), completed the first comprehensive surveys of the ASE during a 2004-2005 aerogeophysical field campaign. Together our investigations covered over 290,000 sq. km. of the ASE, with BAS working primarily in the Pine Island Glacier catchment and UT in the Thwaites Glacier catchment. Our geophysical platform includes ice-penetrating radar, gravity, magnetics, laser and pressure altimetry, and GPS. Here we present the results of the airborne gravity reduction. This was the first use of the LaCoste & Romberg Air/Sea II gravity meter in an airborne survey and it performed very well, especially considering the extreme flight conditions and unusual survey design required for the region. The data were acquired on a 15km grid; the free-air gravity anomaly results have a mean deviation crossover error of 3.8 mGals and a half-wavelength spatial resolution of 9

  7. Martian Magnets Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this microscopic imager view of its capture magnet on sol 92 (April 6, 2004). Both Spirit and the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity are equipped with a number of magnets. The capture magnet, as seen here, has a stronger charge than its sidekick, the filter magnet. The lower-powered filter magnet captures only the most magnetic airborne dust with the strongest charges, while the capture magnet picks up all magnetic airborne dust.

    The magnets' primary purpose is to collect the martian magnetic dust so that scientists can analyze it with the rovers' Moessbauer spectrometers. While there is plenty of dust on the surface of Mars, it is difficult to confirm where it came from, and when it was last airborne. Because scientists are interested in learning about the properties of the dust in the atmosphere, they devised this dust-collection experiment.

    The capture magnet is about 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter and is constructed with a central cylinder and three rings, each with alternating orientations of magnetization. Scientists have been monitoring the continual accumulation of dust since the beginning of the mission with panoramic camera and microscopic imager images. They had to wait until enough dust accumulated before they could get a Moessbauer spectrometer analysis. The results of that analysis, performed on sol 92, have not been sent back to Earth yet.

  8. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  9. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  10. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  11. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  12. Magnetic resonance sounding survey data collected in the North Platte, Twin Platte, and South Platte Natural Resource Districts, Western Nebraska, Fall 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kass, Mason A.; Bloss, Benjamin R.; Irons, Trevor P.; Cannia, James C.; Abraham, Jared D.

    2014-01-01

    This report is a release of digital data and associated survey descriptions from a series of magnetic resonance soundings (MRS, also known as surface nuclear magnetic resonance) that was conducted during October and November of 2012 in areas of western Nebraska as part of a cooperative hydrologic study by the North Platte Natural Resource District (NRD), South Platte NRD, Twin Platte NRD, the Nebraska Environmental Trust, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The objective of the study was to delineate the base-of-aquifer and refine the understanding of the hydrologic properties in the aquifer system. The MRS technique non-invasively measures water content in the subsurface, which makes it a useful tool for hydrologic investigations in the near surface (up to depths of approximately 150 meters). In total, 14 MRS production-level soundings were acquired by the USGS over an area of approximately 10,600 square kilometers. The data are presented here in digital format, along with acquisition information, survey and site descriptions, and metadata.

  13. Data management based on geocoding index and adaptive visualization for airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Xiaodong

    2008-10-01

    With more surveying practice and deeper application, data post-process for airborne LiDAR system has been extracted lots of attention in data accuracy, post-process, fusion, modeling, automation and visualization. However, post-process and flexible visualization were found to be the bottle-neck which limits the LiDAR data usage for industrial applications. The cause of above bottle-neck problems is great capacity for LiDAR system. Thus in article a geocoding index based multivariate data management and adaptive visualization will be studied for based on the feature of airborne LiDAR's data to improve automatization of post-process and surveying efficiency.

  14. Routing architecture and security for airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei; Xie, Peng; Li, Jason; Xu, Roger; Levy, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Airborne networks are envisioned to provide interconnectivity for terrestial and space networks by interconnecting highly mobile airborne platforms. A number of military applications are expected to be used by the operator, and all these applications require proper routing security support to establish correct route between communicating platforms in a timely manner. As airborne networks somewhat different from traditional wired and wireless networks (e.g., Internet, LAN, WLAN, MANET, etc), security aspects valid in these networks are not fully applicable to airborne networks. Designing an efficient security scheme to protect airborne networks is confronted with new requirements. In this paper, we first identify a candidate routing architecture, which works as an underlying structure for our proposed security scheme. And then we investigate the vulnerabilities and attack models against routing protocols in airborne networks. Based on these studies, we propose an integrated security solution to address routing security issues in airborne networks.

  15. Data processing of remotely sensed airborne hyperspectral data using the Airborne Processing Library (APL): Geocorrection algorithm descriptions and spatial accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Mark A.; Taylor, Benjamin H.; Grant, Michael G.; Shutler, Jamie D.

    2014-03-01

    Remote sensing airborne hyperspectral data are routinely used for applications including algorithm development for satellite sensors, environmental monitoring and atmospheric studies. Single flight lines of airborne hyperspectral data are often in the region of tens of gigabytes in size. This means that a single aircraft can collect terabytes of remotely sensed hyperspectral data during a single year. Before these data can be used for scientific analyses, they need to be radiometrically calibrated, synchronised with the aircraft's position and attitude and then geocorrected. To enable efficient processing of these large datasets the UK Airborne Research and Survey Facility has recently developed a software suite, the Airborne Processing Library (APL), for processing airborne hyperspectral data acquired from the Specim AISA Eagle and Hawk instruments. The APL toolbox allows users to radiometrically calibrate, geocorrect, reproject and resample airborne data. Each stage of the toolbox outputs data in the common Band Interleaved Lines (BILs) format, which allows its integration with other standard remote sensing software packages. APL was developed to be user-friendly and suitable for use on a workstation PC as well as for the automated processing of the facility; to this end APL can be used under both Windows and Linux environments on a single desktop machine or through a Grid engine. A graphical user interface also exists. In this paper we describe the Airborne Processing Library software, its algorithms and approach. We present example results from using APL with an AISA Eagle sensor and we assess its spatial accuracy using data from multiple flight lines collected during a campaign in 2008 together with in situ surveyed ground control points.

  16. Enhanced analysis methods to derive the spatial distribution of 131I deposition on the ground by airborne surveys at an early stage after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tatsuo; Sugita, Takeshi; Okada, Colin E; Reed, Michael S; Blumenthal, Daniel J

    2013-08-01

    This paper applies both new and well tested analysis methods to aerial radiological surveys to extract the I ground concentrations present after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident. The analysis provides a complete map of I deposition, an important quantity incalculable at the time of the accident due to the short half-life of I and the complexity of the analysis. A map of I deposition is the first step in conducting internal exposure assessments, population dose reconstruction, and follow-up epidemiological studies. The short half-life of I necessitates the use of aerial radiological surveys to cover the large area quickly, thoroughly, and safely. Teams from the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) performed aerial radiological surveys to provide initial maps of the dispersal of radioactive material in Japan. This work reports on analyses performed on a subset of the initial survey data by a joint Japan-U.S. collaboration to determine I ground concentrations. The analytical results show a high concentration of I northwest of the NPP, consistent with the previously reported radioactive cesium deposition, but also shows a significant I concentration south of the plant, which was not observed in the original cesium analysis. The difference in the radioactive iodine and cesium patterns is possibly the result of differences in the ways these materials settle out of the air.

  17. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7 SPECTROSCOPIC M DWARF CATALOG. III. THE SPATIAL DEPENDENCE OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Pineda, J.; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.; Burgasser, Adam J.

    2013-09-15

    We analyze the magnetic activity of 59,318 M dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. This analysis explores the spatial distribution of M dwarf activity as a function of both vertical distance from the Galactic plane (Z) and planar distance from the Galactic center (R). We confirm the established trends of decreasing magnetic activity (as measured by H{alpha} emission) with increasing distance from the mid-plane of the disk and find evidence of a trend in Galactocentric radii. We measure a non-zero radial gradient in the activity fraction in our analysis of stars with spectral types dM3 and dM4. The activity fraction increases with R and can be explained by a decreasing mean stellar age with increasing distance from the Galactic center.

  18. Aerial infrared surveys of Reykjanes and Torfajökull thermal areas, Oceland, with a section on cost of exploration surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pálmason, G.; Friedman, J.D.; Williams, R. S.; Jónsson, J.; Saemundsson, K.

    1970-01-01

    In 1966 and 1968 aerial infrared surveys were conducted over 10 of 13 high-temperature thermal areas in Iceland. The surveys were made with an airborne scanner system, utilizing radiation in the 4.5–5.5 μm wavelength band.Supplementary ground geological studies were made in the Reykjanes and Torfajökull thermal areas to interpret features depicted on the infrared imagery and to relate zones of high heat flux to tectonic structure. In the Reykjanes area in southwestern Iceland a shallow ground temperature map was prepared for temperatures at a depth of 0.5 meters; comparison of this map with the infrared imagery reveals some striking similarities.It appears that aerial infrared surveys outline the surface thermal patterns of high-temperature areas and aid in relating these patterns to possible geological structures controlling the upflow of hot water. Amplitude-slicing techniques applied to the magnetically taped airborne scanner data permit an estimate to be made of the natural heat output on the basis of size of area and specific radiance.In addition to their value in preliminary studies of high-temperature areas, infrared surveys conducted at regular intervals over thermal area under exploitation can provide valuable data on changes that occur in surface manifestations with time.

  19. Aerial infrared surveys of Reykjanes and Torfajökull thermal areas, Iceland, with a section on cost of exploration surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pálmason, G.; Friedman, J.D.; Williams, R.S.; Jónsson, J.; Saemundsson, K.

    1970-01-01

    In 1966 and 1968 aerial infrared surveys were conducted over 10 of 13 high-temperature thermal areas in Iceland. The surveys were made with an airborne scanner system, utilizing radiation in the 4.5–5.5 μm wavelength band. Supplementary ground geological studies were made in the Reykjanes and Torfajökull thermal areas to interpret features depicted on the infrared imagery and to relate zones of high heat flux to tectonic structure. In the Reykjanes area in southwestern Iceland a shallow ground temperature map was prepared for temperatures at a depth of 0.5 meters; comparison of this map with the infrared imagery reveals some striking similarities. It appears that aerial infrared surveys outline the surface thermal patterns of high-temperature areas and aid in relating these patterns to possible geological structures controlling the upflow of hot water. Amplitude-slicing techniques applied to the magnetically taped airborne scanner data permit an estimate to be made of the natural heat output on the basis of size of area and specific radiance. In addition to their value in preliminary studies of high-temperature areas, infrared surveys conducted at regular intervals over thermal area under exploitation can provide valuable data on changes that occur in surface manifestations with time.

  20. Exposure to airborne asbestos in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.J.; Van Orden, D.R.; Corn, M.; Crump, K.S. )

    1992-08-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings and its implication for the health of building occupants is a major public health issue. A total of 2892 air samples from 315 public, commercial, residential, school, and university buildings has been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result of exposure to the presence of asbestos containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all asbestos structures was 0.02 structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of asbestos greater than or equal to 5 microns long was 0.00013 fibers/ml (f/ml). The concentration of asbestos was higher in schools than in other buildings. In 48% of indoor samples and 75% of outdoor samples, no asbestos fibers were detected. The observed airborne concentration in 74% of the indoor samples and 96% of the outdoor samples is below the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act clearance level of 0.01 s/ml. Finally, using those fibers which could be seen optically, all indoor samples and all outdoor samples are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure level of 0.1 f/ml for fibers greater than or equal to 5 microns in length. These results provide substantive verification of the findings of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency public building study which found very low ambient concentrations of asbestos fibers in buildings with ACM, irrespective of the condition of the material in the buildings.

  1. Airborne EM for mine infrastructure planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijns, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys with near-surface vertical resolution provide rapid and comprehensive coverage of a mine site ahead of infrastructure planning. In environments of sufficient electrical conductivity contrast, the data will map variations in the depth to bedrock, providing guidance for expected excavation depths for solid building foundations, or mine pre-strip volumes. Continuous coverage overcomes the severe areal limitation of relying only on drilling and test pits. An AEM survey in northern Finland illustrates the success of this approach for guiding the placement of a mine crusher and related infrastructure. The cost of the EM data collection and interpretation is insignificant in comparison to the US$300 million capital cost of the mine infrastructure. This environment of shallow glacial cover challenges the limits of AEM resolution, yet analysis of subsequently collected three-dimensional (3D) surface seismic data and actual pre-strip excavation depths reinforces the predictive, but qualitative, mapping capability of the AEM. It also highlights the need to tune the modelling via petrophysics for the specific goal of the investigation, and exposes the limitations of visual drill core logging.

  2. Absolute magnetization of the seafloor at a basalt-hosted hydrothermal site: Insights from a deep-sea submersible survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, Florent; Dyment, Jérôme; Fouquet, Yves; Choi, Yujin; Honsho, Chie

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of high-resolution vector magnetic data acquired by deep-sea submersibles (DSSs) requires the development of specific approaches adapted to their uneven tracks. We present a method that takes advantage of (1) the varying altitude of the DSS above the seafloor and (2) high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data acquired separately, at higher altitude, by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, to estimate the absolute magnetization intensity and the magnetic polarity of the shallow subseafloor along the DSS path. We apply this method to data collected by DSS Nautile on a small active basalt-hosted hydrothermal site. The site is associated with a lack of magnetization, in agreement with previous findings at the same kind of sites: the contrast between nonmagnetic sulfide deposits/stockwork zone and strongly magnetized basalt is sufficient to explain the magnetic signal observed at such a low altitude. Both normal and reversed polarities are observed in the lava flows surrounding the site, suggesting complex history of accumulating volcanic flows.

  3. Airborne Astronomy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, Harold M.

    1999-01-01

    Our understanding about the inter-relationship between the collapsing cloud envelope and the disk has been greatly altered. While the dominant star formation models invoke free fall collapse and r(sup -1.5) density profile, other star formation models are possible. These models invoke either different cloud starting conditions or the mediating effects of magnetic fields to alter the cloud geometry during collapse. To test these models, it is necessary to understand the envelope's physical structure. The discovery of disks, based on millimeter observations around young stellar objects, however makes a simple interpretation of the emission complicated. Depending on the wavelength, the disk or the envelope could dominate emission from a star. In addition, the discovery of planets around other stars has made understanding the disks in their own right quite important. Many star formation models predict disks should form naturally as the star is forming. In many cases, the information we derive about disk properties depends implicitly on the assumed envelope properties. How to understand the two components and their interaction with each other is a key problem of current star formation.

  4. Ground Gravity, Magnetic and Electromagnetic Surveys on a Crater on Basalt of Bajada del Diablo Astrobleme-Strewn Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, R. D.; Prezzi, C.; Orgeira, M. J.; Rocca, M.; Martínez, O.; Ponce, J. F.; Corbella, H.; Rabassa, J.; González-Guillot, M.; Subías, I.

    2014-09-01

    With the aim of further investigate the circular structures from Bajada del Diablo, we carried out geophysics surveys and we conclude that the geophysical features could be satisfactorily explained assuming an extra-terrestrial projectile impact.

  5. Detection of airborne polyoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGarrity, G. J.; Dion, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Polyoma virus was recovered from the air of an animal laboratory housing mice infected with the virus. Air samples were obtained by means of a high volume air sampler and further concentrated by high speed centrifugation. Total concentration of the air samples was 7.5 x 10(7). Assay for polyoma virus was by mouse antibody production tests. Airborne polyoma virus was detected in four of six samples. PMID:211163

  6. The Future of Airborne Reconnaissance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    biplanes to the worldwide Cold War missions of the U - 2 and SR-71, airborne reconnaissance has become an indispensable tool to the intelligence community...Reconnaissance Operations (SRO) procedures, such as the U - 2 , RC- 135, and the EP-3, and traditional theater/fleet tactical reconnaissance systems like...upgraded sensor package on the U -2.14 The Army Staffs argument centers around command and control of the asset. The Army agreed that the U - 2 ’s

  7. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A synoptic view of early and recent data on the planetary magnetism of Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn is presented. The data on Mercury from Mariner 10 are synthesized with various other sources, while data for Venus obtained from 120 orbits of Pioneer Venus give the upper limit of the magnetic dipole. Explorer 35 Lunar Orbiter data provided the first evidence of lunar magnetization, but it was the Apollo subsatellite data that measured accurately the magnetic dipole of the moon. A complete magnetic survey of Mars is still needed, and only some preliminary data are given on the magnetic dipole of the planet. Figures on the magnetic dipoles of Jupiter and Saturn are also suggested. It is concluded that if the magnetic field data are to be used to infer the interior properties of the planets, good measures of the multiple harmonics in the field are needed, which may be obtained only through low altitude polar orbits.

  8. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  9. Fast 3-D large-scale gravity and magnetic modeling using unstructured grids and an adaptive multilevel fast multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Tang, Jingtian; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2017-01-01

    A novel fast and accurate algorithm is developed for large-scale 3-D gravity and magnetic modeling problems. An unstructured grid discretization is used to approximate sources with arbitrary mass and magnetization distributions. A novel adaptive multilevel fast multipole (AMFM) method is developed to reduce the modeling time. An observation octree is constructed on a set of arbitrarily distributed observation sites, while a source octree is constructed on a source tetrahedral grid. A novel characteristic is the independence between the observation octree and the source octree, which simplifies the implementation of different survey configurations such as airborne and ground surveys. Two synthetic models, a cubic model and a half-space model with mountain-valley topography, are tested. As compared to analytical solutions of gravity and magnetic signals, excellent agreements of the solutions verify the accuracy of our AMFM algorithm. Finally, our AMFM method is used to calculate the terrain effect on an airborne gravity data set for a realistic topography model represented by a triangular surface retrieved from a digital elevation model. Using 16 threads, more than 5800 billion interactions between 1,002,001 observation points and 5,839,830 tetrahedral elements are computed in 453.6 s. A traditional first-order Gaussian quadrature approach requires 3.77 days. Hence, our new AMFM algorithm not only can quickly compute the gravity and magnetic signals for complicated problems but also can substantially accelerate the solution of 3-D inversion problems.

  10. Optical/near-infrared polarization survey of Sh 2-29: Magnetic fields, dense cloud fragmentations, and anomalous dust grain sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Fábio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; Reis, Wilson; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G. E-mail: franco@fisica.ufmg.br E-mail: roman@dfuls.cl

    2014-03-01

    Sh 2-29 is a conspicuous star-forming region marked by the presence of massive embedded stars as well as several notable interstellar structures. In this research, our goals were to determine the role of magnetic fields and to study the size distribution of interstellar dust particles within this turbulent environment. We have used a set of optical and near-infrared polarimetric data obtained at OPD/LNA (Brazil) and CTIO (Chile), correlated with extinction maps, Two Micron All Sky Survey data, and images from the Digitized Sky Survey and Spitzer. The region's most striking feature is a swept out interstellar cavity whose polarimetric maps indicate that magnetic field lines were dragged outward, piling up along its borders. This led to a higher magnetic strength value (≈400 μG) and an abrupt increase in polarization degree, probably due to an enhancement in alignment efficiency. Furthermore, dense cloud fragmentations with peak A{sub V} between 20 and 37 mag were probably triggered by its expansion. The presence of 24 μm point-like sources indicates possible newborn stars inside this dense environment. A statistical analysis of the angular dispersion function revealed areas where field lines are aligned in a well-ordered pattern, seemingly due to compression effects from the H II region expansion. Finally, Serkowski function fits were used to study the ratio of the total-to-selective extinction, revealing a dual population of anomalous grain particle sizes. This trend suggests that both effects of coagulation and fragmentation of interstellar grains are present in the region.

  11. Structure of Titan's induced magnetosphere under varying background magnetic field conditions: Survey of Cassini magnetometer data from flybys TA-T85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sven; Treeck, Shari C.; Wennmacher, Alexandre; Saur, Joachim; Neubauer, Fritz M.; Bertucci, Cesar L.; Dougherty, Michele K.

    2013-04-01

    Cassini magnetic field observations between 2004 and 2012 suggest the ambient field conditions near Titan's orbit to differ significantly from the frequently applied pre-Cassini picture (background magnetic field homogeneous and perpendicular to Titan's orbital plane, stationary upstream conditions). In this study, we analyze the impact of these varying background field conditions on the structure of Titan's induced magnetosphere by conducting a systematic survey of Cassini magnetic field observations in the interaction region during flybys TA-T85 (July 2004-July 2012). We introduce a set of criteria that allow to identify deviations in the structure of Titan's induced magnetosphere - as seen by the Cassini magnetometer (MAG) - from the picture of steady-state field line draping. These disruptions are classified as "weak", "moderate", or "strong". After applying this classification scheme to all available Titan encounters, we survey the data for a possible correlation between the disruptions of the draping pattern and the ambient magnetospheric field conditions, as characterized by Simon et al. [2010a]. Our major findings are: (1) When Cassini is embedded in the northern or southern lobe of Saturn's magnetodisk within a ± 3 h interval around closest approach, Titan's induced magnetosphere shows little or no deviations at all from the steady-state draping picture. (2) Even when Titan is embedded in perturbed current sheet fields during an encounter, the notion of draping the average background field around the moon's ionosphere is still applicable to explain MAG observations from numerous Titan flybys. (3) Only when Titan is exposed to intense north-south oscillations of Saturn's current sheet at the time of an encounter, the signatures of the moon's induced magnetosphere may be completely obscured by the ambient field perturbations. (4) So far, T70 is the only flyby that fully meets the idealized pre-Cassini picture of the Titan interaction (steady background

  12. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2002-01-01

    In response to recommendations from the National Aviation Weather Program Council, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working with industry to develop an electronic pilot reporting capability for small aircraft. This paper describes the Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) sensor development effort. NASA is working with industry to develop a sensor capable of measuring temperature, relative humidity, magnetic heading, pressure, icing, and average turbulence energy dissipation. Users of the data include National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) forecast modelers, air traffic controllers, flight service stations, airline operation centers, and pilots. Preliminary results from flight tests are presented.

  13. Airborne Warning and Control Radar Career Ladder, AFSC 328X2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    difficulty, the simulator approach is appropriate for both ground and airborne personnel. Electronics principles instruction may be an area of training where...interrogation systems. The course includes 18 weeks of electronics principles training. Basic resident training is conducted without the benefit of actual mission...training in electronics principles . The Occupational Measurement Center recently completed a survey of electronics principles required across several

  14. Airborne Electromagnetic Sounding of Sea Ice Thickness and Sub-Ice Bathymetry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    the ground using techniques which are standard for mineral exploration surveys. Phasing en- sures that the signal used as a time reference in...been developed, because standard airborne electromagnetic calibration techniques used for mineral exploration proved inadequate for sea ice thickness

  15. Identification of massive sulphide targets using the galvanic source EM signal from a sub-audio magnetic survey at the Far South project, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Card, Daniel; Wallace, Yvonne; Peters, Bill

    2016-07-01

    The Far South project is located 5 km south along strike from the Deep South mine, where gold mineralisation is commonly associated with semi-massive pyrrhotite and pyrite. Data from a sub-audio magnetic (SAM) survey, set up in galvanic configuration, were acquired over the project principally to map stratigraphy and structure using the on-time magnetometric conductivity (MMC) and total magnetic intensity (TMI) responses. The off-time galvanic source electromagnetic (GSEM) data were subsequently extracted from the raw data and four late-time anomalous responses were identified. Two of these responses are strong late-time anomalies up to 350 m in strike length, clearly visible in the 60 ms time gate, and the remaining two are weaker mid-time, subtler and less diagnostic responses. Modelling of the GSEM responses was attempted using conventional electromagnetic (EM) modelling techniques, where certain assumptions had to be made for the survey geometry and current path. The assumed current path has an effect on the coupling of the inducing current with the target, so in order to validate the assumptions and GSEM modelling results, follow-up moving-loop and fixed-loop electromagnetic (MLEM and FLEM) surveys were required. These surveys confirmed well-defined conductive responses over all four follow-up areas. Modelling of the GSEM data over the two strongest anomalies is in good agreement with modelling of the MLEM/FLEM data. Modelling at a third target showed some similarity to results obtained by modelling the follow-up EM survey data, and one target was not defined clearly enough in the GSEM data to allow modelling and had to be modelled solely on the follow-up FLEM data. The results of these efforts confirm the ability to identify and produce a reasonably useful model of strong conductive targets from SAM GSEM data, indicating that the rapid acquisition SAM system is an effective tool for quick reconnaissance in sulphide exploration. Subsequent drilling identified

  16. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey maps and data, East Poplar Oil Field area, August 2004, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Cain, Michael J.; Tyrrell, Christa; Hill, Patricia L.

    2006-01-01

    This report is a data release for a helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey that was conducted during August 2004 in a 275-square-kilometer area that includes the East Poplar oil field on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. The electromagnetic equipment consisted of six different coil-pair orientations that measured resistivity at separate frequencies from about 400 hertz to about 140,000 hertz. The electromagnetic resistivity data were converted to six electrical conductivity grids, each representing different approximate depths of investigation. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow aquifers. Areas of high conductivity in shallow aquifers in the East Poplar oil field area are being delineated by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes, in order to map areas of saline-water plumes. Ground electromagnetic methods were first used during the early 1990s to delineate more than 31 square kilometers of high conductivity saline-water plumes in a portion of the East Poplar oil field area. In the 10 years since the first delineation, the quality of water from some wells completed in the shallow aquifers in the East Poplar oil field changed markedly. The extent of saline-water plumes in 2004 likely differs from that delineated in the early 1990s. The geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies is being used by resource managers to develop ground-water resource plans for the area.

  17. Experimental Investigations on Airborne Gravimetry Based on Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yapeng; Wu, Meiping; Wang, Jinling; Zhang, Kaidong; Cao, Juliang; Cai, Shaokun

    2014-01-01

    Gravity surveys are an important research topic in geophysics and geodynamics. This paper investigates a method for high accuracy large scale gravity anomaly data reconstruction. Based on the airborne gravimetry technology, a flight test was carried out in China with the strap-down airborne gravimeter (SGA-WZ) developed by the Laboratory of Inertial Technology of the National University of Defense Technology. Taking into account the sparsity of airborne gravimetry by the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), this paper proposes a method for gravity anomaly data reconstruction using the theory of compressed sensing (CS). The gravity anomaly data reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem, which can be transformed into a sparse optimization problem. This paper uses the zero-norm as the objective function and presents a greedy algorithm called Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) to solve the corresponding minimization problem. The test results have revealed that the compressed sampling rate is approximately 14%, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by OMP is 0.03 mGal and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 56.48 dB. In contrast, the standard deviation of the reconstruction error by the existing nearest-interpolation method (NIPM) is 0.15 mGal and the SNR is 42.29 dB. These results have shown that the OMP algorithm can reconstruct the gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and fewer measurements. PMID:24647125

  18. Topography and Vegetation Characterization using Dual-Wavelength Airborne Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, A. L.; Bradford, B.; Magruder, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring Earth surface dynamics at an ever increasing resolution has helped to support the characterization of local topography, including vegetated and urban environments. Airborne remote sensing using light detection and ranging (LIDAR) is naturally suited to characterize vegetation and landscapes as it provides detailed three-dimensional spatial data with multiple elevation recordings for each laser pulse. The full waveform LIDAR receiver is unique in this aspect as it can capture and record the complete temporal history of the reflected signal, which contains detailed information about the structure of the objects and ground surfaces illuminated by the beam. This study examines the utility of co-collected, dual-wavelength, full waveform LIDAR data to characterize vegetation and landscapes through the extraction of waveform features, including total waveform energy, canopy energy distribution, and foliage penetration metrics. Assessments are performed using data collected in May 2014 over Monterey, CA, including the Naval Postgraduate School campus area as well as the Point Lobos State Natural Reserve situated on the Monterey coast. The surveys were performed with the Chiroptera dual-laser LIDAR mapping system from Airborne Hydrography AB (AHAB), which can collect both green (515nm) and near infrared (1064nm) waveforms simultaneously. Making use of the dual waveforms allows for detailed characterization of the vegetation and landscape not previously possible with airborne LIDAR.

  19. Field of view selection for optimal airborne imaging sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Tristan M.; Barnard, P. Werner; Fildis, Halidun; Erbudak, Mustafa; Senger, Tolga; Alpman, Mehmet E.

    2014-05-01

    The choice of the Field of View (FOV) of imaging sensors used in airborne targeting applications has major impact on the overall performance of the system. Conducting a market survey from published data on sensors used in stabilized airborne targeting systems shows a trend of ever narrowing FOVs housed in smaller and lighter volumes. This approach promotes the ever increasing geometric resolution provided by narrower FOVs, while it seemingly ignores the influences the FOV selection has on the sensor's sensitivity, the effects of diffraction, the influences of sight line jitter and collectively the overall system performance. This paper presents a trade-off methodology to select the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor that is limited in aperture diameter by mechanical constraints (such as space/volume available and window size) by balancing the influences FOV has on sensitivity and resolution and thereby optimizing the system's performance. The methodology may be applied to staring array based imaging sensors across all wavebands from visible/day cameras through to long wave infrared thermal imagers. Some examples of sensor analysis applying the trade-off methodology are given that highlights the performance advantages that can be gained by maximizing the aperture diameters and choosing the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor used in airborne targeting applications.

  20. Three years of practical use of airborne gravity gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, E.

    2003-04-01

    BHP Billiton has successfully built and deployed three airborne gravity gradiometer (AGG) systems, (Newton, Einstein and Galileo) based upon the Bell Airspace (now Lockheed Martin) Gravity Gradient Instruments developed for the United States Department of Defense. A second-generation gradiometer (Feynman) is presently nearing completion. The GGI technology is based on groups of four (4) accelerometers where the accelerometers are equi-spaced on a circle. The configuration successfully rejects both common mode accelerations and rotations about the axis perpendicular to the plane of the complement. The GGI is mounted within an aircraft in a specially designed, inertially stabilized platform, which significantly reduces sensitivity to noise and turbulence. The BHP Billiton AGG Technology provides high quality gravity maps with a resolution and sensitivity to map gravity anomalies associated with both minerals and hydrocarbon deposits. To date the purpose built and designed hardware and data processing algorithms, in conjunction with several other geophysical survey instruments, have been deployed against a broad range of mineral and hydrocarbon targets, a total of over 300,000km of operational flights having been made. Data will also be presented on the in-flight sensitivity of a gravity gradiometer to the airborne environment. It will also outline some of the many unexpected problems that were encountered in the 18-month flight trials required to achieve satisfactory airborne operation.

  1. The historical development of the magnetic method in exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nabighian, M.N.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Hansen, R.O.; LaFehr, T.R.; Li, Y.; Peirce, J.W.; Phillips, J.D.; Ruder, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic method, perhaps the oldest of geophysical exploration techniques, blossomed after the advent of airborne surveys in World War II. With improvements in instrumentation, navigation, and platform compensation, it is now possible to map the entire crustal section at a variety of scales, from strongly magnetic basement at regional scale to weakly magnetic sedimentary contacts at local scale. Methods of data filtering, display, and interpretation have also advanced, especially with the availability of low-cost, high-performance personal computers and color raster graphics. The magnetic method is the primary exploration tool in the search for minerals. In other arenas, the magnetic method has evolved from its sole use for mapping basement structure to include a wide range of new applications, such as locating intrasedimentary faults, defining subtle lithologic contacts, mapping salt domes in weakly magnetic sediments, and better defining targets through 3D inversion. These new applications have increased the method's utility in all realms of exploration - in the search for minerals, oil and gas, geothermal resources, and groundwater, and for a variety of other purposes such as natural hazards assessment, mapping impact structures, and engineering and environmental studies. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  2. Monitoring radioactive plumes by airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Grasty, R.L.; Hovgaard, J.; Multala, J.

    1996-06-01

    Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer surveys using large volume sodium-iodide detectors are routinely flown throughout the world for mineral exploration and geological mapping. Techniques have now been developed to detect and map man-made sources of radiation. In Canada, airborne gamma-rays surveys have been flown around nuclear reactors to map {sup 41}Ar plumes from nuclear reactors and to calculate the dose rate at ground level. In May 1986, the Finnish Geological survey aircraft flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. As the aircraft flew through the plume, the aircraft became increasingly contaminated. By measuring the final aircraft contamination, the activity of the plume could be separated from the contamination due to the aircraft. Within 1 h of encountering the plume, the aircraft activity was comparable to the maximum levels found in the plume. From an analysis of the gamma-ray spectra, the concentration of {sup 131}I and {sup 140}La within the plume were calculated as a function of time.

  3. Design of Reconnaissance Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Geophysical Surveys of the North Platte River and Lodgepole Creek, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Cannia, J. C.; Abraham, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    An innovative flight line layout using widely separated lines was used for frequency domain helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) surveys in 2008 and 2009 in the Panhandle of western Nebraska. The HEM survey design was developed as part of a joint hydrologic study by the North Platte Natural Resource District, South Platte Natural Resource District, UNL-Conservation and Survey Division, and U.S. Geological Survey to improve the understanding of relationships between surface water and groundwater systems critical to developing groundwater flow models used in water resources management programs. Use of HEM methods for hydrologic mapping had been demonstrated by HEM surveys conducted in 2007 of sites in the glaciated Platte River Basin in eastern Nebraska. These surveys covered township-scale areas with flight lines laid out in blocks where the lines were spaced about 270m apart. The HEM successfully mapped the complex 3D geometry of shallow sand and gravel aquifers through and within conductive till to a depth of about 40m in a total area of about 680 km2 (263 mi2). Current groundwater flow models in western Nebraska include the Cooperative Hydrologic Study (COHYST), run by a consortium of state agencies, which is tasked to develop scientifically supportable hydrologic databases, analyses, and models, and the North Platte River Valley Optimization Model (NPRVOM). The COHYST study area, about 75,000 km2 (29,000 mi2), includes the Platte River Basin from the Nebraska - Wyoming border to Lincoln. Considering the large area of the groundwater models, the USGS decided in collaboration with the NRD to use a more reconnaissance-style layout for the 2008 HEM survey which encompassed about 21,000 km2 (8,000 mi2). A reconnaissance-type HEM survey is made possible due to technical capabilities of applicable HEM systems and due to the level of hydrogeologic information available in the NRD. The particular capabilities of the HEM system are careful calibration, low drift, low noise

  4. Michigan experimental multispectral mapping system: A description of the M7 airborne sensor and its performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasell, P. G., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of a multispectral band scanner for an airborne mapping system are discussed. The sensor operates in the ultraviolet, visual, and infrared frequencies. Any twelve of the bands may be selected for simultaneous, optically registered recording on a 14-track analog tape recorder. Multispectral imagery recorded on magnetic tape in the aircraft can be laboratory reproduced on film strips for visual analysis or optionally machine processed in analog and/or digital computers before display. The airborne system performance is analyzed.

  5. An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Solar Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samra, Jenna; DeLuca, Edward E.; Golub, Leon; Cheimets, Peter; Philip, Judge

    2016-05-01

    The airborne infrared spectrometer (AIR-Spec) is an innovative solar spectrometer that will observe the 2017 solar eclipse from the NSF/NCAR High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER). AIR-Spec will image five infrared coronal emission lines to determine whether they may be useful probes of coronal magnetism.The solar magnetic field provides the free energy that controls coronal heating, structure, and dynamics. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections and ultimately drives space weather. Therefore, direct coronal field measurements have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind.While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, AIR-Spec will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. During the total solar eclipse of 2017, AIR-Spec will observe five magnetically sensitive coronal emission lines between 1.4 and 4 µm from the HIAPER Gulfstream V at an altitude above 14.9 km. The instrument will measure emission line intensity, width, and Doppler shift, map the spatial distribution of infrared emitting plasma, and search for waves in the emission line velocities.AIR-Spec consists of an optical system (feed telescope, grating spectrometer, and infrared detector) and an image stabilization system, which uses a fast steering mirror to correct the line-of-sight for platform perturbations. To ensure that the instrument meets its research goals, both systems are undergoing extensive performance modeling and testing. These results are shown with reference to the science requirements.

  6. Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhothermel, Jeffry; Jones, W. D.; Dunkin, J. A.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This effort involves development of a calibrated, pulsed coherent CO2 Doppler lidar, followed by a carefully-planned and -executed program of multi-dimensional wind velocity and aerosol backscatter measurements from the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The lidar, designated as the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS), will be applicable to two research areas. First, MACAWS will enable specialized measurements of atmospheric dynamical processes in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere in geographic locations and over scales of motion not routinely or easily accessible to conventional sensors. The proposed observations will contribute fundamentally to a greater understanding of the role of the mesoscale, helping to improve predictive capabilities for mesoscale phenomena and to provide insights into improving model parameterizations of sub-grid scale processes within large-scale circulation models. As such, it has the potential to contribute uniquely to major, multi-institutional field programs planned for the mid 1990's. Second, MACAWS measurements can be used to reduce the degree of uncertainty in performance assessments and algorithm development for NASA's prospective Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), which has no space-based instrument heritage. Ground-based lidar measurements alone are insufficient to address all of the key issues. To minimize costs, MACAWS is being developed cooperatively by the lidar remote sensing groups of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, and MSFC using existing lidar hardware and manpower resources. Several lidar components have already been exercised in previous airborne lidar programs (for example, MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) used in 1981,4 Severe Storms Wind Measurement Program; JPL Airborne Backscatter Lidar Experiment (ABLE) used in 1989,90 Global Backscatter Experiment Survey Missions). MSFC has been given responsibility for directing the overall

  7. Application of thorium-normalized airborne radiospectrometric survey data of Wadi Araba area, North-eastern Desert, Egypt, as a guide to the recognition of probable subsurface petroleum accumulations.

    PubMed

    El-Sadek, Mohamed A

    2002-07-01

    A new exploration method has been developed by Saunders et al. (Geophysics 58(10) (1993) 1417) using surface and aerial gamma-ray spectral measurements in prospecting for petroleum in stratigraphic and structural traps. Wadi Araba area, North-eastern Desert, Egypt, was selected to apply this method on its recorded aerial gamma-ray spectrometric survey data, due to its distinct stratigraphic and structural setting as well as its situation in close connection with the Gulf of Suez, which represents one of the important sites of oil production in Egypt. The three variables (eU, eTh, and K) registered for the whole study area, in the form of three contour maps, were digitized along the flight paths every 1.0 km. The DRAD arithmetic means plus three standard deviations for the data set were computed. Any single profile value greater than this quantity should have a probability of 99.87% that it represents a valid anomaly and is not caused by random variations in the background values. The use of these criteria has identified one flight line which has a valid anomaly that is not caused by random variations in the background values. This might indicate a prospective possibility for petroleum accumulation in the Wadi Araba area. North-eastern Desert, Egypt.

  8. A Survey of Magnetic Waves Excited by Newborn Interstellar He+ Observed by the ACE Spacecraft at 1 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Meghan K.; Argall, Matthew R.; Joyce, Colin J.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Sokół, Justyna M.; Bzowski, Maciej; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.

    2016-10-01

    We report observations of low-frequency waves at 1 au by the magnetic field instrument on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE/MAG) and show evidence that they arise due to newborn interstellar pickup He+. Twenty-five events are studied. They possess the generally predicted attributes: spacecraft-frame frequencies slightly greater than the He+ cyclotron frequency, left-hand polarization in the spacecraft frame, and transverse fluctuations with minimum variance directions that are quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field. Their occurrence spans the first 18 years of ACE operations, with no more than 3 such observations in any given year. Thus, the events are relatively rare. As with past observations by the Ulysses and Voyager spacecraft, we argue that the waves are seen only when the background turbulence is sufficiently weak as to allow for the slow accumulation of wave energy over many hours.

  9. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  10. Requirements for airborne vector gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Colombo, O.; Hein, G.; Knickmeyer, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

  11. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  12. Cyberinfrastructure for Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004 the NASA Airborne Science Program has been prototyping and using infrastructure that enables researchers to interact with each other and with their instruments via network communications. This infrastructure uses satellite links and an evolving suite of applications and services that leverage open-source software. The use of these tools has increased near-real-time situational awareness during field operations, resulting in productivity improvements and the collection of better data. This paper describes the high-level system architecture and major components, with example highlights from the use of the infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of ongoing efforts to transition to operational status.

  13. Airborne electromagnetic imaging of discontinuous permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsley, Burke J.; Abraham, Jared D.; Smith, Bruce D.; Cannia, James C.; Voss, Clifford I.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Anderson, Lesleigh; Ball, Lyndsay B.; Deszcz-Pan, Maryla; Wellman, Tristan P.; Ager, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of permafrost in cold regions is inextricably connected to hydrogeologic processes, climate, and ecosystems. Permafrost thawing has been linked to changes in wetland and lake areas, alteration of the groundwater contribution to streamflow, carbon release, and increased fire frequency. But detailed knowledge about the dynamic state of permafrost in relation to surface and groundwater systems remains an enigma. Here, we present the results of a pioneering ˜1,800 line-kilometer airborne electromagnetic survey that shows sediments deposited over the past ˜4 million years and the configuration of permafrost to depths of ˜100 meters in the Yukon Flats area near Fort Yukon, Alaska. The Yukon Flats is near the boundary between continuous permafrost to the north and discontinuous permafrost to the south, making it an important location for examining permafrost dynamics. Our results not only provide a detailed snapshot of the present-day configuration of permafrost, but they also expose previously unseen details about potential surface - groundwater connections and the thermal legacy of surface water features that has been recorded in the permafrost over the past ˜1,000 years. This work will be a critical baseline for future permafrost studies aimed at exploring the connections between hydrogeologic, climatic, and ecological processes, and has significant implications for the stewardship of Arctic environments.

  14. Airborne electromagnetic imaging of discontinuous permafrost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minsley, B.J.; Abraham, J.D.; Smith, B.D.; Cannia, J.C.; Voss, C.I.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Walvoord, M.A.; Wylie, B.K.; Anderson, L.; Ball, L.B.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Wellman, T.P.; Ager, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of permafrost in cold regions is inextricably connected to hydrogeologic processes, climate, and ecosystems. Permafrost thawing has been linked to changes in wetland and lake areas, alteration of the groundwater contribution to streamflow, carbon release, and increased fire frequency. But detailed knowledge about the dynamic state of permafrost in relation to surface and groundwater systems remains an enigma. Here, we present the results of a pioneering ∼1,800 line-kilometer airborne electromagnetic survey that shows sediments deposited over the past ∼4 million years and the configuration of permafrost to depths of ∼100 meters in the Yukon Flats area near Fort Yukon, Alaska. The Yukon Flats is near the boundary between continuous permafrost to the north and discontinuous permafrost to the south, making it an important location for examining permafrost dynamics. Our results not only provide a detailed snapshot of the present-day configuration of permafrost, but they also expose previously unseen details about potential surface – groundwater connections and the thermal legacy of surface water features that has been recorded in the permafrost over the past ∼1,000 years. This work will be a critical baseline for future permafrost studies aimed at exploring the connections between hydrogeologic, climatic, and ecological processes, and has significant implications for the stewardship of Arctic environments.

  15. Precipitation correction of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data using monitoring profiles: methodology and case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl, Andreas; Motschka, Klaus; Slapansky, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Variations of soil moisture content caused by precipitation often complicate the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data. This is particularly the case in repeated surveys designed to monitor the change of near surface abundances of radioactive elements or in large and time-consuming surveys. To counter this precipitation effect we propose a correction method based on repeated survey flights over a monitoring profile. Assuming that the weather and the soil conditions at the monitoring profile are representative for the survey area, the weather dependent effect of soil moisture can be observed and sufficiently corrected.

  16. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  17. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  18. A Simple Method for Collecting Airborne Pollen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Peter G.; DiGiovanni, Franco; Ho, Rong H.; Taki, Hisatomo; Ferguson, Kristyn A.; Pawlowski, Agata K.

    2006-01-01

    Pollination is a broad area of study within biology. For many plants, pollen carried by wind is required for successful seed set. Airborne pollen also affects human health. To foster studies of airborne pollen, we introduce a simple device--the "megastigma"--for collecting pollen from the air. This device is flexible, yielding easily obtained data…

  19. Global Test Range: Toward Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Freudinger, Larry; DelFrate John H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planned global sensor network that will monitor the Earth's climate, and resources using airborne sensor systems. The vision is an intelligent, affordable Earth Observation System. Global Test Range is a lab developing trustworthy services for airborne instruments - a specialized Internet Service Provider. There is discussion of several current and planned missions.

  20. Meeting Review: Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Huebert, Barry; Wilson, Chuck

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings from the Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop are presented. The two central topics of discussion were the role of aerosols in atmospheric processes and the difficulties in characterizing aerosols. The following topics were discussed during the working sessions: airborne observations to date; identification of inlet design issues; inlet modeling needs and directions; objectives for aircraft experiments; and future laboratory and wind tunnel studies.

  1. Airborne Relay-Based Regional Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuman; Noh, Hongjun; Lim, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based pseudolite systems have some limitations, such as low vertical accuracy, multipath effects and near-far problems. These problems are not significant in airborne-based pseudolite systems. However, the monitoring of pseudolite positions is required because of the mobility of the platforms on which the pseudolites are mounted, and this causes performance degradation. To address these pseudolite system limitations, we propose an airborne relay-based regional positioning system that consists of a master station, reference stations, airborne relays and a user. In the proposed system, navigation signals are generated from the reference stations located on the ground and are relayed via the airborne relays. Unlike in conventional airborne-based systems, the user in the proposed system sequentially estimates both the locations of airborne relays and his/her own position. Therefore, a delay due to monitoring does not occur, and the accuracy is not affected by the movement of airborne relays. We conducted several simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. Based on the simulation results, we demonstrated that the proposed system guarantees a higher accuracy than airborne-based pseudolite systems, and it is feasible despite the existence of clock offsets among reference stations. PMID:26029953

  2. Airborne Global Positioning System Antenna System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-14

    GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ANTENNA SYSTEM DISTRIBUTION: SMC/ GP (3 cys); AFFSA...standard that airborne Global Positioning System ( GPS ) antenna system must meet to be identified with the applicable MSO marking. The similarity of...UNCLASSIFIED DOCUMENT NO. DATE NO. MSO-C144 14 Oct 04 Initial Release REV: REV: SHEET 1 OF 16 TITLE: AIRBORNE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM

  3. Detecting Light Hydrocarbon Microseepages and related Intra-sedimentary Structures at the São Francisco Basin, Brazil, using Airborne Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curto, J. B.; Pires, A. C.; Silva, A.; Crosta, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    The use of indirect techniques for the detection of light hydrocarbons occurrences on the surface, named as microseepages, has been used to augment hydrocarbon exploration. Surveys developed for this type of application are normally targeted at mapping the effects that microseepages cause on the environment. In Brazil, most available airborne geophysical surveys were not appropriately designed for this type of application and, thus far they have been mostly used to define the main basin structural features. Existing microseepages are known in Remanso do Fogo area (Minas Gerais State, Brazil), located in São Francisco Basin, where the Quaternary sedimentary cover made the identification of new occurrences and associated controlling structures quite difficult. This study investigates the spatial distribution of hydrocarbon related structures in shallower to intra-sedimentary depths in the Remanso do Fogo area, using airborne magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry data. These data were managed by the ANP (Brazilian Petroleum National Agency) and conducted by Lasa Engineering & Surveys in 2006. In the study area, data were acquired along north-south flight lines spaced 500 m apart and along orthogonal tie lines flown 4 Km apart at a terrain clearance of 100 m. The geophysical data were processed using techniques developed to suppress the influence of regional geological signatures. For the magnetic data, this study focuses on the enhancement of intra-sedimentary structures and possible near surface accumulations of diagenetic magnetic minerals, provided by hydrocarbon related chemical reactions. The amplitude of the analytic signal, calculated with second order derivatives, combined with the total horizontal gradient of the subtraction between the 1200 and 400 meter upward continuations, illuminated the NW and EW magnetic lineaments, which are partially related to the microseepages and the drainage of the area. The distinction of near-surface and deeper signatures also

  4. Use of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry for environmental assessment of the rehabilitated nabarlek uranium mine, Australia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul; Tims, Stephen; McGill, Anthony; Ryan, Bruce; Pfitzner, Kirrilly

    2006-04-01

    This article describes an airborne gamma survey of a 7 x 5 km region around the rehabilitated Nabarlek uranium mine in northern Australia. An unusually tight line spacing (100 m) and low aircraft height (50 m) were used, enabling the survey to distinguish man-made structures such as ponds and accommodation areas, as well as creek lines. Positive correlations between airborne data and ground-based readings enabled an estimation of the average absorbed dose rate arising from terrestrial gamma radiation over large areas of the site to be derived. For the fenced minesite area this estimate was 0.31 micro Gy hr(- 1). The airborne survey data were found to be invaluable in helping to plan further ground-level investigations and showed promise as an assessment tool for rehabilitated minesites.

  5. ISMAR: an airborne submillimetre radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Stuart; Lee, Clare; Moyna, Brian; Philipp, Martin; Rule, Ian; Rogers, Stuart; King, Robert; Oldfield, Matthew; Rea, Simon; Henry, Manju; Wang, Hui; Chawn Harlow, R.

    2017-02-01

    The International Submillimetre Airborne Radiometer (ISMAR) has been developed as an airborne demonstrator for the Ice Cloud Imager (ICI) that will be launched on board the next generation of European polar-orbiting weather satellites in the 2020s. It currently has 15 channels at frequencies between 118 and 664 GHz which are sensitive to scattering by cloud ice, and additional channels at 874 GHz are being developed. This paper presents an overview of ISMAR and describes the algorithms used for calibration. The main sources of bias in the measurements are evaluated, as well as the radiometric sensitivity in different measurement scenarios. It is shown that for downward views from high altitude, representative of a satellite viewing geometry, the bias in most channels is less than ±1 K and the NEΔT is less than 2 K, with many channels having an NEΔT less than 1 K. In-flight calibration accuracy is also evaluated by comparison of high-altitude zenith views with radiative-transfer simulations.

  6. Electrochemical detection of magnetically-entrapped DNA sequences from complex samples by multiplexed enzymatic labelling: Application to a transgenic food/feed quantitative survey.

    PubMed

    Manzanares-Palenzuela, C L; Martín-Clemente, J P; Lobo-Castañón, M J; López-Ruiz, B

    2017-03-01

    Monitoring of genetically modified organisms in food and feed demands molecular techniques that deliver accurate quantitative results. Electrochemical DNA detection has been widely described in this field, yet most reports convey qualitative data and application in processed food and feed samples is limited. Herein, the applicability of an electrochemical multiplex assay for DNA quantification in complex samples is assessed. The method consists of the simultaneous magnetic entrapment via sandwich hybridisation of two DNA sequences (event-specific and taxon-specific) onto the surface of magnetic microparticles, followed by bienzymatic labelling. As proof-of-concept, we report its application in a transgenic food/feed survey where relative quantification (two-target approach) of Roundup Ready Soybean® (RRS) was performed in food and feed. Quantitative coupling to end-point PCR was performed and calibration was achieved from 22 and 243 DNA copies spanning two orders of magnitude for the event and taxon-specific sequences, respectively. We collected a total of 33 soybean-containing samples acquired in local supermarkets, four out of which were found to contain undeclared presence of genetically modified soybean. A real-time PCR method was used to verify these findings. High correlation was found between results, indicating the suitability of the proposed multiplex method for food and feed monitoring.

  7. Assessment of NASA airborne laser altimetry data using ground-based GPS data near Summit Station, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Hawley, Robert L.; Lutz, Eric R.; Studinger, Michael; Sonntag, John G.; Hofton, Michelle A.; Andrews, Lauren C.; Neumann, Thomas A.

    2017-03-01

    A series of NASA airborne lidars have been used in support of satellite laser altimetry missions. These airborne laser altimeters have been deployed for satellite instrument development, for spaceborne data validation, and to bridge the data gap between satellite missions. We used data from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys of an 11 km long track near Summit Station, Greenland, to assess the surface-elevation bias and measurement precision of three airborne laser altimeters including the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS), and the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL). Ground-based GPS data from the monthly ground-based traverses, which commenced in 2006, allowed for the assessment of nine airborne lidar surveys associated with ATM and LVIS between 2007 and 2016. Surface-elevation biases for these altimeters - over the flat, ice-sheet interior - are less than 0.12 m, while assessments of measurement precision are 0.09 m or better. Ground-based GPS positions determined both with and without differential post-processing techniques provided internally consistent solutions. Results from the analyses of ground-based and airborne data provide validation strategy guidance for the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) elevation and elevation-change data products.

  8. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-jin; Jung, Jungkyo; Kang, Ki-mook; Kim, Seung Hee; Xu, Zhen; Hensley, Scott; Swan, Aaron; Duersch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge. PMID:26437413

  9. Application of airborne infrared technology to monitor building heat loss. [Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, F. J.; Sampson, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The application of airborne infrared technology to the requirements for energy conservation in buildings was studied. Quantitative airborne data of the City of Ypsilanti, Michigan, were collected and processed to identify roof temperatures. A thermal scanner was flown at an altitude of 1,200 feet with two thermal bands 8.2-9.3 micrometers and 10.4-12.5 micrometers recorded by an analog system. Calibration was achieved by standard hot and cold plates. Using a thermal model to interpret ceiling insulation status, environmental factors were found to influence the relation between roof temperature and insulation. These include interior and sky temperatures, roofing materials, and the pitch and orientation of the roof. A follow-up mail survey established the ability to identify insulated and uninsulated houses from the airborne infrared data.

  10. Conventional and synthetic aperture processing for airborne ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert M.; Simkins, William L.; Brown, Russell D.

    1994-07-01

    For the past four years Airborne Environmental Surveys, a division of Era Aviation, Inc., has used unique and patented airborne frequency modulated, continuous wave radars and processes for detection and mapping subsurface phenomena. Primary application has focused on the detection of manmade objects in landfills, hazardous waste sites (some of which contain unexploded ordnance), and subsurface plumes of refined free- floating hydrocarbons. Recently, MSB Technologies, Inc. has developed a form of synthetic aperture radar processing, called GPSAR, that is tailored especially for the AES radars. Used as an adjunct to more conventional airborne ground-penetrating radar data processing techniques, GPSAR takes advantage of the radars' coherent transmission and produces imagery that is better focused and more accurate in determining an object's range and true depth. This paper describes the iterative stages of data processing and analysis used with the radars and shows the added advantages that GPSAR processing offers.

  11. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-jin; Jung, Jungkyo; Kang, Ki-mook; Kim, Seung Hee; Xu, Zhen; Hensley, Scott; Swan, Aaron; Duersch, Michael

    2015-09-30

    Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge.

  12. LAN MAP: An Innovative Airborne Light at Night Mapping Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, Eric R.; Craine, B. L.; Craine, E. M.; Craine, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread installation of inefficient and misdirected artificial light at night (LAN) has led to increasing concerns about light pollution and its impact, not only on astronomical facilities but larger communities as well. Light pollution impacts scientific research, environmental ecosystems, human health, and quality of life. In recent years, the public policy response to light pollution has included formulation of government codes to regulate lighting design and installation. Various environmental groups now include light pollution among their rallying themes to protest both specific and general developments. The latter efforts are often conducted in the absence of any quantitative data and are frequently charged by emotion rather than reason. To bring some scientific objectivity, and quantitative data, to these discussions, we have developed a suite of tools for simultaneous photometric measurements and temporal monitoring of both local communities and the sky overhead. We have also developed novel protocols for the use of these tools, including a triad of airborne, ground mobile, and ground static photometric surveys. We present a summary of these tools and protocols, with special emphasis on the airborne systems, and discuss baseline and follow-up measurements of LAN environments in the vicinity of numerous observatories in Arizona, the home of the initial LAN MAP surveys.

  13. Evaluation of airborne topographic lidar for quantifying beach changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2003-01-01

    A scanning airborne topographic lidar was evaluated for its ability to quantify beach topography and changes during the Sandy Duck experiment in 1997 along the North Carolina coast. Elevation estimates, acquired with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), were compared to elevations measured with three types of ground-based mea- surements-1) differential GPS equipped all-terrain vehicle (ATV) that surveyed a 3-km reach of beach from the shoreline to the dune, 2) GPS antenna mounted on a stadia rod used to intensely survey a different 100 m reach of beach, and 3) a second GPS-equipped ATV that surveyed a 70-km-long transect along the coast. Over 40,000 individual intercomparisons between ATM and ground surveys were calculated. RMS vertical differences associated with the ATM when compared to ground measurements ranged from 13 to 19 cm. Considering all of the intercomparisons together, RMS ≃15 cm. This RMS error represents a total error for individual elevation estimates including uncertainties associated with random and mean errors. The latter was the largest source of error and was attributed to drift in differential GPS. The ≃15cm vertical accuracy of the ATM is adequate to resolve beach-change signals typical of the impact of storms. For example, ATM surveys of Assateague Island (spanning the border of MD and VA) prior to and immediately following a severe northeaster showed vertical beach changes in places greater than 2 m, much greater than expected errors associated with the ATM. A major asset of airborne lidar is the high spatial data density. Measurements of elevation are acquired every few m2 over regional scales of hundreds of kilometers. Hence, many scales of beach morphology and change can be resolved, from beach cusps tens of meters in wavelength to entire coastal cells com- prising tens to hundreds of kilometers of coast. Topographic lidars similar to the ATM are becoming increasingly available from commercial vendors and should, in the future

  14. Detection of airborne Legionella while showering using liquid impingement and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Deloge-Abarkan, Magali; Ha, Thi-Lan; Robine, Enric; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Mathieu, Laurence

    2007-01-01

    Aerosols of water contaminated with Legionella bacteria constitute the only mode of exposure for humans. However, the prevention strategy against this pathogenic bacteria risk is managed through the survey of water contamination. No relationship linked the Legionella bacteria water concentration and their airborne abundance. Therefore, new approaches in the field of the metrological aspects of Legionella bioaerosols are required. This study was aimed at testing the main principles for bioaerosol collection (solid impaction, liquid impingement and filtration) and the in situ hybridization (FISH) method, both in laboratory and field assays, with the intention of applying such methodologies for airborne Legionella bacteria detection while showering. An aerosolization chamber was developed to generate controlled and reproducible L. pneumophila aerosols. This tool allowed the identification of the liquid impingement method as the most appropriate one for collecting airborne Legionella bacteria. The culturable fraction of airborne L. pneumophila recovered with the liquid impingement principle was 4 and 700 times higher compared to the impaction and filtration techniques, respectively. Moreover, the concentrations of airborne L. pneumophila in the impinger fluid were on average 7.0 x 10(5) FISH-cells m(-3) air with the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method versus 9.0 x 10(4) CFU m(-3) air with the culture method. These results, recorded under well-controlled conditions, were confirmed during the field experiments performed on aerosols generated by hot water showers in health institutions. This new approach may provide a more accurate characterization of aerobiocontamination by Legionella bacteria.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MiMeS survey of magnetism in massive stars (Wade+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Grunhut, J. H.; Petit, V.; de Batz, B.; Bohlender, D. A.; Cohen, D. H.; Henrichs, H. F.; Kochukhov, O.; Landstreet, J. D.; Manset, N.; Martins, F.; Mathis, S.; Oksala, M. E.; Owocki, S. P.; Rivinius, T.; Shultz, M. E.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Ud-Doula, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Braithwaite, J.; Briquet, M.; Carciofi, A. C.; David-Uraz, A.; Folsom, C. P.; Fullerton, A. W.; Leroy, B.; Marcolino, W. L. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Naze, Y.; St, Louis N.; Auriere, M.; Bagnulo, S.; Bailey, J. D.; Barba, R. H.; Blazere, A.; Bohm, T.; Catala, C.; Donati, J.-F.; Ferrario, L.; Harrington, D.; Howarth, I. D.; Ignace, R.; Kaper, L.; Luftinger, T.; Prinja, R.; Vink, J. S.; Weiss, W. W.; Yakunin, I.

    2016-08-01

    To initiate the observational component of the MiMeS project, the collaboration was awarded a 640 hour Large Program (LP) with ESPaDOnS. This award was followed by LP allocations with Narval (137 nights, or 1213 hours), and with HARPSpol (30 nights , or 280 hours). The TC sample (summarized in Table 4) consists of stars that were established or suspected to be magnetic at the beginning of the project. The majority of these stars are confirmed period ic variables with periods ranging from approximately 1 d to 1.5 years, with the majority having a period of less than 10 days so that they are suitable candidates for observational monitoring and mapping. (1 data file).

  16. Airborne thermography or infrared remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Goillot, C C

    1975-01-01

    Airborne thermography is part of the more general remote sensing activity. The instruments suitable for image display are infrared line scanners. A great deal of interest has developed during the past 10 years in airborne thermal remote sensing and many applications are in progress. Infrared scanners on board a satellite are used for observation of cloud cover; airborne infrared scanners are used for forest fire detection, heat budget of soils, detecting insect attack, diseases, air pollution damage, water stress, salinity stress on vegetation, only to cite some main applications relevant to agronomy. Using this system it has become possible to get a 'picture' of our thermal environment.

  17. Airborne remote sensing of forest biomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne sensor data of forest biomes obtained using an SAR, a laser profiler, an IR MSS, and a TM simulator are presented and examined. The SAR was utilized to investigate forest canopy structures in Mississippi and Costa Rica; the IR MSS measured forest canopy temperatures in Oregon and Puerto Rico; the TM simulator was employed in a tropical forest in Puerto Rico; and the laser profiler studied forest canopy characteristics in Costa Rica. The advantages and disadvantages of airborne systems are discussed. It is noted that the airborne sensors provide measurements applicable to forest monitoring programs.

  18. Airborne microwave radiometric imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Futang; Zhang, Zuyin

    1999-09-01

    A dual channel Airborne Microwave Radiometric Imaging system (AMRI) was designed and constructed for regional environment mapping. The system operates at 35GHz, which collects radiation at horizontal and vertical polarized channels. It runs at mechanical conical scanning with 45 degrees incidence angle. Two Cassegrain antennas with 1.5 degrees beamwidth scan the scene alternately and two pseudo- color images of two channels are displayed on the screen of PC in real time. Simultaneously, all parameters of flight and radiometric data are sorted in hard disk for post- processing. The sensitivity of the radiometer (Delta) T equals 0.16K. A new displaying method, unequal size element arc displaying method, is used in image displaying. Several experiments on mobile tower were carried out and the images demonstrate that the AMRI is available to work steadily and accurately.

  19. Airborne microwave radiometric imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Zhang, Zuyin; Chen, Zhengwen

    1998-08-01

    A dual channel Airborne Microwave Radiometric Imaging system (AMRI) was designed and constructed for regional environment mapping. The system operates at 35GHz, which collects radiation at horizontal and vertical polarized. It runs at mechanical conical scanning with 45 degrees incidence angle. Two Cassegrain antennas with 1.5 degrees 3 dB beamwidth scan the scene alternately and two pseudo-color images of two channels are displayed on the screen of PC in real time. Simultaneously all parameters of flight and radiometric data are stored in hard disk for postprocessing. The sensitivity of the radiometers of flight and radiometric data are stored in hard disk for postprocessing. The sensitivity of the radiometers (Delta) T equals 0.16K. A new display method, unequal size element arc displaying method, is used in image displaying. Several experiments on mobile tower were carried out and the images demonstrate the AMRI is available to work steadily and accurately.

  20. Integration and analysis of airborne geophysical data of the Darrehzar area, Kerman Province, Iran, using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, H.; Hassanzadeh, H.; Torabi, M.; Ilaghi, O.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the integrated interpretation of airborne magnetic and airborne γ-ray spectrometer data. The Darrehzar porphyry copper deposit is situated in the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic assemblage of Central Iran. Phyllic and propylitic alterations are pervasive in the area but potassic and argillic alterations are not readily recognized on the surface. The spatial distributions of geophysical data resemble the lithological and alteration patterns in the area. The Darrehzar porphyry copper deposit is considered as a control site for determination of the degrees that the geophysical data is correlated with the mineralization zone. Airborne magnetic/radiometric, and geochemical/alteration data sets have been integrated and analyzed using principal component analysis. This technique is found to be useful for the delineation of hydrothermally altered areas and data compression.

  1. Second International Airborne Remote Sensing Conference and Exhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The conference provided four days of displays and scientific presentations on applications, technology, a science of sub-orbital data gathering and analysis. The twelve displayed aircraft equipped with sophisticated instrumentation represented a wide range of environmental and reconnaissance missions,including marine pollution control, fire detection, Open Skies Treaty verification, thermal mapping, hydrographical measurements, military research, ecological and agricultural observations, geophysical research, atmospheric and meterological observations, and aerial photography. The U.S. Air Force and the On-Site Inspection Agency displayed the new Open Skies Treaty verification Boeing OC 135B that promotes international monitoring of military forces and activities. SRl's Jetstream uses foliage and ground penetrating SAR for forest inventories, toxic waste delineation, and concealed target and buried unexploded ordnance detection. Earth Search Sciences's Gulfstream 1 with prototype miniaturized airborne hyperspectral imaging equipment specializes in accurate mineral differentiation, low-cost hydrocarbon exploration, and nonproliferation applications. John E. Chance and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers displayed the Bell 2 helicopter with SHOALS that performs hydrographic surveying of navigation projects, coastal environment assessment, and nautical charting surveys. Bechtel Nevada and U.S. DOE displayed both the Beech King AIR B-200 platform equipped to provide first response to nuclear accidents and routine environmental surveillance, and the MBB BO-105 helicopter used in spectral analysis for environmental assessment and military appraisal. NASA Ames Research Center's high-altitude Lockheed ER-2 assists in earth resources monitoring research in atmospheric chemistry, oceanography, and electronic sensors; ozone and greenhouse studies and satellite calibration and data validation. Ames also showcased the Learjet 24 Airborne Observatory that completed missions in Venus

  2. The potential of repeat airborne lidar for the analysis of geomorphic process dynamics in mountain terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailer, R.; Bollmann, E.; Ebe, V.; Girstmair, A.; Klug, C.; Rieg, L.; Spross, M.; Stötter, J.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne lidar offers a wide range of applications in mountain geomorphology. While non-recurring lidar surveys provide base information on topography and surface characteristics, repeat airborne lidar datasets allow analysing processes and quantifying respective changes. At the Institute of Geography, University of Innsbruck, Austria, unique datasets with varying repeat cycles and spatial captures are available. Due to the high spatial resolution and accuracy these datasets facilitate not only the detection but also the quantification of geomorphic processes over large and often inaccessible mountainous regions. Hence, the focus of this study lies on the ability of airborne lidar data for the quantification of rock falls, debris flows and land slides as well as on permafrost related surface phenomena. Annual lidar surveys of the Rofental area (Ötztal, Tyrol; 32 km^2) started in 2001 aiming at the generation of geodetic mass balances of Hintereisferner and Kesselwandferner, two of the best investigated glaciers worldwide. Due to its high vertical accuracy (0.05 m on slopes <40°), these data allow inter-annual analyses of dead ice melting and permafrost degradation as well as rock falls and fluvial processes in the non-glaciated area. Even processes with very small changing rates of less than 0.10 m per year can be quantified on the basis of these multi-temporal airborne lidar datasets. In a larger area of the Tyrolean Central Alps (750 km^2), a bi-temporal lidar survey (2006 and 2010) allowed the detection and analysis of 189 gravitational events (rock falls, debris flows, land slides) affecting an area larger than 100 m^2. It has to be emphasized that the majority of these processes occurred in areas where permafrost conditions are likely. Regarding their permafrost content and thus their activity, the more than 400 rock glaciers in this area can be attributed with an activity index derived from this airborne lidar dataset, using both volumetric changes and

  3. Helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic surveys at Mounts Adams, Baker and Rainier, Washington: implications for debris flow hazards and volcano hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Carol A.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria

    2011-01-01

    High‐resolution helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic (HEM) data flown over the rugged, ice‐covered Mt. Adams, Mt. Baker and Mt. Rainier volcanoes (Washington), reveal the distribution of alteration, water and ice thickness essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards. These data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of appreciable thicknesses (>500 m) of water‐saturated hydrothermally altered rock west of the modern summit of Mount Rainier in the Sunset Amphitheater region and in the central core of Mount Adams north of the summit. Alteration at Mount Baker is restricted to thinner (<300 m) zones beneath Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumarole Fields. The EM data identified water‐saturated rocks from the surface to the detection limit (100–200 m) in discreet zones at Mt. Rainier and Mt Adams and over the entire summit region at Mt. Baker. The best estimates for ice thickness are obtained over relatively low resistivity (<800 ohm‐m) ground for the main ice cap on Mt. Adams and over most of the summit of Mt. Baker. The modeled distribution of alteration, pore fluids and partial ice volumes on the volcanoes helps identify likely sources for future alteration‐related debris flows, including the Sunset Amphitheater region at Mt. Rainier, steep cliffs at the western edge of the central altered zone at Mount Adams and eastern flanks of Mt. Baker.

  4. THE CHANDRA X-RAY SURVEY OF PLANETARY NEBULAE (CHANPLANS): PROBING BINARITY, MAGNETIC FIELDS, AND WIND COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, J. H.; Montez, R. Jr.; Rapson, V.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Frank, A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Guerrero, M. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Behar, E.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; Sandin, C. E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.il; and others

    2012-08-15

    We present an overview of the initial results from the Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first systematic (volume-limited) Chandra X-Ray Observatory survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. The first phase of CHANPLANS targeted 21 mostly high-excitation PNe within {approx}1.5 kpc of Earth, yielding four detections of diffuse X-ray emission and nine detections of X-ray-luminous point sources at the central stars (CSPNe) of these objects. Combining these results with those obtained from Chandra archival data for all (14) other PNe within {approx}1.5 kpc that have been observed to date, we find an overall X-ray detection rate of {approx}70% for the 35 sample objects. Roughly 50% of the PNe observed by Chandra harbor X-ray-luminous CSPNe, while soft, diffuse X-ray emission tracing shocks-in most cases, 'hot bubbles'-formed by energetic wind collisions is detected in {approx}30%; five objects display both diffuse and point-like emission components. The presence (or absence) of X-ray sources appears correlated with PN density structure, in that molecule-poor, elliptical nebulae are more likely to display X-ray emission (either point-like or diffuse) than molecule-rich, bipolar, or Ring-like nebulae. All but one of the point-like CSPNe X-ray sources display X-ray spectra that are harder than expected from hot ({approx}100 kK) central stars emitting as simple blackbodies; the lone apparent exception is the central star of the Dumbbell nebula, NGC 6853. These hard X-ray excesses may suggest a high frequency of binary companions to CSPNe. Other potential explanations include self-shocking winds or PN mass fallback. Most PNe detected as diffuse X-ray sources are elliptical nebulae that display a nested shell/halo structure and bright ansae; the diffuse X-ray emission regions are confined within inner, sharp-rimmed shells. All sample PNe that display diffuse X-ray emission have inner shell dynamical ages {approx}< 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup

  5. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  6. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-01

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of 137Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  7. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-07

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  8. SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE PAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposures to airborne particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in several populations in the US, Japan, and Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors, developed for human exposure biomonitoring studies were used to collect fine particles (<_ 1....

  9. Toolsets for Airborne Data Web Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-17

    ... relevant issues. Features Include Select data based on mission, date and/or scientific parameter Output original data ... Details:  Toolsets for Airborne Data (TAD) Web Application Category:  Instrument Specific Search, ...

  10. Airborne Lidar Point Cloud Density Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, P. T.; Huang, C.-M.

    2006-12-01

    Airborne lidar is useful for collecting a large volume and high density of points with three dimensional coordinates. Among these points are terrain points, as well as those points located aboveground. For DEM production, the density of the terrain points is an important quality index. While the penetration rate of laser points is dependent on the surface type characteristics, there are also different ways to present the point density. Namely, the point density could be measured by subdividing the surveyed area into cells, then computing the ratio of the number of points in each respective cell to its area. In this case, there will be one density value for each cell. The other method is to construct the TIN, and count the number of triangles in the cell, divided by the area of the cell. Aside from counting the number of triangles, the area of the largest, or the 95% ranking, triangle, could be used as an index as well. The TIN could also be replaced by Voronoi diagrams (Thiessen Polygon), and a polygon with even density could be derived from human interpretation. The nature of these indices is discussed later in this research paper. Examples of different land cover types: bare earth, built-up, low vegetation, low density forest, and high density forest; are extracted from point clouds collected in 2005 by ITRI under a contract from the Ministry of the Interior. It is found that all these indices are capable of reflecting the differences of the land cover type. However, further investigation is necessary to determine which the most descriptive one is.

  11. Polarimetric sensor systems for airborne ISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David; Foster, Joseph; Pezzaniti, Joseph; Harchanko, John; Aycock, Todd; Clark, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Over the last decade, polarimetric imaging technologies have undergone significant advancements that have led to the development of small, low-power polarimetric cameras capable of meeting current airborne ISR mission requirements. In this paper, we describe the design and development of a compact, real-time, infrared imaging polarimeter, provide preliminary results demonstrating the enhanced contrast possible with such a system, and discuss ways in which this technology can be integrated with existing manned and unmanned airborne platforms.

  12. Downscaling of Airborne Wind Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechner, Uwe; Schmehl, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Airborne wind energy systems provide a novel solution to harvest wind energy from altitudes that cannot be reached by wind turbines with a similar nominal generator power. The use of a lightweight but strong tether in place of an expensive tower provides an additional cost advantage, next to the higher capacity factor and much lower total mass. This paper investigates the scaling effects of airborne wind energy systems. The energy yield of airborne wind energy systems, that work in pumping mode of operation is at least ten times higher than the energy yield of conventional solar systems. For airborne wind energy systems the yield is defined per square meter wing area. In this paper the dependency of the energy yield on the nominal generator power for systems in the range of 1 kW to 1 MW is investigated. For the onshore location Cabauw, The Netherlands, it is shown, that a generator of just 1.4 kW nominal power and a total system mass of less than 30 kg has the theoretical potential to harvest energy at only twice the price per kWh of large scale airborne wind energy systems. This would make airborne wind energy systems a very attractive choice for small scale remote and mobile applications as soon as the remaining challenges for commercialization are solved.

  13. Challenges and opportunities of airborne metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles.

  14. Challenges and Opportunities of Airborne Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and o