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Sample records for airborne multiangle spectropolarimetric

  1. Automated Data Production For A Novel Airborne Multiangle Spectropolarimetric Imager (AIRMSPI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovanovic, V .M.; Bull, M.; Diner, D. J.; Geier, S.; Rheingans, B.

    2012-01-01

    A novel polarimetric imaging technique making use of rapid retardance modulation has been developed by JPL as a part of NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. It has been built into the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) under NASA's Airborne Instrument Technology Transition Program, and is aimed primarily at remote sensing of the amounts and microphysical properties of aerosols and clouds. AirMSPI includes an 8-band (355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, 865, 935 nm) pushbroom camera that measures polarization in a subset of the bands (470, 660, and 865 nm). The camera is mounted on a gimbal and acquires imagery in a configurable set of along-track viewing angles ranging between +67 deg and -67 deg relative to nadir. As a result, near simultaneous multi-angle, multi-spectral, and polarimetric measurements of the targeted areas at a spatial resolution ranging from 7 m to 20 m (depending on the viewing angle) can be derived. An automated data production system is being built to support high data acquisition rate in concert with co-registration and orthorectified mapping requirements. To date, a number of successful engineering checkout flights were conducted in October 2010, August-September 2011, and January 2012. Data products resulting from these flights will be presented.

  2. On-board Polarimetric Calibration of Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Harten, G.; Diner, D. J.; Bull, M. A.; Tkatcheva, I. N.; Jovanovic, V. M.; Seidel, F. C.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Davis, A. B.; Rheingans, B. E.; Chipman, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) aims at characterizing atmospheric aerosols and clouds using highly accurate imaging polarimetry. The instrument is deployed regularly onboard the NASA ER2 high-altitude aircraft, which is an ideal testbed for satellite remote sensing. Flying at 20 km altitude, AirMSPI's pushbroom camera typically provides 11×11 km images at 10 m resolution. The target is observed from multiple along-track angles within ±67° using a gimbal mount. Eight spectral bands within 355-935 nm are recorded simultaneously in different detector rows, 3 of which also measure linear polarization: 470, 660 and 865 nm. Photoelastic modulators (PEMs) encode the polarized and total intensities in each polarimetric pixel as the amplitude and offset of a wavelike intensity pattern, such that the ratio of the two is insensitive to pixel-to-pixel differences. This enables an accuracy in the degree of linear polarization of ~0.001, as measured in the lab. To maintain this accuracy in-flight, an optical probe continuously monitors the PEMs' retardances and controls their driving signals. Before and after observing a target, the instrument also observes a validator, which is an extended, polarized light source, located inside the instrument housing. These data are now incorporated in the data processing pipeline to further improve the calibration of the modulation functions. Highly polarized pixels in Earth data are utilized to transfer the validator results to meet the illumination in Earth scenes, as well as to make fine adjustments at higher temporal resolution. The reprocessed polarization products for the PODEX campaign show significant improvements when intercompared with the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP, Goddard Institute for Space Studies). We currently evaluate the impact of the on-board polarimetric calibration on aerosol retrievals, and compare against AERONET reference measurements.

  3. FlySPEX: a flexible multi-angle spectropolarimetric sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snik, Frans; Keller, Christoph U.; Wijnen, Merijn; Peters, Hubert; Derks, Roy; Smulders, Edwin

    2016-05-01

    Accurate multi-angle spectropolarimetry permits the detailed and unambiguous characterization of a wide range of objects. Science cases and commercial applications include atmospheric aerosol studies, biomedical sensing, and food quality control. We introduce the FlySPEX spectropolarimetric fiber-head that constitutes the essential building block of a novel multi-angle sensing system. A combination of miniaturized standard polarization optics inside every fiber-head encodes the full linear polarization information as a spectral modulation of the light that enters two regular optical fibers. By orienting many FlySPEX fiber-heads in any desired set of directions, a fiber bundle contains the complete instantaneous information on polarization as a function of wavelength and as a function of the set of viewing directions. This information is to be recorded by one or several multi-fiber spectrometers. Not only is this system flexible in the amount of viewing directions and their configuration, it also permits multiplexing different wavelength ranges and spectral resolutions by implementing different spectrometers. We present the design and prototyping for a FlySPEX fiber-head that is optimized for both polarimetric accuracy and commercial series production. We integrate the polarimetric calibration of each FlySPEX fiber-head in the manufacturing process.

  4. FPGA Coprocessor Design for an Onboard Multi-Angle Spectro-Polarimetric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Werne, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    A multi-angle spectro-polarimetric imager (MSPI) is an advanced camera system currently under development at JPL for possible future consideration on a satellite-based Aerosol-Cloud-Environ - ment (ACE) interaction study. The light in the optical system is subjected to a complex modulation designed to make the overall system robust against many instrumental artifacts that have plagued such measurements in the past. This scheme involves two photoelastic modulators that are beating in a carefully selected pattern against each other. In order to properly sample this modulation pattern, each of the proposed nine cameras in the system needs to read out its imager array about 1,000 times per second. The onboard processing required to compress this data involves least-squares fits (LSFs) of Bessel functions to data from every pixel in realtime, thus requiring an onboard computing system with advanced data processing capabilities in excess of those commonly available for space flight. As a potential solution to meet the MSPI onboard processing requirements, an LSF algorithm was developed on the Xilinx Virtex-4FX60 field programmable gate array (FPGA). In addition to configurable hardware capability, this FPGA includes Power -PC405 microprocessors, which together enable a combination hardware/ software processing system. A laboratory demonstration was carried out based on a hardware/ software co-designed processing architecture that includes hardware-based data collection and least-squares fitting (computationally), and softwarebased transcendental function computation (algorithmically complex) on the FPGA. Initial results showed that these calculations can be handled using a combination of the Virtex- 4TM Power-PC core and the hardware fabric.

  5. Airborne system for multispectral, multiangle polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Jeffrey H; Korwan, Daniel R; Montes, Marcos J; Gray, Deric J; Gillis, David B; Lamela, Gia M; Miller, W David

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication, calibration, and deployment of an airborne multispectral polarimetric imager. The motivation for the development of this instrument was to explore its ability to provide information about water constituents, such as particle size and type. The instrument is based on four 16 MP cameras and uses wire grid polarizers (aligned at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°) to provide the separation of the polarization states. A five-position filter wheel provides for four narrow-band spectral filters (435, 550, 625, and 750 nm) and one blocked position for dark-level measurements. When flown, the instrument is mounted on a programmable stage that provides control of the view angles. View angles that range to ±65° from the nadir have been used. Data processing provides a measure of the polarimetric signature as a function of both the view zenith and view azimuth angles. As a validation of our initial results, we compare our measurements, over water, with the output of a Monte Carlo code, both of which show neutral points off the principle plane. The locations of the calculated and measured neutral points are compared. The random error level in the measured degree of linear polarization (8% at 435) is shown to be better than 0.25%.

  6. Spectral invariance hypothesis study of polarized reflectance with Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Christine L.; Kupinski, Meredith; Diner, David J.; Xu, Feng; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-09-01

    Many models used to represent the boundary condition for the separation of atmospheric scattering from the surface reflectance in polarized remote sensing measurements assume that the polarized surface reflectance is spectrally neutral. The Spectral Invariance Hypothesis asserts that the magnitude and shape of the polarized bidirectional reflectance factor (pBRF) is equal for all wavelengths. In order to test this hypothesis, JPL's Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI) is used to measure polarization information of different outdoor surface types. GroundMSPI measures the linear polarization Stokes parameters (I, Q, U), at three wavelengths, 470 nm, 660 nm, and 865 nm. The camera is mounted on a two-axis gimbal to accurately select the view azimuth and elevation directions. On clear sky days we acquired day-long scans of scenes that contain various surface types such as grass, dirt, cement, brick, and asphalt and placed a Spectralon panel in the camera field of view to provide a reflectance reference. Over the course of each day, changing solar position in the sky provides a large range of scattering angles for this study. The polarized bidirectional reflectance factor (pBRF) is measured for the three wavelengths and the best fit slope of the spectral correlation is reported. This work reports the range of best fit slopes measured for five region types.

  7. Space-Based Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols: The Multi-Angle Spectro-Polarimetric Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Davis, A. B.; Cairns, B.; Dubovik, O.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Sano, I.; Mukai, S.; Rozanov, V. V.; Litvinov, P.; Lapyonok, T.; Martin, W.; Wasilewski, A.; Xu, F.; Natraj, V.

    2015-01-01

    The review of optical instrumentation, forward modeling, and inverse problem solution for the polarimetric aerosol remote sensing from space is presented. The special emphasis is given to the description of current airborne and satellite imaging polarimeters and also to modern satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms based on the measurements of the Stokes vector of reflected solar light as detected on a satellite. Various underlying surface reflectance models are discussed and evaluated.

  8. Aerosol Remote Sensing Applications for Airborne Multiangle, Multispectral Shortwave Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bismarck, Jonas; Ruhtz, Thomas; Starace, Marco; Hollstein, André; Preusker, René; Fischer, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol particles have an important impact on the surface net radiation budget by direct scattering and absorption (direct aerosol effect) of solar radiation, and also by influencing cloud formation processes (semi-direct and indirect aerosol effects). To study the former, a number of multispectral sky- and sunphotometers have been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Free University of Berlin in the past two decades. The latest operational developments were the multispectral aureole- and sunphotometer FUBISS-ASA2, the zenith radiometer FUBISS-ZENITH, and the nadir polarimeter AMSSP-EM, all designed for a flexible use on moving platforms like aircraft or ships. Currently the multiangle, multispectral radiometer URMS/AMSSP (Universal Radiation Measurement System/ Airborne Multispectral Sunphotometer and Polarimeter) is under construction for a Wing-Pod of the high altitude research aircraft HALO operated by DLR. The system is expected to have its first mission on HALO in 2011. The algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol and trace gas properties from the recorded multidirectional, multispectral radiation measurements allow more than deriving standard products, as for instance the aerosol optical depth and the Angstrom exponent. The radiation measured in the solar aureole contains information about the aerosol phasefunction and therefore allows conclusions about the particle type. Furthermore, airborne instrument operation allows vertically resolved measurements. An inversion algorithm, based on radiative transfer simulations and additionally including measured vertical zenith-radiance profiles, allows conclusions about the aerosol single scattering albedo and the relative soot fraction in aerosol layers. Ozone column retrieval is performed evaluating measurements from pixels in the Chappuis absorption band. A retrieval algorithm to derive the water-vapor column from the sunphotometer measurements is currently under development. Of the various airborne

  9. Looking back, looking forward: Scientific and technological advances in multiangle imaging of aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diner, David J.; Garay, Michael J.

    2017-02-01

    Passive optical multiangle observations enable retrieval of information about atmospheric structure than cannot be obtained with single-angle sensors. This paper highlights several applications to studies of aerosols and clouds, using data from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), currently in its 17th year in Earth orbit aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, and the airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI), which flies aboard NASA's ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The recently selected Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA), which will launch into Earth orbit early in the next decade, is also discussed.

  10. Joint aerosol and water-leaving radiance retrieval from Airborne Multi-angle SpectroPolarimeter Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Dubovik, O.; Zhai, P.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) [1] has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. In step-and-stare operation mode, AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° off the nadir. Its spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470*, 555, 660*, and 865* nm, where the asterisk denotes the polarimetric bands. In order to retrieve information from the AirMSPI observations, we developed a efficient and flexible retrieval code that can jointly retrieve aerosol and water leaving radiance simultaneously. The forward model employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) [2] and adding/doubling [3] radiative transfer method which is fully linearized and integrated with a multi-patch retrieval algorithm to obtain aerosol and water leaving radiance/Chl-a information. Various constraints are imposed to improve convergence and retrieval stability. We tested the aerosol and water leaving radiance retrievals using the AirMSPI radiance and polarization measurements by comparing to the retrieved aerosol concentration, size distribution, water-leaving radiance, and chlorophyll concentration to the values reported by the USC SeaPRISM AERONET-OC site off the coast of Southern California. In addition, the MC-based retrievals of aerosol properties were compared with GRASP ([4-5]) retrievals for selected cases. The MC-based retrieval approach was then used to systematically explore the benefits of AirMSPI's ultraviolet and polarimetric channels, the use of multiple view angles, and constraints provided by inclusion of bio-optical models of the water-leaving radiance. References [1]. D. J. Diner, et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech. 6, 1717 (2013). [2]. F. Xu et al. Opt. Lett. 36, 2083 (2011). [3]. J. E. Hansen and L.D. Travis. Space Sci. Rev. 16, 527 (1974). [4]. O. Dubovik et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 975 (2011). [5]. O. Dubovik et al. SPIE: Newsroom, DOI:10.1117/2.1201408.005558 (2014).

  11. Retrievals of Stratocumulus Drop Size Distributions from Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, Michael; Diner, David

    2013-04-01

    Data from the Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) satellite instruments have been used for many years to retrieve information about the mean and dispersion of cloud droplet size distributions. The position of specific features in scattering angle space corresponding to supernumerary bows in the polarized phase function are extremely sensitive to the effective radius of the cloud droplets, while the amplitude of these features carries information on the dispersion of droplet sizes. Due to the relatively coarse angular sampling of POLDER multiangular views (~10°), variations in scattering angle from pixel to pixel are used instead to obtain fine sampling in angle, which requires the clouds to be homogeneous on scales of 150 km × 150 km in the POLDER retrievals. We will describe high-resolution polarimetric observations of marine stratocumulus clouds made off the coast of California by the AirMSPI instrument, which files on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude research aircraft. AirMSPI is an eight-band pushbroom camera mounted on a controllable gimbal, which allows the instrument to make observations over a ±67° range in the direction of aircraft motion. AirMSPI's eight spectral bands are 355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, 865, and 935 nm in the ultraviolet to the near-infrared range. Polarimetric observations are made in the 470, 660, and 865 nm bands using photoelastic modulators (PEMs) to rapidly vary the orientation of the linearly polarized component (Stokes Q and U) of the incoming light, enabling measurement of the relative ratios of these parameters to intensity from individual pixels. From the nominal 20 km altitude of the aircraft, AirMSPI can provide imagery mapped to a 25 m grid using a sweep scanning strategy in which the gimbal controlling the pointing of the instrument is slewed back and forth along the direction of aircraft motion. The AirMSPI observations of the polarimetric features of marine stratocumulus clouds have been used to derive cloud droplet effective radius and effective variance using a single scattering approach pioneered by the POLDER team. By focusing on observations made near the principal plane, measurements of Q at the three AirMSPI wavelengths were used to determine an effective polarized phase function, which was then compared with Mie theory calculations for a cloud composed of spherical droplets with a narrow size distribution. These results show that AirMSPI is capable of extremely sensitive retrievals of the cloud drop size distribution for marine stratocumulus clouds. Even small adjustments to the refractive index of liquid water at the AirMSPI wavelengths results in noticeable changes in the location the modeled polarimetric features.

  12. What We are Learning about Airborne Particles from MISR Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    The NASA Earth Observing System’s Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument has been collecting global observations in 36 angular-spectral channels about once per week for over 14 years. Regarding airborne particles, MISR is contributing in three broad areas: (1) aerosol optical depth (AOD), especially over land surface, including bright desert, (2) wildfire smoke, desert dust, and volcanic ash injection and near-source plume height, and (3) aerosol type, the aggregate of qualitative constraints on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA). Early advances in the retrieval of these quantities focused on AOD, for which surface-based sun photometers provided a global network of ground truth, and plume height, for which ground-based and airborne lidar offered near-coincident validation data. MSIR monthly, global AOD products contributed directly to the advances in modeling aerosol impacts on climate made between the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) third and fourth assessment reports. MISR stereo-derived plume heights are now being used to constrain source inventories for the AeroCom aerosol-climate modeling effort. The remaining challenge for the MISR aerosol effort is to refine and validate our global aerosol type product. Unlike AOD and plume height, aerosol type as retrieved by MISR is a qualitative classification derived from multi-dimensional constraints, so evaluation must be done on a categorical basis. Coincident aerosol type validation data are far less common than for AOD, and, except for rare Golden Days during aircraft field campaigns, amount to remote sensing retrievals from suborbital instruments having uncertainties comparable to those from the MISR product itself. And satellite remote sensing retrievals of aerosol type are much more sensitive to scene conditions such as surface variability and AOD than either AOD or plume height. MISR aerosol type retrieval capability and information content have been

  13. Satellite Multiangle Spectropolarimetric Imaging of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David; Macenka, Steven; Scherr, Lawrence; Seshadri, Suresh; Chipman, Russell; Keller, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    A proposed remote-sensing instrument, to be carried aboard a spacecraft in orbit around the Earth, would gather data on the spatial distribution and radiative characteristics of tropospheric aerosols. These data are needed for better understanding of the natural and anthropogenic origins of aerosols, and of the effects of aerosols on climate and atmospheric chemistry.

  14. Reconstruction of 3D Shapes of Opaque Cumulus Clouds from Airborne Multiangle Imaging: A Proof-of-Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. B.; Bal, G.; Chen, J.

    2015-12-01

    Operational remote sensing of microphysical and optical cloud properties is invariably predicated on the assumption of plane-parallel slab geometry for the targeted cloud. The sole benefit of this often-questionable assumption about the cloud is that it leads to one-dimensional (1D) radiative transfer (RT)---a textbook, computationally tractable model. We present new results as evidence that, thanks to converging advances in 3D RT, inverse problem theory, algorithm implementation, and computer hardware, we are at the dawn of a new era in cloud remote sensing where we can finally go beyond the plane-parallel paradigm. Granted, the plane-parallel/1D RT assumption is reasonable for spatially extended stratiform cloud layers, as well as the smoothly distributed background aerosol layers. However, these 1D RT-friendly scenarios exclude cases that are critically important for climate physics. 1D RT---whence operational cloud remote sensing---fails catastrophically for cumuliform clouds that have fully 3D outer shapes and internal structures driven by shallow or deep convection. For these situations, the first order of business in a robust characterization by remote sensing is to abandon the slab geometry framework and determine the 3D geometry of the cloud, as a first step toward bone fide 3D cloud tomography. With this specific goal in mind, we deliver a proof-of-concept for an entirely new kind of remote sensing applicable to 3D clouds. It is based on highly simplified 3D RT and exploits multi-angular suites of cloud images at high spatial resolution. Airborne sensors like AirMSPI readily acquire such data. The key element of the reconstruction algorithm is a sophisticated solution of the nonlinear inverse problem via linearization of the forward model and an iteration scheme supported, where necessary, by adaptive regularization. Currently, the demo uses a 2D setting to show how either vertical profiles or horizontal slices of the cloud can be accurately reconstructed

  15. Evaluation of applicability of high-resolution multiangle imaging photo-polarimetric observations for aerosol atmospheric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Olga; Garay, Michael; Xu, Feng; Diner, David; Seidel, Felix

    2016-07-01

    Multiangle spectro-polarimetric measurements have been advocated as an additional tool for better understanding and quantifying the aerosol properties needed for atmospheric correction for ocean color retrievals. The central concern of this work is the assessment of the effects of absorbing aerosol properties on remote sensing reflectance measurement uncertainty caused by neglecting UV-enhanced absorption of carbonaceous particles and by not accounting for dust nonsphericity. In addition, we evaluate the polarimetric sensitivity of absorbing aerosol properties in light of measurement uncertainties achievable for the next generation of multi-angle polarimetric imaging instruments, and demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of wavelength selection in the UV/VNIR range. In this work a vector Markov Chain radiative transfer code including bio-optical models was used to quantitatively evaluate in water leaving radiances between atmospheres containing realistic UV-enhanced and non-spherical aerosols and the SEADAS carbonaceous and dust-like aerosol models. The phase matrices for the spherical smoke particles were calculated using a standard Mie code, while those for non-spherical dust particles were calculated using the numerical approach developed for modeling dust for the AERONET network of ground-based sunphotometers. As a next step, we have developed a retrieval code that employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) and adding/doubling radiative transfer method for joint retrieval of aerosol properties and water leaving radiance from Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager-1 (AirMSPI-1) polarimetric observations. The AirMSPI-1 instrument has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° at 10 m resolution. AirMSPI spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, and 865 nm, with 470, 660, and 865 reporting linear polarization. We

  16. Use of In Situ and Airborne Multiangle Data to Assess MODIS- and Landsat-based Estimates of Surface Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Miguel O.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Shuai, Yanmin; Wang, Zhuosen; Gao, Feng; Masek, Jeff; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of uncertainty of global surface albedo data and products is a critical part of producing complete, physically consistent, and decadal land property data records for studying ecosystem change. A current challenge in validating satellite retrievals of surface albedo is the ability to overcome the spatial scaling errors that can contribute on the order of 20% disagreement between satellite and field-measured values. Here, we present the results from an uncertain ty analysis of MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Landsat albedo retrievals, based on collocated comparisons with tower and airborne multi-angular measurements collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program s (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site during the 2007 Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLAS33 IC 07). Using standard error propagation techniques, airborne measurements obtained by NASA s Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) were used to quantify the uncertainties associated with MODIS and Landsat albedos across a broad range of mixed vegetation and structural types. Initial focus was on evaluating inter-sensor consistency through assessments of temporal stability, as well as examining the overall performance of satellite-derived albedos obtained at all diurnal solar zenith angles. In general, the accuracy of the MODIS and Landsat albedos remained under a 10% margin of error in the SW(0.3 - 5.0 m) domain. However, results reveal a high degree of variability in the RMSE (root mean square error) and bias of albedos in both the visible (0.3 - 0.7 m) and near-infrared (0.3 - 5.0 m) broadband channels; where, in some cases, retrieval uncertainties were found to be in excess of 20%. For the period of CLASIC 07, the primary factors that contributed to uncertainties in the satellite-derived albedo values include: (1) the assumption of temporal stability in the retrieval of 500 m MODIS BRDF values over extended periods of cloud

  17. MODEL SELECTION FOR SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC INVERSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Manso Sainz, R.; Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.; Socas-Navarro, H.; Viticchie, B.

    2012-04-01

    Inferring magnetic and thermodynamic information from spectropolarimetric observations relies on the assumption of a parameterized model atmosphere whose parameters are tuned by comparison with observations. Often, the choice of the underlying atmospheric model is based on subjective reasons. In other cases, complex models are chosen based on objective reasons (for instance, the necessity to explain asymmetries in the Stokes profiles) but it is not clear what degree of complexity is needed. The lack of an objective way of comparing models has, sometimes, led to opposing views of the solar magnetism because the inferred physical scenarios are essentially different. We present the first quantitative model comparison based on the computation of the Bayesian evidence ratios for spectropolarimetric observations. Our results show that there is not a single model appropriate for all profiles simultaneously. Data with moderate signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) favor models without gradients along the line of sight. If the observations show clear circular and linear polarization signals above the noise level, models with gradients along the line are preferred. As a general rule, observations with large S/Ns favor more complex models. We demonstrate that the evidence ratios correlate well with simple proxies. Therefore, we propose to calculate these proxies when carrying out standard least-squares inversions to allow for model comparison in the future.

  18. Determination of Aerosol Optical Depth and Land Surface Directional Reflectances Using Multiangle Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martonchik, John V.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral aerosol optical depths, surface hemispherical-directional reflectance factors, and bihemispherical reflectances (albedos) are retrieved for an area of Glacier National Park using spectral, multiangle imagery obtained with the airborne advanced solid state array spectroradiometer (ASAS). The retrieval algorithms are described and are identical in principle to those being devised for use by the multiangle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) which will fly on the EOS-AMI spacecraft in 1998. As part of its science mission, MISR will produce global coverage of both aerosol amounts an an surface reflection properties. The results in this paper represent the initial effort in applying the MISR algorithms to real data. These algorithms will undergo additional testing and validation as more multiangle data become available.

  19. Physical Interpretation of the Correlation Between Multi-Angle Spectral Data and Canopy Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schull, M. A.; Ganguly, S.; Samanta, A.; Huang, D.; Shabanov, N. V.; Jenkins, J. P.; Chiu, J. C.; Marshak, A.; Blair, J. B.; Myneni, R. B.; Knyazikhin, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Recent empirical studies have shown that multi-angle spectral data can be useful for predicting canopy height, but the physical reason for this correlation was not understood. We follow the concept of canopy spectral invariants, specifically escape probability, to gain insight into the observed correlation. Airborne Multi-Angle Imaging Spectrometer (AirMISR) and airborne Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) data acquired during a NASA Terrestrial Ecology Program aircraft campaign underlie our analysis. Two multivariate linear regression models were developed to estimate LVIS height measures from 28 AirMISR multi-angle spectral reflectances and from the spectrally invariant escape probability at 7 AirMISR view angles. Both models achieved nearly the same accuracy, suggesting that canopy spectral invariant theory can explain the observed correlation. We hypothesize that the escape probability is sensitive to the aspect ratio (crown diameter to crown height). The multi-angle spectral data alone therefore may not provide enough information to retrieve canopy height globally

  20. SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC SIGNATURES OF CLUMPY SUPERNOVA EJECTA

    SciTech Connect

    Hole, K. T.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Kasen, D.

    2010-09-10

    Polarization has been detected at early times for all types of supernovae (SNe), indicating that all such systems result from or quickly develop some form of asymmetry. In addition, the detection of strong line polarization in SNe is suggestive of chemical inhomogeneities ('clumps') in the layers above the photosphere, which may reflect hydrodynamical instabilities during the explosion. We have developed a fast, flexible, approximate semi-analytic code for modeling polarized line radiative transfer within three-dimensional inhomogeneous rapidly expanding atmospheres. Given a range of model parameters, the code generates random sets of clumps in the expanding ejecta and calculates the emergent line profile and Stokes parameters for each configuration. The ensemble of these configurations represents the effects both of various host geometries and of different viewing angles. We present results for the first part of our survey of model geometries, specifically the effects of the number and size of clumps (and the related effect of filling factor) on the emergent spectrum and Stokes parameters. Our simulations show that random clumpiness can produce line polarization in the range observed in SNe Ia, as well as the Q-U loops that are frequently seen in all SNe. We have also developed a method to connect the results of our simulations to robust observational parameters such as maximum polarization and polarized equivalent width in the line. Our models, in connection with spectropolarimetric observations, can constrain the three-dimensional structure of SN ejecta and offer important insight into the SN explosion physics and the nature of their progenitor systems.

  1. Sua Pan surface bidirectional reflectance: a validation experiment of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) during SAFARI 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdou, Wedad A.; Pilorz, Stuart H.; Helmlinger, Mark C.; Diner, David J.; Conel, James E.; Martonchik, John V.; Gatebe, Charles K.; King, Michael D.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    2004-01-01

    The Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) dray deason campaign was carried out during August and September 2000 at the peak of biomass burning. The intensive ground-based and airborne measurements in this campaign provided a unique opportunity to validate space sensors, such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), onboard NASA's EOS Terra platform.

  2. SPEX: a multi-angle Spectropolarimeter for Planetary EXploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, J. M.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Rietjens, J.; Stam, D.; Snik, F.; Van Harten, G.; Verlaan, A.; Voors, R.; Moon, S.; Wielinga, K.

    2011-12-01

    , demonstrating excellent performance and overall behavior as compared with design parameters and SPEX instrument simulator. In addition, we present results of multi-angle spectropolarimetric measurements of the Earth's atmosphere from the ground in conjunction with one of AERONET's sun photometers.

  3. A Second Generation Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothwell, Graham; Diner, David J.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Duval, Valerie G.; Beregovski, Yuri; Hovland, Larry E.; Preston, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) has been in Earth orbit since December 1999 on NASA's Terra spacecraft. This instrument provides new ways of looking at the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for the purpose of understanding the Earth's ecology, environment, and climate. To facilitate the potential future continuation of MISR's multi-angle observations, a study was undertaken in 1999 and 2000 under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) of NASA Code Y's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) to investigate and demonstrate the feasibility of a successor to MISR that will have greatly reduced size and mass. The kernel of the program was the design, construction, and testing of a highly miniaturized camera, one of the nine that would probably be used on a future space borne MISR-like instrument. This demonstrated that the size and mass reduction of the optical system and camera electronics are possible and that filters can be assembled to meet the miniaturized packaging requirements. An innovative, reflective optics design was used, enabling the wavelength range to be extended into the shortwave infrared. This was the smallest all-reflective camera ever produced by the contractor. A study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of implementing nine (multi-angle) cameras within a single structure. This resulted in several possible configurations. It would also be possible to incorporate one of the cameras into an airborne instrument.

  4. Satellite Multiangle Cumulus Geometry Retrieval: Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail

    2003-02-08

    Most satellite-based analyses have been conducted using near nadir-viewing sensors. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), recently launched on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Terra platform, provides high-resolution measurements of reflectance at nine different viewing angles. In this study, we examine the possible retrieval of detailed cumulus geometry using the new and unique MISR datasets. We suggested one approach and apply it to an early MISR dataset of small marine cumulus clouds. This paper also presents validation analysis of this technique with both independent ground-based radar measurements and a model-output inverse problem. Collocated and coincident MISR data and ground-based observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site form the basis of this validation. Future work will attempt to test the suggested approach with additional MISR scenes.

  5. Pollution and mineral dust aerosol retrievals over dark water from MISR multi-angle satellite imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R.; Kalashnikova, O.; Li, W.; McDonald, D.; Diner, D.; Martonchik, J.

    2003-04-01

    The MISR multi-angle imaging instrument, flying aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite, makes measurements at nine view angles, in each of four wavelengths, near-simultaneously. MISR systematically covers a range of air mass factors from one to three, and in mid-latitudes, samples scattering angles extending from about 60^o to 160^o. We are quantifying the information these data provide about particle size distribution, shape, composition, and amount, with the help of field data acquired during the ACE-Asia and CLAMS campaigns. In both campaigns, we obtained high-resolution data over a 400-km-wide swath, coincident with observations by multiple instruments on two or more surface and airborne aerosol-measuring platforms. The cases obtained capture a range of clean, dusty, and polluted aerosol conditions. Initial characterization of the detailed environmental conditions for five of these cases, based on the field observations, has been completed. This presentation uses the field results as ground truth, to critically test the sensitivity of MISR aerosol retrievals to assumed particle micro-physical properties, a key step in refining the satellite multi-angle retrieval algorithms. We concentrate here on our ability to distinguish pollution aerosols from naturally occurring, non-spherical Asian dust, to measure the total aerosol column optical depth, and to determine the size distribution and single scattering albedo of the pollution component.

  6. Multi-Angle Views of the Appalachian Mountains, 6 March 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The true-color image at left is a downward-looking (nadir) view of the eastern United States, stretching from Lake Ontario to northern Georgia, and spanning the Appalachian Mountains. The three images to the right are also in true-color, taken by the forward 45.6-degree, 60.0-degree, and 70.5-degree cameras, respectively, of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. As the slant angle increases, the line-of-sight through the atmosphere grows longer, and a pall of haze over the Appalachians becomes progressively more apparent. You can see a similar effect by scanning from near-nadir to the horizon when standing on a mountain top or looking out an airplane window. MISR uses this multi-angle technique to monitor particulate pollution and to distinguish different types of haze. These observations reveal how airborne particles are interacting with sunlight, a measure of their impact on Earth's climate system. The images are about 400 km (250 miles) wide, and the spatial resolution is 1.1 kilometers (1,200 yards). North is toward the top. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  7. REMOVAL OF SPECTRO-POLARIMETRIC FRINGES BY TWO-DIMENSIONAL PATTERN RECOGNITION

    SciTech Connect

    Casini, R.; Judge, P. G.; Schad, T. A.

    2012-09-10

    We present a pattern-recognition-based approach to the problem of the removal of polarized fringes from spectro-polarimetric data. We demonstrate that two-dimensional principal component analysis can be trained on a given spectro-polarimetric map in order to identify and isolate fringe structures from the spectra. This allows us, in principle, to reconstruct the data without the fringe component, providing an effective and clean solution to the problem. The results presented in this paper point in the direction of revising the way that science and calibration data should be planned for a typical spectro-polarimetric observing run.

  8. Aerosol Retrieval from Multiangle Multispectral Photopolarimetric Measurements: Importance of Spectral Range and Angular Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Hasekamp, O.; Van Diedenhoven, B.; Cairns, B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the importance of spectral range and angular resolution for aerosol retrieval from multiangle photopolarimetric measurements over land. For this purpose, we use an extensive set of simulated measurements for different spectral ranges and angular resolutions and subsets of real measurements of the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) carried out during the PODEX and SEAC4RS campaigns over the continental USA. Aerosol retrievals performed from RSP measurements show good agreement with ground-based AERONET measurements for aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and refractive index. Furthermore, we found that inclusion of shortwave infrared bands (1590 and/or 2250 nm) significantly improves the retrieval of AOD, SSA and coarse mode microphysical properties. However, accuracies of the retrieved aerosol properties do not improve significantly when more than five viewing angles are used in the retrieval.

  9. Feasibility of spectro-polarimetric characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres with direct observing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, J.; Matsuo, T.; Itoh, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Spectro-polarimetry of reflected light from exoplanets is anticipated to be a powerful method for probing atmospheric composition and structure. Aims: We aim to evaluate the feasibility of the search for a spectro-polarimetric feature of water vapor using a high-contrast polarimetric instrument on a 30-40 m-class ground-based telescope. Methods: Three types of errors are considered: (a) errors from the difference between efficiencies for two orthogonally polarized states; (b) errors caused by speckle noises; and (c) errors caused by photon noise from scattered starlight. Using the analytically derived error formulas, we estimate the number of planets for which feasible spectro-polarimetric detection of water vapor is possible. Results: Our calculations show that effective spectro-polarimetric searches for water vapor are possible for 5 to 14 known planets. Spectro-polarimetric characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible with an extremely large telescope and a direct observing spectro-polarimeter.

  10. Circular spectropolarimetric sensing of chiral photosystems in decaying leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patty, C. H. Lucas; Visser, Luuk J. J.; Ariese, Freek; Buma, Wybren Jan; Sparks, William B.; van Spanning, Rob J. M.; Röling, Wilfred F. M.; Snik, Frans

    2017-03-01

    Circular polarization spectroscopy has proven to be an indispensable tool in photosynthesis research and (bio)molecular research in general. Oxygenic photosystems typically display an asymmetric Cotton effect around the chlorophyll absorbance maximum with a signal ≤ 1 % . In vegetation, these signals are the direct result of the chirality of the supramolecular aggregates. The circular polarization is thus directly influenced by the composition and architecture of the photosynthetic macrodomains, and is thereby linked to photosynthetic functioning. Although ordinarily measured only on a molecular level, we have developed a new spectropolarimetric instrument, TreePol, that allows for both laboratory and in-the-field measurements. Through spectral multiplexing, TreePol is capable of fast measurements with a sensitivity of ∼ 1 *10-4 and is therefore suitable of non-destructively probing the molecular architecture of whole plant leaves. We have measured the chiroptical evolution of Hedera helix leaves for a period of 22 days. Spectrally resolved circular polarization measurements (450-900 nm) on whole leaves in transmission exhibit a strong decrease in the polarization signal over time after plucking, which we accredit to the deterioration of chiral macro-aggregates. Chlorophyll a levels measured over the same period by means of UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy showed a much smaller decrease. With these results we are able to distinguish healthy from deteriorating leaves. Hereby we indicate the potency of circular polarization spectroscopy on whole and intact leaves as a nondestructive tool for structural and plant stress assessment. Additionally, we underline the establishment of circular polarization signals as remotely accessible means of detecting the presence of extraterrestrial life.

  11. Refining the Concept of Combining Hyperspectral and Multi-Angle Sensors for Land Surface Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simic, Anita

    reflectances. It has been successfully demonstrated that the off-nadir hyperspectral simulations could be closely reconstructed based on the nadir hyperspectral reflectance and off-nadir multi-spectral reflectance in the red and NIR bands. This is shown using the Compact High-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) data acquired over a forested area in the Sudbury region (Ontario, Canada). Through intensive validation using field data, it is demonstrated that the combination of reflectances at two angles, the hotspot and darkspot, through the Normalized Difference between Hotspot and Darkspot (NDHD) index has the strongest response to changes in vegetation clumping, an important structural component of canopy. Clumping index (O) and Leaf Area Index (LAI) maps are generated based on previous algorithms as well as empirical relationships developed in this study. To retrieve chlorophyll content, inversion of the 5-Scale model is performed by developing Look-Up Tables (LUTs) that are based on the improved structural characteristics developed using multi-angle data. The generated clumping index and LAI maps are used in the LUTs to estimate leaf reflectance. Inversion of the leaf reflectance model, PROSPECT, is further employed to estimate chlorophyll content per unit leaf area. The estimated leaf chlorophyll contents are in good agreement with field-measured values. The refined measurement concept of combining hyperspectral with multispectral multi-angle data provides the opportunity for simultaneous retrieval of vegetation structural and biochemical parameters.

  12. Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    MISR views the sunlit Earth simultaneously at nine widely spaced angles and provides ongoing global coverage with high spatial detail. Its imagery is carefully calibrated to provide accurate measures of the brightness, contrast, and color of reflected sunlight. MISR provides new types of information for scientists studying Earth's climate, such as the regional and global distribution of different types of atmospheric particles and aerosols. The change in reflection at different view angles provides the means to distinguish aerosol types, cloud forms, and land surface cover. Combined with stereoscopic techniques, this enables construction of 3-D cloud models and estimation of the total amount of sunlight reflected by Earth's diverse environments. MISR was built for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. It is part of NASA's first Earth Observing System (EOS) spacecraft, the Terra spacecraft, which was launched into polar orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base on December 18, 1999. MISR has been continuously providing data since February 24, 2000. [Mission Objectives] The MISR instrument acquires systematic multi-angle measurements for global monitoring of top-of-atmosphere and surface albedos and for measuring the shortwave radiative properties of aerosols, clouds, and surface scenes in order to characterize their impact on the Earth's climate. The Earth's climate is constantly changing -- as a consequence of both natural processes and human activities. Scientists care a great deal about even small changes in Earth's climate, since they can affect our comfort and well-being, and possibly our survival. A few years of below-average rainfall, an unusually cold winter, or a change in emissions from a coal-burning power plant, can influence the quality of life of people, plants, and animals in the region involved. The goal of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is to increase our understanding of the climate changes that are occurring on our

  13. [Investigation of Multi-Angle Polarization Properties of Vegetation Based on RSP].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian-nan; Zhao, Hai-meng; Yang, Bin; Yan, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Polarization detection provides us with novel information to reflect the target attribute. Compared with traditional remote sensing methods, multi-angle polarization has relatively stable correlation and regularity. RSP(research scanning polarimeter)is an airborne prototype for the APS(aerosol polarimetery sensor) developed by the USA, which can provide with us the polarization detection information of 9 channels. We can get optical properties and physical characteristics of vegetation by analyzing stable multi-angle and multi-band polarization detection information from preprocessing scanning polarization data of flight test. In this paper, after making registration based on flight attitude information, a comparative analysis is made between characteristics of reflectance and polarization reflectance with visible light and near infrared band of the view zenith angles between--30 degree and 65 degree, based on dense area and sparse area(close to bare field) of vegetation. The results show that both dense area and sparse area demonstrate regular characteristics of polarization degree. The area close to hot spot area has highest reflectance energy. In contrast,. it has relatively least energy of polarization degree, which can prevent strong reflectance energy from influencing the stability of detector. Because the degree of polarization in dense area of vegetation is higher than that in sparse area at visible light band while that in concentration area of vegetation is lower than sparse area at near infrared light band, it shows that the visible light band information of dense area of vegetation that the sensor received is dominated by single scattering while the near infrared light band information of dense area of vegetation is dominated by multiple scattering.

  14. Assessment of capabilities of multiangle imaging photo-polarimetry for atmospheric correction in presence of absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Seidel, F. C.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color is a critical tool for assessing the productivity of marine ecosystems and monitoring changes resulting from climatic or environmental influences. Yet water-leaving radiance comprises less than 10% of the signal measured from space, making correction for absorption and scattering by the intervening atmosphere imperative. Traditional ocean color retrieval algorithms utilize a standard set of aerosol models and the assumption of negligible water-leaving radiance in the near-infrared. Modern improvements have been developed to handle absorbing aerosols such as urban particulates in coastal areas and transported desert dust over the open ocean, where ocean fertilization can impact biological productivity at the base of the marine food chain. Even so, imperfect knowledge of the absorbing aerosol optical properties or their height distribution results in well-documented sources of error. In the UV, the problem of UV-enhanced absorption and nonsphericity of certain aerosol types are amplified due to the increased Rayleigh and aerosol optical depth, especially at off-nadir view angles. Multi-angle spectro-polarimetric measurements have been advocated as an additional tool to better understand and retrieve the aerosol properties needed for atmospheric correction for ocean color retrievals. The central concern of the work to be described is the assessment of the effects of absorbing aerosol properties on water leaving radiance measurement uncertainty by neglecting UV-enhanced absorption of carbonaceous particles and by not accounting for dust nonsphericity. In addition, we evaluate the polarimetric sensitivity of absorbing aerosol properties in light of measurement uncertainties achievable for the next generation of multi-angle polarimetric imaging instruments, and demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of wavelength selection in the UV/VNIR range. The phase matrices for the spherical smoke particles were calculated using a standard

  15. Using Image Tour to Explore Multiangle, Multispectral Satellite Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braverman, Amy; Wegman, Edward J.; Martinez, Wendy; Symanzik, Juergen; Wallet, Brad

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of Image Tour to explore the multiangle, multispectral satellite imagery. Remote sensing data are spatial arrays of p-dimensional vectors where each component corresponds to one of p variables. Applying the same R(exp p) to R(exp d) projection to all pixels creates new images, which may be easier to analyze than the original because d < p. Image grand tour (IGT) steps through the space of projections, and d=3 outputs a sequence of RGB images, one for each step. In this talk, we apply IGT to multiangle, multispectral data from NASA's MISR instrument. MISR views each pixel in four spectral bands at nine view angles. Multiple views detect photon scattering in different directions and are indicative of physical properties of the scene. IGT allows us to explore MISR's data structure while maintaining spatial context; a key requirement for physical interpretation. We report results highlighting the uniqueness of multiangle data and how IGT can exploit it.

  16. What We Can Learn About Aerosols from EOS-MISR Multi-Angle Remote Sensing Observations Over Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, R.

    1999-01-01

    Multiangle, multispectral remote sensing observations, such as those anticipated from the Earth Observing System (EOS) Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), promise to significantly improve our ability to constrain aerosol properties from space.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL EXPLOSION GEOMETRY OF STRIPPED-ENVELOPE CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. I. SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Iye, Masanori; Kawabata, Koji S.; Yamanaka, Masayuki; Hattori, Takashi; Aoki, Kentaro; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Pian, Elena

    2012-07-20

    We study the multi-dimensional geometry of supernova (SN) explosions by means of spectropolarimetric observations of stripped-envelope SNe, i.e., SNe without a hydrogen-rich layer. We perform spectropolarimetric observations of two stripped-envelope SNe, Type Ib SN 2009jf and Type Ic SN 2009mi. Both objects show non-zero polarization at the wavelength of the strong lines. They also show a loop in the Stokes Q - U diagram, which indicates a non-axisymmetric, three-dimensional ion distribution in the ejecta. We show that five out of six stripped-envelope SNe, which have been observed spectropolarimetrically so far, show such a loop. This implies that a three-dimensional geometry is common in stripped-envelope SNe. We find that stronger lines tend to show higher polarization. This effect is not related to the geometry, and must be corrected for to compare the polarization of different lines or different objects. Even after the correction, however, there remains a dispersion of polarization degree among different objects. Such a dispersion might be caused by three-dimensional clumpy ion distributions viewed from different directions.

  18. What We Can Learn About Aerosols from EOS-MISR Multi-Angle Remote Sensing Observations Over Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, R.

    1999-01-01

    Multiangle, multispectral remote sensing observations, such as those anticipated from the Multiangle, multispectral remote sensing observations, such as those anticipated from the Earth Observing System (EOS) Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), promise to significantly improve our ability to constrain aerosol properties from space.

  19. MISR Multi-angle Views of Sunday Morning Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Hot, dry Santa Ana winds began blowing through the Los Angeles and San Diego areas on Sunday October 21, 2007. Wind speeds ranging from 30 to 50 mph were measured in the area, with extremely low relative humidities. These winds, coupled with exceptionally dry conditions due to lack of rainfall resulted in a number of fires in the Los Angeles and San Diego areas, causing the evacuation of more than 250,000 people.

    These two images show the Southern California coast from Los Angeles to San Diego from two of the nine cameras on the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on the NASA EOS Terra satellite. These images were obtained around 11:35 a.m. PDT on Sunday morning, October 21, 2007 and show a number of plumes extending out over the Pacific ocean. In addition, locations identified as potential hot spots from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on the same satellite are outlined in red.

    The left image is from MISR's nadir looking camera and the plumes appear very faint. The image on the right is from MISR's 60o forward looking camera, which accentuates the amount of light scattered by aerosols in the atmosphere, including smoke and dust. Both these images are false color and contain information from MISR's red, green, blue and near-infrared wavelengths, which makes vegetated land appear greener than it would naturally. Notice in the right hand image that the color of the plumes associated with the MODIS hot spots is bluish, while plumes not associated with hot spots appear more yellow. This is because the latter plumes are composed of dust kicked up by the strong Santa Ana winds. In some locations along Interstate 5 on this date, visibility was severely reduced due to blowing dust. MISR's multiangle and multispectral capability give it the ability to distinguish smoke from dust in this situation.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days

  20. Digital holographic metrology based on multi-angle interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Jiang, Chao; Jia, Shuhai

    2016-09-15

    We propose a multi-angle interferometry method for digital holographic metrology. In an application of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, the hologram corresponding to a different illumination angle is recorded as the illumination angle with a single wavelength tilted at regular intervals by an electronically controlled rotating stage. A Fourier-transform-based axial depth scanning algorithm formed by the reconstructed phase is used to obtain the height point by point over the whole field of view. Hence, the 3D reconstruction can be obtained effectively; even the object has large depth discontinuities resulting from the difficulty of the phase unwrapping. Due to a monochrome source only being used, the method is available for objects with wavelength-dependent reflectivity and those that are free of chromatic aberration caused by the different wavelengths.

  1. Multi-angle Imaging Spectro Radiometer (MISR) Design Issues Influened by Performance Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegge, C. J.; White, M. L.; Chrien, N. C. L.; Villegas, E. B.; Raouf, N.

    1993-01-01

    The design of an Earth Remote Sensing Sensor, such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), begins with a set of science requirements and is quickly followed by a set of instrument specifications.

  2. Vegetation Canopy Structure from NASA EOS Multiangle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopping, M.; Martonchik, J. V.; Bull, M.; Rango, A.; Schaaf, C. B.; Zhao, F.; Wang, Z.

    2008-12-01

    We used red band bidirectional reflectance data from the NASA Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) mapped onto a 250 m grid in a multiangle approach to obtain estimates of woody plant fractional cover and crown height through adjustment of the mean radius and mean crown aspect ratio parameters of an hybrid geometric-optical (GO) model. We used a technique to rapidly obtain MISR surface reflectance estimates at 275 m resolution through regression on 1 km MISR land surface estimates previously corrected for atmospheric attenuation using MISR aerosol estimates. MISR data were used to make end of dry season maps from 2000-2007 for parts of southern New Mexico, while MODIS data were used to replicate previous results obtained using MISR for June 2002 over large parts of New Mexico and Arizona. We also examined the applicability of this method in Alaskan tundra and forest by adjusting the GO model against MISR data for winter (March 2000) and summer (August 2008) scenes. We found that the GO model crown aspect ratio from MISR followed dominant shrub species distributions in the USDA, ARS Jornada Experimental Range, enabling differentiation of the more spherical crowns of creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) from the more prolate crowns of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa). The measurement limits determined from 2000-2007 maps for a large part of southern New Mexico are ~0.1 in fractional shrub crown cover and ~3 m in mean canopy height (results obtained using data acquired shortly after precipitation events that radically darkened and altered the structure and angular response of the background). Typical standard deviations over the period for 12 sites covering a range of cover types are on the order of 0.05 in crown cover and 2 m in mean canopy height. We found that the GO model can be inverted to retrieve reasonable distributions of canopy parameters in southwestern environments using MODIS V005 red

  3. Second-Generation Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macenka, Steven; Hovland, Larry; Preston, Daniel; Zellers, Brian; Downing, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses an early phase in the development of the MISR-2 C, a second, improved version of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), which has been in orbit around the Earth aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft since 1999. Like the MISR, the MISR-2 would contain a pushbroom array of nine charge-coupled- device (CCD) cameras one aimed at the nadir and the others aimed at different angles sideways from the nadir. The major improvements embodied in the MISR-2 would be the following: A new folded-reflective-optics design would render the MISR-2 only a third as massive as the MISR. Smaller filters and electronic circuits would enable a reduction in volume to a sixth of that of the MISR. The MISR-2 would generate images in two infrared spectral bands in addition to the blue, green, red, and near-infrared spectral bands of the MISR. Miniature polarization filters would be incorporated to add a polarization-sensing capability. Calibration would be performed nonintrusively by use of a gimbaled tenth camera. The main accomplishment thus far has been the construction of an extremely compact all-reflective-optics CCD camera to demonstrate feasibility.

  4. Atmospheric correction for ocean spectra retrievals from high-altitude multi-angle, multi-spectral photo-polarimetric remote sensing observations: Results for coastal ocean waters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, J.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Cairns, B.; Wasilewski, A. P.; McCubbin, I.

    2015-12-01

    A major challenge for spaceborne observations of ocean color is to correct for atmospheric scattering, which typically contributes ≥85% to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance and varies substantially with aerosols. Ocean color missions traditionally analyze TOA radiance in the near-infrared (NIR), where the ocean is black, to constrain the TOA atmospheric scattering in the visible (VIS). However, this procedure is limited by insufficient sensitivity of NIR radiance to absorption and vertical distribution of aerosols, and by uncertainties in the extrapolation of aerosol properties from the NIR to the VIS.To improve atmospheric correction for ocean color observations, one needs to change the traditional procedure for this correction and/or increase the aerosol information. The instruments proposed to increase the aerosol information content for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission include ultraviolet and Oxygen A-band observations, as well as multispectral and multiangle polarimetry. However few systematic studies have been performed to quantify the improvement such measurements bring to atmospheric correction. To study the polarimetric atmospheric correction capabilities of PACE-like instruments, we conducted field experiments off the Coast of California to obtain high-altitude (65,000 ft) and ship-based observations of water-leaving radiance. The airborne data sets consist of hyperspectral radiance between 380-2500 nm by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, and multi-spectral multi-angle polarimetric data between 410-2250 nm by the Research Scanning Polarimeter. We discuss examples of retrieved atmosphere and ocean state vectors, and of corresponding ocean color spectra obtained by subtracting the computed atmospheric scattering contribution from the high-altitude radiance measurements. The ocean color spectra thus obtained are compared with those measured from the ship.

  5. Least-Squares Multi-Angle Doppler Estimators for Plane Wave Vector Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-06-20

    Designing robust Doppler vector estimation strategies for use in plane wave imaging schemes based on unfocused transmissions is a topic that has yet to be studied in depth. One potential solution is to use a multi-angle Doppler estimation approach that computes flow vectors via least-squares fitting, but its performance has not been established. Here, we investigated the efficacy of multi-angle Doppler vector estimators by: (i) comparing its performance with respect to the classical dual-angle (cross-beam) Doppler vector estimator; (ii) examining the working effects of multi-angle Doppler vector estimators on flow visualization quality in the context of dynamic flow path rendering. Implementing Doppler vector estimators that use different combinations of transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) steering angles, our analysis has compared the classical dual-angle Doppler method, a 5-Tx version of dual-angle Doppler, and various multi-angle Doppler configurations based on 3 Tx and 5 Tx. Two angle spans (10°, 20°) were examined in forming the steering angles. In imaging scenarios with known flow profiles (rotating disc and straight-tube parabolic flow), the 3-Tx, 3-Rx and 5-Tx, 5-Rx multi-angle configurations produced vector estimates with smaller variability comparing to the dual-angle method, and the estimation results were more consistent with the use of a 20° angle span. Flow vectors derived from multi-angle Doppler estimators were also found to be effective in rendering the expected flow paths in both rotating disc and straight-tube imaging scenarios, while the ones derived from the dual-angle estimator yielded flow paths that deviated from the expected course. These results serve to attest that, using multi-angle least-squares Doppler vector estimators, flow visualization can be consistently achieved.

  6. Least-Squares Multi-Angle Doppler Estimators for Plane-Wave Vector Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-11-01

    Designing robust Doppler vector estimation strategies for use in plane-wave imaging schemes based on unfocused transmissions is a topic that has yet to be studied in depth. One potential solution is to use a multi-angle Doppler estimation approach that computes flow vectors via least-squares fitting, but its performance has not been established. Here, we investigated the efficacy of multi-angle Doppler vector estimators by: 1) comparing its performance with respect to the classical dual-angle (cross-beam) Doppler vector estimator and 2) examining the working effects of multi-angle Doppler vector estimators on flow visualization quality in the context of dynamic flow path rendering. Implementing Doppler vector estimators that use different combinations of transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) steering angles, our analysis has compared the classical dual-angle Doppler method, a 5-Tx version of dual-angle Doppler, and various multi-angle Doppler configurations based on 3 Tx and 5 Tx. Two angle spans (10°, 20°) were examined in forming the steering angles. In imaging scenarios with known flow profiles (rotating disk and straight-tube parabolic flow), the 3-Tx, 3-Rx and 5-Tx, 5-Rx multi-angle configurations produced vector estimates with smaller variability compared with the dual-angle method, and the estimation results were more consistent with the use of a 20° angle span. Flow vectors derived from multi-angle Doppler estimators were also found to be effective in rendering the expected flow paths in both rotating disk and straight-tube imaging scenarios, while the ones derived from the dual-angle estimator yielded flow paths that deviated from the expected course. These results serve to attest that using multi-angle least-squares Doppler vector estimators, flow visualization can be consistently achieved.

  7. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  8. Spectropolarimetric Evidence for a Siphon Flow along an Emerging Magnetic Flux Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requerey, Iker S.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; van Noort, M.; Schmidt, W.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Knölker, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the dynamics and topology of an emerging magnetic flux concentration using high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment on board the sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. We obtain the full vector magnetic field and the line of sight (LOS) velocity through inversions of the Fe i line at 525.02 nm with the SPINOR code. The derived vector magnetic field is used to trace magnetic field lines. Two magnetic flux concentrations with different polarities and LOS velocities are found to be connected by a group of arch-shaped magnetic field lines. The positive polarity footpoint is weaker (1100 G) and displays an upflow, while the negative polarity footpoint is stronger (2200 G) and shows a downflow. This configuration is naturally interpreted as a siphon flow along an arched magnetic flux tube.

  9. SPECTRO-POLARIMETRIC IMAGING REVEALS HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS IN SOLAR PROMINENCE FEET

    SciTech Connect

    González, M. J. Martínez; Sainz, R. Manso; Ramos, A. Asensio; Beck, C.; Díaz, A. J.

    2015-03-20

    Solar prominences are clouds of cool plasma levitating above the solar surface and insulated from the million-degree corona by magnetic fields. They form in regions of complex magnetic topology, characterized by non-potential fields, which can evolve abruptly, disintegrating the prominence and ejecting magnetized material into the heliosphere. However, their physics is not yet fully understood because mapping such complex magnetic configurations and their evolution is extremely challenging, and must often be guessed by proxy from photometric observations. Using state-of-the-art spectro-polarimetric data, we reconstruct the structure of the magnetic field in a prominence. We find that prominence feet harbor helical magnetic fields connecting the prominence to the solar surface below.

  10. Determining Small Scale Albedos Using High Resolution Multiangle Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowski, G. R.; Davies, R.

    2005-05-01

    Current satellite short-wave (SW) albedo measurements, such as CERES's, have only a broad spatial resolution and cannot by themselves accurately measure reflectance (roughly solar "forcing") on small space and time scales. The major difficulty is that earth's surface reflectivity, including the atmosphere and clouds, is substantially anisotropic. However, accurate regional and time-dependent albedos are needed for studying causes of climate variability and change, and improving models from global to at least cloud resolving scales. A first step to obtain these albedos, for which we show results, is to accurately relate (and verify) the high resolution spatial and angular surface narrow-band MISR (Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer) radiance measurements aboard the Terra satellite to coincident total shortwave broadband (SWB) low resolution measurements from the onboard CERES instrument. Because MISR measures radiance of the same points along an orbital swath, it becomes possible to check and improve Angular (reflection) Distribution Models (ADMs) at small scales (< 1 km). The ADMs can later be used to invert a measured angular radiance to a local albedo. The difficulty lies in obtaining accurate ADMs for earth's highly varied surface and lighting conditions. We show prediction accuracy examples of CERES SWB vs. single and multiple band MISR data regressions. We include view angle dependence (9 angles: nadir plus 26, 46, 60, and 70 degrees fore and aft) and show improved accuracy when surface data, e.g., solar zenith and scattering angle, and surface type are included. In many cases, we predict angular (bidirectional) reflectance to ~ 0.01, or about 10 watts/sq m in irradiance. We also show examples of "difficult" scene types, such as varying levels of broken clouds, where accuracy degrades by a factor of ~2.

  11. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  12. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  13. What we can Learn About Aerosols from EOS-MISR Multi-Angle Remote Sensing Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2000-01-01

    Multiangle, multispectral remote sensing observations, such as those anticipated from the Earth Observing System (EOS) Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), promise to significantly improve our ability to constrain aerosol properties from space. Recent advances in modeling the Earth's climate have brought us to a point where the contributions made by aerosols to the global radiation budget noticeably affect the results. Knowledge of both aerosol optical depth and the microphysical properties of particles is needed to adequately model aerosol effects. This talk explores the ability of multiangle, multi-spectral remote sensing observations anticipated from the EOS MISR instrument, to retrieve aerosol optical depth and information about mixes of particle types, globally, at 17.6 km spatial resolution. The instrument is scheduled for launch into a 10:30 AM, sun-synchronous polar orbit in 1999.

  14. Radiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling infrared radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathke, Carsten; Neshyba, Steven; Shupe, Matthew D.; Rowe, Penny; Rivers, Aaron

    2002-12-01

    The information content of multiangle downwelling infrared radiance spectra of stratus clouds is investigated. As an example, 76 sets of spectra were measured at angles of 0, 15, 30 and 45° from zenith, using an interferometer based at the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) drifting ice camp. Exploiting the angular variation of radiance in infrared microwindows, a "geometric" algorithm is used to determine cloud temperature and optical depth without auxiliary information. For comparison, a spectral method allows us to infer cloud microphysical properties for each angle; each multiangle set therefore constitutes a microphysical characterization of horizontal inhomogeneity of the cloudy scene. We show that cloud temperatures determined with both approaches agree with temperatures obtained from lidar/radiosonde data. The multiangle radiance observations can also be used to calculate the longwave flux reaching the surface. We find that up to 14 W m-2 of the overcast fluxes can be attributed to horizontal variations in cloud microphysical properties.

  15. Large area mapping of southwestern forest crown cover, canopy height, and biomass using the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid canopy reflectance model inversion experiment was performed using multiangle reflectance data from the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) on the Earth Observing System Terra satellite, with the goal of obtaining measures of forest fractional crown cover, mean canopy height, a...

  16. WIRC-POL: A near-IR spectro-polarimetric imager at Palomar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Ricky; Tinyanont, Samaporn; Mawet, Dimitri; Knutson, Heather; WIRC-POL Team

    2017-01-01

    The 200-inch Hale Telescope at Palomar Observatory is the largest equatorial-mounted telescope in the world. Combining a large aperture, extremely stable tracking, and no differential motion of optics, it introduces low and stable instrument polarization, making it uniquely suited for time-resolved polarimetry. Its prime focus currently hosts the Wide-field InfraRed Camera (WIRC), which is being refurbished with a new H2 detector, 32 channel readout electronics, grism, focal-plane mask and polarization grating. This will transform it into WIRC-POL — a machine for high-precision photometry, and slitless low-resolution (R~150) spectroscopy and spectro-polarimetry. Two key science programs are starting in 2017: (1) a large spectro-polarimetric survey of approximately 1000 LTY field brown dwarfs, probing atmospheric composition, physical properties, and cloud dynamics at the L-T transition, and (2) a survey of transiting exoplanets, using the high photometric stability and slitless spectroscopy mode to characterize exoplanet atmospheres from spectra obtained in transit and secondary eclipse, and search for transit-timing variations in multiple planet systems. Here we present an overview of the instrument upgrades and the exciting scientific questions we aim to address.

  17. The Galactic Center Radio Arc: A Multi-Frequency Spectro-Polarimetric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, James Edward; Lang, Cornelia C.; Ludovici, Dominic

    2014-06-01

    Despite the Radio Arc non-thermal filaments (NTFs) being discovered 30 years ago, their origin remain poorly understood. The Radio Arc NTFs have an unusually flat spectrum in the centimeter to millimeter spectrum with a predicted, though poorly constrained, turn-over between 30- 200 GHz. With the recently upgraded wide-band capabilities of the VLA, we conducted a multi-frequency spectro-polarimetric study of the Radio Arc region. With observations at a set of low radio frequencies (continuous coverage over 2-6 GHz & 10-12 GHz), we imaged both the total and polarized intensity distributions at high angular resolution (≤ 1”). Presented here are the preliminary results from four observations spanning May 2013 to February 2014 using the DnC, CnB, B & BnA array configurations. This study has produced the deepest continuum intensity images of the Radio Arc region to date, with a sensitivity an order of magnitude greater than previous surveys, and resulted in the detection of new structure and compact emission sources. These observations will serve as a pilot polarization study for larger, more complete polarimetric surveys of the Galactic center region.

  18. Spectro-polarimetric observation in UV with CLASP to probe the chromosphere and transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Ryouhei; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Winebarger, Amy R.; Auchère, Frédéric; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Narukage, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Ken; Bando, Takamasa; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Giono, Gabriel; Hara, Hirohisa; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Sakao, Taro; Tsuneta, Saku; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Goto, Motoshi; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Casini, Roberto; Manso Sainz, Rafael; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Stepan, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-05-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a NASA sounding-rocket experiment that was performed in White Sands in the US on September 3, 2015. During its 5-minute ballistic flight, CLASP successfully made the first spectro-polarimetric observation in the Lyman-alpha line (121.57 nm) originating in the chromosphere and transition region. Since the Lyman-alpha polarization is sensitive to magnetic field of 10-100 G by the Hanle effect, we aim to infer the magnetic field information in such upper solar atmosphere with this experiment.The obtained CLASP data showed that the Lyman-alpha scattering polarization is about a few percent in the wings and the order of 0.1% in the core near the solar limb, as it had been theoretically predicted, and that both polarization signals have a conspicuous spatio-temporal variability. CLASP also observed another upper-chromospheric line, Si III (120.65 nm), whose critical field strength for the Hanle effect is 290 G, and showed a measurable scattering polarization of a few % in this line. The polarization properties of the Si III line could facilitate the interpretation of the scattering polarization observed in the Lyman-alpha line.In this presentation, we would like to show how the upper chromosphere and transition region are seen in the polarization of these UV lines and discuss the possible source of these complicated polarization signals.

  19. Differential optical spectropolarimetric imaging system assisted by liquid crystal devices for skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, Ofir; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Arnon, Ofer; Rosenberg, Lior; Dyomin, Victor; Silberstein, Eldad

    2011-08-01

    Skin cancer diagnosis depends not only on histopathological examination but also on visual inspection before and after the excision of suspected lesion. Neoplasm is accompanied with changes in birefringence of collagen, pleomorphicity, and hyperchromatic state of epithelial nuclei. These phenomena can be measured by spectral and polarization changes of light backscattered by the examined tissue. A new differential spectropolarimetric system is proposed using liquid crystal devices, one as a tunable filter and the other as a polarization rotator, both operating at wide spectral ranges from the visible to the near-infrared. Since collagen's fibrils texture orientation depends on its location in the skin and since it is not well organized, our system scans the bipolarization states by continuously rotating the linearly polarized light incident on a skin lesion, and collecting differential contrasts between sequenced images when simultaneously averaging the statistical readout of a video camera. This noninvasive method emphasizes areas on skin where the neoplasm, or tumor, minimizes the statistical polarization change of the scattered light from the lesion. The module can be considered as an assistant tool for epiluminescence microscopy. Images of skin tumors were captured in vivo before the patients having their surgery and compared to histopathological results.

  20. Aerosol Airmass Type Mapping Over the Urban Mexico City Region From Space-based Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.; Limbacher, J. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Using Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and sub-orbital measurements from the 2006 INTEX-B/MILAGRO field campaign, in this study we explore MISR's ability to map different aerosol air mass types over the Mexico City metropolitan area. The aerosol air mass distinctions are based on shape, size and single scattering albedo retrievals from the MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval algorithm. In this region, the research algorithm identifies dust-dominated aerosol mixtures based on non-spherical particle shape, whereas spherical biomass burning and urban pollution particles are distinguished by particle size. Two distinct aerosol air mass types based on retrieved particle microphysical properties, and four spatially distributed aerosol air masses, are identified in the MISR data on 6 March 2006. The aerosol air mass type identification results are supported by coincident, airborne high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients are also consistent between the MISR and sub-orbital measurements, but particles having single-scattering albedo of approx. 0.7 at 558 nm must be included in the retrieval algorithm to produce good absolute AOD comparisons over pollution-dominated aerosol air masses. The MISR standard V22 AOD product, at 17.6 km resolution, captures the observed AOD gradients qualitatively, but retrievals at this coarse spatial scale and with limited spherical absorbing particle options underestimate AOD and do not retrieve particle properties adequately over this complex urban region. However, we demonstrate how AOD and aerosol type mapping can be accomplished with MISR data over complex urban regions, provided the retrieval is performed at sufficiently high spatial resolution, and with a rich enough set of aerosol components and mixtures.

  1. Aerosol airmass type mapping over the urban Mexico City region from space-based multi-angle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.; Limbacher, J. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2013-03-01

    Using Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and sub-orbital measurements from the 2006 INTEX-B/MILAGRO field campaign, in this study we demonstrate MISR's ability to map different aerosol air mass types over the Mexico City metropolitan area. The aerosol air mass distinctions are based on shape, size and single scattering albedo retrievals from the MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval algorithm. In this region, the research algorithm identifies dust-dominated aerosol mixtures based on non-spherical particle shape, whereas spherical biomass burning and urban pollution particles are distinguished by particle size. Four distinct aerosol air masses are identified in the MISR data on 6 March 2006; these results are supported by coincident, airborne high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients are also consistent between the MISR and sub-orbital measurements, but particles having SSA558≈0.7 must be included in the retrieval algorithm to produce good absolute AOD comparisons over pollution-dominated aerosol air masses. The MISR standard V22 AOD product, at 17.6 km resolution, captures the observed AOD gradients qualitatively, but retrievals at this coarse spatial scale and with limited spherical absorbing particle options underestimate AOD and do not retrieve particle properties adequately over this complex urban region. However, we demonstrate how AOD and aerosol type mapping can be accomplished with MISR data over urban regions, provided the retrieval is performed at sufficiently high spatial resolution, and with a rich enough set of aerosol components and mixtures.

  2. Aerosol airmass type mapping over the Urban Mexico City region from space-based multi-angle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.; Limbacher, J. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2013-09-01

    Using Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and sub-orbital measurements from the 2006 INTEX-B/MILAGRO field campaign, in this study we explore MISR's ability to map different aerosol air mass types over the Mexico City metropolitan area. The aerosol air mass distinctions are based on shape, size and single scattering albedo retrievals from the MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval algorithm. In this region, the research algorithm identifies dust-dominated aerosol mixtures based on non-spherical particle shape, whereas spherical biomass burning and urban pollution particles are distinguished by particle size. Two distinct aerosol air mass types based on retrieved particle microphysical properties, and four spatially distributed aerosol air masses, are identified in the MISR data on 6 March 2006. The aerosol air mass type identification results are supported by coincident, airborne high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients are also consistent between the MISR and sub-orbital measurements, but particles having single-scattering albedo of ≈0.7 at 558 nm must be included in the retrieval algorithm to produce good absolute AOD comparisons over pollution-dominated aerosol air masses. The MISR standard V22 AOD product, at 17.6 km resolution, captures the observed AOD gradients qualitatively, but retrievals at this coarse spatial scale and with limited spherical absorbing particle options underestimate AOD and do not retrieve particle properties adequately over this complex urban region. However, we demonstrate how AOD and aerosol type mapping can be accomplished with MISR data over complex urban regions, provided the retrieval is performed at sufficiently high spatial resolution, and with a rich enough set of aerosol components and mixtures.

  3. Airborne Sea of Dust over China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    TDust covered northern China in the last week of March during some of the worst dust storms to hit the region in a decade. The dust obscuring China's Inner Mongolian and Shanxi Provinces on March 24, 2002, is compared with a relatively clear day (October 31, 2001) in these images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Each image represents an area of about 380 by 630 kilometers (236 by 391 miles). In the image from late March, shown on the right, wave patterns in the yellowish cloud liken the storm to an airborne ocean of dust. The veil of particulates obscures features on the surface north of the Yellow River (visible in the lower left). The area shown lies near the edge of the Gobi desert, a few hundred kilometers, or miles, west of Beijing. Dust originates from the desert and travels east across northern China toward the Pacific Ocean. For especially severe storms, fine particles can travel as far as North America. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer, built and managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is one of five Earth-observing instruments aboard the Terra satellite, launched in December 1999. The instrument acquires images of Earth at nine angles simultaneously, using nine separate cameras pointed forward, downward and backward along its flight path. The change in reflection at different view angles affords the means to distinguish different types of atmospheric particles, cloud forms and land surface covers. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team

  4. Atmospheric aerosol characterization with a ground-based SPEX spectropolarimetric instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Harten, G.; de Boer, J.; Rietjens, J. H. H.; Di Noia, A.; Snik, F.; Volten, H.; Smit, J. M.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Henzing, J. S.; Keller, C. U.

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of atmospheric aerosols is important for understanding their impact on health and climate. A wealth of aerosol parameters can be retrieved from multi-angle, multi-wavelength radiance and polarization measurements of the clear sky. We developed a ground-based SPEX instrument (groundSPEX) for accurate spectropolarimetry, based on the passive, robust, athermal and snapshot spectral polarization modulation technique, and hence ideal for field deployment. It samples the scattering phase function in the principal plane in an automated fashion, using a motorized pan/tilt unit and automatic exposure time detection. Extensive radiometric and polarimetric calibrations were performed, yielding values for both random noise and systematic uncertainties. The absolute polarimetric accuracy at low degrees of polarization is established to be ~ 5 × 10-3. About 70 measurement sequences have been performed throughout four clear-sky days at Cabauw, the Netherlands. Several aerosol parameters were retrieved: aerosol optical thickness, effective radius, and complex refractive index for fine and coarse mode. The results are in good agreement with the co-located AERONET products, with a correlation coefficient of ρ = 0.932 for the total aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm.

  5. Atmospheric aerosol characterization with a ground-based SPEX spectropolarimetric instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Harten, G.; de Boer, J.; Rietjens, J. H. H.; Di Noia, A.; Snik, F.; Volten, H.; Smit, J. M.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Henzing, J. S.; Keller, C. U.

    2014-12-01

    Characterization of atmospheric aerosols is important for understanding their impact on health and climate. A wealth of aerosol parameters can be retrieved from multi-angle, multi-wavelength radiance and polarization measurements of the clear sky. We developed a ground-based SPEX instrument (groundSPEX) for accurate spectropolarimetry, based on the passive, robust, athermal, and snapshot spectral polarization modulation technique, and is hence ideal for field deployment. It samples the scattering phase function in the principal plane in an automated fashion, using a motorized pan/tilt unit and automatic exposure time detection. Extensive radiometric and polarimetric calibrations were performed, yielding values for both random noise and systematic uncertainties. The absolute polarimetric accuracy at low degrees of polarization is established to be ~5 × 10-3. About 70 measurement sequences have been performed throughout four clear-sky days at Cabauw, the Netherlands. Several aerosol parameters were retrieved: aerosol optical thickness, effective radius, and complex refractive index for fine and coarse mode. The results are in good agreement with the colocated AERONET products, with a correlation coefficient of ρ = 0.932 for the total aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm.

  6. A DETAILED SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE PLANET-HOSTING STAR WASP-12

    SciTech Connect

    Fossati, L.; Elmasli, A.; Haswell, C. A.; Holmes, S. E-mail: elmasli@ankara.edu.t E-mail: s.holmes@open.ac.u

    2010-09-01

    The knowledge of accurate stellar parameters is paramount in several fields of stellar astrophysics, particularly in the study of extrasolar planets, where often the star is the only visible component and therefore used to infer the planet's fundamental parameters. Another important aspect of the analysis of planetary systems is the stellar activity and the possible star-planet interaction. Here, we present a self-consistent abundance analysis of the planet-hosting star WASP-12 and a high-precision search for a structured stellar magnetic field on the basis of spectropolarimetric observations obtained with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter. Our results show that the star does not have a structured magnetic field, and that the obtained fundamental parameters are in good agreement with what was previously published. In addition, we derive improved constraints on the stellar age (1.0-2.65 Gyr), mass (1.23-1.49 M/M{sub sun}), and distance (295-465 pc). WASP-12 is an ideal object in which to look for pollution signatures in the stellar atmosphere. We analyze the WASP-12 abundances as a function of the condensation temperature and compare them with those published by several other authors on planet-hosting and non-planet-hosting stars. We find hints of atmospheric pollution in WASP-12's photosphere but are unable to reach firm conclusions with our present data. We conclude that a differential analysis based on WASP-12 twins will probably clarify whether an atmospheric pollution is present as well as the nature of this pollution and its implications in planet formation and evolution. We also attempt the direct detection of the circumstellar disk through infrared excess, but without success.

  7. Mid-infrared imaging- and spectro-polarimetric subarcsecond observations of NGC 1068

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C.; Roche, P. F.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Nikutta, R.; González-Martín, O.; Álvarez, C. A.; Esquej, P.; Espinosa, J. M. Rodríguez; Perlman, E.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Telesco, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present subarcsecond 7.5-13 μm imaging- and spectro-polarimetric observations of NGC 1068 using CanariCam on the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS. At all wavelengths, we find: (1) A 90 × 60 pc extended polarized feature in the northern ionization cone, with a uniform ˜44° polarization angle. Its polarization arises from dust and gas emission in the ionization cone, heated by the active nucleus and jet, and further extinguished by aligned dust grains in the host galaxy. The polarization spectrum of the jet-molecular cloud interaction at ˜24 pc from the core is highly polarized, and does not show a silicate feature, suggesting that the dust grains are different from those in the interstellar medium. (2) A southern polarized feature at ˜9.6 pc from the core. Its polarization arises from a dust emission component extinguished by a large concentration of dust in the galaxy disc. We cannot distinguish between dust emission from magnetically aligned dust grains directly heated by the jet close to the core, and aligned dust grains in the dusty obscuring material surrounding the central engine. Silicate-like grains reproduce the polarized dust emission in this feature, suggesting different dust compositions in both ionization cones. (3) An upper limit of polarization degree of 0.3 per cent in the core. Based on our polarization model, the expected polarization of the obscuring dusty material is ≲0.1 per cent in the 8-13 μm wavelength range. This low polarization may be arising from the passage of radiation through aligned dust grains in the shielded edges of the clumps.

  8. The X-ray and Spectropolarimetric View of Mass Loss and Transfer in Massive Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of massive stars are members of binary systems. However, in order to understand their evolutionary pathways, mass and angular momentum loss from these systems needs to be well characterized. Self-consistent explanations for their behavior across many wavelength regimes need to be valid in order to illuminate key evolutionary phases. In this talk I will present the results of an X-ray and spectropolarimetric study of three key binaries: beta Lyrae, V444 Cyg, and WR 140. In beta Lyrae, I will show a repeatable discrepancy between secondary eclipse in the total and polarized light curves indicates an accretion hot spot has formed on the edge of the disk in the system. The existence of this hot spot and its relationship to bipolar outflows within the system is important in the understanding of mass transfer dynamics in Roche-lobe overflow binaries. For V444 Cyg, I will present the results of an X-ray and polarimetric monitoring campaign which indicate the effects of radiative inhibition or braking, and the Coriolis force can be significant contributors to the location and shape of the shock within colliding wind binaries. Additionally, I will present data from WR 140 that suggest unexpected intrinsic hard X-ray emission may be present at some and argue that better polarimetric monitoring of the system is needed. Continued work on these and additional objects will provide new and important constraints on the mass loss structures within binary systems. This research includes contributions from collaborators at the University of Denver, NASA/GSFC, The Universite de Liege, The University of Toledo, East Tennessee State University, The University of Leeds, ESA, Hokkai-Gakuen University, NRAO, The University of Delaware, and Vanderbilt University. Additionally, I acknowledge support from the NASA Harriett G. Jenkins Pre-doctoral Fellowship Program, Sigma Xi’s Grants-in-Aid of Research Program, and NASA ADAP award NNH12ZDA001N.

  9. 3D reconstruction of cortical microtubules using multi-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Luhong; Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xiaoxu; Fan, Jiannan; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu; Xu, Yingke

    2017-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) has been widely used in biomedical research to visualize cellular processes near the cell surface. In this study, a novel multi-angle ring-illuminated TIRFM system, equipped with two galvo mirrors that are on conjugate plan of a 4f optical system was developed. Multi-angle TIRFM generates images with different penetration depths through the controlled variation of the incident angle of illuminating laser. We presented a method to perform three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of microtubules from multi-angle TIRFM images. The performance of our method was validated in simulated microtubules with variable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and the axial resolution and accuracy of reconstruction were evaluated in selecting different numbers of illumination angles or in different SNR conditions. In U373 cells, we reconstructed the 3-D localization of microtubules near the cell surface with high resolution using over a hundred different illumination angles. Theoretically, the presented TIRFM setup and 3-D reconstruction method can achieve 40 nm axial resolution in experimental conditions where SNR is as low as 2, with 35 different illumination angles. Moreover, our system and reconstruction method have the potential to be used in live cells to track membrane dynamics in 3-D.

  10. Stereoscopic Retrieval of Smoke Plume Heights and Motion from Space-Based Multi-Angle Imaging, Using the MISR INteractive eXplorer(MINX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, David L.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    Airborne particles desert dust, wildfire smoke, volcanic effluent, urban pollution affect Earth's climate as well as air quality and health. They are found in the atmosphere all over the planet, but vary immensely in amount and properties with season and location. Most aerosol particles are injected into the near-surface boundary layer, but some, especially wildfire smoke, desert dust and volcanic ash, can be injected higher into the atmosphere, where they can stay aloft longer, travel farther, produce larger climate effects, and possibly affect human and ecosystem health far downwind. So monitoring aerosol injection height globally can make important contributions to climate science and air quality studies. The Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) is a space borne instrument designed to study Earths clouds, aerosols, and surface. Since late February 2000 it has been retrieving aerosol particle amount and properties, as well as cloud height and wind data, globally, about once per week. The MINX visualization and analysis tool complements the operational MISR data products, enabling users to retrieve heights and winds locally for detailed studies of smoke plumes, at higher spatial resolution and with greater precision than the operational product and other space-based, passive remote sensing techniques. MINX software is being used to provide plume height statistics for climatological studies as well as to investigate the dynamics of individual plumes, and to provide parameterizations for climate modeling.

  11. Environmental Snapshots for Satellite Multi-Angle Aerosol Retrieval Validation During the ACE-Asia Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Anderson, Jim; Anderson, Theodore L.; Bates, Tim; Brechtel, Fred; Clarke, Antony; Dutton, Ellsworth; Flagan, Richard; Fouin, Robert; Fukushima, Hajime

    2003-01-01

    On five occasions spanning the ACE-Asia field experiment in spring 2001, the multi-angle imaging MISR instrument, flying aboard the NASA Earth Observing System s Terra satellite, took quarter-kilometer data over a 400-km-wide swath, coincident with high-quality observations by multiple instruments on two or more participating surface and airborne platforms. The cases capture a range of clean, polluted, and dusty aerosol conditions. They represent some of the best opportunities during ACE- Asia for comparative studies among intensive and extensive aerosol observations in their environmental context. We inter-compare related measurements and discuss the implications of apparent discrepancies for each case, at a level of detail appropriate to the analysis of satellite observations. With a three-stage optical modeling process, we synthesize data from multiple sources into layer-by-layer snapshots that summarize what we know about the state of the atmosphere and surface at key locations during each event, to be used for satellite vicarious calibration and aerosol retrieval validation. Aerosols within a few kilometers of the surface were composed primarily of pollution and Asian dust mixtures, as expected. Accumulation and coarse-mode particle size distributions varied little among the events studied, but column aerosol optical depth changed by more than a factor of four, and the near-surface proportion of dust ranged from about 25% to 50%. The amount of absorbing material in the sub-micron fraction was highest when near-surface winds crossed Beijing and the Korean Peninsula, and was considerably lower for all other cases. Ambiguities remain in segregating size distributions by composition; having simultaneous single scattering albedo measurements at more than a single wavelength would significantly reduce the resulting optical model uncertainties, as would integral constraints from surface and atmospheric radiative flux observations. The consistency of component

  12. [Evaluation of molecular weights of hyaluronate preparations by multi-angle laser light scattering].

    PubMed

    Yomota, Chikako

    2003-01-01

    Hyaluronate (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polysaccharide, has been used for osteoarthritis, periartritis of the shoulder and rheumatoid arthritis by intraarticular administration, and in ophthalmic surgery such as anterior segment surgery, and eye lotion. In this study, the molecular weight (Mw) of HA preparations were estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) system consisted of a refractometer (RI) and a multi-angle laser light scattering (MALS). From the results, it has been clarified that a successful characterization of HA samples with Mw up to 2 - 3 x 10(6) g/mol was possible by multidetector system.

  13. Reflections on current and future applications of multiangle imaging to aerosol and cloud remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diner, David

    2010-05-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument has been collecting global Earth data from NASA's Terra satellite since February 2000. With its 9 along-track view angles, 4 spectral bands, intrinsic spatial resolution of 275 m, and stable radiometric and geometric calibration, no instrument that combines MISR's attributes has previously flown in space, nor is there is a similar capability currently available on any other satellite platform. Multiangle imaging offers several tools for remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties, including bidirectional reflectance and scattering measurements, stereoscopic pattern matching, time lapse sequencing, and potentially, optical tomography. Current data products from MISR employ several of these techniques. Observations of the intensity of scattered light as a function of view angle and wavelength provide accurate measures of aerosol optical depths (AOD) over land, including bright desert and urban source regions. Partitioning of AOD according to retrieved particle classification and incorporation of height information improves the relationship between AOD and surface PM2.5 (fine particulate matter, a regulated air pollutant), constituting an important step toward a satellite-based particulate pollution monitoring system. Stereoscopic cloud-top heights provide a unique metric for detecting interannual variability of clouds and exceptionally high quality and sensitivity for detection and height retrieval for low-level clouds. Using the several-minute time interval between camera views, MISR has enabled a pole-to-pole, height-resolved atmospheric wind measurement system. Stereo imagery also makes possible global measurement of the injection heights and advection speeds of smoke plumes, volcanic plumes, and dust clouds, for which a large database is now available. To build upon what has been learned during the first decade of MISR observations, we are evaluating algorithm updates that not only refine retrieval

  14. Position error correction in absolute surface measurement based on a multi-angle averaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weibo; Wu, Biwei; Liu, Pengfei; Liu, Jian; Tan, Jiubin

    2017-04-01

    We present a method for position error correction in absolute surface measurement based on a multi-angle averaging method. Differences in shear rotation measurements at overlapping areas can be used to estimate the unknown relative position errors of the measurements. The model and the solving of the estimation algorithm have been discussed in detail. The estimation algorithm adopts a least-squares technique to eliminate azimuthal errors caused by rotation inaccuracy. The cost functions can be minimized to determine the true values of the unknowns of Zernike polynomial coefficients and rotation angle. Experimental results show the validity of the method proposed.

  15. SPICES: Spectro-Polarimetric Imaging and Characterization of Exoplanetary Systems - From Planetary Disks To Nearby Super Earths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccaletti, Anthony; Schneider, Jean; Traub, Wes; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Stam, Daphne; Gratton, Raffaele; Trauger, John; Cahoy, Kerri; Snik, Frans; Baudoz, Pierre; Galicher, Raphael; Reess, Jean-Michel; Mawet, Demitri; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Patience, Jenny; Kuchner, Marc; Wyatt, Mark; Pantin, Eric; Maire, Anne-Lise; Verinaud, Christophe; Ronayette, Samuel; Dubreuil, Didier; Belikov, Russ; Marley, M.; Stapelfeldt, K.

    2012-01-01

    SPICES (Spectro-Polarimetric Imaging and Characterization of Exoplanetary Systems) is a five-year M-class mission proposed to ESA Cosmic Vision. Its purpose is to image and characterize long-period extrasolar planets and circumstellar disks in the visible (450-900 nm) at a spectral resolution of about 40 using both spectroscopy and polarimetry. By 2020/2022, present and near-term instruments will have found several tens of planets that SPICES will be able to observe and study in detail. Equipped with a 1.5 m telescope, SPICES can preferentially access exoplanets located at several AUs (0.5-10 AU) from nearby stars (less than 25 pc) with masses ranging from a few Jupiter masses to Super Earths (approximately 2 Earth radii, approximately 10 mass compared to Earth) as well as circumstellar disks as faint as a few times the zodiacal light in the Solar System.

  16. Non-LTE Inversion of Spectropolarimetric and Spectroscopic Observations of a Small Active-region Filament Observed at the VTT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, P.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; Koza, J.; Gömöry, P.; Rybák, J.; Kučera, A.; Heinzel, P.

    2016-04-01

    An active region mini-filament was observed by VTT simultaneously in the HeI 10 830 Å triplet by the TIP 1 spectropolarimeter, in Hα by the TESOS Fabry-Pérot interferometer, and in Ca II 8542 Å by the VTT spectrograph. The spectropolarimetric data were inverted using the HAZEL code and Hα profiles were modelled solving a NLTE radiative transfer in a simple isobaric and isothermal 2D slab irradiated both from bottom and sides. It was found that the mini-filament is composed of horizontal fluxtubes, along which the cool plasma of T˜10 000 K can flow by very large - even supersonic - velocities.

  17. Airborne polarimeter intercomparison for the NASA Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Redemann, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) mission, recommended by the National Research Council's Decadal Survey, calls for a multi-angle, multi-spectral polarimeter devoted to observations of atmospheric aerosols and clouds. In preparation for ACE, NASA funds the deployment of airborne polarimeter prototypes, including the Airborne Multi-angle SpectroPolarimeter Imager (AirMSPI), the Passive Aerosol and Cloud Suite (PACS) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). These instruments have been operated together on NASA's ER-2 high altitude aircraft as part of field campaigns such as the POlarimeter DEfinition EXperiment (PODEX) (California, early 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, California and Texas, summer 2013). Our role in these efforts has been to serve as an assessment team performing level 1 (calibrated radiance, polarization) and level 2 (retrieved geophysical parameter) instrument intercomparisons, and to promote unified and generalized calibration, uncertainty assessment and retrieval techniques. We will present our progress in this endeavor thus far and describe upcoming research in 2015.

  18. Progress in Airborne Polarimeter Inter Comparison for the NASA Aerosols-Clouds-Ecosystems (ACE) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Redemann, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The Aerosols-Clouds-Ecosystems (ACE) mission, recommended by the National Research Council's Decadal Survey, calls for a multi-angle, multi-spectral polarimeter devoted to observations of atmospheric aerosols and clouds. In preparation for ACE, NASA funds the deployment of airborne polarimeters, including the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimeter Imager (AirMSPI), the Passive Aerosol and Cloud Suite (PACS) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). These instruments have been operated together on NASA's ER-2 high altitude aircraft as part of field campaigns such as the POlarimeter DEfinition EXperiment (PODEX) (California, early 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, California and Texas, summer 2013). Our role in these efforts has been to serve as an assessment team performing level 1 (calibrated radiance, polarization) and level 2 (retrieved geophysical parameter) instrument intercomparisons, and to promote unified and generalized calibration, uncertainty assessment and retrieval techniques. We will present our progress in this endeavor thus far and describe upcoming research in 2015.

  19. Airborne Polarimeter Intercomparison for the NASA Aerosols-Clouds-Ecosystems (ACE) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Redemann, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The Aerosols-Clouds-Ecosystems (ACE) mission, recommended by the National Research Council's Decadal Survey, calls for a multi-angle, multi-spectral polarimeter devoted to observations of atmospheric aerosols and clouds. In preparation for ACE, NASA funds the deployment of airborne polarimeters, including the Airborne Multi-angle SpectroPolarimeter Imager (AirMSPI), the Passive Aerosol and Cloud Suite (PACS) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). These instruments have been operated together on NASA's ER-2 high altitude aircraft as part of field campaigns such as the POlarimeter DEfinition EXperiment (PODEX) (California, early 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, California and Texas, summer 2013). Our role in these efforts has been to serve as an assessment team performing level 1 (calibrated radiance, polarization) and level 2 (retrieved geophysical parameter) instrument intercomparisons, and to promote unified and generalized calibration, uncertainty assessment and retrieval techniques. We will present our progress in this endeavor thus far and describe upcoming research in 2015.

  20. A single camera photogrammetry system for multi-angle fast localization of EEG electrodes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shuo; Sheng, Yang

    2011-11-01

    Photogrammetry has become an effective method for the determination of electroencephalography (EEG) electrode positions in three dimensions (3D). Capturing multi-angle images of the electrodes on the head is a fundamental objective in the design of photogrammetry system for EEG localization. Methods in previous studies are all based on the use of either a rotating camera or multiple cameras, which are time-consuming or not cost-effective. This study aims to present a novel photogrammetry system that can realize simultaneous acquisition of multi-angle head images in a single camera position. Aligning two planar mirrors with the angle of 51.4°, seven views of the head with 25 electrodes are captured simultaneously by the digital camera placed in front of them. A complete set of algorithms for electrode recognition, matching, and 3D reconstruction is developed. It is found that the elapsed time of the whole localization procedure is about 3 min, and camera calibration computation takes about 1 min, after the measurement of calibration points. The positioning accuracy with the maximum error of 1.19 mm is acceptable. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system provides a fast and cost-effective method for the EEG positioning.

  1. Aerosol and Surface Parameter Retrievals for a Multi-Angle, Multiband Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This software retrieves the surface and atmosphere parameters of multi-angle, multiband spectra. The synthetic spectra are generated by applying the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model, and a single-scattering dominated atmosphere model to surface reflectance data from Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The aerosol physical model uses a single scattering approximation using Rayleigh scattering molecules, and Henyey-Greenstein aerosols. The surface and atmosphere parameters of the models are retrieved using the Lavenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The software can retrieve the surface and atmosphere parameters with two different scales. The surface parameters are retrieved pixel-by-pixel while the atmosphere parameters are retrieved for a group of pixels where the same atmosphere model parameters are applied. This two-scale approach allows one to select the natural scale of the atmosphere properties relative to surface properties. The software also takes advantage of an intelligent initial condition given by the solution of the neighbor pixels.

  2. Eyjafjallajokull Volcano Plume Particle-Type Characterization from Space-Based Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Limbacher, James

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Research Aerosol algorithm makes it possible to study individual aerosol plumes in considerable detail. From the MISR data for two optically thick, near-source plumes from the spring 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallaj kull volcano, we map aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients and changing aerosol particle types with this algorithm; several days downwind, we identify the occurrence of volcanic ash particles and retrieve AOD, demonstrating the extent and the limits of ash detection and mapping capability with the multi-angle, multi-spectral imaging data. Retrieved volcanic plume AOD and particle microphysical properties are distinct from background values near-source, as well as for overwater cases several days downwind. The results also provide some indication that as they evolve, plume particles brighten, and average particle size decreases. Such detailed mapping offers context for suborbital plume observations having much more limited sampling. The MISR Standard aerosol product identified similar trends in plume properties as the Research algorithm, though with much smaller differences compared to background, and it does not resolve plume structure. Better optical analogs of non-spherical volcanic ash, and coincident suborbital data to validate the satellite retrieval results, are the factors most important for further advancing the remote sensing of volcanic ash plumes from space.

  3. Simultaneous regularization method for the determination of radius distributions from experimental multiangle correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Buttgereit, R; Roths, T; Honerkamp, J; Aberle, L B

    2001-10-01

    Dynamic light scattering experiments have become a powerful tool in order to investigate the dynamical properties of complex fluids. In many applications in both soft matter research and industry so-called "real world" systems are subject of great interest. Here, the dilution of the investigated system often cannot be changed without getting measurement artifacts, so that one often has to deal with highly concentrated and turbid media. The investigation of such systems requires techniques that suppress the influence of multiple scattering, e.g., cross correlation techniques. However, measurements at turbid as well as highly diluted media lead to data with low signal-to-noise ratio, which complicates data analysis and leads to unreliable results. In this article a multiangle regularization method is discussed, which copes with the difficulties arising from such samples and enhances enormously the quality of the estimated solution. In order to demonstrate the efficiency of this multiangle regularization method we applied it to cross correlation functions measured at highly turbid samples.

  4. Research on large aperture multi-angle multi-surface mirror process technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; He, Manze; Yan, Dingyao; Liu, Yibin

    2016-10-01

    Light weighted multi-angle multi-surface mirror is made of glass-ceramic, with the structural characteristic of multicavity thin wall, high precision of surface figure and angle between surfaces, has very different processing technology with traditional solid mirror. Based on the 460mm×434mm×80mm multi-angle multi-surface mirror, glass combination manufacture method and relevant interferometry of angle measurement was designed. The process technology was studied, then the consistency of angle between surfaces and the influence on multi-cavity thin wall deformation of lateral surface and material of polishing pad on the surface figure processing were controlled. The model between the variation of angle and load was established, from which the hysteresis of angle variation was analyzed, then the prototype workpiece was finished. The difficult problem on synchronically controlling the surface angles and surface figure of the mirror, which has high center of gravity and multi-cavity thin wall, was solved. The lateral surface figure was controlled below λ/6 (PV, λ=632.8nm), and the perpendicularity of lateral surfaces were controlled below 5''.

  5. Siberian boreal forest structure estimates from concurrent multi-angle WorldView acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neigh, C. S. R.; Montesano, P. M.; Sun, G.; Ranson, K.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating forest structure from space is important for monitoring the distribution and abundance of forest carbon stocks. Very-High Spatial Resolution (VHSR, 1 m or less) optical data could be used to estimate forest structure in remote and difficult to access forests of the world, but little information exists about the utility of multi-sensor cross-track stereo pairs for this purpose. We estimated Siberian boreal forest structure in Tura Krasnoyarsk, Russia from a tasked dense 2014 summer time-series of WorldView-1 and 2 in multi-angle combinations of Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) runs to generate point clouds from parallax that are used to produce digital surface models (DSMs). We evaluated single pair point cloud DSMs and accumulated point cloud DSMs with different viewing geometries from ASP to estimate root mean square errors (RMSEs). Our results suggest that a dense multi-angle time series from the WorldView constellation is a useful tool for estimating forest canopy height and dense multi-temporal observations can reduce height RMSEs if they have the appropriate viewing geometry.

  6. Multi-angle lensless digital holography for depth resolved imaging on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ting-Wei; Isikman, Serhan O.; Bishara, Waheb; Tseng, Derek; Erlinger, Anthony; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-01-01

    A multi-angle lensfree holographic imaging platform that can accurately characterize both the axial and lateral positions of cells located within multi-layered micro-channels is introduced. In this platform, lensfree digital holograms of the micro-objects on the chip are recorded at different illumination angles using partially coherent illumination. These digital holograms start to shift laterally on the sensor plane as the illumination angle of the source is tilted. Since the exact amount of this lateral shift of each object hologram can be calculated with an accuracy that beats the diffraction limit of light, the height of each cell from the substrate can be determined over a large field of view without the use of any lenses. We demonstrate the proof of concept of this multi-angle lensless imaging platform by using light emitting diodes to characterize various sized microparticles located on a chip with sub-micron axial and lateral localization over ~60 mm2 field of view. Furthermore, we successfully apply this lensless imaging approach to simultaneously characterize blood samples located at multi-layered micro-channels in terms of the counts, individual thicknesses and the volumes of the cells at each layer. Because this platform does not require any lenses, lasers or other bulky optical/mechanical components, it provides a compact and high-throughput alternative to conventional approaches for cytometry and diagnostics applications involving lab on a chip systems. PMID:20588819

  7. Multi-angle RT Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douté, S.; Ceamanos, X.; Fernando, J.; Schmidt, F.; Lyapustin, A.; Pinet, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    We address the atmospheric correction of near-simultaneous multi-angle observations acquired by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) [1] aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. In the targeted mode CRISM senses the surface of Mars using eleven viewing angles that allow it to provide unique information on the scattering properties of the surface materials. In order to retrieve this information we put forward an innovative radiative transfer-based method named Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations [2] (MARS-ReCO). It retrieves photometric curves of surface materials in reflectance units after compensating the signal sensed by CRISM for the aerosol and gaseous contributions. MARS-ReCO represents a substantial improvement regarding previous planetary remote sensing techniques as it takes into consideration the anisotropy of the surface, thus providing more realistic surface products. MARS-ReCO inherits the basis of state-of-the-art atmospheric correction methods in Earth observation such as the MAIAC algorithm [3] while adding some features. Contrary to MAIAC, which works with multi-temporal series of images, MARS-ReCO is devised to process near-simultaneous multi-angle CRISM observations. Furthermore, MARS-ReCO adopts a new inversion scheme that takes care of propagating several sources of errors to the end products. In addition an aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm is put forward which exploits the full view zenith angle range spanned by a single CRISM targeted observation. This technique is based on a formulation of the TOA signal expressing the correlation at 2 μm between the intensity of the CO2 gas absorption and the amount of aerosols. In conclusion, the present work thus proposes a complete chain for atmospheric correction of CRISM targeted observations composed by (i) the transformation of targeted observations into appropriate products for multi-angular data processing

  8. Sampling for Airborne Radioactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    compared to betas, gammas and neutrons. For an airborne radioactivity detection system, it is most important to be able to detect alpha particles and... Airborne radioactive particles may emit alpha, beta, gamma or neutron radiation, depending on which radioisotope is present. From a health perspective...

  9. Molecular characterization of multivalent bioconjugates by size-exclusion chromatography with multiangle laser light scattering.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Jacob F; Ashton, Randolph S; Rode, Nikhil A; Schaffer, David V; Healy, Kevin E

    2012-09-19

    The degree of substitution and valency of bioconjugate reaction products are often poorly judged or require multiple time- and product-consuming chemical characterization methods. These aspects become critical when analyzing and optimizing the potency of costly polyvalent bioactive conjugates. In this study, size-exclusion chromatography with multiangle laser light scattering was paired with refractive index detection and ultraviolet spectroscopy (SEC-MALS-RI-UV) to characterize the reaction efficiency, degree of substitution, and valency of the products of conjugation of either peptides or proteins to a biopolymer scaffold, i.e., hyaluronic acid (HyA). Molecular characterization was more complete compared to estimates from a protein quantification assay, and exploitation of this method led to more accurate deduction of the molecular structures of polymer bioconjugates. Information obtained using this technique can improve macromolecular engineering design principles and help to better understand multivalent macromolecular interactions in biological systems.

  10. Tomographic reconstruction of an aerosol plume using passive multiangle observations from the MISR satellite instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Davis, Anthony B.; Diner, David J.

    2016-12-01

    We present initial results using computed tomography to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of an aerosol plume from passive observations made by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. MISR views the Earth from nine different angles at four visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Adopting the 672 nm channel, we treat each view as an independent measure of aerosol optical thickness along the line of sight at 1.1 km resolution. A smoke plume over dark water is selected as it provides a more tractable lower boundary condition for the retrieval. A tomographic algorithm is used to reconstruct the horizontal and vertical aerosol extinction field for one along-track slice from the path of all camera rays passing through a regular grid. The results compare well with ground-based lidar observations from a nearby Micropulse Lidar Network site.

  11. An Integrated Multiangle, Multispectral, and Polarimetric Imaging Concept for Aerosol Remote Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J.; Chipman, Russell A.; Beaudry, Neil; Cairns, Brian; Foo, Leslie D.; Macenka, Steven A.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Keller, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    Techniques for passive remote sensing of aerosol optical and microphysical properties from space include visible, near and shortwave-infrared imaging (e.g., from MODIS), multiangle intensity imaging (e.g., ATSR-2, AATSR, MISR), near-ultraviolet mapping (e.g., TOMSIOMI), and polarimetry (e.g., POLDER, APS). Each of these methods has unique strengths. In this paper, we present a concept for integrating these approaches into a unified sensor. Design goals include spectral coverage from the near-UV to the shortwave infrared; intensity and polarimetric imaging simultaneously at multiple view angles; global coverage within a few days; kilometer to sub-kilometer spatial resolution; and measurement of the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) for a subset of the spectral complement with an uncertainty of 0.5% or less.

  12. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.

    2012-11-01

    We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  13. Fallspeed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in freefall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.

    2012-07-01

    We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in freefall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) captures high resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fallspeed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fallspeed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than graupel particles of similar size.

  14. Sensitivity of Multiangle, Multispectral Polarimetric Remote Sensing Over Open Oceans to Water-Leaving Radiance: Analyses of RSP Data Acquired During the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chowdhary, Jacek; Cairns, Brian; Waquet, Fabien; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Ottaviani, Matteo; Redemann, Jens; Travis, Larry; Mishchenko, Michael

    2012-01-01

    For remote sensing of aerosol over the ocean, there is a contribution from light scattered underwater. The brightness and spectrum of this light depends on the biomass content of the ocean, such that variations in the color of the ocean can be observed even from space. Rayleigh scattering by pure sea water, and Rayleigh-Gans type scattering by plankton, causes this light to be polarized with a distinctive angular distribution. To study the contribution of this underwater light polarization to multiangle, multispectral observations of polarized reflectance over ocean, we previously developed a hydrosol model for use in underwater light scattering computations that produces realistic variations of the ocean color and the underwater light polarization signature of pure sea water. In this work we review this hydrosol model, include a correction for the spectrum of the particulate scattering coefficient and backscattering efficiency, and discuss its sensitivity to variations in colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and in the scattering function of marine particulates. We then apply this model to measurements of total and polarized reflectance that were acquired over open ocean during the MILAGRO field campaign by the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). Analyses show that our hydrosol model faithfully reproduces the water-leaving contributions to RSP reflectance, and that the sensitivity of these contributions to Chlorophyll a concentration [Chl] in the ocean varies with the azimuth, height, and wavelength of observations. We also show that the impact of variations in CDOM on the polarized reflectance observed by the RSP at low altitude is comparable to or much less than the standard error of this reflectance whereas their effects in total reflectance may be substantial (i.e. up to >30%). Finally, we extend our study of polarized reflectance variations with [Chl] and CDOM to include results for simulated spaceborne observations.

  15. Sensitivity of PARASOL multi-angle photo-polarimetric aerosol retrievals to cloud contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stap, F. A.; Hasekamp, O.; Röckmann, T.

    2014-10-01

    An important problem in satellite remote sensing of aerosols is related to the need to perform an adequate cloud screening. If a cloud screening is applied that is not strict enough, the ground scene has the probability of residual cloud cover which causes large errors on the retrieved aerosol parameters. On the other hand, if the cloud screening procedure is too strict, too many clear sky cases, especially near-cloud scenes, will falsely be flagged cloudy. The detrimental effects of cloud contamination as well as the importance of aerosol cloud interactions that can be studied in these near-cloud scenes call for new approaches to cloud screening. Multi-angle, multi-wavelength photo-polarimetric measurements have a unique capability to distinguish between scattering by (liquid) cloud droplets and aerosol particles. In this paper the sensitivity of aerosol retrievals from multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements to cloud contamination is investigated and the ability to intrinsically filter the cloud contaminated scenes based on a goodness-of-fit criteria is evaluated. Hereto, an aerosol retrieval algorithm is applied to a partially clouded, synthetic data-set including partial cloud cover as well as non-cloud screened POLDER-3/PARASOL observations It is found that a goodness-of-fit filter, together with a filter on the coarse mode refractive index (mrcoarse > 1.335) and a cirrus screening adequately reject the cloud contaminated scenes. No bias nor larger SD are found in the retrieved parameters for this intrinsic cloud filter compared to the parameters retrieved in a priori cloud screened data-set (using MODIS/AQUA cloud masks) of PARASOL observations. Moreover, less high aerosol load scenes are misinterpreted as cloud contaminated. The retrieved aerosol optical thickness, single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent show good agreement with AERONET observations. Furthermore, the synthetic retrievals give confidence in the ability of the algorithm to

  16. Sensitivity of PARASOL multi-angle photopolarimetric aerosol retrievals to cloud contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stap, F. A.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-03-01

    An important problem in satellite remote sensing of aerosols is related to the need to perform an adequate cloud screening. If a cloud screening is applied that is not strict enough, the ground scene has the probability of residual cloud cover which causes large errors on the retrieved aerosol parameters. On the other hand, if the cloud-screening procedure is too strict, too many clear sky cases, especially near-cloud scenes, will falsely be flagged cloudy. The detrimental effects of cloud contamination as well as the importance of aerosol cloud interactions that can be studied in these near-cloud scenes call for new approaches to cloud screening. Multi-angle multi-wavelength photopolarimetric measurements have a unique capability to distinguish between scattering by (liquid) cloud droplets and aerosol particles. In this paper the sensitivity of aerosol retrievals from multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements to cloud contamination is investigated and the ability to intrinsically filter the cloud-contaminated scenes based on a goodness-of-fit criteria is evaluated. Hereto, an aerosol retrieval algorithm is applied to a partially clouded over-ocean synthetic data set as well as non-cloud-screened over-ocean POLDER-3/PARASOL observations. It is found that a goodness-of-fit filter, together with a filter on the coarse mode refractive index (mrcoarse > 1.335) and a cirrus screening, adequately rejects the cloud-contaminated scenes. No bias or larger SD are found in the retrieved parameters for this intrinsic cloud filter compared to the parameters retrieved in a priori cloud-screened data set (using MODIS/AQUA cloud masks) of PARASOL observations. Moreover, less high-aerosol load scenes are misinterpreted as cloud contaminated. The retrieved aerosol optical thickness, single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent show good agreement with AERONET observations. Furthermore, the synthetic retrievals give confidence in the ability of the algorithm to correctly

  17. Spectro-polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function determination of in-scene materials and its use in target detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Brent D.; Gartley, Michael G.; Messinger, David W.; Salvaggio, Carl; Schott, John R.

    2010-11-01

    For sensing systems that characterize the spectro-polarimetric radiance reaching the camera, the origin of the sensed phenomenology is a complex mixture of sources. While some of these sources do not contribute to the polarimetric signature, many do such as the polarization state of the downwelled sky radiance, the target and background p-BRDF(polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function), the polarization state of the upwelled path radiance, and the sensor Mueller matrix transfer function. In this paper we derive portions of the p-BRDF in terms of both the spectral diffuse and polarimetric specular components of the reflectance using an in-scene calibration technique. This process is applied to simulated data, laboratory data, and data from a field collection. Spectra of a car panel for clean and contaminated states derived using laboratory data are injected into a hyperspectral image cube. It is shown how this target can be identified using a target specific tracking vector derived from its polarimetric signature as it moves between spatial locations within a scene.

  18. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  19. Coordinated Airborne, Spaceborne, and Ground-Based Measurements of Massive, Thick Aerosol Layers During the Dry Season in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hlavka, D. L.; McGill, M. J.; Holben, B. N.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J.; Torres, O.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the dry-season airborne campaign of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000), unique coordinated observations were made of massive, thick aerosol layers. These layers were often dominated by aerosols from biomass burning. We report on airborne Sunphotometer measurements of aerosol optical depth (lambda=354-1558 nm), columnar water vapor, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and water vapor density that were obtained aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft. We compare these with ground-based AERONET Sun/sky radiometer results, with ground based lidar data MPL-Net), and with measurements from a downward-pointing lidar aboard the high-flying NASA ER-2 aircraft. Finally, we show comparisons between aerosol optical depths from the Sunphotometer and those retrieved over land and over water using four spaceborne sensors (TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer), MISR (Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer) and ATSR-2 (Along Track Scanning Radiometer)).

  20. Aerosol optical and microphysical properties from POLDER-PARASOL multi-angle photo-polarimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasekamp, O.; Litvinov, P.; Butz, A.

    2010-12-01

    The large uncertainty on the aerosol effects on clouds and climate is reflected in considerable discrepancies between different model simulations of the radiative forcing caused by these effects. Also, there exist even larger differences between values for radiative forcing calculated by models and those estimated from satellites (and model calculations constrained by satellite measurements). Relationships between aerosols and clouds derived from satellite measurements are subject to a number of important limitations. First of all, with current satellite aerosol products it is hard to determine which fraction of the aerosols is anthropogenic and which fraction is natural. Often the rather crude assumption is used that the fine mode contribution is fully anthropogenic. Furthermore, most aerosol types are strongly hygroscopic, which means that in an environment with high relative humidity (in the surrounding of clouds) the particle size increases considerably leading, in turn, to an increase in optical thickness. This effect may be misinterpreted as an apparent relation between aerosol concentration and cloud cover. Also, meteorology effects can be misinterpreted as apparent aerosol-cloud relationships. Accurate information on aerosol size and refractive index (related to chemical composition of aerosols and absorption) is needed to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic aerosols and to distinguish between aerosol effects on cloud formation and apparent relationships due to humidity and meteorology effects. Multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements have the potential to provide the necessary information on these aerosol properties. The POLDER instrument onboard the PARASOL micro-satellite is the only instrument currently in space that performs multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements. To fully exploit the information contained in these measurements a new type of retrieval algorithm is needed that retrieves detailed information on aerosol microphysical and

  1. Forest and Shrub Canopy Structure from Multiangle and High Resolution Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopping, M. J.; Wang, Z.; Bull, M. A.; Duchesne, R.; North, M.

    2015-12-01

    The 3-D structure of forest and shrub canopies can be mapped using diverse technologies, with the most advanced being lidar and interferometric radar. Other approaches include various modes of interpretation of multi-angle imagery, high-resolution stereo photogrammetry, plant identification, delineation, and measurement from high-resolution panchromatic imagery, and image texture metrics. While active remote sensing will revolutionize mapping of canopy structure, there are currently limitations. High precision lidar will remain limited geographically until the launch of NASA's innovative Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation to the International Space Station in 2019 but even this mission will not see high latitude boreal forest, taiga, or shrubs in tundra because of the orbit. Radar-based methods must be calibrated using high quality data. Imagery from passive imagers acquired at a range of scales therefore has much value if it can be used to provide structure data at broader geographic and temporal scales. Here we report on canopy mapping at scales from 0.5 m to 250 m using high-resolution panchromatic imagery from satellite imagers and NASA's Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), respectively. MISR-based 250 m aboveground biomass maps for the southwestern U.S. were assessed against the radar-derived North American Carbon Program National Biomass and Carbon Dataset 2000, showing good agreement (R2=0.80, RMSE=31 Mg ha-1 for the validation data set; and 0.76 and 18 Mg ha-1, respectively, for 1013 random points). For Oregon forests the best and worst cases were R2=0.90, RMSE=42 Mg ha-1 and R2=0.78, RMSE=62 Mg ha-1, respectively. For improved validation, the CANAPI algorithm was used to interpret high-resolution panchromatic imagery. In Sierra National forest, California, canopy cover estimates agreed well with those from field inventory (R2=0.92, RMSE=0.03). Height estimates gave R2=0.94 and relative RMSE=0.25 m for the range 3 m - 60 m, vs. lidar

  2. The use of MISR Multiangle Image Data to Visualize Cloud Morphology and Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Realmuto, V. J.; Moroney, C. M.; Davies, R.

    2002-12-01

    The Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), currently orbiting the Earth aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, acquires image data at 9 distinct viewing angles simultaneously. This multiangle imaging is accomplished through the use of 9 cameras, with one camera providing a nadir view and the remaining cameras providing views 26.1, 45.6, 60.0, and 70.5 degrees fore and aft of nadir. Each camera, in turn, measures scene radiance in 4 spectral bands (red, green, blue, and near infrared). One of the objectives of the MISR mission is to infer the physical properties of atmospheric aerosols, clouds, and land cover (including snow, ice, and vegetation) from angular variations in scene radiance. One step in the operational processing of MISR data is to map these data into a Space Oblique Mercator projection. As a result of this projection, features at elevations above or below the reference ellipsoid (WGS 84) exhibit an apparent displacement, known as parallax or disparity, in the off-nadir images. The disparities exhibited by clouds can be used to estimate the height of the clouds, and cloud-top height maps are an operational MISR data product. Although the 9 MISR cameras acquire data simultaneously, approximately 7 minutes are required to obtain a suite of fore- and aft-viewing images that depict the same scene. This time lag allows MISR to capture the motion of clouds due to winds, and maps of wind direction and wind speed are operational data products. Visualization of the cloud properties measured by MISR presents several unique challenges, such as registration of the angular distribution of radiance above a cloud with its surface morphology and depiction of cloud motion independent of the disparity resulting from cloud height. We will present some of the tools and animation techniques developed to address these challenges. For example, MISR_Shift is an interactive tool that allows us to evaluate the effects of changes (or uncertainties) in cloud height and wind speed

  3. Development of the Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera for Improved Hydrometeor Habit-Diameter-Mass-Fallspeed Parameterizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-20

    storms. Completion of the Multi-angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) will provide for the first time auto - mated measurement of these properties. The...data that can be collected for hydrometeors at the point that MASC development is completed. • Stereoscopic polarized color images – Color and...10 µm at 1/100,000th second shutter speed. • Volume and mass – Calculated through stereoscopic reconstruction. • Fall speed – Vertically stacked

  4. DISK-LOSS AND DISK-RENEWAL PHASES IN CLASSICAL Be STARS. I. ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewski, John P.; Draper, Zachary H.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Meade, Marilyn R. E-mail: zhd@uw.ed E-mail: karen.bjorkman@utoledo.ed E-mail: meade@astro.wisc.ed

    2010-02-01

    Classical Be stars are known to occasionally transition from having a gaseous circumstellar disk ('Be phase') to a state in which all observational evidence for the presence of these disks disappears ('normal B-star phase'). We present one of the most comprehensive spectropolarimetric views to date of such a transition for two Be stars, pi Aquarii and 60 Cygni.The disk-loss episode of 60 Cyg was characterized by a generally monotonic decrease in emission strength over a timescale of approx1000 days from the maximum V-band polarization to the minimum Halpha equivalent width, consistent with the viscous timescale of the disk, assuming alphaapprox0.14. pi Aqr's disk loss was episodic in nature and occurred over a timescale of approx2440 days. An observed time lag between the behavior of the polarization and Halpha in both stars indicates the disk clearing proceeded in an 'inside-out' manner. We determine the position angle of the intrinsic polarization to be 166.{sup 0}7 +- 0.{sup 0}1 for pi Aqr and 107.{sup 0}7 +- 0.{sup 0}4 for 60 Cyg, and model the wavelength dependence of the observed polarization during the quiescent diskless phase of each star to determine the interstellar polarization along the line of sight. Minor outbursts observed during the quiescent phase of each star shared similar lifetimes as those previously reported for mu Cen, suggesting that the outbursts represent the injection and subsequent viscous dissipation of individual blobs of material into the inner circumstellar environments of these stars. We also observe deviations from the mean intrinsic polarization position angle during polarization outbursts in each star, indicating deviations from axisymmetry. We propose that these deviations might be indicative of the injection (and subsequent circularization) of new blobs into the inner disk, either in the plane of the bulk of the disk material or in a slightly inclined (non-coplanar) orbit.

  5. A Spectropolarimetric Test of the Structure of the Intrinsic Absorbers in the Quasar HS 1603+3820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Kawabata, Koji S.; Eracleous, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Kashikawa, Nobunari

    2010-08-01

    We report the results of a spectropolarimetric observation of the C VI "mini-broad" absorption line (mini-BAL) in the quasar HS 1603+3820 (z em = 2.542). The observations were carried out with the FOCAS instrument on the Subaru Telescope and yielded an extremely high polarization sensitivity of δp~ 0.1%, at a resolving power of R ~ 1500. HS 1603+3820 has been the target of a high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring campaign for more than four years, aimed at studying its highly variable C VI mini-BAL profile. Using the monitoring observations in an earlier paper, we were able to narrow down the causes of the variability to the following two scenarios: (1) scattering material of variable optical depth redirecting photons around the absorber and (2) a variable, highly ionized screen between the continuum source and the absorber which modulates the UV continuum incident on the absorber. The observations presented here provide a crucial test of the scattering scenario and lead us to disfavor it because (1) the polarization level is very small (p ~ 0.6%) throughout the spectrum and (2) the polarization level does not increase across the mini-BAL trough. Thus, the variable screen scenario emerges as our favored explanation of the C VI mini-BAL variability. Our conclusion is bolstered by recent X-ray observations of nearby mini-BAL quasars, which show a rapidly variable soft X-ray continuum that appears to be the result of transmission through an ionized absorber of variable ionization parameter and optical depth. Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  6. A SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC TEST OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE INTRINSIC ABSORBERS IN THE QUASAR HS 1603+3820

    SciTech Connect

    Misawa, Toru; Kawabata, Koji S.; Eracleous, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Kashikawa, Nobunari E-mail: mce@astro.psu.ed E-mail: kawabtkj@hiroshima-u.ac.j

    2010-08-20

    We report the results of a spectropolarimetric observation of the C VI 'mini-broad' absorption line (mini-BAL) in the quasar HS 1603+3820 (z {sub em} = 2.542). The observations were carried out with the FOCAS instrument on the Subaru Telescope and yielded an extremely high polarization sensitivity of {delta}p{approx} 0.1%, at a resolving power of R {approx} 1500. HS 1603+3820 has been the target of a high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring campaign for more than four years, aimed at studying its highly variable C VI mini-BAL profile. Using the monitoring observations in an earlier paper, we were able to narrow down the causes of the variability to the following two scenarios: (1) scattering material of variable optical depth redirecting photons around the absorber and (2) a variable, highly ionized screen between the continuum source and the absorber which modulates the UV continuum incident on the absorber. The observations presented here provide a crucial test of the scattering scenario and lead us to disfavor it because (1) the polarization level is very small (p {approx} 0.6%) throughout the spectrum and (2) the polarization level does not increase across the mini-BAL trough. Thus, the variable screen scenario emerges as our favored explanation of the C VI mini-BAL variability. Our conclusion is bolstered by recent X-ray observations of nearby mini-BAL quasars, which show a rapidly variable soft X-ray continuum that appears to be the result of transmission through an ionized absorber of variable ionization parameter and optical depth.

  7. Multi-angle Spectra Evolution of Langmuir Turbulence Excited by RF Ionospheric Interactions at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Rayyan, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Spaleta, J.; Watanabe, N.; Golkowski, M.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    The high power HAARP HF transmitter is employed to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Dependence of diagnostic signals on HAARP HF parameters, including pulselength, duty-cycle, aspect angle, and frequency were recorded. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI) and isolation of ponderomotive effects. Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra including cascade, collapse, and co-existence spectra and an outshifted plasma line under certain ionospheric conditions. High time resolution studies of the temporal evolution of the plasma line reveal the appearance of an overshoot effect on ponderomotive timescales. Bursty turbulence is observed in the collapse and cascade lines. For the first time, simultaneous multi-angle radar measurements of plasma line spectra are recorded demonstrating marked dependence on aspect angle with the strongest interaction region observed displaced southward of the HF zenith pointing angle. Numerous measurements of the outshifted plasma line are observed. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  8. Simultaneous Multi-angle Radar Observations of Langmuir Turbulence Excited by RF Ionospheric Interactions at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Rayyan, N.; Watanabe, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2013-10-01

    The high power HAARP HF transmitter is employed to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Dependence of diagnostic signals on HAARP HF parameters, including pulselength, duty-cycle, aspect angle, and frequency were recorded. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI) and isolation of ponderomotive effects. Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra including cascade, collapse, and co-existence spectra and an outshifted plasma line under certain ionospheric conditions. High time resolution studies of the temporal evolution of the plasma line reveal the appearance of an overshoot effect on ponderomotive timescales. Bursty turbulence is observed in the collapse and cascade lines. For the first time, simultaneous multi-angle radar measurements of plasma line spectra are recorded demonstrating marked dependence on aspect angle with the strongest interaction region observed displaced southward of the HF zenith pointing angle. Numerous measurements of the outshifted plasma line are observed. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  9. Multi-angle Spectra Evolution of Ionospheric Turbulence Excited by RF Interactions at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Rayyan, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Watanabe, N.; Golkowski, M.; Bristow, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The high power HAARP HF transmitter is employed to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Dependence of diagnostic signals on HAARP HF parameters, including pulselength, duty-cycle, aspect angle, and frequency were recorded. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI) and isolation of ponderomotive effects. For the first time, simultaneous multi-angle radar measurements of plasma line spectra are recorded demonstrating marked dependence on aspect angle with the strongest interaction region observed displaced southward of the HF zenith pointing angle. For a narrow range of HF pointing between Spitze and magnetic zenith, a reduced threshold for AFAI is observed. High time resolution studies of the temporal evolution of the plasma line reveal the appearance of an overshoot effect on ponderomotive timescales. Numerous measurements of the outshifted plasma line are observed. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts

  10. A recursive regularization algorithm for estimating the particle size distribution from multiangle dynamic light scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Kecheng; Li, Wei; Wang, Wanyan; Guo, Wenping; Xia, Min

    2016-07-01

    Conventional regularization methods have been widely used for estimating particle size distribution (PSD) in single-angle dynamic light scattering, but they could not be used directly in multiangle dynamic light scattering (MDLS) measurements for lack of accurate angular weighting coefficients, which greatly affects the PSD determination and none of the regularization methods perform well for both unimodal and multimodal distributions. In this paper, we propose a recursive regularization method-Recursion Nonnegative Tikhonov-Phillips-Twomey (RNNT-PT) algorithm for estimating the weighting coefficients and PSD from MDLS data. This is a self-adaptive algorithm which distinguishes characteristics of PSDs and chooses the optimal inversion method from Nonnegative Tikhonov (NNT) and Nonnegative Phillips-Twomey (NNPT) regularization algorithm efficiently and automatically. In simulations, the proposed algorithm was able to estimate the PSDs more accurately than the classical regularization methods and performed stably against random noise and adaptable to both unimodal and multimodal distributions. Furthermore, we found that the six-angle analysis in the 30-130° range is an optimal angle set for both unimodal and multimodal PSDs.

  11. Sensitivity of Multiangle Imaging to the Optical and Microphysical Properties of Biomass Burning Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David; Yau, Kevin; Seinfeld, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of biomass burning (BB) carbonaceous particles in the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Standard Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm is assessed, and algorithm refinements are suggested, based on a theoretical sensitivity analysis and comparisons with near-coincident AERONET measurements at representative BB sites. Over the natural ranges of BB aerosol microphysical and optical properties observed in past field campaigns, patterns of retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), particle size, and single scattering albedo (SSA) are evaluated. On the basis of the theoretical analysis, assuming total column AOD of 0.2, over a dark, uniform surface, MISR can distinguish two to three groups in each of size and SSA, except when the assumed atmospheric particles are significantly absorbing (mid-visible SSA approx.0.84), or of medium sizes (mean radius approx.0.13 pin); sensitivity to absorbing, medium-large size particles increases considerably when the assumed column AOD is raised to 0.5. MISR Research Aerosol Retrievals confirm the theoretical results, based on coincident AERONET inversions under BB-dominated conditions. When BB is externally mixed with dust in the atmosphere, dust optical model and surface reflection uncertainties, along with spatial variability, contribute to differences between the Research Retrievals and AERONET. These results suggest specific refinements to the MISR Standard Aerosol Algorithm complement of component particles and mixtures. They also highlight the importance for satellite aerosol retrievals of surface reflectance characterization, with accuracies that can be difficult to achieve with coupled surface-aerosol algorithms in some higher AOD situations.

  12. The remote-controlled, multiangle bent sub for drilling trajectory control and corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Boulet, J.G.; Morin, P.E.

    1986-10-01

    A downhole, adjustable, multiangle bent sub, called Telepilote, has been developed for remote control of the wellbore path on a real-time basis without changing the general bottomhole assembly (BHA) configuration. Different modes of actuation for changing the bent sub correspond to different types of construction. The tool is available in 6 3/4-, 7 3/4-, 8-, and 9 1/2-in. (17.1-, 19.7-, 20.3-, and 24.1-cm) nominal sizes. It can be set at six positions, from zero (or straight position) to a maximum angle position of 2/sup 0/, 2/sup 0/30', or 3/sup 0/, according to nominal sizes. The main construction features and different drilling applications are presented. In addition, the T-3000 Telepilote is described, which features the Telehydrocom (THD) actuator system. This system makes an immediate, direct hookup in the drillstring between the sub and all survey instruments, including measurement-while-drilling (MWD) systems, possible.

  13. Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Design Issues Influenced by Performance Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegge, Carol J.; White, Mary L.; Chrien, Nadine C. L.; Villegas, Enrique B.; Ford, Virginia G.

    1993-01-01

    The design of an Earth remote sensing sensor, such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), begins with a set of science requirements that determine a set of instrument specifications. It is required that the sensor meet these specifications across the image field, over a range of sensor operating temperatures, and throughout mission life. In addition, data quality must be maintained irrespective of bright objects, such as clouds, within the scene, or out-of-field glint sources. During the design phase of MISR, many refinements to the conceptual design have been made to insure that these performance criteria are met. These design considerations are the focus of this paper. Spectral stability with field angle, scene polarization insensitivity, and LTV exposure hardness have, for example, been enabled through a telecentric optical design, a gaussian shaped filter spectral profile used in conjunction with a Lyot depolarizer, and contamination prevention through consideration of material choices and handling procedures. Spectral, radiometric, and MTF stability of the instrument assures the scientific community that MISR imagery can be used for highly accurate aerosol, bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), and cloud studies.

  14. Modeling of oil spreading in a problem of radar multiangle diagnostics of Sea surface pollutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, A. Ya.; Kubryakov, A. A.; Boev, A. G.; Bychkov, D. M.; Ivanov, V. K.; Stanichny, S. V.; Tsymbal, V. N.

    2016-12-01

    The possibilities of a multiangle method of radar diagnostics to determine thickness of an oil film on a sea surface by comparing the radar data with the quantitative modeling results obtained using the model of oil spreading dynamics are analyzed. The experimental results of the remote sensing of the Caspian Sea water area near the Neftyanye Kamni oil field by the Envisat-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and the new Floating Objects Tracking System (FOTS) model of oil spreading are used for the analysis. The model allows to calculate the dynamics and change in the mass and size of an oil slick basing only on the available data of satellite measurements and atmospheric reanalysis.The model takes into account the main processes that influence the slick formation (gravity spreading, advective transport, dispersion, emulsification, turbulent mixing, and evaporation). This model is used to calculate the thickness evolution and dynamics of the displacement of oil slicks in the period between two consecutive radar images of this region (0.5-4 days) and to estimate the volumes of oil spilled in the field. The good consistence of the height of the oil film calculated using radar measurements and the modeling results confirms the method's reliability.

  15. Informing Aerosol Transport Models With Satellite Multi-Angle Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limbacher, J.; Patadia, F.; Petrenko, M.; Martin, M. Val; Chin, M.; Gaitley, B.; Garay, M.; Kalashnikova, O.; Nelson, D.; Scollo, S.

    2011-01-01

    As the aerosol products from the NASA Earth Observing System's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) mature, we are placing greater focus on ways of using the aerosol amount and type data products, and aerosol plume heights, to constrain aerosol transport models. We have demonstrated the ability to map aerosol air-mass-types regionally, and have identified product upgrades required to apply them globally, including the need for a quality flag indicating the aerosol type information content, that varies depending upon retrieval conditions. We have shown that MISR aerosol type can distinguish smoke from dust, volcanic ash from sulfate and water particles, and can identify qualitative differences in mixtures of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol components in urban settings. We demonstrated the use of stereo imaging to map smoke, dust, and volcanic effluent plume injection height, and the combination of MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depth maps to constrain wildfire smoke source strength. This talk will briefly highlight where we stand on these application, with emphasis on the steps we are taking toward applying the capabilities toward constraining aerosol transport models, planet-wide.

  16. Simultaneous Multi-angle Radar Observations of Langmuir Turbulence Excited by RF Ionospheric Interactions at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Watanabe, N.; Rayyan, N.; Spry, D.; Adham, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Spaleta, J.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    The high power HAARP HF transmitter is employed to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Dependence of diagnostic signals on HAARP HF parameters, including pulselength, duty-cycle, aspect angle, and frequency were recorded. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI) and isolation of ponderomotive effects. Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra including cascade, collapse, and co-existence spectra and an outshifted plasma line under certain ionospheric conditions. High time resolution studies of the temporal evolution of the plasma line reveal the appearance of an overshoot effect on ponderomotive timescales. Bursty turbulence is observed in the collapse and cascade lines. For the first time, simultaneous multi-angle radar measurements of plasma line spectra are recorded demonstrating marked dependence on aspect angle with the strongest interaction region observed displaced southward of the HF zenith pointing angle. Numerous measurements of the outshifted plasma line are observed. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  17. Bounding the error on bottom estimation for multi-angle swath bathymetry sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Geoff K.; Bird, John S.

    2005-04-01

    With the recent introduction of multi-angle swath bathymetry (MASB) sonar to the commercial marketplace (e.g., Benthos Inc., C3D sonar, 2004), additions must be made to the current sonar lexicon. The correct interpretation of measurements made with MASB sonar, which uses filled transducer arrays to compute angle-of-arrival information (AOA) from backscattered signal, is essential not only for mapping, but for applications such as statistical bottom classification. In this paper it is shown that aside from uncorrelated channel to channel noise, there exists a tradeoff between effects that govern the error bounds on bottom estimation for surfaces having shallow grazing angle and surfaces distributed along a radial arc centered at the transducer. In the first case, as the bottom aligns with the radial direction to the receiver, footprint shift and shallow grazing angle effects dominate the uncertainty in physical bottom position (surface aligns along a single AOA). Alternatively, if signal from a radial arc arrives, a single AOA is usually estimated (not necessarily at the average location of the surface). Through theoretical treatment, simulation, and field measurements, the aforementioned factors affecting MASB bottom mapping are examined. [Work supported by NSERC.

  18. Multi-angle ratiometric approach to measure chemical exchange in amide proton transfer imaging.

    PubMed

    Zu, Zhongliang; Janve, Vaibhav A; Li, Ke; Does, Mark D; Gore, John C; Gochberg, Daniel F

    2012-09-01

    Amide proton transfer imaging, a specific form of chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging, has previously been applied to studies of acute ischemic acidosis, stroke, and cancer. However, interpreting the resulting contrast is complicated by its dependence on the exchange rate between amides and water, the amide concentration, amide and water relaxation, and macromolecular magnetization transfer. Hence, conventional chemical exchange saturation transfer contrast is not specific to changes such as reductions in pH due to tissue acidosis. In this article, a multi-angle ratiometric approach based on several pulsed-chemical exchange saturation transfer scans at different irradiation flip angles is proposed to specifically reflect exchange rates only. This separation of exchange effects in pulsed-chemical exchange saturation transfer experiments is based on isolating rotation vs. saturation contributions, and such methods form a new subclass of chemical exchange rotation transfer (CERT) experiments. Simulations and measurements of creatine/agar phantoms indicate that a newly proposed imaging metric isolates the effects of exchange rate changes, independent of other sample parameters.

  19. Airborne Next: Rethinking Airborne Organization and Applying New Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    structures since its employment on a large scale during World War II. It is puzzling to consider how little airborne organizational structures and employment...future potential of airborne concepts by rethinking traditional airborne organizational structures and employment concepts. Using a holistic approach in... structures of airborne forces to model a “small and many” approach over a “large and few” approach, while incorporating a “swarming” concept. Utilizing

  20. Soil moisture deficit estimation using satellite multi-angle brightness temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei; Dai, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Accurate soil moisture information is critically important for hydrological modelling. Although remote sensing soil moisture measurement has become an important data source, it cannot be used directly in hydrological modelling. A novel study based on nonlinear techniques (a local linear regression (LLR) and two feedforward artificial neural networks (ANNs)) is carried out to estimate soil moisture deficit (SMD), using the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) multi-angle brightness temperatures (Tbs) with both horizontal (H) and vertical (V) polarisations. The gamma test is used for the first time to determine the optimum number of Tbs required to construct a reliable smooth model for SMD estimation, and the relationship between model input and output is achieved through error variance estimation. The simulated SMD time series in the study area is from the Xinanjiang hydrological model. The results have shown that LLR model is better at capturing the interrelations between SMD and Tbs than ANNs, with outstanding statistical performances obtained during both training (NSE = 0.88, r = 0.94, RMSE = 0.008 m) and testing phases (NSE = 0.85, r = 0.93, RMSE = 0.009 m). Nevertheless, both ANN training algorithms (radial BFGS and conjugate gradient) have performed well in estimating the SMD data and showed excellent performances compared with those derived directly from the SMOS soil moisture products. This study has also demonstrated the informative capability of the gamma test in the input data selection for model development. These results provide interesting perspectives for data-assimilation in flood-forecasting.

  1. Lensfree on-chip tomographic microscopy employing multi-angle illumination and pixel super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Isikman, Serhan O; Bishara, Waheb; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-08-16

    Tomographic imaging has been a widely used tool in medicine as it can provide three-dimensional (3D) structural information regarding objects of different size scales. In micrometer and millimeter scales, optical microscopy modalities find increasing use owing to the non-ionizing nature of visible light, and the availability of a rich set of illumination sources (such as lasers and light-emitting-diodes) and detection elements (such as large format CCD and CMOS detector-arrays). Among the recently developed optical tomographic microscopy modalities, one can include optical coherence tomography, optical diffraction tomography, optical projection tomography and light-sheet microscopy. These platforms provide sectional imaging of cells, microorganisms and model animals such as C. elegans, zebrafish and mouse embryos. Existing 3D optical imagers generally have relatively bulky and complex architectures, limiting the availability of these equipments to advanced laboratories, and impeding their integration with lab-on-a-chip platforms and microfluidic chips. To provide an alternative tomographic microscope, we recently developed lensfree optical tomography (LOT) as a high-throughput, compact and cost-effective optical tomography modality. LOT discards the use of lenses and bulky optical components, and instead relies on multi-angle illumination and digital computation to achieve depth-resolved imaging of micro-objects over a large imaging volume. LOT can image biological specimen at a spatial resolution of <1 μm x <1 μm x <3 μm in the x, y and z dimensions, respectively, over a large imaging volume of 15-100 mm(3), and can be particularly useful for lab-on-a-chip platforms.

  2. Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction for MODIS (MAIAC). Part 3: Atmospheric Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Laszlo, I.; Hilker, T.; Hall, F.; Sellers, P.; Tucker, J.; Korkin, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the atmospheric correction (AC) component of the Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction algorithm (MAIAC) which introduces a new way to compute parameters of the Ross-Thick Li-Sparse (RTLS) Bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), spectral surface albedo and bidirectional reflectance factors (BRF) from satellite measurements obtained by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). MAIAC uses a time series and spatial analysis for cloud detection, aerosol retrievals and atmospheric correction. It implements a moving window of up to 16 days of MODIS data gridded to 1 km resolution in a selected projection. The RTLS parameters are computed directly by fitting the cloud-free MODIS top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectance data stored in the processing queue. The RTLS retrieval is applied when the land surface is stable or changes slowly. In case of rapid or large magnitude change (as for instance caused by disturbance), MAIAC follows the MODIS operational BRDF/albedo algorithm and uses a scaling approach where the BRDF shape is assumed stable but its magnitude is adjusted based on the latest single measurement. To assess the stability of the surface, MAIAC features a change detection algorithm which analyzes relative change of reflectance in the Red and NIR bands during the accumulation period. To adjust for the reflectance variability with the sun-observer geometry and allow comparison among different days (view geometries), the BRFs are normalized to the fixed view geometry using the RTLS model. An empirical analysis of MODIS data suggests that the RTLS inversion remains robust when the relative change of geometry-normalized reflectance stays below 15%. This first of two papers introduces the algorithm, a second, companion paper illustrates its potential by analyzing MODIS data over a tropical rainforest and assessing errors and uncertainties of MAIAC compared to conventional MODIS products.

  3. Aerosol Source Plume Physical Characteristics from Space-based Multiangle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Li, W.-H.; Moroney, Catherine; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Fishbein, Evan

    2007-01-01

    Models that assess aerosol effects on regional air quality and global climate parameterize aerosol sources in terms of amount, type, and injection height. The multiangle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) aboard NASA's Terra satellite retrieves total column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), and aerosol type over cloud-free land and water. A stereo-matching algorithm automatically retrieves reflecting-layer altitude wherever clouds or aerosol plumes have discernable spatial contrast, with about 500-m accuracy, at 1.1-km horizontal resolution. Near-source biomass burning smoke, volcanic effluent, and desert dust plumes are observed routinely, providing information about aerosol amount, particle type, and injection height useful for modeling applications. Compared to background aerosols, the plumes sampled have higher AOT, contain particles having expected differences in Angstrom exponent, size, single-scattering albedo, and for volcanic plume and dust cloud cases, particle shape. As basic thermodynamics predicts, thin aerosol plumes lifted only by regional winds or less intense heat sources are confined to the boundary layer. However, when sources have sufficient buoyancy, the representative plumes studied tend to concentrate within discrete, high-elevation layers of local stability; the aerosol is not uniformly distributed up to a peak altitude, as is sometimes assumed in modeling. MISR-derived plume heights, along with meteorological profile data from other sources, make it possible to relate radiant energy flux observed by the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), also aboard the Terra spacecraft, to convective heat flux that plays a major role in buoyant plume dynamics. A MISR climatology of plume behavior based on these results is being developed.

  4. Multi-size, Multi-angle Microbipolar Forceps for Skull Base Surgery: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Schick, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhage control in skull base surgery is critical but hindered by the lack of instruments suitable for coagulating structural curves and corners. The main impediment is that most of the instruments currently used are right-angled and unsuitable because anatomical and pathologic structures are three-dimensional objects having complex curves and corners. In this article, we present a solution: the use of angled bipolar microforceps having a range of small diameters and angles for dissection and coagulation. Methods Utilizing modern design software and up-to-date synthetic and metallic materials, a variety of nonstick bipolar microforceps with different angles and very fine tips (0.2–1.2 mm) were designed and constructed for use on different anatomical and pathologic curves. The tips of the forceps were made very fine to improve coagulation precision as well as to improve microdissection dexterity. The blades were made long and thin to improve visibility during coagulation and dissection procedures. As a result, these multi-size, multiangle micro instruments can be used not only for coagulation but also for microdissection or tumor removal in most anatomical areas accessed during the course of skull base surgery Results The research, design, and construction of a new bipolar microforceps with different angles and sizes represents a technical innovation that can lead to improved surgical outcomes. Conclusion The new micro-instruments enhance the quality and quantity of tumor and tissue resection and dissection in skull base surgery and open the possibility of new surgical approaches to microscopic tumor resection and hemorrhage coagulation in the anatomical areas of the skull base. PMID:26251793

  5. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  6. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  7. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  8. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  9. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  10. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  11. Aerosol Properties Over Dark Water From MISR Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    The Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) has been orbiting Earth for just under two years. It provides 36 simultaneous views of the planet, in an unprecedented combination of nine angles and four wavelengths, with spatial resolution as high as 275 m. Pre-launch theoretical studies indicated that MISR's well-calibrated spectral radiances, measured at precisely known air-mass factors ranging from one to three, could provide tight constraints on aerosol optical depth. And along with the wide range of scattering angles sampled (about 50o to 160 o at mid-latitudes), MISR would offer constraints on particle shape, size distribution, and composition, particularly over a dark, uniform ocean surface. We have participated in four major field campaigns during the past year, giving us opportunities to measure the actual performance of MISR standard and research aerosol retrieval approaches against near-simultaneous in situ atmospheric and surface observations. The analysis of these data is underway. MISR overflew the Puerto RIco Dust Experiment (PRIDE; July 2000) site when coordinated measurements were made of dusty as well as clean maritime air. At SAFARI 2000, MISR and AirMISR imaged air containing biomass burning and dust particles off the west coast of Namibia. ACE-Asia (April 2001) produced MISR aerosol validation data in air containing Gobi desert dust, biomass burning particles, marine aerosols, and pollution. And during the CLAMS campaign (July 2001), MISR and AirMISR viewed clean maritime and polluted air while detailed characterization of the atmosphere and ocean surface below was taking place. In addition to testing MISR aerosol retrieval approaches with these data and refining the component particle properties we assume in the climatological retrievals, ACE and CLAMS included volume closure experiments, allowing us to assess the contribution of scene variability to measurement uncertainty. Early results indicate that under many circumstances, MISR

  12. Airborne Intercept Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Primary mirror of Zerodur with Pilkington 747 coating • FOV = 0.104 degrees Airborne Intercept Monitoring RTO-MP-SET-105 16 - 3 UNCLASSIFIED...Pointing System (SPS). The STS is a 0.75 meter aperture Mersenne Cassegrain telescope and the SAT is a 0.34 meter aperture 3- mirror anastigmat telescope...UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED • Air Flow to Mitigate Thermal “Seeing” Effects • Light weighted primary mirror to reduce mass The SAT

  13. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  14. Airborne Infrared Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.

    2017-01-01

    A unique program of infrared astronomical observations from aircraft evolved at NASA’s Ames Research Center, beginning in the 1960s. Telescopes were flown on a Convair 990, a Lear Jet, and a Lockheed C-141 - the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) - leading to the planning and development of SOFIA: a 2.7 m telescope now flying on a Boeing 747SP. The poster describes these telescopes and highlights of some of the scientific results obtained from them.

  15. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D [Menan, ID; Schmitt, Michael J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Warren F [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  16. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  17. Simultaneous determination of protein aggregation, degradation, and absolute molecular weight by size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hongping

    2006-09-01

    The feasibility of size exclusion chromotography (SEC)-multiangle laser-light scattering as a technique to investigate aggregation and degradation of glycosylated and nonglycosylated proteins, and antibodies under various conditions such as addition of detergent, changes in pH, and variation of protein concentration and heat stress temperature was examined. Separation of proteins and their aggregates was performed using SEC-high-performance liquid chromatography. Detection of analytes was carried out with on-line UV, refractive index, and multiangle laser light-scattering detectors. Quantification and molecular weight determination were performed using commercial software. Aggregation and degradation were examined under various conditions and quantitative results are presented for bovine serum albumin, choriogonadotropin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, Herceptin, and ReoPro. This method can simultaneously determine both the quantities and the molecular weights of macromolecules from a single injection. The determination of molecular weight is absolute which avoids misleading results caused by molecular shape or interactions with the column matrix. This technique is valuable not only for assessing the extent of aggregation but also for effectively monitoring molecule degradation as evidenced by molecular weight reduction and change in monomer amount.

  18. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  19. B fields in OB stars (BOB): FORS 2 spectropolarimetric follow-up of the two rare rigidly rotating magnetosphere stars HD 23478 and HD 345439

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Schöller, M.; Fossati, L.; Morel, T.; Castro, N.; Oskinova, L. M.; Przybilla, N.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Nieva, M.-F.; Langer, N.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: Massive B-type stars with strong magnetic fields and fast rotation are very rare and pose a mystery for theories of star formation and magnetic field evolution. Only two such stars, called σ Ori E analogues, were known until recently. A team involved in APOGEE, one of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III programs, announced the discovery of two additional rigidly rotating magnetosphere stars, HD 23478 and HD 345439. The magnetic fields in these newly discovered σ Ori E analogues have not been investigated so far. Methods: In the framework of our ESO Large Programme and one normal ESO programme, we carried out low-resolution FORS 2 spectropolarimetric observations of HD 23478 and HD 345439. Results: In the measurements of hydrogen lines, we discover a rather strong longitudinal magnetic field of up to 1.5 kG in HD 23478 and up to 1.3 kG using the entire spectrum. The analysis of HD 345439 using four subsequent spectropolarimetric subexposures does not reveal a magnetic field at a significance level of 3σ. On the other hand, individual subexposures indicate that HD 345439 may host a strong magnetic field that rapidly varies over 88 min. The fast rotation of HD 345439 is also indicated by the behaviour of several metallic and He i lines in the low-resolution FORS 2 spectra that show profile variations already on this short time-scale. Based on observations obtained in the framework of the ESO Prgs. 191.D-0255(E) and 094.D-0355(B).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Use of in situ and airborne multiangle data to assess MODIS-and landsat-based estimates of directional reflectance and albedo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quantification of uncertainty in satellite-derived global surface albedo products is a critical aspect in producing complete, physically consistent, and decadal land property data records for studying ecosystem change. A challenge in validating albedo measurements acquired from space is the abil...

  1. A Radiative Analysis of Angular Signatures and Oblique Radiance Retrievals over the Polar Regions from the Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Michael Jason

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation studies clouds over the polar regions using the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on-board EOS-Terra. Historically, low thin clouds have been problematic for satellite detection, because these clouds have similar brightness and temperature properties to the surface they overlay. However, the oblique angles of MISR…

  2. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  3. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  4. The New Airborne Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Community air pollution is the new airborne disease of our generation's communities. It is caused by the increasing use of fuel, associated with both affluence and careless waste. Photochemical air pollution of the California type involves newly defined atmospheric reactions, is due mostly to motor vehicle exhaust, is oxidizing, and produces ozone, plant damage, impairment of visibility and eye and respiratory symptoms. Aggravation of asthma, impairment of lung function among persons with chronic respiratory disease and a possible causal role, along with cigarette smoking in emphysema and chronic bronchitis, are some of the effects of photochemical pollution. More subtle effects of pollution include impairment of oxygen transport by the blood due to carbon monoxide and interference with porphyrin metabolism due to lead. Carbon monoxide exposures may affect survival of patients who are in hospitals because of myocardial infarction. While many uncertainties in pollution-health reactions need to be resolved, a large number of people in California have health impairment due to airborne disease of this new type. PMID:5485227

  5. Imager-to-Radiometer In-flight Cross Calibration: RSP Radiometric Comparison with Airborne and Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), which takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI). First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  6. Detailed characterization of hyaluronan using aqueous size exclusion chromatography with triple detection and multiangle light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Patricia S; Maziarz, E Peter; Liu, X Michael

    2012-10-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) has attracted great interest and attention from ophthalmic surgical and eye care companies owing to its unique properties. A more complete understanding of HA biopolymers has, therefore, become increasingly critical as thorough characterization of raw materials helps promote product quality and process control. Often, such detailed information requires the use of a combination of analytical techniques. In this study, we compared size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with online multiangle light scattering (SEC-MALS) and SEC with triple detection (SEC-TD) experiments for HA analysis. Three lots of commercially available eye drop grade HA were characterized by SEC-MALS and SEC-TD. The absolute molecular weight averages, molecular weight distribution, radius of gyration, and solution conformation of the three HA lots were determined and compared by the two techniques. In addition, the intrinsic viscosity and intrinsic viscosity distribution were measured by SEC-TD.

  7. Lensless phase microscopy and diffraction tomography with multi-angle and multi-wavelength illuminations using a LED matrix.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Zhang, Jialin; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate lensless quantitative phase microscopy and diffraction tomography based on a compact on-chip platform, using only a CMOS image sensor and a programmable color LED matrix. Based on the multi-wavelength phase retrieval and multi-angle illumination diffraction tomography, this platform offers high quality, depth resolved images with a lateral resolution of 3.72μm and an axial resolution of 5μm, across a wide field-of-view of 24mm2. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging cheek cells, micro-beads, and fertilized eggs of Parascaris equorum. Such high-throughput and miniaturized imaging device can provide a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications and point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited environments.

  8. Using Support Vector Machines to Automatically Extract Open Water Signatures from POLDER Multi-Angle Data Over Boreal Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, J.; Diaz-Barrios, M.; Pinzon, J.; Ustin, S. L.; Shih, P.; Tournois, S.; Zarco-Tejada, P. J.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Perry, G. L.; Brass, James A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This study used Support Vector Machines to classify multiangle POLDER data. Boreal wetland ecosystems cover an estimated 90 x 10(exp 6) ha, about 36% of global wetlands, and are a major source of trace gases emissions to the atmosphere. Four to 20 percent of the global emission of methane to the atmosphere comes from wetlands north of 4 degrees N latitude. Large uncertainties in emissions exist because of large spatial and temporal variation in the production and consumption of methane. Accurate knowledge of the areal extent of open water and inundated vegetation is critical to estimating magnitudes of trace gas emissions. Improvements in land cover mapping have been sought using physical-modeling approaches, neural networks, and active microwave, examples that demonstrate the difficulties of separating open water, inundated vegetation and dry upland vegetation. Here we examine the feasibility of using a support vector machine to classify POLDER data representing open water, inundated vegetation and dry upland vegetation.

  9. Multiangle photopolarimetric aerosol retrievals in the vicinity of clouds: Synthetic study based on a large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stap, F. A.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Emde, C.; Röckmann, T.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of cloud contamination and 3-D radiative transfer effects on aerosol retrievals from multiangle photopolarimetric measurements in the vicinity of clouds. To this end multiangle, multiwavelength photopolarimetric observations are simulated using a 3-D radiative transfer model for scenes with realistic cloud properties, based on a large eddy simulation. Spatial resolutions of 2 × 2, 4 × 4, and 6 × 6 km2 have been considered. It is found that a goodness-of-fit criterion efficiently filters out cloud contamination. However, it does not filter out all scenes that are affected by 3-D radiative effects, resulting in small biases in the retrieved aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and single-scattering albedo (SSA). We also found that measurements at higher spatial resolution (2 × 2 km2) do not result in retrievals closer to clouds compared to measurements at coarser spatial resolutions (4 × 4 and 6 × 6 km2). If cloud parameters are fitted simultaneously with aerosol parameters using a 1-D radiative transfer model and the Independent Pixel Approximation, more successful retrievals are obtained in partially cloudy scenes and in the vicinity of clouds. This effect is most apparent at 6 × 6 km2 and only marginal at 2 × 2 km2 resolution. The retrieved aerosol AOT and SSA from the simultaneous aerosol and cloud retrievals still have a small bias, like the aerosol-only retrievals. We conclude that in order to substantially improve aerosol retrievals in the vicinity of clouds, a retrieval algorithm is needed that takes into account 3-D radiative transfer effects.

  10. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  11. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  12. Scaling estimates of vegetation structure in Amazonian tropical forests using multi-angle MODIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Yhasmin Mendes de; Hilker, Thomas; Gonçalves, Fabio Guimarães; Galvão, Lênio Soares; dos Santos, João Roberto; Lyapustin, Alexei; Maeda, Eduardo Eiji; de Jesus Silva, Camila Valéria

    2016-10-01

    Detailed knowledge of vegetation structure is required for accurate modelling of terrestrial ecosystems, but direct measurements of the three dimensional distribution of canopy elements, for instance from LiDAR, are not widely available. We investigate the potential for modelling vegetation roughness, a key parameter for climatological models, from directional scattering of visible and near-infrared (NIR) reflectance acquired from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We compare our estimates across different tropical forest types to independent measures obtained from: (1) airborne laser scanning (ALS), (2) spaceborne Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS)/ICESat, and (3) the spaceborne SeaWinds/QSCAT. Our results showed linear correlation between MODIS-derived anisotropy to ALS-derived entropy (r2 = 0.54, RMSE = 0.11), even in high biomass regions. Significant relationships were also obtained between MODIS-derived anisotropy and GLAS-derived entropy (0.52 ≤ r2 ≤ 0.61; p < 0.05), with similar slopes and offsets found throughout the season, and RMSE between 0.26 and 0.30 (units of entropy). The relationships between the MODIS-derived anisotropy and backscattering measurements (σ0) from SeaWinds/QuikSCAT presented an r2 of 0.59 and a RMSE of 0.11. We conclude that multi-angular MODIS observations are suitable to extrapolate measures of canopy entropy across different forest types, providing additional estimates of vegetation structure in the Amazon.

  13. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  14. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  15. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  16. Case Studies for UV, O2-A Band and Polarimetric Airborne Remote Sensing Observations of Coastal Waters: Implications for Atmospheric Correction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, J.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Cairns, B.; Wasilewski, A. P.; Mccubbin, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for spaceborne observations of ocean color is to correct for atmospheric scattering, which typically contributes ≥85% to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance and varies substantially with aerosols. Ocean color missions traditionally analyze TOA radiance in the near-infrared (NIR), where the ocean is black, to constrain the TOA atmospheric scattering in the visible (VIS). However, this procedure is limited by insufficient sensitivity of NIR radiance to absorption and vertical distribution of aerosols, and by uncertainties in the extrapolation of aerosol properties from the NIR to the VIS. To improve atmospheric correction for ocean color observations, one needs to change the traditional procedure for this correction and/or increase the aerosol information. The instruments proposed for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission include ultraviolet and Oxygen A-band observations, as well as multispectral and multiangle polarimetry, to increase the aerosol information content. However no studies have been performed on whether such observations contain sufficient aerosol information, and on how to use this information, to substantially improve atmospheric correction. To study the atmospheric correction capabilities of PACE-like instruments, we are conducting field experiments off the Coast of California to obtain high-altitude airborne and in-situ observations of water-leaving radiance. The airborne data sets consist of hyperspectral radiance between 380-2500 nm by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, and narrow-band multiangle polarimetric data between 410-2250 nm by the Research Scanning Polarimeter. We discuss the quality of and comparisons between these data sets, and their differential sensitivities to variations in aerosol properties and ocean color.

  17. Three-dimensional magnetic and abundance mapping of the cool Ap star HD 24712 . I. Spectropolarimetric observations in all four Stokes parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusomarov, N.; Kochukhov, O.; Piskunov, N.; Jeffers, S. V.; Johns-Krull, C. M.; Keller, C. U.; Makaganiuk, V.; Rodenhuis, M.; Snik, F.; Stempels, H. C.; Valenti, J. A.

    2013-10-01

    Context. High-resolution spectropolarimetric observations provide simultaneous information about stellar magnetic field topologies and three-dimensional distributions of chemical elements. High-quality spectra in the Stokes IQUV parameters are currently available for very few early-type magnetic chemically peculiar stars. Here we present analysis of a unique full Stokes vector spectropolarimetric data set, acquired for the cool magnetic Ap star HD 24712 with a recently commissioned spectropolarimeter. Aims: The goal of our work is to examine the circular and linear polarization signatures inside spectral lines and to study variation of the stellar spectrum and magnetic observables as a function of rotational phase. Methods: HD 24712 was observed with the HARPSpol instrument at the 3.6-m ESO telescope over a period of 2010-2011. We achieved full rotational phase coverage with 43 individual Stokes parameter observations. The resulting spectra have a signal-to-noise ratio of 300-600 and resolving power exceeding 105. The multiline technique of least-squares deconvolution (LSD) was applied to combine information from the spectral lines of Fe-peak and rare earth elements. Results: We used the HARPSPol spectra of HD 24712 to study the morphology of the Stokes profile shapes in individual spectral lines and in LSD Stokes profiles corresponding to different line masks. From the LSD Stokes V profiles we measured the longitudinal component of the magnetic field, ⟨Bz⟩, with an accuracy of 5-10 G. We also determined the net linear polarization from the LSD Stokes Q and U profiles. Combining previous ⟨Bz⟩ measurements with our data allowed us to determine an improved rotational period of the star, Prot = 12.45812 ± 0.00019 d. We also measured the longitudinal magnetic field from the cores of Hα and Hβ lines. The analysis of ⟨Bz⟩ measurements showed no evidence for a significant radial magnetic field gradient in the atmosphere of HD 24712. We used our ⟨Bz⟩ and

  18. TESTS OF GENERAL RELATIVITY IN THE STRONG-GRAVITY REGIME BASED ON X-RAY SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF BLACK HOLES IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczynski, Henric

    2012-08-01

    Although general relativity (GR) has been tested extensively in the weak-gravity regime, similar tests in the strong-gravity regime are still missing. In this paper, we explore the possibility to use X-ray spectropolarimetric observations of black holes in X-ray binaries to distinguish between the Kerr metric and the phenomenological metrics introduced by Johannsen and Psaltis (which are not vacuum solutions of Einstein's equation) and thus to test the no-hair theorem of GR. To this end, we have developed a numerical code that calculates the radial brightness profiles of accretion disks and parallel transports the wave vector and polarization vector of photons through the Kerr and non-GR spacetimes. We used the code to predict the observational appearance of GR and non-GR accreting black hole systems. We find that the predicted energy spectra and energy-dependent polarization degree and polarization direction do depend strongly on the underlying spacetime. However, for large regions of the parameter space, the GR and non-GR metrics lead to very similar observational signatures, making it difficult to observationally distinguish between the two types of models.

  19. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  20. Airborne rescue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The airborne rescue system includes a boom with telescoping members for extending a line and collar to a rescue victim. The boom extends beyond the tip of the helicopter rotor so that the victim may avoid the rotor downwash. The rescue line is played out and reeled in by winch. The line is temporarily retained under the boom. When the boom is extended, the rescue line passes through clips. When the victim dons the collar and the tension in the line reaches a predetermined level, the clips open and release the line from the boom. Then the rescue line can form a straight line between the victim and the winch, and the victim can be lifted to the helicopter. A translator is utilized to push out or pull in the telescoping members. The translator comprises a tape and a rope. Inside the telescoping members the tape is curled around the rope and the tape has a tube-like configuration. The tape and rope are provided from supply spools.

  1. Size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering analysis of hyaluronan size distributions made by membrane-bound hyaluronan synthase.

    PubMed

    Baggenstoss, Bruce A; Weigel, Paul H

    2006-05-15

    Size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS) analyses of Escherichia coli membranes expressing Streptococcus equisimilis hyaluronan synthase (seHAS) demonstrated an inherent artifact (10-100 MDa) that coeluted with hyaluronan (HA) and skewed the apparent weight-average mass of HA to erroneously high values. Briefly heating samples to 65-75 degrees C eliminated this artifact and increased the yield of recovered HA due to the release of HA chains that were attached to membrane-bound HAS. Inclusion of alkaline phosphatase, which removed uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP) produced during the reaction, improved the linearity of HA synthesis-even at high substrate use. Surprisingly, the addition of EDTA, to chelate Mg(2+) ions, did not completely stop the HAS reaction at 30 degrees C or at 4 degrees C. The best conditions for stopping the reaction without altering SEC-MALLS profiles of the product HA were to chill samples on ice in the presence of both EDTA and UDP. Even with excess substrate, the maximum size of product HA decreased as the enzyme concentration increased. Therefore, the maximum HA size made by HAS was determined by extrapolation to zero enzyme concentration. Using the above conditions, membrane-bound seHAS synthesized a cohort of HA products that steadily increased in weight-average molar mass, reaching a final maximal steady-state size of 4 to 6 MDa within 2-4 h.

  2. Analysis of therapeutic proteins and peptides using multiangle light scattering coupled to ultra high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-de la Garza, Carlos E; Miranda-Hernández, Mariana P; Acosta-Flores, Lilia; Pérez, Néstor O; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Medina-Rivero, Emilio

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of the physical properties of biotherapeutic proteins is crucial throughout all the stages of their lifecycle. Herein, we used size-exclusion ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to multiangle light scattering and refractive index detection systems to determine the molar mass, mass-average molar mass, molar-mass dispersity and hydrodynamic radius of two monoclonal antibodies (rituximab and trastuzumab), a fusion protein (etanercept), and a synthetic copolymer (glatiramer acetate) employed as models. A customized instrument configuration was set to diminish band-broadening effects and enhance sensitivity throughout detectors. The customized configuration showed a performance improvement with respect to the high-performance liquid chromatography standard configuration, as observed by a 3 h column conditioning and a higher resolution analysis in 20 min. Analysis of the two monoclonal antibodies showed averaged values of 148.0 kDa for mass-average molar mass and 5.4 nm for hydrodynamic radius, whereas for etanercept these values were 124.2 kDa and 6.9 nm, respectively. Molar-mass dispersity was 1.000 on average for these proteins. Regarding glatiramer acetate, a molar mass range from 3 to 45 kDa and a molar-mass dispersity of 1.304 were consistent with its intrinsic peptide diversity, and its mass-average molar mass was 10.4 kDa. Overall, this method demonstrated an accurate determination of molar mass, overcoming the difficulties of size-exclusion chromatography.

  3. New developments for an electron impact (e,2e)/(e,3e) spectrometer with multiangle collection and multicoincidence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catoire, F.; Staicu-Casagrande, E. M.; Lahmam-Bennani, A.; Duguet, A.; Naja, A.; Ren, X. G.; Lohmann, B.; Avaldi, L.

    2007-01-15

    We describe new developments aimed to extend the capabilities and the sensitivity of the (e,2e)/(e,3e) multicoincidence spectrometer at Orsay University [Duguet et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 3524 (1998)]. The spectrometer has been improved by the addition of a third multiangle detection channel for the fast ''scattered'' electron. The present system is unique in that it is the only system which combines three toroidal analyzers all equipped with position sensitive detectors, thus allowing the triple coincidence detection of the three electrons present in the final state of an electron impact double ionization process. The setup allows measurement of the angular and energy distributions of the ejected electrons over almost the totality of the collision plane as well as that of the scattered electron over a large range of scattering angles in the forward direction. The resulting gain in sensitivity ({approx}25) has rendered feasible a whole class of experiments which could not be otherwise envisaged. The setup is described with a special emphasis on the new toroidal analyzer, data acquisition hardware, and data analysis procedures. The performances are illustrated by selected results of (e,2e) and (e,3e) experiments on the rare gases.

  4. Multi-angle static and dynamic light scattering investigation of lysozyme association: From crystallization to liquid liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuma, Kazuo; Kanzaki, Noriko

    2007-06-01

    The association of hen egg white lysozyme was observed using time-resolved multi-angle static and dynamic light scattering. In solutions containing 1.2 M of NaCl with a pH of 4.6 buffered by 50 mM of NaAc, and maintained at 20C, the apparent molecular weight Mw, and gyration radius Rg, of lysozyme aggregates were measured at 0.3-5-s intervals for various lysozyme concentrations from 8 to 32 mg/mL using static light scattering. At 32 mg/mL, liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) occurred. The (Kc/ΔR(q)) vs. q2 plot had a non-linear shape with a maximum at a particular q2, indicating that the aggregate size distribution was within a narrow range. This had not been observed in our previous studies of high-molecular-weight proteins. The dynamic light scattering data were consistent with those of static light scattering; i.e., CONTIN analysis showed clear bimodal (monomer and aggregate) distributions. Fractal dimension analysis of the aggregates with the protein concentration showed that the inner structure of the scatterer formed during LLPS was rigid in the final stage, which supports a two-step nucleation model.

  5. Curved PVDF airborne transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Toda, M

    1999-01-01

    In the application of airborne ultrasonic ranging measurement, a partially cylindrical (curved) PVDF transducer can effectively couple ultrasound into the air and generate strong sound pressure. Because of its geometrical features, the ultrasound beam angles of a curved PVDF transducer can be unsymmetrical (i.e., broad horizontally and narrow vertically). This feature is desired in some applications. In this work, a curved PVDF air transducer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Two resonances were observed in this transducer. They are length extensional mode and flexural bending mode. Surface vibration profiles of these two modes were measured by a laser vibrometer. It was found from the experiment that the surface vibration was not uniform along the curvature direction for both vibration modes. Theoretical calculations based on a model developed in this work confirmed the experimental results. Two displacement peaks were found in the piezoelectric active direction of PVDF film for the length extensional mode; three peaks were found for the flexural bending mode. The observed peak positions were in good agreement with the calculation results. Transient surface displacement measurements revealed that vibration peaks were in phase for the length extensional mode and out of phase for the flexural bending mode. Therefore, the length extensional mode can generate a stronger ultrasound wave than the flexural bending mode. The resonance frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the two modes strongly depend on the structure parameters as well as the material properties. For the transducer design, the theoretical model developed in this work can be used to optimize the ultrasound performance.

  6. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  7. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  8. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  9. Airborne transmission of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Jason M; Beren, Joel; Merkel, Tod J

    2012-09-15

    Pertussis is a contagious, acute respiratory illness caused by the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Although it is widely believed that transmission of B. pertussis occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets, no controlled study has ever documented airborne transmission of pertussis. We set out to determine if airborne transmission occurs between infected and naive animals, utilizing the baboon model of pertussis. Our results showed that 100% of exposed naive animals became infected even when physical contact was prevented, demonstrating that pertussis transmission occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets.

  10. What we Hope to Learn about Global Mineral Dust Aerosols from EOS Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2000-01-01

    On global scales, just a few broad atmospheric aerosol compositional groups are commonly observed. Of these, "mineral dust" is the only group which both contains non-spherical particles, and typically has size distributions with enough large particles for particle shape to affect its visible-light-scattering properties. The MISR instrument is scheduled for launch into a 10:30 AM sun-synchronous, polar orbit aboard the EOS Terra satellite in 1999. MISR will measure the upwelling visible radiance from Earth in 4 spectral bands centered at 446, 558, 672, and 866 nm, at each of 9 emission angles spread out in the forward and aft directions along the flight path at +/-70.5 deg, +/-60.0 deg, +/-45.6 deg, +/-26.1deg, and nadir. Over a period of 7 minutes, as the spacecraft flies along, a 360 km wide swath of Earth will successively be viewed by each of the cameras, allowing MISR to sample a very large range of scattering angles; in mid latitudes, the instrument will observe scattering angles between about 60 deg and 160 deg. Global coverage will be acquired about once in 9 days at the equator; the nominal mission lifetime is 6 years. The distinction in single scattering phase function between natural distributions of spherical and randomly oriented, non-spherical particles, with a broad range of aspect ratios, shows up strongly for scattering angles ranging from about 90 deg to near 180 deg. For non-spherical particle distributions, single scattering phase functions tend to be much flatter in this region than for spherical particles. Since MISR samples the relevant range of scattering angles very well, we expect to be able to make critical distinctions between natural distributions of spherical and randomly oriented, non-spherical particles with MISR data. We anticipate that the new multiangle, multispectral data from MISR will also contain other information about particle properties, a major step beyond current spacecraft remote sensing retrievals, which obtain aerosol

  11. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  12. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  13. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  14. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  15. Comparation of Typical Wetlands Classification Accuracy in Yellow River Estuary Using Multi-Angle Proba CHRIS Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yi; Ren, Guangbo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, Multi-angle PROBA CHRIS hyperspectral remote sensing images were used to study on their imaging quality and the ability of classification of Typical Wetlands in Yellow River Estuary, by the cooperation of interpretation and automatic classification. Taking 5-angle (0°, ±36°, ±55°) CHRIS hyperspectral remote sensing images of mode 2 obtained in September 2006 as an example, this paper research results indicate that the 0° image has the best imaging quality, with the highest spatial resolution, the ±36° images come second, the ±55° images are last; 5 typical wetlands, such as reservoir, bulrush, watercourse, barren beach and swamp were selected as study objects, then a Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm is used to classify different-angle remote sensing images into these 5 typical wetlands using training samples in the same location, the results of classification were analyzed based on field survey data, which shows that (1) The classification accuracy differs along the viewing angle of images, the overall accuracy and Kappa factor of the 0° image is highest, and the -36° image is lowest. (2) The overall accuracy and Kappa factor of the positive-angle images is higher than which of minus-angle images. (3) The producer accuracy and user accuracy of swamp is the lowest among all 5 typical wetlands in all images. (4) The producer accuracy and user accuracy of reservoir, bulrush and barren beach are relatively stable in all 5-angle images, however, the accuracies of Watercourse and swamp are fluctuant in all 5-angle images, and highest in the 0° image.

  16. Generating and Evaluation Leaf Area Index (LAI) from MODIS MultiAngle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) Surface Reflectance Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Park, T.; Yan, K.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; CHOI, S.; Yang, B.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Myneni, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    This study generates and evaluates prototype Leaf Area Index (LAI) product based on MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer's (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF, commonly known as surface reflectance) which is a product of MultiAngle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) package. LAI is a key parameter of vegetation in characterizing interactions of energy and mass between the Earth's surface and atmosphere. On the other hand, MAIAC BRF is retrieved from a new atmospheric correction algorithm, which has higher spatial resolution and is believed to have more reliable cloud/aerosol detection technique than standard MODIS BRF product. Two main objectives of this study are: 1). Maintaining the radiative transfer theory based LAI algorithm's look up table (LUT) unchanged, to compare LAI product retrieved from different versions of BRF products (MODIS collection 5, collection 6 and MAIAC); 2). To adjust the LUT to resolve LAI's possible systematic discrepancies resulting from atmospheric correction methods within the input BRF other than our LAI algorithm. Before the LUT adjusting, comparing to standard MODIS products shows that MAIAC LAI product will overestimate among herbaceous biome types which have low LAI values, while underestimate among woody biome types which have relatively higher values. Based on the theory of radiative transfer of canopy spectral invariants, two biome and MAIAC specific configurable parameters (Single Scattering Albedo and Uncertainty) in the LUT are adjusted to minimize the inconsistency due to input BRFs. Experiments shows that our new result: 1). has good agreement with field measured data (e.g. DIRECT); 2) is consistent with standard MODIS LAI product.

  17. Routing architecture and security for airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei; Xie, Peng; Li, Jason; Xu, Roger; Levy, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Airborne networks are envisioned to provide interconnectivity for terrestial and space networks by interconnecting highly mobile airborne platforms. A number of military applications are expected to be used by the operator, and all these applications require proper routing security support to establish correct route between communicating platforms in a timely manner. As airborne networks somewhat different from traditional wired and wireless networks (e.g., Internet, LAN, WLAN, MANET, etc), security aspects valid in these networks are not fully applicable to airborne networks. Designing an efficient security scheme to protect airborne networks is confronted with new requirements. In this paper, we first identify a candidate routing architecture, which works as an underlying structure for our proposed security scheme. And then we investigate the vulnerabilities and attack models against routing protocols in airborne networks. Based on these studies, we propose an integrated security solution to address routing security issues in airborne networks.

  18. A conjunct near-surface spectroscopy system for fix-angle and multi-angle continuous measurements of canopy reflectance and sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Fan, Yifeng; Zhang, Yongguang; Chou, Shuren; Ju, Weimin; Chen, Jing M.

    2016-09-01

    An automated spectroscopy system, which is divided into fix-angle and multi-angle subsystems, for collecting simultaneous, continuous and long-term measurements of canopy hyper-spectra in a crop ecosystem is developed. The fix-angle subsystem equips two spectrometers: one is HR2000+ (OceanOptics) covering the spectral range 200-1100 nm with 1.0 nm spectral resolution, and another one is QE65PRO (OceanOptics) providing 0.1 nm spectral resolution within the 730-780 nm spectral range. Both spectrometers connect a cosine-corrected fiber-optic fixed up-looking to collect the down-welling irradiance and a bare fiber-optic to measure the up-welling radiance from the vegetation. An inline fiber-optic shutter FOS-2x2-TTL (OceanOptics) is used to switch between input fibers to collect the signal from either the canopy or sky at one time. QE65PRO is used to permit estimation of vegetation Sun-Induced Fluorescence (SIF) in the O2-A band. The data collection scheme includes optimization of spectrometer integration time to maximize the signal to noise ratio and measurement of instrument dark currency. The multi-angle subsystem, which can help understanding bidirectional reflectance effects, alternatively use HR4000 (OceanOptics) providing 0.1 nm spectral resolution within the 680-800 nm spectral range to measure multi-angle SIF. This subsystem additionally includes a spectrometer Unispec-DC (PPSystems) featuring both up-welling and down-welling channels with 3 nm spectral resolution covering the 300-1100 nm spectral range. Two down-looking fiber-optics are mounted on a rotating device PTU-D46 (FLIR Systems), which can rotate horizontally and vertically at 10° angular step widths. Observations can be used to calculate canopy reflectance, vegetation indices and SIF for monitoring plant physiological processes.

  19. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Kittaka, C.; Vaughn, M. A.; Remer, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    We derive aerosol extinction profiles from airborne and space-based lidar backscatter signals by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), with no need to rely on assumptions about aerosol type or lidar ratio. The backscatter data were acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The HSRL also simultaneously measures aerosol extinction coefficients independently using the high spectral resolution lidar technique, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the retrieval. We retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from both HSRL and CALIOP attenuated backscatter data constrained with HSRL, Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer column AOT. The resulting profiles are compared with the aerosol extinction measured by HSRL. Retrievals are limited to cases where the column aerosol thickness is greater than 0.2 over land and 0.15 over water. In the case of large AOT, the results using the Aqua MODIS constraint over water are poorer than Aqua MODIS over land or Terra MODIS. The poorer results relate to an apparent bias in Aqua MODIS AOT over water observed in August 2007. This apparent bias is still under investigation. Finally, aerosol extinction coefficients are derived from CALIPSO backscatter data using AOT from Aqua MODIS for 28 profiles over land and 9 over water. They agree with coincident measurements by the airborne HSRL to within +/-0.016/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of land points and within +/-0.028/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of ocean points.

  20. Detection of airborne polyoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGarrity, G. J.; Dion, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Polyoma virus was recovered from the air of an animal laboratory housing mice infected with the virus. Air samples were obtained by means of a high volume air sampler and further concentrated by high speed centrifugation. Total concentration of the air samples was 7.5 x 10(7). Assay for polyoma virus was by mouse antibody production tests. Airborne polyoma virus was detected in four of six samples. PMID:211163

  1. The Future of Airborne Reconnaissance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    biplanes to the worldwide Cold War missions of the U - 2 and SR-71, airborne reconnaissance has become an indispensable tool to the intelligence community...Reconnaissance Operations (SRO) procedures, such as the U - 2 , RC- 135, and the EP-3, and traditional theater/fleet tactical reconnaissance systems like...upgraded sensor package on the U -2.14 The Army Staffs argument centers around command and control of the asset. The Army agreed that the U - 2 ’s

  2. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  3. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  4. Requirements for airborne vector gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Colombo, O.; Hein, G.; Knickmeyer, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

  5. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  6. Cyberinfrastructure for Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004 the NASA Airborne Science Program has been prototyping and using infrastructure that enables researchers to interact with each other and with their instruments via network communications. This infrastructure uses satellite links and an evolving suite of applications and services that leverage open-source software. The use of these tools has increased near-real-time situational awareness during field operations, resulting in productivity improvements and the collection of better data. This paper describes the high-level system architecture and major components, with example highlights from the use of the infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of ongoing efforts to transition to operational status.

  7. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  8. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

  9. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  10. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  11. A Simple Method for Collecting Airborne Pollen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Peter G.; DiGiovanni, Franco; Ho, Rong H.; Taki, Hisatomo; Ferguson, Kristyn A.; Pawlowski, Agata K.

    2006-01-01

    Pollination is a broad area of study within biology. For many plants, pollen carried by wind is required for successful seed set. Airborne pollen also affects human health. To foster studies of airborne pollen, we introduce a simple device--the "megastigma"--for collecting pollen from the air. This device is flexible, yielding easily obtained data…

  12. Global Test Range: Toward Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Freudinger, Larry; DelFrate John H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planned global sensor network that will monitor the Earth's climate, and resources using airborne sensor systems. The vision is an intelligent, affordable Earth Observation System. Global Test Range is a lab developing trustworthy services for airborne instruments - a specialized Internet Service Provider. There is discussion of several current and planned missions.

  13. Meeting Review: Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Huebert, Barry; Wilson, Chuck

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings from the Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop are presented. The two central topics of discussion were the role of aerosols in atmospheric processes and the difficulties in characterizing aerosols. The following topics were discussed during the working sessions: airborne observations to date; identification of inlet design issues; inlet modeling needs and directions; objectives for aircraft experiments; and future laboratory and wind tunnel studies.

  14. Airborne Relay-Based Regional Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuman; Noh, Hongjun; Lim, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based pseudolite systems have some limitations, such as low vertical accuracy, multipath effects and near-far problems. These problems are not significant in airborne-based pseudolite systems. However, the monitoring of pseudolite positions is required because of the mobility of the platforms on which the pseudolites are mounted, and this causes performance degradation. To address these pseudolite system limitations, we propose an airborne relay-based regional positioning system that consists of a master station, reference stations, airborne relays and a user. In the proposed system, navigation signals are generated from the reference stations located on the ground and are relayed via the airborne relays. Unlike in conventional airborne-based systems, the user in the proposed system sequentially estimates both the locations of airborne relays and his/her own position. Therefore, a delay due to monitoring does not occur, and the accuracy is not affected by the movement of airborne relays. We conducted several simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. Based on the simulation results, we demonstrated that the proposed system guarantees a higher accuracy than airborne-based pseudolite systems, and it is feasible despite the existence of clock offsets among reference stations. PMID:26029953

  15. Airborne Global Positioning System Antenna System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-14

    GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ANTENNA SYSTEM DISTRIBUTION: SMC/ GP (3 cys); AFFSA...standard that airborne Global Positioning System ( GPS ) antenna system must meet to be identified with the applicable MSO marking. The similarity of...UNCLASSIFIED DOCUMENT NO. DATE NO. MSO-C144 14 Oct 04 Initial Release REV: REV: SHEET 1 OF 16 TITLE: AIRBORNE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM

  16. ISMAR: an airborne submillimetre radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Stuart; Lee, Clare; Moyna, Brian; Philipp, Martin; Rule, Ian; Rogers, Stuart; King, Robert; Oldfield, Matthew; Rea, Simon; Henry, Manju; Wang, Hui; Chawn Harlow, R.

    2017-02-01

    The International Submillimetre Airborne Radiometer (ISMAR) has been developed as an airborne demonstrator for the Ice Cloud Imager (ICI) that will be launched on board the next generation of European polar-orbiting weather satellites in the 2020s. It currently has 15 channels at frequencies between 118 and 664 GHz which are sensitive to scattering by cloud ice, and additional channels at 874 GHz are being developed. This paper presents an overview of ISMAR and describes the algorithms used for calibration. The main sources of bias in the measurements are evaluated, as well as the radiometric sensitivity in different measurement scenarios. It is shown that for downward views from high altitude, representative of a satellite viewing geometry, the bias in most channels is less than ±1 K and the NEΔT is less than 2 K, with many channels having an NEΔT less than 1 K. In-flight calibration accuracy is also evaluated by comparison of high-altitude zenith views with radiative-transfer simulations.

  17. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  18. Magnetic characterization of airborne particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Doh, S.; Yu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Burning fossil fuels from vehicles, domestics, industries and power plants in the large urban or industrial areas emit significant quantity of anthropogenic particulates which become a potential threat to human health. Here, we present temporal variability of particulate pollution associated with compositional differences, using magnetic measurements and electron microscopic observations. Six different grain-sizes of airborne particulates have been collected by filtering from 10 precipitation events in Seoul, Korea from February 2009 to June 2009. Magnetic concentration proxies show relatively better (R2 >0.6) and poorer correlations (R2 <0.3) with the masses of samples filtered by >0.45 μm and <0.45 μm sizes, respectively, suggesting the usefulness of magnetic characterization for the >0.45 μm particulates. Temporally, magnetic concentrations are higher in the cold season than the warm season. In particular, a significant increase of magnetic concentration is observed in 3 μm and 1 μm filters after the Chinese wind-blown dust events, indicating additional influx of fine-grained anthropogenic particulates into Seoul. Microscopic observations identify that increase of magnetic concentration is highly linked with the frequent occurrence of combustion derived particulates (i.e., carbon and/or sulfur mixed particles) than natural alumino-silicates. Overall, the present study demonstrates that magnetic measurements efficiently reflect the concentration of particulates produced from fossil-fuel combustion among the airborne particles from various sources.

  19. SPECTRO-POLARIMETRIC SIMULATIONS OF THE SOLAR LIMB: ABSORPTION-EMISSION Fe I 6301.5 Å AND 6302.5 Å LINE PROFILES AND TORSIONAL FLOWS IN THE INTERGRANULAR MAGNETIC FLUX CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shelyag, S.

    2015-03-01

    Using radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetized solar photosphere and detailed spectro-polarimetric diagnostics with the Fe I 6301.5 Å and 6302.5 Å photospheric lines in the local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation, we model active solar granulation as if it was observed at the solar limb. We analyze general properties of the radiation across the solar limb, such as the continuum and the line core limb darkening and the granulation contrast. We demonstrate the presence of profiles with both emission and absorption features at the simulated solar limb, and pure emission profiles above the limb. These profiles are associated with the regions of strong linear polarization of the emergent radiation, indicating the influence of the intergranular magnetic fields on the line formation. We analyze physical origins of the emission wings in the Stokes profiles at the limb, and demonstrate that these features are produced by localized heating and torsional motions in the intergranular magnetic flux concentrations.

  20. On-line direct determination of the second virial coefficient of a natural polysaccharide using size-exclusion chromatography and multi-angle laser light scattering.

    PubMed

    Girod, S; Baldet-Dupy, P; Maillols, H; Devoisselle, J M

    2002-01-11

    By combining a size-exclusion chromatographic (SEC) separation and an on-line multi-angle light scattering (MALLS) analysis, we have elaborated an original methodology permitting on-line direct determination of the second virial coefficient of molar mass fractions of polydisperse polysaccharides. By assimilating the SEC-MALLS data to a batch mode acquisition, we have obtained on-line the complete Zimm plot of the eluted fractions, leading to knowledge of their weight-average molar mass Mw, radius of gyration r(g) and second virial coefficient A2. Our methodology was successfully applied to a iota carrageenan sample in LiCl 100 mM, EDTA 1 g/l.

  1. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering and quasi-elastic light scattering for characterization of polymersomes: comparison with classical techniques.

    PubMed

    Till, Ugo; Gaucher-Delmas, Mireille; Saint-Aguet, Pascale; Hamon, Glenn; Marty, Jean-Daniel; Chassenieux, Christophe; Payré, Bruno; Goudounèche, Dominique; Mingotaud, Anne-Françoise; Violleau, Frédéric

    2014-12-01

    Polymersomes formed from amphiphilic block copolymers, such as poly(ethyleneoxide-b-ε-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) or poly(ethyleneoxide-b-methylmethacrylate), were characterized by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), multi-angle light scattering (MALS), and refractive index detection, leading to the determination of their size, shape, and molecular weight. The method was cross-examined with more classical ones, like batch dynamic and static light scattering, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The results show good complementarities between all the techniques; asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation being the most pertinent one when the sample exhibits several different types of population.

  2. Surface Reflectance of Mars Observed by CRISM-MRO: 1. Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations (mars-reco)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceamanos, Xavier; Doute, S.; Fernando, J.; Pinet, P.; Lyapustin, A.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the correction for aerosol effects in near-simultaneous multiangle observations acquired by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. In the targeted mode, CRISM senses the surface of Mars using 11 viewing angles, which allow it to provide unique information on the scattering properties of surface materials. In order to retrieve these data, however, appropriate strategies must be used to compensate the signal sensed by CRISM for aerosol contribution. This correction is particularly challenging as the photometric curve of these suspended particles is often correlated with the also anisotropic photometric curve of materials at the surface. This article puts forward an innovative radiative transfer based method named Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations (MARS-ReCO). The proposed method retrieves photometric curves of surface materials in reflectance units after removing aerosol contribution. MARS-ReCO represents a substantial improvement regarding previous techniques as it takes into consideration the anisotropy of the surface, thus providing more realistic surface products. Furthermore, MARS-ReCO is fast and provides error bars on the retrieved surface reflectance. The validity and accuracy of MARS-ReCO is explored in a sensitivity analysis based on realistic synthetic data. According to experiments, MARS-ReCO provides accurate results (up to 10 reflectance error) under favorable acquisition conditions. In the companion article, photometric properties of Martian materials are retrieved using MARS-ReCO and validated using in situ measurements acquired during the Mars Exploration Rovers mission.

  3. Airborne thermography or infrared remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Goillot, C C

    1975-01-01

    Airborne thermography is part of the more general remote sensing activity. The instruments suitable for image display are infrared line scanners. A great deal of interest has developed during the past 10 years in airborne thermal remote sensing and many applications are in progress. Infrared scanners on board a satellite are used for observation of cloud cover; airborne infrared scanners are used for forest fire detection, heat budget of soils, detecting insect attack, diseases, air pollution damage, water stress, salinity stress on vegetation, only to cite some main applications relevant to agronomy. Using this system it has become possible to get a 'picture' of our thermal environment.

  4. Airborne remote sensing of forest biomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne sensor data of forest biomes obtained using an SAR, a laser profiler, an IR MSS, and a TM simulator are presented and examined. The SAR was utilized to investigate forest canopy structures in Mississippi and Costa Rica; the IR MSS measured forest canopy temperatures in Oregon and Puerto Rico; the TM simulator was employed in a tropical forest in Puerto Rico; and the laser profiler studied forest canopy characteristics in Costa Rica. The advantages and disadvantages of airborne systems are discussed. It is noted that the airborne sensors provide measurements applicable to forest monitoring programs.

  5. Airborne microwave radiometric imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Futang; Zhang, Zuyin

    1999-09-01

    A dual channel Airborne Microwave Radiometric Imaging system (AMRI) was designed and constructed for regional environment mapping. The system operates at 35GHz, which collects radiation at horizontal and vertical polarized channels. It runs at mechanical conical scanning with 45 degrees incidence angle. Two Cassegrain antennas with 1.5 degrees beamwidth scan the scene alternately and two pseudo- color images of two channels are displayed on the screen of PC in real time. Simultaneously, all parameters of flight and radiometric data are sorted in hard disk for post- processing. The sensitivity of the radiometer (Delta) T equals 0.16K. A new displaying method, unequal size element arc displaying method, is used in image displaying. Several experiments on mobile tower were carried out and the images demonstrate that the AMRI is available to work steadily and accurately.

  6. Airborne microwave radiometric imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Zhang, Zuyin; Chen, Zhengwen

    1998-08-01

    A dual channel Airborne Microwave Radiometric Imaging system (AMRI) was designed and constructed for regional environment mapping. The system operates at 35GHz, which collects radiation at horizontal and vertical polarized. It runs at mechanical conical scanning with 45 degrees incidence angle. Two Cassegrain antennas with 1.5 degrees 3 dB beamwidth scan the scene alternately and two pseudo-color images of two channels are displayed on the screen of PC in real time. Simultaneously all parameters of flight and radiometric data are stored in hard disk for postprocessing. The sensitivity of the radiometers of flight and radiometric data are stored in hard disk for postprocessing. The sensitivity of the radiometers (Delta) T equals 0.16K. A new display method, unequal size element arc displaying method, is used in image displaying. Several experiments on mobile tower were carried out and the images demonstrate the AMRI is available to work steadily and accurately.

  7. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  8. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-01

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of 137Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  9. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-07

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  10. SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE PAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposures to airborne particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in several populations in the US, Japan, and Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors, developed for human exposure biomonitoring studies were used to collect fine particles (<_ 1....

  11. Toolsets for Airborne Data Web Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-17

    ... relevant issues. Features Include Select data based on mission, date and/or scientific parameter Output original data ... Details:  Toolsets for Airborne Data (TAD) Web Application Category:  Instrument Specific Search, ...

  12. Polarimetric sensor systems for airborne ISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David; Foster, Joseph; Pezzaniti, Joseph; Harchanko, John; Aycock, Todd; Clark, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Over the last decade, polarimetric imaging technologies have undergone significant advancements that have led to the development of small, low-power polarimetric cameras capable of meeting current airborne ISR mission requirements. In this paper, we describe the design and development of a compact, real-time, infrared imaging polarimeter, provide preliminary results demonstrating the enhanced contrast possible with such a system, and discuss ways in which this technology can be integrated with existing manned and unmanned airborne platforms.

  13. Downscaling of Airborne Wind Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechner, Uwe; Schmehl, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Airborne wind energy systems provide a novel solution to harvest wind energy from altitudes that cannot be reached by wind turbines with a similar nominal generator power. The use of a lightweight but strong tether in place of an expensive tower provides an additional cost advantage, next to the higher capacity factor and much lower total mass. This paper investigates the scaling effects of airborne wind energy systems. The energy yield of airborne wind energy systems, that work in pumping mode of operation is at least ten times higher than the energy yield of conventional solar systems. For airborne wind energy systems the yield is defined per square meter wing area. In this paper the dependency of the energy yield on the nominal generator power for systems in the range of 1 kW to 1 MW is investigated. For the onshore location Cabauw, The Netherlands, it is shown, that a generator of just 1.4 kW nominal power and a total system mass of less than 30 kg has the theoretical potential to harvest energy at only twice the price per kWh of large scale airborne wind energy systems. This would make airborne wind energy systems a very attractive choice for small scale remote and mobile applications as soon as the remaining challenges for commercialization are solved.

  14. Challenges and opportunities of airborne metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles.

  15. Challenges and Opportunities of Airborne Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles. PMID:25953766

  16. Performance Basis for Airborne Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Emerging applications of Airborne Separation Assistance System (ASAS) technologies make possible new and powerful methods in Air Traffic Management (ATM) that may significantly improve the system-level performance of operations in the future ATM system. These applications typically involve the aircraft managing certain components of its Four Dimensional (4D) trajectory within the degrees of freedom defined by a set of operational constraints negotiated with the Air Navigation Service Provider. It is hypothesized that reliable individual performance by many aircraft will translate into higher total system-level performance. To actually realize this improvement, the new capabilities must be attracted to high demand and complexity regions where high ATM performance is critical. Operational approval for use in such environments will require participating aircraft to be certified to rigorous and appropriate performance standards. Currently, no formal basis exists for defining these standards. This paper provides a context for defining the performance basis for 4D-ASAS operations. The trajectory constraints to be met by the aircraft are defined, categorized, and assessed for performance requirements. A proposed extension of the existing Required Navigation Performance (RNP) construct into a dynamic standard (Dynamic RNP) is outlined. Sample data is presented from an ongoing high-fidelity batch simulation series that is characterizing the performance of an advanced 4D-ASAS application. Data of this type will contribute to the evaluation and validation of the proposed performance basis.

  17. Visualizing Airborne and Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierwirth, Victoria A.

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing is a process able to provide information about Earth to better understand Earth's processes and assist in monitoring Earth's resources. The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is one remote sensing instrument dedicated to the cause of collecting data on anthropogenic influences on Earth as well as assisting scientists in understanding land-surface and atmospheric interactions. Landsat is a satellite program dedicated to collecting repetitive coverage of the continental Earth surfaces in seven regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Combining these two aircraft and satellite remote sensing instruments will provide a detailed and comprehensive data collection able to provide influential information and improve predictions of changes in the future. This project acquired, interpreted, and created composite images from satellite data acquired from Landsat 4-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+). Landsat images were processed for areas covered by CAR during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCT AS), Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC), Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-Phase B (INTEXB), and Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI) 2000 missions. The acquisition of Landsat data will provide supplemental information to assist in visualizing and interpreting airborne and satellite imagery.

  18. Estimation of sunlit/shaded light-use efficiency of cropland using tower-based multi-angle remote sensing data and eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Chen, B.; Zhang, L.

    2014-12-01

    The light-use efficiency (LUE, ɛ) is one of critical parameters in the terrestrial ecosystem production studies. However, it is still a challenge how to up-scale LUE from canopy to the landscape/regional scales. One potential solution is to use automated multi-angle tower-based remote sensing platforms, which observe canopy reflectance with high spatial, temporal, spectral and angle resolution. Although some published paper on the LUE in boreal and temperate forests had used continuous multi-angle measurements of the surface reflectance, lack of study in literature investigated the vegetation physiological parameters of cropland using the surface reflectance with high spatio-temporal and high spectral data with multiple angles. To improve our understanding of physiological status of cropland, the maize within the footprint of the Daman Superstation flux tower site of Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experiment Research (HiWATER) was employed in this study. Based on the observed reflectance and flux data, a Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of vegetation index (Photochemical Reflectance Index, PRI and Vegetation Index using the Universal Pattern Decomposition method, VIUPD) at continuous time series was established by integrating of a semi-empirical kernel-driven BRDF model (RossThick-LiSparse), a footprint model (the Simple Analytical Footprint model on Eulerian coordinates for scalar Flux, SAFE-f) and a LUE model. Besides, based on the sky-condition (direct/diffused radiation) data, the relationships between the vegetation index (PRI and VIUPD) and sunlit/shaded LUE under corresponding sky conditions were established. Taking maize field as an example, the measurements were obtained during June to August, 2012. The relationships between PRI and ɛ for sunlit and shaded leaves were: PRIsu=0.06339×log(ɛsu) + 0.04882,PRIsh= 0.02675×log(ɛsh) + 0.01619, where, the subscript su, sh represent sunlit and shaded leaves respectively; p< 0.0001, R2

  19. Estimation of sunlit/shaded light-use efficiency of cropland using tower-based multi-angle remote sensing data and eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dongjie; Chen, Baozhang; Zhang, Lifu

    2015-04-01

    The light-use efficiency (LUE) is one of critical parameters in the terrestrial ecosystem production studies. However, it is still a challenge how to up-scale LUE from canopy to the landscape/regional scales. One potential solution is to use automated multi-angle tower-based remote sensing platforms, which observe canopy reflectance with high spatial, temporal, spectral and angle resolution. Although some published paper on the LUE in boreal and temperate forests had used continuous multi-angle measurements of the surface reflectance, lack of study in literature investigated the vegetation physiological parameters of cropland using the surface reflectance with high spatio-temporal and high spectral data with multiple angles. To improve our understanding of physiological status of cropland, the maize within the footprint of the Daman Superstation flux tower site of Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experiment Research (HiWATER) was employed in this study. Based on the observed reflectance and flux data, a Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of vegetation index (Photochemical Reflectance Index, PRI and Vegetation Index using the Universal Pattern Decomposition method, VIUPD) at continuous time series was established by integrating of a semi-empirical kernel-driven BRDF model (RossThick-LiSparse), a footprint model (the Simple Analytical Footprint model on Eulerian coordinates for scalar Flux, SAFE-f) and a LUE model. Besides, based on the sky-condition (direct/diffused radiation) data, the relationships between the vegetation index (PRI and VIUPD) and sunlit/shaded LUE under corresponding sky conditions were established. Taking maize field as an example, the measurements were obtained during June to August, 2012. The relationships between PRI and LUE for sunlit and shaded leaves were: PRIsu=0.06339×log(LUEsu) + 0.04882, PRIsh= 0.02675×log(LUEsh) + 0.01619, where, the subscript su, sh represent sunlit and shaded leaves respectively; p< 0.0001, R2

  20. Quick response airborne command post communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaisdell, Randy L.

    1988-08-01

    National emergencies and strategic crises come in all forms and sizes ranging from natural disasters at one end of the scale up to and including global nuclear warfare at the other. Since the early 1960s the U.S. Government has spent billions of dollars fielding airborne command posts to ensure continuity of government and the command and control function during times of theater conventional, theater nuclear, and global nuclear warfare. Unfortunately, cost has prevented the extension of the airborne command post technology developed for these relatively unlikely events to the lower level, though much more likely to occur, crises such as natural disasters, terrorist acts, political insurgencies, etc. This thesis proposes the implementation of an economical airborne command post concept to address the wide variety of crises ignored by existing military airborne command posts. The system is known as the Quick Response Airborne Command Post (QRAC Post) and is based on the exclusive use of commercially owned and operated aircraft, and commercially available automated data processing and communications resources. The thesis addresses the QRAC Post concept at a systems level and is primarily intended to demonstrate how current technology can be exploited to economically achieve a national objective.

  1. Airborne Gravimetry and Downward Continuation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jekeli, C.; Yang, H.; Kwon, J.

    2009-12-01

    Measuring the Earth’s gravity field using airborne instrumentation is fully operational and has been widely practiced for nearly three decades since its official debut in the early 1980s (S. Hammer: “Airborne Gravity is Here!”) coinciding with the precision kinematic positioning capability of GPS. Airborne gravimetry is undertaken for both efficient geophysical exploration purposes, as well as the determination of the regional geoid to aid in the modernization of height systems. Especially for the latter application, downward continuation of the data and combination with existing terrestrial gravimetry pose theoretical as well as practical challenges, which, on the other hand, create multiple processing possibilities. Downward continuation may be approached in various ways from the viewpoint of potential theory and the boundary-value problem to using gradients either estimated locally or computed from existing models. Logistical constraints imposed by the airborne survey, instrumental noise, and the intrinsic numerical instability of downward continuation all conspire to impact the final product in terms of achievable resolution and accuracy. In this paper, we review the theory of airborne gravimetry and the methodology of downward continuation, and provide a numerical comparison of possible schemes and their impact on geoid determination.

  2. Mapping permafrost with airborne electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsley, B. J.; Ball, L. B.; Bloss, B. R.; Kass, A.; Pastick, N.; Smith, B. D.; Voss, C. I.; Walsh, D. O.; Walvoord, M. A.; Wylie, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost is a key characteristic of cold region landscapes, yet detailed assessments of how the subsurface distribution of permafrost impacts the environment, hydrologic systems, and infrastructure are lacking. Data acquired from several airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys in Alaska provide significant new insight into the spatial extent of permafrost over larger areas (hundreds to thousands of square kilometers) than can be mapped using ground-based geophysical methods or through drilling. We compare several AEM datasets from different areas of interior Alaska, and explore the capacity of these data to infer geologic structure, permafrost extent, and related hydrologic processes. We also assess the impact of fires on permafrost by comparing data from different burn years within similar geological environments. Ultimately, interpretations rely on understanding the relationship between electrical resistivity measured by AEM surveys and the physical properties of interest such as geology, permafrost, and unfrozen water content in the subsurface. These relationships are often ambiguous and non-unique, so additional information is useful for reducing uncertainty. Shallow (upper ~1m) permafrost and soil characteristics identified from remotely sensed imagery and field observations help to constrain and aerially extend near-surface AEM interpretations, where correlations between the AEM and remote sensing data are identified using empirical multivariate analyses. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) measurements quantify the contribution of unfrozen water at depth to the AEM-derived electrical resistivity models at several locations within one survey area. AEM surveys fill a critical data gap in the subsurface characterization of permafrost environments and will be valuable in future mapping and monitoring programs in cold regions.

  3. Size separations of starch of different botanical origin studied by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Wahlund, Karl-Gustav; Leeman, Mats; Santacruz, Stalin

    2011-02-01

    Asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation combined with multiangle light scattering and refractive index detection has been revealed to be a powerful tool for starch characterization. It is based on size separation according to the hydrodynamic diameter of the starch components. Starch from a wide range of different botanical sources were studied, including normal starch and high-amylose and high-amylopectin starch. The starch was dissolved by heat treatment at elevated pressure in a laboratory autoclave. This gave clear solutions with no granular residues. Amylose retrogradation was prevented by using freshly dissolved samples. Programmed cross flow starting at 1.0 mL min(-1) and decreasing exponentially with a half-life of 4 min was utilised. The starches showed two size populations representing mainly amylose and mainly amylopectin with an overlapping region where amylose and amylopectin were possibly co-eluted. Most of the first population had molar masses below 10(6) g mol(-1), and most of the second size population had molar masses above 10(7) g mol(-1). Large differences were found in the relative amounts of the two populations, the molar mass, and hydrodynamic diameters, depending on the plant source and its varieties.

  4. Determination of the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin under varying pH and ionic strength by composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingfang; Acosta, Diana M; Whitney, Jon R; Podgornik, Rudolf; Steinmetz, Nicole F; French, Roger H; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering (CG-MALS) is an emerging technique for the determination of intermolecular interactions via the second virial coefficient B22. With CG-MALS, detailed studies of the second virial coefficient can be carried out more accurately and effectively than with traditional methods. In addition, automated mixing, delivery and measurement enable high speed, continuous, fluctuation-free sample delivery and accurate results. Using CG-MALS we measure the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solutions at various values of pH and ionic strength of a univalent salt (NaCl). The systematic variation of the second virial coefficient as a function of pH and NaCl strength reveals the net charge change and the isoelectric point of BSA under different solution conditions. The magnitude of the second virial coefficient decreases to 1.13 x 10(-5) ml*mol/g(2) near the isoelectric point of pH 4.6 and 25 mM NaCl. These results illuminate the role of fundamental long-range electrostatic and van der Waals forces in protein-protein interactions, specifically their dependence on pH and ionic strength.

  5. Multi-angle indicators system of non-point pollution source assessment in rural areas: a case study near Taihu Lake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Ban, Jie; Han, Yu Ting; Yang, Jie; Bi, Jun

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to identify key environmental risk sources contributing to water eutrophication and to suggest certain risk management strategies for rural areas. The multi-angle indicators included in the risk source assessment system were non-point source pollution, deficient waste treatment, and public awareness of environmental risk, which combined psychometric paradigm methods, the contingent valuation method, and personal interviews to describe the environmental sensitivity of local residents. Total risk values of different villages near Taihu Lake were calculated in the case study, which resulted in a geographic risk map showing which village was the critical risk source of Taihu eutrophication. The increased application of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), loss vulnerability of pollutant, and a lack of environmental risk awareness led to more serious non-point pollution, especially in rural China. Interesting results revealed by the quotient between the scores of objective risk sources and subjective risk sources showed what should be improved for each study village. More environmental investments, control of agricultural activities, and promotion of environmental education are critical considerations for rural environmental management. These findings are helpful for developing targeted and effective risk management strategies in rural areas.

  6. Multi-angle Indicators System of Non-point Pollution Source Assessment in Rural Areas: A Case Study Near Taihu Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Ban, Jie; Han, Yu Ting; Yang, Jie; Bi, Jun

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to identify key environmental risk sources contributing to water eutrophication and to suggest certain risk management strategies for rural areas. The multi-angle indicators included in the risk source assessment system were non-point source pollution, deficient waste treatment, and public awareness of environmental risk, which combined psychometric paradigm methods, the contingent valuation method, and personal interviews to describe the environmental sensitivity of local residents. Total risk values of different villages near Taihu Lake were calculated in the case study, which resulted in a geographic risk map showing which village was the critical risk source of Taihu eutrophication. The increased application of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), loss vulnerability of pollutant, and a lack of environmental risk awareness led to more serious non-point pollution, especially in rural China. Interesting results revealed by the quotient between the scores of objective risk sources and subjective risk sources showed what should be improved for each study village. More environmental investments, control of agricultural activities, and promotion of environmental education are critical considerations for rural environmental management. These findings are helpful for developing targeted and effective risk management strategies in rural areas.

  7. Desert dust aerosol air mass mapping in the western Sahara, using particle properties derived from space-based multi-angle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Müller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite's larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05-0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR's ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  8. Desert Dust Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, using Particle Properties Derived from Space-based Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Fiebig, Marcus; Schladitz, Alexander; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the SAhara Mineral dUst experiMent (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the sub-orbital aerosol measurements into the satellite's larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days for which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 to 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR's ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (a) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (b) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow, and (c) show an air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometers away.

  9. Desert Dust Aerosol Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, Using Particle Properties Derived from Space-Based Multi-Angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Mueller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; Von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite s larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR s ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  10. Biophysical characterization of influenza virus subpopulations using field flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering: correlation of particle counts, size distribution and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ziping; McEvoy, Matt; Razinkov, Vladimir; Polozova, Alla; Li, Elizabeth; Casas-Finet, Jose; Tous, Guillermo I; Balu, Palani; Pan, Alfred A; Mehta, Harshvardhan; Schenerman, Mark A

    2007-09-01

    Adequate biophysical characterization of influenza virions is important for vaccine development. The influenza virus vaccines are produced from the allantoic fluid of developing chicken embryos. The process of viral replication produces a heterogeneous mixture of infectious and non-infectious viral particles with varying states of aggregation. The study of the relative distribution and behavior of different subpopulations and their inter-correlation can assist in the development of a robust process for a live virus vaccine. This report describes a field flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FFF-MALS) method optimized for the analysis of size distribution and total particle counts. The FFF-MALS method was compared with several other methods such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), size exclusion chromatography followed by MALS (SEC-MALS), quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT Q-PCR), median tissue culture dose (TCID(50)), and the fluorescent focus assay (FFA). The correlation between the various methods for determining total particle counts, infectivity and size distribution is reported. The pros and cons of each of the analytical methods are discussed.

  11. Nondestructive testing using air-borne ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hsu, David K

    2006-12-22

    Over the last two decades, more efficient transducers were developed for the generation and reception of air-borne ultrasound, thus enabling the non-contact, non-contaminating inspection of composite laminates and honeycomb structures widely used in the aerospace industry. This paper presents the fundamentals of making air-borne ultrasonic measurement, and point out special considerations unique to propagating ultrasound in air and through solids. Transducer beam profile characterization, thickness dependence and resonance effects in the transmission of air-coupled ultrasound through plates, and the detection and imaging of defects and damage in solid laminates and honeycomb sandwich will be discussed and illustrated with examples. Finally, a manual scan system developed for implementing air-borne ultrasonic imaging in the field and on aircraft will be introduced.

  12. Airborne Microalgae: Insights, Opportunities, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Löndahl, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Airborne dispersal of microalgae has largely been a blind spot in environmental biological studies because of their low concentration in the atmosphere and the technical limitations in investigating microalgae from air samples. Recent studies show that airborne microalgae can survive air transportation and interact with the environment, possibly influencing their deposition rates. This minireview presents a summary of these studies and traces the possible route, step by step, from established ecosystems to new habitats through air transportation over a variety of geographic scales. Emission, transportation, deposition, and adaptation to atmospheric stress are discussed, as well as the consequences of their dispersal on health and the environment and state-of-the-art techniques to detect and model airborne microalga dispersal. More-detailed studies on the microalga atmospheric cycle, including, for instance, ice nucleation activity and transport simulations, are crucial for improving our understanding of microalga ecology, identifying microalga interactions with the environment, and preventing unwanted contamination events or invasions. PMID:26801574

  13. Airborne space laser communication system and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Li-zhong; Meng, Li-Xin

    2015-11-01

    Airborne space laser communication is characterized by its high speed, anti-electromagnetic interference, security, easy to assign. It has broad application in the areas of integrated space-ground communication networking, military communication, anti-electromagnetic communication. This paper introduce the component and APT system of the airborne laser communication system design by Changchun university of science and technology base on characteristic of airborne laser communication and Y12 plan, especially introduce the high communication speed and long distance communication experiment of the system that among two Y12 plans. In the experiment got the aim that the max communication distance 144Km, error 10-6 2.5Gbps - 10-7 1.5Gbps capture probability 97%, average capture time 20s. The experiment proving the adaptability of the APT and the high speed long distance communication.

  14. Urban greenness influences airborne bacterial community composition.

    PubMed

    Mhuireach, Gwynne; Johnson, Bart R; Altrichter, Adam E; Ladau, Joshua; Meadow, James F; Pollard, Katherine S; Green, Jessica L

    2016-11-15

    Urban green space provides health benefits for city dwellers, and new evidence suggests that microorganisms associated with soil and vegetation could play a role. While airborne microorganisms are ubiquitous in urban areas, the influence of nearby vegetation on airborne microbial communities remains poorly understood. We examined airborne microbial communities in parks and parking lots in Eugene, Oregon, using high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene on the Illumina MiSeq platform to identify bacterial taxa, and GIS to measure vegetation cover in buffer zones of different diameters. Our goal was to explore variation among highly vegetated (parks) versus non-vegetated (parking lots) urban environments. A secondary objective was to evaluate passive versus active collection methods for outdoor airborne microbial sampling. Airborne bacterial communities from five parks were different from those of five parking lots (p=0.023), although alpha diversity was similar. Direct gradient analysis showed that the proportion of vegetated area within a 50m radius of the sampling station explained 15% of the variation in bacterial community composition. A number of key taxa, including several Acidobacteriaceae were substantially more abundant in parks, while parking lots had higher relative abundance of Acetobacteraceae. Parks had greater beta diversity than parking lots, i.e. individual parks were characterized by unique bacterial signatures, whereas parking lot communities tended to be similar to each other. Although parks and parking lots were selected to form pairs of nearby sites, spatial proximity did not appear to affect compositional similarity. Our results also showed that passive and active collection methods gave comparable results, indicating the "settling dish" method is effective for outdoor airborne sampling. This work sets a foundation for understanding how urban vegetation may impact microbial communities, with potential implications for designing

  15. Assessing inhalation exposure from airborne soil contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.H.

    1998-04-01

    A method of estimation of inhalation exposure to airborne soil contaminants is presented. this method is derived from studies of airborne soil particles with radioactive tags. The concentration of contaminants in air (g/m{sup 3}) can be derived from the product of M, the suspended respirable dust mass concentration (g/m{sup 3}), S, the concentration of contaminant in the soil (g/g), and E{sub f}, an enhancement factor. Typical measurement methods and values of M, and E{sub f} are given along with highlights of experiences with this method.

  16. Airborne Turbulence Detection System Certification Tool Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, David W.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2006-01-01

    A methodology and a corresponding set of simulation tools for testing and evaluating turbulence detection sensors has been presented. The tool set is available to industry and the FAA for certification of radar based airborne turbulence detection systems. The tool set consists of simulated data sets representing convectively induced turbulence, an airborne radar simulation system, hazard tables to convert the radar observable to an aircraft load, documentation, a hazard metric "truth" algorithm, and criteria for scoring the predictions. Analysis indicates that flight test data supports spatial buffers for scoring detections. Also, flight data and demonstrations with the tool set suggest the need for a magnitude buffer.

  17. Monitoring airborne alpha-emitter contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, P.L.; Koster, J.E.; Conaway, J.G.; Bounds, J.A.; Whitley, C.W.; Steadman, P.A.

    1998-02-01

    Facilities that may produce airborne alpha emitter contamination require a continuous air monitoring (CAM) system. However, these traditional CAMs have difficulty in environments with large quantities of non-radioactive particulates such as dust and salt. Los Alamos has developed an airborne plutonium sensor (APS) for the REBOUND experiment at the Nevada Test Site which detects alpha contamination directly in the air, and so is less vulnerable to the problems associated with counting activity on a filter. In addition, radon compensation is built into the detector by the use of two measurement chambers.

  18. National center for airborne laser mapping proposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Bill; Shrestha, Ramesh L.; Dietrich, Bill

    Researchers from universities, U.S. government agencies, U.S. national laboratories, and private industry met in the spring to learn about the current capabilities of Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM), share their experiences in using the technology for a wide variety of research applications, outline research that would be made possible by research-grade ALSM data, and discuss the proposed operation and management of the brand new National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM).The workshop successfully identified a community of researchers with common interests in the advancement and use of ALSM—a community which strongly supports the immediate establishment of the NCALM.

  19. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  20. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  1. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  2. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  3. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  4. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  5. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  6. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  7. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  8. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  9. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  10. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  11. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  12. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  13. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  14. 76 FR 76333 - Notification for Airborne Wind Energy Systems (AWES)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 77 Notification for Airborne Wind Energy Systems (AWES) AGENCY...,'' to airborne wind energy systems (AWES). In addition, this notice requests information from airborne wind energy system developers and the public related to these systems so that the FAA...

  15. CALIOPE airborne CO{sub 2} DIAL (CACDI) system design

    SciTech Connect

    Mietz, D.; Archuleta, B.; Archuleta, J.

    1997-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently developing an airborne CO{sub 2} Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system based on second generation technology demonstrated last summer at NTS. The CALIOPE Airborne CO{sub 2} DIAL (CACDI) system requirements have been compiled based on the mission objectives and SONDIAL model trade studies. Subsystem designs have been developed based on flow down from these system requirements, as well as experience gained from second generation ground tests and N-ABLE (Non-proliferation AirBorne Lidar Experiments) airborne experiments. This paper presents the CACDI mission objectives, system requirements, the current subsystem design, and provides an overview of the airborne experimental plan.

  16. Infrared airborne spectroradiometer survey results in the western Nevada area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W.; Chang, S. H.; Kuo, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark II airborne spectroradiometer system was flown over several geologic test sites in western Nevada. The infrared mineral absorption bands were observed and recorded for the first time using an airborne system with high spectral resolution in the 2.0 to 2.5 micron region. The data show that the hydrothermal alteration zone minerals, carbonates, and other minerals are clearly visible in the airborne survey mode. The finer spectral features that distinguish the various minerals with infrared bands are also clearly visible in the airborne survey data. Using specialized computer pattern recognition methods, it is possible to identify mineralogy and map alteration zones and lithologies by airborne spectroradiometer survey techniques.

  17. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Ocean Directional Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; King, Michael D.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Arnold, G. Thomas; Redemann, Jens

    2004-01-01

    During summer of 2001 NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) obtained measurement of ocean angular distribution of reflected radiation or BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft under cloud-free conditions. The measurements took place aver the Atlantic Ocean off the eastern seaboard of the U.S. in the vicinity of the Chesapeake Light Tower and at nearby National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Buoy Stations. The measurements were in support of CLAMS, Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites, field campaign that was primarily designed to validate and improve NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite data products being derived from three sensors: MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectro-Radiometer), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) and CERES (Clouds and Earth s Radiant Energy System). Because of the high resolution of the CAR measurements and its high sensitivity to detect weak ocean signals against a noisy background, results of radiance field above the ocean are seen in unprecedented detail. The study also attempts to validate the widely used Cox-Munk model for predicting reflectance from a rough ocean surface.

  18. Data Analysis of Airborne Electromagnetic Bathymetry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    ploration Method. CIMM Bulletin, May, pp. 1-12. terpretation of Airborne Electromagnetic Data. Turnross, J., H. F. Morrison, and A. Becker (1984...System. CIMM Bulletin, v. 66, pp. 104-109. Fraser. D. C. (1978). Resistivity Mapping with an Air- report, Office of Naval Research, Washington, DC

  19. Tandem mass spectrometry of individual airborne microparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.T.A.; Gieray, R.A.; Yang, M.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for real-time MS/MS analysis of individual airborne microparticles by laser ablation in an ion trap is described. The performance has been demonstrated by the detection of tributyl phosphate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate on silicon carbide and kaolin microparticles. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Airborne Satcom Terminal Research at NASA Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoder, Doug; Zakrajsek, Robert

    2002-01-01

    NASA Glenn has constructed an airborne Ku-band satellite terminal, which provides wideband full-duplex ground-aircraft communications. The terminal makes use of novel electronically-steered phased array antennas and provides IP connectivity to and from the ground. The satcom terminal communications equipment may be easily changed whenever a new configuration is required, enhancing the terminal's versatility.

  1. Temporal variability in airborne pollen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Raynor, G S; Hayes, J V; Ogden, E C

    1976-06-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the relationship between concentrations of airborne pollens and sampling time, using sequential rotoslide samplers at urban and rural locations. Short-period data showed an increase in variability with time between samples. Two-hour data showed a stronger trend for the first 12 hours but better agreement as the time between samples approached one day.

  2. A Technique for Airborne Aerobiological Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mill, R. A.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Report of a study of airborne micro-organisms collected over the Oklahoma City Metropolitan area and immediate environments, to investigate the possibility that a cloud of such organisms might account for the prevalence of some respiratory diseases in and around urban areas. (LK)

  3. Airborne Forcible Entry Operations: USAF Airlift Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-03

    34Urgent Fury." U.S. military forces would land in Grenada at 5:00 A.M. on 25 October 1983. 35 Admiral Wesley MacDonald, C~ munder -in-CMief, Atlantic...The airdrop of the 82nd Airborne Division troopers at Torri- jos/Tocwmen Airport, although successful, encountered sae problems. Bad weather in the U.S

  4. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  5. AN AIRBORNE COLLISION-WARNING DEVICE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A simplified airborne collision- warning device is suggested in which each aircraft transmits its barometric altitude by radio. The likelihood of...signals into ’near’ and ’far’ categories would have to be determined by flight tests, it is felt that the low cost and early availability of the system justifies its consideration. (Author)

  6. Mapping Waterhyacinth Infestations Using Airborne Hyperspectral Imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Waterhyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms] is an exotic aquatic weed that often invades and clogs waterways in many tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The objective of this study was to evaluate airborne hyperspectral imagery and different image classification techniques for mapp...

  7. The Beginnings of Airborne Astronomy, 1920 - 1930: an Historical Narrative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craine, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    The emergence of airborne astronomy in the early twentieth century is recounted. The aerial expedition to observe the solar eclipse on September 10, 1923, is described. Observation of the total solar eclipse of January 24, 1925, is discussed. The Honey Lake aerial expedition to study the solar eclipse of April 28, 1930, is also described. Four major accomplishments in airborne astronomy during the period 1920 to 1930 are listed. Airborne expeditions were undertaken at every logical opportunity, starting a continuous sequence of airborne astronomical expeditions which was to remain unbroken, except by World War II, to the present day. Although the scientific returns of the first ten years were modest, they did exist. Interest in, and support for, airborne astronomy was generated not only among astronomers but also among the public. Albert Stevens, arguably the true father of airborne astronomy, was to become interested in applying his considerable skill and experience to the airborne acquisition of astronomical data.

  8. Airborne laser sensors and integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark A.; Gardi, Alessandro; Ramasamy, Subramanian

    2015-11-01

    The underlying principles and technologies enabling the design and operation of airborne laser sensors are introduced and a detailed review of state-of-the-art avionic systems for civil and military applications is presented. Airborne lasers including Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR), Laser Range Finders (LRF), and Laser Weapon Systems (LWS) are extensively used today and new promising technologies are being explored. Most laser systems are active devices that operate in a manner very similar to microwave radars but at much higher frequencies (e.g., LIDAR and LRF). Other devices (e.g., laser target designators and beam-riders) are used to precisely direct Laser Guided Weapons (LGW) against ground targets. The integration of both functions is often encountered in modern military avionics navigation-attack systems. The beneficial effects of airborne lasers including the use of smaller components and remarkable angular resolution have resulted in a host of manned and unmanned aircraft applications. On the other hand, laser sensors performance are much more sensitive to the vagaries of the atmosphere and are thus generally restricted to shorter ranges than microwave systems. Hence it is of paramount importance to analyse the performance of laser sensors and systems in various weather and environmental conditions. Additionally, it is important to define airborne laser safety criteria, since several systems currently in service operate in the near infrared with considerable risk for the naked human eye. Therefore, appropriate methods for predicting and evaluating the performance of infrared laser sensors/systems are presented, taking into account laser safety issues. For aircraft experimental activities with laser systems, it is essential to define test requirements taking into account the specific conditions for operational employment of the systems in the intended scenarios and to verify the performance in realistic environments at the test ranges. To support the

  9. Polysaccharide characterization by hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation with on-line multi-angle static light scattering and differential refractometry.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Striegel, André M

    2015-02-06

    Accurate characterization of the molar mass and size of polysaccharides is an ongoing challenge, oftentimes due to architectural diversity but also to the broad molar mass (M) range over which a single polysaccharide can exist and to the ultra-high M of many polysaccharides. Because of the latter, many of these biomacromolecules experience on-column, flow-induced degradation during analysis by size-exclusion and, even, hydrodynamic chromatography (SEC and HDC, respectively). The necessity for gentler fractionation methods has, to date, been addressed employing asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Here, we introduce the coupling of hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) to multi-angle static light scattering (MALS) and differential refractometry (DRI) detection for the analysis of polysaccharides. In HF5, less stresses are placed on the macromolecules during separation than in SEC or HDC, and HF5 can offer a higher sensitivity, with less propensity for system overloading and analyte aggregation, than generally found in AF4. The coupling to MALS and DRI affords the determination of absolute, calibration-curve-independent molar mass averages and dispersities. Results from the present HF5/MALS/DRI experiments with dextrans, pullulans, and larch arabinogalactan were augmented with hydrodynamic radius (RH) measurements from off-line quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and by RH distribution calculations and fractogram simulations obtained via a finite element analysis implementation of field-flow fractionation theory by commercially available software. As part of this study, we have investigated analyte recovery in HF5 and also possible reasons for discrepancies between calculated and simulated results vis-à-vis experimentally determined data.

  10. Understanding angular effects in VHR imagery and their significance for urban land-cover model portability: A study of two multi-angle in-track image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matasci, Giona; Longbotham, Nathan; Pacifici, Fabio; Kanevski, Mikhail; Tuia, Devis

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the angular effects causing spectral distortions in multi-angle remote sensing imagery. We study two WorldView-2 multispectral in-track sequences acquired over the cities of Atlanta, USA, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, consisting of 13 and 20 co-located images, respectively. The sequences possess off-nadir acquisition angles up to 47.5° and bear markedly different sun-satellite configurations with respect to each other. Both scenes comprise classic urban structures such as buildings of different size, road networks, and parks. First, we quantify the degree of distortion affecting the sequences by means of a non-linear measure of distance between probability distributions, the Maximum Mean Discrepancy. Second, we assess the ability of a classification model trained on an image acquired at a certain view angle to predict the land-cover of all the other images in the sequence. The portability across the sequence is investigated for supervised classifiers of different nature by analyzing the evolution of the classification accuracy with respect to the off-nadir look angle. For both datasets, the effectiveness of physically- and statistically-based normalization methods in obtaining angle-invariant data spaces is compared and synergies are discussed. The empirical results indicate that, after a suitable normalization (histogram matching, atmospheric compensation), the loss in classification accuracy when using a model trained on the near-nadir image to classify the most off-nadir acquisitions can be reduced to as little as 0.06 (Atlanta) or 0.03 (Rio de Janeiro) Kappa points when using a SVM classifier.

  11. ACE-Asia Aerosol Optical Depth and Water Vapor Measured by Airborne Sunphotometers and Related to Other Measurements and Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Eilers, J. A.; Ramirez, S. A.; Kahn, R.; Hegg, D.; Pilewskie, P.; Anderson, T.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the Spring 2001 phase of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the 6-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated on 15 of the 19 research flights of the NCAR C-130, while its 14-channel counterpart (AATS- 14) flew successfully on all 18 research flights of the CIRPAS Twin Otter. ACE-Asia studied aerosol outflow from the Asian continent to the Pacific basin. It was designed to integrate suborbital and satellite measurements and models so as to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosols. AATS-6 and AATS-14 measured solar beam transmission at 6 and 14 wavelengths (380-1021 and 354-1558 nm, respectively), yielding aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and column water vapor (CWV). Vertical differentiation in profiles yielded aerosol extinction spectra and water vapor concentration. The wavelength dependence of these AOD and extinction spectra indicates that supermicron dust was often a major component of the ACE-Asia aerosol. Frequently this dust-containing aerosol extended to high altitudes. For example, in AATS- 14 profiles analyzed to date, 36% of full-column AOD at 525 nm was above 3 km. In contrast, only 10% of CWV was above 3 km. Analyses and applications of AATS-6 and AATS-14 data to date include comparisons to (i) extinction products derived using in situ measurements, (ii) extinction profiles derived from lidar measurements, and (iii) AOD retrievals from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) aboard the TERRA satellite. Other planned collaborative studies include comparisons to results from size spectrometers, chemical measurements, other satellite sensors, flux radiometers, and chemical transport models. Early results of these studies will be presented.

  12. Latest Advancement In Airborne Relative Gravity Instrumentation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, N.

    2011-12-01

    Airborne gravity surveying has been performed with widely varying degrees of success since early experimentation with the Lacoste and Romberg dynamic meter in the 1950s. There are a number of different survey systems currently in operation including relative gravity meters and gradiometers. Airborne gravity is ideally suited to rapid, wide coverage surveying and is not significantly more expensive in more remote and inhospitable terrain which makes airborne measurements one of the few viable options available for cost effective exploration. As improved instrumentation has become available, scientific applications have also been able to take advantage for use in determining sub surface geologic structures, for example under ice sheets in Antarctica, and more recently direct measurement of the geoid to improve the vertical datum in the United States. In 2004, Lacoste and Romberg (now Micro-g Lacoste) decided to build on their success with the newly developed AirSea II dynamic meter and use that system as the basis for a dedicated airborne gravity instrument. Advances in electronics, timing and positioning technology created the opportunity to refine both the hardware and software, and to develop a truly turnkey system that would work well for users with little or no airborne gravity experience as well as those with more extensive experience. The resulting Turnkey Airborne Gravity System (TAGS) was successfully introduced in 2007 and has since been flown in applications from oil, gas and mineral exploration surveys to regional gravity mapping and geoid mapping. The system has been mounted in a variety of airborne platforms including depending on the application of interest. The development experience with the TAGS enabled Micro-g Lacoste to embark on a new project in 2010 to completely redesign the mechanical and electronic components of the system rather than continuing incremental upgrades. Building on the capabilities of the original TAGS, the objectives for the

  13. Accurate Size and Size-Distribution Determination of Polystyrene Latex Nanoparticles in Aqueous Medium Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Asymmetrical Flow Field Flow Fractionation with Multi-Angle Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Takahashi, Kayori; Kinugasa, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Accurate determination of the intensity-average diameter of polystyrene latex (PS-latex) by dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out through extrapolation of both the concentration of PS-latex and the observed scattering angle. Intensity-average diameter and size distribution were reliably determined by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AFFFF) using multi-angle light scattering (MALS) with consideration of band broadening in AFFFF separation. The intensity-average diameter determined by DLS and AFFFF-MALS agreed well within the estimated uncertainties, although the size distribution of PS-latex determined by DLS was less reliable in comparison with that determined by AFFFF-MALS.

  14. Airborne Sunphotometry in Support of the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.; Eilers, J. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kahn, R.; Smith, W. L.

    2001-12-01

    As part of the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) experiment, July 10 - August 2, 2001, the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was operated successfully aboard the University of Washington CV-580 during 10 research flights, totaling 45.09 flight hours. The CLAMS campaign was a clear sky, shortwave (SW) closure campaign sponsored by CERES, MISR, MODIS-Atmospheres, and the NASA/GEWEX Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP), and entailed measurements from the Chesapeake Lighthouse research platform, several land sites, 6 research aircraft and the TERRA satellite. Among the CLAMS research goals were the validation of satellite-based retrievals of aerosol properties, vertical profiles of radiative fluxes, temperature and water vapor. AATS-14 measures the direct solar beam transmission at 14 discrete wavelengths (354-1558 nm), yielding aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra, columnar water vapor and columnar ozone. Differentiation of AOD (CWV) with respect to altitude in favorable flight patterns, allows the derivation of aerosol extinction (water vapor density). During coordinated flights of the UW CV-580, AATS-14 measured full column aerosol optical depth spectra at exact TERRA overpass time on at least 7 occasions. For five of these opportunities, AOD at 499nm was at or below 0.1. During TERRA overpass time on July 17, 2001, AATS-14 measured the highest AOD encountered during the entire experiment (ca. 0.48 at 499nm), including a horizontal gradient in AOD of more than 0.1 over a horizontal distance of ca. 80 kilometers. In this paper, we will show first sunphotometer-derived results regarding the spatial variation of AOD and CWV during TERRA overpass time at key locations for the CLAMS experiment. Preliminary comparison studies between our AOD/aerosol extinction data and results from (i) extinction products derived using in situ measurements aboard the UW CV-580 and (ii) AOD retrievals using the Multi-angle

  15. The Callaway Plant's airborne tritium sampling cart

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Roselius, R.R. )

    1986-07-01

    The water vapor condensation method for sampling airborne tritium offers significant advantages over other methods, including minimal sample preparation, high sensitivity, and independence from collection efficiency and sample flow rate. However, it does have disadvantages that must be overcome in the design of a sampler. This article describes a cart-mounted, portable airborne tritium sampler used at the Callaway Nuclear Plant that incorporates the advantages of the condensation technique while minimizing its shortcomings. The key elements in the design of the sampler are the use of a refrigerated bath to cool a series of three water vapor collection traps and the use of an optical condensation dew point hygrometer to measure the moisture content of the sample. Design considerations for the proper operation of dew point hygrometers are presented, and the method used to convert due point readings to water vapor content is described.

  16. Airborne Infrared Spectroscopy of 1994 Western Wildfires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, Helen; Beer, Reinhard; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1997-01-01

    In the summer of 1994 the 0.07/ cm resolution infrared Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) acquired spectral data over two wildfires, one in central Oregon on August 3 and the other near San Luis Obispo, California, on August 15. The spectrometer was on board a NASA DC-8 research aircraft, flying at an altitude of 12 km. The spectra from both fires clearly show features due to water vapor, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, methanol, formic acid, and ethylene at significantly higher abundance and temperature than observed in downlooking spectra of normal atmospheric and ground conditions. Column densities are derived for several species, and molar ratios are compared with previous biomass fire measurements. We believe that this is the first time such data have been acquired by airborne spectral remote sensing.

  17. Airborne Wind Measurements at Cape Blanco, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jung-Tai Lin; Veenhuizen, Scott D.

    1983-12-01

    The airborne wind measuring system using a fixed wing airplane and a Loran-C navigation unit was proven to be feasible to provide the large scale background wind flow for initialization of numerical wind modeling. The rms errors in the airborne wind measuring system were +- 2 mph in wind speed and +- 12 degrees in wind direction. The advantages of this method were that wind speeds over a large area (5 miles x 14 miles, or 18 miles x 30 miles) may be determined rapidly, economically and at altitudes above the normal altitudes of TALA kite mesurements. The disadvantages were that the spatial resolution of the measurements was poor and near surface measurements were not feasible using a fixed wing aircraft. 1 reference, 10 figures, 1 table.

  18. Analyzing Options for Airborne Emergency Wireless Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schmitt; Juan Deaton; Curt Papke; Shane Cherry

    2008-03-01

    In the event of large-scale natural or manmade catastrophic events, access to reliable and enduring commercial communication systems is critical. Hurricane Katrina provided a recent example of the need to ensure communications during a national emergency. To ensure that communication demands are met during these critical times, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the guidance of United States Strategic Command has studied infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities associated with an airborne wireless communications capability. Such a capability could provide emergency wireless communications until public/commercial nodes can be systematically restored. This report focuses on the airborne cellular restoration concept; analyzing basic infrastructure requirements; identifying related infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities and offers recommended solutions.

  19. Airborne Microwave Imaging of River Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project was to determine whether airborne microwave remote sensing systems can measure river surface currents with sufficient accuracy to make them prospective instruments with which to monitor river flow from space. The approach was to fly a coherent airborne microwave Doppler radar, developed by APL/UW, on a light airplane along several rivers in western Washington state over an extended period of time. The fundamental quantity obtained by this system to measure river currents is the mean offset of the Doppler spectrum. Since this scatter can be obtained from interferometric synthetic aperture radars (INSARs), which can be flown in space, this project provided a cost effective means for determining the suitability of spaceborne INSAR for measuring river flow.

  20. Airborne Laser/GPS Mapping of Beaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Swift, R. N.; Fredrick, E. B.; Manizade, S. S.; Martin, C. F.; Sonntag, J. G.; Duffy, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented from topographic surveys of the Assateague National Seashore Park using recently developed airborne laser and Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. During November, 1995, and again in May, 1996, the NASA Arctic Ice Mapping (AIM) group from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility conducted surveys as a part of technology enhancement activities or warm-up missions prior to conducting elevation measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet as part of NASA's Global Climate Change program. The resulting data are compared to surface surveys using standard techniques. The goal of these projects is to make these measurements to an accuracy of 10 cm. The measurements were made from NASA's 4-engine P-3 Orion aircraft using the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), a scanning laser system. The necessary high accuracy vertical as well as horizontal positioning are provided by Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers located both on board the aircraft and at a fixed site at Wallops Island.

  1. Airborne infrared spectroscopy of 1994 western wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, Helen; Beer, Reinhard; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1997-01-01

    In the summer of 1994 the 0.07 cm-1 resolution infrared Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) acquired spectral data over two wildfires, one in central Oregon on August 3 and the other near San Luis Obispo, California, on August 15. The spectrometer was on board a NASA DC-8 research aircraft, flying at an altitude of 12 km. The spectra from both fires clearly show features due to water vapor, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, methanol, formic acid, and ethylene at significantly higher abundance and temperature than observed in downlooking spectra of normal atmospheric and ground conditions. Column densities are derived for several species, and molar ratios are compared with previous biomass fire measurements. We believe that this is the first time such data have been acquired by airborne spectral remote sensing.

  2. BOREAS RSS-12 Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Wrigley, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-12 team collected both ground and airborne sunphotometer measurements for use in characterizing the aerosol optical properties of the atmosphere during the BOREAS data collection activities. These measurements are to be used to: 1) measure the magnitude and variability of the aerosol optical depth in both time and space; 2) determine the optical properties of the boreal aerosols; and 3) atmospherically correct remotely sensed data acquired during BOREAS. This data set contains airborne tracking sunphotometer data that were acquired from the C-130 aircraft during its flights over the BOREAS study areas. The data cover selected days and times from May to September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  3. Performance metrics for an airborne imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, David C.; Gonglewski, John D.

    2004-11-01

    A series of airborne imaging experiments have been conducted on the island of Maui and at North Oscura Peak in New Mexico. Two platform altitudes were considered 3000 meters and 600 meters, both with a slant range to the target up to 10000 meters. The airborne imaging platform was a Twin Otter aircraft, which circled ground target sites. The second was a fixed platform on a mountain peak overlooking a valley 600 meters below. The experiments were performed during the day using solar illuminated target buildings. Imaging system performance predictions were calculated using standard atmospheric turbulence models, and aircraft boundary layer models. Several different measurement approaches were then used to estimate the actual system performance, and make comparisons with the calculations.

  4. Airborne Chemical Sensing with Mobile Robots

    PubMed Central

    Lilienthal, Achim J.; Loutfi, Amy; Duckett, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Airborne chemical sensing with mobile robots has been an active research area since the beginning of the 1990s. This article presents a review of research work in this field, including gas distribution mapping, trail guidance, and the different subtasks of gas source localisation. Due to the difficulty of modelling gas distribution in a real world environment with currently available simulation techniques, we focus largely on experimental work and do not consider publications that are purely based on simulations.

  5. A new tool for sampling airborne isocyanates

    SciTech Connect

    Sesana, G.; Nano, G.; Baj, A. )

    1991-05-01

    A new sampling system is presented that uses solid sorbent media contained in a tube for the determination of airborne isocyanates (2.4-2.6 toluene diisocyanate, hexamethylene diisocyanate, and 4.4' diaminodiphenylmethane diisocyanate). The method is compared with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method P CAM 5505 (Revision {number sign}1). Experimental tests yielded results that were highly concordant with the NIOSH method.

  6. Airborne Nanostructured Particles and Occupational Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Andrew D.; Kuempel, Eileen D.

    2005-12-01

    Nanotechnology is leading to the development in many field, of new materials and devices in many fields that demonstrate nanostructure-dependent properties. However, concern has been expressed that these same properties may present unique challenges to addressing potential health impact. Airborne particles associated with engineered nanomaterials are of particular concern, as they can readily enter the body through inhalation. Research into the potential occupational health risks associated with inhaling engineered nanostructured particles is just beginning. However, there is a large body of data on occupational and environmental aerosols, which is applicable to developing an initial assessment of potential risk and risk reduction strategies. Epidemiological and pathological studies of occupational and environmental exposures to airborne particles and fibers provide information on the aerosol-related lung diseases and conditions that have been observed in humans. Toxicological studies provide information on the specific disease mechanisms, dose-response relationships, and the particle characteristics that influence toxicity, including the size, surface area, chemistry or reactivity, solubility, and shape. Potential health risk will depend on the magnitude and nature of exposures to airborne nanostructured particles, and on the release, dispersion, transformation and control of materials in the workplace. Aerosol control methods have not been well-characterized for nanometer diameter particles, although theory and limited experimental data indicate that conventional ventilation, engineering control and filtration approaches should be applicable in many situations. Current information supports the development of preliminary guiding principles on working with engineered nanomaterials. However critical research questions remain to be answered before the potential health risk of airborne nanostructured particles in the workplace can be fully addressed.

  7. Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.

    1998-01-01

    Scanning holographic lidar receivers are currently in use in two operational lidar systems, PHASERS (Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing) and now HARLIE (Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment). These systems are based on volume phase holograms made in dichromated gelatin (DCG) sandwiched between 2 layers of high quality float glass. They have demonstrated the practical application of this technology to compact scanning lidar systems at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths, the ability to withstand moderately high laser power and energy loading, sufficient optical quality for most direct detection systems, overall efficiencies rivaling conventional receivers, and the stability to last several years under typical lidar system environments. Their size and weight are approximately half of similar performing scanning systems using reflective optics. The cost of holographic systems will eventually be lower than the reflective optical systems depending on their degree of commercialization. There are a number of applications that require or can greatly benefit from a scanning capability. Several of these are airborne systems, which either use focal plane scanning, as in the Laser Vegetation Imaging System or use primary aperture scanning, as in the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar or the Large Aperture Scanning Airborne Lidar. The latter class requires a large clear aperture opening or window in the aircraft. This type of system can greatly benefit from the use of scanning transmission holograms of the HARLIE type because the clear aperture required is only about 25% larger than the collecting aperture as opposed to 200-300% larger for scan angles of 45 degrees off nadir.

  8. Image Based Synthesis for Airborne Minefield Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    applications of image synthesis include artificial texture generation [1], image repairing [2], photometric image rendering [3] and ultrasound imaging...1999. 4. M. Song, R. M. Haralick, F.H. Sheehan, " Ultrasound imaging simulation and echocardiographic image synthesis ", Proceedings of the IEEE...Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate AMSRD-CER-NV-TR-246I Image Based Synthesis for Airborne Minefield Data December 2005 Approved for

  9. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This 17-second clip shows air-to-air shots of the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory as it passes over the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, and the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains. On December 29, 1997, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, received a DC-8 airborne laboratory from NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, where it had flown missions related to airborne science and earth science for many years. This airplane has continued to be used from Dryden for basic research about the Earth's surface and atmosphere as well as sensor development and satellite sensor verification. In mid-February 1998, the DC-8 resumed flying its medium-altitude, science-gathering missions following maintenance and upgrades of its satellite communications system. It flew a variety of missions over widely scattered geographic regions during the rest of the calendar year and beyond to gather data about earth science, including weather and climate. Built by Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, California, in 1966, the DC-8 flew for 20 years with two major airlines before being acquired by NASA and converted to its present role as an airborne laboratory. The four-engine former jetliner was capable of flying extended-duration missions as long as 12 hours over a range of 5,400 nautical miles at cruise altitudes up to 41,000 feet. It was also capable of carrying a payload of multiple experiments weighing up to 30,000 pounds. On some of its missions, up to 30 scientists have worked on as many as 14 different experiments.

  10. DC-8 airborne laboratory in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In this 26-second clip the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory is shown making turns over the Sierra Nevada foothills, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, and Rogers Dry Lakebed at Edwards Air Force Base, California. On December 29, 1997, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, received a DC-8 airborne laboratory from NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, where it had flown missions related to airborne science and earth science for many years. This airplane has continued to be used from Dryden for basic research about the Earth's surface and atmosphere as well as sensor development and satellite sensor verification. In mid-February 1998, the DC-8 resumed flying its medium-altitude, science-gathering missions following maintenance and upgrades of its satellite communications system. It flew a variety of missions over widely scattered geographic regions during the rest of the calendar year and beyond to gather data about earth science, including weather and climate. Built by Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, California, in 1966, the DC-8 flew for 20 years with two major Airlines before being acquired by NASA and converted to its present role as an airborne laboratory. The four-engine former jetliner was capable of flying extended-duration missions for as long as 12 hours over a range of 5,400 nautical miles at cruise altitudes of up to 41,000 feet. It was also capable of carrying a payload of multiple experiments weighing up to 30,000 pounds. On some of its missions, up to 30 scientists have worked on as many as 14 different experiments.

  11. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  12. Improved Airborne System for Sensing Wildfires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKeown, Donald; Richardson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Wildfire Airborne Sensing Program (WASP) is engaged in a continuing effort to develop an improved airborne instrumentation system for sensing wildfires. The system could also be used for other aerial-imaging applications, including mapping and military surveillance. Unlike prior airborne fire-detection instrumentation systems, the WASP system would not be based on custom-made multispectral line scanners and associated custom- made complex optomechanical servomechanisms, sensors, readout circuitry, and packaging. Instead, the WASP system would be based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment that would include (1) three or four electronic cameras (one for each of three or four wavelength bands) instead of a multispectral line scanner; (2) all associated drive and readout electronics; (3) a camera-pointing gimbal; (4) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver for measuring the position, velocity, and orientation of the aircraft; and (5) a data-acquisition subsystem. It would be necessary to custom-develop an integrated sensor optical-bench assembly, a sensor-management subsystem, and software. The use of mostly COTS equipment is intended to reduce development time and cost, relative to those of prior systems.

  13. Airborne SAR imagery to support hydraulic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, S.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite images and airborne SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery are increasingly widespread and they are effective tools for measuring the size of flood events and for assessment of damage. The Hurricane Katrina disaster and the tsunami catastrophe in Indian Ocean countries are two recent and sadly famous examples. Moreover, as well known, the inundation maps can be used as tools to calibrate and validate hydraulic model (e.g. Horritt et al., Hydrological Processes, 2007). We carry out an application of a 1D hydraulic model coupled with a high resolution DTM for predicting the flood inundation processes. The study area is a 16 km reach of the River Severn, in west-central England, for which, four maps of inundated areas, obtained through airborne SAR images, and hydrometric data are available. The inundation maps are used for the calibration/validation of a 1D hydraulic model through a comparison between airborne SAR images and the results of hydraulic simulations. The results confirm the usefulness of inundation maps as hydraulic modelling tools and, moreover, show that 1D hydraulic model can be effectively used when coupled with high resolution topographic information.

  14. Cryospheric Applications of Modern Airborne Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne photogrammetry is undergoing a renaissance. Lower-cost equipment, more powerful software, and simplified methods have lowered the barriers-to-entry significantly and now allow repeat-mapping of cryospheric dynamics that were previously too expensive to consider. The current state-of-the-art is the ability to use an airborne equipment package costing less than $20,000 to make topographic maps on landscape-scales at 10 cm pixel size with a vertical repeatability of about 10 cm. Nearly any surface change on the order of decimeters can be measured using these techniques through analysis of time-series of such maps. This presentation will discuss these new methods and their application to cryospheric dynamics such as the measurement of snow depth, coastal erosion, valley-glacier volume-change, permafrost thaw, frost heave of infrastructure, river bed geomorphology, and aufeis melt. Because of the expense of other airborne methods, by necessity measurements of these dynamics are currently most often made on the ground along benchmark transects that are then extrapolated to the broader scale. The ability to directly measure entire landscapes with equal or higher accuracy than transects eliminates the need to extrapolate them and the ability to do so at lower costs than transects may revolutionize the way we approach studying change in the cryosphere, as well as our understanding of the cryosphere itself.

  15. Airborne myxomycete spores: detection using molecular techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamono, Akiko; Kojima, Hisaya; Matsumoto, Jun; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Fukui, Manabu

    2009-01-01

    Myxomycetes are organisms characterized by a life cycle that includes a fruiting body stage. Myxomycete fruiting bodies contain spores, and wind dispersal of the spores is considered important for this organism to colonize new areas. In this study, the presence of airborne myxomycetes and the temporal changes in the myxomycete composition of atmospheric particles (aerosols) were investigated with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method for Didymiaceae and Physaraceae. Twenty-one aerosol samples were collected on the roof of a three-story building located in Sapporo, Hokkaido Island, northern Japan. PCR analysis of DNA extracts from the aerosol samples indicated the presence of airborne myxomycetes in all the samples, except for the one collected during the snowfall season. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the PCR products showed seasonally varying banding patterns. The detected DGGE bands were subjected to sequence analyses, and four out of nine obtained sequences were identical to those of fruiting body samples collected in Hokkaido Island. It appears that the difference in the fruiting period of each species was correlated with the seasonal changes in the myxomycete composition of the aerosols. Molecular evidence shows that newly formed spores are released and dispersed in the air, suggesting that wind-driven dispersal of spores is an important process in the life history of myxomycetes. This study is the first to detect airborne myxomycetes with the use of molecular ecological analyses and to characterize their seasonal distribution.

  16. Optical Communications Link to Airborne Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regehr, Martin W.; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Biswas, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    An optical link from Earth to an aircraft demonstrates the ability to establish a link from a ground platform to a transceiver moving overhead. An airplane has a challenging disturbance environment including airframe vibrations and occasional abrupt changes in attitude during flight. These disturbances make it difficult to maintain pointing lock in an optical transceiver in an airplane. Acquisition can also be challenging. In the case of the aircraft link, the ground station initially has no precise knowledge of the aircraft s location. An airborne pointing system has been designed, built, and demonstrated using direct-drive brushless DC motors for passive isolation of pointing disturbances and for high-bandwidth control feedback. The airborne transceiver uses a GPS-INS system to determine the aircraft s position and attitude, and to then illuminate the ground station initially for acquisition. The ground transceiver participates in link-pointing acquisition by first using a wide-field camera to detect initial illumination from the airborne beacon, and to perform coarse pointing. It then transfers control to a high-precision pointing detector. Using this scheme, live video was successfully streamed from the ground to the aircraft at 270 Mb/s while simultaneously downlinking a 50 kb/s data stream from the aircraft to the ground.

  17. Airborne multispectral detection of regrowth cotton fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, John K.; Suh, Charles P.-C.; Yang, Chenghai; Lan, Yubin; Eyster, Ritchie S.

    2015-01-01

    Effective methods are needed for timely areawide detection of regrowth cotton plants because boll weevils (a quarantine pest) can feed and reproduce on these plants beyond the cotton production season. Airborne multispectral images of regrowth cotton plots were acquired on several dates after three shredding (i.e., stalk destruction) dates. Linear spectral unmixing (LSU) classification was applied to high-resolution airborne multispectral images of regrowth cotton plots to estimate the minimum detectable size and subsequent growth of plants. We found that regrowth cotton fields can be identified when the mean plant width is ˜0.2 m for an image resolution of 0.1 m. LSU estimates of canopy cover of regrowth cotton plots correlated well (r2=0.81) with the ratio of mean plant width to row spacing, a surrogate measure of plant canopy cover. The height and width of regrowth plants were both well correlated (r2=0.94) with accumulated degree-days after shredding. The results will help boll weevil eradication program managers use airborne multispectral images to detect and monitor the regrowth of cotton plants after stalk destruction, and identify fields that may require further inspection and mitigation of boll weevil infestations.

  18. ICESat-2 Simulated Data from Airborne Altimetery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Neumann, T. A.; Markus, T.; Brenner, A. C.; Barbieri, K. A.; Field, C. T.; Sirota, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is scheduled to launch in 2015 and will carry onboard the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which represents a new approach to spaceborne determination of surface elevations. Specifically, the current ATLAS design is for a micropulse, multibeam, photon-counting laser altimeter with lower energy, a shorter pulse width, and a higher repetition rate relative to the Geoscience Laser Altimeter (GLAS), the instrument that was onboard ICESat. Given the new and untested technology associated with ATLAS, airborne altimetry data is necessary (1) to test the proposed ATLAS instrument geometry, (2) to validate instrument models, and (3) to assess the atmospheric effects on multibeam altimeters. We present an overview of the airborne instruments and datasets intended to address the ATLAS instrument concept, including data collected over Greenland (July 2009) using an airborne SBIR prototype 100 channel, photon-counting, terrain mapping altimeter, which addresses the first of these 3 scientific concerns. Additionally, we present the plan for further simulator data collection over vegetated and ice covered regions using Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), intended to address the latter two scientific concerns. As the ICESAT-2 project is in the design phase, the particular configuration of the ATLAS instrument may change. However, we expect this work to be relevant as long as ATLAS pursues a photon-counting approach.

  19. Emergency communications via airborne communications node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niessen, Charles W.

    1997-02-01

    Natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, and earthquakes invariably result in disruption of the commercial communications infrastructure and can severely impede the delivery of emergency services by local and federal agencies. In addition, the public's inability to communicate with commercial service providers can substantially slow the recovery process. Since wide-spread destruction of communications plant and distribution systems takes a long time to rebuild, an attractive alternative would be to provide communications connectivity through an airborne platform configured as a communication node. From a high altitude, a single aircraft could provide line of sight connectivity between users that are not within line of sight of each other, and could relay communications through ground or satellite gateways to the national PSTN. This capability could be used to substitute for multiple base stations for fire and police as well as military relief workers using their normal mobile communications gear. The airborne platform could also serve as a wide area base station to replace cellular phone towers that have been destroyed; this would enable civilian access to communications services from existing cellular phones, but could also be used by relief workers carrying low-cost commercial handsets. This paper examines the technical methods for achieving these goals, identifies the equipment needed on the airborne platform, and discusses the performance that could be expected.

  20. Methods for Sampling of Airborne Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Daniel; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Summary: To better understand the underlying mechanisms of aerovirology, accurate sampling of airborne viruses is fundamental. The sampling instruments commonly used in aerobiology have also been used to recover viruses suspended in the air. We reviewed over 100 papers to evaluate the methods currently used for viral aerosol sampling. Differentiating infections caused by direct contact from those caused by airborne dissemination can be a very demanding task given the wide variety of sources of viral aerosols. While epidemiological data can help to determine the source of the contamination, direct data obtained from air samples can provide very useful information for risk assessment purposes. Many types of samplers have been used over the years, including liquid impingers, solid impactors, filters, electrostatic precipitators, and many others. The efficiencies of these samplers depend on a variety of environmental and methodological factors that can affect the integrity of the virus structure. The aerodynamic size distribution of the aerosol also has a direct effect on sampler efficiency. Viral aerosols can be studied under controlled laboratory conditions, using biological or nonbiological tracers and surrogate viruses, which are also discussed in this review. Lastly, general recommendations are made regarding future studies on the sampling of airborne viruses. PMID:18772283

  1. Airborne Infrared Spectrograph for Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, L.; Cheimets, P.; DeLuca, E. E.; Samra, J.; Judge, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field have significant potential to enhance our understanding of coronal dynamics, and improve forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of coronal field lines in the Transition Corona, the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on eruptive instabilities and on the origin of the slow solar wind. While current instruments routinely observe the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, the proposed airborne spectrometer will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. The targeted lines are five forbidden magnetic dipole transitions between 1.4 and 4 um. The airborne system will consist of a telescope, grating spectrometer and pointing/stabilization system to be flown on the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during the 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse. We will discuss the scientific objectives of the 2017 flight, describe details of the instrument design, and present the observing program for the eclipse.

  2. Experience with airborne detection of radioactive pollution (ENMOS, IRIS).

    PubMed

    Pavlik, Bohuslav; Engelsmann, Jan

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the advantages of airborne monitoring of radioactive pollution and shows example maps indicating manmade pollution from different sources. The sensitivity of airborne radioactive detection is discussed. Comparisons of airborne and different ground measurements are presented. New instrumentation for airborne or ground moving vehicles is briefly described. Airborne footprinting provides rapid, well-defined spatial images of natural and manmade radioactive contamination. Data acquisition integrated with GPS navigation provides consistent data and guarantees proper data location. Real-time airborne measurements are re-calculated, with the use of special algorithms, into absolute units for individual radioactive nuclei contamination of the ground together with dose calculation. Raw records and calculated data are provided after enhanced post-flight processing. Dose rates and detection of different radioactive elements are presented. (ENMOS is a product of Picodas Group Inc. and IRIS is the product of Pico Envirotec Inc.)

  3. Characterization of aggregates of surface modified fullerenes by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Kok, Wim Th; Bäuerlein, Patrick; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; de Voogt, Pim; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-08-21

    Fullerenes are carbon nanoparticles with widespread biomedical, commercial and industrial applications. Attributes such as their tendency to aggregate and aggregate size and shape impact their ability to be transported into and through the environment and living tissues. Knowledge of these properties is therefore valuable for their human and environmental risk assessment as well as to control their synthesis and manufacture. In this work, asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) was used for the first time to study the size distribution of surface modified fullerenes with both polyhydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups in aqueous solutions having different pH (6.5-11) and ionic strength values (0-200mM) of environmental relevance. Fractionation key parameters such as flow rates, flow programming, and membrane material were optimized for the selected fullerenes. The aggregation of the compounds studied appeared to be indifferent to changes in solution pH, but was affected by changes in the ionic strength. Polyhydroxy-fullerenes were found to be present mostly as 4nm aggregates in water without added salt, but showed more aggregation at high ionic strength, with an up to 10-fold increase in their mean hydrodynamic radii (200mM), due to a decrease in the electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticles. Carboxy-fullerenes showed a much stronger aggregation degree in water (50-100nm). Their average size and recoveries decreased with the increase in the salt concentration. This behavior can be due to enhanced adsorption of the large particles to the membrane at high ionic strength, because of their higher hydrophobicity and much larger particle sizes compared to polyhydroxy-fullerenes. The method performance was evaluated by calculating the run-to-run precision of the retention time (hydrodynamic radii), and the obtained RSD values were lower than 1%. MALS measurements showed aggregate sizes that were in good

  4. Monitoring marine pollution by airborne remote sensing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yuanfu, S.; Quanan, Z.

    1982-06-01

    In order to monitor marine pollution by airborne remote sensing techniques, some comprehensive test of airborne remote sensing, involving monitoring marine oil pollution, were performed at several bay areas of China. This paper presents some typical results of monitoring marine oil pollution. The features associated with the EM spectrum (visible, thermal infrared, and microwave) response of marine oil spills is briefly analyzed. It has been verified that the airborne oil surveillance systems manifested their advantages for monitoring the oil pollution of bay environments.

  5. Range Corrections for Airborne Radar - A Joint STARS Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    ESD-TR-84-169 MTR-9055 RANGE CORRECTIONS FOR AIRBORNE RADAR - A JOINT STARS STUDY By • _,.G. A. ROBERTSHAW MAY 1984 - Prepared for DEPUTY COMMANDER...NO NO Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 6460 11. TITLE •Include securi,•,cleaficatton) Range Corrections Tor Airborne Radar - A Joint STARS Study 12. PERSONAL...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17 COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reuera if necemary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB GR. Airborne Radar

  6. Radiative heating rates during AAOE and AASE. [Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1990-01-01

    Radiative transit computations of heating rates utilizing data from the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) (Tuck et al., 1989) and the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment (AASE) (Turco et al., 1990) are described. Observed temperature and ozone profiles and a radiative transfer model are used to compute the heating rates for the Southern Hemisphere during AAOE and the Northern Hemisphere during AASE. The AASE average cooling rates computed inside the vortex are in good agreement with the diabatic cooling rates estimated from the ER-2 profile data for N2O for the AASE period (Schoeberl et al., 1989).

  7. Airborne lidar experiments at the Savannah River Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, William B.; Swift, Robert N.

    1985-01-01

    The results of remote sensing experiments at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Nuclear Facility utilizing the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) are presented. The flights were conducted in support of the numerous environmental monitoring requirements associated with the operation of the facility and for the purpose of furthering research and development of airborne lidar technology. Areas of application include airborne laser topographic mapping, hydrologic studies using fluorescent tracer dye, timber volume estimation, baseline characterization of wetlands, and aquatic chlorophyll and photopigment measurements. Conclusions relative to the usability of airborne lidar technology for the DOE for each of these remote sensing applications are discussed.

  8. Raytheon low temperature RSP2 cryocooler airborne testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Raytheon Cryocooler Product Line tested the Low Temperature Stirling / Pulse Tube Hybrid 2-Stage (LTRSP2) cryocooler for an airborne application during 2012. Several tests were carried out to verify the ability of the machine to operate in an airborne environment. The vacuum level and heat rejection surface temperatures were varied to determine the performance over the excursions. Vibration testing was performed to prove that the LT-RSP2 cryocooler can operate on an airborne platform. This paper will present the results of the airborne characterization testing.

  9. Raytheon low temperature RSP2 cryocooler airborne testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. J.

    2013-09-01

    The Raytheon Cryocooler Product Line tested the Low Temperature Stirling / Pulse Tube Hybrid 2-Stage (LTRSP2) cryocooler for an airborne application during 2012. Several tests were carried out to verify the ability of the machine to operate in an airborne environment. The vacuum level and heat rejection surface temperatures were varied to determine the performance over the excursions. Vibration testing was performed to prove that the LT-RSP2 cryocooler can operate on an airborne platform. This paper will present the results of the airborne characterization testing.

  10. Absorption-Desorption Compressor for Spaceborne/Airborne Cryogenic Refrigerators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Refrigerant compressors, *Refrigeration systems), Spaceborne, Airborne, Cryogenics, Gases, Absorption, Desorption, Hydrogen, Hydrides, Lanthanum compounds, Nickel alloys, Joule Thomson effect , Heat transfer

  11. Toolsets for Airborne Data - URS and New Documentation

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-03-23

    ... missions, documentation, and EOSDIS User Registration System (URS) authentication. This web application features an intuitive user interface for variable selection across different airborne field studies and ...

  12. Airborne Astronomy Symposium. A symposium commemorating the tenth anniversary of operations of the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr. (Editor); Erickson, E. F. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Airborne infrared astronomy is discussed with respect to observations of the solar system, stars, star formation, and the interstellar medium. Far infrared characteristics of the Milky Way, its center, and other galaxies are considered. The instrumentation associated with IR astronomy is addressed.

  13. NEON Airborne Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Karpowicz, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is the continental-scale research platform that will collect information on ecosystems across the United States to advance our understanding and ability to forecast environmental change at the continental scale. One of NEON's observing systems, the Airborne Observation Platform (AOP), will fly an instrument suite consisting of a high-fidelity visible-to-shortwave infrared imaging spectrometer, a full waveform small footprint LiDAR, and a high-resolution digital camera on a low-altitude aircraft platform. NEON AOP is focused on acquiring data on several terrestrial Essential Climate Variables including bioclimate, biodiversity, biogeochemistry, and land use products. These variables are collected throughout a network of 60 sites across the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico via ground-based and airborne measurements. Airborne remote sensing plays a critical role by providing measurements at the scale of individual shrubs and larger plants over hundreds of square kilometers. The NEON AOP plays the role of bridging the spatial scales from that of individual organisms and stands to the scale of satellite-based remote sensing. NEON is building 3 airborne systems to facilitate the routine coverage of NEON sites and provide the capacity to respond to investigator requests for specific projects. The first NEON imaging spectrometer, a next-generation VSWIR instrument, was recently delivered to NEON by JPL. This instrument has been integrated with a small-footprint waveform LiDAR on the first NEON airborne platform (AOP-1). A series of AOP-1 test flights were conducted during the first year of NEON's construction phase. The goal of these flights was to test out instrument functionality and performance, exercise remote sensing collection protocols, and provide provisional data for algorithm and data product validation. These test flights focused the following questions: What is the optimal remote

  14. Even Shallower Exploration with Airborne Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Kirkegaard, C.; Nyboe, N. S.; Sørensen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne electromagnetics (EM) is in many ways undergoing the same type rapid technological development as seen in the telecommunication industry. These developments are driven by a steadily increasing demand for exploration of minerals, groundwater and geotechnical targets. The latter two areas demand shallow and accurate resolution of the near surface geology in terms of both resistivity and spatial delineation of the sedimentary layers. Airborne EM systems measure the grounds electromagnetic response when subject to either a continuous discrete sinusoidal transmitter signal (frequency domain) or by measuring the decay of currents induced in the ground by rapid transmission of transient pulses (time domain). In the last decade almost all new developments of both instrument hardware and data processing techniques has focused around time domain systems. Here we present a concept for measuring the time domain response even before the transient transmitter current has been turned off. Our approach relies on a combination of new instrument hardware and novel modeling algorithms. The newly developed hardware allows for measuring the instruments complete transfer function which is convolved with the synthetic earth response in the inversion algorithm. The effect is that earth response data measured while the transmitter current is turned off can be included in the inversion, significantly increasing the amount of available information. We demonstrate the technique using both synthetic and field data. The synthetic examples provide insight on the physics during the turn off process and the field examples document the robustness of the method. Geological near surface structures can now be resolved to a degree that is unprecedented to the best of our knowledge, making airborne EM even more attractive and cost-effective for exploration of water and minerals that are crucial for the function of our societies.

  15. Airborne seeker evaluation and test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollie, William B.

    1991-08-01

    The Airborne Seeker Evaluation Test System (ASETS) is an airborne platform for development, test, and evaluation of air-to-ground seekers and sensors. ASETS consists of approximately 10,000 pounds of equipment, including sixteen racks of control, display, and recording electronics, and a very large stabilized airborne turret, all carried by a modified C- 130A aircraft. The turret measures 50 in. in diameter and extends over 50 in. below the aircraft. Because of the low ground clearance of the C-130, a unique retractor mechanism was designed to raise the turret inside the aircraft for take-offs and landings, and deploy the turret outside the aircraft for testing. The turret has over 7 cubic feet of payload space and can accommodate up to 300 pounds of instrumentation, including missile seekers, thermal imagers, infrared mapping systems, laser systems, millimeter wave radar units, television cameras, and laser rangers. It contains a 5-axis gyro-stabilized gimbal system that will maintain a line of sight in the pitch, roll, and yaw axes to an accuracy better than +/- 125 (mu) rad. The rack-mounted electronics in the aircraft cargo bay can be interchanged to operate any type of sensor and record the data. Six microcomputer subsystems operate and maintain all of the system components during a test mission. ASETS is capable of flying at altitudes between 200 and 20,000 feet, and at airspeeds ranging from 100 to 250 knots. Mission scenarios can include air-to-surface seeker testing, terrain mapping, surface target measurement, air-to-air testing, atmospheric transmission studies, weather data collection, aircraft or missile tracking, background signature measurements, and surveillance. ASETS is fully developed and available to support test programs.

  16. Exposure to airborne microorganisms in furniture factories.

    PubMed

    Krysińska-Traczyk, Ewa; Skórska, Czesława; Cholewa, Grazyna; Sitkowska, Jolanta; Milanowski, Janusz; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2002-01-01

    Microbiological air sampling was performed in 2 furniture factories located in eastern Poland. In one factory furniture were made from fibreboards and chipboards while in the other from beech wood. It was found that the concentration of total microorganisms (bacteria + fungi) in the air of the facility using beech wood for furniture production (mean 10.7 x (3) cfu/m(3), range 3.3 27.5 x (3) cfu/m(3)) was significantly higher (p < 0.01) compared to microbial concentration in the facility using fibre- and chipboards (mean 3.6 x (3) cfu/m(3), range 1.9-6.2 x (3) cfu/m(3)). On average, the commonest microorganisms in the air of the furniture factories were corynebacteria (Corynebacterium spp., Arthrobacter spp., Brevibacterium spp.) which formed 18.1-50.0% of the total airborne microflora, and fungi (mostly Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., Absidia spp. and yeasts) which formed 6.2-54.4% of the total count. The values of the respirable fraction of airborne microflora in the furniture factories varied within fairly wide limits and were between 15.0-62.4%. Altogether, 28 species or genera of bacteria and 12 species or genera of fungi were identified in the air of examined factories, of which respectively 8 and 7 species or genera were reported as having allergenic and/or immunotoxic properties. In conclusion, the workers of furniture factories are exposed to relatively low concentrations of airborne microorganisms which do not exceed the suggested occupational exposure limits. Nevertheless, the presence of allergenic and/or immunotoxic microbial species in the air of factories poses a potential risk of respiratory disease, in particular in sensitive workers.

  17. Airborne optical detection of oil on water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Arvesen, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Airborne measurements were made over controlled oil-spill test sites to evaluate various techniques, utilizing reflected sunlight, for detecting oil on water. The results of these measurements show that (1) maximum contrast between oil and water is in the UV and red portions of the spectrum; (2) minimum contrast is in the blue-green; (3) differential polarization appears to be a very promising technique; (4) no characteristic absorption bands, which would permit one oil to be distinguished from another, were discovered in the spectral regions measured; (5) sky conditions greatly influence the contrast between oil and water; and (6) highest contrast was achieved under overcast sky conditions.

  18. A prospectus on airborne laser mapping systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, L. E.; Krabill, W. B.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne laser systems have demonstrated enormous potential for topographic and bathymetric mapping. Both profiling and scanning systems have been evaluated for terrain elevation mapping, stream valley cross-section determination, and nearshore bottom profiling. Performance of the laser systems has been impressive and for some applications matches current operational accuracy requirements. Determining the position of individual laser measurements remains a constraint for most applications. Laser technology constrains some terrain and bathymetric applications, particularly for water penetration and frequency of measurements for high-spatial resolution over large areas.

  19. Aircraft deployment, and airborne arctic stratospheric expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Estelle; Tuck, Adrian; Hipskind, Steve; Toon, Brian; Wegener, Steve

    1990-01-01

    The Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition had two primary objectives: to study the production and loss mechanisms of ozone in the north polar stratosphere and to study the effect on ozone distribution of the Arctic Polar Vortex and of the cold temperatures associated with the formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds. Two specially instrumented NASA aircraft were flown over the Arctic region. Each aircraft flew to acquire data on the meteorological, chemical and cloud physical phenomena that occur in the polar stratosphere during winter. The chemical processes which occur in the polar stratosphere during winter were also observed and studied. The data acquired are being analyzed.

  20. Highly Protable Airborne Multispectral Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehnemann, Robert; Mcnamee, Todd

    2001-01-01

    A portable instrumentation system is described that includes and airborne and a ground-based subsytem. It can acquire multispectral image data over swaths of terrain ranging in width from about 1.5 to 1 km. The system was developed especially for use in coastal environments and is well suited for performing remote sensing and general environmental monitoring. It includes a small,munpilotaed, remotely controlled airplance that carries a forward-looking camera for navigation, three downward-looking monochrome video cameras for imaging terrain in three spectral bands, a video transmitter, and a Global Positioning System (GPS) reciever.

  1. The fate of airborne polycyclic organic matter.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, T; Ramdahl, T; Bjørseth, A

    1983-01-01

    Biological tests have shown that a significant part of the mutagenicity of organic extracts of collected airborne particulate matter is not due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It is possible that part of these unknown compounds are transformation products of PAH. This survey focuses on the reaction of PAH in the atmosphere with other copollutants, such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, ozone and free radicals and their reaction products. Photochemically induced reactions of PAH are also included. The reactivity of particle-associated PAH is discussed in relation to the chemical composition and the physical properties of the carrier. Recommendations for future work are given. PMID:6825615

  2. Refractive acoustic devices for airborne sound.

    PubMed

    Cervera, F; Sanchis, L; Sánchez-Pérez, J V; Martínez-Sala, R; Rubio, C; Meseguer, F; López, C; Caballero, D; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2002-01-14

    We show that a sonic crystal made of periodic distributions of rigid cylinders in air acts as a new material which allows the construction of refractive acoustic devices for airborne sound. It is demonstrated that, in the long-wave regime, the crystal has low impedance and the sound is transmitted at subsonic velocities. Here, the fabrication and characterization of a convergent lens are presented. Also, an example of a Fabry-Perot interferometer based on this crystal is analyzed. It is concluded that refractive devices based on sonic crystals behave in a manner similar to that of optical systems.

  3. A spherical gas bearing for airborne application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouvier, A.; Schmertz, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A spherical gas bearing is analyzed and tested for an airborne application. The externally pressurized bearing supports an inertially stabilized 36-in aperture, infrared telescope. The bearing provides the isolation of rotary motion from the aircraft and also serves as a seal between the aircraft cabin and cavity condition at 50,000 ft altitude. The accompanying temperature gradient of 135 F across the 16-in.-diam bearing created special design and manufacturing considerations. Test data on the static load under temperature and vacuum environment are presented in support of the analysis.

  4. Airborne Data Link Operational Evaluation Test Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    Peg* 1. Rep meft .2. Gowe,; , Accessio, No. 3. Recspsent’s Catel " No. DOT/FAA/CT-TN93/30 I 4. Title and Subtite 5. Roep,, .t. AIRBORNE DATA LINK...320 15. Supplementary Notes 16 . Abstract This plan desci. s an end-to-end study of operational concepts and procedures associated with the introduction...4.4 Dependent Measures 9 4.5 ATC Messages 14 4.6 Flight Scenarios 14 4.7 Support Personnel 15 4.8 Data Reduction and Analysis 16 5. SCHEDULE 16 5.1

  5. Stressed detector arrays for airborne astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Geis, N.; Poglitsch, A.; Rumitz, M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of stressed Ge:Ga detector arrays for far-infrared astronomy from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) is discussed. Researchers successfully constructed and used a three channel detector array on five flights from the KAO, and have conducted laboratory tests of a two-dimensional, 25 elements (5x5) detector array. Each element of the three element array performs as well as the researchers' best single channel detector, as do the tested elements of the 25 channel system. Some of the exciting new science possible with far-infrared detector arrays is also discussed.

  6. Airborne Bistatic Radar Limitations and Sample Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Any parameter which maximizes the viewing area of the receiver platform is a prime candidate for change if the transmitter wishes to deny or decrease...AES-19, NO. 4, 513-520 (July 1983) 4. Lorti , D. "Airborne Bistatic RadaL Operation With Non-Cooperative Transmitters," Aeronautical Systems Divi- ’V...nology Center. Contract DASG60-82-C-0014 with McDonnell Douglas Research Labs. Huntsville AL. July 1982. 7. Moreno, C, and D. Lorti . "Tactical

  7. Electrical charge measurements on fine airborne particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tardos, G.I.; Dietz, P.W.; Snaddon, R.W.L.

    1984-11-01

    A small parallel-plate precipitator and a theoretical collection model have been used to determine the distribution of charges acquired by monodisperse airborne polystyrene latex particles in a corona charger. The mean charge based on the total number of particles was found to be slightly higher than half the predicted saturation charge, and it agreed well with independent measurements made in a Faraday cage particle separator. The importance of careful measurements of particle charge in fine particle transport studies is highlighted by a discussion of the effect of charge (particle mobility) distribution width on observed transport characteristics.

  8. Development of a Spectropolarimetric Remote Sensing Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    measuring the intensity of a constant light source through a polarizer at four different orientations, 0, 45, 90, and 135 degrees, the spectro - polarization...a Bomem MR-254 Michelson-based spectro -radiometer coupled to a Thorlabs WP50H-B rotating wire-grid polarizer in a Zinc Selenide substrate (2-30 μm...by a KLA Tencor profiler. A broadband integrating sphere was used as a light source. The spectro -polarimetric response of the FTS was determined

  9. Multiwavelength spectropolarimetric observations of an Ellerman bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, R.; Beck, C.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Ellerman bombs (EBs) are enhanced emission in the wings of the Hα line in the solar spectrum. Aims: We study the structure of an EB in the photosphere and chromosphere. Methods: We analyze simultaneous observations of four chromospheric lines (Hα, Ca ii H, Ca ii IR 854 nm, and He i 1083 nm) as well as two photospheric lines (Fe i 630 and Si i 1082.7 nm) along with high-cadence 160 and 170 nm ultraviolet (UV) continuum filtergrams. Full Stokes data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) are used to trace the temporal evolution of the magnetic structure. Results: We identify the EB by excess emission in the wings of the Hα line, a brightening in the UV continuum, and large emission peaks in the core of the two Ca ii lines. The EB shows a blueshift in all chromospheric lines, while no shifts are observed in the photospheric lines. The blueshift in the chromospheric layer causes very asymmetric emission peaks in the Ca ii H line. The photospheric Si i spectral line shows a shallower line depth at the location of the EB. The UV continuum maps show that the EB was substantially brighter than its surroundings for about 30 min. The continuum contrast of the EB from 170 nm to 1080 nm shows a power-law dependency on the wavelength. The temperature enhancement amounts to 130 K in the low photosphere and 400 K at the temperature minimum level. This temperature excess is also seen in an LTE inversion of the Ca ii spectra. The total thermal and radiative energy content of the EB is about 1020 J and 1018 J in the photosphere and chromosphere, respectively. The HMI data hints at a photospheric magnetic flux cancellation as the driver of the EB. Conclusions: Ellerman bombs release the energy in a height range of several pressure scale heights around the temperature minimum such that they affect both the photosphere and the lower chromosphere.

  10. Decontamination of airborne bacteria in meat processing plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating AirOcare equipment on the reduction of airborne bacteria in a meat processing environment was determined. Bacterial strains found in ground beef were used to artificially contaminate the air using a 6-jet Collison nebulizer. Airborne bact...

  11. 14 CFR 135.173 - Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.173 Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements. (a) No person may... the aircraft is equipped with either approved thunderstorm detection equipment or approved...

  12. 14 CFR 135.173 - Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.173 Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements. (a) No person may... the aircraft is equipped with either approved thunderstorm detection equipment or approved...

  13. 14 CFR 135.173 - Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.173 Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements. (a) No person may... the aircraft is equipped with either approved thunderstorm detection equipment or approved...

  14. 14 CFR 135.173 - Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.173 Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements. (a) No person may... the aircraft is equipped with either approved thunderstorm detection equipment or approved...

  15. 14 CFR 135.173 - Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.173 Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements. (a) No person may... the aircraft is equipped with either approved thunderstorm detection equipment or approved...

  16. UAVSAR: An Airborne Window on Earth Surface Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates that UAVSAR's precision autopilot and electronic steering have allowed for the reliable collection of airborne repeat pass radar interferometric data for deformation mapping. Deformation maps from temporal scales ranging from hours to months over a variety of signals of geophysical interest illustrate the utility of UAVSAR airborne repeat pass interferometry to these studies.

  17. Enumerating Spore-Forming Bacteria Airborne with Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Barengoltz, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory method has been conceived to enable the enumeration of (1) Cultivable bacteria and bacterial spores that are, variously, airborne by themselves or carried by, parts of, or otherwise associated with, other airborne particles; and (2) Spore-forming bacteria among all of the aforementioned cultivable microbes.

  18. 54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET (LEFT) AND ASSOCIATED GOULD BRUSH CHART RECORDERS (RIGHT). ELAPSED TIME COUNTER SITS ATOP AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. SOFIA's Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors: An External Evaluation of Cycle 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) represents a partnership between NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The observatory itself is a Boeing 747 SP that has been modified to serve as the world's largest airborne research observatory. The SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors (AAA) program is a component of SOFIA's…

  20. OPTIMIZING THE PAKS METHOD FOR MEASURING AIRBORNE ACROLEIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne acrolein is produced from the combustion of fuel and tobacco and is of concern due to its potential for respiratory tract irritation and other adverse health effects. DNPH active-sampling is a method widely used for sampling airborne aldehydes and ketones (carbonyls); ...

  1. 59 FR- Method Development for Airborne Mycobacterium Tuberculosis; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-03-07

    ... Tuberculosis; Meeting The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for... Airborne Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. Time and Date: 1 p.m.-5 p.m., March 29, 1994. Place: Alice Hamilton... peer review of a NIOSH project entitled ``Method Development For Airborne Mycobacterium...

  2. Polymerization of rod-like macromolecular monomers studied by stopped-flow, multiangle light scattering: set-up, data processing, and application to fibrin formation.

    PubMed Central

    Bernocco, S; Ferri, F; Profumo, A; Cuniberti, C; Rocco, M

    2000-01-01

    Many biological supramolecular structures are formed by polymerization of macromolecular monomers. Light scattering techniques can provide structural information from such systems, if suitable procedures are used to collect the data and then to extract the relevant parameters. We present an experimental set-up in which a commercial multiangle laser light scattering photometer is linked to a stopped-flow mixer, allowing, in principle, the time-resolved extrapolation of the weight-average molecular weight M(w) and of the z-average square radius of gyration (z) of the polymers from Zimm-like plots. However, if elongated structures are formed as the polymerization proceeds, curved plots rapidly arise, from which M(w) and (z) cannot be recovered by linear fitting. To verify the correctness of a polynomial fitting procedure, polydisperse collections of rod-like or worm-like particles of different lengths, generated at various stages during bifunctional polycondensations of rod-like macromolecular monomers, were considered. Then, the angular dependence of their time-averaged scattered intensity was calculated in the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye approximation, with random and systematic noise also added to the data. For relatively narrow size distributions, a third-degree polynomial fitting gave satisfactory results across a broad range of conversion degrees, yielding M(w) and (z) values within 2% and no greater than 10-20%, respectively, of the calculated values. When more broad size distributions were analyzed, the procedure still performed well for semiflexible polymers, but started to seriously underestimate both M(w) and (z) when rigid rod-like particles were analyzed, even at relatively low conversion degrees. The data were also analyzed in the framework of the Casassa approximation, from which the mass per unit length of the polymers can be derived. These procedures were applied to a set of data taken on the early stages of the thrombin

  3. Multi-source and multi-angle remote sensing image data collection, application and sharing of Beichuan National Earthquake Ruins Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yueguan; Wang, Wei; Wen, Qi; Huang, He; Lin, Jingli; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Ms8.0 Wenchuan earthquake that occurred on May 12, 2008 brought huge casualties and property losses to the Chinese people, and Beichuan County was destroyed in the earthquake. In order to leave a site for commemorate of the people, and for science propaganda and research of earthquake science, Beichuan National Earthquake Ruins Museum has been built on the ruins of Beichuan county. Based on the demand for digital preservation of the earthquake ruins park and collection of earthquake damage assessment of research and data needs, we set up a data set of Beichuan National Earthquake Ruins Museum, including satellite remote sensing image, airborne remote sensing image, ground photogrammetry data and ground acquisition data. At the same time, in order to make a better service for earthquake science research, we design the sharing ideas and schemes for this scientific data set.

  4. Stellar Occultations from Airborne Platforms: 1988 to 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosh, Amanda S.; Dunham, Edward W.; Zuluaga, Carlos; Levine, Stephen; Person, Michael J.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey E.

    2016-10-01

    Observing a stellar occultation by a solar system body with an airborne telescope requires precise positioning of the observer within the shadow cast onto the Earth. For small bodies like Pluto and Kuiper Belt objects, smaller than the Earth, the challenge is particularly intense, with the accuracy of the astrometric and flight planning determining whether the observation succeeds or fails. From our first airborne occultation by Pluto in 1988 aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), to our most recent event by Pluto in 2015 aboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), we have refined our astrometric and flight planning systems to the point where we can now place an airborne observer into the small central flash zone. We will discuss the history of airborne observation of occultations while detailing the improvements in the astrometric processes. Support for this work was provided by NASA SSO grant NNX15AJ82G to Lowell Observatory.

  5. Study on analysis from sources of error for Airborne LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H. C.; Yan, Q.; Liu, Z. J.; Zuo, Z. Q.; Xu, Q. Q.; Li, F. F.; Song, C.

    2016-11-01

    With the advancement of Aerial Photogrammetry, it appears that to obtain geo-spatial information of high spatial and temporal resolution provides a new technical means for Airborne LIDAR measurement techniques, with unique advantages and broad application prospects. Airborne LIDAR is increasingly becoming a new kind of space for earth observation technology, which is mounted by launching platform for aviation, accepting laser pulses to get high-precision, high-density three-dimensional coordinate point cloud data and intensity information. In this paper, we briefly demonstrates Airborne laser radar systems, and that some errors about Airborne LIDAR data sources are analyzed in detail, so the corresponding methods is put forwarded to avoid or eliminate it. Taking into account the practical application of engineering, some recommendations were developed for these designs, which has crucial theoretical and practical significance in Airborne LIDAR data processing fields.

  6. CO2 Budget and Rectification Airborne Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grainger, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this award was to supply a platform for the airborne measurements of gases associated with the CO2 Budget and Regional Airborne Study (COBRA). The original program was to consist of three field programs: the first was to be in 1999, the second in 2000, and the third in 2001. At the end of the second field program, it was agreed that the science could better be served by making the measurements in northern Brazil, rather than in North America. The final North American program would be postponed until after two field programs in Brazil. A substantial amount of effort was diverted into making plans and preparations for the Brazil field programs. The Brazil field programs were originally scheduled to take place in the Fall of 2002 and Spring of 2003. Carrying out the field program in Brazil was going to logistically much more involved than a program in the US. Shipping of equipment, customs, and site preparations required work to begin many months prior to the actual measurement program. Permission to fly in that country was also not trivial and indeed proved to be a major obstacle. When we were not able to get permission to fly in Brazil for the 2002 portion of the experiment, the program was pushed back to 2003. When permission by the Brazilian government was not given in time for a Spring of 2003 field program, the experiment was postponed again to begin in the Fall of 2003.

  7. Calibration Matters: Advances in Strapdown Airborne Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, D.

    2015-12-01

    Using a commercial navigation-grade strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU) for airborne gravimetry can be advantageous in terms of cost, handling, and space consumption compared to the classical stable-platform spring gravimeters. Up to now, however, large sensor errors made it impossible to reach the mGal-level using such type IMUs as they are not designed or optimized for this kind of application. Apart from a proper error-modeling in the filtering process, specific calibration methods that are tailored to the application of aerogravity may help to bridge this gap and to improve their performance. Based on simulations, a quantitative analysis is presented on how much IMU sensor errors, as biases, scale factors, cross couplings, and thermal drifts distort the determination of gravity and the deflection of the vertical (DOV). Several lab and in-field calibration methods are briefly discussed, and calibration results are shown for an iMAR RQH unit. In particular, a thermal lab calibration of its QA2000 accelerometers greatly improved the long-term drift behavior. Latest results from four recent airborne gravimetry campaigns confirm the effectiveness of the calibrations applied, with cross-over accuracies reaching 1.0 mGal (0.6 mGal after cross-over adjustment) and DOV accuracies reaching 1.1 arc seconds after cross-over adjustment.

  8. Spatial variability in airborne pollen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Raynor, G S; Ogden, E C; Hayes, J V

    1975-03-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the relationship between airborne pollen concentrations and distance. Simultaneous samples were taken in 171 tests with sets of eight rotoslide samplers spaced from one to 486 M. apart in straight lines. Use of all possible pairs gave 28 separation distances. Tests were conducted over a 2-year period in urban and rural locations distant from major pollen sources during both tree and ragweed pollen seasons. Samples were taken at a height of 1.5 M. during 5-to 20-minute periods. Tests were grouped by pollen type, location, year, and direction of the wind relative to the line. Data were analyzed to evaluate variability without regard to sampler spacing and variability as a function of separation distance. The mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, ratio of maximum to the mean, and ratio of minimum to the mean were calculated for each test, each group of tests, and all cases. The average coefficient of variation is 0.21, the maximum over the mean, 1.39 and the minimum over the mean, 0.69. No relationship was found with experimental conditions. Samples taken at the minimum separation distance had a mean difference of 18 per cent. Differences between pairs of samples increased with distance in 10 of 13 groups. These results suggest that airborne pollens are not always well mixed in the lower atmosphere and that a sample becomes less representative with increasing distance from the sampling location.

  9. Asthmatic responses to airborne acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ostro, B.D.; Lipsett, M.J.; Wiener, M.B.; Selner, J.C. )

    1991-06-01

    Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid, fine particulates, sulfates and nitrates were obtained during an intensive air monitoring effort in Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1987-88. A panel of 207 asthmatics recorded respiratory symptoms, frequency of medication use, and related information in daily diaries. We used a multiple regression time-series model to analyze which air pollutants, if any, were associated with health outcomes reported by study participants. Airborne H+ was found to be significantly associated with several indicators of asthma status, including moderate or severe cough and shortness of breath. Cough was also associated with fine particulates, and shortness of breath with sulfates. Incorporating the participants' time spent outside and exercise intensity into the daily measure of exposure strengthened the association between these pollutants and asthmatic symptoms. Nitric acid and nitrates were not significantly associated with any respiratory symptom analyzed. In this population of asthmatics, several outdoor air pollutants, particularly airborne acidity, were associated with daily respiratory symptoms.

  10. Airborne Dust in Space Vehicles and Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John

    2006-01-01

    Airborne dust, suspended inside a space vehicle or in future celestial habitats, can present a serious threat to crew health if it is not controlled. During the Apollo missions to the moon, lunar dust brought inside the capsule caused eye irritation and breathing difficulty to the crew when they launched from the moon and re-acquired "microgravity." During Shuttle flights reactive and toxic dusts such as lithium hydroxide have created a risk to crew health, and fine particles from combustion events can be especially worrisome. Under nominal spaceflight conditions, airborne dusts and particles tend to be larger than on earth because of the absence of gravity settling. Aboard the ISS, dusts are effectively managed by HEPA filters, although floating dust in newly-arrived modules can be a nuisance. Future missions to the moon and to Mars will present additional challenges because of the possibility that external dust will enter the breathing atmosphere of the habitat and reach the crew's respiratory system. Testing with simulated lunar and Martian dust has shown that these materials are toxic when placed into the lungs of test animals. Defining and evaluating the physical and chemical properties of Martian dusts through robotic missions will challenge our ability to prepare better dust simulants and to determine the risk to crew health from exposure to such dusts.

  11. Filter algorithm for airborne LIDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Ma, Hongchao; Wu, Jianwei; Tian, Liqiao; Qiu, Feng

    2007-11-01

    Airborne laser scanning data has become an accepted data source for highly automated acquisition of digital surface models(DSM) as well as for the generation of digital terrain models(DTM). To generate a high quality DTM using LIDAR data, 3D off-terrain points have to be separated from terrain points. Even though most LIDAR system can measure "last-return" data points, these "last-return" point often measure ground clutter like shrubbery, cars, buildings, and the canopy of dense foliage. Consequently, raw LIDAR points must be post-processed to remove these undesirable returns. The degree to which this post processing is successful is critical in determining whether LIDAR is cost effective for large-scale mapping application. Various techniques have been proposed to extract the ground surface from airborne LIDAR data. The basic problem is the separation of terrain points from off-terrain points which are both recorded by the LIDAR sensor. In this paper a new method, combination of morphological filtering and TIN densification, is proposed to separate 3D off-terrain points.

  12. Impact detection on airborne multilayered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noharet, Bertrand; Chazelas, Jean; Bonniau, Philippe; Lecuellet, Jerome; Turpin, Marc J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper reviews the progress of an ongoing research program at Thomson-CSF and Bertin & Cie which addresses an optical fiber system dedicated to the assessment of impact induced damages on airborne multilayered structures. The method is based on the use of embedded high birefringence optical fiber sensors and distributed white light interfero-polarimetry. The first part is devoted to the transduction process efficiency within optical fibers depending on the applied force intensity, direction versus the fiber eigen axes and the interaction length. To understand the behavior of these optical fibers and calibrate the detection system, experiments have been conducted on elliptical core fibers, `bow-tie' fibers and side-hole fibers and showed a wide range of available sensitivities. The second step is related to the inclusion of optical fibers in a sandwich structure representative of an airborne dome, and composed of foam between glass/epoxy composite skins. Different designs of grooves in the foam and tube sheathings have been investigated to support and protect the optical fiber. Impacts have been performed on the structure in the 1 to 10 Joules energy range. Experimental impact location and energy measurements have been achieved for a variety of stress fields.

  13. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  14. Regional lithology mapping using airborne hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Kai; Chen, Jianping; Zhao, Yingjun

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposed a new procedure for rock identifiction and mapping using airborne hyperspectral CASI/SASI data (wavelength: 380-2450 nm) for the Nanbaishiling in Liuyuan area, Gansu Province, NW China. Rocks in the study area include granite, diorite, marble, basalt and quartzite. In situ and laboratory reflectance spectra (400 to 2500 nm) show Al-OH absorption of muscovite, kaolinite, and illite in granite, granodiorite and quartz diorite, and Fe-OH, Mg-OH absorptions of biotite and chlorite .The absorption near 2.3µm caused by carbonate is most intense in marble reflectance spectra. Ferric-iron absorption is intense in most of the felsic rocks. CASI/SASI data with approximately 2-m spatial resolution were recorded in 149 narrow bands along a 1.2-km-wide swath. Correction of the data to spectral reflectance was performed by reference to in situ measurements of an extensive, alluvial plain. Five major rock types have been identified by using MNF and analysis of in situ and laboratory spectra. The lithoglogic map presented in this study were verified by field investigation, and was compared with previous lithologic map. The result show a reliable classification of lithology using Airborne Hyperspectral data.

  15. Handling Trajectory Uncertainties for Airborne Conflict Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Doble, Nathan A.; Karr, David; Palmer, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    Airborne conflict management is an enabling capability for NASA's Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) concept. DAGTM has the goal of significantly increasing capacity within the National Airspace System, while maintaining or improving safety. Under DAG-TM, autonomous aircraft maintain separation from each other and from managed aircraft unequipped for autonomous flight. NASA Langley Research Center has developed the Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP), an onboard decision support system that provides airborne conflict management (ACM) and strategic flight planning support for autonomous aircraft pilots. The AOP performs conflict detection, prevention, and resolution from nearby traffic aircraft and area hazards. Traffic trajectory information is assumed to be provided by Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B). Reliable trajectory prediction is a key capability for providing effective ACM functions. Trajectory uncertainties due to environmental effects, differences in aircraft systems and performance, and unknown intent information lead to prediction errors that can adversely affect AOP performance. To accommodate these uncertainties, the AOP has been enhanced to create cross-track, vertical, and along-track buffers along the predicted trajectories of both ownship and traffic aircraft. These buffers will be structured based on prediction errors noted from previous simulations such as a recent Joint Experiment between NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers and from other outside studies. Currently defined ADS-B parameters related to navigation capability, trajectory type, and path conformance will be used to support the algorithms that generate the buffers.

  16. AESMIR: A New NASA Airborne Microwave Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Hood, Robbie; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR) is a versatile new airborne imaging radiometer under development by NASA. The AESMIR design is unique in that it will perform dual-polarized imaging at all AMSR frequency bands (6.9 through 89 GHz) using only one sensor head/scanner package, providing an efficient solution for AMSR-type science applications (snow, soil moisture/land parameters, precip, ocean winds, SST, water vapor, sea ice, etc.). The microwave radiometers themselves will incorporate state-of-the-art receivers, with particular attention given to instrument calibration for the best possible accuracy and sensitivity. The single-package design of AESMIR makes it compatible with high-altitude aircraft platforms such as the NASA ER-2s and the Proteus. The arbitrary 2-axis gimbal can perform conical and cross-track scanning, as well as fixed-beam staring. This compatibility with high-altitude platforms coupled with the flexible scanning configuration, opens up previously unavailable science opportunities for convection/precip/cloud science and co-flying with complementary instruments, as well as providing wider swath coverage for all science applications. By designing AESMIR to be compatible with these high-altitude platforms, we are also compatible with the NASA P-3, the NASA DC-8, and ground-based deployments. Thus AESMIR can provide low-, mid-, and high altitude microwave imaging.

  17. Advanced Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging System (AAHIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, Miles Q.; Pfeiffer, Joel E.; Sparks, Andrew W.; Jim, Kevin T. C.; Yoon, Dugan

    2002-11-01

    The design, operation, and performance of the fourth generation of Science and Technology International's Advanced Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging Sensors (AAHIS) are described. These imaging spectrometers have a variable bandwidth ranging from 390-840 nm. A three-axis image stabilization provides spatially and spectrally coherent imagery by damping most of the airborne platform's random motion. A wide 40-degree field of view coupled with sub-pixel detection allows for a large area coverage rate. A software controlled variable aperture, spectral shaping filters, and high quantum efficiency, back-illuminated CCD's contribute to the excellent sensitivity of the sensors. AAHIS sensors have been operated on a variety of fixed and rotary wing platforms, achieving ground-sampling distances ranging from 6.5 cm to 2 m. While these sensors have been primarily designed for use over littoral zones, they are able to operate over both land and water. AAHIS has been used for detecting and locating submarines, mines, tanks, divers, camouflage and disturbed earth. Civilian applications include search and rescue on land and at sea, agricultural analysis, environmental time-series, coral reef assessment, effluent plume detection, coastal mapping, damage assessment, and seasonal whale population monitoring

  18. A Multi-Use Airborne Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Much of our progress in understanding the Earth system comes from measurements made in the atmosphere. Aircraft are widely used to collect in situ measurements of the troposphere and lower stratosphere, and they also serve as platforms for many remote sensing instruments. Airborne field measurement campaigns require a capable aircraft, a specially trained support team, a suite of basic instrumentation, space and power for new instruments, and data analysis and processing capabilities (e.g. Veal et al., 1977). However, these capabilities are expensive and there is a need to reduce costs while maintaining the capability to perform this type of research. To this end, NASA entered a Cooperative Agreement with the University of North Dakota (UND) to help support the operations of the UND Cessna Citation research aircraft. This Cooperative Agreement followed in form and substance a previous agreement. The Cooperative Agreement has benefited both NASA and UND. In part because of budget reductions, the NASA Airborne Science Office has elected to take advantage of outside operators of science research platforms to off-load some science requirements (Huning, 1996). UND has worked with NASA to identify those requirements that could be met more cost effectively with the UND platform. This has resulted in significant cost savings to NASA while broadening the base of researchers in the NASA science programs. At the same time, the Agreement has provided much needed support to UND to help sustain the Citation research facility. In this report, we describe the work conducted under this Cooperative Agreement.

  19. Airborne soil organic particles generated by precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Harder, Tristan H.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Piens, Dominique S.; China, Swarup; Kovarik, Libor; Keiluweit, Marco; Arey, Bruce W.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Airborne organic particles play a critical role in Earth's climate, public health, air quality, and hydrological and carbon cycles. However, sources and formation mechanisms for semi-solid and solid organic particles are poorly understood and typically neglected in atmospheric models. Laboratory evidence suggests that fine particles can be formed from impaction of mineral surfaces by droplets. Here, we use chemical imaging of particles collected following rain events in the Southern Great Plains, Oklahoma, USA and after experimental irrigation to show that raindrop impaction of soils generates solid organic particles. We find that after rain events, sub-micrometre solid particles, with a chemical composition consistent with soil organic matter, contributed up to 60% of atmospheric particles. Our irrigation experiments indicate that intensive water impaction is sufficient to cause ejection of airborne soil organic particles from the soil surface. Chemical imaging and micro-spectroscopy analysis of particle physico-chemical properties suggest that these particles may have important impacts on cloud formation and efficiently absorb solar radiation. We suggest that raindrop-induced formation of solid organic particles from soils may be a widespread phenomenon in ecosystems such as agricultural systems and grasslands where soils are exposed to strong, episodic precipitation events.

  20. Airborne system for testing multispectral reconnaissance technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Dirk-Roger; Doergeloh, Heinrich; Keil, Heiko; Wetjen, Wilfried

    1999-07-01

    There is an increasing demand for future airborne reconnaissance systems to obtain aerial images for tactical or peacekeeping operations. Especially Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) equipped with multispectral sensor system and with real time jam resistant data transmission capabilities are of high interest. An airborne experimental platform has been developed as testbed to investigate different concepts of reconnaissance systems before their application in UAVs. It is based on a Dornier DO 228 aircraft, which is used as flying platform. Great care has been taken to achieve the possibility to test different kinds of multispectral sensors. Hence basically it is capable to be equipped with an IR sensor head, high resolution aerial cameras of the whole optical spectrum and radar systems. The onboard equipment further includes system for digital image processing, compression, coding, and storage. The data are RF transmitted to the ground station using technologies with high jam resistance. The images, after merging with enhanced vision components, are delivered to the observer who has an uplink data channel available to control flight and imaging parameters.

  1. APEX - the Hyperspectral ESA Airborne Prism Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Itten, Klaus I.; Dell'Endice, Francesco; Hueni, Andreas; Kneubühler, Mathias; Schläpfer, Daniel; Odermatt, Daniel; Seidel, Felix; Huber, Silvia; Schopfer, Jürg; Kellenberger, Tobias; Bühler, Yves; D'Odorico, Petra; Nieke, Jens; Alberti, Edoardo; Meuleman, Koen

    2008-01-01

    The airborne ESA-APEX (Airborne Prism Experiment) hyperspectral mission simulator is described with its distinct specifications to provide high quality remote sensing data. The concept of an automatic calibration, performed in the Calibration Home Base (CHB) by using the Control Test Master (CTM), the In-Flight Calibration facility (IFC), quality flagging (QF) and specific processing in a dedicated Processing and Archiving Facility (PAF), and vicarious calibration experiments are presented. A preview on major applications and the corresponding development efforts to provide scientific data products up to level 2/3 to the user is presented for limnology, vegetation, aerosols, general classification routines and rapid mapping tasks. BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) issues are discussed and the spectral database SPECCHIO (Spectral Input/Output) introduced. The optical performance as well as the dedicated software utilities make APEX a state-of-the-art hyperspectral sensor, capable of (a) satisfying the needs of several research communities and (b) helping the understanding of the Earth's complex mechanisms. PMID:27873868

  2. The Next Generation Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Salazar, Jorge; Chandrasekar, V.

    2013-04-01

    NCAR's Electra Doppler radar (ELDORA) with a dual-beam slotted waveguide array using dual-transmitter, dual-beam, rapid scan and step-chirped waveform significantly improved the spatial scale to 300m (Hildebrand et al. 1996). However, ELDORA X-band radar's penetration into precipitation is limited by attenuation and is not designed to collect polarimetric measurements to remotely estimate microphysics. ELDORA has been placed on dormancy because its airborne platform (P3 587) was retired in January 2013. The US research community has strongly voiced the need to continue measurement capability similar to the ELDORA. A critical weather research area is quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting (QPE/QPF). In recent years, hurricane intensity change involving eye-eyewall interactions has drawn research attention (Montgomery et al., 2006; Bell and Montgomery, 2006). In the case of convective precipitation, two issues, namely, (1) when and where convection will be initiated, and (2) determining the organization and structure of ensuing convection, are key for QPF. Therefore collocated measurements of 3-D winds and precipitation microphysics are required for achieving significant skills in QPF and QPE. Multiple radars in dual-Doppler configuration with polarization capability estimate dynamical and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation are mostly available over land. However, storms over complex terrain, the ocean and in forest regions are not observable by ground-based radars (Bluestein and Wakimoto, 2003). NCAR/EOL is investigating potential configurations for the next generation airborne radar that is capable of retrieving dynamic and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. ELDORA's slotted waveguide array radar is not compatible for dual-polarization measurements. Therefore, the new design has to address both dual-polarization capability and platform requirements to replace the ELDORA system. NCAR maintains a C-130

  3. Alternative analysis of airborne laser data collected within conventional multi-parameter airborne geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl, Andreas; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.; Schattauer, I.

    2010-05-01

    For the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry as well as airborne electromagnetics it is of great importance to determine the distance between the geophysical sensor and the ground surface. Since radar altimeters do not penetrate vegetation, laser altimeters became popular in airborne geophysics over the past years. Currently the airborne geophysical platform of the Geological Survey of Austria (GBA) is equipped with a Riegl LD90-3800VHS-FLP high resolution laser altimeter, measuring the distances according to the first and the last reflected pulse. The goal of the presented study was to explore the possibilities of deriving additional information about the survey area from the laser data and to determine the accuracy of such results. On one hand the difference between the arrival time of the first and the last reflected pulse can be used to determine the height of the vegetation. This parameter is for example important for the correction of damping effects on airborne gamma-ray measurements caused by vegetation. Moreover especially for groundwater studies at catchment scale, this parameter can also be applied to support the spatial assessment of evapotranspiration. In combination with the altitude above geoid, determined by a GPS receiver, a rough digital elevation model of the survey area can be derived from the laser altimetry. Based on a data set from a survey area in the northern part of Austria, close to the border with the Czech Republic, the reliability of such a digital elevation model and the calculated vegetation height was tested. In this study a mean deviation of -1.4m, with a standard deviation of ±3.4m, between the digital elevation model from Upper Austria (25m spatial resolution) and the determined elevation model was determined. We also found an obvious correlation between the calculated vegetation heights greater 15m and the mapped forest published by the ‘Department of Forest Inventory' of the ‘Federal Forest Office' of Austria

  4. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    Airborne research management and shuttle sortie planning at the Ames Research Center are reported. Topics discussed include: basic criteria and procedures for the formulation and approval of airborne missions; ASO management structure and procedures; experiment design, development, and testing aircraft characteristics and experiment interfaces; information handling for airborne science missions; mission documentation requirements; and airborne science methods and shuttle sortie planning.

  5. Airborne Electromagnetic Mapping of Subsurface Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. D.; Minsley, B. J.; Cannia, J. C.; Smith, B. D.; Walvoord, M. A.; Voss, C. I.; Jorgenson, T. T.; Wylie, B. K.; Anderson, L.

    2011-12-01

    Concerns over the impacts of climate change have recently energized research on the potential impacts thawing permafrost may have on groundwater flow, infrastructure, forest health, ecosystems, energy production, CO2 release, and contaminant transport. There is typically little knowledge about subsurface permafrost distributions, such as thickness and where groundwater-surface-water connections may occur through taliks. In June of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey in the area of Fort Yukon, Alaska in order to map the 3-D distribution of permafrost and provide information for the development of groundwater models within the Yukon River Basin. Prior to the development of these models, information on areas of groundwater-surface water interaction was extremely limited. Lithology determined from a borehole drilled in Fort Yukon in 1994 agrees well with the resistivity depth sections inferred from the airborne survey. In addition to lithology, there a thermal imprint appears on the subsurface resistivity values. In the upper 20-50 m, the sections show continuous areas of high electrical resistivity, consistent with alluvial gravel deposits that are likely frozen. At depth, unfrozen gravel deposits have intermediate-to-high resistivity; frozen silts have intermediate resistivity; and unfrozen silts have low resistivity. Under the Yukon River and lakes where the subsurface is not frozen, zones of moderate resistivity intermix with areas of low resistivity. The areas of loess hills on the margins of the Yukon Flats have very-high electrical resistivity, indicating higher ice content, and are associated with the some of the greatest thickness of permafrost in the survey area. This work provides the first look into the 3-D distribution of permafrost in the areas around Fort Yukon and is a demonstration of the application of AEM to permafrost mapping. The AEM survey provides unprecedented 3-D images of subsurface electrical

  6. Integrated approach to airborne laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louthain, James A.

    Lasers offer tremendous advantages over RF communication systems in terms of bandwidth and security due to their ultra-high frequency and narrow spatial beamwidth. Unfortunately, atmospheric turbulence significantly increases the received power variation and bit error rate (BER) in free-space optical communication (FSOC) systems. Further, airborne optical communication systems require special considerations in size, complexity, power, and weight. If two or more laser beams are sufficiently separated so that their turbulence effects are uncorrelated (i.e. anisoplanatic), they can effectively "average out" turbulence effects. This requisite separation distance is derived for multiple geometries, turbulence conditions, and optical properties. In most cases and geometries, the angles ordered from largest to smallest are: phase uncorrelated angle (equivalent to the tilt uncorrelated angle and phase anisoplanatic angle), tilt isoplanatic angle, phase isoplanatic angle, scintillation uncorrelated angle (or scintillation anisoplanatic angle), and scintillation isoplanatic angle ( qyind > thetaTA > theta0 > qcind > qc0 ). Conventional adaptive optics (AO) systems only correct for phase and cannot correct for strong scintillation, while multiple-transmitter systems use several transmission paths to "average out" effects of the strong scintillation by incoherently summing up the beams in the receiver. Since all three airborne geometries (air-to-air, air-to-ground, and ground-to-air) are studied, a comparison of multiple-beam airborne laser communication system performance is presented for the first time. Wave optics simulations show that a combination of transmitter diversity, receiver and transmitter trackers, and adaptive thresholding can significantly reduce BER in an air-to-air FSOC system by over 10,000 times. As demonstrated in this work, two transmitters alone separated by only 31 cm (100 km path length, 1.55 mum wavelength, 4 km in altitude) provide a significant BER

  7. Developing Metadata Requirements for NASA Airborne Field Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L.; Rinsland, P. L.; Kusterer, J.; Chen, G.; Early, A. B.; Beach, A. L., III; Wang, D.; Typanski, N. D.; Rutherford, M.; Rieflin, E.

    2014-12-01

    The common definition of metadata is "data about data". NASA has developed metadata formats to meet the needs of its satellite missions and emerging users. Coverage of satellite missions is highly predictable based on orbit characteristics. Airborne missions feature complicated flight patterns to maximize science return and changes in the instrument suites. More relevant to the airborne science data holding, the metadata describes the airborne measurements, in terms of measurement location, time, platform, and instruments. The metadata organizes the data holdings and facilitates the data ordering process from the DAAC. Therefore, the metadata requirements will need to fit the type of airborne measurements and sampling strategies as well as leverage current Earth Science and Data Information System infrastructure (ECHO/Reverb, GCMD). Current airborne data is generated/produced in a variety of formats (ICARRT, ASCII, etc) with the metadata information embedded in the data file. Special readers are needed to parse data file to generate metadata needed for search and discovery. With loosely defined standards within the airborne community this process poses challenges to the data providers. It is necessary to assess the suitability of current metadata standards, which have been mostly developed for satellite observations. To be presented are the use case-based assessments of the current airborne metadata standards and suggestions for future changes.

  8. [Phylogenetic diversity of airborne microbes in Qingdao downtown in autumn].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Song, Zhi-wen; Xu, Ai-ling; Wu, Deng-deng; Xia, Yan

    2015-04-01

    To determine the community structure of airborne microbes in Qingdao downtown in autumn, the airborne bacteria and fungi were collected by the KC-6120 air sampler and analyzed using the 16S/18S rDNA gene clone library method. Phylogenetic analysis of airborne bacteria showed that they belonged to six major phylogenetic groups: Proteobacteria (78. 8%), Firmicutes (14.6%), Actinobacteria (4.0%), Planctomycetes (1.3%), Cyanobacteria (0.7%), and Deinococcus-Thermus (0.7%). The dominant genera of airborne bacteria included Acinetobacter (39.7%), Staphylococcus (11.3%), Sphingomonas (8.6%), Paracoccus (6.0%) and Massilia (5.3%). The main types of airborne fungi were Ascomycota (97.5%) and Basidiomycota (2.5%). Dominant genera of airborne fungi included Pyrenophora (76.5%), Xylaria (13.6%) and Exophiala (2.5%). The pathogens or conditioned pathogens, such as Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus, or Sphingomonas were detected in the airborne bacteria, whereas certain kinds of fungi, such as P. graminea, X. hypoxylon and Zasmidium angulare that could cause a variety of crop diseases were also detected.

  9. Towards airborne nanoparticle mass spectrometry with nanomechanical string resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Silvan; Kurek, Maksymilian; Boisen, Anja

    2013-06-01

    Airborne nanoparticles can cause severe harm when inhaled. Therefore, small and cheap portable airborne nanoparticle monitors are highly demanded by authorities and the nanoparticle producing industry. We propose to use nanomechanical resonators to build the next generation cheap and portable airborne nanoparticle sensors. Recently, nanomechanical mass spectrometry was established. One of the biggest challenges of nanomechanical sensors is the low efficiency of diffusion-based sampling. We developed an inertial-based sampling method that enables the efficient sampling of airborne nanoparticles on a nanomechanical sensor operating directly in air. We measured a sampling rate of over 1000 particles per second, for 28 nm silica nanoparticles with a concentration of 380000 #/cm3, collected on a 500 nm wide nanomechanical string resonator. We show that it is possible to reach a saturated sampling regime in which 100% of all nanoparticles are captured that are owing in the projection of the nanostring. We further show that it is possible to detect single airborne nanoparticles by detecting 50 nm Au particles with a 250 nm wide string resonator. Our resonators are currently operating in the first bending mode. Mass spectrometry of airborne nanoparticles requires the simultaneous operation in the first and second mode, which can be implemented in the transduction scheme of the resonator. The presented results lay the cornerstone for the realization of a portable airborne nanoparticle mass spectrometer.

  10. Airborne lidar measurements of ozone during the 1989 airborne Arctic stratospheric expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Fenn, Marta A.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) was conducted during the winter to study the conditions leading to possible ozone (O3) destruction in the wintertime Arctic stratosphere. As part of this experiment, the NASA-Langley airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system was configured for operation on the NASA-Ames DS-8 aircraft to make measurements of O3 profiles from about 1 km above the aircraft to altitudes of 22 to 26 km. The airborne DIAL system remotely sensed O3 above the DC-8 by transmitting two laser beams at 10 Hz using wavelengths of 301.5 and 311 nm. Large scale distributions of O3 were obtained on 15 long range flights into the polar vortex during the AASE. Selected data samples are presented of O3 observed during these flights, general trends observed in O3 distributions, and correlations between these measurements and meteorological and chemical parameters. The O3 distribution observed on the first flight of the DC-8 into the polar vortex on Jan. 6 reflected the result of diabatic cooling of the air inside the vortex during the winter compared to the warmer air outside the vortex. On a potential temperature surface, the O3 mixing ratio generally increases when going from outside to inside the vortex.

  11. NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Instrument Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, David B.; Cook, Anthony; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John W.; Mack, Terry L.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) recently developed the LaRC Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to make measurements of aerosol and cloud distribution and optical properties. The Airborne HSRL has undergone as series of test flights and was successfully deployed on the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field mission in March 2006 (see Hair et al. in these proceedings). This paper provides an overview of the design of the Airborne HSRL and descriptions of some key subsystems unique to this instrument.

  12. A resonance-free nano-film airborne ultrasound emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daschewski, Maxim; Harrer, Andrea; Prager, Jens; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Beck, Uwe; Lange, Thorid; Weise, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a novel thermo-acoustic approach for the generation of broad band airborne ultrasound and investigate the applicability of resonance-free thermo-acoustic emitters for very short high pressure airborne ultrasound pulses. We report on measurements of thermo-acoustic emitter consisting of a 30 nm thin metallic film on a usual soda-lime glass substrate, generating sound pressure values of more than 140 dB at 60 mm distance from the transducer and compare the results with conventional piezoelectric airborne ultrasound transducers. Our experimental investigations show that such thermo-acoustic devices can be used as broad band emitters using pulse excitation.

  13. Apparatus and method for automated monitoring of airborne bacterial spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus and method for automated monitoring of airborne bacterial spores. The apparatus is provided with an air sampler, a surface for capturing airborne spores, a thermal lysis unit to release DPA from bacterial spores, a source of lanthanide ions, and a spectrometer for excitation and detection of the characteristic fluorescence of the aromatic molecules in bacterial spores complexed with lanthanide ions. In accordance with the method: computer-programmed steps allow for automation of the apparatus for the monitoring of airborne bacterial spores.

  14. AIRBORNE CONTACT DERMATITIS – CURRENT PERSPECTIVES IN ETIOPATHOGENESIS AND MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Sanjeev; De, Dipankar; Mahajan, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    The increasing recognition of occupational origin of airborne contact dermatitis has brought the focus on the variety of irritants, which can present with this typical morphological picture. At the same time, airborne allergic contact dermatitis secondary to plant antigens, especially to Compositae family, continues to be rampant in many parts of the world, especially in the Indian subcontinent. The recognition of the contactant may be difficult to ascertain and the treatment may be even more difficult. The present review focuses on the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic issues in airborne contact dermatitis. PMID:22345774

  15. Measurement of airborne mite allergen exposure in individual subjects.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Sasaki, R; Hashimoto, M; Kobayashi, C; Yasueda, H

    1996-05-01

    To evaluate the extent of personal exposure to airborne mite allergens, subjects were asked to carry a personal air sampler when in their houses. The level of Der 1 allergen trapped by the sampler was measured with a highly sensitive immunoassay. There were great variations in airborne Der 1 exposure in each subject. When used bedding was replaced with new allergen-free bedding, we detected a decrease in the allergen level. The use of new bedding seems to be an effective measure for reducing airborne mite allergen exposure.

  16. An approach to evaluating reactive airborne wind shear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Joseph P., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    An approach to evaluating reactive airborne windshear detection systems was developed to support a deployment study for future FAA ground-based windshear detection systems. The deployment study methodology assesses potential future safety enhancements beyond planned capabilities. The reactive airborne systems will be an integral part of planned windshear safety enhancements. The approach to evaluating reactive airborne systems involves separate analyses for both landing and take-off scenario. The analysis estimates the probability of effective warning considering several factors including NASA energy height loss characteristics, reactive alert timing, and a probability distribution for microburst strength.

  17. Airborne chemical baseline evaluation of the 222-S laboratory complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12

    The 222-S Laboratory complex stores and uses over 400 chemicals. Many of these chemicals are used in laboratory analysis and some are used for maintenance activities. The majority of laboratory analysis chemicals are only used inside of fume hoods or glove boxes to control both chemical and radionuclide airborne concentrations. This evaluation was designed to determine the potential for laboratory analysis chemicals at the 222-S Laboratory complex to cause elevated airborne chemical concentrations under normal conditions. This was done to identify conditions and activities that should be subject to airborne chemical monitoring in accordance with the Westinghouse Hanford Company Chemical Hygiene Plan.

  18. Vine variety discrimination with airborne imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreiro-Armán, M.; Alba-Castro, J. L.; Homayouni, S.; da Costa, J. P.; Martín-Herrero, J.

    2007-09-01

    We aim at the discrimination of varieties within a single plant species (Vitis vinifera) by means of airborne hyperspectral imagery collected using a CASI-2 sensor and supervised classification, both under constant and varying within-scene illumination conditions. Varying illumination due to atmospheric conditions (such as clouds) and shadows cause different pixels belonging to the same class to present different spectral vectors, increasing the within class variability and hindering classification. This is specially serious in precision applications such as variety discrimination in precision agriculture, which depends on subtle spectral differences. In this study, we use machine learning techniques for supervised classification, and we also analyze the variability within and among plots and within and among sites, in order to address the generalizability of the results.

  19. Composite mapping experiences in airborne gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bucher, B

    2014-08-01

    During an international intercomparison exercise of airborne gamma spectrometry held in Switzerland 2007 teams from Germany, France and Switzerland were proving their capabilities. One of the tasks was the composite mapping of an area around Basel. Each team was mainly covering the part of its own country at its own flying procedures. They delivered the evaluated data in a data format agreed in advance. The quantities to be delivered were also defined in advance. Nevertheless, during the process to put the data together a few questions raised: Which dose rate was meant? Had the dose rate to be delivered with or without cosmic contribution? Activity per dry or wet mass? Which coordinate system was used? Finally, the data could be put together in one map. For working procedures in case of an emergency, quantities of interest and exchange data format have to be defined in advance. But the procedures have also to be proved regularly.

  20. NASA Airborne Science Program: NASA Stratospheric Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducts a wide variety of remote sensing projects using several unique aircraft platforms. These vehicles have been selected and modified to provide capabilities that are particularly important for geophysical research, in particular, routine access to very high altitudes, long range, long endurance, precise trajectory control, and the payload capacity to operate multiple, diverse instruments concurrently. While the NASA program has been in operation for over 30 years, new aircraft and technological advances that will expand the capabilities for airborne observation are continually being assessed and implemented. This presentation will review the current state of NASA's science platforms, recent improvements and new missions concepts as well as provide a survey of emerging technologies unmanned aerial vehicles for long duration observations (Global Hawk and Predator). Applications of information technology that allow more efficient use of flight time and the ability to rapidly reconfigure systems for different mission objectives are addressed.

  1. Dual channel airborne hygrometer for climate research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatrai, David; Gulyas, Gabor; Bozoki, Zoltan; Szabo, Gabor

    2015-04-01

    Airborne hygrometry has an increasing role in climate research and nowadays the determination of cloud content especially of cirrus clouds is gaining high interest. The greatest challenges for such measurements are being used from ground level up to the lower stratosphere with appropriate precision and accuracy the low concentration and varying environment pressure. Such purpose instrument was probably presented first by our research group [1-2]. The development of the system called WaSUL-Hygro and some measurement results will be introduced. The measurement system is based on photoacoustic spectroscopy and contains two measuring cells, one is used to measure water vapor concentration which is typically sampled by a sideward or backward inlet, while the second one measures total water content (water vapor plus ice crystals) after evaporation in a forward facing sampler. The two measuring cells are simultaneously illuminated through with one distributed feedback diode laser (1371 or 1392 nm). Two early versions have been used within the CARIBIC project. During the recent years, efforts were made to turn the system into a more reliable and robust one [3]. The first important development was the improvement of the wavelength stabilization method of the applied laser. As a result the uncertainty of the wavelength is less than 40fm, which corresponds to less than 0.05% of PA signal uncertainty. This PA signal uncertainty is lower than the noise level of the system itself. The other main development was the improvement of the concentration determination algorithm. For this purpose several calibration and data evaluation methods were developed, the combination of the latest ones have made the system traceable to the humidity generator applied during the calibration within 1.5% relative deviation or within noise level, whichever is greater. The improved system was several times blind tested at the Environmental Simulation Facility (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany) in

  2. Airborne infrared low level wind shear predictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, P. M.; Kurkowski, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The operating principles and test performance of an airborne IR (13-16 micron) temperature-sensing detection and warning system for low-level wind shear (LLWS) are presented. The physics of LLWS phenomena and of the IR radiometer are introduced. The cold density-current outflow or gust front related to LLWS is observed in the IR spectrum of CO2 by a radiometer with + or - 0.5-C accuracy at 0.5-Hz sampling rate; LLWS alerts are given on the basis of specific criteria. Test results from the JAWS experiments conducted at Denver in July 1982, are presented graphically and discussed. The feasibility of the passive IR system is demonstrated, with an average warning time of 51 sec, corresponding to a distance from touchdown of about 2 miles.

  3. Characterization of iron in airborne particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, F. V. F.; Ardisson, J. D.; Rodrigues, P. C. H.; Brito, W.; Macedo, W. A. A.; Jacomino, V. M. F.

    2014-01-01

    In this work soil samples, iron ore and airborne atmospheric particulate matter (PM) in the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte (MRBH), State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, are investigated with the aim of identifying if the sources of the particulate matter are of natural origin, such as, resuspension of particles from soil, or due to anthropogenic origins from mining and processing of iron ore. Samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy. The results showed that soil samples studied are rich in quartz and have low contents of iron mainly iron oxide with low crystallinity. The samples of iron ore and PM have high concentration of iron, predominantly well crystallized hematite. 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed the presence of similar iron oxides in samples of PM and in the samples of iron ore, indicating the anthropogenic origin in the material present in atmosphere of the study area.

  4. The Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition - Prologue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard; Plumb, Alan; Condon, Estelle

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to the initial scientific results of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE), as well as data from other atmospheric experiments and analyses carried out during the Arctic polar winter of 1989. Mission objectives of the AASE were to study the mechanisms of ozone depletion and redistribution in the northern polar stratosphere, including the influences of Arctic meteorology, and polar stratospheric clouds formed at low temperatures. Some major aspects of the AASE are described including: logistics and operations, meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, trace composition and chemistry, and ozone depletion. It is concluded that the Arctic-89 experiments have provided the scientific community with a wealth of new information that will contribute to a better understanding of the polar winter stratosphere and the critical problem of global ozone depletion.

  5. SOFIA: The future of airborne astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.; Davidson, Jacqueline A.

    1995-01-01

    For the past 20 years, the 91 cm telescope in NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) has enabled scientists to observe infrared sources which are obscured by the earth's atmosphere at ground-based sites, and to observe transient astronomical events from anywhere in the world. To augment this capability, the United States and German Space Agencies (NASA and DARA) are collaborating in plans to replace the KAO with a 2.5 meter telescope installed in a Boeing 747 aircraft: SOFIA - The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy. SOFIA's large aperture, wide wavelength coverage, mobility, accessibility, and sophisticated instruments will permit a broad range of scientific studies, some of which are described here. Its unique features complement the capabilities of other future space missions. In addition, SOFIA has important potential as a stimulus for development of new technology and as a national resource for education of K-12 teachers. If started in 1996, SOFIA will be flying in the year 2000.

  6. Respiratory protection against airborne nanoparticles: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Ronald E.; Rengasamy, Samy

    2009-10-01

    As a precautionary measure, it is often recommended that workers take steps to reduce their exposure to airborne nanoparticles through the use of respiratory protective devices. The purpose of this study was to provide a review and analysis of the research literature and current recommendations on respirators used for protection against nanoparticles. Key research findings were that studies with particles as small as 4 nm have shown that conventional single-fiber filtration theory can be used to describe the filtration performance of respirators and that the most penetrating particle size for respirators equipped with commonly used electrostatic filter media is in the range of 30-100 nm. Future research needs include human laboratory and workplace protection factor studies to measure the respirator total inward leakage of nanoparticles. Industrial hygienists and safety professionals should continue to use traditional respirator selection guidance for workers exposed to nanoparticles.

  7. Dynamic spectrum of airborne gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Minato, S

    1990-04-01

    This note describes a method of direct measurement of airborne gamma-rays primarily from 222Rn daughters using a NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer with lead shields. This method has the advantage of being able to maintain the system easily compared to other usual systems including a pump. The pulse-height distributions are successively fed to a floppy disk in a personal computer every unit time. The gain shifts can be corrected automatically by a computer program. This technique would be applicable to the estimation of 222Rn daughters concentration and to examination of disequilibrium between 214Pb(RaB) and 214Bi(RaC) and of those height distribution up to about 200 m. The accuracy for estimating the concentration is as good as that of the filter method.

  8. Digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Li, Chen; Tan, Cheng-Jun; Ge, Liang-Quan; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-07-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. After energy calibration, the spectrometer can clearly distinguish photopeaks at 239, 352, 583 and 609 keV in the low-energy spectral sections. The photopeak energy resolution of 137Cs improves to 6.75% from the original 7.8%. Furthermore, the energy resolution of three photopeaks, namely, K, U, and Th, is maintained, and the overall stability of the energy spectrum is increased through potassium peak spectrum stabilization. Thus, it is possible to effectively measure energy from 20 keV to 10 MeV.

  9. Determination of airborne nanoparticles from welding operations.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João Fernando Pereira; Albuquerque, Paula Cristina Silva; Miranda, Rosa Maria Mendes; Vieira, Maria Teresa Freire

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in welding processes (tungsten inert gas [TIG], metal active gas [MAG] of carbon steel, and friction stir welding [FSW] of aluminum) in terms of deposited area in pulmonary alveolar tract using a nanoparticle surface area monitor (NSAM) analyzer. The obtained results showed the dependence of process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles compared to background levels. Data indicated that the process that resulted in the lowest levels of alveolar deposited surface area (ADSA) was FSW, followed by TIG and MAG. However, all tested processes resulted in significant concentrations of ultrafine particles being deposited in humans lungs of exposed workers.

  10. CALIOPE and TAISIR airborne experiment platform

    SciTech Connect

    Chocol, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    Between 1950 and 1970, scientific ballooning achieved many new objectives and made a substantial contribution to understanding near-earth and space environments. In 1986, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began development of ballooning technology capable of addressing issues associated with precision tracking of ballistic missiles. In 1993, the Radar Ocean Imaging Project identified the need for a low altitude (1 km) airborne platform for its Radar system. These two technologies and experience base have been merged with the acquisition of government surplus Aerostats by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The CALIOPE and TAISIR Programs can benefit directly from this technology by using the Aerostat as an experiment platform for measurements of the spill facility at NTS.

  11. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop: Summary Minutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The general theme for the workshop revolved around global environmental change. Over 170 individuals participated in the presentations and ensuing discussions about the many agency activities using airborne platforms and sensors in support of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (GCRP). The U.S. GCRP was developed as a central component of the U.S. Government's approach to global change and its contribution to worldwide efforts. An all-encompassing U.S. plan was developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES), which continues as the interagency coordinating group for the program. The U.S. GCRP was established as a Presidential initiative in the FY90 budget, making it a particularly relevant topic for the workshop. The following are presented in the appendices: (1) final agenda and list of registrants; (2) final list of poster presenters; (3) steering group luncheon participants; (4) the draft resolution; and (5) selected handouts.

  12. Lidar measurements of airborne particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangkun; Philbrick, C. Russell

    2003-03-01

    Raman lidar techniques have been used in remote sensing to measure the aerosol optical extinction in the lower atmosphere, as well as water vapor, temperature and ozone profiles. Knowledge of aerosol optical properties assumes special importance in the wake of studies strongly correlating airborne particulate matter with adverse health effects. Optical extinction depends upon the concentration, composition, and size distribution of the particulate matter. Optical extinction from lidar returns provide information on particle size and density. The influence of relative humidity upon the growth and size of aerosols, particularly the sulfate aerosols along the northeast US region, has been investigated using a Raman lidar during several field measurement campaigns. A particle size distribution model is being developed and verified based on the experimental results. Optical extinction measurements from lidar in the NARSTO-NE-OPS program in Philadelphia PA, during summer of 1999 and 2001, have been analyzed and compared with other measurements such as PM sampling and particle size measurements.

  13. Airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1992-01-01

    Proper interpretation of airborne gravimetry and altimetry requires good knowledge of aircraft trajectory. Recent advances in precise navigation with differential GPS have made it possible to measure gravity from the air with accuracies of a few milligals, and to obtain altimeter profiles of terrain or sea surface correct to one decimeter. These developments are opening otherwise inaccessible regions to detailed geophysical mapping. Navigation with GPS presents some problems that grow worse with increasing distance from a fixed receiver: the effect of errors in tropospheric refraction correction, GPS ephemerides, and the coordinates of the fixed receivers. Ionospheric refraction and orbit error complicate ambiguity resolution. Optimal navigation should treat all error sources as unknowns, together with the instantaneous vehicle position. To do so, fast and reliable numerical techniques are needed: efficient and stable Kalman filter-smoother algorithms, together with data compression and, sometimes, the use of simplified dynamics.

  14. Integrated approach to airborne laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louthain, James A.; Schmidt, Jason D.

    2008-10-01

    Lasers offer tremendous advantages over RF communication systems in bandwidth and security, due to their ultrahigh frequency and narrow spatial beamwidth. Unfortunately, atmospheric turbulence causes severe received power variations and significant bit error rates (BERs) in free-space optical communication (FSOC). Airborne optical communication systems require special considerations in size, complexity, power, and weight. We alleviate the deleterious effects of turbulence by integrating multiple techniques into an on/off keying direct detection system. Wave optics simulations show a combination of transmitter diversity, receiver and transmitter trackers, and adaptive thresholding significantly reduces the BER in air-to-air FSOC (up to 13 dB). Two transmitters alone provide a significant BER improvement over one transmitter, especially for the strong turbulence regime with up to a 9 dB improvement. Two beams also provide a reduction in fade length, indicating they will probably provide even greater improvement with interleaving and forward error correction coding.

  15. Airborne transmission of disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Eames, I.; Tang, J. W.; Li, Y.; Wilson, P.

    2009-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infection (HAI) is an important public health issue with unacceptable levels of morbidity and mortality, over the last 5 years. Disease can be transmitted by air (over large distances), by direct/indirect contact or a combination of both routes. While contact transmission of disease forms the majority of HAI cases, transmission through the air is harder to control, but one where the engineering sciences can play an important role in limiting the spread. This forms the focus of this themed volume. In this paper, we describe the current hospital environment and review the contributions from microbiologists, mechanical and civil engineers, and mathematicians to this themed volume on the airborne transmission of infection in hospitals. The review also points out some of the outstanding scientific questions and possible approaches to mitigating transmission. PMID:19828499

  16. Airborne Dust Models in Valley Fever Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, W. A.; Galgiani, J. N.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Vukovic, A. J.; Prasad, A. K.; Djurdjevic, V.; Nickovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    Dust storms (haboobs) struck Phoenix, Arizona, in 2011 on July 5th and again on July 18th. One potential consequence: an estimated 3,600 new cases of Valley Fever in Maricopa County from the first storm alone. The fungi, Coccidioides immitis, the cause of the respiratory infection, Valley Fever, lives in the dry desert soils of the American southwest and southward through Mexico, Central America and South America. The fungi become part of the dust storm and, a few weeks after inhalation, symptoms of Valley Fever may appear, including pneumonia-like illness, rashes, and severe fatigue. Some fatalities occur. Our airborne dust forecast system predicted the timing and extent of the storm, as it has done with other, often different, dust events. Atmosphere/land surface models can be part of public health services to reduce risk of Valley Fever and exacerbation of other respiratory and cardiovascular illness.

  17. SOFIA'S Challenge: Scheduling Airborne Astronomy Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is NASA's next generation airborne astronomical observatory, and will commence operations in 2005. The facility consists of a 747-SP modified to accommodate a 2.5 meter telescope. SOFIA is expected to fly an average of 140 science flights per year over its 20 year lifetime. Depending on the nature of the instrument used during flight, 5-15 observations per flight are expected. The SOFIA telescope is mounted aft of the wings on the port side of the aircraft and is articulated through a range of 20deg to 60deg of elevation. The telescope has minimal lateral flexibility; thus, the aircraft must turn constantly to maintain the telescope's focus on an object during observations. A significant problem in future SOFIA operations is that of scheduling flights in support of observations. Investigators are expected to propose small numbers of observations, and many observations must be grouped together to make up single flights. Flight planning for the previous generation airborne observatory, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), was done by hand; planners had to choose takeoff time, observations to perform, and decide on setup-actions (called "dead-legs") to position the aircraft prior to observing. This task frequently required between 6-8 hours to plan one flight The scope of the flight planning problem for supporting GI observations with the anticipated flight rate for SOFIA makes the manual approach for flight planning daunting. In response, we have designed an Automated Flight Planner (AFP) that accepts as input a set of requested observations, designated flight days, weather predictions and fuel limitations, and searches automatically for high-quality flight plans that satisfy all relevant aircraft and astronomer specified constraints. The AFP can generate one candidate flight plan in 5-10 minutes, of computation time, a feat beyond the capabilities of human flight planners. The rate at which the AFP can

  18. Exposure to airborne asbestos in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.J.; Van Orden, D.R.; Corn, M.; Crump, K.S. )

    1992-08-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings and its implication for the health of building occupants is a major public health issue. A total of 2892 air samples from 315 public, commercial, residential, school, and university buildings has been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result of exposure to the presence of asbestos containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all asbestos structures was 0.02 structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of asbestos greater than or equal to 5 microns long was 0.00013 fibers/ml (f/ml). The concentration of asbestos was higher in schools than in other buildings. In 48% of indoor samples and 75% of outdoor samples, no asbestos fibers were detected. The observed airborne concentration in 74% of the indoor samples and 96% of the outdoor samples is below the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act clearance level of 0.01 s/ml. Finally, using those fibers which could be seen optically, all indoor samples and all outdoor samples are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure level of 0.1 f/ml for fibers greater than or equal to 5 microns in length. These results provide substantive verification of the findings of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency public building study which found very low ambient concentrations of asbestos fibers in buildings with ACM, irrespective of the condition of the material in the buildings.

  19. Identifying Airborne Pathogens in Time to Respond

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-25

    Among the possible terrorist activities that might threaten national security is the release of an airborne pathogen such as anthrax. Because the potential damage to human health could be severe, experts consider 1 minute to be an operationally useful time limit for identifying the pathogen and taking action. Many commercial systems can identify airborne pathogenic microbes, but they take days or, at best, hours to produce results. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other U.S. government agencies are interested in finding a faster approach. To answer this national need, a Livermore team, led by scientist Eric Gard, has developed the bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) system--the only instrument that can detect and identify spores at low concentrations in less than 1 minute. BAMS can successfully distinguish between two related but different spore species. It can also sort out a single spore from thousands of other particles--biological and nonbiological--with no false positives. The BAMS team won a 2005 R&D 100 Award for developing the system. Livermore's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program funded the biomedical aspects of the BAMS project, and the Department of Defense's Technical Support Working Group and Defense Advanced Research Project Agency funded the biodefense efforts. Developing a detection system that can analyze small samples so quickly has been challenging. Livermore engineer Vincent Riot, who worked on the BAMS project, explains, ''A typical spore weighs approximately one-trillionth of a gram and is dispersed in the atmosphere, which contains naturally occurring particles that could be present at concentrations thousands of times higher. Previous systems also had difficulty separating benign organisms from those that are pathogenic but very similar, which has resulted in false alarms''.

  20. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) flight mission participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1988-01-01

    From February 1986 to the present, the AOL participated in six interagency flight missions. (1) Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP II) (Department of Energy). The SEEP experiments are designed to assess the assimilative capacity of the Continental Shelf to absorb the energy by-products introduced into the near-shore ocean environment from coastal communities and marine activities such as energy production plants and offshore oil operations. (2) BIOWATT II (Office of Naval Research). The major objective of this study was to provide a better understanding of the relationships between ocean physics, biology, bioluminescence, and optics in oligotrophic portions of the Atlantic Ocean. (3) Fall Experiment (FLEX) (Department of Energy). The FLEX studies were designed to determine the fate of low salinity water in the coastal boundary zone that is advected south towards the Florida coast during autumn. (4) Greenland Sea and Icelandic Marine Biological Experiments (NASA). The investigations were designed to evaluate the distribution of surface layer chlorophyll in the Greeland Sea and in the coastal waters in the vicinity of Iceland. (5) Submerged Oceanic Scattering Layer Experiment (Naval Ocean Systems Center). This flight experiment demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of detecting and metrically measuring the depth to submerged layers of particulate matter in the shelf break region and in the inner coastal zone. (6) Microbial Exchanges and Coupling in Coastal Atlantic Systems (National Science Foundation). This investigation was designed to study the transportation and fate of particulates in coastal waters and in particular the Chesapeake Bay/coastal Atlantic Ocean. Shortly after the conduct of the flight experiments, airborne laser-induced chlorophyll a and phycoerythrin fluorescence data, as well as sea surface temperature and airborne expendable bathythermograph water column temperature profiles are supplied to cooperating institutions.

  1. CHARM-F: the Airborne MERLIN Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Büdenbender, C.; Fix, A.; Quatrevalet, M.; Wirth, M.

    2013-12-01

    A common and efficient method for demonstration of the usefulness of new remote sensing instruments in space science is to test them on airborne platforms prior to fly them on space-borne platform. CHARM-F comprises a new IPDA lidar sensor for the simultaneous measurement of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). This instrument is regarded to serve as an MERLIN demonstrator when operated on an airborne platform measuring the differential atmospheric optical depth (DAOD) of CH4 beneath the aircraft. The data products of the French-German climate mission MERLIN are DAOD and XCH4 that will be measured by a small OPO-based IPDA lidar at 1.64 μm. Similar to the MERLIN transmitter, the transmitter of CHARM-F emits two frequency-controlled, spectrally narrow-band OPO pulses into the atmosphere serving for the on- and off-line measurements. The ground echoes are measured by means of fast IR sensors in the direct detection mode. A special feature of CHARM-F comprises its weighting function which is quite similar to the one considered for MERLIN since the on- and off-line frequencies can be selected to be identically. Moreover, CHARM-F is designed for operation on the German HALO aircraft that can cruise at an altitude as high as 15 km. Thus a large portion of the MERLIN DAOD will be measured by CHARM-F offering the unique possibility to validate DAOD of MERLIN which is not possible by any other means. In our presentation we will introduce the CHARM-F instrument as a demonstrator for MERLIN. Further we report on results of the qualification tests of the subsystems which are required prior to fly the instrument on the HALO aircraft. Finally, we present first results from ground-based long-path absorption measurements of CH4 employing topographic targets.

  2. The enhanced MODIS airborne simulator hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, Daniel C.; Fisher, John; Graham, Edward R.

    2011-06-01

    The EMAS-HS or Enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator is an upgrade to the solar reflected and thermal infrared channels of NASA's MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS). In the solar reflected bands, the MAS scanner functionality will be augmented with the addition of this separate pushbroom hyperspectral instrument. As well as increasing the spectral resolution of MAS beyond 10 nm, this spectrometer is designed to maintain a stable calibration that can be transferred to the existing MAS sensor. The design emphasizes environmental control and on-board radiometric stability monitoring. The system is designed for high-altitude missions on the ER-2 and the Global Hawk platforms. System trades optimize performance in MODIS spectral bands that support land, cloud, aerosol, and atmospheric water studies. The primary science mission driving the development is high altitude cloud imaging, with secondary missions possible for ocean color. The sensor uses two Offner spectrometers to cover the 380-2400 nm spectral range. It features an all-reflective telescope with a 50° full field-of-view. A dichroic cold mirror will split the image from the telescope, with longer radiation transmitted to the SWIR spectrometer. The VNIR spectrometer uses a TE-cooled Si CCD detector that samples the spectrum at 2.5 nm intervals, while the SWIR spectrometer uses a Stirling-cooled hybrid HgCdTe detector to sample the spectrum at 10 nm per band. Both spectrometers will feature 1.05 mRad instantaneous fields-of-view registered to the MAS scanner IFOV's.

  3. The NASA enhanced MODIS airborne simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Thomas A.; Myers, Jeffrey; Grant, Patrick; Platnick, Steven; Guerin, Daniel C.; Fisher, John; Song, Kai; Kimchi, Joseph; Kilmer, Louis; LaPorte, Daniel D.; Moeller, Christopher C.

    2011-10-01

    The new NASA Enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator (eMAS) is based on the legacy MAS system, which has been used extensively in support of the NASA Earth Observing System program since 1995. eMAS consists of two separate instruments designed to fly together on the NASA ER-2 and Global Hawk high altitude aircraft. The eMAS-IR instrument is an upgraded version of the legacy MAS line-scanning spectrometer, with 38 spectral bands in the wavelength range from 0.47 to 14.1 μm. The original LN2-cooled MAS MWIR and LWIR spectrometers are replaced with a single vacuum-sealed, Stirling-cooled assembly, having a single MWIR and twelve LWIR bands. This spectrometer module contains a cold optical bench where both dispersive optics and detector arrays are maintained at cryogenic temperatures to reduce infrared background noise, and ensure spectral stability during high altitude airborne operations. The EMAS-HS instrument is a stand-alone push-broom imaging spectrometer, with 202 contiguous spectral bands in the wavelength range from 0.38 to 2.40 μm. It consists of two Offner spectrometers, mated to a 4-mirror anastigmatic telescope. The system has a single slit, and uses a dichroic beam-splitter to divide the incoming energy between VNIR and SWIR focal plane arrays. It will be synchronized and bore-sighted with the IR line-scanner, and includes an active source for monitoring calibration stability. eMAS is intended to support future satellite missions including the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager ( HyspIRI,) the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP,) and the follow-on Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS.)

  4. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in

  5. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yun-Jin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996, was divided into two smaller workshops:(1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop. This current paper, Volume 2 of the Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, presents the summaries for The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop.

  6. The Western Airborne Contaminant Assessment Project (WACAP): An interdisciplinary evaluation of the impacts of airborne contaminants in Western U.S. National Parks

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) was initiated in 2002 by the National Park Service to determine if airborne contaminants were having an impact on remote western ecosystems. Multiple sample media (snow, water, sediment, fish and terrestrial vegetation...

  7. Assessment of lightweight mobile nuclear power systems. [for airborne vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.; Rom, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    A review was made of lightweight mobile nuclear power systems (LMNPS). Data cover technical feasibility studies of LMNPS and airborne vehicles, mission studies, and non-technical conditions that are required to develop and use LMNPS.

  8. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic Fluid Buildings, Northeast of Looking Glass Avenue at southwest side of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  9. NASA’s Sense of Snow: the Airborne Snow Observatory

    NASA Video Gallery

    Water is a critical resource in the western U.S. NASA’s Airborne Snow Observatory is giving California water agencies the first complete measurements of the water available in the Sierra snowpack ...

  10. Exploratory Meeting on Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, G. H. (Editor); Kaufman, J. W. (Editor); Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific interests and applications of the Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement System to severe storms and local weather are discussed. The main areas include convective phenomena, local circulation, atmospheric boundary layer, atmospheric dispersion, and industrial aerodynamics.

  11. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle Refueling Station, Northeast of AGE Storage Facility at far northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  12. Airborne X-band SAR tomography for forest volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, Fiona; Woodhouse, Iain H.; Mulgrew, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    We evaluate the usefulness of X-band, airborne (helicopter) data for tomography over forestry regions and discuss the use of compressive sensing algorithms to aid X-band airborne tomography. This work examines if there is any information that can be gained from forest volumes when analysing forestry sites using X-band data. To do so, different forest scenarios were simulated and a fast SAR simulator was used to model airborne multipass SAR data, at X-band, with parameters based on Leonardo's PicoSAR instrument. Model simulations considered varying factors that affect the height determination when using tomography. The main parameters that are considered here are: motion errors of the platform, the spacing of the flight paths, the resolution of the SAR images and plant life being present under the canopy (an understory). It was found that residual motion errors from the airborne platform cause the largest error in the tomographic profile.

  13. Light scattering from nonspherical airborne particles: Experimental and theoretical comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Edwin; Kaye, Paul H.; Guppy, John R.

    1994-10-01

    Spatial intensity distribution of laser light scattered by airborne hazardous particles such as asbestos fiber is studied to classify particles shape and size. Theoretical treatment is based on Rayleigh-Gans formalism. Theoretical and experimental data are in good agreement.

  14. Advances and perspectives in bathymetry by airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Wang, Chenxi; Li, Mingyan; Wang, Yuefeng; Ye, Siqi; Han, Caiyun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the history of the airborne lidar and the development stages of the technology are reviewed. The basic principle of airborne lidar and the method of processing point-cloud data were discussed. At present, single point laser scanning method is widely used in bathymetric survey. Although the method has high ranging accuracy, the data processing and hardware system is too much complicated and expensive. For this reason, this paper present a kind of improved dual-frequency method for bathymetric and sea surface survey, in this method 176 units of 1064nm wavelength laser has been used by push-broom scanning and due to the airborne power limits still use 532nm wavelength single point for bathymetric survey by zigzag scanning. We establish a spatial coordinates for obtaining the WGS-84 of point cloud by using airborne POS system.

  15. Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance: Mission Command and Centralized Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-10

    reconnaissance support by World War I artillerymen, whose views on organic control echo current dialogue on UAS employment. This monograph concludes by...Mission Command, Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance, ISR, Helmuth Von Moltke, J.E.B. Stuart, World War I, artillery, centralized...reconnaissance and modern airborne ISR operations. This monograph also highlights the experiences of World War I artillerymen and their pursuit of

  16. Airborne Expendable Bathythermogragh Surveys, 1981, Western Tasman Sea.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    No. 2/82 AIRBORNE EXPENDABLE BATHYTHERMOGRAGH SURVEYS, 1981, WESTERN TASMAN SEA BY P.J. MULHEARN APPROVED DTIC ELECTE FOR PUTBLI I ~LT -i~ COPY• N. 7...NO. 2/82 AIRBORNE EXPENDABLE BATHYTHERMOGRAPH SURVEYS, 1981, WESTERN TASMAN SEA P.J. MULHEARN ABSTRACT On four occasions in 1981 AXBT surveys were...conducted in the western Tasman Sea in support of the RAN’s ocean analysis scheme. The results of these surveys show that the limited number of probes

  17. Proceedings of the 11th JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2002-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop forum held to report science research and applications results with spectral images measured by the NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). These papers were presented at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory from March 5-8, 2001. Electronic versions of these papers may be found at the A VIRIS Web http://popo.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/docs/workshops/aviris.proceedings.html

  18. User definition and mission requirements for unmanned airborne platforms, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhner, M. B.; Mcdowell, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The airborne measurement requirements of the scientific and applications experiment user community were assessed with respect to the suitability of proposed strawman airborne platforms. These platforms provide a spectrum of measurement capabilities supporting associated mission tradeoffs such as payload weight, operating altitude, range, duration, flight profile control, deployment flexibility, quick response, and recoverability. The results of the survey are used to examine whether the development of platforms is warranted and to determine platform system requirements as well as research and technology needs.

  19. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiuhong

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, some remote-sensing applications require advanced airborne multi-sensor systems to provide high performance reflective and emissive spectral imaging measurement rapidly over large areas. The key or unique problem of characteristics is associated with a black box back-end system that operates a suite of cutting-edge imaging sensors to collect simultaneously the high throughput reflective and emissive spectral imaging data with precision georeference. This back-end system needs to be portable, easy-to-use, and reliable with advanced onboard processing. The innovation of the black box backend is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS integrates a complex embedded system of systems with dedicated power and signal electronic circuits inside to serve a suite of configurable cutting-edge electro- optical (EO), long-wave infrared (LWIR), and medium-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras, a hyperspectral imaging scanner, and a GPS and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for atmospheric and surface remote sensing. Its compatible sensor packages include NASA s 1,024 1,024 pixel LWIR quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) imager; a 60.5 megapixel BuckEye EO camera; and a fast (e.g. 200+ scanlines/s) and wide swath-width (e.g., 1,920+ pixels) CCD/InGaAs imager-based visible/near infrared reflectance (VNIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometer. MAICSS records continuous precision georeferenced and time-tagged multisensor throughputs to mass storage devices at a high aggregate rate, typically 60 MB/s for its LWIR/EO payload. MAICSS is a complete stand-alone imaging server instrument with an easy-to-use software package for either autonomous data collection or interactive airborne operation. Advanced multisensor data acquisition and onboard processing software features have been implemented for MAICSS. With the onboard processing for real time image development, correction, histogram-equalization, compression, georeference, and

  20. Potential of Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy at Czechglobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuš, J.; Fabiánek, T.; Fajmon, L.

    2016-06-01

    Ecosystems, their services, structures and functions are affected by complex environmental processes, which are both natural and human-induced and globally changing. In order to understand how ecosystems behave in globally changing environment, it is important to monitor the current status of ecosystems and their structural and functional changes in time and space. An essential tool allowing monitoring of ecosystems is remote sensing (RS). Many ecosystems variables are being translated into a spectral response recorded by RS instruments. It is however important to understand the complexity and synergies of the key ecosystem variables influencing the reflected signal. This can be achieved by analysing high resolution RS data from multiple sources acquired simultaneously from the same platform. Such a system has been recently built at CzechGlobe - Global Change Research Institute (The Czech Academy of Sciences). CzechGlobe has been significantly extending its research infrastructure in the last years, which allows advanced monitoring of ecosystem changes at hierarchical levels spanning from molecules to entire ecosystems. One of the CzechGlobe components is a laboratory of imaging spectroscopy. The laboratory is now operating a new platform for advanced remote sensing observations called FLIS (Flying Laboratory of Imaging Spectroscopy). FLIS consists of an airborne carrier equipped with passive RS systems. The core instrument of FLIS is a hyperspectral imaging system provided by Itres Ltd. The hyperspectral system consists of three spectroradiometers (CASI 1500, SASI 600 and TASI 600) that cover the reflective spectral range from 380 to 2450 nm, as well as the thermal range from 8 to 11.5 μm. The airborne platform is prepared for mounting of full-waveform laser scanner Riegl-Q780 as well, however a laser scanner is not a permanent part of FLIS. In 2014 the installation of the hyperspectral scanners was completed and the first flights were carried out with all

  1. Technology-enabled Airborne Spacing and Merging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, James; Barmore, Bryan; Abbott, Tetence

    2005-01-01

    Over the last several decades, advances in airborne and groundside technologies have allowed the Air Traffic Service Provider (ATSP) to give safer and more efficient service, reduce workload and frequency congestion, and help accommodate a critically escalating traffic volume. These new technologies have included advanced radar displays, and data and communication automation to name a few. In step with such advances, NASA Langley is developing a precision spacing concept designed to increase runway throughput by enabling the flight crews to manage their inter-arrival spacing from TRACON entry to the runway threshold. This concept is being developed as part of NASA s Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) project under the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies Program. Precision spacing is enabled by Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), which provides air-to-air data exchange including position and velocity reports; real-time wind information and other necessary data. On the flight deck, a research prototype system called Airborne Merging and Spacing for Terminal Arrivals (AMSTAR) processes this information and provides speed guidance to the flight crew to achieve the desired inter-arrival spacing. AMSTAR is designed to support current ATC operations, provide operationally acceptable system-wide increases in approach spacing performance and increase runway throughput through system stability, predictability and precision spacing. This paper describes problems and costs associated with an imprecise arrival flow. It also discusses methods by which Air Traffic Controllers achieve and maintain an optimum interarrival interval, and explores means by which AMSTAR can assist in this pursuit. AMSTAR is an extension of NASA s previous work on in-trail spacing that was successfully demonstrated in a flight evaluation at Chicago O Hare International Airport in September 2002. In addition to providing for precision inter-arrival spacing, AMSTAR

  2. Overview of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Pfister, Leonhard

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) is a series of airborne campaigns focused on understanding physical processes in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) and their role in atmospheric chemistry and climate. ATTREX is using the high-altitude, long-duration NASA Global Hawk Unmanned Air System to make in situ and remote-sensing measurements spanning the Pacific. A particular ATIREX emphasis is to better understand the dehydration of air as it passes through the cold tropical tropopause region. The ATTREX payload contains 12 in situ and remote sensing instruments that measure water vapor, clouds, multiple gaseous tracers (CO, CO2, CH4, NMHC, SF6, CFCs, N2O), reactive chemical compounds (O3, BrO, NO2), meteorological parameters, and radiative fluxes. ATTREX flight series have been conducted in the fall of 2011 from Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) in California, in the winter of 2013 from AFRC, and in the winter/spring of 2014 from Guam. The first two f light series provided extensive sampling of the central and eastern Pacific, whereas the last flight series permitted sampling in the western Pacific. The sampling strategy has primarily involved repeated ascents and descents through the depth of the TTL (about 13-19 km). Over 100 TTL profiles were obtained on each flight series. The ATTREX dataset includes TTL water vapor measurements with unprecedented accuracy, ice crystal size distributions and habits. The cloud and water measurements provide unique information about TTL cloud formation, the persistence of supersaturation with respect to ice, and dehydration. The plethora of tracers measured on the Global Hawk flights are providing unique information about TTL transport pathways and time scales. The meteorological measurements are revealing dynamical phenomena controlling the TTL thermal structure, and the radiation measurements are providing information about heating rates associated with TTL clouds and water vapor. This presentation

  3. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  4. Airborne electromagnetic imaging of discontinuous permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsley, Burke J.; Abraham, Jared D.; Smith, Bruce D.; Cannia, James C.; Voss, Clifford I.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Anderson, Lesleigh; Ball, Lyndsay B.; Deszcz-Pan, Maryla; Wellman, Tristan P.; Ager, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of permafrost in cold regions is inextricably connected to hydrogeologic processes, climate, and ecosystems. Permafrost thawing has been linked to changes in wetland and lake areas, alteration of the groundwater contribution to streamflow, carbon release, and increased fire frequency. But detailed knowledge about the dynamic state of permafrost in relation to surface and groundwater systems remains an enigma. Here, we present the results of a pioneering ˜1,800 line-kilometer airborne electromagnetic survey that shows sediments deposited over the past ˜4 million years and the configuration of permafrost to depths of ˜100 meters in the Yukon Flats area near Fort Yukon, Alaska. The Yukon Flats is near the boundary between continuous permafrost to the north and discontinuous permafrost to the south, making it an important location for examining permafrost dynamics. Our results not only provide a detailed snapshot of the present-day configuration of permafrost, but they also expose previously unseen details about potential surface - groundwater connections and the thermal legacy of surface water features that has been recorded in the permafrost over the past ˜1,000 years. This work will be a critical baseline for future permafrost studies aimed at exploring the connections between hydrogeologic, climatic, and ecological processes, and has significant implications for the stewardship of Arctic environments.

  5. Cloud detection using disposable airborne sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, K.; Harrison, R. G.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements from airborne platforms are important for studies of clouds' impact on the radiation balance and on precipitation. A range of small, low cost, disposable sensors has been developed for cloud detection from unmanned balloon or UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) platforms (Nicoll and Harrison, 2010). The techniques already deployed include exploiting the associated solar radiation modification, electric charge changes, and optical fluctuations due to cloud droplets. As well as needing to be inexpensive, the sensors are required to be lightweight (mass typically ~ 100g) with low consumption (typical power ~100mW), and have been tested alongside standard meteorological radiosondes, as well as on a small UAS (SUMO - Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (Reuder et al 2009)). Design criteria for these sensors will be discussed, as well as measurements from the test flights, through a variety of different cloud layers. The advantages of using optical and charge methods of cloud detection over the normal thermodynamic method deployed with conventional radiosondes (capacitative sensing of relative humidity combined with temperature measurements), will also be discussed. Nicoll K.A. and R.G. Harrison. Research Radiosondes, Met. Tech. Int. Nov 2010, 140 (2010). Reuder J., P. Brisset, M. Jonassen, M. Muller, S. Mayer. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO: A new tool for atmospheric boundary layer research Meteorologische Zeitschrift, Vol. 18, No. 2, 141-147 (2009).

  6. Evaluation of principal cannabinoids in airborne particulates.

    PubMed

    Balducci, C; Nervegna, G; Cecinato, A

    2009-05-08

    The determination of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), cannabidiol (CND) and cannabinol (CNB), primary active components in cannabis preparation, was carried out on airborne particulates by applying a specific procedure consisting of soot extraction by ultrasonic bath, purification by solvent partitioning, derivatization with N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyl-trifluoroacetamide, and separation/detection through gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The optimized procedure was found suitable for measuring the three psychotropic substances at concentrations ranging from ca. 0.001 to ca. 5.0 ng cm(-3) of air, with recoveries always higher than 82%, accuracy >7.3% and precision >90%. Application of the procedure performed on field in Rome and Bari, Italy, demonstrated that all three compounds contaminate the air in Italian cities whereas in Algiers, Algeria, only cannabinol, the most stable in the atmosphere, exceeded the limit of quantification of the method. The relative percentages of the three cannabinoids in general reproduced those typical of the Cannabis sativa plant and were very different from those found in human blood, urine and sweat.

  7. SOFIA, an airborne observatory for infrared astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, Alfred; Mehlert, Dörte; Röser, Hans-Peter; Scorza, Cecilia

    2013-11-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a joint US/German project operating a 2.7 m infrared airborne telescope onboard a modified Boeing 747-SP in the stratosphere at altitudes up to 13.7 km. SOFIA covers a spectral range from 0.3 µm to 1.6 mm, with an average atmospheric transmission greater than 80%. After successfully completing its commissioning, SOFIA commenced regular astronomical observation in spring 2013, and will ramp up to more than one hundred 8 to 10 h flights per year by 2015. The observatory is expected to operate until the mid 2030s. SOFIA's initial complement of seven focal plane instruments includes broadband imagers, moderate-resolution spectrographs and high-resolution spectrometers. SOFIA also includes an elaborate program for Education and Public Outreach. We describe the SOFIA facility together with its first light instrumentation and include some of its first scientific results. In addition, the education and public outreach program is presented.

  8. Collaboration Portals for NASA's Airborne Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conover, Helen; Kulkami, Ajinkya; Garrett, Michele; Goodman, Michael; Peterson, Walter Arthur; Drewry, Marilyn; Hardin, Danny M.; He, Matt

    2011-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), in collaboration with the Global Hydrology Resource Center, a NASA Earth Science Data Center, has provided information management for a number of NASA Airborne Field campaigns, both hurricane science investigations and satellite instrument validation. Effective field campaign management requires communication and coordination tools, including utilities for personnel to upload and share flight plans, weather forecasts, a variety of mission reports, preliminary science data, and personal photos. Beginning with the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) hurricane field campaign in 2010, we have provided these capabilities via a Drupal-based collaboration portal. This portal was reused and modified for the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), part of the Global Precipitation Measurement mission ground validation program. An end goal of these development efforts is the creation of a Drupal profile for field campaign management. This presentation will discuss experiences with Drupal in developing and using these collaboration portals. Topics will include Drupal modules used, advantages and disadvantages of working with Drupal in this context, and how the science teams used the portals in comparison with other communication and collaboration tools.

  9. Separability of agricultural crops with airborne scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, N. C.

    1983-01-01

    Backscattering measurements were acquired with airborne scatterometers over a site in Cass County, North Dakota on four days in the 1981 crop growing season. Data were acquired at three frequencies (L-, C- and Ku-bands), two polarizations (like and cross) and ten incidence angles (5 degrees to 50 degrees in 5 degree steps). Crop separability is studied in an hierarchical fashion. A two-class separability measure is defined, which compares within-class to between-class variability, to determine crop separability. The scatterometer channels with the best potential for crop separability are determined, based on this separability measure. Higher frequencies are more useful for discriminating small grains, while lower frequencies tend to separate non-small grains better. Some crops are more separable when row direction is taken into account. The effect of pixel purity is to increase the separability between all crops while not changing the order of useful scatterometer channels. Crude estimates of separability errors are calculated based on these analyses. These results are useful in selecting the parameters of active microwave systems in agricultural remote sensing.

  10. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Moninger, William R.; Mamrosh, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an overview of the Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) project, giving some history on the project, various applications of the atmospheric data, and future ideas and plans. As part of NASA's Aviation Safety and Security Program, the TAMDAR project developed a small low-cost sensor that collects useful meteorological data and makes them available in near real time to improve weather forecasts. This activity has been a joint effort with FAA, NOAA, universities, and industry. A tri-agency team collaborated by developing a concept of operations, determining the sensor specifications, and evaluating sensor performance as reported by Moosakhanian et. al. (2006). Under contract with Georgia Tech Research Institute, NASA worked with AirDat of Raleigh, NC to develop the sensor. The sensor is capable of measuring temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and icing. It can compute pressure altitude, indicated and true air speed, ice accretion rate, wind speed and direction, peak and average turbulence, and eddy dissipation rate. The overall development process, sensor capabilities, and performance based on ground and flight tests is reported by Daniels (2002), Daniels et. al. (2004) and by Tsoucalas et. al. (2006). An in-service evaluation of the sensor was performed called the Great Lakes Fleet Experiment (GLFE), first reported by Moninger et. al. (2004) and Mamrosh et. al. (2005). In this experiment, a Mesaba Airlines fleet was equipped to collect meteorological data over the Great Lakes region during normal revenue-producing flights.

  11. A multiprocessor airborne lidar data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. W.; Bailey, S. A.; Heath, G. E.; Piazza, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A new multiprocessor data acquisition system was developed for the existing Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL). This implementation simultaneously utilizes five single board 68010 microcomputers, the UNIX system V operating system, and the real time executive VRTX. The original data acquisition system was implemented on a Hewlett Packard HP 21-MX 16 bit minicomputer using a multi-tasking real time operating system and a mixture of assembly and FORTRAN languages. The present collection of data sources produce data at widely varied rates and require varied amounts of burdensome real time processing and formatting. It was decided to replace the aging HP 21-MX minicomputer with a multiprocessor system. A new and flexible recording format was devised and implemented to accommodate the constantly changing sensor configuration. A central feature of this data system is the minimization of non-remote sensing bus traffic. Therefore, it is highly desirable that each micro be capable of functioning as much as possible on-card or via private peripherals. The bus is used primarily for the transfer of remote sensing data to or from the buffer queue.

  12. Helicopter Airborne Laser Positioning System (HALPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppel, Joseph C.; Christiansen, Howard; Cross, Jeffrey; Totah, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The theory of operation, configuration, laboratory, and ground test results obtained with a helicopter airborne laser positioning system developed by Princeton University is presented. Unfortunately, due to time constraints, flight data could not be completed for presentation at this time. The system measures the relative position between two aircraft in three dimensions using two orthogonal fan-shaped laser beams sweeping across an array of four detectors. Specifically, the system calculates the relative range, elevation, and azimuth between an observation aircraft and a test helicopter with a high degree of accuracy. The detector array provides a wide field of view in the presence of solar interference due to compound parabolic concentrators and spectral filtering of the detector pulses. The detected pulses and their associated time delays are processed by the electronics and are sent as position errors to the helicopter pilot who repositions the aircraft as part of the closed loop system. Accuracies obtained in the laboratory at a range of 80 ft in the absence of sunlight were + or - 1 deg in elevation; +0.5 to -1.5 deg in azimuth; +0.5 to -1.0 ft in range; while elevation varied from 0 to +28 deg and the azimuth varied from 0 to + or - 45 deg. Accuracies in sunlight were approximately 40 deg (+ or - 20 deg) in direct sunlight.

  13. Airborne intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Torres, Arnold L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during missions flown in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system and two chemiluminescence instruments (CL). NO mixing ratios from below 5 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) to greater than 100 pptv were reported, with the majority less than 20 pptv. Good correlation was observed between the measurements reported by the CL and LIF techniques. The general level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements obtained during the two missions provides the basis from which one can conclude that equally 'valid' measurements of background levels of NO can be expected from either CL or LIF instruments. At the same time the periods of disagreement that were observed between the CL and LIF instruments as well as between the two CL instruments highlight the difficulty of obtaining reliable measurements with NO mixing ratios in the 5-20 pptv range and emphasize the vigilance that should be maintained in future NO measurements.

  14. ARIES: NASA Langley's Airborne Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wusk, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    In 1994, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) acquired a B-757-200 aircraft to replace the aging B-737 Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The TSRV was a modified B-737-100, which served as a trailblazer in the development of glass cockpit technologies and other innovative aeronautical concepts. The mission for the B-757 is to continue the three-decade tradition of civil transport technology research begun by the TSRV. Since its arrival at Langley, this standard 757 aircraft has undergone extensive modifications to transform it into an aeronautical research "flying laboratory". With this transformation, the aircraft, which has been designated Airborne Research Integrated Experiments System (ARIES), has become a unique national asset which will continue to benefit the U.S. aviation industry and commercial airline customers for many generations to come. This paper will discuss the evolution of the modifications, detail the current capabilities of the research systems, and provide an overview of the research contributions already achieved.

  15. Diversity and seasonal dynamics of airborne archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Ruzene Nespoli, C.; Pickersgill, D. A.; Galand, P. E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Nunes, T.; Gomes Cardoso, J.; Almeida, S. M.; Pio, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Conrad, R.; Pöschl, U.; Després, V. R.

    2014-11-01

    Archaea are widespread and abundant in many terrestrial and aquatic environments, and are thus outside extreme environments, accounting for up to ~10% of the prokaryotes. Compared to bacteria and other microorganisms, however, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and dispersal of archaea in the atmosphere. By means of DNA analysis and Sanger sequencing targeting the 16S rRNA (435 sequences) and amoA genes in samples of air particulate matter collected over 1 year at a continental sampling site in Germany, we obtained first insights into the seasonal dynamics of airborne archaea. The detected archaea were identified as Thaumarchaeota or Euryarchaeota, with soil Thaumarchaeota (group I.1b) being present in all samples. The normalized species richness of Thaumarchaeota correlated positively with relative humidity and negatively with temperature. This together with an increase in bare agricultural soil surfaces may explain the diversity peaks observed in fall and winter. The detected Euryarchaeota were mainly predicted methanogens with a low relative frequency of occurrence. A slight increase in their frequency during spring may be linked to fertilization processes in the surrounding agricultural fields. Comparison with samples from the Cape Verde islands (72 sequences) and from other coastal and continental sites indicates that the proportions of Euryarchaeota are enhanced in coastal air, which is consistent with their suggested abundance in marine surface waters. We conclude that air transport may play an important role in the dispersal of archaea, including assumed ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota and methanogens.

  16. Ion-Beam Analysis of Airborne Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Charles; Gleason, Colin; Schuff, Katie; Battaglia, Maria; Moore, Robert; Turley, Colin; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2010-11-01

    An undergraduate laboratory research program in ion-beam analysis (IBA) of atmospheric aerosols is being developed to study pollution in the Capitol District and Adirondack Mountains of New York. The IBA techniques applied in this project include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE), proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), Rutherford backscattering (RBS), and proton elastic scattering analysis (PESA). These methods are well suited for studying air pollution because they are quick, non-destructive, require little to no sample preparation, and capable of investigating microscopic samples. While PIXE spectrometry is used to analyze most elements from silicon to uranium, the other techniques are being applied to measure some of the remaining elements and complement PIXE in the study of aerosols. The airborne particulate matter is collected using nine-stage cascade impactors that separate the particles according to size and the samples are bombarded with proton beams from the Union College 1.1-MV Pelletron Accelerator. The reaction products are measured with SDD X-ray, Ge gamma-ray, and Si surface barrier charged particle detectors. Here we report on the progress we have made on the PIGE, RBS, and PESA analysis of aerosol samples.

  17. Airborne EM for mine infrastructure planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijns, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys with near-surface vertical resolution provide rapid and comprehensive coverage of a mine site ahead of infrastructure planning. In environments of sufficient electrical conductivity contrast, the data will map variations in the depth to bedrock, providing guidance for expected excavation depths for solid building foundations, or mine pre-strip volumes. Continuous coverage overcomes the severe areal limitation of relying only on drilling and test pits. An AEM survey in northern Finland illustrates the success of this approach for guiding the placement of a mine crusher and related infrastructure. The cost of the EM data collection and interpretation is insignificant in comparison to the US$300 million capital cost of the mine infrastructure. This environment of shallow glacial cover challenges the limits of AEM resolution, yet analysis of subsequently collected three-dimensional (3D) surface seismic data and actual pre-strip excavation depths reinforces the predictive, but qualitative, mapping capability of the AEM. It also highlights the need to tune the modelling via petrophysics for the specific goal of the investigation, and exposes the limitations of visual drill core logging.

  18. Advanced airborne ISR demonstration system (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Daniel J.

    2005-05-01

    Recon/Optical, Inc. (ROI) is developing an advanced airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) demonstration system based upon the proven ROI technology used in the SHAred Reconnaissance Pod (SHARP) for the U.S. Navy F/A-18. The demonstration system, which includes several state-of-the-art technology enhancements for next-generation ISR, is scheduled for flight testing in the summer of 2005. The demonstration system contains a variant of the SHARP medium altitude CA-270 camera, comprising an inertially stabilized Visible/NIR 5Kx5K imager and MWIR 2Kx2K imager to provide simultaneous high resolution/wide area coverage dual-band operation. The imager has been upgraded to incorporate a LN-100G GPS/INS within the sensor passive isolation loop to improve the accuracy of the NITF image metadata. The Image Processor is also based upon the SHARP configuration, but the demo system contains several enhancements including increased image processing horsepower, Ethernet-based Command & Control, next-generation JPEG2000 image compression, JPEG2000 Interactive Protocol (JPIP) network data server/client architecture, bi-directional RF datalink, advanced image dissemination/exploitation, and optical Fibrechannel I/O to the solid state recorder. This paper describes the ISR demonstration system and identifies the new network centric CONOPS made possible by the technology enhancements.

  19. Turbulence control on an airborne laser platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gad-El-hak, Mohamed

    1987-01-01

    An active flow control device to generate large-scale, periodic structures in a turbulent shear flow is developed. Together with adaptive optics, the device may be used on airborne laser platforms to reduce or eliminate optical distortion caused by the turbulence in the aircraft's boundary layer. A cyclic jet issuing from a spanwise slot is used to collect the turbulent boundary layer for a finite time and then release all of the flow instantaneously in one large eddy that convects downstream. Flow visualization and hot-film probe measurements are used together with pattern recognition algorithms to demonstrate the viability of the flow control method. A flat plate towed in a water channel is used as a test bed. The instantaneous velocity signal is used to compute important statistical quantities of the random velocity field, such as the mean, the root-mean-square, the spectral distribution, and the probability density function. When optimized for a given boundary layer, it is shown that the cyclic jet will produce periodic structures that are similar to the random, naturally occurring ones. These structures seem to trigger the onset of bursting events near the wall of the plate. Thus, the present device generates periodic structures in both the outer and inner regions of a turbulent boundary layer.

  20. Airborne chemistry: acoustic levitation in chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Nilsson, Staffan

    2004-04-01

    This review with 60 references describes a unique path to miniaturisation, that is, the use of acoustic levitation in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry applications. Levitation of small volumes of sample by means of a levitation technique can be used as a way to avoid solid walls around the sample, thus circumventing the main problem of miniaturisation, the unfavourable surface-to-volume ratio. Different techniques for sample levitation have been developed and improved. Of the levitation techniques described, acoustic or ultrasonic levitation fulfils all requirements for analytical chemistry applications. This technique has previously been used to study properties of molten materials and the equilibrium shape()and stability of liquid drops. Temperature and mass transfer in levitated drops have also been described, as have crystallisation and microgravity applications. The airborne analytical system described here is equipped with different and exchangeable remote detection systems. The levitated drops are normally in the 100 nL-2 microL volume range and additions to the levitated drop can be made in the pL-volume range. The use of levitated drops in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry offers several benefits. Several remote detection systems are compatible with acoustic levitation, including fluorescence imaging detection, right angle light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Applications include liquid/liquid extractions, solvent exchange, analyte enrichment, single-cell analysis, cell-cell communication studies, precipitation screening of proteins to establish nucleation conditions, and crystallisation of proteins and pharmaceuticals.

  1. Diversity and seasonal dynamics of airborne Archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Ruzene Nespoli, C.; Pickersgill, D. A.; Galand, P. E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Nunes, T.; Gomes Cardoso, J.; Marta Almeida, S.; Pio, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Conrad, R.; Pöschl, U.; Després, V. R.

    2014-05-01

    Archaea are widespread and abundant in many terrestrial and aquatic environments, accounting for up to ∼10% of the prokaryotes. Compared to Bacteria and other microorganisms, however, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and dispersal of Archaea in the atmosphere. By DNA analysis targeting the 16S rRNA and amoA genes in samples of air particulate matter collected over one year at a continental sampling site in Germany, we obtained first insights into the seasonal dynamics of airborne Archaea. The detected Archaea were identified as Thaumarchaeota or Euryarchaeota, with soil Thaumarchaeota (group I.1b) being present in all samples. The normalized species richness of Thaumarchaeota correlated positively with relative humidity and negatively with temperature. This together with an increase of bare agricultural soil surfaces may explain the diversity peaks observed in fall and winter. The detected Euryarchaeota were mainly methanogens with a low relative frequency of occurrence. A slight increase in their frequency during spring may be linked to fertilization processes in the surrounding agricultural fields. Comparison with samples from the Cape Verde islands and from other coastal and continental sites indicates that the proportions of Euryarchaeota are enhanced in coastal air, which is consistent with their suggested abundance in marine surface waters. We conclude that air transport may play an important role for the dispersal of Archaea, including ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota and methanogens. Also, anthropogenic activities might influence the atmospheric abundance and diversity of Archaea.

  2. Collaboration Portals for NASA's Airborne Field Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, H.; Kulkarni, A.; Garrett, M.; Goodman, M.; Petersen, W. A.; Drewry, M.; Hardin, D. M.; He, M.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), in collaboration with the Global Hydrology Resource Center, a NASA Earth Science Data Center, has provided information management for a number of NASA Airborne Field campaigns, both hurricane science investigations and satellite instrument validation. Effective field campaign management requires communication and coordination tools, including utilities for personnel to upload and share flight plans, weather forecasts, a variety of mission reports, preliminary science data, and personal photos. Beginning with the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) hurricane field campaign in 2010, we have provided these capabilities via a Drupal-based collaboration portal. This portal was reused and modified for the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), part of the Global Precipitation Measurement mission ground validation program. An end goal of these development efforts is the creation of a Drupal profile for field campaign management. This presentation will discuss experiences with Drupal in developing and using these collaboration portals. Topics will include Drupal modules used, advantages and disadvantages of working with Drupal in this context, and how the science teams used the portals in comparison with other communication and collaboration tools.

  3. An airborne intensive care facility (fixed wing).

    PubMed

    Gilligan, J E; Goon, P; Maughan, G; Griggs, W; Haslam, R; Scholten, A

    1996-04-01

    A fixed-wing aircraft (Beechcraft KingAir B200 C) fitted as an airborne intensive care facility is described. It completed 2000 missions from 1987-1992 for distances up to 1300 km. Features include: 1. Space for carriage of two stretchers, medical cabin crew of up to five persons and equipment and two-pilot operation if necessary. A third stretcher may be carried in emergencies. 2. Two CARDIOCAP (TM) fixed monitors for ECG, invasive and noninvasive pressures pulse oximetry and end-tidal C02 plus SIEMENS 630(TM)/PROPAQ(TM) compact monitors for the ground transport phase of missions, or the total duration. 3. A medical oxygen reservoir of 4650 litres sufficient for two patients on IPPV with FiO2 = 1.0 for a four-hour trip. The medical suction system is powered from the engine or a vacuum pump. 4. Other medical equipment and drugs in portable packs, for ground transport and resuscitation needs and for replenishment by nursing staff at the parent hospitals. 5. Stretchers compatible with helicopter and road ambulance vehicles used. 6. A stretcher loading device energized from the aircraft, operating through a wide (cargo) door. 7. Provision of 24Ov AC (alternating current) and 28v DC (direct current) electrical energy. 8. Pressurization and climate control. 9. Satisfactory aviation performance for conditions encountered, with single-pilot operation.

  4. Airborne biological particles and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benninghoff, William S.; Benninghoff, Anne S.

    1982-01-01

    In November and December 1977 at McMurdo Station in Antarctica we investigated the kinds, numbers, and deposition of airborne particles larger than 2 μm while measuring electric field gradient at 2.5 m above the ground. Elementary collecting devices were used: Staplex Hi-Volume and Roto-rod samplers, Tauber (static sedimentation) traps, petrolatum-coated microscope slides, and snow (melted and filtered). The electric fields were measured by a rotating dipole (Stanford Radioscience Laboratory field mill number 2). During periods of blowing snow and dust the electric field gradient was + 500 to + 2500 V/m, and Tauber traps with grounded covers collected 2 or more times as much snow and dust as the ones with ungrounded covers. During falling snow the electric field gradient was -1000 to -1500 V/m, and the ungrounded traps collected almost twice as much snow and dust as those grounded. These observations suggest that under the prevailing weather conditions in polar regions the probable net effect is deposition of greater quantities of dust, including diaspores and minute organisms, on wet, grounded surfaces. This hypothesis needs examination for its use in explanation of biological distribution patterns.

  5. Airborne infrared spectrophotometry of Mira variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.; Erickson, E. F.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    Airborne spectrophotometric observations of R Cas near minimum and maximum light, R Leo near minimum, and NML Tau near maximum are reported which were obtained over the wavelength range from 1.2 to 4 microns with 1.5% resolution. The spectral energy distributions of the three stars at the indicated times are presented, and it is shown that the H2O bands at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.7 microns are clearly evident in all the spectra, while the absorption bands of CO at about 1.6 and 2.3 microns are probably present although they are masked by the strong water vapor features. The results indicate that water vapor is the dominant opacity source in the atmospheres of Mira variables, that R Leo and NML Tau may be fitted well over the entire spectrum by respective single temperatures of 2250 and 1800 K, and that R Cas near both minimum and maximum cannot be adequately described by one temperature over the entire wavelength range investigated. The shapes and depths of the absorption bands are determined together with the apparent angular diameter of each star and the equivalent widths of the H2O + CO absorption bands. It is concluded that water vapor absorption is more strongly correlated with color temperature than with spectral type for R Cas and R Leo.

  6. Airborne LIDAR point cloud tower inclination judgment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    liang, Chen; zhengjun, Liu; jianguo, Qian

    2016-11-01

    Inclined transmission line towers for the safe operation of the line caused a great threat, how to effectively, quickly and accurately perform inclined judgment tower of power supply company safety and security of supply has played a key role. In recent years, with the development of unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with a laser scanner, GPS, inertial navigation is one of the high-precision 3D Remote Sensing System in the electricity sector more and more. By airborne radar scan point cloud to visually show the whole picture of the three-dimensional spatial information of the power line corridors, such as the line facilities and equipment, terrain and trees. Currently, LIDAR point cloud research in the field has not yet formed an algorithm to determine tower inclination, the paper through the existing power line corridor on the tower base extraction, through their own tower shape characteristic analysis, a vertical stratification the method of combining convex hull algorithm for point cloud tower scarce two cases using two different methods for the tower was Inclined to judge, and the results with high reliability.

  7. Improving network utilization over heterogeneous airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Peter H.; Rickenbach, Brent L.; Rush, Jason A.

    2011-06-01

    Existing and future military networks vary widely in bandwidth and other network characteristics, potentially challenging deployment of services and applications across heterogeneous data links. To address this challenge, General Dynamics and Naval Research Laboratory created network services to allow applications to use wireless data links more efficiently. The basis for the network services are hooks into the data links and transport protocols providing status about the airborne networking environment. The network service can monitor heterogeneous data links on a platform and report on link availability and parameters such as latency and bandwidth. The network service then presents the network characteristics to other services and applications. These services and applications are then able to tune parameters and content based on network parameters. The technology has been demonstrated in several live-flight experiments sponsored by the United States Air Force and United States Navy. The technology was housed on several aircraft with a variety of data links ranging from directional, high-bandwidth systems to omnidirectional, medium-bandwidth systems to stable but low-bandwidth satellite systems. In each of these experiments, image and video data was successfully delivered over tactical data links that varied greatly in bandwidth and delay.

  8. Multifunction multiband airborne radio architecture study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. N.; Ogi, S. K.; Huang, M. Y.; Bodnar, L. L.; Martin, P.

    1982-01-01

    The demands of modern military avionic communication, radio navigation, and cooperative identification (CNI) equipment has been greatly expanded as the result of the need for antijam (AJ), low probability of intercept (LPI), higher navigation accuracy, and increased volume of information transfer. These demands are verified in programs such as GPS, JTIDS, SEEK TALK, SINCGARS and AFSAT I and II. The cost of this additional capability has severely hampered the ability of the Government to procure new CNI systems and equipment with desired performance capabilities. The problem is further compounded by the lack of available space in the tactical aircraft, the transition of new equipment into the inventory, and the retention of many current systems. The multifunction multiband airborne radio system (MFBARS) program is formulated to explore the feasibility of producing a modern CNI system at an affordable life cycle cost (LCC) and within real estate requirements. A cost effective system approach was developed that revolved around high technology RF-LSI analog components that are in the development stage, high speed digital pre-processor elements and a programmable signal processor all under control of a host processor configuration. This design trades the ultimate gain in volume, weight and life cycle cost against a reasonable risk for the mid 1980's development.

  9. ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements

    DOE Data Explorer

    Biraud, Sebastien

    2013-03-26

    The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

  10. Battlefield connectivity via airborne communications nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niessen, Charles W.

    1997-06-01

    Communications are essential to support today's information- rich tactics with distributed forces in a non-linear battlespace. Rapid deployment requirements and limited air/sea lift capability makes it difficult to transport and emplace communications infrastructure equipment in a timely manner. Furthermore, mobile forces quickly out-run fixed communications infrastructure and lose contact with command, support, and intelligence sources. What is needed is a reliable, easily deployed theater-wide communications network to provide the connectivity to separated forces; a mechanism for supplying this is a network of airborne communications nodes. A UAV flying at high altitude (65,000 ft) can provide line of sight connectivity (at up to 150 mi radius) between users that are not within line of sight of each other, and could relay communications through ground or on-board satellite gateways to provide world-wide connectivity. Since a high-altitude, long-endurance UAV (such as the Global Hawk) self-deploys from a great distance, there is no local infrastructure burden to provide this capability. Furthermore, since the range to the ground is relatively short, communications links can be established with even hand-held, low-power radios; heavy ground communications gear is not needed. This paper explores the utility of the UAV communication node concept, discussing applications, capabilities, and networking possibilities. In particular, UAVs, other aircraft, and selected ground sites could provide a backbone network for data communications on a 'warfighter's Internet.'

  11. A multiprocessor airborne lidar data system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, C. W.; Bailey, S. A.; Heath, G. E.; Piazza, C. R.

    A new multiprocessor data acquisition system was developed for the existing Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL). This implementation simultaneously utilizes five single board 68010 microcomputers, the UNIX system V operating system, and the real time executive VRTX. The original data acquisition system was implemented on a Hewlett Packard HP 21-MX 16 bit minicomputer using a multi-tasking real time operating system and a mixture of assembly and FORTRAN languages. The present collection of data sources produce data at widely varied rates and require varied amounts of burdensome real time processing and formatting. It was decided to replace the aging HP 21-MX minicomputer with a multiprocessor system. A new and flexible recording format was devised and implemented to accommodate the constantly changing sensor configuration. A central feature of this data system is the minimization of non-remote sensing bus traffic. Therefore, it is highly desirable that each micro be capable of functioning as much as possible on-card or via private peripherals. The bus is used primarily for the transfer of remote sensing data to or from the buffer queue.

  12. An airborne icing characterization probe: nephelometer prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, S.

    2007-10-01

    The aeronautical industry uses airborne probes to characterize icing conditions for flight certification purposes by counting and sizing cloud droplets. Existing probes have been developed for meteorologists in order to study cloud microphysics. They are used on specific aircraft, instrumented for this type of study, but are not adapted for an industrial flight test environment. The development by Airbus of a new probe giving a real time response for particle sizes between 10 and 500 µm, adapted to operational requirements, is in progress. An optical principle by coherent shadowgraphy with a low coherency point source is used for the application. The size of the droplets is measured from their shadows on a CCD. A pulsed laser coupled to a fast camera freezes the movement. Usually, image processing rejects out-of-focus objects. Here, particles far from the focal plane can be sized because of the large depth of field due to the point source. The technique used increases the depth of field and the sampled volume is enough to build a histogram even for low droplet concentrations. Image processing is done in real time and results are provided to the flight test engineer. All data and images are recorded in order to allow on-ground complementary analysis if necessary. A non-telescopic prototype has been tested in a wind tunnel and in flight. The definitive probe being retractable is designed to be easily installed through a dummy window. Retracted, it will allow the aircraft to fly at VMO (maximum operating limit speed).

  13. Airborne and laboratory studies of interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Hudgins, D. M.; Witteborn, Fred C.

    1995-01-01

    A brief history of the observations which have led to the hypothesis that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) are the carriers of the widespread interstellar emission features near 3050, 1615, '1300' and 890 cm(exp -1) (3.29, 6.2, '7.7', and 11.2 mu m) is presented. The central role of airborne spectroscopy is stressed. The principal reason for the assignment to PAH's was the resemblance of the interstellar emission spectrum to the laboratory absorption spectra of PAH's and PAH-like materials. Since precious little information was available on the properties of PAH's in the forms that are thought to exist under interstellar conditions -isolated and ionized in the emission zones, with the smallest PAH's being dehydrogenated- there was a need for a spectral data base on PAH's taken in these states. Here, the relevant infrared spectroscopic properties of PAH's will be reviewed. These laboratory spectra show that relative band intensities are severely altered and that band frequencies shift. It is shown that these new data alleviate several of the spectroscopic criticisms previously leveled at the hypothesis.

  14. Airborne electromagnetic imaging of discontinuous permafrost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minsley, B.J.; Abraham, J.D.; Smith, B.D.; Cannia, J.C.; Voss, C.I.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Walvoord, M.A.; Wylie, B.K.; Anderson, L.; Ball, L.B.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Wellman, T.P.; Ager, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of permafrost in cold regions is inextricably connected to hydrogeologic processes, climate, and ecosystems. Permafrost thawing has been linked to changes in wetland and lake areas, alteration of the groundwater contribution to streamflow, carbon release, and increased fire frequency. But detailed knowledge about the dynamic state of permafrost in relation to surface and groundwater systems remains an enigma. Here, we present the results of a pioneering ∼1,800 line-kilometer airborne electromagnetic survey that shows sediments deposited over the past ∼4 million years and the configuration of permafrost to depths of ∼100 meters in the Yukon Flats area near Fort Yukon, Alaska. The Yukon Flats is near the boundary between continuous permafrost to the north and discontinuous permafrost to the south, making it an important location for examining permafrost dynamics. Our results not only provide a detailed snapshot of the present-day configuration of permafrost, but they also expose previously unseen details about potential surface – groundwater connections and the thermal legacy of surface water features that has been recorded in the permafrost over the past ∼1,000 years. This work will be a critical baseline for future permafrost studies aimed at exploring the connections between hydrogeologic, climatic, and ecological processes, and has significant implications for the stewardship of Arctic environments.

  15. Characterization of airborne bacteria at an underground subway station.

    PubMed

    Dybwad, Marius; Granum, Per Einar; Bruheim, Per; Blatny, Janet Martha

    2012-03-01

    The reliable detection of airborne biological threat agents depends on several factors, including the performance criteria of the detector and its operational environment. One step in improving the detector's performance is to increase our knowledge of the biological aerosol background in potential operational environments. Subway stations are enclosed public environments, which may be regarded as potential targets for incidents involving biological threat agents. In this study, the airborne bacterial community at a subway station in Norway was characterized (concentration level, diversity, and virulence- and survival-associated properties). In addition, a SASS 3100 high-volume air sampler and a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry-based isolate screening procedure was used for these studies. The daytime level of airborne bacteria at the station was higher than the nighttime and outdoor levels, and the relative bacterial spore number was higher in outdoor air than at the station. The bacterial content, particle concentration, and size distribution were stable within each environment throughout the study (May to September 2010). The majority of the airborne bacteria belonged to the genera Bacillus, Micrococcus, and Staphylococcus, but a total of 37 different genera were identified in the air. These results suggest that anthropogenic sources are major contributors to airborne bacteria at subway stations and that such airborne communities could harbor virulence- and survival-associated properties of potential relevance for biological detection and surveillance, as well as for public health. Our findings also contribute to the development of realistic testing and evaluation schemes for biological detection/surveillance systems by providing information that can be used to mimic real-life operational airborne environments in controlled aerosol test chambers.

  16. Characterization of Airborne Bacteria at an Underground Subway Station

    PubMed Central

    Dybwad, Marius; Granum, Per Einar; Bruheim, Per

    2012-01-01

    The reliable detection of airborne biological threat agents depends on several factors, including the performance criteria of the detector and its operational environment. One step in improving the detector's performance is to increase our knowledge of the biological aerosol background in potential operational environments. Subway stations are enclosed public environments, which may be regarded as potential targets for incidents involving biological threat agents. In this study, the airborne bacterial community at a subway station in Norway was characterized (concentration level, diversity, and virulence- and survival-associated properties). In addition, a SASS 3100 high-volume air sampler and a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry-based isolate screening procedure was used for these studies. The daytime level of airborne bacteria at the station was higher than the nighttime and outdoor levels, and the relative bacterial spore number was higher in outdoor air than at the station. The bacterial content, particle concentration, and size distribution were stable within each environment throughout the study (May to September 2010). The majority of the airborne bacteria belonged to the genera Bacillus, Micrococcus, and Staphylococcus, but a total of 37 different genera were identified in the air. These results suggest that anthropogenic sources are major contributors to airborne bacteria at subway stations and that such airborne communities could harbor virulence- and survival-associated properties of potential relevance for biological detection and surveillance, as well as for public health. Our findings also contribute to the development of realistic testing and evaluation schemes for biological detection/surveillance systems by providing information that can be used to mimic real-life operational airborne environments in controlled aerosol test chambers. PMID:22247150

  17. Characterizing string-of-pearls colloidal silica by multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography and comparison to multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, off-line multiangle static light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Amandaa K; Striegel, André M

    2011-04-15

    The string-of-pearls-type morphology is ubiquitous, manifesting itself variously in proteins, vesicles, bacteria, synthetic polymers, and biopolymers. Characterizing the size and shape of analytes with such morphology, however, presents a challenge, due chiefly to the ease with which the "strings" can be broken during chromatographic analysis or to the paucity of information obtained from the benchmark microscopy and off-line light scattering methods. Here, we address this challenge with multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC), which has the ability to determine, simultaneously, the size, shape, and compactness and their distributions of string-of-pearls samples. We present the quadruple-detector HDC analysis of colloidal string-of-pearls silica, employing static multiangle and quasielastic light scattering, differential viscometry, and differential refractometry as detection methods. The multidetector approach shows a sample that is broadly polydisperse in both molar mass and size, with strings ranging from two to five particles, but which also contains a high concentration of single, unattached "pearls". Synergistic combination of the various size parameters obtained from the multiplicity of detectors employed shows that the strings with higher degrees of polymerization have a shape similar to the theory-predicted shape of a Gaussian random coil chain of nonoverlapping beads, while the strings with lower degrees of polymerization have a prolate ellipsoidal shape. The HDC technique is contrasted experimentally with multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, where, even under extremely gentle conditions, the strings still degraded during analysis. Such degradation is shown to be absent in HDC, as evidenced by the fact that the molar mass and radius of gyration obtained by HDC with multiangle static light scattering detection (HDC/MALS) compare quite favorably to those determined by off-line MALS analysis under otherwise identical conditions. The

  18. Modelling the risk of airborne infectious disease using exhaled air.

    PubMed

    Issarow, Chacha M; Mulder, Nicola; Wood, Robin

    2015-05-07

    In this paper we develop and demonstrate a flexible mathematical model that predicts the risk of airborne infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis under steady state and non-steady state conditions by monitoring exhaled air by infectors in a confined space. In the development of this model, we used the rebreathed air accumulation rate concept to directly determine the average volume fraction of exhaled air in a given space. From a biological point of view, exhaled air by infectors contains airborne infectious particles that cause airborne infectious diseases such as tuberculosis in confined spaces. Since not all infectious particles can reach the target infection site, we took into account that the infectious particles that commence the infection are determined by respiratory deposition fraction, which is the probability of each infectious particle reaching the target infection site of the respiratory tracts and causing infection. Furthermore, we compute the quantity of carbon dioxide as a marker of exhaled air, which can be inhaled in the room with high likelihood of causing airborne infectious disease given the presence of infectors. We demonstrated mathematically and schematically the correlation between TB transmission probability and airborne infectious particle generation rate, ventilation rate, average volume fraction of exhaled air, TB prevalence and duration of exposure to infectors in a confined space.

  19. Airborne Emissions from Si/FeSi Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, Ida; Grådahl, Svend; Tranell, Gabriella

    2017-02-01

    The management of airborne emissions from silicon and ferrosilicon production is, in many ways, similar to the management of airborne emissions from other metallurgical industries, but certain challenges are highly branch-specific, for example the dust types generated and the management of NO X emissions by furnace design and operation. A major difficulty in the mission to reduce emissions is that information about emission types and sources as well as abatement and measurement methods is often scarce, incomplete and scattered. The sheer diversity and complexity of the subject presents a hurdle, especially for new professionals in the field. This article focuses on the airborne emissions from Si and FeSi production, including greenhouse gases, nitrogen oxides, airborne particulate matter also known as dust, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals. The aim is to summarize current knowledge in a state-of-the-art overview intended to introduce fresh industry engineers and academic researchers to the technological aspects relevant to the reduction of airborne emissions.

  20. Biophysical influence of airborne carbon nanomaterials on natural pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Valle, Russell P; Wu, Tony; Zuo, Yi Y

    2015-05-26

    Inhalation of nanoparticles (NP), including lightweight airborne carbonaceous nanomaterials (CNM), poses a direct and systemic health threat to those who handle them. Inhaled NP penetrate deep pulmonary structures in which they first interact with the pulmonary surfactant (PS) lining at the alveolar air-water interface. In spite of many research efforts, there is a gap of knowledge between in vitro biophysical study and in vivo inhalation toxicology since all existing biophysical models handle NP-PS interactions in the liquid phase. This technical limitation, inherent in current in vitro methodologies, makes it impossible to simulate how airborne NP deposit at the PS film and interact with it. Existing in vitro NP-PS studies using liquid-suspended particles have been shown to artificially inflate the no-observed adverse effect level of NP exposure when compared to in vivo inhalation studies and international occupational exposure limits (OELs). Here, we developed an in vitro methodology called the constrained drop surfactometer (CDS) to quantitatively study PS inhibition by airborne CNM. We show that airborne multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets induce a concentration-dependent PS inhibition under physiologically relevant conditions. The CNM aerosol concentrations controlled in the CDS are comparable to those defined in international OELs. Development of the CDS has the potential to advance our understanding of how submicron airborne nanomaterials affect the PS lining of the lung.

  1. Airborne Gravity Data Enhances NGS Experimental Gravimetric Geoid in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, S. A.; Childers, V. A.; Li, X.; Roman, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Geodetic Survey [NGS], through their Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum [GRAV-D] program, continues to update its gravimetry holdings by flying new airborne gravity surveys over a large fraction of the USA and its territories. By 2022, NGS intends that all orthometric heights in the USA will be determined in the field by using a reliable national gravimetric geoid model to transform from geodetic heights obtained from GPS. Several airborne campaigns have already been flown over Alaska and its coastline. Some of this Alaskan coastal data have been incorporated into a new NGS experimental geoid model - xGEOID14. The xGEOID14 model is the first in a series of annual experimental geoid models that will incorporate NGS GRAV-D airborne data. This series provides a useful benchmark for assessing and improving current techniques by which the airborne and land-survey data are filtered and cleaned, and then combined with satellite gravity models, elevation data (etc.) with the ultimate aim of computing a geoid model that can support a national physical height system by 2022. Here we will examine the NGS GRAV-D airborne data in Alaska, and assess its contribution to xGEOID14. Future prospects for xGEOID15 will also be considered.

  2. An integrated compact airborne multispectral imaging system using embedded computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuedong; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xuguo

    2015-08-01

    An integrated compact airborne multispectral imaging system using embedded computer based control system was developed for small aircraft multispectral imaging application. The multispectral imaging system integrates CMOS camera, filter wheel with eight filters, two-axis stabilized platform, miniature POS (position and orientation system) and embedded computer. The embedded computer has excellent universality and expansibility, and has advantages in volume and weight for airborne platform, so it can meet the requirements of control system of the integrated airborne multispectral imaging system. The embedded computer controls the camera parameters setting, filter wheel and stabilized platform working, image and POS data acquisition, and stores the image and data. The airborne multispectral imaging system can connect peripheral device use the ports of the embedded computer, so the system operation and the stored image data management are easy. This airborne multispectral imaging system has advantages of small volume, multi-function, and good expansibility. The imaging experiment results show that this system has potential for multispectral remote sensing in applications such as resource investigation and environmental monitoring.

  3. Characteristics of airborne bacteria in Mumbai urban environment.

    PubMed

    Gangamma, S

    2014-08-01

    Components of biological origin constitute small but a significant proportion of the ambient airborne particulate matter (PM). However, their diversity and role in proinflammatory responses of PM are not well understood. The present study characterizes airborne bacterial species diversity in Mumbai City and elucidates the role of bacterial endotoxin in PM induced proinflammatory response in ex vivo. Airborne bacteria and endotoxin samples were collected during April-May 2010 in Mumbai using six stage microbial impactor and biosampler. The culturable bacterial species concentration was measured and factors influencing the composition were identified by principal component analysis (PCA). The biosampler samples were used to stimulate immune cells in whole blood assay. A total of 28 species belonging to 17 genera were identified. Gram positive and spore forming groups of bacteria dominated the airborne culturable bacterial concentration. The study indicated the dominance of spore forming and human or animal flora derived pathogenic/opportunistic bacteria in the ambient air environment. Pathogenic and opportunistic species of bacteria were also present in the samples. TNF-α induction by PM was reduced (35%) by polymyxin B pretreatment and this result was corroborated with the results of blocking endotoxin receptor cluster differentiation (CD14). The study highlights the importance of airborne biological particles and suggests need of further studies on biological characterization of ambient PM.

  4. Airborne soil particulates as vehicles for Salmonella contamination of tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Govindaraj Dev; Williams, Robert C; Al Qublan, Hamzeh M; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyer, Renee R; Eifert, Joseph D

    2017-02-21

    The presence of dust is ubiquitous in the produce growing environment and its deposition on edible crops could occur. The potential of wind-distributed soil particulate to serve as a vehicle for S. Newport transfer to tomato blossoms and consequently, to fruits, was explored. Blossoms were challenged with previously autoclaved soil containing S. Newport (9.39log CFU/g) by brushing and airborne transfer. One hundred percent of blossoms brushed with S. Newport-contaminated soil tested positive for presence of the pathogen one week after contact (P<0.0001). Compressed air was used to simulate wind currents and direct soil particulates towards blossoms. Airborne soil particulates resulted in contamination of 29% of the blossoms with S. Newport one week after contact. Biophotonic imaging of blossoms post-contact with bioluminescent S. Newport-contaminated airborne soil particulates revealed transfer of the pathogen on petal, stamen and pedicel structures. Both fruits and calyxes that developed from blossoms contaminated with airborne soil particulates were positive for presence of S. Newport in both fruit (66.6%) and calyx (77.7%). Presence of S. Newport in surface-sterilized fruit and calyx tissue tested indicated internalization of the pathogen. These results show that airborne soil particulates could serve as a vehicle for Salmonella. Hence, Salmonella contaminated dust and soil particulate dispersion could contribute to pathogen contamination of fruit, indicating an omnipresent yet relatively unexplored contamination route.

  5. Validation of Airborne CO2 Laser Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Kooi, S.; Fenn, M. A.; Choi, Y.; Vay, S. A.; Harrison, F. W.; Moore, B.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses the flight test validation of a unique, multi-frequency, intensity-modulated, single-beam laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) that operates near 1.57 μm for remote column CO2 measurements. This laser system is under development for a future space-based mission to determine the global distribution of regional-scale CO2 sources and sinks, which is the objective of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions during Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. A prototype of this LAS system, called the Multi-frequency Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), was developed by ITT, and it has been flight tested in nine airborne campaigns since May 2005. This paper focuses on the most recent results obtained over the last two years of flight-testing where the MFLL remote CO2 column measurements were evaluated against airborne in situ CO2 profile measurements traceable to World Meteorological Organization standards. A comprehensive multiple-aircraft flight test program was conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia in July-August 2009. The MFLL obtained surface reflectance and average CO2 column variations along the 50-km flight legs over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility (CF) in Lamont, Oklahoma; over rural Virginia and North Carolina; and over the Chesapeake Bay. For a flight altitude of 4.6 km, the average signal to noise ratio (SNR) for a 1-s CO2 column measurement was found to be 760, which is the equivalent of a CO2 mixing ratio precision of 0.60 ppmv, and for a 10-s average the SNR was found to be 2002 or 0.20 ppmv. Absolute comparisons of MFLL-derived and in situ-derived CO2 column measurements were made for all daytime flights conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia with an average agreement to within 0.32 ppmv. A major ASCENDS flight test campaign was conducted using the NASA DC-8 during 6-18 July 2010. The MFLL system and associated in situ CO2 instrumentation were operated on DC-8 flights over the Central Valley

  6. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  7. Airborne Lidar Point Cloud Density Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, P. T.; Huang, C.-M.

    2006-12-01

    Airborne lidar is useful for collecting a large volume and high density of points with three dimensional coordinates. Among these points are terrain points, as well as those points located aboveground. For DEM production, the density of the terrain points is an important quality index. While the penetration rate of laser points is dependent on the surface type characteristics, there are also different ways to present the point density. Namely, the point density could be measured by subdividing the surveyed area into cells, then computing the ratio of the number of points in each respective cell to its area. In this case, there will be one density value for each cell. The other method is to construct the TIN, and count the number of triangles in the cell, divided by the area of the cell. Aside from counting the number of triangles, the area of the largest, or the 95% ranking, triangle, could be used as an index as well. The TIN could also be replaced by Voronoi diagrams (Thiessen Polygon), and a polygon with even density could be derived from human interpretation. The nature of these indices is discussed later in this research paper. Examples of different land cover types: bare earth, built-up, low vegetation, low density forest, and high density forest; are extracted from point clouds collected in 2005 by ITRI under a contract from the Ministry of the Interior. It is found that all these indices are capable of reflecting the differences of the land cover type. However, further investigation is necessary to determine which the most descriptive one is.

  8. Development of a new airborne humidigraph system.

    SciTech Connect

    Pekour, Mikhail S.; Schmid, Beat; Chand, Duli; Hubbe, John M.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Nelson, Danny A.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2012-12-06

    Modeling and measurements of aerosol properties is complicated by the hygroscopic behavior of the aerosols adding significant uncertainty to our best estimates of the direct effect aerosols exert on the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Airborne measurements of aerosol hygroscopicity are particularly challenging but critically needed. This motivated the development of a newly designed system which can measure the dependence of the aerosol light scattering coefficient (σsp) on relative humidity (RH), known as f(RH), in real-time at a rapid rate (<10 s) on an aerial platform. The new system has several advantages over existing systems. It consists of three integrating nephelometers and humidity conditioners for simultaneous measurement of the σsp at three different RHs. The humidity is directly controlled in exchanger cells without significant temperature disturbances and without particle dilution, heating or loss of volatile compounds. The single-wavelength nephelometers are illuminated by LED-based light sources thereby minimizing heating of the sample stream. The flexible design of the RH conditioners, consisting of a number of specially designed exchanger cells (driers or humidifiers), enables us to measure f(RH) under hydration or dehydration conditions (always starting with the aerosol in a known state) with a simple system re-configuration. These exchanger cells have been characterized for losses of particles using latex spheres and laboratory generated ammonium sulfate aerosols. Residence times of 6 - 9 s in the exchangers and subsequent lines is sufficient for most aerosols to attain equilibrium with the new water vapor content. The performance of this system has been assessed aboard DOE’s G-1 research aircraft during test flights over California, Oregon, and Washington.

  9. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  10. Planar electrostatic gradiometer for airborne geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Lebat, V.; Boulanger, D.

    2011-12-01

    The knowledge of the gravity field of the Earth has been considerably improved for the last decades, thanks to satellites, in particular, both for gravity measurements and positioning. Gravity, and especially gravity gradiometry data are then of great interest to the study of the structure of the continental margins. Space gravity measurements, in particular with the GOCE satellite in orbit since 2009, provide an absolute gravity reference and should contribute to estimate the systematic effects that would affect the surface datasets. But the spatial resolution of those data essentially addresses the large and medium wavelengths of the field (down to a resolution of 90km) and it is therefore essential to complete them at the shorter wavelengths in particular in the littoral area. To this aim, gravity gradiometry systems may be particularly suitable by covering the land/sea transition zone with a uniform precision, and a spatial resolution higher than from gravimetry. The GREMLIT instrument is taking advantage of technologies, formerly developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions, by adapting them to an airborne environment, using a planar configuration for the gradiometer and designing and building a dedicated stabilized platform controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself similarly to the drag free control of the GOCE satellite. The mains interests of the planar configuration are: - its definition, optimized for levitation in the Earth's gravity field ; - its intrinsic linearity, which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth ; - its compactness, ensuring an excellent dimensional stability, a better thermal homogeneity and making the realization of the decoupling platform easier. The performance objective is 0.1 Eötvös. This lowered performance level with respect to a one hundred times better GOCE-type instrument, takes into account the difficulty of measurements

  11. Trajectory association across multiple airborne cameras.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Yaser Ajmal; Shah, Mubarak

    2008-02-01

    A camera mounted on an aerial vehicle provides an excellent means for monitoring large areas of a scene. Utilizing several such cameras on different aerial vehicles allows further flexibility, in terms of increased visual scope and in the pursuit of multiple targets. In this paper, we address the problem of associating objects across multiple airborne cameras. Since the cameras are moving and often widely separated, direct appearance-based or proximity-based constraints cannot be used. Instead, we exploit geometric constraints on the relationship between the motion of each object across cameras, to test multiple association hypotheses, without assuming any prior calibration information. Given our scene model, we propose a likelihood function for evaluating a hypothesized association between observations in multiple cameras that is geometrically motivated. Since multiple cameras exist, ensuring coherency in association is an essential requirement, e.g. that transitive closure is maintained between more than two cameras. To ensure such coherency we pose the problem of maximizing the likelihood function as a k-dimensional matching and use an approximation to find the optimal assignment of association. Using the proposed error function, canonical trajectories of each object and optimal estimates of inter-camera transformations (in a maximum likelihood sense) are computed. Finally, we show that as a result of associating objects across the cameras, a concurrent visualization of multiple aerial video streams is possible and that, under special conditions, trajectories interrupted due to occlusion or missing detections can be repaired. Results are shown on a number of real and controlled scenarios with multiple objects observed by multiple cameras, validating our qualitative models, and through simulation quantitative performance is also reported.

  12. Sensor fusion for airborne landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Miranda A.; Gader, Paul D.; Bolton, Jeremy; Zare, Alina; Mendez-Vasquez, Andres

    2006-05-01

    Sensor fusion has become a vital research area for mine detection because of the countermine community's conclusion that no single sensor is capable of detecting mines at the necessary detection and false alarm rates over a wide variety of operating conditions. The U. S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) evaluates sensors and algorithms for use in a multi-sensor multi-platform airborne detection modality. A large dataset of hyperspectral and radar imagery exists from the four major data collections performed at U. S. Army temperate and arid testing facilities in Autumn 2002, Spring 2003, Summer 2004, and Summer 2005. There are a number of algorithm developers working on single-sensor algorithms in order to optimize feature and classifier selection for that sensor type. However, a given sensor/algorithm system has an absolute limitation based on the physical phenomena that system is capable of sensing. Therefore, we perform decision-level fusion of the outputs from single-channel algorithms and we choose to combine systems whose information is complementary across operating conditions. That way, the final fused system will be robust to a variety of conditions, which is a critical property of a countermine detection system. In this paper, we present the analysis of fusion algorithms on data from a sensor suite consisting of high frequency radar imagery combined with hyperspectral long-wave infrared sensor imagery. The main type of fusion being considered is Choquet integral fusion. We evaluate performance achieved using the Choquet integral method for sensor fusion versus Boolean and soft "and," "or," mean, or majority voting.

  13. Airborne asbestos fibres monitoring in tunnel excavation.

    PubMed

    Gaggero, Laura; Sanguineti, Elisa; Yus González, Adrián; Militello, Gaia Maria; Scuderi, Alberto; Parisi, Giovanni

    2017-04-03

    Tunnelling across ophiolitic formation with Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) can release fibres into the environment, exposing workers, and the population, if fibres spread outside the tunnel, leading to increased risk of developing asbestos-related disease. Therefore, a careful plan of environmental monitoring is carried out during Terzo Valico tunnel excavation. In the present study, data of 1571 samples of airborne dust, collected between 2014 and 2016 inside the tunnels, and analyzed by SEM-EDS for quantification of workers exposure, are discussed. In particular, the engineering and monitoring management of 100 m tunnelling excavation across a serpentinite lens (Cravasco adit), intercalated within calcschists, is reported. At this chrysotile occurrence, 84% of 128 analyzed samples (from the zone closer to the front rock) were above 2 ff/l. However, thanks to safety measures implemented and tunnel compartmentation in zones, the asbestos fibre concentration did not exceed the Italian standard of occupational exposure (100 ff/l) and 100% of samples collected in the outdoor square were below 1 ff/l. During excavation under normal working conditions, asbestos concentrations were below 2 ff/l in 97.4% of the 668 analyzed samples. Our results showed that air monitoring can objectively confirm the presence of asbestos minerals at a rock front in relative short time and provide information about the nature of the lithology at the front. The present dataset, the engineering measures described and the operative conclusions are liable to support the improvement of legislation on workers exposure to asbestos referred to the tunnelling sector, lacking at present.

  14. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS USING AIRBORNE LWIR HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne longwave infrared LWIR) hyperspectral imagery was utilized to detect and identify gaseous chemical release plumes at sites in sourthern Texzas. The Airborne Hysperspectral Imager (AHI), developed by the University of Hawaii was flown over a petrochemical facility and a ...

  15. AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICAN NATIONAL PARKS--WHAT WE KNOW AND WANT TO LEARN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Park Service initiated the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) in 2002 to determine if airborne contaminants from regional or distant sources have an impact on remote (typically high elevation) western ecosystems, including Alaska. Eight Nationa...

  16. ARE AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS A RISK FACTOR TO AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS IN REMOTE WESTERN NATIONAL PARKS (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) was initiated in 2002 by the National Park Service to determine if airborne contaminants were having an impact on remote western ecosystems. Multiple sample media (snow, water, sediment, fish and terrestrial vegetation...

  17. WHICH AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS POSE THE GREATEST RISK TO WESTERN NATIONAL PARKS (USA)?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) was initiated in 2002 by the National Park Service to determine if airborne contaminants where having an impact on remote western ecosystems. Multiple sample media (snow, water, sediment, fish and terrestrial vegetatio...

  18. Risk factors for injuries during airborne static line operations.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Steelman, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    US Army airborne operations began in World War II. Continuous improvements in parachute technology, aircraft exit procedures, and ground landing techniques have reduced the number of injuries over time from 27 per 1,000 descents to about 6 per 1,000 jumps. Studies have identified a number of factors that put parachutists at higher injury risk, including high wind speeds, night jumps, combat loads, higher temperatures, lower fitness, heavier body weight, and older age. Airborne injuries can be reduced by limiting risker training (higher wind speeds, night jumps, combat load) to the minimum necessary for tactical and operational proficiency. Wearing a parachute ankle brace (PAB) will reduce ankle injuries without increasing other injuries and should be considered by all parachutists, especially those with prior ankle problems. A high level of upper body muscular endurance and aerobic fitness is not only beneficial for general health but also associated with lower injury risk during airborne training.

  19. Airborne bacteria in the atmosphere: Presence, purpose, and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, Wenke; Moretti, Serena; Denys, Siegfried; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Numerous recent studies have highlighted that the types of bacteria present in the atmosphere often show predictable patterns across space and time. These patterns can be driven by differences in bacterial sources of the atmosphere and a wide range of environmental factors, including UV intensity, precipitation events, and humidity. The abundance of certain bacterial taxa is of interest, not only for their ability to mediate a range of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, such as cloud formation and ice nucleation, but also for their implications -both beneficial and detrimental-for human health. Consequently, the widespread importance of airborne bacteria has stimulated the search for their applicability. Improving air quality, modelling the dispersal of airborne bacteria (e.g. pathogens) and biotechnological purposes are already being explored. Nevertheless, many technological challenges still need to be overcome to fully understand the roles of airborne bacteria in our health and global ecosystems.

  20. Galaxy: a new state of the art airborne lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartsell, Daryl; LaRocque, Paul E.; Tripp, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    Recent advancements in lidar technologies have led to significant improvements in Teledyne Optech's airborne lidar systems. This paper will present the performance enhancements that have led to the creation of the Galaxy, a compact scanning lidar system. Unlike the previous generation of conventional airborne lidar, the Galaxy offers fundamentally improved specifications for long-range airborne lidar systems. The Galaxy system is capable of acquiring high-density, multiple-return data with unique pulse separation characteristics and exceptional precision. Utilizing discrete time-of-flight measurement electronics, this new system is capable of seamlessly operating at very high laser repetition rates through blind zones and with multiple pulses in the air. By utilizing even higher scan products , the system outperforms previous generations of systems and optimizes point density during collection.

  1. Tunable Infrared Laser Instruments for Airborne Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, A.; Diskin, G.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J. G.; Sachse, G.; Slate, T.; Rana, M.; Podolske, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable infrared laser-based instruments on airborne platforms have provided invaluable contributions to atmospheric studies over the past several decades. This paper presents an overview of some recent studies and developments using this approach that were presented at the 2007 Field Laser Applications in Industry and Research (FLAIR, http://www.inoa.it/flair/) conference in Florence, Italy. The present overview only covers select in situ absorption-based instruments that were presented in the airborne session at this conference. In no case are comprehensive details presented. These details can be found in the numerous references given. Additional approaches based upon cavity-enhanced and photoacoustic measurements, which are also making invaluable contributions in airborne atmospheric studies, are not discussed in this brief overview.

  2. Airborne lidar detection of subsurface oceanic scattering layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Krabill, William B.; Buntzen, Rodney R.; Gilbert, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    The airborne lidar detection and cross-sectional mapping of submerged oceanic scattering layers are reported. The field experiment was conducted in the Atlantic Ocean southeast of Assateague Island, VA. NASA's Airborne Oceanographic Lidar was operated in the bathymetric mode to acquire on-wavelength 532-nm depth-resolved backscatter signals from shelf/slope waters. Unwanted laser pulse reflection from the air-water interface was minimized by spatial filtering and off-nadir operation. The presence of thermal stratification over the shelf was verified by the deployment of airborne expendable bathythermographs. Optical beam transmission measurements acquired from a surface truthing vessel indicated the presence of a layer of turbid water near the sea floor over the inner portion of the shelf.

  3. Airborne backscatter lidar measurements at three wavelengths during ELITE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, H. G.; Wirth, Martin; Moerl, P.; Renger, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    The German Aerospace Establishment (DLR) operates an airborne backscatter lidar based on a Nh:YAG laser which is flashlamp-pumped at 10 Hz. It works on the wavelengths 1064, 532, and 354 nm. It is mounted downward-looking on the research aircraft Falcon 20, flying at about 12 km altitude at speeds of 200 m/s. We present airborne measurements correlated with the orbit tracks of the shuttle-borne LITE-instrument (lidar in-space technology experiment). The emphasis in data evalution is on the comparison between the airborne and the shuttle- borne lidars. First results show excellent agreement between the two instruments even on details of cirrus clouds. The results comprise cloud geometrical and optical depths, as well as profiles of aerosol backscattering coefficients at three wavelengths.

  4. Airborne signals of communication in sagebrush: a pharmacological approach

    PubMed Central

    Shiojiri, Kaori; Ishizaki, Satomi; Ozawa, Rika; Karban, Richard

    2015-01-01

    When plants receive volatiles from a damaged plant, the receivers become more resistant to herbivory. This phenomenon has been reported in many plant species and called plant-plant communication. Lab experiments have suggested that several compounds may be functioning as airborne signals. The objective of this study is to identify potential airborne signals used in communication between sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) individuals in the field. We collected volatiles of one branch from each of 99 sagebrush individual plants. Eighteen different volatiles were detected by GC-MS analysis. Among these, 4 compounds; 1.8-cineol, β-caryophyllene, α-pinene and borneol, were investigated as signals of communication under natural conditions. The branches which received either 1,8-cineol or β-caryophyllene tended to get less damage than controls. These results suggested that 1,8-cineol and β-caryophyllene should be considered further as possible candidates for generalized airborne signals in sagebrush. PMID:26418970

  5. MULTIPLY: Development of a European HSRL Airborne Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binietoglou, Ioannis; Serikov, Ilya; Nicolae, Doina; Amiridis, Vassillis; Belegante, Livio; Boscornea, Andrea; Brugmann, Bjorn; Costa Suros, Montserrat; Hellmann, David; Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Linne, Holger; Stachlewska, Iwona; Vajaiac, Sorin-Nicolae

    2016-08-01

    MULTIPLY is a novel airborne high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) currently under development by a consortium of European institutions from Romania, Germany, Greece, and Poland. Its aim is to contribute to calibration and validations activities of the upcoming ESA aerosol sensing missions like ADM-Aeolus, EarthCARE and the Sentinel-3/-4/-5/-5p which include products related to atmospheric aerosols. The effectiveness of these missions depends on independent airborne measurements to develop and test the retrieval methods, and validate mission products following launch. The aim of ESA's MULTIPLY project is to design, develop, and test a multi-wavelength depolarization HSRL for airborne applications. The MULTIPLY lidar will deliver the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles at three wavelengths (355nm, 532nm, 1064nm), as well as profiles of aerosol intensive parameters (Ångström exponents, extinction- to-backscatter ratios, and linear particle depolarization ratios).

  6. Control of airborne infectious diseases in ventilated spaces.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter V

    2009-12-06

    We protect ourselves from airborne cross-infection in the indoor environment by supplying fresh air to a room by natural or mechanical ventilation. The air is distributed in the room according to different principles: mixing ventilation, displacement ventilation, etc. A large amount of air is supplied to the room to ensure a dilution of airborne infection. Analyses of the flow in the room show that there are a number of parameters that play an important role in minimizing airborne cross-infection. The air flow rate to the room must be high, and the air distribution pattern can be designed to have high ventilation effectiveness. Furthermore, personalized ventilation may reduce the risk of cross-infection, and in some cases, it can also reduce the source of infection. Personalized ventilation can especially be used in hospital wards, aircraft cabins and, in general, where people are in fixed positions.

  7. Airborne Trace Gas Mapping During the GOSAT-COMEX Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratt, D. M.; Leifer, I.; Buckland, K. N.; Johnson, P. D.; Van Damme, M.; Pierre-Francois, C.; Clarisse, L.

    2015-12-01

    The GOSAT-COMEX-IASI (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite - CO2 and Methane EXperiment - Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) experiment acquired data on 24-27 April 2015 with two aircraft, a mobile ground-based sampling suite, and the GOSAT and IASI platforms. Collections comprised the Kern Front and Kern River oil fields north of Bakersfield, Calif. and the Chino stockyard complex in the eastern Los Angeles Basin. The nested-grid experiment examined the convergence of multiple approaches to total trace gas flux estimation from the experimental area on multiple length-scales, which entailed the integrated analysis of ground-based, airborne, and space-based measurements. Airborne remote sensing was employed to map the spatial distribution of discrete emission sites - crucial information to understanding their relative aggregate contribution to the overall flux estimation. This contribution discusses the methodology in the context of the airborne GHG source mapping component of the GOSAT-COMEX experiment and its application to satellite validation.

  8. The risk of airborne influenza transmission in passenger cars.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, L D; Morawska, L; Bell, S C

    2012-03-01

    Travel in passenger cars is a ubiquitous aspect of the daily activities of many people. During the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic a case of probable transmission during car travel was reported in Australia, to which spread via the airborne route may have contributed. However, there are no data to indicate the likely risks of such events, and how they may vary and be mitigated. To address this knowledge gap, we estimated the risk of airborne influenza transmission in two cars (1989 model and 2005 model) by employing ventilation measurements and a variation of the Wells-Riley model. Results suggested that infection risk can be reduced by not recirculating air; however, estimated risk ranged from 59% to 99·9% for a 90-min trip when air was recirculated in the newer vehicle. These results have implications for interrupting in-car transmission of other illnesses spread by the airborne route.

  9. Endotoxins in baled cottons and airborne dusts in textile mills in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed Central

    Olenchock, S A; Christiani, D C; Mull, J C; Ye, T T; Lu, P L

    1983-01-01

    Bulk cotton samples and airborne vertical elutriated cotton dusts were obtained from textile mills in Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Analysis of endotoxin contents revealed that baled cottons which were grown in different countries varied in endotoxin contamination. The two textile mills, which operated at similar overall airborne dust levels, differed markedly in the levels of airborne endotoxins. The data suggest that the biological activity or "toxicity" of airborne cotton dusts may not be correlated directly with gravimetric dust levels. PMID:6639029

  10. From Kites through Cold War: The Evolution of United States Air Force Manned Airborne ISR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-06

    solidified as the platform of choice for airborne ISR. Airborne ISR growth was precipitous following the invention of the airplane and the navigable...an unproven capability. As a result, growth was slow and when World War I started, the United States had almost no airborne ISR capability...decision makers. Chapter Five details the travails of airborne ISR during the interwar period and its meteoric growth during World War II. Despite the

  11. The effect of environmental parameters on the survival of airborne infectious agents

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Julian W.

    2009-01-01

    The successful transmission of infection via the airborne route relies on several factors, including the survival of the airborne pathogen in the environment as it travels between susceptible hosts. This review summarizes the various environmental factors (particularly temperature and relative humidity) that may affect the airborne survival of viruses, bacteria and fungi, with the aim of highlighting specific aspects of environmental control that may eventually enhance the aerosol or airborne infection control of infectious disease transmission within hospitals. PMID:19773291

  12. Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hospodsky, Denina; Qian, Jing; Nazaroff, William W.; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Bibby, Kyle; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study presents evidence for elevated concentrations of indoor airborne bacteria due to human occupancy, and investigates the sources of these bacteria. Samples were collected in a university classroom while occupied and when vacant. The total particle mass concentration, bacterial genome concentration, and bacterial phylogenetic populations were characterized in indoor, outdoor, and ventilation duct supply air, as well as in the dust of ventilation system filters and in floor dust. Occupancy increased the total aerosol mass and bacterial genome concentration in indoor air PM10 and PM2.5 size fractions, with an increase of nearly two orders of magnitude in airborne bacterial genome concentration in PM10. On a per mass basis, floor dust was enriched in bacterial genomes compared to airborne particles. Quantitative comparisons between bacterial populations in indoor air and potential sources suggest that resuspended floor dust is an important contributor to bacterial aerosol populations during occupancy. Experiments that controlled for resuspension from the floor implies that direct human shedding may also significantly impact the concentration of indoor airborne particles. The high content of bacteria specific to the skin, nostrils, and hair of humans found in indoor air and in floor dust indicates that floors are an important reservoir of human-associated bacteria, and that the direct particle shedding of desquamated skin cells and their subsequent resuspension strongly influenced the airborne bacteria population structure in this human-occupied environment. Inhalation exposure to microbes shed by other current or previous human occupants may occur in communal indoor environments. PMID:22529946

  13. Human occupancy as a source of indoor airborne bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hospodsky, Denina; Qian, Jing; Nazaroff, William W; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Bibby, Kyle; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study presents evidence for elevated concentrations of indoor airborne bacteria due to human occupancy, and investigates the sources of these bacteria. Samples were collected in a university classroom while occupied and when vacant. The total particle mass concentration, bacterial genome concentration, and bacterial phylogenetic populations were characterized in indoor, outdoor, and ventilation duct supply air, as well as in the dust of ventilation system filters and in floor dust. Occupancy increased the total aerosol mass and bacterial genome concentration in indoor air PM(10) and PM(2.5) size fractions, with an increase of nearly two orders of magnitude in airborne bacterial genome concentration in PM(10). On a per mass basis, floor dust was enriched in bacterial genomes compared to airborne particles. Quantitative comparisons between bacterial populations in indoor air and potential sources suggest that resuspended floor dust is an important contributor to bacterial aerosol populations during occupancy. Experiments that controlled for resuspension from the floor implies that direct human shedding may also significantly impact the concentration of indoor airborne particles. The high content of bacteria specific to the skin, nostrils, and hair of humans found in indoor air and in floor dust indicates that floors are an important reservoir of human-associated bacteria, and that the direct particle shedding of desquamated skin cells and their subsequent resuspension strongly influenced the airborne bacteria population structure in this human-occupied environment. Inhalation exposure to microbes shed by other current or previous human occupants may occur in communal indoor environments.

  14. Geoid Determination At Coastal Areas From Satellite and Airborne Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, F. B.; Bastos, L.; Fernandes, M. J.

    During the last ten years, the data from various satellite altimetry missions had a great impact in the definition of the sea surface topography and the Earth gravity field. How- ever, despite of its continuity, global covering and increasing accuracy, the use of satel- lite altimetry is mainly maximised in the open oceans. In the coastal and islands zones, where tidal dynamics and oceans currents have a special interest for several regional studies, the lower accuracy of these data limits the potentialities and applications of this technique. Although significant data recovery and accuracy improvement can be obtained in satellite data by applying appropriate filtering and interpolation methods, at these land/ocean transition zones, satellite altimetry information can benefit from the complementary information given by airborne altimetry/gravimetry data. As a consequence of the recent advances in GPS/INS integration for positioning and orientation of airborne sensors, it is now possible to obtain good quality airborne al- timetry data in coastal and island areas. Merging this information with satellite al- timetry, and also with existing marine gravity data, allows an accurate definition of the geoid in zones where satellite data are unavailable or are poor in quality and accu- racy. This study aims at the determination of a high accuracy regional geoid using free air anomalies derived by inversion of satellite and airborne altimetry data. The data sets used were ERS and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data and airborne laser altimeter measurements collected during an observation campaign that took place in the Azores region, in 1997, in the scope of the European project AGMASCO. This paper outlines the evaluation and the impact of the results obtained and points out the main limitations and possibilities for further improvements in the use of satellite and airborne altimeter data for regional geoid mapping in coastal and island regions.

  15. Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) on left rear fuselage of DC-8 Airborne Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A view of the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) antenna on the left rear fuselage of the DC-8. The AIRSAR captures images of the ground from the side of the aircraft and can provide precision digital elevation mapping capabilities for a variety of studies. The AIRSAR is one of a number of research systems that have been added to the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  16. A Brief History of Airborne Self-Spacing Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a history of seven of the more significant airborne and airborne-assisted aircraft spacing concepts that have been developed and evaluated during the past 40 years. The primary focus of the earlier concepts was on enhancing airport terminal area productivity and reducing air traffic controller workload. The more recent efforts were designed to increase runway throughput through improved aircraft spacing precision at landing. The latest concepts are aimed at supporting more fuel efficient and lower community noise operations while maintaining or increasing runway throughput efficiency.

  17. Rapid System to Quantitatively Characterize the Airborne Microbial Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macnaughton, Sarah J.

    1998-01-01

    Bioaerosols have been linked to a wide range of different allergies and respiratory illnesses. Currently, microorganism culture is the most commonly used method for exposure assessment. Such culture techniques, however, generally fail to detect between 90-99% of the actual viable biomass. Consequently, an unbiased technique for detecting airborne microorganisms is essential. In this Phase II proposal, a portable air sampling device his been developed for the collection of airborne microbial biomass from indoor (and outdoor) environments. Methods were evaluated for extracting and identifying lipids that provide information on indoor air microbial biomass, and automation of these procedures was investigated. Also, techniques to automate the extraction of DNA were explored.

  18. The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Asner, David M.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Day, Anthony R.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Jordan, David V.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Morris, Scott J.; Mullen, O Dennis; Myers, Allan W.; Pitts, W. Karl; Rohrer, John S.; Runkle, Robert C.; Seifert, Allen; Shergur, Jason M.; Stave, Sean C.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Thompson, Robert C.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; Willett, Jesse A.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2013-01-11

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gama ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach, we found, is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. Moreover, the system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications, including airborne and maritime operations.

  19. Airborne bathymetric charting using pulsed blue-green lasers.

    PubMed

    Kim, H H

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory and airborne experiments have proven the feasibility and demonstrated the techniques of an airborne pulsed laser system for rapidly mapping coastal water bathymetry. Water depths of 10 +/- 0.25 m were recorded in waters having an effective attenuation coefficient of 0.175 m(-1). A2-MW peak power Nd:YAG pulsed laser was flown at an altitude of 600 m. An advanced system, incorporating a mirror scanner, a high pulsed rate laser, and a good signal processor, could survey coastal zones at the rate of several square miles per hour.

  20. Remote monitoring of soil moisture using airborne microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    The current status of microwave radiometry is provided. The fundamentals of the microwave radiometer are reviewed with particular reference to airborne operations, and the interpretative procedures normally used for the modeling of the apparent temperature are presented. Airborne microwave radiometer measurements were made over selected flight lines in Chickasha, Oklahoma and Weslaco, Texas. Extensive ground measurements of soil moisture were made in support of the aircraft mission over the two locations. In addition, laboratory determination of the complex permittivities of soil samples taken from the flight lines were made with varying moisture contents. The data were analyzed to determine the degree of correlation between measured apparent temperatures and soil moisture content.