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Sample records for airborne multisensor pod

  1. Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) data management overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, J.D.; Blough, D.K.; Daugherty, W.R.; Hucks, J.A.; Gerhardstein, L.H.; Meitzler, W.D.; Melton, R.B.; Shoemaker, S.V.

    1994-09-01

    An overview of the Data Management Plan for the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) pro-grain is provided in this document. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been assigned the responsibility of data management for the program, which includes defining procedures for data management and data quality assessment. Data management is defined as the process of planning, acquiring, organizing, qualifying and disseminating data. The AMPS program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation (DOE/AN) and is integrated into the overall DOE AN-10.1 technology development program. Sensors used for collecting the data were developed under the on-site inspection, effluence analysis, and standoff sensor program, the AMPS program interacts with other technology programs of DOE/NN-20. This research will be conducted by both government and private industry. AMPS is a research and development program, and it is not intended for operational deployment, although the sensors and techniques developed could be used in follow-on operational systems. For a complete description of the AMPS program, see {open_quotes}Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) Program Plan{close_quotes}. The primary purpose of the AMPS is to collect high-quality multisensor data to be used in data fusion research to reduce interpretation problems associated with data overload and to derive better information than can be derived from any single sensor. To collect the data for the program, three wing-mounted pods containing instruments with sensors for collecting data will be flight certified on a U.S. Navy RP-3A aircraft. Secondary objectives of the AMPS program are sensor development and technology demonstration. Pod system integrators and instrument developers will be interested in the performance of their deployed sensors and their supporting data acquisition equipment.

  2. Airborne Multisensor Pod System, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Alonzo, G M; Sanford, N M

    1995-01-01

    This issue focuses on the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) which is a collaboration of many of the DOE national laboratories to provide a scientific environment to research multiple sensors and the new information that can be derived from them. The bulk of the research has been directed at nonproliferation applications, but it has also proven useful in environmental monitoring and assessment, and land/water management. The contents of this issue are: using AMPS technology to detect proliferation and monitor resources; combining multisensor data to monitor facilities and natural resources; planning a AMPS mission; SAR pod produces images day or night, rain or shine; MSI pod combines data from multiple sensors; ESI pod will analyze emissions and effluents; and accessing AMPS information on the Internet.

  3. Airborne multisensor pod system (AMPS) data: Multispectral data integration and processing hints

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, T.J.; Lamb, A.

    1996-11-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation (NN-20) has developed a suite of airborne remote sensing systems that simultaneously collect coincident data from a US Navy P-3 aircraft. The primary objective of the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) Program is {open_quotes}to collect multisensor data that can be used for data research, both to reduce interpretation problems associated with data overload and to develop information products more complete than can be obtained from any single sensor.{close_quotes} The sensors are housed in wing-mounted pods and include: a Ku-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar; a CASI Hyperspectral Imager; a Daedalus 3600 Airborne Multispectral Scanner; a Wild Heerbrugg RC-30 motion compensated large format camera; various high resolution, light intensified and thermal video cameras; and several experimental sensors (e.g. the Portable Hyperspectral Imager of Low-Light Spectroscopy (PHILLS)). Over the past year or so, the Coastal Marine Resource Assessment (CAMRA) group at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection`s Marine Research Institute (FMRI) has been working with the Department of Energy through the Naval Research Laboratory to develop applications and products from existing data. Considerable effort has been spent identifying image formats integration parameters. 2 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. MITAS: multisensor imaging technology for airborne surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John D.

    1991-08-01

    MITAS, a unique and low-cost solution to the problem of collecting and processing multisensor imaging data for airborne surveillance operations has been developed, MITAS results from integrating the established and proven real-time video processing, target tracking, and sensor management software of TAU with commercially available image exploitation and map processing software. The MITAS image analysis station (IAS) supports airborne day/night reconnaissance and surveillance missions involving low-altitude collection platforms employing a suite of sensors to perform reconnaissance functions against a variety of ground and sea targets. The system will detect, locate, and recognize threats likely to be encountered in support of counternarcotic operations and in low-intensity conflict areas. The IAS is capable of autonomous, near real-time target exploitation and has the appropriate communication links to remotely located IAS systems for more extended analysis of sensor data. The IAS supports the collection, fusion, and processing of three main imaging sensors: daylight imagery (DIS), forward looking infrared (FLIR), and infrared line scan (IRLS). The MITAS IAS provides support to all aspects of the airborne surveillance mission, including sensor control, real-time image enhancement, automatic target tracking, sensor fusion, freeze-frame capture, image exploitation, target data-base management, map processing, remote image transmission, and report generation.

  5. Multisensor airborne imagery collection and processing onboard small unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linne von Berg, Dale; Anderson, Scott A.; Bird, Alan; Holt, Niel; Kruer, Melvin; Walls, Thomas J.; Wilson, Michael L.

    2010-04-01

    FEATHAR (Fusion, Exploitation, Algorithms, and Targeting for High-Altitude Reconnaissance) is an ONR funded effort to develop and test new tactical sensor systems specifically designed for small manned and unmanned platforms (payload weight < 50 lbs). This program is being directed and executed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in conjunction with the Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL). FEATHAR has developed and integrated EyePod, a combined long-wave infrared (LWIR) and visible to near infrared (VNIR) optical survey & inspection system, with NuSAR, a combined dual band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system. These sensors are being tested in conjunction with other ground and airborne sensor systems to demonstrate intelligent real-time cross-sensor cueing and in-air data fusion. Results from test flights of the EyePod and NuSAR sensors will be presented.

  6. A wing pod-based millimeter wavelength airborne cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Ellis, S.; Tsai, P.; Loew, E.; Lee, W.-C.; Emmett, J.; Dixon, M.; Burghart, C.; Rauenbuehler, S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter (mm) wavelength radar. Its frequency of operation is 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength). The radar has been designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft; however, it could be deployed on other similarly equipped aircraft. The pod-based configuration occupies minimum cabin space and maximizes scan coverage. The radar system is capable of collecting observations in a staring mode between zenith and nadir or in a scanning mode. Standard pulse-pair estimates of moments and raw time series of backscattered signals are recorded. The radar system design and characteristics as well as techniques for calibrating reflectivity and correcting Doppler velocity for aircraft attitude and motion are described. The radar can alternatively be deployed in a ground-based configuration, housed in the 20 ft shipping container it shares with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The radar was tested both on the ground and in flight. Preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected and examples are presented.

  7. A wing pod-based millimeter wavelength airborne cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Ellis, S.; Tsai, P.; Loew, E.; Lee, W. C.; Emmett, J.; Dixon, M.; Burghart, C.; Rauenbuehler, S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter wavelength radar. Its frequency of operation is 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength). The radar has been designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft; however, it could be deployed on other similarly equipped aircraft. The pod-based configuration occupies minimum cabin space and maximizes scan coverage. The radar system is capable of collecting observations in a staring mode between zenith and nadir or in a scanning mode. Standard pulse-pair estimates of moments and raw time series of backscattered signals are recorded. The radar system design and characteristics, as well as techniques for calibrating reflectivity and correcting Doppler velocity for aircraft attitude and motion are described. The radar can alternatively be deployed in a ground-based configuration, housed in the 20 ft shipping container it shares with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The radar was tested both on the ground and in flight. Preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected and examples are presented.

  8. Using Airborne Lidar Data from IcePod to Measure Annual and Seasonal Ice Changes Over Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frearson, N.; Bertinato, C.; Das, I.

    2014-12-01

    The IcePod is a multi-sensor airborne science platform that supports a wide suite of instruments, including a Riegl VQ-580 infrared scanning laser, GPS-inertial positioning system, shallow and deep-ice radars, visible-wave and infrared cameras, and upward-looking pyrometer. These instruments allow us to image the ice from top to bottom, including the surface of melt-water plumes that originate at the ice-ocean boundary. In collaboration with the New York Air National Guard 109th Airlift Wing, the IcePod is flown on LC-130 aircraft, which presents the unique opportunity to routinely image the Greenland ice sheet several times within a season. This is particularly important for mass balance studies, as we can measure elevation changes during the melt season. During the 2014 summer, laser data was collected via IcePod over the Greenland ice sheet, including Russell Glacier, Jakobshavn Glacier, Eqip Glacier, and Summit Camp. The Icepod will also be routinely operated in Antarctica. We present the initial testing, calibration, and error estimates from the first set of laser data that were collected on IcePod. At a survey altitude of 1000 m, the laser swath covers ~ 1000 m. A Northrop-Grumman LN-200 tactical grade IMU is rigidly attached to the laser scanner to provide attitude data at a rate of 200 Hz. Several methods were used to determine the lever arm between the IMU center of navigation and GPS antenna phase center, terrestrial scanning laser, total station survey, and optimal estimation. Additionally, initial bore sight calibration flights yielded misalignment angles within an accuracy of ±4 cm. We also performed routine passes over the airport ramp in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, comparing the airborne GPS and Lidar data to a reference GPS-based ground survey across the ramp, spot GPS points on the ramp and a nearby GPS base station. Positioning errors can severely impact the accuracy of a laser altimeter when flying over remote regions such as across the ice sheets

  9. Initial Field Measurements with the Multisensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) High Purity Germanium (HPGe) Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Morris, Scott J.; Orrell, John L.; Pitts, W. Karl; Rohrer, John S.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2010-06-29

    Abstract: The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. The system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications. This paper reports on results from initial field measurements conducted in a truck and on two different boats.

  10. A multisensor system for airborne surveillance of oil pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, A. T.; Ketchal, R.; Catoe, C.

    1973-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard is developing a prototype airborne oil surveillance system for use in its Marine Environmental Protection Program. The prototype system utilizes an X-band side-looking radar, a 37-GHz imaging microwave radiometer, a multichannel line scanner, and a multispectral low light level system. The system is geared to detecting and mapping oil spills and potential pollution violators anywhere within a 25 nmi range of the aircraft flight track under all but extreme weather conditions. The system provides for false target discrimination and maximum identification of spilled materials. The system also provides an automated detection alarm, as well as a color display to achieve maximum coupling between the sensor data and the equipment operator.

  11. Information management and target detection for multisensor airborne platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Klaus; Hebel, Marcus; Armbruster, Walter; Bers, Karlheinz

    2006-05-01

    Future military helicopters will be provided with multiple information sources for self-protection and reconnaissance, e.g. imaging IR, laser radar and GPS. In addition, knowledge bases like maps, aerial images, geographical information (GIS) and other previously acquired data can be used for the interpretation of the current scenario. To support the mission, results of data fusion and information management have to be presented to the pilot in an appropriate way. This paper describes concepts and results of our work on IR and laser data fusion for airborne systems. Data is gathered by forward-looking sensors mounted in a helicopter. For further improvement, fusion with collateral information (laser elevation data, aerial images) is used for change detection and definition of regions of interest with respect to the stored and continuously updated database. Results are demonstrated by the analysis of an exemplary data set, showing a scenario with a group of vehicles. Two moving vehicles are detected automatically in both channels (IR, laser) and the results are combined to achieve improved visualization for the pilot.

  12. Detection of multiple airborne targets from multisensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltz, Mark A.; Srivastava, Anuj; Miller, Michael I.; Grenander, Ulf

    1995-08-01

    Previously we presented a jump-diffusion based random sampling algorithm for generating conditional mean estimates of scene representations for the tracking and recongition of maneuvering airborne targets. These representations include target positions and orientations along their trajectories and the target type associated with each trajectory. Taking a Bayesian approach, a posterior measure is defined on the parameter space by combining sensor models with a sophisticated prior based on nonlinear airplane dynamics. The jump-diffusion algorithm constructs a Markov process which visits the elements of the parameter space with frequencies proportional to the posterior probability. It consititutes both the infinitesimal, local search via a sample path continuous diffusion transform and the larger, global steps through discrete jump moves. The jump moves involve the addition and deletion of elements from the scene configuration or changes in the target type assoviated with each target trajectory. One such move results in target detection by the addition of a track seed to the inference set. This provides initial track data for the tracking/recognition algorithm to estimate linear graph structures representing tracks using the other jump moves and the diffusion process, as described in our earlier work. Target detection ideally involves a continuous research over a continuum of the observation space. In this work we conclude that for practical implemenations the search space must be discretized with lattice granularity comparable to sensor resolution, and discuss how fast Fourier transforms are utilized for efficient calcuation of sufficient statistics given our array models. Some results are also presented from our implementation on a networked system including a massively parallel machine architecture and a silicon graphics onyx workstation.

  13. Reduction of mine suspected areas by multisensor airborne measurements: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Martin; Milisavljevic, Nada; Suess, Helmut; Acheroy, Marc P. J.

    2002-08-01

    Humanitarian demining is a very dangerous, cost and time intensive work, where a lot of effort is usually wasted in inspecting suspected areas that turn out to be mine-free. The main goal of the project SMART (Space and airborne Mined Area Reduction Tools) is to apply a multisensor approach towards corresponding signature data collection, developing adapted data understanding and data processing tools for improving the efficiency and reliability of level 1 minefield surveys by reducing suspected mined areas. As a result, the time for releasing mine-free areas for civilian use should be shortened. In this paper, multisensor signature data collected at four mine suspected areas in different parts of Croatia are presented, their information content is discussed, and first results are described. The multisensor system consists of a multifrequency multipolarization SAR system (DLR Experimental Synthetic Aperture Radar E-SAR), an optical scanner (Daedalus) and a camera (RMK) for color infrared aerial views. E-SAR data were acquired in X-, C-, L- and P- bands, the latter two being fully polarimetric interferometric. This provides pieces of independent information, ranging from high spatial resolution (X-band) to very good penetration abilities (P-band), together with possibilities for polarimetric and interferometric analysis. The Daedalus scanner, with 12 channels between visible and thermal infrared, has a very high spatial resolution. For each of the sensors, the applied processing, geocoding and registration is described. The information content is analyzed in sense of the capability and reliability in describing conditions inside suspected mined areas, as a first step towards identifying their mine-free parts, with special emphasis set on polarimetric and interferometric information.

  14. NASA 1990 Multisensor Airborne Campaigns (MACs) for ecosystem and watershed studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickland, Diane E.; Asrar, Ghassem; Murphy, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The Multisensor Airborne Campaign (MAC) focus within NASA's former Land Processes research program was conceived to achieve the following objectives: to acquire relatively complete, multisensor data sets for well-studied field sites, to add a strong remote sensing science component to ecology-, hydrology-, and geology-oriented field projects, to create a research environment that promotes strong interactions among scientists within the program, and to more efficiently utilize and compete for the NASA fleet of remote sensing aircraft. Four new MAC's were conducted in 1990: the Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) project along an east-west transect through central Oregon, the Forest Ecosystem Dynamics (FED) project at the Northern Experimental Forest in Howland, Maine, the MACHYDRO project in the Mahantango Creek watershed in central Pennsylvania, and the Walnut Gulch project near Tombstone, Arizona. The OTTER project is testing a model that estimates the major fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and water through temperate coniferous forest ecosystems. The focus in the project is on short time-scale (days-year) variations in ecosystem function. The FED project is concerned with modeling vegetation changes of forest ecosystems using remotely sensed observations to extract biophysical properties of forest canopies. The focus in this project is on long time-scale (decades to millenia) changes in ecosystem structure. The MACHYDRO project is studying the role of soil moisture and its regulating effects on hydrologic processes. The focus of the study is to delineate soil moisture differences within a basin and their changes with respect to evapotranspiration, rainfall, and streamflow. The Walnut Gulch project is focused on the effects of soil moisture in the energy and water balance of arid and semiarid ecosystems and their feedbacks to the atmosphere via thermal forcing.

  15. Development of a multi-sensor airborne investigation platform based on an ultra-light aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herd, Rainer; Holst, Jonathan; Lay, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012 the chair Raw Material and Natural Resource Management of Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus, Germany started to develop, construct and assemble a multi-sensor airborne investigation system based on an ultra-light aircraft. The conceptual ideas were born several years before and triggered by the increasing demand of spatial underground information, increasing restrictions to access private property and the lack of affordable commercially operated systems for projects with small budgets. The concept of the presented system comprehends a full composite ultra-light aircraft, the Pipistrel VIRUS which combines a low minimum (65 km/h, a high crusing speed (250 km/h, a long range (1700 km) and a low noise potential. The investigation equipment which can be modified according to the investigation target comprises actually a CsI-y-spectrometer in the fuselage, 2 K-magnetometer at the wing tips and a VLF-EM-receiver underneath the tail. This configuration enables the system to operate for mineral exploration, geological mapping, detection of freshwater resources and brines and different environmental monitoring missions. The development and actual stage of the project will be presented. The first operating flight is scheduled for spring 2013.

  16. The precision analysis of continuous zoom lens in airborne electro-optical pod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-xu; Li, Da-wei; Han, Jun-feng; Dong, Qiang; Huang, Wei; Wei, Yu

    2014-02-01

    In the research of electro-optical pod, this paper propose a mission requirements that continuous zoom lens system is using for measuring angle in the process. This paper analyzes the influence of angle measurement accuracy from focal length and optical axis errors in the process of continuous zoom, and given the mathematical model of the influence of angle measurement accuracy. The simulation analysis indicated that Angle measuring accuracy is affected by the process of continuous zoom. The simulation analysis results have certain instructive significance to engineering practice.

  17. The Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE): The first geology multisensor airborne campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.; Arvidson, Raymond E.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) is to acquire relevant data for geological sites that can be used to test models for extraction of surface property information from remote sensing data for earth, Mars and Venus in support of the Earth Observing System (EOS), Mars Observer, and Magellan, respectively. Over forty scientists from eight universities and three NASA centers are participating in GRSFE which is co-sponsored by the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program and the NASA Geology Program. Highlights of the airborne campaign included the first simultaneous acquisition of Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVRIS) and Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data on September 29, 1989, and acquisition of Advanced Solid-State Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS), Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), and Airborne Terrain Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) data all within three months of each other. The sites covered were Lunar Crater Volcanic Field and Fish Lake Valley in Nevada; and Cima Volcanic Field, Death Valley, and Ubehebe Crater in California. Coincident field measurements included meteorological and atmospheric measurements, visible/near-infrared and thermal spectra, and characterization of geology and vegetation cover. The GRSFE airborne and field data will be reduced to a suite of standard products and submitted, along with appropriate documentation, to the Planetary Data System (PDS) and the Pilot Land Data System (PLDS). These data will be used for a variety of investigations including paleoclimatic studies in the arid southwestern United States, and analysis of Magellan data. GRSFE data will also be used to support Mars Observer Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and Mars Rover Sample Return (MRSR) simulation studies.

  18. Airborne investigation of bathymetric sills in Godthåbsfjord, Greenland - results from IcePOD and Operation IceBridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinto, K. J.; Zappa, C. J.; Bell, R. E.; Frearson, N.; Cochran, J. R.; Boghosian, A.; Porter, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    The bathymetry of Greenlandic fjords is an important boundary condition for understanding circulation within the fjord. This in turn is crucial to the understanding of ocean-ice interactions at the margins of the Greenland ice sheet. Marine-based surveys have identified sills at the heads of many of these fjords, and demonstrated their importance to the circulation patterns within the fjords themselves. The inaccessibility of much of the Greenland fjord system leaves many regions poorly surveyed, with important data gaps remaining in the interior of the fjords. Airborne surveys provide a valuable platform for the study of fjord dynamics by offering wide coverage and the ability to survey otherwise inaccessible regions of fjords. In this study we combine results from Operation IceBridge gravity surveys with visible and infrared imagery from the IcePOD project to investigate circulation, transport, and mixing in Godthåbsfjord, Greenland, at the calving front of Kangiata Nunâta Sermia. The bathymetry of this fjord has been well mapped, but information is sparse from the inner 13 km where the fjord is filled with icebergs. Gravity data show a 4 mGal positive anomaly 10 km from the calving front. Models constrained by the gravity anomaly over a known sill further up the fjord give this newly identified sill a predicted depth of approximately 100 m. IcePOD is a multi-instrument pod flown on an LC130 operated by the New York Air National Guard. During test flights in the summer of 2013 multiple passes were made of the inner, iceberg-filled part of Godthåbsfjord with both visible and infra-red cameras. Here we compare the movement of ice within the fjord with modelled bathymetry from IceBridge to investigate the circulation of the inner part of the fjord.

  19. Experimental Validation of a Compound Control Scheme for a Two-Axis Inertially Stabilized Platform with Multi-Sensors in an Unmanned Helicopter-Based Airborne Power Line Inspection System

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Jia, Yuan; Zhao, Qiang; Yu, Ruixia

    2016-01-01

    A compound control scheme is proposed to achieve high control performance for a two-axis inertially stabilized platform (ISP) with multi-sensors applied to an unmanned helicopter (UH)-based airborne power line inspection (APLI) system. Compared with the traditional two closed-loop control scheme that is composed of a high-bandwidth rate loop and a lower bandwidth position loop, a new current loop inside rate loop is particularly designed to suppress the influences of voltage fluctuation from power supply and motor back electromotive force (BEMF) on control precision. In this way, the stabilization accuracy of the ISP is greatly improved. The rate loop, which is the middle one, is used to improve sensor’s stability precision through compensating for various disturbances. To ensure the pointing accuracy of the line of sight (LOS) of multi-sensors, the position loop is designed to be the outer one and acts as the main feedback path, by which the accurate pointing angular position is achieved. To validate the scheme, a series of experiments were carried out. The results show that the proposed compound control scheme can achieve reliable control precision and satisfy the requirements of real APLI tasks. PMID:26978371

  20. Experimental Validation of a Compound Control Scheme for a Two-Axis Inertially Stabilized Platform with Multi-Sensors in an Unmanned Helicopter-Based Airborne Power Line Inspection System.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Jia, Yuan; Zhao, Qiang; Yu, Ruixia

    2016-01-01

    A compound control scheme is proposed to achieve high control performance for a two-axis inertially stabilized platform (ISP) with multi-sensors applied to an unmanned helicopter (UH)-based airborne power line inspection (APLI) system. Compared with the traditional two closed-loop control scheme that is composed of a high-bandwidth rate loop and a lower bandwidth position loop, a new current loop inside rate loop is particularly designed to suppress the influences of voltage fluctuation from power supply and motor back electromotive force (BEMF) on control precision. In this way, the stabilization accuracy of the ISP is greatly improved. The rate loop, which is the middle one, is used to improve sensor's stability precision through compensating for various disturbances. To ensure the pointing accuracy of the line of sight (LOS) of multi-sensors, the position loop is designed to be the outer one and acts as the main feedback path, by which the accurate pointing angular position is achieved. To validate the scheme, a series of experiments were carried out. The results show that the proposed compound control scheme can achieve reliable control precision and satisfy the requirements of real APLI tasks. PMID:26978371

  1. Multisensor classification of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane

    1988-01-01

    A comparison is made between linear discriminant analysis and supervised classification results based on signatures from the Landsat TM, the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and airborne SAR, alone and combined into extended spectral signatures for seven sedimentary rock units exposed on the margin of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. Results from a linear discriminant analysis showed that training-area classification accuracies based on the multisensor data were improved an average of 15 percent over TM alone, 24 percent over TIMS alone, and 46 percent over SAR alone, with similar improvement resulting when supervised multisensor classification maps were compared to supervised, individual sensor classification maps. When training area signatures were used to map spectrally similar materials in an adjacent area, the average classification accuracy improved 19 percent using the multisensor data over TM alone, 2 percent over TIMS alone, and 11 percent over SAR alone. It is concluded that certain sedimentary lithologies may be accurately mapped using a single sensor, but classification of a variety of rock types can be improved using multisensor data sets that are sensitive to different characteristics such as mineralogy and surface roughness.

  2. The Mod Pod.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    1998-01-01

    Explains how Project Oriented Development Stations (PODS) provide a flexible facilities solution that can fit within any elementary school, and that combines custom furnishing with technology, curriculum, and hands-on learning. An explanation of the POD approach and an example of its development, usefulness, and funding is provided. (GR)

  3. Analysis of remote sensing data collected for detection and mapping of oil spills: Reduction and analysis of multi-sensor airborne data of the NASA Wallops oil spill exercise of November 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Airborne, remotely sensed data of the NASA Wallops controlled oil spill were corrected, reduced and analysed. Sensor performance comparisons were made by registering data sets from different sensors, which were near-coincident in time and location. Multispectral scanner images were, in turn, overlayed with profiles of correlation between airborne and laboratory-acquired fluorosensor spectra of oil; oil-thickness contours derived (by NASA) from a scanning fluorosensor and also from a two-channel scanning microwave radiometer; and synthetic aperture radar X-HH images. Microwave scatterometer data were correlated with dual-channel (UV and TIR) line scanner images of the oil slick.

  4. Multisensor Fusion for Change Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, T.; Csatho, B.

    2005-12-01

    Combining sensors that record different properties of a 3-D scene leads to complementary and redundant information. If fused properly, a more robust and complete scene description becomes available. Moreover, fusion facilitates automatic procedures for object reconstruction and modeling. For example, aerial imaging sensors, hyperspectral scanning systems, and airborne laser scanning systems generate complementary data. We describe how data from these sensors can be fused for such diverse applications as mapping surface erosion and landslides, reconstructing urban scenes, monitoring urban land use and urban sprawl, and deriving velocities and surface changes of glaciers and ice sheets. An absolute prerequisite for successful fusion is a rigorous co-registration of the sensors involved. We establish a common 3-D reference frame by using sensor invariant features. Such features are caused by the same object space phenomena and are extracted in multiple steps from the individual sensors. After extracting, segmenting and grouping the features into more abstract entities, we discuss ways on how to automatically establish correspondences. This is followed by a brief description of rigorous mathematical models suitable to deal with linear and area features. In contrast to traditional, point-based registration methods, lineal and areal features lend themselves to a more robust and more accurate registration. More important, the chances to automate the registration process increases significantly. The result of the co-registration of the sensors is a unique transformation between the individual sensors and the object space. This makes spatial reasoning of extracted information more versatile; reasoning can be performed in sensor space or in 3-D space where domain knowledge about features and objects constrains reasoning processes, reduces the search space, and helps to make the problem well-posed. We demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed multisensor fusion approach

  5. Multisensor Fire Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boquist, C.

    2004-01-01

    This DVD includes animations of multisensor fire observations from the following satellite sources: Landsat, GOES, TOMS, Terra, QuikSCAT, and TRMM. Some of the animations are included in multiple versions of a short video presentation on the DVD which focuses on the Hayman, Rodeo-Chediski, and Biscuit fires during the 2002 North American fire season. In one version of the presentation, MODIS, TRMM, GOES, and QuikSCAT data are incorporated into the animations of these wildfires. These data products provided rain, wind, cloud, and aerosol data on the fires, and monitored the smoke and destruction created by them. Another presentation on the DVD consists of a panel discussion, in which experts from academia, NASA, and the U.S. Forest Service answer questions on the role of NASA in fighting forest fires, the role of the Terra satellite and its instruments, including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), in fire fighting decision making, and the role of fire in the Earth's climate. The third section of the DVD features several animations of fires over the years 2001-2003, including animations of global and North American fires, and specific fires from 2003 in California, Washington, Montana, and Arizona.

  6. Multisensor image cueing (MUSIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodvold, David; Patterson, Tim J.

    2002-07-01

    There have been many years of research and development in the Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) community. This development has resulted in numerous algorithms to perform target detection automatically. The morphing of the ATR acronym to Aided Target Recognition provides a succinct commentary regarding the success of the automatic target recognition research. Now that the goal is aided recognition, many of the algorithms which were not able to provide autonomous recognition may now provide valuable assistance in cueing a human analyst where to look in the images under consideration. This paper describes the MUSIC system being developed for the US Air Force to provide multisensor image cueing. The tool works across multiple image phenomenologies and fuses the evidence across the set of available imagery. MUSIC is designed to work with a wide variety of sensors and platforms, and provide cueing to an image analyst in an information-rich environment. The paper concentrates on the current integration of algorithms into an extensible infrastructure to allow cueing in multiple image types.

  7. Multi-Sensor Characterization of the Boreal Forest: Initial Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reith, Ernest; Roberts, Dar A.; Prentiss, Dylan

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented in an initial apriori knowledge approach toward using complementary multi-sensor multi-temporal imagery in characterizing vegetated landscapes over a site in the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data were segmented using multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis and binary decision tree approaches. Individual date/sensor land cover maps had overall accuracies between 55.0% - 69.8%. The best eight land cover layers from all dates and sensors correctly characterized 79.3% of the cover types. An overlay approach was used to create a final land cover map. An overall accuracy of 71.3% was achieved in this multi-sensor approach, a 1.5% improvement over our most accurate single scene technique, but 8% less than the original input. Black spruce was evaluated to be particularly undermapped in the final map possibly because it was also contained within jack pine and muskeg land coverages.

  8. Characrterizing frozen ground with multisensor remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csatho, B. M.; Ping, C.; Everett, L. R.; Kimble, J. M.; Michaelson, G.; Tremper, C.

    2006-12-01

    data collected by the NASA ATM airborne scanning laser system and multi-temporal aerial photographs are available for the ice free regions of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. The area has been the focus of geologic, soil and glaciogical mapping as well as ecological studies for many decades, making it an ideal test site for developing new interpretation techniques. Examples shown from the Dry Valleys include the delineation and characterization of patterned ground and mapping soil distribution and landscape units by using spatial operations and object-based contextual image classification of a multisensor and multiscale data set, which consists of multi- and hyperspectral images and high resolution topography. state.edu/DEM

  9. Intelligent multi-sensor integrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Richard A.; Jain, Ramesh; Weymouth, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Growth in the intelligence of space systems requires the use and integration of data from multiple sensors. Generic tools are being developed for extracting and integrating information obtained from multiple sources. The full spectrum is addressed for issues ranging from data acquisition, to characterization of sensor data, to adaptive systems for utilizing the data. In particular, there are three major aspects to the project, multisensor processing, an adaptive approach to object recognition, and distributed sensor system integration.

  10. Supporting the Copernicus POD Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Heike; Springer, Tim; Otten, Michiel; Fernandez, Jaime; Escobar, Diego; Femenias, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The Copernicus POD (Precise Orbit Determination) Service is part of the Copernicus PDGS (Payload Data Ground Segment) of the Sentinel missions. A GMV-led consortium is operating the Copernicus POD Service being in charge of generating precise orbital products and auxiliary data files for their use as part of the processing chains of the respective Sentinel PDGS. As part of the consortium PosiTim is responsible for implementing and testing software and model updates thoroughly before integrating them in the operational chain of the Copernicus POD Service. The NAPEOS (Navigation Package for Earth Observation Satellites) software is used for the generation of the orbit products within the Copernicus POD Service. The test procedures and results obtained for a recent software and model update to IERS 2010 Conventions are presented. It has been tested as well that the arc length of 72 hours for the non-time critical (NTC) orbit solutions might be shorten to 48 hours without losing accuracy. Orbit comparisons to external solutions help to validate the different orbit solutions. GPS antenna phase centre variations (PCVs) are one of the largest systematic error sources in POD. Since the satellite body may cause signal multipath a ground calibration of the GPS antenna without taking into account the satellite body might not be sufficient to quantify the PCVs. The PCVs are therefore obtained by an in-flight calibration. A first map for the PCVs determined from a limited amount of data at the beginning of the mission has shown significant multipath signals in parts of the antenna for code and carrier phase measurements. Since the satellite has moving parts it has been checked carefully if these multipath regions are moving as well or if they are antenna-fixed. Normally the correction maps are only applied for the carrier phase measurements. Since significant multipath has been spotted for the code measurements as well investigations are performed to study the impact of

  11. Mesquite pods into nutritious foods

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mesquite trees produce bean pods that a new process can turn into nutrient-rich foods. A simple, automated procedure converts the dried mesquite pods into a high-protein, sweet-tasting flour and a gum that can be used as a natural thickening additive in foods. Standard food-processing equipment can be used. For flour, whole pods are ground with a disk mill, which produces a mixture of seeds and flour. The mixture is then sifted to separate the two components. Its the seeds that contain the gum - a thin, white film that lines the inside of the hard, brown seed coat. To extract gum, seeds are split and soaked in an alkali solution. The solution, after being neutralized, is sprayed through a fine-mist nozzle into a heated chamber, where it dries as a fine powder of edible gum. This spray-drying is the same process that converts fresh milk into powdered. Analyses showed that the natural gum in mesquite pods is better than the guar gum US food processors now import to use as a natural thickener in ice cream; salad dressings, puddings, and other foods.

  12. Multi-sensor fusion development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bish, Sheldon; Rohrer, Matthew; Scheffel, Peter; Bennett, Kelly

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and McQ Inc. are developing a generic sensor fusion architecture that involves several diverse processes working in combination to create a dynamic task-oriented, real-time informational capability. Processes include sensor data collection, persistent and observational data storage, and multimodal and multisensor fusion that includes the flexibility to modify the fusion program rules for each mission. Such a fusion engine lends itself to a diverse set of sensing applications and architectures while using open-source software technologies. In this paper, we describe a fusion engine architecture that combines multimodal and multi-sensor fusion within an Open Standard for Unattended Sensors (OSUS) framework. The modular, plug-and-play architecture of OSUS allows future fusion plugin methodologies to have seamless integration into the fusion architecture at the conceptual and implementation level. Although beyond the scope of this paper, this architecture allows for data and information manipulation and filtering for an array of applications.

  13. Multisensor system for mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvoisin, Herbert A., III; Steinway, William J.; Tomassi, Mark S.; Thomas, James E.; Morris, Carl A.; Kahn, Barry A.; Stern, Peter H.; Krywick, Scott; Johnson, Kevin; Dennis, Kevin; Betts, George; Blood, Ben; Simoneaux, Wanda; Miller, John L.

    1998-10-01

    A multi-sensor approach to buried object discrimination has been developed by Coleman Research Corporation (CRC) as a practical successor to currently prevalent metal detectors. The CRC multi-sensor unit integrates with and complements standard metal detectors to enable the detection of low- metallic and non-metallic anti-tank and anti-personnel mines as well as the older metallic-jacketed mines. The added sensors include Ground Penetration Radar (GPR) and Infrared (IR). The GPR consists of a lightweight (less than 1 LB) snap on antenna unit, a belt attached electronics unit (less than 5 LB) and batteries. The IR consists of a lightweight (less than 3 LB) head mounted camera, a heads-up virtual display, and a belt attached processing unit (Figure 1.1). The output from Automatic Target Recognition algorithms provide the detection of metallic and non-metallic mines in real-time on the IR display and as an audio alert from the GPR and MD.

  14. Multisensor Investigation of Deep Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houze, R.; Yuan, J.; Barnes, H. C.; Brodzik, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    The array of sensors for studying cloud systems from space provides the opportunity to globally map the occurrence of various types of deep convective cloud systems more precisely than ever before. The revolutionary TRMM satellite has not only determined rainfall from space but also identified the structures of storms producing the rainfall and how the different types of convective structures relate to features of the global circulation. The multiple sensors of the A-Train constellation have added more capacity to globally map convective cloud system types. By simultaneously using Aqua's MODIS 11-micron brightness temperature sensor to map cloud-top size and coldness, Aqua's AMSR-E passive microwave to detect rainfall, and CloudSat's cloud radar observations to see the internal structure of the nonprecipitating anvil clouds extending laterally from the precipitating cores of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), we have objectively identified and mapped different types of MCSs. This multisensor analysis has determined the degrees to which MCSs vary according to size, amount of anvil cloud, and whether or not they occur separately or in merged complexes. Using these multisensor-derived quantities, we have established the patterns in which tropical MCSs occur over land, ocean, or the maritime continent. Ongoing work is integrating more sensors and other innovative global datasets into the analysis of A-Train data to further knowledge of MCSs and their variability over the Earth. Global lightning data are being integrated with the A-Train data to better understand convective intensity in different types of MCSs. Environments of the MCSs identified by multisensor A-Train analysis are being further analyzed using AIRS temperature profiles and MODIS and CALIPSO aerosol fields to better document the influence of environmental properties on the different types of mesoscale system. The integration of aerosol loading into the global analysis of the patterns of occurrence of

  15. Concentrated liquid detergent pod ingestion in children.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Natasha; Jaeger, Matthew W

    2014-12-01

    Concentrated liquid detergent pods are an emerging public health hazard, especially in pediatric patients. Ingestion is a more common route of exposure for liquid detergent pods compared with non-pod detergents and it tends to be associated with more severe adverse effects. We present 3 cases that demonstrate the varied clinical symptoms resulting from detergent pod ingestion. These cases not only demonstrate findings such as gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms but also show more rare neurological symptoms. The cases highlight the dangers of concentrated liquid detergent pod ingestion. To help prevent further life-threatening injuries, there is a need for more consumer information and provider knowledge about the potential adverse complications.

  16. Semiotic foundation for multisensor-multilook fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myler, Harley R.

    1998-07-01

    This paper explores the concept of an application of semiotic principles to the design of a multisensor-multilook fusion system. Semiotics is an approach to analysis that attempts to process media in a united way using qualitative methods as opposed to quantitative. The term semiotic refers to signs, or signatory data that encapsulates information. Semiotic analysis involves the extraction of signs from information sources and the subsequent processing of the signs into meaningful interpretations of the information content of the source. The multisensor fusion problem predicated on a semiotic system structure and incorporating semiotic analysis techniques is explored and the design for a multisensor system as an information fusion system is explored. Semiotic analysis opens the possibility of using non-traditional sensor sources and modalities in the fusion process, such as verbal and textual intelligence derived from human observers. Examples of how multisensor/multimodality data might be analyzed semiotically is shown and discussion on how a semiotic system for multisensor fusion could be realized is outlined. The architecture of a semiotic multisensor fusion processor that can accept situational awareness data is described, although an implementation has not as yet been constructed.

  17. Multisensor data fusion algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, D.A.; Chadwick, M.D.; Goudy, S.P.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a two-year LDRD research effort into multisensor data fusion. We approached the problem by addressing the available types of data, preprocessing that data, and developing fusion algorithms using that data. The report reflects these three distinct areas. First, the possible data sets for fusion are identified. Second, automated registration techniques for imagery data are analyzed. Third, two fusion techniques are presented. The first fusion algorithm is based on the two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform. Using test images, the wavelet algorithm is compared against intensity modulation and intensity-hue-saturation image fusion algorithms that are available in commercial software. The wavelet approach outperforms the other two fusion techniques by preserving spectral/spatial information more precisely. The wavelet fusion algorithm was also applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery data. The second algorithm is based on a linear-regression technique. We analyzed the technique using the same Landsat and SPOT data.

  18. Observer POD for radiographic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kanzler, Daniel E-mail: uwe.ewert@bam.de Ewert, Uwe E-mail: uwe.ewert@bam.de Müller, Christina E-mail: uwe.ewert@bam.de; Pitkänen, Jorma

    2015-03-31

    The radiographic testing (RT) is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method capable of finding volumetric and open planar defects depending on their orientation. The radiographic contrast is higher for larger penetrated length of the defect in a component. Even though, the detectability of defects does not only depend on the contrast, but also on the noise, the defect area and the geometry of the defect. The currently applied Probability of Detection (POD) approach uses a detection threshold that is only based on a constant noise level or on a constant contrast threshold. This does not reflect accurately the results of evaluations by human observers. A new approach is introduced, using the widely applied POD evaluation and additionally a detection threshold depending on the lateral area and shape of the indication. This work shows the process of calculating the POD curves with simulated data by the modeling software aRTist and with artificial reference data of different defect types, such as ASTM E 476 EPS plates, flat bottom holes and notches. Additional experiments with different operators confirm that the depth of a defect, the lateral area and shape of its indication contribute with different weight to the detectability of the defect if evaluated by human operators on monitors.

  19. Classification and Modelling of Urban Micro-Climates Using Multisensoral and Multitemporal Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, B.; Langkamp, T.; Böhner, J.; Daneke, C.; Oßenbrügge, J.; Schempp, S.

    2012-07-01

    Remote sensing has widely been used in urban climatology since it has the advantage of a simultaneous synoptic view of the full urban surface. Methods include the analysis of surface temperature patterns, spatial (biophysical) indicators for urban heat island modelling, and flux measurements. Another approach is the automated classification of urban morphologies or structural types. In this study it was tested, whether Local Climate Zones (a new typology of thermally 'rather' homogenous urban morphologies) can be automatically classified from multisensor and multitemporal earth observation data. Therefore, a large number of parameters were derived from different datasets, including multitemporal Landsat data and morphological profiles as well as windowed multiband signatures from an airborne IFSAR-DHM. The results for Hamburg, Germany, show that different datasets have high potential for the differentiation of urban morphologies. Multitemporal thermal data performed very well with up to 96.3 % overall classification accuracy with a neuronal network classifier. The multispectral data reached 95.1 % and the morphological profiles 83.2 %.The multisensor feature sets reached up to 97.4 % with 100 selected features, but also small multisensoral feature sets reached good results. This shows that microclimatic meaningful urban structures can be classified from different remote sensing datasets. Further, the potential of the parameters for spatiotemporal modelling of the mean urban heat island was tested. Therefore, a comprehensive mobile measurement campaign with GPS loggers and temperature sensors on public buses was conducted in order to gain in situ data in high spatial and temporal resolution.

  20. Multisensor/multimission surveillance aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobe, John T.

    1994-10-01

    The realignment of international powers, and the formation of new nations has resulted in increasing worldwide concern over border security, an expanding refugee problem, protection of fishery and mineral areas, and smuggling of all types. The focus on military services, to protect or defend against these threats of vital, national interest, is shifting to other government agencies and even commercial contractors to apply innovative and cost effective solutions. Previously, airborne surveillance and reconnaissance platforms have been large, mission dedicated military aircraft. The time has arrived for a smaller, more efficient, and more effective airborne capability. This paper briefly outlines a system of systems approach that smaller nations can afford to incorporate in their budgets, while greatly expanding their surveillance capability. The characteristics of specific cameras and sensors are purposely not addressed, so the emphasis can be placed on the integration of multiple sensors and capabilities.

  1. Multisensor image fusion techniques in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Manfred

    Current and future remote sensing programs such as Landsat, SPOT, MOS, ERS, JERS, and the space platform's Earth Observing System (Eos) are based on a variety of imaging sensors that will provide timely and repetitive multisensor earth observation data on a global scale. Visible, infrared and microwave images of high spatial and spectral resolution will eventually be available for all parts of the earth. It is essential that efficient processing techniques be developed to cope with the large multisensor data volumes. This paper discusses data fusion techniques that have proved successful for synergistic merging of SPOT HRV, Landsat TM and SIR-B images. It is demonstrated that these techniques can be used to improve rectification accuracies, to depicit greater cartographic detail, and to enhance spatial resolution in multisensor image data sets.

  2. Hierarchical Robot Control In A Multisensor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanu, Bir; Thune, Nils; Lee, Jih Kun; Thune, Mari

    1987-03-01

    Automatic recognition, inspection, manipulation and assembly of objects will be a common denominator in most of tomorrow's highly automated factories. These tasks will be handled by intelligent computer controlled robots with multisensor capabilities which contribute to desired flexibility and adaptability. The control of a robot in such a multisensor environment becomes of crucial importance as the complexity of the problem grows exponentially with the number of sensors, tasks, commands and objects. In this paper we present an approach which uses CAD (Computer-Aided Design) based geometric and functional models of objects together with action oriented neuroschemas to recognize and manipulate objects by a robot in a multisensor environment. The hierarchical robot control system is being implemented on a BBN Butterfly multi processor. Index terms: CAD, Hierarchical Control, Hypothesis Generation and Verification, Parallel Processing, Schemas

  3. An introduction to multisensor data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.L.; Llinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    Multisensor data fusion is an emerging technology applied to Department of Defense (DoD) areas such as automated target recognition, battlefield surveillance, and guidance and control of autonomous vehicles, and to non-DoD applications such as monitoring of complex machinery, medical diagnosis, and smart buildings. Techniques for multisensor data fusion are drawn from a wide range of areas including artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, statistical estimation, and other areas. This paper provides a tutorial on data fusion, introducing data fusion applications, process models, and identification of applicable techniques. Comments are made on the state-of-the-art in data fusion.

  4. Corneal injuries from liquid detergent pods.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael E; West, Constance E

    2014-10-01

    Laundry and dishwasher detergent "pods" were introduced to the United States market in 2010 and are sold by several manufacturers. They represent a high percentage of household cleaning product exposure in the United Kingdom. We present a consecutive case series of 10 children seen in a 9-month period with corneal injuries from exposure to liquid detergent pods.

  5. Listening Habits of iPod Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Michael; Marozeau, Jeremy; Cleveland, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate real-environment iPod listening levels for listeners in 4 environments to gain insight into whether average listeners receive dosages exceeding occupational noise exposure guidelines as a result of their listening habits. Method: The earbud outputs of iPods were connected directly into the inputs of a digital recorder to make…

  6. In iPod We Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaisdell, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    Beloved by students worldwide, iPod is becoming a presence in the classroom as teachers discover its many educational uses. At heart, the iPod's appeal is about its easily accessible audio and visual content in an attractive and conveniently sized package. Mechanically, the product is mostly a hard disk drive (although some models use only flash…

  7. Airborne Transparencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Lois Thommason

    1984-01-01

    Starting from a science project on flight, art students discussed and investigated various means of moving in space. Then they made acetate illustrations which could be used as transparencies. The projection phenomenon made the illustrations look airborne. (CS)

  8. Solving Cocoa Pod Sigmoid Growth Model with Newton Raphson Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Albert Ling Sheng; Maisin, Navies

    Cocoa pod growth modelling are useful in crop management, pest and disease management and yield forecasting. Recently, the Beta Growth Function has been used to determine the pod growth model due to its unique for the plant organ growth which is zero growth rate at both the start and end of a precisely defined growth period. Specific pod size (7cm to 10cm in length) is useful in cocoa pod borer (CPB) management for pod sleeving or pesticide spraying. The Beta Growth Function is well-fitted to the pods growth data of four different cocoa clones under non-linear function with time (t) as its independent variable which measured pod length and diameter weekly started at 8 weeks after fertilization occur until pods ripen. However, the same pod length among the clones did not indicate the same pod age since the morphological characteristics for cocoa pods vary among the clones. Depending on pod size for all the clones as guideline in CPB management did not give information on pod age, therefore it is important to study the pod age at specific pod sizes on different clones. Hence, Newton Raphson method is used to solve the non-linear equation of the Beta Growth Function of four different group of cocoa pod at specific pod size.

  9. Numerical Investigation on Ship Podded Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacuraru, Florin; Lungu, Adrian

    2010-09-01

    The paper proposes a numerical investigation based on RANS computation for solving the viscous flow around a ship podded propulsion unit. A set of computations has been performed to better understand the influences exerted by different configurations on the wake structure in the propeller disk in the pushing type case. The RANS computation method is employed to evaluate the flow field structure around the podded propulsion units and the forces acting on it. Hydrodynamic design podded system has not, so far, been fully established in the propeller-pod-strut system. It is necessary to use a reliable procedure in the design of such propulsion systems to increase the propulsion efficiency. In an attempt to meet these needs, the present paper introduces a numerical procedure to analyze the hydrodynamic performance of the propeller and steering system using a combined lifting line and RANS methods.

  10. RecceLite tactical reconnaissance pod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhl, Bernd

    2001-12-01

    New generation of tactical reconnaissance pod for high performance aircraft. The pod will contain a high resolution multispectral sensor suite for day/night missions, digital solid state recorder and optional data link. The modular structure of the pod is based on the Litening targeting pod and uses the same interface to the aircraft, saving cost for new system integration and certification. The system is designed for medium to low altitude reconnaissance missions. The overall system includes modules for mission planning and image evaluation on ground. RecceLite is an affordable high performance reconnaissance system with state of the art technology. Due to the modular design it provides growth potential and easy integration of future developments.

  11. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  12. Adaptive multisensor fusion for planetary exploration rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collin, Marie-France; Kumar, Krishen; Pampagnin, Luc-Henri

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the adaptive multisensor fusion system currently being designed at NASA/Johnson Space Center is to provide a robotic rover with assured vision and safe navigation capabilities during robotic missions on planetary surfaces. Our approach consists of using multispectral sensing devices ranging from visible to microwave wavelengths to fulfill the needs of perception for space robotics. Based on the illumination conditions and the sensors capabilities knowledge, the designed perception system should automatically select the best subset of sensors and their sensing modalities that will allow the perception and interpretation of the environment. Then, based on reflectance and emittance theoretical models, the sensor data are fused to extract the physical and geometrical surface properties of the environment surface slope, dielectric constant, temperature and roughness. The theoretical concepts, the design and first results of the multisensor perception system are presented.

  13. Multisensor benchmark data for riot control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Uwe; Höpken, Marc; Dürr, Bernhard; Metzler, Jürgen; Willersinn, Dieter

    2008-10-01

    Quick and precise response is essential for riot squads when coping with escalating violence in crowds. Often it is just a single person, known as the leader of the gang, who instigates other people and thus is responsible of excesses. Putting this single person out of action in most cases leads to a de-escalating situation. Fostering de-escalations is one of the main tasks of crowd and riot control. To do so, extensive situation awareness is mandatory for the squads and can be promoted by technical means such as video surveillance using sensor networks. To develop software tools for situation awareness appropriate input data with well-known quality is needed. Furthermore, the developer must be able to measure algorithm performance and ongoing improvements. Last but not least, after algorithm development has finished and marketing aspects emerge, meeting of specifications must be proved. This paper describes a multisensor benchmark which exactly serves this purpose. We first define the underlying algorithm task. Then we explain details about data acquisition and sensor setup and finally we give some insight into quality measures of multisensor data. Currently, the multisensor benchmark described in this paper is applied to the development of basic algorithms for situational awareness, e.g. tracking of individuals in a crowd.

  14. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  15. Disaster-hardened imaging POD for PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice; Frost, Meryll

    2005-04-01

    After the events of 9/11, many people questioned their ability to keep critical services operational in the face of massive infrastructure failure. Hospitals increased their backup and recovery power, made plans for emergency water and food, and operated on a heightened alert awareness with more frequent disaster drills. In a film-based radiology department, if a portable X-ray unit, a CT unit, an Ultrasound unit, and an film processor could be operated on emergency power, a limited, but effective number of studies could be performed. However, in a digital department, there is a reliance on the network infrastructure to deliver images to viewing locations. The system developed for our institution uses several imaging PODS, a name we chose because it implied to us a safe, contained environment. Each POD is a stand-alone emergency powered network capable of generating images and displaying them in the POD or printing them to a DICOM printer. The technology we used to create a POD consists of a computer with dual network interface cards joining our private, local POD network, to the hospital network. In the case of an infrastructure failure, each POD can and does work independently to produce CTs, CRs, and Ultrasounds. The system has been tested during disaster drills and works correctly, producing images using equipment technologists are comfortable using with very few emergency switch-over tasks. Purpose: To provide imaging capabilities in the event of a natural or man-made disaster with infrastructure failure. Method: After the events of 9/11, many people questioned their ability to keep critical services operational in the face of massive infrastructure failure. Hospitals increased their backup and recovery power, made plans for emergency water and food, and operated on a heightened alert awareness with more frequent disaster drills. In a film-based radiology department, if a portable X-ray unit, a CT unit, an Ultrasound unit, and an film processor could be

  16. Gold resource modeling using pod indicator kriging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargawa, Waterman Sulistyana; Rauf, Abdul; Amri, Nur Ali

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes an implementation of the pod indicator kriging method used to gold resource modeling. Method such as ordinary kriging estimate the mean grade of a block that is fairly large. The usual outcome is that large blocks rarely turn out to be all ore or all waste, thus making reserve estimates an incorrect estimate of what will be mined. Pod indicator kriging offers a solution to this problem by estimating the distribution of grade values within a large block, rather than just estimating the mean grade of the block. Knowing the distribution of grade value within the block, it is then easy to calculate the proportion of the block that is above cutoff grade and the grade of the ore above cutoff grade. This research shows that the pod indicator kriging model is quite applicable and reliable in gold resourcemodeling.

  17. Probability of Detection (POD) Demonstration Transferability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Special Level POD demonstration tests are typically performed on flat plates of a single material containing fatigue cracks with aspect rations between 0.3 and 0.5. Subsequent fracture mechanics analyses consider aspect ratios that range from 0.1 to 0.5. There is debate within the NDE community about the detectability of shallow cracks associated with NASA Special Level penetrant inspections that are routinely performed by propellant tank manufactures. The objective of the task is to investigate effect of crack aspect ratio on POD crack sizes for the penetrant inspection technique.

  18. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiuhong

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, some remote-sensing applications require advanced airborne multi-sensor systems to provide high performance reflective and emissive spectral imaging measurement rapidly over large areas. The key or unique problem of characteristics is associated with a black box back-end system that operates a suite of cutting-edge imaging sensors to collect simultaneously the high throughput reflective and emissive spectral imaging data with precision georeference. This back-end system needs to be portable, easy-to-use, and reliable with advanced onboard processing. The innovation of the black box backend is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS integrates a complex embedded system of systems with dedicated power and signal electronic circuits inside to serve a suite of configurable cutting-edge electro- optical (EO), long-wave infrared (LWIR), and medium-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras, a hyperspectral imaging scanner, and a GPS and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for atmospheric and surface remote sensing. Its compatible sensor packages include NASA s 1,024 1,024 pixel LWIR quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) imager; a 60.5 megapixel BuckEye EO camera; and a fast (e.g. 200+ scanlines/s) and wide swath-width (e.g., 1,920+ pixels) CCD/InGaAs imager-based visible/near infrared reflectance (VNIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometer. MAICSS records continuous precision georeferenced and time-tagged multisensor throughputs to mass storage devices at a high aggregate rate, typically 60 MB/s for its LWIR/EO payload. MAICSS is a complete stand-alone imaging server instrument with an easy-to-use software package for either autonomous data collection or interactive airborne operation. Advanced multisensor data acquisition and onboard processing software features have been implemented for MAICSS. With the onboard processing for real time image development, correction, histogram-equalization, compression, georeference, and

  19. Multi-sensor magnetoencephalography with atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Cort N.; Schwindt, P. D. D.; Weisend, M.

    2013-09-01

    The authors have detected magnetic fields from the human brain with two independent, simultaneously operating rubidium spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometers. Evoked responses from auditory stimulation were recorded from multiple subjects with two multi-channel magnetometers located on opposite sides of the head. Signal processing techniques enabled by multi-channel measurements were used to improve signal quality. This is the first demonstration of multi-sensor atomic magnetometer magnetoencephalography and provides a framework for developing a non-cryogenic, whole-head magnetoencephalography array for source localization.

  20. Multi-sensor analysis of urban ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallo, K.; Ji, L.

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the synthesis of multiple space-based sensors to characterize the urban environment Single scene data (e.g., ASTER visible and near-IR surface reflectance, and land surface temperature data), multi-temporal data (e.g., one year of 16-day MODIS and AVHRR vegetation index data), and DMSP-OLS nighttime light data acquired in the early 1990s and 2000 were evaluated for urban ecosystem analysis. The advantages of a multi-sensor approach for the analysis of urban ecosystem processes are discussed.

  1. Multi-sensor magnetoencephalography with atomic magnetometers

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cort N; Schwindt, P D D; Weisend, M

    2014-01-01

    The authors have detected magnetic fields from the human brain with two independent, simultaneously operating rubidium spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometers. Evoked responses from auditory stimulation were recorded from multiple subjects with two multi-channel magnetometers located on opposite sides of the head. Signal processing techniques enabled by multi-channel measurements were used to improve signal quality. This is the first demonstration of multi-sensor atomic magnetometer magnetoencephalography and provides a framework for developing a non-cryogenic, whole-head magnetoencephalography array for source localization. PMID:23939051

  2. The Attack of the Pod People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In an article in the "Northern Star," a university student newspaper, reporter Lauren Stott began a lyrical note: "It's every student's dream: Wake up for school, stumble over to the computer, and download the day's class lectures ... then crawl back into bed--iPod in one hand, notebook in the other." The object of the student journalist's…

  3. Multisensor configurations for early sniper detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, D.; Bank, D.; Carlsson, L.; Dulski, R.; Duval, Y.; Fournier, G.; Grasser, R.; Habberstad, H.; Jacquelard, C.; Kastek, M.; Otterlei, R.; Piau, G.-P.; Pierre, F.; Renhorn, I.; Sjöqvist, L.; Steinvall, O.; Trzaskawka, P.

    2011-11-01

    This contribution reports some of the fusion results from the EDA SNIPOD project, where different multisensor configurations for sniper detection and localization have been studied. A project aim has been to cover the whole time line from sniper transport and establishment to shot. To do so, different optical sensors with and without laser illumination have been tested, as well as acoustic arrays and solid state projectile radar. A sensor fusion node collects detections and background statistics from all sensors and employs hypothesis testing and multisensor estimation programs to produce unified and reliable sniper alarms and accurate sniper localizations. Operator interfaces that connect to the fusion node should be able to support both sniper countermeasures and the guidance of personnel to safety. Although the integrated platform has not been actually built, sensors have been evaluated at common field trials with military ammunitions in the caliber range 5.56 to 12.7 mm, and at sniper distances up to 900 m. It is concluded that integrating complementary sensors for pre- and postshot sniper detection in a common system with automatic detection and fusion will give superior performance, compared to stand alone sensors. A practical system is most likely designed with a cost effective subset of available complementary sensors.

  4. A Wing Pod-based Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar on HIAPER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, Jothiram; Tsai, Peisang; Ellis, Scott; Loew, Eric; Lee, Wen-Chau; Emmett, Joanthan

    2014-05-01

    One of the attractive features of a millimeter wave radar system is its ability to detect micron-sized particles that constitute clouds with lower than 0.1 g m-3 liquid or ice water content. Scanning or vertically-pointing ground-based millimeter wavelength radars are used to study stratocumulus (Vali et al. 1998; Kollias and Albrecht 2000) and fair-weather cumulus (Kollias et al. 2001). Airborne millimeter wavelength radars have been used for atmospheric remote sensing since the early 1990s (Pazmany et al. 1995). Airborne millimeter wavelength radar systems, such as the University of Wyoming King Air Cloud Radar (WCR) and the NASA ER-2 Cloud Radar System (CRS), have added mobility to observe clouds in remote regions and over oceans. Scientific requirements of millimeter wavelength radar are mainly driven by climate and cloud initiation studies. Survey results from the cloud radar user community indicated a common preference for a narrow beam W-band radar with polarimetric and Doppler capabilities for airborne remote sensing of clouds. For detecting small amounts of liquid and ice, it is desired to have -30 dBZ sensitivity at a 10 km range. Additional desired capabilities included a second wavelength and/or dual-Doppler winds. Modern radar technology offers various options (e.g., dual-polarization and dual-wavelength). Even though a basic fixed beam Doppler radar system with a sensitivity of -30 dBZ at 10 km is capable of satisfying cloud detection requirements, the above-mentioned additional options, namely dual-wavelength, and dual-polarization, significantly extend the measurement capabilities to further reduce any uncertainty in radar-based retrievals of cloud properties. This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter wave radar, preliminary radar measurements and corresponding derived scientific products. Since some of the primary engineering requirements of this millimeter wave radar are that it should be deployable on an airborne platform

  5. Copernicus POD Service: Ready for Sentinel-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, H.; Fernández, J.; Escobar, D.; Féménias, P.; Flohrer, C.; Otten, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Copernicus POD Service is part of the Copernicus PDGS Ground Segment of the Sentinel missions. A GMV-led consortium is operating the Copernicus POD Service being in charge of generating precise orbital products and auxiliary data files for their use as part of the processing chains of the respective Sentinel PDGS. The Sentinel-1, -2 & -3 missions have different but very demanding requirements in terms of orbital accuracy and timeliness. Orbital products in Near Real Time (latency: 30 min), Short Time Critical (1.5 days) and Non-time Critical (20-30 days) are required. The accuracy requirements are very challenging, targeting 5 cm in 3D for Sentinel-1 and 2-3 cm in radial direction for Sentinel-3. Sentinel-3A carries, in addition to a GPS receiver a laser retro reflector and a DORIS receiver. On the one hand, the three different techniques GPS, SLR and DORIS make POD more complex but, on the other hand, it is very helpful to have independent techniques available for validation of the orbit results. The successful POD processing for Sentinel-1A is a good preparation for Sentinel-3A due to the similar demanding orbit accuracy requirements. The Copernicus POD Service is ready for Sentinel-3A and the service will process GPS and SLR data routinely and has the capacity to process DORIS in NTC and reprocessing campaigns. The three independent orbit determination techniques on Sentinel-3 offer big potential for scientific exploitation. Carrying all three techniques together makes the satellite, e.g., very useful for combining all the techniques on observation level as it could only be done for Jason-2 until now. The Sentinel POD Quality Working Group strongly supporting the CPOD Service delivers additional orbit solutions to validate the CPOD results independently. The recommendations from this body guarantee that the CPOD Service is updated following state-of-the-art algorithms, models and conventions. The QWG also focuses on the scientific exploitation of the

  6. Simulation supported POD: Methodology and HFET validation case

    SciTech Connect

    Jenson, F.; Iakovleva, E.; Dominguez, N.

    2011-06-23

    Structure reliability guaranty requires prior evaluation of non destructive testing methods. The concept of Probability of Detection (POD) is generally used to quantitatively assess performances and reliability of testing operations. Such probabilistic approaches take into account the uncertainties that appear during inspections and that are responsible for the output variability. POD curve determination is based on costly and time consuming experimental campaigns. Increasing demand of NDT configurations requiring POD evaluation makes cost reduction of POD campaigns a major issue. A new trend is to apply simulation in the context of probabilistic approaches in order to replace some of the experimental data required to determine the POD with simulation results. This paper presents results of simulation based POD curves of a high frequency eddy current inspection procedure obtained with the new POD module of CIVA. The methodology used for describing uncertainties on the input simulation parameters is described and comparisons with experimental results are presented and discussed.

  7. Analysis and design of pod silencers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munjal, M. L.

    2003-05-01

    Parallel baffle mufflers or split silencers are used extensively in heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems for increased attenuation of noise within a short or given length. Acoustic analysis of rectangular parallel baffle mufflers runs on the same lines as that of a rectangular duct lined on two sides. This simplification would not hold for circular configurations. Often, a cylindrical pod is inserted into a circular lined duct to increase its attenuation (or transmission loss), thereby making the flow passage annular and providing an additional absorptive layer on the inner side of this annular passage. This configuration, called a pod silencer, is analyzed here for the four-pole parameters as well as transmission loss, making use of the bulk reaction model. The effect of thin protective film or a highly perforated metallic plate is duly incorporated by means of a grazing-flow impedance. Use of appropriate boundary conditions leads to a set of linear homogeneous equations which in turn lead to a transcendental frequency equation in the unknown complex axial wave number. This is solved by means of the Newton-Raphson method, and the axial wave number is then used in the expressions for transmission loss as well as the transfer matrix parameters. Finally, results of a parametric study are reported to help the designer in optimization of a pod silencer configuration within a given overall size for minimal cost.

  8. Joint multisensor exploitation for mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaven, Scott G.; Stocker, Alan D.; Winter, Edwin M.

    2004-09-01

    Robust, timely, and remote detection of mines and minefields is central to both tactical and humanitarian demining efforts, yet remains elusive for single-sensor systems. Here we present an approach to jointly exploit multisensor data for detection of mines from remotely sensed imagery. LWIR, MWIR, laser, multispectral, and radar sensor have been applied individually to the mine detection and each has shown promise for supporting automated detection. However, none of these sources individually provides a full solution for automated mine detection under all expected mine, background and environmental conditions. Under support from Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) we have developed an approach that, through joint exploitation of multiple sensors, improves detection performance over that achieved from a single sensor. In this paper we describe the joint exploitation method, which is based on fundamental detection theoretic principles, demonstrate the strength of the approach on imagery from minefields, and discuss extensions of the method to additional sensing modalities. The approach uses pre-threshold anomaly detector outputs to formulate accurate models for marginal and joint statistics across multiple detection or sensor features. This joint decision space is modeled and decision boundaries are computed from measured statistics. Since the approach adapts the decision criteria based on the measured statistics and no prior target training information is used, it provides a robust multi-algorithm or multisensor detection statistic. Results from the joint exploitation processing using two different imaging sensors over surface mines acquired by NVESD will be presented to illustrate the process. The potential of the approach to incorporate additional sensor sources, such as radar, multispectral and hyperspectral imagery is also illustrated.

  9. Linking goniometer measurements to hyperspectral and multisensor imagery for retrieval of beach properties and coastal characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Charles M.; Gray, Deric; Abelev, Andrei; Philpot, William; Montes, Marcos J.; Fusina, Robert; Musser, Joseph; Li, Rong-Rong; Vermillion, Michael; Smith, Geoffrey; Korwan, Daniel; Snow, Charlotte; Miller, W. David; Gardner, Joan; Sletten, Mark; Georgiev, Georgi; Truitt, Barry; Killmon, Marcus; Sellars, Jon; Woolard, Jason; Parrish, Christopher; Schwarzscild, Art

    2012-06-01

    In June 2011, a multi-sensor airborne remote sensing campaign was flown at the Virginia Coast Reserve Long Term Ecological Research site with coordinated ground and water calibration and validation (cal/val) measurements. Remote sensing imagery acquired during the ten day exercise included hyperspectral imagery (CASI-1500), topographic LiDAR, and thermal infra-red imagery, all simultaneously from the same aircraft. Airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquisition for a smaller subset of sites occurred in September 2011 (VCR'11). Focus areas for VCR'11 were properties of beaches and tidal flats and barrier island vegetation and, in the water column, shallow water bathymetry. On land, cal/val emphasized tidal flat and beach grain size distributions, density, moisture content, and other geotechnical properties such as shear and bearing strength (dynamic deflection modulus), which were related to hyperspectral BRDF measurements taken with the new NRL Goniometer for Outdoor Portable Hyperspectral Earth Reflectance (GOPHER). This builds on our earlier work at this site in 2007 related to beach properties and shallow water bathymetry. A priority for VCR'11 was to collect and model relationships between hyperspectral imagery, acquired from the aircraft at a variety of different phase angles, and geotechnical properties of beaches and tidal flats. One aspect of this effort was a demonstration that sand density differences are observable and consistent in reflectance spectra from GOPHER data, in CASI hyperspectral imagery, as well as in hyperspectral goniometer measurements conducted in our laboratory after VCR'11.

  10. Texting Dependence, iPod Dependence, and Delay Discounting.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, F Richard; Weatherly, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    We gave 127 undergraduates questionnaires about their iPod and texting dependence and 2 hypothetical delay discounting scenarios related to free downloaded songs and free texting for life. Using regression analyses we found that when iPod dependence was the dependent variable, Text2-excessive use, Text4-psychological and behavioral symptoms, iPod2-excessive use, and iPod3-relationship disruption were significant predictors of discounting. When texting dependence was the dependent variable, Text4-psychological and behavioral symptoms and iPod3-relationship disruption were significant predictors of discounting. These are the first data to show that delay discounting relates to certain aspects of social media, namely iPod and texting dependence. These data also show that across these 2 dependencies, both psychological and behavioral symptoms and relationship disruptions are affected. PMID:27424418

  11. Texting Dependence, iPod Dependence, and Delay Discounting.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, F Richard; Weatherly, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    We gave 127 undergraduates questionnaires about their iPod and texting dependence and 2 hypothetical delay discounting scenarios related to free downloaded songs and free texting for life. Using regression analyses we found that when iPod dependence was the dependent variable, Text2-excessive use, Text4-psychological and behavioral symptoms, iPod2-excessive use, and iPod3-relationship disruption were significant predictors of discounting. When texting dependence was the dependent variable, Text4-psychological and behavioral symptoms and iPod3-relationship disruption were significant predictors of discounting. These are the first data to show that delay discounting relates to certain aspects of social media, namely iPod and texting dependence. These data also show that across these 2 dependencies, both psychological and behavioral symptoms and relationship disruptions are affected.

  12. Toxicity following laundry detergent pod ingestion.

    PubMed

    Schneir, Aaron B; Rentmeester, Landen; Clark, Richard F; Cantrell, F Lee

    2013-06-01

    Laundry detergent pods (LDPs) have only recently become available in the United States, and there has been increasing concern regarding pediatric ingestions of them. We describe a 15-month-old female infant who ingested an LDP and had a depressed level of consciousness, metabolic acidosis, pulmonary toxicity, and swallowing difficulties. It is currently unclear what the exact etiologic agent(s) is responsible for the toxicity associated with LDPs. The case demonstrates the potential for significant toxicity following the ingestion of an LDP. Clearly, measures should be taken to avoid ingestions of these products.

  13. Change detection in very high resolution multisensor optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano Correa, Yady T.; Bovolo, Francesca; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2014-10-01

    This work aims at developing an approach to the detection of changes in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The main steps of the proposed method are: i) multisensor data homogenization; and ii) change detection in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The proposed approach takes advantage of: the conversion to physical quantities suggested by Pacifici et. al.1 , the framework for the design of systems for change detection in VHR images presented by Bruzzone and Bovolo2 and the framework for unsupervised change detection presented by Bovolo and Bruzzone3. Multisensor data homogenization is achieved during pre-processing by taking into account differences in both radiometric and geometric dimensions. Whereas change detection was approached by extracting proper features from multisensor images such that they result to be comparable (at a given level of abstraction) even if extracted from images acquired by different sensors. In order to illustrate the results, a data set made up of a QuickBird and a WorldView-2 images - acquired in 2006 and 2010 respectively - over an area located in the Trentino region of Italy were used. However, the proposed approach is thought to be exportable to multitemporal images coming from passive sensors other than the two mentioned above. The experimental results obtained on the QuickBird and WorlView-2 image pair are accurate. Thus opening to further experiments on multitemporal images acquired by other sensors.

  14. Diffuse corneal abrasion after ocular exposure to laundry detergent pod.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Rachel E; Baum, Carl R; Aronson, Paul L

    2015-02-01

    Although ocular injury from alkaline household cleaning products is well described, there is less known about the significance and extent of injury with ocular exposure to detergent pods. We report a 12-month-old with diffuse corneal abrasion caused by ocular contact with a laundry detergent pod. In addition to the known risks with aspiration with detergent pods, the potential for severe ocular injury is important for parents and clinicians to recognize. Children with ocular exposure to detergent pods should seek immediate medical care.

  15. Genetic analysis of pod dehiscence in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Weeden, Norman F; Brauner, Soren; Przyborowski, Jerzy A

    2002-01-01

    The inheritance of the dehiscent pod character was investigated in two recombinant inbred populations using a simplified correlation analysis. The approach identified three regions on the pea genome that affect the expression of pod dehiscence. The region on linkage group III corresponded to the expected position of Dpo, a gene known to influence pod dehiscence. A locus on linkage group V appeared to have a slightly smaller effect on expression of the phenotype. The third region was observed only in one cross, had a greater effect than Dpo, and was postulated to be yellow pod allele at the Gp locus

  16. NASA DOE POD NDE Capabilities Data Book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    This data book contains the Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection (POD) Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD) analyses of the nondestructive inspection data presented in the NTIAC, Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Capabilities Data Book, 3rd ed., NTIAC DB-97-02. DOEPOD is designed as a decision support system to validate inspection system, personnel, and protocol demonstrating 0.90 POD with 95% confidence at critical flaw sizes, a90/95. The test methodology used in DOEPOD is based on the field of statistical sequential analysis founded by Abraham Wald. Sequential analysis is a method of statistical inference whose characteristic feature is that the number of observations required by the procedure is not determined in advance of the experiment. The decision to terminate the experiment depends, at each stage, on the results of the observations previously made. A merit of the sequential method, as applied to testing statistical hypotheses, is that test procedures can be constructed which require, on average, a substantially smaller number of observations than equally reliable test procedures based on a predetermined number of observations.

  17. Visual programming environment for multisensor data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David L.; Kasmala, Gerald

    1996-06-01

    In recent years, numerous multisensor data fusion systems have been developed for a wide variety of applications. Defense related applications include; automatic target recognition systems, identification-friend-foe-neutral, automated situation assessment and threat assessment systems, and systems for smart weapons. Non-defense applications include; robotics, condition-based maintenance, environmental monitoring, and medical diagnostics. For each of these applications, multiple sensor data are combined to achieve inferences which are not generally possible using only a single sensor. Implementation of these data fusion systems often involves a significant amount of effort. In particular, software must be developed for components such as data base access, human computer interfaces and displays, communication software, and data fusion algorithms. While commercial software packages exist to assist development of data bases, communications, and human computer interfaces, there are no general purpose packages available to support the implementation of the data fusion algorithms. This paper describes a visual programming tool developed to assist in rapid prototyping of data fusion systems. This toolkit is modeled after the popular tool, Khoros, used by the image processing community. The tool described here is written in visual C, and provides the capability to rapidly implement and apply data fusion algorithms. An application to condition based maintenance is described.

  18. Multispectral multisensor image fusion using wavelet transforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, George P.

    1999-01-01

    Fusion techniques can be applied to multispectral and higher spatial resolution panchromatic images to create a composite image that is easier to interpret than the individual images. Wavelet transform-based multisensor, multiresolution fusion (a type of band sharpening) was applied to Landsat thematic mapper (TM) multispectral and coregistered higher resolution SPOT panchromatic images. The objective was to obtain increased spatial resolution, false color composite products to support the interpretation of land cover types wherein the spectral characteristics of the imagery are preserved to provide the spectral clues needed for interpretation. Since the fusion process should not introduce artifacts, a shift invariant implementation of the discrete wavelet transform (SIDWT) was used. These results were compared with those using the shift variant, discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Overall, the process includes a hue, saturation, and value color space transform to minimize color changes, and a reported point-wise maximum selection rule to combine transform coefficients. The performance of fusion based on the SIDWT and DWT was evaluated with a simulated TM 30-m spatial resolution test image and a higher resolution reference. Simulated imagery was made by blurring higher resolution color-infrared photography with the TM sensors' point spread function. The SIDWT based technique produced imagery with fewer artifacts and lower error between fused images and the full resolution reference. Image examples with TM and SPOT 10-m panchromatic illustrate the reduction in artifacts due to the SIDWT based fusion.

  19. Approach to multisensor/multilook information fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myler, Harley R.; Patton, Ronald

    1997-07-01

    We are developing a multi-sensor, multi-look Artificial Intelligence Enhanced Information Processor (AIEIP) that combines classification elements of geometric hashing, neural networks and evolutionary algorithms in a synergistic combination. The fusion is coordinated using a piecewise level fusion algorithm that operates on probability data from statistics of the individual classifiers. Further, the AIEIP incorporates a knowledge-based system to aid a user in evaluating target data dynamically. The AIEIP is intended as a semi-autonomous system that not only fuses information from electronic data sources, but also has the capability to include human input derived from battlefield awareness and intelligence sources. The system would be useful in either advanced reconnaissance information fusion tasks where multiple fixed sensors and human observer inputs must be combined or for a dynamic fusion scenario incorporating an unmanned vehicle swarm with dynamic, multiple sensor data inputs. This paper represents our initial results from experiments and data analysis using the individual components of the AIEIP on FLIR target sets of ground vehicles.

  20. Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, M.; Ichoku, C.; Leptoukh, G.

    2011-01-01

    Global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols have been extensively observed and measured using both spaceborne and ground-based instruments, especially during the last decade. Unique properties retrieved by the different instruments contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. However, some of these measurements remain underutilized, largely due to the complexities involved in analyzing them synergistically. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have established a Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS), which consistently samples and generates the spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient) of aerosol products from multiple spacebome sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Samples of satellite aerosol products are extracted over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations as well as over other locations of interest such as those with available ground-based aerosol observations. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between Level-2 aerosol observations from multiple sensors. In addition, the available well-characterized co-located ground-based data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products. This paper explains the sampling methodology and concepts used in MAPSS, and demonstrates specific examples of using MAPSS for an integrated analysis of multiple aerosol products.

  1. Multisensor data fusion for automated guided vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Rachad; Loffeld, Otmar; Hartmann, Klaus

    1994-11-01

    The paper addresses multi-sensor data fusion for the navigation of a 4 wheel vehicle with two driven wheels. The main advantage of such a configuration is its flexibility concerning free motion and navigation, this advantage is paid for, however, with an increased complexity concerning the dynamic model of the vehicle. The basic sensors of the vehicle comprise a fiber optical gyro, continuously delivering angular orientation information (namely the angular velocity), a landmark sensor, delivering global position information at those instants where a landmark is available and within the reach of the sensor. Eventually an undriven and therefore not subject to slippage measuring wheel can be added. The control inputs to the vehicle are taken to be noisy but nominally known but subject to errors due to measuring errors and unknown influences. The approach taken in the paper essentially uses Kalman filtering ideas namely extended Kalman filtering to implement multi model filtering. The Kalman filter incorporates the different noisy measurements in order to `fuse' them to one precise position and orientation estimate, copes with the only temporary available global information, and automatically realizes dead-reckoning where no global information is available. The paper covers the state space formulation of the problem, discuses the different models needed to describe the different motions. Based on a realistic state space model the corresponding Kalman filter is designed and tested with simulated measurement data delivered by a truth model simulator.

  2. Closeup of rear of LASRE pod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This rear view of the Linear Aerospike SR Experiment (LASRE) pod shows the business end of the linear aerospike rocket engine prior to the experiment's fit-check on Feb. 15, 1996, at Lockheed Martin Skunkworks in Palmdale, California. One of the differences between linear aerospike and traditional rocket engines is that the linear aerospike utilizes the airflow around the engine to form the outer 'nozzle.' There is no bell-shaped nozzle as is commonly seen on most rocket engines. The engine is made of a high strength copper alloy called NARloy-Z. The white curved ramps next to the copper area pictured act as the inner half of the engine's 'nozzle.' There are four thrusters (copper area) on each side of the engine for a total of eight which combine the fuel, oxidizer, and ignition source for the engine. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The

  3. Weighted measurement fusion Kalman estimator for multisensor descriptor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Yinfeng; Ran, Chenjian; Gao, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    For the multisensor linear stochastic descriptor system with correlated measurement noises, the fused measurement can be obtained based on the weighted least square (WLS) method, and the reduced-order state components are obtained applying singular value decomposition method. Then, the multisensor descriptor system is transformed to a fused reduced-order non-descriptor system with correlated noise. And the weighted measurement fusion (WMF) Kalman estimator of this reduced-order subsystem is presented. According to the relationship of the presented non-descriptor system and the original descriptor system, the WMF Kalman estimator and its estimation error variance matrix of the original multisensor descriptor system are presented. The presented WMF Kalman estimator has global optimality, and can avoid computing these cross-variances of the local Kalman estimator, compared with the state fusion method. A simulation example about three-sensors stochastic dynamic input and output systems in economy verifies the effectiveness.

  4. Vehicle passes detector based on multi-sensor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, D.; Sidorchuk, D.; Konovalenko, I.; Koptelov, I.

    2015-02-01

    The study concerned deals with a new approach to the problem of detecting vehicle passes in vision-based automatic vehicle classification system. Essential non-affinity image variations and signals from induction loop are the events that can be considered as detectors of an object presence. We propose several vehicle detection techniques based on image processing and induction loop signal analysis. Also we suggest a combined method based on multi-sensor analysis to improve vehicle detection performance. Experimental results in complex outdoor environments show that the proposed multi-sensor algorithm is effective for vehicles detection.

  5. Induction of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) oncogenic domains (PODs) by papillomavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Tomomi; Lambert, Paul F.

    2007-09-30

    Promyelocytic leukemia oncogenic domains (PODs), also called nuclear domain 10 (ND10), are subnuclear structures that have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes as well as the life cycle of DNA viruses including papillomaviruses. In order to investigate the interplay between papillomaviruses and PODs, we analyzed the status of PODs in organotypic raft cultures of human keratinocytes harboring HPV genome that support the differentiation-dependent HPV life cycle. The number of PODs per nucleus was increased in the presence of HPV genomes selectively within the poorly differentiated layers but was absent in the terminally differentiated layers of the stratified epithelium. This increase in PODs was correlated with an increase in abundance of post-translationally modified PML protein. Neither the E2-dependent transcription nor viral DNA replication was reliant upon the presence of PML. Implications of these findings in terms of HPV's interaction with its host are discussed.

  6. The iPod Revolution: An Exploratory Case Study of the Implementation of an iPod Touch Pilot Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Staci A.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory case study was designed to investigate the implementation of an iPod touch pilot program in sixth grade science classrooms at an intermediate school in Southeast Texas. More specifically, this study explored the benefits and challenges associated with the utilization of iPod touch devices for students, teachers, and their campus…

  7. The multisensor PHD filter: II. Erroneous solution via Poisson magic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    The theoretical foundation for the probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter is the FISST multitarget differential and integral calculus. The "core" PHD filter presumes a single sensor. Theoretically rigorous formulas for the multisensor PHD filter can be derived using the FISST calculus, but are computationally intractable. A less theoretically desirable solution-the iterated-corrector approximation-must be used instead. Recently, it has been argued that an "elementary" methodology, the "Poisson-intensity approach," renders FISST obsolete. It has further been claimed that the iterated-corrector approximation is suspect, and in its place an allegedly superior "general multisensor intensity filter" has been proposed. In this and a companion paper I demonstrate that it is these claims which are erroneous. The companion paper introduces formulas for the actual "general multisensor intensity filter." In this paper I demonstrate that (1) the "general multisensor intensity filter" fails in important special cases; (2) it will perform badly in even the easiest multitarget tracking problems; and (3) these rather serious missteps suggest that the "Poisson-intensity approach" is inherently faulty.

  8. Optimal multisensor decision fusion of mine detection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yuwei; Nolte, Loren W.; Collins, Leslie M.

    2003-09-01

    Numerous detection algorithms, using various sensor modalities, have been developed for the detection of mines in cluttered and noisy backgrounds. The performance for each detection algorithm is typically reported in terms of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC), which is a plot of the probability of detection versus false alarm as a function of the threshold setting on the output decision variable of each algorithm. In this paper we present multi-sensor decision fusion algorithms that combine the local decisions of existing detection algorithms for different sensors. This offers, in certain situations, an expedient, attractive and much simpler alternative to "starting over" with the redesign of a new algorithm which fuses multiple sensors at the data level. The goal in our multi-sensor decision fusion approach is to exploit complimentary strengths of existing multi-sensor algorithms so as to achieve performance (ROC) that exceeds the performance of any sensor algorithm operating in isolation. Our approach to multi-sensor decision fusion is based on optimal signal detection theory, using the likelihood ratio. We consider the optimal fusion of local decisions for two sensors, GPR (ground penetrating radar) and MD (metal detector). A new robust algorithm for decision fusion is presented that addresses the problem that the statistics of the training data is not likely to exactly match the statistics of the test data. ROC's are presented and compared for real data.

  9. Multisensor Arrays for Greater Reliability and Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Eckhoff, Anthony; Lane, John; Perotti, Jose; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman; Ree, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Arrays of multiple, nominally identical sensors with sensor-output-processing electronic hardware and software are being developed in order to obtain accuracy, reliability, and lifetime greater than those of single sensors. The conceptual basis of this development lies in the statistical behavior of multiple sensors and a multisensor-array (MSA) algorithm that exploits that behavior. In addition, advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and integrated circuits are exploited. A typical sensor unit according to this concept includes multiple MEMS sensors and sensor-readout circuitry fabricated together on a single chip and packaged compactly with a microprocessor that performs several functions, including execution of the MSA algorithm. In the MSA algorithm, the readings from all the sensors in an array at a given instant of time are compared and the reliability of each sensor is quantified. This comparison of readings and quantification of reliabilities involves the calculation of the ratio between every sensor reading and every other sensor reading, plus calculation of the sum of all such ratios. Then one output reading for the given instant of time is computed as a weighted average of the readings of all the sensors. In this computation, the weight for each sensor is the aforementioned value used to quantify its reliability. In an optional variant of the MSA algorithm that can be implemented easily, a running sum of the reliability value for each sensor at previous time steps as well as at the present time step is used as the weight of the sensor in calculating the weighted average at the present time step. In this variant, the weight of a sensor that continually fails gradually decreases, so that eventually, its influence over the output reading becomes minimal: In effect, the sensor system "learns" which sensors to trust and which not to trust. The MSA algorithm incorporates a criterion for deciding whether there remain enough sensor readings that

  10. Site Specific Evaluation of Multisensor Capacitance Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, R. A.; Guber, A. K.; Pachepsky, Y.; Gish, T. J.; Daughtry, C. S.

    2007-12-01

    Multisensor capacitance probes (MCPs) are widely used for measuring soil water content (SWC) at the field scale. Although manufacturers supply a generic MCP calibration, many researchers recognize that MCPs should be calibrated for specific field conditions. MCPs measurements are typically associated with small soil volumes, and are subsequently scaled up to the plot or field scale. Research is needed to understand how representative are these measurements for water monitoring studies that operate with the elementary area from one to tens square meters. The objectives of this study were: (a) to test the accuracy of SWC field measurements using generic and laboratory MCP calibrations; (b) to test applicability of a single MCP calibration for SWC measurements at different depths; and (c) to compare the accuracy of two and three-parameter equations using scaled frequency (SF). Four 1x1 m plots were equipped with MCPs to measure SWC at 9 depths at the OPE3 USDA-ARS research site at Beltsville, MD. Within each plot, three undisturbed soil cores were taken with a 100 cm3 soil auger. SWC sampling was made on three different dates when soil water contents were distinctly different. To compare MCP measurements with observed SWC, the SF was converted into SWC using: (a) the manufacturer generic calibration; and (b) calibration obtained in laboratory for a mesic Aquic Hapludult soil. Parameters of three different calibration equations were also obtained by fitting the equations to the water contents measurements at the plots. This fit was done: (a) for all observations regardless the depth, (b) for observations at each genetic horizon, and (c) for each depth separately. Results show that the manufacturer and the laboratory calibrations provided a satisfactory fit to the field-measured SWC at depths of 30, 40 and 50 cm. The fit was about two times less accurate at depths of 10, 20, 60, 70 80 and 90 cm. A minor improvement was obtained at depths of 10 and 20 cm after

  11. A Wing Pod-based Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar on HIAPER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, Jothiram; Tsai, Peisang; Ellis, Scott; Loew, Eric; Lee, Wen-Chau; Emmett, Joanthan

    2014-05-01

    One of the attractive features of a millimeter wave radar system is its ability to detect micron-sized particles that constitute clouds with lower than 0.1 g m-3 liquid or ice water content. Scanning or vertically-pointing ground-based millimeter wavelength radars are used to study stratocumulus (Vali et al. 1998; Kollias and Albrecht 2000) and fair-weather cumulus (Kollias et al. 2001). Airborne millimeter wavelength radars have been used for atmospheric remote sensing since the early 1990s (Pazmany et al. 1995). Airborne millimeter wavelength radar systems, such as the University of Wyoming King Air Cloud Radar (WCR) and the NASA ER-2 Cloud Radar System (CRS), have added mobility to observe clouds in remote regions and over oceans. Scientific requirements of millimeter wavelength radar are mainly driven by climate and cloud initiation studies. Survey results from the cloud radar user community indicated a common preference for a narrow beam W-band radar with polarimetric and Doppler capabilities for airborne remote sensing of clouds. For detecting small amounts of liquid and ice, it is desired to have -30 dBZ sensitivity at a 10 km range. Additional desired capabilities included a second wavelength and/or dual-Doppler winds. Modern radar technology offers various options (e.g., dual-polarization and dual-wavelength). Even though a basic fixed beam Doppler radar system with a sensitivity of -30 dBZ at 10 km is capable of satisfying cloud detection requirements, the above-mentioned additional options, namely dual-wavelength, and dual-polarization, significantly extend the measurement capabilities to further reduce any uncertainty in radar-based retrievals of cloud properties. This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter wave radar, preliminary radar measurements and corresponding derived scientific products. Since some of the primary engineering requirements of this millimeter wave radar are that it should be deployable on an airborne platform

  12. Field-design optimization with triangular heliostat pods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Bravo, Carmen-Ana; Bode, Sebastian-James; Heiming, Gregor; Richter, Pascal; Carrizosa, Emilio; Fernández-Cara, Enrique; Frank, Martin; Gauché, Paul

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the optimization of a heliostat field with triangular heliostat pods is addressed. The use of structures which allow the combination of several heliostats into a common pod system aims to reduce the high costs associated with the heliostat field and therefore reduces the Levelized Cost of Electricity value. A pattern-based algorithm and two pattern-free algorithms are adapted to handle the field layout problem with triangular heliostat pods. Under the Helio100 project in South Africa, a new small-scale Solar Power Tower plant has been recently constructed. The Helio100 plant has 20 triangular pods (each with 6 heliostats) whose positions follow a linear pattern. The obtained field layouts after optimization are compared against the reference field Helio100.

  13. Contribution of the pod wall to seed grain filling in alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Hou, Longyu; Wang, Mingya; Mao, Peisheng

    2016-01-01

    Three genotypes of alfalfa viz. Medicago sativa (Zhongmu No. 1, Zhongmu No. 2) and M. varia (Caoyuan No. 3) grown in the filed were investigated for the contribution of pod wall and leaves by shading all pods and leaves on July 15, 20 and 25, respectively. Date was recorded for total pod weight (TPW), pod wall weight (PWW), seed weight per pod (SWP), seed number per pod (SNP) and single seed weight (SSW) of one-coil and two-coil spiral pods. TPW, SNP, PWW and SWP were reduced by shading all leaves or pods, whereas SSW was not significantly affected. The relative photosynthetic contribution of pod wall to SWP was 25.6–48.1% in three genotypes on July 15. The pod wall in one-coil spiral pods generated a greater relative contribution to the TPW and SWP than in two-coil spiral pods. In the last stage (July 25), the relative photosynthetic contribution of leaves to SWP sharply decreased, whereas the relative photosynthetic contribution of pod wall to SWP was stable in the late stage (July 20 and 25). In conclusion, the pod wall of alfalfa could carry out photosynthesis and the pod wall played an important role in pod filling at the late growth stage. PMID:27210048

  14. Contribution of the pod wall to seed grain filling in alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Hou, Longyu; Wang, Mingya; Mao, Peisheng

    2016-01-01

    Three genotypes of alfalfa viz. Medicago sativa (Zhongmu No. 1, Zhongmu No. 2) and M. varia (Caoyuan No. 3) grown in the filed were investigated for the contribution of pod wall and leaves by shading all pods and leaves on July 15, 20 and 25, respectively. Date was recorded for total pod weight (TPW), pod wall weight (PWW), seed weight per pod (SWP), seed number per pod (SNP) and single seed weight (SSW) of one-coil and two-coil spiral pods. TPW, SNP, PWW and SWP were reduced by shading all leaves or pods, whereas SSW was not significantly affected. The relative photosynthetic contribution of pod wall to SWP was 25.6-48.1% in three genotypes on July 15. The pod wall in one-coil spiral pods generated a greater relative contribution to the TPW and SWP than in two-coil spiral pods. In the last stage (July 25), the relative photosynthetic contribution of leaves to SWP sharply decreased, whereas the relative photosynthetic contribution of pod wall to SWP was stable in the late stage (July 20 and 25). In conclusion, the pod wall of alfalfa could carry out photosynthesis and the pod wall played an important role in pod filling at the late growth stage. PMID:27210048

  15. Metabolic changes in different developmental stages of Vanilla planifolia pods.

    PubMed

    Palama, Tony Lionel; Khatib, Alfi; Choi, Young Hae; Payet, Bertrand; Fock, Isabelle; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2009-09-01

    The metabolomic analysis of developing Vanilla planifolia green pods (between 3 and 8 months after pollination) was carried out by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis. Multivariate data analysis of the (1)H NMR spectra, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), showed a trend of separation of those samples based on the metabolites present in the methanol/water (1:1) extract. Older pods had a higher content of glucovanillin, vanillin, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde glucoside, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and sucrose, while younger pods had more bis[4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl]-2-isopropyltartrate (glucoside A), bis[4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl]-2-(2-butyl)tartrate (glucoside B), glucose, malic acid, and homocitric acid. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis targeted at phenolic compound content was also performed on the developing pods and confirmed the NMR results. Ratios of aglycones/glucosides were estimated and thus allowed for detection of more minor metabolites in the green vanilla pods. Quantification of compounds based on both LC-MS and NMR analyses showed that free vanillin can reach 24% of the total vanillin content after 8 months of development in the vanilla green pods.

  16. POD evaluation using simulation: Progress, practice and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Nicolas; Reverdy, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    NDT performances evaluation in the aeronautic industry is made by estimating Probability of Detection (POD). It is a statistical estimation of the capability of a given NDT procedure to detect defects as a function of their size. The accuracy of the statistical estimation is directly linked the quality and quantity of collected data. The more data and the more realistic they are, the better the POD estimation. This practical production of data may have very high cost, sometimes obliging to decrease either the quantity or the quality (realistic) of data, or even both. In the last decade MAPOD and simulation-based POD approaches have emerged and been used for concept demonstration as a solution to decrease the cost of evaluating POD. Today tools are available to support these studies and are used in industrial laboratories. This paper reviews some examples of POD evaluation using simulation, describes the actual practice of the tools in the European aeronautical context and also draws some limits and perspectives for a future wider application of the simulation helped POD approach.

  17. Dissipation of hexythiozox on beans pods by HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Abd-Alrahman, Sherif H

    2013-04-01

    An effective analytical method for the residue analysis of a novel acaricide hexythiozox and its dissipation in beans pods were studied. Hexythiozox residues were extracted from beans pods samples and the extract was cleaned up according to QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector (HPLC-DAD). At fortification levels of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg kg(-1) in Beans Pods, it was shown that recoveries ranged from 82.4 % to 89.6 % with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6 %-9 %. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were found to be 0.02 and 0.06 mg kg(-1), respectively. The dissipation half-life time of hexythiozox residues in beans pods was 12.04 days. According to maximum residue limit (MRL) 0.5 mg kg(-1), the preharvest interval (PHI) of hexythiozox on beans pods was 10 days after the treatment. Based on the results of this study and the relevant residue regulation, hexythiozox residue levels will be acceptable when applied to beans pods in Egypt.

  18. Theseus Nose and Pod Cones Being Unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Crew members are seen here unloading the nose and pod cones of the Theseus prototype research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental

  19. Multisensor evaluation research: enhancement techniques and sensor evaluation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Gary A.; Heidbreder, William H.; Hammack, James; Szpak, Casimir

    1996-06-01

    This paper compares imagery from four mapping sensors and evaluates the utility of the imagery to support the function of cartographic feature analysis. The four sensors examined are: Landsat TM, SPOT, 5 M Landsat (simulated), and 1 M electro-optical. The feature analysis process is described, and a proposed experiment designed to compare feature analysis utility is discussed. The proposed experiment includes the use of both monoscopic and stereo imagery, as well as application of visual image enhancement techniques and supporting algorithms that facilitate image interpretation. The described techniques represent an initial basis for study of more automated multispectral and multisensor techniques. Also, the applicability of using multiresolution and multisensor techniques is discussed.

  20. Multi-Sensor Registration of Earth Remotely Sensed Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Cole-Rhodes, Arlene; Eastman, Roger; Johnson, Kisha; Morisette, Jeffrey; Netanyahu, Nathan S.; Stone, Harold S.; Zavorin, Ilya; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Assuming that approximate registration is given within a few pixels by a systematic correction system, we develop automatic image registration methods for multi-sensor data with the goal of achieving sub-pixel accuracy. Automatic image registration is usually defined by three steps; feature extraction, feature matching, and data resampling or fusion. Our previous work focused on image correlation methods based on the use of different features. In this paper, we study different feature matching techniques and present five algorithms where the features are either original gray levels or wavelet-like features, and the feature matching is based on gradient descent optimization, statistical robust matching, and mutual information. These algorithms are tested and compared on several multi-sensor datasets covering one of the EOS Core Sites, the Konza Prairie in Kansas, from four different sensors: IKONOS (4m), Landsat-7/ETM+ (30m), MODIS (500m), and SeaWIFS (1000m).

  1. Shade tree spatial structure and pod production explain frosty pod rot intensity in cacao agroforests, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Gidoin, Cynthia; Avelino, Jacques; Deheuvels, Olivier; Cilas, Christian; Bieng, Marie Ange Ngo

    2014-03-01

    Vegetation composition and plant spatial structure affect disease intensity through resource and microclimatic variation effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the independent effect and relative importance of host composition and plant spatial structure variables in explaining disease intensity at the plot scale. For that purpose, frosty pod rot intensity, a disease caused by Moniliophthora roreri on cacao pods, was monitored in 36 cacao agroforests in Costa Rica in order to assess the vegetation composition and spatial structure variables conducive to the disease. Hierarchical partitioning was used to identify the most causal factors. Firstly, pod production, cacao tree density and shade tree spatial structure had significant independent effects on disease intensity. In our case study, the amount of susceptible tissue was the most relevant host composition variable for explaining disease intensity by resource dilution. Indeed, cacao tree density probably affected disease intensity more by the creation of self-shading rather than by host dilution. Lastly, only regularly distributed forest trees, and not aggregated or randomly distributed forest trees, reduced disease intensity in comparison to plots with a low forest tree density. A regular spatial structure is probably crucial to the creation of moderate and uniform shade as recommended for frosty pod rot management. As pod production is an important service expected from these agroforests, shade tree spatial structure may be a lever for integrated management of frosty pod rot in cacao agroforests.

  2. Sparse Downscaling and Adaptive Fusion of Multi-sensor Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebtehaj, M.; Foufoula, E.

    2011-12-01

    The past decades have witnessed a remarkable emergence of new sources of multiscale multi-sensor precipitation data including data from global spaceborne active and passive sensors, regional ground based weather surveillance radars and local rain-gauges. Resolution enhancement of remotely sensed rainfall and optimal integration of multi-sensor data promise a posteriori estimates of precipitation fluxes with increased accuracy and resolution to be used in hydro-meteorological applications. In this context, new frameworks are proposed for resolution enhancement and multiscale multi-sensor precipitation data fusion, which capitalize on two main observations: (1) sparseness of remotely sensed precipitation fields in appropriately chosen transformed domains, (e.g., in wavelet space) which promotes the use of the newly emerged theory of sparse representation and compressive sensing for resolution enhancement; (2) a conditionally Gaussian Scale Mixture (GSM) parameterization in the wavelet domain which allows exploiting the efficient linear estimation methodologies, while capturing the non-Gaussian data structure of rainfall. The proposed methodologies are demonstrated using a data set of coincidental observations of precipitation reflectivity images by the spaceborne precipitation radar (PR) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite and ground-based NEXRAD weather surveillance Doppler radars. Uniqueness and stability of the solution, capturing non-Gaussian singular structure of rainfall, reduced uncertainty of estimation and efficiency of computation are the main advantages of the proposed methodologies over the commonly used standard Gaussian techniques.

  3. A multi-sensor scenario for coastal surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broek, A. C.; van den Broek, S. P.; van den Heuvel, J. C.; Schwering, P. B. W.; van Heijningen, A. W. P.

    2007-10-01

    Maritime borders and coastal zones are susceptible to threats such as drug trafficking, piracy, undermining economical activities. At TNO Defence, Security and Safety various studies aim at improving situational awareness in a coastal zone. In this study we focus on multi-sensor surveillance of the coastal environment. We present a study on improving classification results for small sea surface targets using an advanced sensor suite and a scenario in which a small boat is approaching the coast. A next generation sensor suite mounted on a tower has been defined consisting of a maritime surveillance and tracking radar system, capable of producing range profiles and ISAR imagery of ships, an advanced infrared camera and a laser range profiler. For this suite we have developed a multi-sensor classification procedure, which is used to evaluate the capabilities for recognizing and identifying non-cooperative ships in coastal waters. We have found that the different sensors give complementary information. Each sensor has its own specific distance range in which it contributes most. A multi-sensor approach reduces the number of misclassifications and reliable classification results are obtained earlier compared to a single sensor approach.

  4. Concept of data processing in multisensor system for perimeter protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulski, R.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.; Piątkowski, T.; Szustakowski, M.; Życzkowski, M.

    2011-06-01

    The nature of recent terrorist attacks and military conflicts as well as the necessity to protect bases, convoys and patrols gave serious impact to the development of more effective security systems. Widely-used so far concepts of perimeter protection with zone sensors will be replaced in the near future with multi-sensor systems. This kind of systems can utilize day/night cameras, IR uncooled thermal cameras as well as millimeter-wave radars detecting radiation reflected from target. Ranges of detection, recognition and identification for all targets depends on the parameters of the sensors used and the observed scene itself. Apart from the sensors the most important elements that influence the system effectiveness is intelligent data analysis and a proper data fusion algorithm. A multi-sensor protection system allows to achieve significant improvement of detection probability of intruder. The concept of data fusion in multi-sensor system has been introduced. It is based on image fusion algorithm which allows visualizing and tracking intruders under any conditions.

  5. Multi-sensor management for data fusion in target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Genshe; Blasch, Erik; Patrick, Jim; Yang, Chun; Kadar, Ivan

    2009-05-01

    Multi-sensor management for data fusion in target tracking concerns issues of sensor assignment and scheduling by managing or coordinating the use of multiple sensor resources. Since a centralized sensor management technique has a crucial limitation in that the failure of the central node would cause whole system failure, a decentralized sensor management (DSM) scheme is increasingly important in modern multi-sensor systems. DSM is afforded in modern systems through increased bandwidth, wireless communication, and enhanced power. However, protocols for system control are needed to management device access. As game theory offers learning models for distributed allocations of surveillance resources and provides mechanisms to handle the uncertainty of surveillance area, we propose an agent-based negotiable game theoretic approach for decentralized sensor management (ANGADS). With the decentralized sensor management scheme, sensor assignment occurs locally, and there is no central node and thus reduces the risk of whole-system failure. Simulation results for a multi-sensor target-tracking scenario demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach.

  6. Fiber optic based multisensor to brain neurons in awake animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zheng; Lin, Shuzhi

    1995-02-01

    The fibeated broptic-based multisensor was made of quartz optic fiber capillary with an outer diameter of 250 micrometers and an inner diameter of 10 micrometers through two methods: a capillary and the parallel capillary with another piece of optic fiber. There was a thin layer of tungsten membrane (thickness 1 micrometers ) around the outer surface of the optic fiber or capillary. The metal membrane worked as a micro electrode or an electro-osmosis electrode. Nitrogen laser beam and laser-fluorescent pulses were guided in two ways through optic fiber or the wall of the capillary. The advantage of one capillary was its small tip and measurement of different physiological indices in the same site, but the intensity of laser-fluorescent pulses was diminished by electro-osmosis flow; the parallel optic fiber and capillary avoided the shortage, but the device tip was bigger than a capillary. The multisensor was used to inquire into cognitive brain mechanism in awake animals by simultaneous recording of neuron activities (neuron firing), neuron metabolism rate (laser-fluorescent pulses), and biochemical events through microelectrophore in vivo and field effect electro-osmosis analysis at situ. The effects of nitric oxide biosynthesis-related compounds on neuron efficiency of the cortex were investigated by the multisensor.

  7. Determination of urine ionic composition with potentiometric multisensor system.

    PubMed

    Yaroshenko, Irina; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Kartsova, Lyudmila; Sidorova, Alla; Borisova, Irina; Legin, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    The ionic composition of urine is a good indicator of patient's general condition and allows for diagnostics of certain medical problems such as e.g., urolithiasis. Due to environmental factors and malnutrition the number of registered urinary tract cases continuously increases. Most of the methods currently used for urine analysis are expensive, quite laborious and require skilled personnel. The present work deals with feasibility study of potentiometric multisensor system of 18 ion-selective and cross-sensitive sensors as an analytical tool for determination of urine ionic composition. In total 136 samples from patients of Urolithiasis Laboratory and healthy people were analyzed by the multisensor system as well as by capillary electrophoresis as a reference method. Various chemometric approaches were implemented to relate the data from electrochemical measurements with the reference data. Logistic regression (LR) was applied for classification of samples into healthy and unhealthy producing reasonable misclassification rates. Projection on Latent Structures (PLS) regression was applied for quantitative analysis of ionic composition from potentiometric data. Mean relative errors of simultaneous prediction of sodium, potassium, ammonium, calcium, magnesium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, urate and creatinine from multisensor system response were in the range 3-13% for independent test sets. This shows a good promise for development of a fast and inexpensive alternative method for urine analysis. PMID:25281140

  8. Sensor fusion for hand-held multisensor landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sanjeev; Chander, Venkat S.; Palit, Partha P.; Stanley, Joe; Mitchell, O. Robert

    2001-10-01

    Sensor fusion issues in a streamlined assimilation of multi-sensor information for landmine detection are discussed. In particular multi-sensor fusion in hand-held landmine detection system with ground penetrating radar (GPR) and metal detector sensors is investigated. The fusion architecture consists of feature extraction for individual sensors followed by a feed-forward neural network training to learn the feature space representation of the mine/no-mine classification. A correlation feature from GPR, and slope and energy feature from metal detector are used for discrimination. Various fusion strategies are discussed and results compared against each other and against individual sensors using ROC curves for the available multi-sensor data. Both feature level and decision level fusion have been investigated. Simple decision level fusion scheme based on Dempster-Shafer evidence accumulation, soft AND, MIN and MAX are compared. Feature level fusion using neural network training is shown to provide best results. However comparable performance is achieved using decision level sensor fusion based on Dempster-Shafer accumulation. It is noted that, the above simple feed-forward fusion scheme lacks a means to verify detections after a decision has been made. New detection algorithms that are more than anomaly detectors are needed. Preliminary results with features based on independent component analysis (ICA) show promising results towards this end.

  9. Emerging standards for testing of multisensor mine detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibsdall, Ian M.

    2005-06-01

    The standards relating to testing of metal detectors for demining operations are developing well, including (but not limited to) CEN Working Agreement CWA14747:2003, UNMAS Mine Action Standards and others. However, for developing multisensor mine detectors there is no agreed standard method of testing. ITEP, the International Test and Evaluation Program for Humanitarian Demining, is currently drawing together several nation's experience of testing multisensor mine detectors into a "best practice" document that could be used as the basis for standardised testing. This paper outlines the test methodology used during recent multisensor mine detector tests and discusses the issues that have arisen and lessons learned. In particular, the requirements for suitable targets, careful site preparation, measurement of appropriate environmental factors and methods of maximising useful results with limited resources are highlighted. Most recent tests have used a combined Metal Detector (MD) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), but other sensor systems will be considered. An emerging test methodology is presented, along with an invitation for feedback from other researchers for inclusion into the "best practice" document.

  10. A smart multisensor approach to assist blind people in specific urban navigation tasks.

    PubMed

    Ando, B

    2008-12-01

    Visually impaired people are often discouraged in using electronic aids due to complexity of operation, large amount of training, nonoptimized degree of information provided to the user, and high cost. In this paper, a new multisensor architecture is discussed, which would help blind people to perform urban mobility tasks. The device is based on a multisensor strategy and adopts smart signal processing.

  11. Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkraus, J. M.; Wright, M. W.; Rheingans, B. E.; Steinkraus, D. E.; George, W. P.; Aljabri, A.; Hall, J. L.; Scott, D. C.

    2012-06-01

    One novel approach towards addressing the need for innovative instrumentation and investigation approaches is the integration of a suite of four spectrometer systems to form the Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometers (MAPS) for prospecting on Mars.

  12. An update on pellicle-compatible EUV inner pod development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaping; Rashke, Russ; Newman, Chris; Harris, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    By 2015 EUV pellicle development has made significant progress such that it is mature enough for production testing. To support the implementation of the pellicle, the current EUV Inner Pod (EIP) design is modified to accommodate the addition of a pellicle to the reticle, which primarily involves adding a pellicle pocket to the baseplate of the EIP. Working closely with an EUV lithography customer, Entegris has developed a pellicle-compatible EUV inner pod that has passed this customer's testing. This paper presents the key design features of the Entegris pellicle-compatible EUV pod and the testing results. The non-pellicle EIP baseplate is a flat plate and is designed to maintain a very small distance from the underside (also pattern side) of the reticle. In the pellicle-compatible version a pocket is added to the baseplate to accommodate the pellicle and its frame. For compatibility purpose, the weight of the pellicle-compatible baseplate is kept about the same as the non-pellicle baseplates. In addition, considering that both non-pellicle and pellicalized reticles are going to be used by end users, a feature on the backside of the baseplate that's different between the two versions is going to be used by a sensor in the lithography tool to tell whether it is a pellicle or non-pellicle pod. Test results from several critical defectivity tests are highlighted in this paper including: full system cycle test, reticle handling tests, venting tests, EIP outgassing tests, along with pod shipping test.

  13. Test and evaluate passive orbital disconnect struts (PODS 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.; Henninger, W. C.; Katz, S. A.; Spradley, I.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of the Passive Orbital Disconnect Struts (PODS) test are to evaluate modal resonance of the PODS-III supports to obtain engineering data required for use of PODS-III on flight systems; determine possible performance improvements in large LO2/LH2 space applications. (1) Modal Vibration Tests. A modal resonance survey is performed on a set of six PODS-III struts assembled in a dewar simulator. The survey conditions simulate both launch and orbital loadings of the struts. The orbital load range spans a full to an empty tank. The frequencies surveyed cover the range consistent with Shuttle qualification requirements and the principal resonant modes of the strut system. (2) Benefit study. The benefit of using PODS-III supports on OTV and Space Station LO sub 2 and LH sub 2 reference tanks was compared to nondisconnect supports. Four LO sub 2 and LH sub 2 tanks were studied under various conditions: (1) holding the launch resonance at 35 Hz and varying the orbit resonance; (2) analyzing both full and emtpy tanks at launch; (3) varying orbit boundary temperaure; (4) varying the number of struts; (5) varying orbit times; and (6) using or not using vapor cooling.

  14. Multi-Sensor Data Fusion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodier, S. D.; Hu, Y.; Vaughan, M.; Hlavka, D.; Arnold, T.

    2006-12-01

    We describe a data fusion technique for combining lidar measurements with correlative observations made by passive sensors. Simultaneous measurements obtained by the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL)1 and the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS)2 serve as inputs to a Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM)3 algorithm, which in turn classifies the collocated MAS+CPL pixels according to scene type; i.e., according to the number, the type, and the vertical locations of the cloud and aerosol layers present. Tests conducted using the MAS data alone show that the SOM algorithm recognizes a much greater percentage of the pixels containing high, thin clouds than does the standard MAS cloud mask algorithm. Results obtained when using the combined measurements identify a greater number of distinct classes of data (i.e., scene types) within individual MAS pixels, and thus will allow the selection of more accurate physical models for the retrievals of radiatively significant properties. The wealth of information gained by including the lidar profile in the SOM algorithm clustering study is, however, limited by (to) the instruments nadir only footprint. To fully utilize this information a method for extending or transferring the classification to the full passive swath was developed. We will describe our technique for extending the classifications derived from the nadir track analysis, where we have coincident measurements from both instruments, to the full passive sensor swath, for which we have only MAS measurements. Preliminary validation studies show that we can expect a classification success rate of better than 70 percent when applying this method. The recent CALIPSO-CloudSat validation campaign will provide additional datasets to validate our technique. REFERENCES M. J. McGill, D. L. Hlavka, W. D. Hart, V. S. Scott, J. D. Spinhirne, and B. Schmid, "The cloud physics lidar: Instrument description and initial measurement results", Applied Optics, 41, pp. 3725 3734, 2002. King, M. D., Y. J

  15. Use of plant residues for improving soil fertility, pod nutrients, root growth and pod weight of okra (Abelmoschus esculentum L).

    PubMed

    Moyin-Jesu, Emmanuel Ibukunoluwa

    2007-08-01

    The effect of wood ash, sawdust, ground cocoa husk, spent grain and rice bran upon root development, ash content, pod yield and nutrient status and soil fertility for okra (Abelmoschus esculentum L NHAe 47 variety) was studied. The five organic fertilizer treatments were compared to chemical fertilizer (400kg/ha/crop NPK 15-15-15) and unfertilized controls in four field experiments replicated four times in a randomized complete block design. The results showed that the application of 6tha(-1) of plant residues increased (P<0.05) the soil N, P, K, Ca, Mg, pH, and SOM; pod N, P, K, Ca, Mg and ash; root length; and pod yield of okra in all four experiments relative to the control treatment. For instance, spent grain treatment increased the okra pod yield by 99%, 33%, 50%, 49%, 65% and 67% compared to control, NPK, wood ash, cocoa husk, rice bran and sawdust treatments respectively. In the stepwise regression, out of the total R(2) value of 0.83 for the soil nutrients to the pod yield of okra; soil N accounted for 50% of the soil fertility improvement and yield of okra. Spent grain, wood ash and cocoa husk were the most effective in improving okra pod weight, pod nutrients, ash content, root length and soil fertility whereas the rice bran and sawdust were the least effective. This was because the spent grain, wood ash and cocoa husk had lower C/N ratio and higher nutrient composition than rice bran and sawdust, thus, the former enhanced an increase in pod nutrients, composition for better human dietary intake, increased the root length, pod weight of okra and improved soil fertility and plant nutrition crop. The significance of the increases in okra mineral nutrition concentration by plant residues is that consumers will consume more of these minerals in their meals and monetarily spend less for purchasing vitamins and mineral supplement drugs to meet health requirements. In addition, the increase in plant nutrition and soil fertility would help to reduce the high cost

  16. Use of plant residues for improving soil fertility, pod nutrients, root growth and pod weight of okra (Abelmoschus esculentum L).

    PubMed

    Moyin-Jesu, Emmanuel Ibukunoluwa

    2007-08-01

    The effect of wood ash, sawdust, ground cocoa husk, spent grain and rice bran upon root development, ash content, pod yield and nutrient status and soil fertility for okra (Abelmoschus esculentum L NHAe 47 variety) was studied. The five organic fertilizer treatments were compared to chemical fertilizer (400kg/ha/crop NPK 15-15-15) and unfertilized controls in four field experiments replicated four times in a randomized complete block design. The results showed that the application of 6tha(-1) of plant residues increased (P<0.05) the soil N, P, K, Ca, Mg, pH, and SOM; pod N, P, K, Ca, Mg and ash; root length; and pod yield of okra in all four experiments relative to the control treatment. For instance, spent grain treatment increased the okra pod yield by 99%, 33%, 50%, 49%, 65% and 67% compared to control, NPK, wood ash, cocoa husk, rice bran and sawdust treatments respectively. In the stepwise regression, out of the total R(2) value of 0.83 for the soil nutrients to the pod yield of okra; soil N accounted for 50% of the soil fertility improvement and yield of okra. Spent grain, wood ash and cocoa husk were the most effective in improving okra pod weight, pod nutrients, ash content, root length and soil fertility whereas the rice bran and sawdust were the least effective. This was because the spent grain, wood ash and cocoa husk had lower C/N ratio and higher nutrient composition than rice bran and sawdust, thus, the former enhanced an increase in pod nutrients, composition for better human dietary intake, increased the root length, pod weight of okra and improved soil fertility and plant nutrition crop. The significance of the increases in okra mineral nutrition concentration by plant residues is that consumers will consume more of these minerals in their meals and monetarily spend less for purchasing vitamins and mineral supplement drugs to meet health requirements. In addition, the increase in plant nutrition and soil fertility would help to reduce the high cost

  17. Molecular genetic basis of pod corn (Tunicate maize)

    PubMed Central

    Wingen, Luzie U.; Münster, Thomas; Faigl, Wolfram; Deleu, Wim; Sommer, Hans; Saedler, Heinz; Theißen, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Pod corn is a classic morphological mutant of maize in which the mature kernels of the cob are covered by glumes, in contrast to generally grown maize varieties in which kernels are naked. Pod corn, known since pre-Columbian times, is the result of a dominant gain-of-function mutation at the Tunicate (Tu) locus. Some classic articles of 20th century maize genetics reported that the mutant Tu locus is complex, but molecular details remained elusive. Here, we show that pod corn is caused by a cis-regulatory mutation and duplication of the ZMM19 MADS-box gene. Although the WT locus contains a single-copy gene that is expressed in vegetative organs only, mutation and duplication of ZMM19 in Tu lead to ectopic expression of the gene in the inflorescences, thus conferring vegetative traits to reproductive organs. PMID:22517751

  18. Antarctic Sea Ice Thickness From Surface Elevation: A Multi-Sensor Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necsoiu, M.; Lewis, M. J.; Parra, J.; Ackley, S. F.; Weissling, B.; Hwang, B.

    2011-12-01

    Sea ice is an important component of the climate system affecting ocean-atmospheric interactions and global energy balance. The assessment of sea ice thickness using satellite and airborne laser altimetry is largely dependent upon isostatic buoyancy relationships between snow, ice, slush and ocean water. The use of these relationships in estimating sea ice thickness is complicated by a number of factors including spatial resolution, changing sea level reference, varying snow and ice density, and snow-ice interface flooding. Previous work has suggested that the effects of these factors can be reduced using a multi-sensor approach. The X-band backscatter from TerraSAR-X (TSX) is sensitive to surface roughness, snow and ice properties, and the presence of wet snow. The combined use of TSX for sea ice characterization and laser altimetry has the potential to provide more accurate estimates of sea ice thickness. In this study, we examine the feasibility of using TSX dual-polarized backscatter data to determine ice characteristics in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen Sea in the Antarctic region. Actual surface sea ice characteristics were derived from sea ice station measurements during the J.C. Ross (ICEBell) and Oden Southern Ocean (OSO) expeditions during the austral summer of 2010-11. Data from ice mass-balance buoys emplaced during the two cruises continued through summer melt and bridged the transition into fall freeze up conditions in the snow pack and ice cover. Shannon entropy derived from TSX, measures the statistical disorder of a medium illuminated by the radar, being a sum of two contributions related to intensity and the degree of polarization. A geostatistical approach is employed to correlate measured surface properties and sea ice freeboard with TSX-derived Shannon entropy. The floes are subsequently classified based on Shannon entropy and used in an empirically-based buoyancy model to estimate sea ice thickness. This approach is then compared with

  19. Satellite Data Simulator Unit: A Multisensor, Multispectral Satellite Simulator Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masunaga, Hirohiko; Matsui, Toshihisa; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Hou, Arthur Y.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Bauer, Peter; Olson, William S.; Sekiguchi, Miho; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2010-01-01

    Several multisensor simulator packages are being developed by different research groups across the world. Such simulator packages [e.g., COSP , CRTM, ECSIM, RTTO, ISSARS (under development), and SDSU (this article), among others] share overall aims, although some are targeted more on particular satellite programs or specific applications (for research purposes or for operational use) than others. The SDSU or Satellite Data Simulator Unit is a general-purpose simulator composed of Fortran 90 codes and applicable to spaceborne microwave radiometer, radar, and visible/infrared imagers including, but not limited to, the sensors listed in a table. That shows satellite programs particularly suitable for multisensor data analysis: some are single satellite missions carrying two or more instruments, while others are constellations of satellites flying in formation. The TRMM and A-Train are ongoing satellite missions carrying diverse sensors that observe clouds and precipitation, and will be continued or augmented within the decade to come by future multisensor missions such as the GPM and Earth-CARE. The ultimate goals of these present and proposed satellite programs are not restricted to clouds and precipitation but are to better understand their interactions with atmospheric dynamics/chemistry and feedback to climate. The SDSU's applicability is not technically limited to hydrometeor measurements either, but may be extended to air temperature and humidity observations by tuning the SDSU to sounding channels. As such, the SDSU and other multisensor simulators would potentially contribute to a broad area of climate and atmospheric sciences. The SDSU is not optimized to any particular orbital geometry of satellites. The SDSU is applicable not only to low-Earth orbiting platforms as listed in Table 1, but also to geostationary meteorological satellites. Although no geosynchronous satellite carries microwave instruments at present or in the near future, the SDSU would be

  20. Assessment of Superflux relative to remote sensing. [airborne remote sensing of the Chesapeake Bay plume and shelf regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The state-of-the-art advancements in remote sensor technology due to the Superflux program are examined. Three major individual sensor technologies benefitted from the program: laser fluorosensors, optical-range scanners, and passive microwave sensors. Under Superflux, convincing evidence was obtained that the airborne oceanographic lidar fluorosensor can map chlorophyll, i.e., is linear, over a wide range from less than 0.5 to 5.0 mg/cu m. The lidar oceanographic probe dual-excitation concept for addressing phytoplankton color group composition was also demonstrated convincingly. Algorithm development, real time capabilities, and multisensor integration are also addressed.

  1. Podagogy: The iPod as a Learning Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Crispin; Pymm, John M.

    2009-01-01

    With the growing influence of social media on contemporary society, educators have to adapt to new ways of engaging students in the learning process. The use of iPod technologies, as part of this new breed of social media and associated gadgetry, offers fresh opportunities to enhance the student learning experience. As part of a research project…

  2. Night reconnaissance for F-16 multirole reconnaissance pod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownie, Ralph S.; Larroque, Clement

    2004-08-01

    The Belgian Air Force successfully carried out flight trials of the latest Low Light CCD focal plane technology during December of 2003. Simultaneous imaging of the ground was performed by conventional CCD, Infra Red Linescan and Low Light CCD reconnaissance sensors; provided and integrated by Thales within the Modular Reconnaissance Pod (MRP). This paper reports on the results and compares capability of the technologies.

  3. Probability of detection (POD) is not NDT/E reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, Ward D.

    2013-01-01

    The reliability of nondestructive testing procedures has been a primary consideration in the development, application and advancement of nondestructive testing (NDT/E) technology. Indeed significant advancements have been made in process control of procedures and in training, qualification personnel who apply NDT procedures. Recognition and the demand for NDT increased with successes. NDT was integrated into engineering practices and technologies. The design, operation, maintenance, life cycle and risk analyses changed dramatically with the development, application and incorporation of fracture mechanics in engineering requirements, engineering practices and engineering systems management. Those engineering changes increased demands and a revolution in NDT requirements, practices and technology advancement. The Probability of Detection (POD) metric was developed to provide a quantitative assessment of NDT detection capabilities and was focused on the smallest reliably detectable flaw. Critical needs for application resulted in wide acceptance of POD as a metric to quantify the detection capability of NDT procedures. Unfortunately, POD is often misinterpreted as a primary measure of the reliability of NDT procedures. This paper addresses the nature of POD and requirements for assessment and application. Emphasis is on evolution of a new branch in NDT engineering, technology application and validation.

  4. Design of Landing PODS for Near Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, R. V.; Ball, J. M.; Pellz, L.

    2014-06-01

    Boeing has been developing design for a set of small landing PODS that could be deployed from a spacecraft bus orbiting a NEA to address the set of SKGs for investigation prior to crewed missions to Near Earth Asteroids or the moons of Mars.

  5. Using the iPod to Teach Freedom and Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Technology is making it easier for people with disabilities to function independently in their homes, workplaces, schools, and communities. Things that were once thought impossible are now possible with the aid of new tools available to assist in the transition toward independent living. None have had as big an impact as the iPod Touch. When most…

  6. iPod Stands for: Absorb, Engage, and Matter!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettcher, Judith V.

    2007-01-01

    The iPod's almost overwhelming popularity probably stems from the combination of power, size, convenience, and flexibility inherent in the devices. They fit into arm bands during jogging, ride in jean pockets, and swing from belt loops. They are small enough to easily be tucked into purses and backpacks, even large pockets. Clearly, using and…

  7. Bean pod mottle virus movement in insect feeding resistant soybeans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) impacts yield and seed quality. BPMV is vectored primarily by the bean leaf beetle (Cerotoma trifurcata) in Ohio. A 2-year experiment was carried out at two locations in Ohio to determine if resistance to insect feeding reduces disease incidence and spread in soybeans....

  8. Bean Pod Mottle Virus Spread in Insect Feeding Resistant Soybeans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) reduces yield and seed quality in soybeans. No qualitative resistance to this virus has been found in soybean, although some tolerance is known. To test the hypothesis that virus incidence and movement would be reduced in soybeans with resistance to feeding by the viru...

  9. Temporal characteristics of POD modes from wind farm LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, Claire; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    Large eddy simulations of a fully developed wind farm in the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer have been analyzed using 3D Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). In this study we consider the temporal variations of the POD modes and their relationship to unsteadiness in the wind turbine power production. We find that the streamwise-constant counter-rotating roller modes vary on time-scales much longer that the mean advection time from turbine to turbine. The structure of these roller modes and their long-time variations are consistent with meandering of high- and low-speed streaks in the turbulent flow within the wind farm. Another class of POD modes--one with significant streamwise-variation--is found to correspond to advection of velocity perturbations in the streamwise direction. Temporal variations of the shear-type modes are found to strongly correlate with power production of the wind farm as a whole. Overall, the long-time power production is well captured by reconstructions using fewer than 50 POD modes (<1% of the total), but variations faster than the inter-turbine advection time are only captured by higher-order, less energetic modes. This work was supported by NSF Grant 1243482 (the WINDINSPIRE project).

  10. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cocoa pod husks. [Trichoderma reesei

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.K.; Oldham, J.H.; Martin, A.M

    1984-07-01

    Laboratory results are presented of the bioconversion of cellulose from cocoa pod husks, utilizing cellulase from three mutants of Trichoderma reesei. Total reducing sugars in filtered hydrolysates were estimated by the dinitrosalicylic acid method. The sugars present were identified by paper chromatography as glucose and xylose.

  11. Airborne data acquisition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Arro, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    The introduction of standards on acceptable procedures for assessing building heat loss has created a dilemma for the contractor performing airborne thermographic surveys. These standards impose specifications on instrumentation, data acquisition, recording, interpretation, and presentation. Under the standard, the contractor has both the obligation of compliance and the requirement of offering his services at a reasonable price. This paper discusses the various aspects of data acquisition for airborne thermographic surveys and various techniques to reduce the costs of this operation. These techniques include the calculation of flight parameters for economical data acquisition, the selection and use of maps for mission planning, and the use of meteorological forecasts for flight scheduling and the actual execution of the mission. The proper consideration of these factors will result in a cost effective data acquisition and will place the contractor in a very competitive position in offering airborne thermographic survey services.

  12. 3 in 4 Youngsters Exposed to Laundry Pod Detergent Suffer Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160006.html 3 in 4 Youngsters Exposed to Laundry Pod Detergent Suffer Poisoning Hospitalizations 4 times more common with ... THURSDAY, July 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Brightly colored laundry detergent pods pose a much greater risk to young ...

  13. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Specifications and preliminary design of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system, which is to be constructed for installation and used on a NASA Wallops Flight Center (WFC) C-54 research aircraft, are reported. The AOL system is to provide an airborne facility for use by various government agencies to demonstrate the utility and practicality of hardware of this type in the wide area collection of oceanographic data on an operational basis. System measurement and performance requirements are presented, followed by a description of the conceptual system approach and the considerations attendant to its development. System performance calculations are addressed, and the system specifications and preliminary design are presented and discussed.

  14. Airborne rain mapping radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Parks, G. S.; Li, F. K.; Im, K. E.; Howard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne scanning radar system for remote rain mapping is described. The airborne rain mapping radar is composed of two radar frequency channels at 13.8 and 24.1 GHz. The radar is proposed to scan its antenna beam over + or - 20 deg from the antenna boresight; have a swath width of 7 km; a horizontal spatial resolution at nadir of about 500 m; and a range resolution of 120 m. The radar is designed to be applicable for retrieving rainfall rates from 0.1-60 mm/hr at the earth's surface, and for measuring linear polarization signatures and raindrop's fall velocity.

  15. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  16. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  17. New three-dimensional fiber probe for multisensor coordinate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettemeyer, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Increasing manufacturing accuracy requirements enforce the development of innovative and highly sensitive measuring tools. Especially for measurement with submicrometer accuracy, the sensor principle has to be chosen appropriately for each measurement surface. Modern multisensor coordinate measurement systems allow automatic selection of different sensor heads to measure different areas or properties of a sample. As an example, different types of optical sensors as well as tactile sensors can be used within the same measuring system. I describe different principles of optical sensors used in multisensor coordinate measurement systems as well as a new approach for tactile measurement with submicrometer accuracy. A special fiber probe has been developed. The tip of the fiber probe is formed as a sphere. The lateral position of this sphere is observed by a microscope objective and can be determined within a fraction of a micrometer. Additionally, a novel optical setup now allows the determination of the z-position of the fiber tip with submicrometer accuracy. For this purpose, an interferometer setup is used. The laser light is coupled into the optical fiber. The light exiting the fiber tip is collected by the microscope objective and superposed with a reference wave, generated directly from the laser. The result is an interference signal that is recorded by the camera and processed by a computer. With this setup, the z-displacement of the fiber sphere can be measured with an accuracy of a fraction of the laser wavelength used.

  18. View and sensor planning for multi-sensor surface inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronle, Marc; Osten, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Modern manufacturing processes enable the precise fabrication of high-value parts with high precision and performance. At the same time, the demand for flexible on-demand production of individual objects is continuously increasing. These requirements can only be met if inspection systems provide appropriate answers. One solution is the use of flexible, multi-sensor setups where multiple optical sensors with different fields of application are combined in one system. However, the challenge is then to assist the user in planning the inspection for individual parts. A manual planning requires an expert knowledge of the performance and functionality of every sensor. Therefore, software assistant systems help the user to objectively select the right sensors for a given inspection task. The planning step becomes still more difficult if the manufactured part has a complex form. The implication is that a sensor’s position must also be part of the planning process since it significantly influences the quality of the inspection. This paper describes a view and sensor planning approach for a multi-sensor surface inspection system in the context of optical topography measurements in the micro- and meso-scale range. In order to realize an online processing of the assistant system, a significant part of the calculations are done on the graphics processing unit (GPU).

  19. Infrared-optical multisensor for autonomous landing guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Richard; Pond, Duane P.; Inman, Scott

    1995-06-01

    Infrared sensors at the nominal 8 - 12 and 3 - 5 micron wavebands respectively can be shown to have complementary performance characteristics when used over a range of meteorological conditions. The infrared/optical multisensor for the autonomous landing guidance system integrates staring longwave, midwave, and visible sensors into an environmentally sealed and purged assembly. The infrared modules include specific enhancements for the detection of runways under adverse weather conditions. The sensors incorporate pixel-for-pixel overlap registration, and the fields of view match a conformal head-up display with sensor/display boresighting to within a fraction of a pixel. Tower tests will be used to characterize the sensors and gather data to support simulation and image processing efforts. After integration with other elements of the autonomous landing guidance system, flight tests will be conducted on Air Force and commercial transport aircraft. In addition to display and analog video recording, the multisensor data will be digitally captured during critical flight test phases.

  20. Multisensor fusion for vehicle-mounted mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte, Hilda I.; Campana, Stephen B.; McGovern, Meghan A.

    2001-10-01

    Mine Hunter/Killer (MH/K) is an Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) program directed by the Army Night Vision Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD). The MH/K system consists of a vehicle-mounted system that detects and neutralizes surface and buried anti-tank (AT) mines. The detection element in this program consists of a Close-In Detection (CID) System that relies on a multi-sensor configuration. The CID System consists of three sensors: a ground penetrating radar (GPR), a metal detector (MD) and a forward-looking IR imaging system. TRW S and ITG has provided support for analysis, testing and algorithm development for Automatic Target Recognition and sensor fusion processing. This paper presents a multi-sensor fusion approach developeby TRW under this effort. In this approach, the incoming alarms from the three sensors are segregate into five classes, based on spatial coincidence of GPR and MD alarms, and on the presence of a surface null in the GPR depth profile. This GPR null, or 'notch', is indicative of shallowly buried objects or clutter, and helps in the discrimination against false alarm density, attempting to maintain a constant false alarm rate. This paper will describe this fusion methodology and the adaptive threshold method in detail, show the target and clutter probability density functions for each class, and show result form recent field test. Fused results will be compared with single sensor performance, and strengths and weaknesses of each sensor will be discussed.

  1. Monitoring changes in behaviour from multi-sensor systems.

    PubMed

    Amor, James D; James, Christopher J

    2014-10-01

    Behavioural patterns are important indicators of health status in a number of conditions and changes in behaviour can often indicate a change in health status. Currently, limited behaviour monitoring is carried out using paper-based assessment techniques. As technology becomes more prevalent and low-cost, there is an increasing movement towards automated behaviour-monitoring systems. These systems typically make use of a multi-sensor environment to gather data. Large data volumes are produced in this way, which poses a significant problem in terms of extracting useful indicators. Presented is a novel method for detecting behavioural patterns and calculating a metric for quantifying behavioural change in multi-sensor environments. The data analysis method is shown and an experimental validation of the method is presented which shows that it is possible to detect the difference between weekdays and weekend days. Two participants are analysed, with different sensor configurations and test environments and in both cases, the results show that the behavioural change metric for weekdays and weekend days is significantly different at 95% confidence level, using the methods presented.

  2. Calibrating a novel multi-sensor physical activity measurement system

    PubMed Central

    John, D; Liu, S; Sasaki, J E; Howe, C A; Staudenmayer, J; Gao, R X; Freedson, P S

    2011-01-01

    Advancing the field of physical activity (PA) monitoring requires the development of innovative multi-sensor measurement systems that are feasible in the free-living environment. The use of novel analytical techniques to combine and process these multiple sensor signals is equally important. This paper, describes a novel multi-sensor ‘Integrated PA Measurement System’ (IMS), the lab-based methodology used to calibrate the IMS, techniques used to predict multiple variables from the sensor signals, and proposes design changes to improve the feasibility of deploying the IMS in the free-living environment. The IMS consists of hip and wrist acceleration sensors, two piezoelectric respiration sensors on the torso, and an ultraviolet radiation sensor to obtain contextual information (indoors vs. outdoors) of PA. During lab-based calibration of the IMS, data were collected on participants performing a PA routine consisting of seven different ambulatory and free-living activities while wearing a portable metabolic unit (criterion measure) and the IMS. Data analyses on the first 50 adult participants are presented. These analyses were used to determine if the IMS can be used to predict the variables of interest. Finally, physical modifications for the IMS that could enhance feasibility of free-living use are proposed and refinement of the prediction techniques is discussed. PMID:21813941

  3. Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, F. C.; Markle, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator enables prospecting for fluorescent materials, hydrography with fluorescent dyes, and plant studies based on fluorescence of chlorophyll. Optical unit design is the coincidence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum occurring at the characteristic wavelengths of some fluorescent materials.

  4. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  5. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  6. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  7. ArduiPod Box: a low-cost and open-source Skinner box using an iPod Touch and an Arduino microcontroller.

    PubMed

    Pineño, Oskar

    2014-03-01

    This article introduces the ArduiPod Box, an open-source device built using two main components (i.e., an iPod Touch and an Arduino microcontroller), developed as a low-cost alternative to the standard operant conditioning chamber, or "Skinner box." Because of its affordability, the ArduiPod Box provides an opportunity for educational institutions with small budgets seeking to set up animal laboratories for research and instructional purposes. A pilot experiment is also presented, which shows that the ArduiPod Box, in spite of its extraordinary simplicity, can be effectively used to study animal learning and behavior.

  8. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  9. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions Support Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Kudela, R. M.; Hooker, S. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Russell, P. B.; Palacios, S. L.; Livingston, J. M.; Negrey, K.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Broughton, J.

    2014-12-01

    NASA has a continuing requirement to collect high-quality in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation ocean color satellite sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems. The primary goal is to demonstrate the following in support of calibration and validation exercises for satellite coastal ocean color products: 1) the utility of a multi-sensor airborne instrument suite to assess the bio-optical properties of coastal California, including water quality; and 2) the importance of contemporaneous atmospheric measurements to improve atmospheric correction in the coastal zone. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue spectral domain to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. The novel airborne instrument, Coastal Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) provides measurements of apparent optical properties with high dynamic range and fidelity for deriving exact water leaving radiances at the land-ocean boundary, including radiometrically shallow aquatic ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data are accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Flight operations are presented for the instrument payloads using the CIRPAS Twin Otter flown over Monterey Bay during the seasonal fall algal bloom in 2011 (COAST) and 2013 (OCEANIA) to support bio-optical measurements of phytoplankton for coastal zone research.

  10. Chemometric analysis of multisensor hyperspectral images of precipitated atmospheric particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Ofner, Johannes; Kamilli, Katharina A; Eitenberger, Elisabeth; Friedbacher, Gernot; Lendl, Bernhard; Held, Andreas; Lohninger, Hans

    2015-09-15

    The chemometric analysis of multisensor hyperspectral data allows a comprehensive image-based analysis of precipitated atmospheric particles. Atmospheric particulate matter was precipitated on aluminum foils and analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy and subsequently by electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. All obtained images were of the same spot of an area of 100 × 100 μm(2). The two hyperspectral data sets and the high-resolution scanning electron microscope images were fused into a combined multisensor hyperspectral data set. This multisensor data cube was analyzed using principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, k-means clustering, and vertex component analysis. The detailed chemometric analysis of the multisensor data allowed an extensive chemical interpretation of the precipitated particles, and their structure and composition led to a comprehensive understanding of atmospheric particulate matter.

  11. Autonomous collection of dynamically-cued multi-sensor imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Brian; Wilson, Michael L.; Edelberg, Jason; Jensen, Mark; Johnson, Troy; Anderson, Scott

    2011-05-01

    The availability of imagery simultaneously collected from sensors of disparate modalities enhances an image analyst's situational awareness and expands the overall detection capability to a larger array of target classes. Dynamic cooperation between sensors is increasingly important for the collection of coincident data from multiple sensors either on the same or on different platforms suitable for UAV deployment. Of particular interest is autonomous collaboration between wide area survey detection, high-resolution inspection, and RF sensors that span large segments of the electromagnetic spectrum. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in conjunction with the Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) is building sensors with such networked communications capability and is conducting field tests to demonstrate the feasibility of collaborative sensor data collection and exploitation. Example survey / detection sensors include: NuSAR (NRL Unmanned SAR), a UAV compatible synthetic aperture radar system; microHSI, an NRL developed lightweight hyper-spectral imager; RASAR (Real-time Autonomous SAR), a lightweight podded synthetic aperture radar; and N-WAPSS-16 (Nighttime Wide-Area Persistent Surveillance Sensor-16Mpix), a MWIR large array gimbaled system. From these sensors, detected target cues are automatically sent to the NRL/SDL developed EyePod, a high-resolution, narrow FOV EO/IR sensor, for target inspection. In addition to this cooperative data collection, EyePod's real-time, autonomous target tracking capabilities will be demonstrated. Preliminary results and target analysis will be presented.

  12. Regional Drought Monitoring Based on Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Jinyoung; Im, Jungho; Park, Seonyoung

    2014-05-01

    Drought originates from the deficit of precipitation and impacts environment including agriculture and hydrological resources as it persists. The assessment and monitoring of drought has traditionally been performed using a variety of drought indices based on meteorological data, and recently the use of remote sensing data is gaining much attention due to its vast spatial coverage and cost-effectiveness. Drought information has been successfully derived from remotely sensed data related to some biophysical and meteorological variables and drought monitoring is advancing with the development of remote sensing-based indices such as the Vegetation Condition Index (VCI), Vegetation Health Index (VHI), and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) to name a few. The Scaled Drought Condition Index (SDCI) has also been proposed to be used for humid regions proving the performance of multi-sensor data for agricultural drought monitoring. In this study, remote sensing-based hydro-meteorological variables related to drought including precipitation, temperature, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture were examined and the SDCI was improved by providing multiple blends of the multi-sensor indices for different types of drought. Multiple indices were examined together since the coupling and feedback between variables are intertwined and it is not appropriate to investigate only limited variables to monitor each type of drought. The purpose of this study is to verify the significance of each variable to monitor each type of drought and to examine the combination of multi-sensor indices for more accurate and timely drought monitoring. The weights for the blends of multiple indicators were obtained from the importance of variables calculated by non-linear optimization using a Machine Learning technique called Random Forest. The case study was performed in the Republic of Korea, which has four distinct seasons over the course of the year and contains complex topography with a variety

  13. Physiological Mechanisms behind Differences in Pod Shattering Resistance in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Peipei; Zhou, Min; Wu, Jiangsheng; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Pod shattering resistance index (SRI) is a key factor affecting the mechanical harvesting of rapeseed. Research on the differences in pod shattering resistance levels of various rapeseed varieties can provide a theoretical basis for varietal breeding and application in mechanical harvesting. The indicators on pod shattering resistance including pod morphology and wall components were evaluated on eight hybrids and open pollinators, respectively, during 2012–2014. The results showed the following: (1) From the current study, SRI varied greatly with variety, and conventional varieties had stronger resistance than hybrid according to the physiological indexes. and (2) Under the experimental conditions, the SRI was linearly related to pod wall weight and the water content in pod walls, and the goodness-of-fit measurements for the regression model of the SRI based on pod wall weight and water content were 0.584** and 0.377*, respectively, reaching the significant level. This illustrated that pod wall weight and the water content in pod walls determined the SRI. (3) Compared with the relative contents of biochemical components in pod walls, the contents of particular biochemical components in pod walls had closer correlations with SRI. Among the biochemical components, the hemicellulose content was the decisive factor for the SRI. PMID:27299997

  14. Physiological Mechanisms behind Differences in Pod Shattering Resistance in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) Varieties.

    PubMed

    Kuai, Jie; Sun, Yingying; Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Peipei; Zhou, Min; Wu, Jiangsheng; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Pod shattering resistance index (SRI) is a key factor affecting the mechanical harvesting of rapeseed. Research on the differences in pod shattering resistance levels of various rapeseed varieties can provide a theoretical basis for varietal breeding and application in mechanical harvesting. The indicators on pod shattering resistance including pod morphology and wall components were evaluated on eight hybrids and open pollinators, respectively, during 2012-2014. The results showed the following: (1) From the current study, SRI varied greatly with variety, and conventional varieties had stronger resistance than hybrid according to the physiological indexes. and (2) Under the experimental conditions, the SRI was linearly related to pod wall weight and the water content in pod walls, and the goodness-of-fit measurements for the regression model of the SRI based on pod wall weight and water content were 0.584** and 0.377*, respectively, reaching the significant level. This illustrated that pod wall weight and the water content in pod walls determined the SRI. (3) Compared with the relative contents of biochemical components in pod walls, the contents of particular biochemical components in pod walls had closer correlations with SRI. Among the biochemical components, the hemicellulose content was the decisive factor for the SRI. PMID:27299997

  15. Cell Penetrating Peptide POD Mediates Delivery of Recombinant Proteins to Retina, Cornea and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Leslie N.; Cashman, Siobhan M.; Read, Sarah Parker; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Recently we described a novel cell penetrating peptide, POD (peptide for ocular delivery) that could deliver small molecules including fluorescent dyes into retinal cells. The objective of the current study was to examine whether biologically relevant macromolecules such as proteins, genetically fused with POD could also be delivered into retinal tissues in vivo. We generated a POD-GFP fusion protein and examined its cell and tissue penetrating properties. We found that endogenously expressed POD-GFP fusion protein localized to the nucleus, suggesting that POD acts as a nuclear localization signal. Adenovirus (Ad) vectors expressing POD-GFP fusion protein were constructed and the recombinant protein was purified from Ad-infected human embryonic retinoblasts (HER). Exogenously supplied POD-GFP fusion protein rapidly transduced A549 and HER cells and colocalized in part with markers of late endosomes, from which it could escape. Following subretinal delivery, POD-GFP localized to the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptor cell bodies. When injected into the vitreous, POD-GFP localized to the ganglion cells and the inner nuclear layer of the retina as well as the lens capsule. Topical application of POD-GFP to ocular surfaces resulted in uptake by the corneal epithelium. POD-GFP also transduced non-ocular tissues, including the epidermis of the skin following topical application. PMID:19733192

  16. Copernicus POD Service: Orbit Determination of the Sentinel Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Heike; Fernández, Jaime; Ayuga, Francisco; Féménias, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Copernicus POD (Precise Orbit Determination) Service is part of the Copernicus Processing Data Ground Segment (PDGS) of the Sentinel-1, -2 and -3 missions. A GMV-led consortium is operating the Copernicus POD Service being in charge of generating precise orbital products and auxiliary data files for their use as part of the processing chains of the respective Sentinel PDGS. Sentinel-1A was launched in April 2014 while Sentinel-2A was on June 2015 and both are routinely operated since then. Sentinel-3A is expected to be launched in February 2016 and Sentinel-1B is planned for spring 2016. Thus the CPOD Service will be operating three to four satellites simultaneously in spring 2016. The satellites of the Sentinel-1, -2, and -3 missions are all equipped with dual frequency high precision GPS receivers delivering the main observables for POD. Sentinel-3 satellites will additionally be equipped with a laser retro reflector for Satellite Laser Ranging and a receiver for DORIS tracking. All three types of observables (GPS, SLR and DORIS) will be used routinely for POD. The POD core of the CPOD Service is NAPEOS (Navigation Package for Earth Orbiting Satellites) the leading ESA/ESOC software for precise orbit determination. The careful selection of models and inputs is important to achieve the different but very demanding requirements in terms of orbital accuracy and timeliness for the Sentinel -1, -2 & -3 missions. The three missions require orbital products with various latencies from 30 minutes up to 20-30 days. The accuracy requirements are also different and partly very challenging, targeting 5 cm in 3D for Sentinel-1 and 2-3 cm in radial direction for Sentinel-3. Although the characteristics and the requirements are different for the three missions the same core POD setup is used to the largest extent possible. This strategy facilitates maintenance of the complex system of the CPOD Service. Updates in the dynamical modelling of the satellite orbits, e

  17. Sensor Configuration For A Short To Medium Range Reconnaissance Pod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Ingvar H.

    1987-02-01

    The GREEN BARON pod is designed and developed specifically for penetrating reconnaissance and for reconnaissance up to medium distance. An Infra Red Line Scanner (IRLS) in combination with a panoramic camera are the main short range sensors, the IRLS as an allweather sensor and the panoramic camera to get horizon to horizon coverage and stereo interpretation. For reconnaissance up to medium distance our choice was a camera with 12 inch focal length. This focal length gives moderate focusing problems when operating over a wide distance range. Influence on performance caused by environment is easier to deal with compared to operating a camera with longer focal length. This paper concentrates on the reasons for choosing a focal length of 12 inch for the pod.

  18. Drying of vanilla pods using a greenhouse effect solar dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, K.; Mursalim

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the basic design of the GHE solar dryer and evaluates the performance of the dryer when used to dry vanilla pods. From laboratory test results it was indicted that the average drying time for vanilla pods was between 49 to 53.5 hrs. For the case of heating augmentation using coal briquette stoves. The total amount of coal briquettes used to produce drying air temperature between 33 C to 65 C and RH of about 34% during day time was 61 kg equivalent to 6.1 kW heating rate and the average electric energy usage of 36.5 kWh, respectively. Quality test results indicated that the dried products were of grade IA of the export quality standard with vaniline content of 2.36%.

  19. My favourite flowering image: a cob of pod corn.

    PubMed

    Theißen, Günter

    2014-12-01

    For good reasons scientists usually do not report the personal circumstances of their work when publishing their results. This means, however, that the scientific facts being reported may not accurately reflect the personal importance of the respective work for the individual scientists. Pictures of pod corn (or Tunicate maize) have been on my mind for much of my life, through good and through bad times. This is why... PMID:24980907

  20. Reduced order models based on local POD plus Galerkin projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapún, María-Luisa; Vega, José M.

    2010-04-01

    A method is presented to accelerate numerical simulations on parabolic problems using a numerical code and a Galerkin system (obtained via POD plus Galerkin projection) on a sequence of interspersed intervals. The lengths of these intervals are chosen according to several basic ideas that include an a priori estimate of the error of the Galerkin approximation. Several improvements are introduced that reduce computational complexity and deal with: (a) updating the POD manifold (instead of calculating it) at the end of each Galerkin interval; (b) using only a limited number of mesh points to calculate the right hand side of the Galerkin system; and (c) introducing a second error estimate based on a second Galerkin system to account for situations in which qualitative changes in the dynamics occur during the application of the Galerkin system. The resulting method, called local POD plus Galerkin projection method, turns out to be both robust and efficient. For illustration, we consider a time-dependent Fisher-like equation and a complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  1. System Identification and POD Method Applied to Unsteady Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Deman; Kholodar, Denis; Juang, Jer-Nan; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The representation of unsteady aerodynamic flow fields in terms of global aerodynamic modes has proven to be a useful method for reducing the size of the aerodynamic model over those representations that use local variables at discrete grid points in the flow field. Eigenmodes and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) modes have been used for this purpose with good effect. This suggests that system identification models may also be used to represent the aerodynamic flow field. Implicit in the use of a systems identification technique is the notion that a relative small state space model can be useful in describing a dynamical system. The POD model is first used to show that indeed a reduced order model can be obtained from a much larger numerical aerodynamical model (the vortex lattice method is used for illustrative purposes) and the results from the POD and the system identification methods are then compared. For the example considered, the two methods are shown to give comparable results in terms of accuracy and reduced model size. The advantages and limitations of each approach are briefly discussed. Both appear promising and complementary in their characteristics.

  2. Jason-1 and Jason-2 POD Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melachroinos, Stavros; Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Rowlands, David D.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Beckley, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    The Jason-2 satellite, launched in June 2008, is the latest follow-on to the successful Jason-1 altimetry satellite mission launched in December 7, 2001. Both, Jason-2 and Jason-1 are equipped with a GPS dual-frequency receiver, a laser retroreflector array, and a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination (POD). A series of dynamic and reduced-dynamic Jason-2 orbits computed at NASA GSFC, based on GPS-only data and the std0905 standards, have been completed till cy74through cycle 74 using the IGS05 framework. These orbits, now publicly available, have been shown to agree radially at 1 cm RMS with the GSFC std0905 SLR/DORIS orbits and in comparison with orbits produced by JPL, ESA and CNES. In this paper, we describe the implementation of the IGS08 and repro1 framework for the Jason-2 and Jason-1 GPS POD processing with the NASA GSFC GEODYN software. . In our updated GPS POD, ambiguity fixing and updated time variable and static gravity fields. We also evaluate the implementation of non-tidal and degree-1 loading displacement as forward modeling to the tracking stations. Reduced-dynamic versus dynamic orbit differences are used to characterize the remaining force model errors and TRF instability. In particular, we assess their consistency radially and the stability of the altimeter satellite reference frame in the North/South direction as a proxy to assess the consistency of the reference frame.

  3. Selection of soybean pods by the stink bugs, Nezara viridula and Piezodorus guildinii.

    PubMed

    Molina, Gonzalo A R; Trumper, Eduardo V

    2012-01-01

    Different biological parameters of the stink bugs, Nezara viridula L. and Piezodorus guildinii Westwood (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), are affected by the developmental stage of the soybean (Glycine max Merrill) pods they feed on. These effects of the soybean on the stink bugs could represent a selection pressure leading to the ability of these species to discriminate the phenological stage of soybean pods, and, therefore, to exhibit feeding preferences. We designed three studies: (1) Distant detection of soybean pods through an olfactometer; (2) Free choice tests to evaluate preferences for soybean pods of different developmental stages; (3) No choice tests to study effects of soybean pod development on feeding time and number of probes. Stink bugs showed no differential response to olfactometer arms with or without soybean pods, suggesting an inability to detect soybean volatiles. Free choice tests showed no species effects on pods selection, but significant differences among fifth instar nymphs, adult male, and adult females. Fifth instar nymphs fed more frequently on soybean pods of advanced development stages compared to female adults, despite previous evidence showing poor development of stink bugs fed pods of the same stage. No choice tests showed significant effects of stink bug species, stink bug stage and sex, and soybean pod phenology. N. viridula expressed shorter feeding times and higher numbers of probes than P. guildinii. The highest numbers of probes of both species were observed when they were fed soybean pods in early phenological stages. When placed in direct contact with food, fifth instar nymphs prefered to feed on more developed pods, despite these pods being suboptimal food items. These results suggest that for the ecological time framework of soybean-stink bugs coexistence, around thirty-five years in Argentina, the selection pressure was not enough for stink bugs to evolve food preferences that match their performance on soybean pods of

  4. A POD reduced order unstructured mesh ocean modelling method for moderate Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Navon, I. M.; Gorman, G. J.; Piggott, M. D.; Allison, P. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Goddard, A. J. H.

    Herein a new approach to enhance the accuracy of a novel Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) model applied to moderate Reynolds number flows (of the type typically encountered in ocean models) is presented. This approach develops the POD model of Fang et al. [Fang, F., Pain, C.C., Navon, I.M., Piggott, M.D., Gorman, G.J., Allison, P., Goddard, A.J.H., 2008. Reduced-order modelling of an adaptive mesh ocean model. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids. doi:10.1002/fld.1841] used in conjunction with the Imperial College Ocean Model (ICOM), an adaptive, non-hydrostatic finite element model. Both the velocity and vorticity results of the POD reduced order model (ROM) exhibit an overall good agreement with those obtained from the full model. The accuracy of the POD-Galerkin model with the use of adaptive meshes is first evaluated using the Munk gyre flow test case with Reynolds numbers ranging between 400 and 2000. POD models using the L2 norm become oscillatory when the Reynolds number exceeds Re=400. This is because the low-order truncation of the POD basis inhibits generally all the transfers between the large and the small (unresolved) scales of the fluid flow. Accuracy is improved by using the H1 POD projector in preference to the L2 POD projector. The POD bases are constructed by incorporating gradients as well as function values in the H1 Sobolev norm. The accuracy of numerical results is further enhanced by increasing the number of snapshots and POD bases. Error estimation was used to assess the effect of truncation (involved in the POD-Galerkin approach) when adaptive meshes are used in conjunction with POD/ROM. The RMSE of velocity results between the full model and POD-Galerkin model is reduced by as much as 50% by using the H1 norm and increasing the number of snapshots and POD bases.

  5. Selection of Soybean Pods by the Stink Bugs, Nezara viridula and Piezodorus guildinii

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Gonzalo A. R.; Trumper, Eduardo V.

    2012-01-01

    Different biological parameters of the stink bugs, Nezara viridula L. and Piezodorus guildinii Westwood (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), are affected by the developmental stage of the soybean (Glycine max Merrill) pods they feed on. These effects of the soybean on the stink bugs could represent a selection pressure leading to the ability of these species to discriminate the phenological stage of soybean pods, and, therefore, to exhibit feeding preferences. We designed three studies: (1) Distant detection of soybean pods through an olfactometer; (2) Free choice tests to evaluate preferences for soybean pods of different developmental stages; (3) No choice tests to study effects of soybean pod development on feeding time and number of probes. Stink bugs showed no differential response to olfactometer arms with or without soybean pods, suggesting an inability to detect soybean volatiles. Free choice tests showed no species effects on pods selection, but significant differences among fifth instar nymphs, adult male, and adult females. Fifth instar nymphs fed more frequently on soybean pods of advanced development stages compared to female adults, despite previous evidence showing poor development of stink bugs fed pods of the same stage. No choice tests showed significant effects of stink bug species, stink bug stage and sex, and soybean pod phenology. N. viridula expressed shorter feeding times and higher numbers of probes than P. guildinii. The highest numbers of probes of both species were observed when they were fed soybean pods in early phenological stages. When placed in direct contact with food, fifth instar nymphs prefered to feed on more developed pods, despite these pods being suboptimal food items. These results suggest that for the ecological time framework of soybean-stink bugs coexistence, around thirty-five years in Argentina, the selection pressure was not enough for stink bugs to evolve food preferences that match their performance on soybean pods of

  6. Multi-sensor data fusion framework for CNC machining monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duro, João A.; Padget, Julian A.; Bowen, Chris R.; Kim, H. Alicia; Nassehi, Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Reliable machining monitoring systems are essential for lowering production time and manufacturing costs. Existing expensive monitoring systems focus on prevention/detection of tool malfunctions and provide information for process optimisation by force measurement. An alternative and cost-effective approach is monitoring acoustic emissions (AEs) from machining operations by acting as a robust proxy. The limitations of AEs include high sensitivity to sensor position and cutting parameters. In this paper, a novel multi-sensor data fusion framework is proposed to enable identification of the best sensor locations for monitoring cutting operations, identifying sensors that provide the best signal, and derivation of signals with an enhanced periodic component. Our experimental results reveal that by utilising the framework, and using only three sensors, signal interpretation improves substantially and the monitoring system reliability is enhanced for a wide range of machining parameters. The framework provides a route to overcoming the major limitations of AE based monitoring.

  7. Reliability measurement during software development. [for a multisensor tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, H.; Sturm, W. A.; Trattner, S.

    1977-01-01

    During the development of data base software for a multi-sensor tracking system, reliability was measured. The failure ratio and failure rate were found to be consistent measures. Trend lines were established from these measurements that provided good visualization of the progress on the job as a whole as well as on individual modules. Over one-half of the observed failures were due to factors associated with the individual run submission rather than with the code proper. Possible application of these findings for line management, project managers, functional management, and regulatory agencies is discussed. Steps for simplifying the measurement process and for use of these data in predicting operational software reliability are outlined.

  8. Background Subtraction for Automated Multisensor Surveillance: A Comprehensive Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristani, Marco; Farenzena, Michela; Bloisi, Domenico; Murino, Vittorio

    2010-12-01

    Background subtraction is a widely used operation in the video surveillance, aimed at separating the expected scene (the background) from the unexpected entities (the foreground). There are several problems related to this task, mainly due to the blurred boundaries between background and foreground definitions. Therefore, background subtraction is an open issue worth to be addressed under different points of view. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive review of the background subtraction methods, that considers also channels other than the sole visible optical one (such as the audio and the infrared channels). In addition to the definition of novel kinds of background, the perspectives that these approaches open up are very appealing: in particular, the multisensor direction seems to be well-suited to solve or simplify several hoary background subtraction problems. All the reviewed methods are organized in a novel taxonomy that encapsulates all the brand-new approaches in a seamless way.

  9. MIST Final Report: Multi-sensor Imaging Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Michael A.; Medvick, Patricia A.; Foley, Michael G.; Foote, Harlan P.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Thompson, Sandra E.; Nuffer, Lisa L.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Renholds, Andrea S.

    2008-03-15

    The Multi-sensor Imaging Science and Technology (MIST) program was undertaken to advance exploitation tools for Long Wavelength Infra Red (LWIR) hyper-spectral imaging (HSI) analysis as applied to the discovery and quantification of nuclear proliferation signatures. The program focused on mitigating LWIR image background clutter to ease the analyst burden and enable a) faster more accurate analysis of large volumes of high clutter data, b) greater detection sensitivity of nuclear proliferation signatures (primarily released gasses) , and c) quantify confidence estimates of the signature materials detected. To this end the program investigated fundamental limits and logical modifications of the more traditional statistical discovery and analysis tools applied to hyperspectral imaging and other disciplines, developed and tested new software incorporating advanced mathematical tools and physics based analysis, and demonstrated the strength and weaknesses of the new codes on relevant hyperspectral data sets from various campaigns. This final report describes the content of the program and the outlines the significant results.

  10. [Air-borne disease].

    PubMed

    Lameiro Vilariño, Carmen; del Campo Pérez, Victor M; Alonso Bürger, Susana; Felpeto Nodar, Irene; Guimarey Pérez, Rosa; Pérez Alvarellos, Alberto

    2003-11-01

    Respiratory protection is a factor which worries nursing professionals who take care of patients susceptible of transmitting microorganisms through the air more as every day passes. This type of protection covers the use of surgical or hygienic masks against the transmission of infection by airborne drops to the use of highly effective masks or respirators against the transmission of airborne diseases such as tuberculosis or SARS, a recently discovered disease. The adequate choice of this protective device and its correct use are fundamental in order to have an effective protection for exposed personnel. The authors summarize the main protective respiratory devices used by health workers, their characteristics and degree of effectiveness, as well as the circumstances under which each device is indicated for use. PMID:14705591

  11. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  12. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  13. Capturing Greenland Meltwater Plume Dynamics with IcePod Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S.; Le Bel, D. A.; Zappa, C. J.; Porter, D. F.; Tinto, K. J.; Bell, R. E.; Frearson, N.

    2014-12-01

    Meltwater that forms on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet and falls to the ice sheet bed eventually emerges at the calving front as tan, turbid plumes of water. Adjacent to the ice, these meltwater plumes foster mixing in the fjord moving warm ocean water into contact with the front of the ice sheet where it can undercut the ice front and trigger calving. The dynamics of meltwater plumes is difficult to study due to their proximity to the steep calving fronts and their intermittent nature. In July 2014 the IcePod, the ice-ocean imaging system mounted on a New York Air National Guard LC-130, surveyed the 5 glaciers just north of Jakobshavn Isbrae, each of which had an active meltwater plume. The IcePod system has core instrumentation that can resolve high-resolution surface elevations with a scanning laser and visual cameras, the temperature of the surface with an infrared camera, and the structure of snow and ice with two radar systems. For the study of plume dynamics, the key IcePod observations include: (1) the morphology of the calving front captured with the visual camera and the scanning laser and (2) thermal structure, velocity and turbulence of the plume water resolved with the infrared camera. In the future, an expanded IcePod capability will include an AXCTD launching system to recovery the hydrography of the fjord and the plumes. The IcePod survey directly crossed 3 of the 5 meltwater plumes on two subsequent days. The plumes sampled multiple times were Sermeq Avangnardleq A that drains into the Jakobshavn Isbrae Fjord, Eqip Sermia and Sermia Kangilerngata. While each of the ice feeding these three adjacent fjords has experienced the same surface melting conditions the structure of the meltwater plumes was very different in each fjords. Sermeq Avangnardleq A had a narrow angular shaped plume nestled in an embayment in the calving front, Eqip Sermia had two broad diffuse plumes and Sermia Kangilerngata had a narrow circular plume in an ice choked

  14. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles.

  15. Mammalian airborne allergens.

    PubMed

    Aalberse, Rob C

    2014-01-01

    Historically, horse dandruff was a favorite allergen source material. Today, however, allergic symptoms due to airborne mammalian allergens are mostly a result of indoor exposure, be it at home, at work or even at school. The relevance of mammalian allergens in relation to the allergenic activity of house dust extract is briefly discussed in the historical context of two other proposed sources of house dust allergenic activity: mites and Maillard-type lysine-sugar conjugates. Mammalian proteins involved in allergic reactions to airborne dust are largely found in only 2 protein families: lipocalins and secretoglobins (Fel d 1-like proteins), with a relatively minor contribution of serum albumins, cystatins and latherins. Both the lipocalin and the secretoglobin family are very complex. In some instances this results in a blurred separation between important and less important allergenic family members. The past 50 years have provided us with much detailed information on the genomic organization and protein structure of many of these allergens. However, the complex family relations, combined with the wide range of post-translational enzymatic and non-enzymatic modifications, make a proper qualitative and quantitative description of the important mammalian indoor airborne allergens still a significant proteomic challenge. PMID:24925404

  16. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  17. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  18. Proteome analysis of pod and seed development in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Nautrup-Pedersen, Gitte; Dam, Svend; Laursen, Brian S; Siegumfeldt, Astrid L; Nielsen, Kasper; Goffard, Nicolas; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Friis, Carsten; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Lorentzen, Andrea; Roepstorff, Peter; Stougaard, Jens

    2010-11-01

    Legume pods serve important functions during seed development and are themselves sources of food and feed. Compared to seeds, the metabolism and development of pods are not well-defined. The present characterization of pods from the model legume Lotus japonicus, together with the detailed analyses of the pod and seed proteomes in five developmental stages, paves the way for comparative pathway analysis and provides new metabolic information. Proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem-mass spectrometry. These analyses lead to the identification of 604 pod proteins and 965 seed proteins, including 263 proteins distinguishing the pod. The complete data set is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/cgi-bin/lotus/db.cgi , where spots in a reference map are linked to experimental data, such as matched peptides, quantification values, and gene accessions. Identified pod proteins represented enzymes from 85 different metabolic pathways, including storage globulins and a late embryogenesis abundant protein. In contrast to seed maturation, pod maturation was associated with decreasing total protein content, especially proteins involved in protein biosynthesis and photosynthesis. Proteins detected only in pods included three enzymes participating in the urea cycle and four in nitrogen and amino group metabolism, highlighting the importance of nitrogen metabolism during pod development. Additionally, five legume seed proteins previously unassigned in the glutamate metabolism pathway were identified.

  19. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  20. Note on the POD-based time interpolation from successive PIV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhoubeiny, Elkhadim; Druault, Philippe

    2009-11-01

    To enhance the temporal resolution of the PIV measurements of pseudo-periodic turbulent flows, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) has been previously used to time interpolate PIV database. In this note, it is demonstrated that such POD interpolation is equivalent to the classical mathematical interpolation when dealing with the whole POD eigenfunctions, since POD is a linear transform. In fact, the POD-based time interpolation is only valid for the large scale structures of the flow. The advantage of using POD procedure resides in its efficiency in extracting the dominant flow structures. In this sense, other interpolation methods such as turbulent filtering procedures could provide similar results. To cite this article: E. Bouhoubeiny, P. Druault, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  1. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  2. Antioxidant Enzymes Regulate Reactive Oxygen Species during Pod Elongation in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan; Lin, Zhifang; Guan, Lanlan; Gaughan, Gerald; Lin, Guizhu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has focused on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell wall loosening and cell extension in plant vegetative growth, but few studies have investigated ROS functions specifically in plant reproductive organs. In this study, ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were assessed in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis pods at five developmental stages. In juvenile pods, the high levels of O2.− and.OH indicates that they had functions in cell wall loosening and cell elongation. In later developmental stages, high levels of.OH were also related to increases in cell wall thickness in lignified tissues. Throughout pod development, most of the O2.− was detected on plasma membranes of parenchyma cells and outer epidermis cells of the mesocarp, while most of the H2O2 was detected on plasma membranes of most cells throughout the mesocarp. This suggests that these sites are presumably the locations of ROS generation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) apparently contributed to ROS accumulation in pod wall tissues. Furthermore, specifically SOD and POD were found to be associated with pod growth through the regulation of ROS generation and transformation. Throughout pod development, O2.− decreases were associated with increased SOD activity, while changes in H2O2 accumulation were associated with changes in CAT and POD activities. Additionally, high POD activity may contribute to the generation of.OH in the early development of pods. It is concluded that the ROS are produced in different sites of plasma membranes with the regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and that substantial ROS generation and accumulation are evident in cell elongation and cell wall loosening in pod wall cells. PMID:24503564

  3. A POD-based analysis of turbulence in the reduced nonlinear dynamics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaidis, M.-A.; Farrell, B. F.; Ioannou, P. J.; Gayme, D. F.; Lozano-Durán, A.; Jiménez, J.

    2016-04-01

    The structure of turbulence in a reduced model of turbulence (RNL) is analyzed by means of a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD modes). POD analysis was carried out on two different components of the flow, the roll/streak and the perturbation structure. The POD structure in both RNL and direct numerical simulations (DNS) is similar and this correspondence suggests that the dynamics retained in RNL are the essential dynamical ingredients underlying the self-sustaining mechanism of the turbulent state.

  4. Antioxidant enzymes regulate reactive oxygen species during pod elongation in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Lin, Zhifang; Guan, Lanlan; Gaughan, Gerald; Lin, Guizhu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has focused on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell wall loosening and cell extension in plant vegetative growth, but few studies have investigated ROS functions specifically in plant reproductive organs. In this study, ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were assessed in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis pods at five developmental stages. In juvenile pods, the high levels of O2.- and .OH indicates that they had functions in cell wall loosening and cell elongation. In later developmental stages, high levels of .OH were also related to increases in cell wall thickness in lignified tissues. Throughout pod development, most of the O2.- was detected on plasma membranes of parenchyma cells and outer epidermis cells of the mesocarp, while most of the H2O2 was detected on plasma membranes of most cells throughout the mesocarp. This suggests that these sites are presumably the locations of ROS generation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) apparently contributed to ROS accumulation in pod wall tissues. Furthermore, specifically SOD and POD were found to be associated with pod growth through the regulation of ROS generation and transformation. Throughout pod development, O2.- decreases were associated with increased SOD activity, while changes in H2O2 accumulation were associated with changes in CAT and POD activities. Additionally, high POD activity may contribute to the generation of(.)OH in the early development of pods. It is concluded that the ROS are produced in different sites of plasma membranes with the regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and that substantial ROS generation and accumulation are evident in cell elongation and cell wall loosening in pod wall cells.

  5. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  6. Airborne ballistic camera tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redish, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    An operational airborne ballistic camera tracking system was tested for operational and data reduction feasibility. The acquisition and data processing requirements of the system are discussed. Suggestions for future improvements are also noted. A description of the data reduction mathematics is outlined. Results from a successful reentry test mission are tabulated. The test mission indicated that airborne ballistic camera tracking systems are feasible.

  7. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown. PMID:23406937

  8. Performance assessment of MEMS adaptive optics in tactical airborne systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, Robert K.

    1999-09-01

    Tactical airborne electro-optical systems are severely constrained by weight, volume, power, and cost. Micro- electrical-mechanical adaptive optics provide a solution that addresses the engineering realities without compromising spatial and temporal compensation requirements. Through modeling and analysis, we determined that substantial benefits could be gained for laser designators, ladar, countermeasures, and missile seekers. The developments potential exists for improving seeker imagery resolution 20 percent, extending countermeasures keep-out range by a factor of 5, doubling the range for ladar detection and identification, and compensating for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft boundary layers. Innovative concepts are required for atmospheric pat hand boundary layer compensation. We have developed design that perform these tasks using high speed scene-based wavefront sensing, IR aerosol laser guide stars, and extended-object wavefront beacons. We have developed a number of adaptive optics system configurations that met the spatial resolution requirements and we have determined that sensing and signal processing requirements can be met. With the help of micromachined deformable mirrors and sensor, we will be able to integrate the systems into existing airborne pods and missiles as well as next generation electro-optical systems.

  9. Mapping and use of QTLs controlling pod dehiscence in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Funatsuki, Hideyuki; Hajika, Makita; Yamada, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Masaya; Hagihara, Seiji; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Fujita, Shohei; Ishimoto, Masao; Fujino, Kaien

    2012-01-01

    While the cultivated soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., is more recalcitrant to pod dehiscence (shattering-resistant) than wild soybean, Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc., there is also significant genetic variation in shattering resistance among cultivated soybean cultivars. To reveal the genetic basis and develop DNA markers for pod dehiscence, several research groups have conducted quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis using segregated populations derived from crosses between G. max accessions or between a G. max and G. soja accession. In the populations of G. max, a major QTL was repeatedly identified near SSR marker Sat_366 on linkage group J (chromosome 16). Minor QTLs were also detected in several studies, although less commonality was found for the magnitudes of effect and location. In G. max × G. soja populations, only QTLs with a relatively small effect were detected. The major QTL found in G. max was further fine-mapped, leading to the development of specific markers for the shattering resistance allele at this locus. The markers were used in a breeding program, resulting in the production of near-isogenic lines with shattering resistance and genetic backgrounds of Japanese elite cultivars. The markers and lines developed will hopefully contribute to the rapid production of a variety of shattering-resistant soybean cultivars. PMID:23136494

  10. POD Analysis of Jet-Plume/Afterbody-Wake Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Nathan E.; Seiner, John M.; Jansen, Bernard J.; Gui, Lichuan; Sockwell, Shuan; Joachim, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    The understanding of the flow physics in the base region of a powered rocket is one of the keys to designing the next generation of reusable launchers. The base flow features affect the aerodynamics and the heat loading at the base of the vehicle. Recent efforts at the National Center for Physical Acoustics at the University of Mississippi have refurbished two models for studying jet-plume/afterbody-wake interactions in the NCPA's 1-foot Tri-Sonic Wind Tunnel Facility. Both models have a 2.5 inch outer diameter with a nominally 0.5 inch diameter centered exhaust nozzle. One of the models is capable of being powered with gaseous H2 and O2 to study the base flow in a fully combusting senario. The second model uses hi-pressure air to drive the exhaust providing an unheated representative flow field. This unheated model was used to acquire PIV data of the base flow. Subsequently, a POD analysis was performed to provide a first look at the large-scale structures present for the interaction between an axisymmetric jet and an axisymmetric afterbody wake. PIV and Schlieren data are presented for a single jet-exhaust to free-stream flow velocity along with the POD analysis of the base flow field.

  11. SR-71 wind tunnel scale model with LASRE pod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This is a photo of the SR-71 scale wind tunnel model showing the Linear Aerospike SR Experiment (LASRE) pod attachment location. The model was on display for the LASRE fit-check at the Lockheed Martin Skunkworks on Feb. 15, 1996, in Palmdale, California. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The LASRE experiment itself was a 20-percent-scale, half-span model of a lifting body shape (X-33) without the fins. It was rotated 90 degrees and equipped with eight thrust cells of an aerospike engine and was mounted on a housing known as the 'canoe,' which contained the gaseous hydrogen, helium, and instrumentation gear. The model, engine, and canoe together were called a 'pod.' The experiment focused on determining how a reusable launch vehicle's engine flume would affect the aerodynamics of its lifting-body shape at specific altitudes and speeds. The

  12. HALO: a reconfigurable image enhancement and multisensor fusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F.; Hickman, D. L.; Parker, Steve J.

    2014-06-01

    Contemporary high definition (HD) cameras and affordable infrared (IR) imagers are set to dramatically improve the effectiveness of security, surveillance and military vision systems. However, the quality of imagery is often compromised by camera shake, or poor scene visibility due to inadequate illumination or bad atmospheric conditions. A versatile vision processing system called HALO™ is presented that can address these issues, by providing flexible image processing functionality on a low size, weight and power (SWaP) platform. Example processing functions include video distortion correction, stabilisation, multi-sensor fusion and image contrast enhancement (ICE). The system is based around an all-programmable system-on-a-chip (SoC), which combines the computational power of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with the flexibility of a CPU. The FPGA accelerates computationally intensive real-time processes, whereas the CPU provides management and decision making functions that can automatically reconfigure the platform based on user input and scene content. These capabilities enable a HALO™ equipped reconnaissance or surveillance system to operate in poor visibility, providing potentially critical operational advantages in visually complex and challenging usage scenarios. The choice of an FPGA based SoC is discussed, and the HALO™ architecture and its implementation are described. The capabilities of image distortion correction, stabilisation, fusion and ICE are illustrated using laboratory and trials data.

  13. Multi-sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Carrington, Connie K.

    2008-01-01

    During the past two years, many sensors have been tested in an open-loop fashion in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL) to both determine their suitability for use in Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) systems and to ensure the test facility is prepared for future multi-sensor testing. The primary focus of this work was in support of the CEV AR&D system, because the AR&D sensor technology area was identified as one of the top risks in the program. In 2006, four different sensors were tested individually or in a pair in the MSFC FRL. In 2007, four sensors, two each of two different types, were tested simultaneously. In each set of tests, the target was moved through a series of pre-planned trajectories while the sensor tracked it. In addition, a laser tracker "truth" sensor also measured the target motion. The tests demonstrated the functionality of testing four sensors simultaneously as well as the capabilities (both good and bad) of all of the different sensors tested. This paper outlines the test setup and conditions, briefly describes the facility, summarizes the earlier results of the individual sensor tests, and describes in some detail the results of the four-sensor testing. Post-test analysis includes data fusion by minimum variance estimation and sequential Kalman filtering. This Sensor Technology Project work was funded by NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program.

  14. Development of subminiature multi-sensor hot-wire probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Russell V.; Ligrani, Phillip M.; Lemos, Fred R.

    1988-01-01

    Limitations on the spatial resolution of multisensor hot wire probes have precluded accurate measurements of Reynolds stresses very near solid surfaces in wind tunnels and in many practical aerodynamic flows. The fabrication, calibration and qualification testing of very small single horizontal and X-array hot-wire probes which are intended to be used near solid boundaries in turbulent flows where length scales are particularly small, is described. Details of the sensor fabrication procedure are reported, along with information needed to successfully operate the probes. As compared with conventional probes, manufacture of the subminiature probes is more complex, requiring special equipment and careful handling. The subminiature probes tested were more fragile and shorter lived than conventional probes; they obeyed the same calibration laws but with slightly larger experimental uncertainty. In spite of these disadvantages, measurements of mean statistical quantities and spectra demonstrate the ability of the subminiature sensors to provide the measurements in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers that are more accurate than conventional sized probes.

  15. A hierarachical data structure representation for fusing multisensor information

    SciTech Connect

    Maren, A.J. . Space Inst.); Pap, R.M.; Harston, C.T. )

    1989-01-01

    A major problem with MultiSensor Information Fusion (MSIF) is establishing the level of processing at which information should be fused. Current methodologies, whether based on fusion at the data element, segment/feature, or symbolic levels, are each inadequate for robust MSIF. Data-element fusion has problems with coregistration. Attempts to fuse information using the features of segmented data relies on a Presumed similarity between the segmentation characteristics of each data stream. Symbolic-level fusion requires too much advance processing (including object identification) to be useful. MSIF systems need to operate in real-time, must perform fusion using a variety of sensor types, and should be effective across a wide range of operating conditions or deployment environments. We address this problem through developing a new representation level which facilitates matching and information fusion. The Hierarchical Data Structure (HDS) representation, created using a multilayer, cooperative/competitive neural network, meets this need. The HDS is an intermediate representation between the raw or smoothed data stream and symbolic interpretation of the data. it represents the structural organization of the data. Fused HDSs will incorporate information from multiple sensors. Their knowledge-rich structure aids top-down scene interpretation via both model matching and knowledge-based region interpretation.

  16. A hierarchical structure approach to MultiSensor Information Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Maren, A.J.; Pap, R.M.; Harston, C.T.

    1989-12-31

    A major problem with image-based MultiSensor Information Fusion (MSIF) is establishing the level of processing at which information should be fused. Current methodologies, whether based on fusion at the pixel, segment/feature, or symbolic levels, are each inadequate for robust MSIF. Pixel-level fusion has problems with coregistration of the images or data. Attempts to fuse information using the features of segmented images or data relies an a presumed similarity between the segmentation characteristics of each image or data stream. Symbolic-level fusion requires too much advance processing to be useful, as we have seen in automatic target recognition tasks. Image-based MSIF systems need to operate in real-time, must perform fusion using a variety of sensor types, and should be effective across a wide range of operating conditions or deployment environments. We address this problem through developing a new representation level which facilitates matching and information fusion. The Hierarchical Scene Structure (HSS) representation, created using a multilayer, cooperative/competitive neural network, meets this need. The MSS is intermediate between a pixel-based representation and a scene interpretation representation, and represents the perceptual organization of an image. Fused HSSs will incorporate information from multiple sensors. Their knowledge-rich structure aids top-down scene interpretation via both model matching and knowledge-based,region interpretation.

  17. A hierarachical data structure representation for fusing multisensor information

    SciTech Connect

    Maren, A.J.; Pap, R.M.; Harston, C.T.

    1989-12-31

    A major problem with MultiSensor Information Fusion (MSIF) is establishing the level of processing at which information should be fused. Current methodologies, whether based on fusion at the data element, segment/feature, or symbolic levels, are each inadequate for robust MSIF. Data-element fusion has problems with coregistration. Attempts to fuse information using the features of segmented data relies on a Presumed similarity between the segmentation characteristics of each data stream. Symbolic-level fusion requires too much advance processing (including object identification) to be useful. MSIF systems need to operate in real-time, must perform fusion using a variety of sensor types, and should be effective across a wide range of operating conditions or deployment environments. We address this problem through developing a new representation level which facilitates matching and information fusion. The Hierarchical Data Structure (HDS) representation, created using a multilayer, cooperative/competitive neural network, meets this need. The HDS is an intermediate representation between the raw or smoothed data stream and symbolic interpretation of the data. it represents the structural organization of the data. Fused HDSs will incorporate information from multiple sensors. Their knowledge-rich structure aids top-down scene interpretation via both model matching and knowledge-based region interpretation.

  18. A hierarchical structure approach to MultiSensor Information Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Maren, A.J. . Space Inst.); Pap, R.M.; Harston, C.T. )

    1989-01-01

    A major problem with image-based MultiSensor Information Fusion (MSIF) is establishing the level of processing at which information should be fused. Current methodologies, whether based on fusion at the pixel, segment/feature, or symbolic levels, are each inadequate for robust MSIF. Pixel-level fusion has problems with coregistration of the images or data. Attempts to fuse information using the features of segmented images or data relies an a presumed similarity between the segmentation characteristics of each image or data stream. Symbolic-level fusion requires too much advance processing to be useful, as we have seen in automatic target recognition tasks. Image-based MSIF systems need to operate in real-time, must perform fusion using a variety of sensor types, and should be effective across a wide range of operating conditions or deployment environments. We address this problem through developing a new representation level which facilitates matching and information fusion. The Hierarchical Scene Structure (HSS) representation, created using a multilayer, cooperative/competitive neural network, meets this need. The MSS is intermediate between a pixel-based representation and a scene interpretation representation, and represents the perceptual organization of an image. Fused HSSs will incorporate information from multiple sensors. Their knowledge-rich structure aids top-down scene interpretation via both model matching and knowledge-based,region interpretation.

  19. Adaptive multi-sensor integration for mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.

    1997-05-01

    State-of-the-art in multi-sensor integration (MSI) application involves extensive research and development time to understand and characterize the application domain; to determine and define the appropriate sensor suite; to analyze, characterize, and calibrate the individual sensor systems; to recognize and accommodate the various sensor interactions; and to develop and optimize robust merging code. Much of this process can benefit from adaptive learning, i.e., an output-based system can take raw sensor data and desired merged results as input and adaptively develop/determine an effective method if interpretation and merger. This approach significantly reduces the time required to apply MSI to a given application, while increasing the quality of the final result and provides a quantitative measure for comparing competing MSI techniques and sensor suites. The ability to automatically develop and optimize MSI techniques for new sensor suites and operating environments makes this approach well suited to the detection of mines and mine-like targets. Perhaps more than any other, this application domain is characterized by diverse, innovative, and dynamic sensor suites, whose nature and interactions are not yet well established. This paper presents such an outcome-based multi-image analysis system. An empirical evaluation of its performance and its application, sensor and domain robustness is presented.

  20. Irma 5.2 multi-sensor signature prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Coker, Charles; Thai, Bea; Aboutalib, Omar; Chow, Anthony; Yamaoka, Neil; Kim, Charles

    2007-04-01

    The Irma synthetic signature prediction code is being developed by the Munitions Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/MN) to facilitate the research and development of multi-sensor systems. There are over 130 users within the Department of Defense, NASA, Department of Transportation, academia, and industry. Irma began as a high-resolution, physics-based Infrared (IR) target and background signature model for tactical weapon applications and has grown to include: a laser (or active) channel (1990), improved scene generator to support correlated frame-to-frame imagery (1992), and passive IR/millimeter wave (MMW) channel for a co-registered active/passive IR/MMW model (1994). Irma version 5.0 was released in 2000 and encompassed several upgrades to both the physical models and software; host support was expanded to Windows, Linux, Solaris, and SGI Irix platforms. In 2005, version 5.1 was released after an extensive verification and validation of an upgraded and reengineered active channel. Since 2005, the reengineering effort has focused on the Irma passive channel. Field measurements for the validation effort include the unpolarized data collection. Irma 5.2 is scheduled for release in the summer of 2007. This paper will report the validation test results of the Irma passive models and discuss the new features in Irma 5.2.

  1. Irma 5.2 multi-sensor signature prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Coker, Charles; Thai, Bea; Aboutalib, Omar; Pau, John

    2008-04-01

    The Irma synthetic signature prediction code is being developed by the Munitions Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RW) to facilitate the research and development of multi-sensor systems. There are over 130 users within the Department of Defense, NASA, Department of Transportation, academia, and industry. Irma began as a high-resolution, physics-based Infrared (IR) target and background signature model for tactical weapon applications and has grown to include: a laser (or active) channel (1990), improved scene generator to support correlated frame-to-frame imagery (1992), and passive IR/millimeter wave (MMW) channel for a co-registered active/passive IR/MMW model (1994). Irma version 5.0 was released in 2000 and encompassed several upgrades to both the physical models and software; host support was expanded to Windows, Linux, Solaris, and SGI Irix platforms. In 2005, version 5.1 was released after extensive verification and validation of an upgraded and reengineered ladar channel. The reengineering effort then shifted focus to the Irma passive channel. Field measurements for the validation effort include both polarized and unpolarized data collection. Irma 5.2 was released in 2007 with a reengineered passive channel. This paper summarizes the capabilities of Irma and the progress toward Irma 5.3, which includes a reengineered radar channel.

  2. Multisensor Network System for Wildfire Detection Using Infrared Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, I.; Serrano, A.; Vergara, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the next step in the evolution of multi-sensor wireless network systems in the early automatic detection of forest fires. This network allows remote monitoring of each of the locations as well as communication between each of the sensors and with the control stations. The result is an increased coverage area, with quicker and safer responses. To determine the presence of a forest wildfire, the system employs decision fusion in thermal imaging, which can exploit various expected characteristics of a real fire, including short-term persistence and long-term increases over time. Results from testing in the laboratory and in a real environment are presented to authenticate and verify the accuracy of the operation of the proposed system. The system performance is gauged by the number of alarms and the time to the first alarm (corresponding to a real fire), for different probability of false alarm (PFA). The necessity of including decision fusion is thereby demonstrated. PMID:23843734

  3. Integrated multi-sensor package (IMSP) for unmanned vehicle operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Eddie C.; Reichard, Karl; Rogan, Chris; Callen, Jeff; Seifert, Elwood

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes recent efforts to develop integrated multi-sensor payloads for small robotic platforms for improved operator situational awareness and ultimately for greater robot autonomy. The focus is on enhancements to perception through integration of electro-optic, acoustic, and other sensors for navigation and inspection. The goals are to provide easier control and operation of the robot through fusion of multiple sensor outputs, to improve interoperability of the sensor payload package across multiple platforms through the use of open standards and architectures, and to reduce integration costs by embedded sensor data processing and fusion within the sensor payload package. The solutions investigated in this project to be discussed include: improved capture, processing and display of sensor data from multiple, non-commensurate sensors; an extensible architecture to support plug and play of integrated sensor packages; built-in health, power and system status monitoring using embedded diagnostics/prognostics; sensor payload integration into standard product forms for optimized size, weight and power; and the use of the open Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems (JAUS)/ Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) AS-4 interoperability standard. This project is in its first of three years. This paper will discuss the applicability of each of the solutions in terms of its projected impact to reducing operational time for the robot and teleoperator.

  4. Evaluating fusion techniques for multi-sensor satellite image data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Benjamin W; Vatsavai, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Satellite image data fusion is a topic of interest in many areas including environmental monitoring, emergency response, and defense. Typically any single satellite sensor cannot provide all of the benefits offered by a combination of different sensors (e.g., high-spatial but low spectral resolution vs. low-spatial but high spectral, optical vs. SAR). Given the respective strengths and weaknesses of the different types of image data, it is beneficial to fuse many types of image data to extract as much information as possible from the data. Our work focuses on the fusion of multi-sensor image data into a unified representation that incorporates the potential strengths of a sensor in order to minimize classification error. Of particular interest is the fusion of optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images into a single, multispectral image of the best possible spatial resolution. We explore various methods to optimally fuse these images and evaluate the quality of the image fusion by using K-means clustering to categorize regions in the fused images and comparing the accuracies of the resulting categorization maps.

  5. Multisensor based robotic manipulation in an uncalibrated manufacturing workcell

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, B.K.; Xiao, Di; Xi, Ning; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    1997-12-31

    The main problem that we address in this paper is how a robot manipulator is able to track and grasp a part placed arbitrarily on a moving disc conveyor aided by a single CCD camera and fusing information from encoders placed on the conveyor and also from encoders on the robot manipulator. The important assumption that distinguishes our work from what has been previously reported in the literature is that the position and orientation of the camera and the base frame of the robot is apriori assumed to be unknown and is `visually calibrated` during the operation of the manipulator. Moreover the part placed on the conveyor is assumed to be non-planar, i.e. the feature points observed on the part is assumed to be located arbitrarily in IR{sup 3}. The novelties of the proposed approach in this paper includes a (i) multisensor fusion scheme based on complementary data for the purpose of part localization, and (ii) self-calibration between the turntable and the robot manipulator using visual data and feature points on the end-effector. The principle advantages of the proposed scheme are the following. (i) It renders possible to reconfigure a manufacturing workcell without recalibrating the relation between the turntable and the robot. This significantly shortens the setup time of the workcell. (ii) It greatly weakens the requirement on the image processing speed.

  6. Reliable sources and uncertain decisions in multisensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, Christian; Johnson, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Conflict among information sources is a feature of fused multisource and multisensor systems. Accordingly, the subject of conflict resolution has a long history in the literature of data fusion algorithms such as that of Dempster-Shafer theory (DS). Most conflict resolution strategies focus on distributing the conflict among the elements of the frame of discernment (the set of hypotheses that describe the possible decisions for which evidence is obtained) through rescaling of the evidence. These "closed-world" strategies imply that conflict is due to the uncertainty in evidence sources stemming from their reliability. An alternative approach is the "open-world" hypothesis, which allows for the presence of "unknown" elements not included in the original frame of discernment. Here, conflict must be considered as a result of uncertainty in the frame of the discernment, rather than solely the province of evidence sources. Uncertainty in the operating environment of a fused system is likely to appear as an open-world scenario. Understanding the origin of conflict (source versus frame of discernment uncertainty) is a challenging area for research in fused systems. Determining the ratio of these uncertainties provides useful insights into the operation of fused systems and confidence in their decisions for a variety of operating environments. Results and discussion for the computation of these uncertainties are presented for several combination rules with simulated data sets.

  7. Multi-Sensor Fusion and Enhancement for Object Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-Ur

    2005-01-01

    This was a quick &week effort to investigate the ability to detect changes along the flight path of an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) over time. Video was acquired by the UAV during several passes over the same terrain. Concurrently, GPS data and UAV attitude data were also acquired. The purpose of the research was to use information from all of these sources to detect if any change had occurred in the terrain encompassed by the flight path.

  8. Health hazards associated with laundry detergent pods - United States, May-June 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-10-19

    During May and early June 2012, the Carolinas Poison Center and the Poison Control Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia received four reports of children with vomiting, mental status changes, and respiratory distress after ingesting the contents of laundry detergent pods. Laundry detergent pods are single-load capsules that contain concentrated liquid detergent within a water-soluble membrane that dissolves when in contact with moisture. Laundry detergent pods were introduced in the U.S. market in 2010, and multiple manufacturers now sell laundry detergent packaged in pods (2-4). On May 17, 2012, CDC and the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) began tracking and characterizing reported exposures to laundry detergent from pods. During May 17-June 17, 2012, poison centers reported 1,008 laundry detergent exposures to the National Poison Data System (NPDS), of which 485 (48%) exposures involved laundry detergent pods. Age was recorded for 481 exposures, of which 454 (94%) exposures involved children aged ≤5 years. Among children aged ≤5 years, a significantly greater proportion of those exposed to laundry detergent from pods had gastrointestinal and respiratory adverse health effects and mental status changes compared with those with non-pod laundry detergent exposures. Parents and caregivers should keep laundry detergent pods, as well as other household cleaning products, out of reach and out of sight of children. Health-care providers should be aware that exposure to laundry detergent from pods might be associated with adverse health effects more often than exposure to non-pod laundry detergents.

  9. POD/DEIM nonlinear model order reduction of an ADI implicit shallow water equations model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ştefănescu, R.; Navon, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    In the present paper we consider a 2-D shallow-water equations (SWE) model on a β-plane solved using an alternating direction fully implicit (ADI) finite-difference scheme on a rectangular domain. The scheme was shown to be unconditionally stable for the linearized equations. The discretization yields a number of nonlinear systems of algebraic equations. We then use a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to reduce the dimension of the SWE model. Due to the model nonlinearities, the computational complexity of the reduced model still depends on the number of variables of the full shallow - water equations model. By employing the discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) we reduce the computational complexity of the reduced order model due to its depending on the nonlinear full dimension model and regain the full model reduction expected from the POD model. To emphasize the CPU gain in performance due to use of POD/DEIM, we also propose testing an explicit Euler finite difference scheme (EE) as an alternative to the ADI implicit scheme for solving the swallow water equations model. We then proceed to assess the efficiency of POD/DEIM as a function of number of spatial discretization points, time steps, and POD basis functions. As was expected, our numerical experiments showed that the CPU time performances of POD/DEIM schemes are proportional to the number of mesh points. Once the number of spatial discretization points exceeded 10000 and for 90 DEIM interpolation points, the CPU time decreased by a factor of 10 in case of POD/DEIM implicit SWE scheme and by a factor of 15 for the POD/DEIM explicit SWE scheme in comparison with the corresponding POD SWE schemes. Moreover, our numerical tests revealed that if the number of points selected by DEIM algorithm reached 50, the approximation errors due to POD/DEIM and POD reduced systems have the same orders of magnitude, thus supporting the theoretical results existing in the literature.

  10. A national study examining closed points of dispensing (PODs): existence, preparedness, exercise participation, and training provided.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, Terri; Loux, Travis M; Swick, Zachary; Reddick, David; Dolgin, Harlan; Anthony, John; Prasad, Rohan

    2014-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends using open points of dispensing (PODs) and alternative modalities, such as closed PODs, for mass dispensing of medical countermeasures. However, closed POD existence has not been assessed. In 2013 we sent an online questionnaire to US Cities Readiness Initiative (CRI) and non-CRI public health disaster planners. Chi-square tests were used to determine differences between CRIs and non-CRIs when comparing having at least 1 closed POD, and to compare having a closed POD and perceived mass dispensing preparedness. A total of 301 disaster planners participated. Almost all (89.3%, n=218) jurisdictions have considered establishing a closed POD, and three-quarters (74.2%, n=181) currently have at least one. CRIs were more likely than non-CRIs to have a closed POD (85.0% vs 58.5%, X(2)=21.3, p<.001). Those with 1 or more closed PODs were more likely to believe their jurisdiction could distribute medical countermeasures within 48 hours compared to those without a closed POD (78.5% vs 21.5%; X(2)=10.8, p=.001). Half had a written plan and/or written standing orders (59.1% and 52.5%, respectively). Almost half (42%, n=72) have done no preevent training for POD staff in the past 2 years; almost 20% (18%, n=32) do not plan to offer any just-in-time training. Nearly 40% (n=70) have conducted no exercises in the past year. Closed PODs contribute to community preparedness; their establishment should be followed by development of written plans, worker training, and exercises.

  11. A national study examining closed points of dispensing (PODs): existence, preparedness, exercise participation, and training provided.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, Terri; Loux, Travis M; Swick, Zachary; Reddick, David; Dolgin, Harlan; Anthony, John; Prasad, Rohan

    2014-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends using open points of dispensing (PODs) and alternative modalities, such as closed PODs, for mass dispensing of medical countermeasures. However, closed POD existence has not been assessed. In 2013 we sent an online questionnaire to US Cities Readiness Initiative (CRI) and non-CRI public health disaster planners. Chi-square tests were used to determine differences between CRIs and non-CRIs when comparing having at least 1 closed POD, and to compare having a closed POD and perceived mass dispensing preparedness. A total of 301 disaster planners participated. Almost all (89.3%, n=218) jurisdictions have considered establishing a closed POD, and three-quarters (74.2%, n=181) currently have at least one. CRIs were more likely than non-CRIs to have a closed POD (85.0% vs 58.5%, X(2)=21.3, p<.001). Those with 1 or more closed PODs were more likely to believe their jurisdiction could distribute medical countermeasures within 48 hours compared to those without a closed POD (78.5% vs 21.5%; X(2)=10.8, p=.001). Half had a written plan and/or written standing orders (59.1% and 52.5%, respectively). Almost half (42%, n=72) have done no preevent training for POD staff in the past 2 years; almost 20% (18%, n=32) do not plan to offer any just-in-time training. Nearly 40% (n=70) have conducted no exercises in the past year. Closed PODs contribute to community preparedness; their establishment should be followed by development of written plans, worker training, and exercises. PMID:25014759

  12. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

    2000-08-31

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift

  13. Establishment of Stereo Multi-sensor Network for Giant Landslide Monitoring and its Deploy in Xishan landslide, Sichuan, China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Lu, P.; WU, H.

    2015-12-01

    Landslide is one of the most destructive natural disasters, which severely affects human lives as well as the safety of personal properties and public infrastructures. Monitoring and predicting landslide movements can keep an adequate safety level for human beings in those situations. This paper indicated a newly developed Stereo Multi-sensor Landslide Monitoring Network (SMSLMN) based on a uniform temporal geo-reference. Actually, early in 2003, SAMOA (Surveillance et Auscultation des Mouvements de Terrain Alpins, French) project was put forwarded as a plan for landslide movements monitoring. However, SAMOA project did not establish a stereo observation network to fully cover the surface and internal part of landslide. SMSLMN integrated various sensors, including space-borne, airborne, in-situ and underground sensors, which can quantitatively monitor the slide-body and obtain portent information of movement in high frequency with high resolution. The whole network has been deployed at the Xishan landslide, Sichuan, P.R.China. According to various characteristic of stereo monitoring sensors, observation capabilities indicators for different sensors were proposed in order to obtain the optimal sensors combination groups and observation strategy. Meanwhile, adaptive networking and reliable data communication methods were developed to apply intelligent observation and sensor data transmission. Some key technologies, such as signal amplification and intelligence extraction technology, data access frequency adaptive adjustment technology, different sensor synchronization control technology were developed to overcome the problems in complex observation environment. The collaboratively observation data have been transferred to the remote data center where is thousands miles away from the giant landslide spot. These data were introduced into the landslide stability analysis model, and some primary conclusion will be achieved at the end of paper.

  14. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  15. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  16. Could We Apply a NeuroProcessor For Analyzing a Gas Response Of Multisensor Arrays?

    SciTech Connect

    Sysoev, V. V.; Musatov, V. Yu.; Maschenko, A. A.; Varegnikov, A. S.; Chrizostomov, A. A.; Kiselev, I.; Schneider, T.; Bruns, M.; Sommer, M.

    2009-05-23

    We describe an effort of implementation of hardware neuroprocessor to carry out pattern recognition of signals generated by a multisensor microarray of Electronic Nose type. The multisensor microarray is designed with the SnO{sub 2} thin film segmented by co-planar electrodes according to KAMINA (KArlsruhe Micro NAse) E-nose architecture. The response of this microarray to reducing gases mixtured with a synthetic air is processed by principal component analysis technique realized in PC (Matlab software) and the neural microprocessor NeuroMatrix NM6403. It is shown that the neuroprocessor is able to successfully carry out a gas-recognition algorithm at a real-time scale.

  17. Autonomous navigation vehicle system based on robot vision and multi-sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lihong; Chen, Yingsong; Cui, Zhouping

    2011-12-01

    The architecture of autonomous navigation vehicle based on robot vision and multi-sensor fusion technology is expatiated in this paper. In order to acquire more intelligence and robustness, accurate real-time collection and processing of information are realized by using this technology. The method to achieve robot vision and multi-sensor fusion is discussed in detail. The results simulated in several operating modes show that this intelligent vehicle has better effects in barrier identification and avoidance and path planning. And this can provide higher reliability during vehicle running.

  18. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  19. Parameterizing Coefficients of a POD-Based Dynamical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia L.

    2010-01-01

    A method of parameterizing the coefficients of a dynamical system based of a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) representing the flow dynamics of a viscous fluid has been introduced. (A brief description of POD is presented in the immediately preceding article.) The present parameterization method is intended to enable construction of the dynamical system to accurately represent the temporal evolution of the flow dynamics over a range of Reynolds numbers. The need for this or a similar method arises as follows: A procedure that includes direct numerical simulation followed by POD, followed by Galerkin projection to a dynamical system has been proven to enable representation of flow dynamics by a low-dimensional model at the Reynolds number of the simulation. However, a more difficult task is to obtain models that are valid over a range of Reynolds numbers. Extrapolation of low-dimensional models by use of straightforward Reynolds-number-based parameter continuation has proven to be inadequate for successful prediction of flows. A key part of the problem of constructing a dynamical system to accurately represent the temporal evolution of the flow dynamics over a range of Reynolds numbers is the problem of understanding and providing for the variation of the coefficients of the dynamical system with the Reynolds number. Prior methods do not enable capture of temporal dynamics over ranges of Reynolds numbers in low-dimensional models, and are not even satisfactory when large numbers of modes are used. The basic idea of the present method is to solve the problem through a suitable parameterization of the coefficients of the dynamical system. The parameterization computations involve utilization of the transfer of kinetic energy between modes as a function of Reynolds number. The thus-parameterized dynamical system accurately predicts the flow dynamics and is applicable to a range of flow problems in the dynamical regime around the Hopf bifurcation. Parameter

  20. 7 CFR 319.56-62 - Fresh beans, shelled or in pods, from Jordan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fresh beans, shelled or in pods, from Jordan. 319.56... PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-62 Fresh beans, shelled or in pods, from Jordan. Fresh beans (Phaseolus vulgaris...

  1. Relationships Between Black Pod and Witches'-Broom Diseases in Theobroma cacao.

    PubMed

    Thevenin, J-M; Umaharan, R; Surujdeo-Maharaj, S; Latchman, B; Cilas, C; Butler, D R

    2005-11-01

    ABSTRACT Field observations were conducted from 1998 to 2001 at the International Cocoa Genebank, Trinidad, to evaluate 57 cacao clones for resistance to black pod (BP) and witches'-broom (WB) diseases (caused by Phytophthora sp. and Crinipellis perniciosa, respectively). Each month ripe pods were harvested and the number of healthy and diseased was recorded. The number of brooms on vegetative shoots was recorded three times a year on selected branches. Twenty-three clones showed less than 10% of infection for both BP and WB on pods. Among those, eight clones showed an absence of brooms on the observed branches: IMC 6, MAN 15/60 [BRA], PA 67 [PER], PA 195 [PER], PA 218 [PER], PA 296 [PER], PA 303 [PER], and POUND 32/A [POU]. Broad-sense heritability was estimated at 0.38 and 0.57 for WB disease on pods and shoots, respectively, and at 0.51 for BP disease. Genetic correlation between WB disease on pods and on shoots was low and estimated at 0.39, whereas the correlation between WB and BP diseases on pods was 0.48. To choose putative parents for breeding schemes, it is suggested that clones are first assessed for their level of resistance to WB on shoots, and the most promising individuals are screened for BP with a detached pods test. Further studies are needed to confirm whether the level of resistance to WB on pods can be predicted using an early test on seedlings.

  2. Toward The identification Of candidate genes involved in black pod disease resistance in Theobroma cacao L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing yield, quality and disease resistance are important objectives for cacao breeding programs. Some of the diseases, such as black pod rot (Phytophtora spp), frosty pod (Moniliophthora roreri) and witches’ broom (M. perniciosa), produce significant losses in all or in some of the various pro...

  3. Teaching Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disability ATM Use via the "iPod"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Renee; Collins, Belva; Knight, Victoria; Kleinert, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Money management can increase independence and access to communities for individuals with disabilities. Although research on computer-based instruction for teaching banking skills to students with intellectual disability is established, the use of portable electronic devices (e.g., iPod) has not been evaluated. iPods may be an effective, portable,…

  4. Providing Faculty iPods to Explore Innovative Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, Jace; Jensen, Scott; Kohn, Carolynn; Normand, Matthew; Schooler, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    The iPod digital music player has been available since late 2001, and even in higher education, its presence has been seen, although mostly in the hands of students and rarely for outcomes-based educational purposes. In 2004, Duke University provided free iPods to all 1,650 first year students, which subsequently enabled faculty to create learning…

  5. Exercising with an iPod, Friend, or Neither: Which Is Better for Psychological Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Thomas G.; Gustafson, Carissa; Brecht, Carrie; Imberi, Jenny; Sanchez, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the role of music and social contact on exercise benefits. Methods: Two hundred twenty-nine (n229) students were randomly assigned to one of 6 conditions: biking alone with iPod or friend in a laboratory, walking alone with iPod or friend outdoors, or biking or walking alone in control conditions. All participants completed…

  6. Fine phenotyping of pod and seed traits in Arachis germplasm accessions using digital image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reliable and objective phenotyping of peanut pod and seed traits is important for cultivar selection and genetic mapping of yield components. To develop useful and efficient methods to quantitatively define peanut pod and seed traits, a group of peanut germplasm with high levels of phenotypic varia...

  7. Effect of climate variables on cocoa black pod incidence in Sabah using ARIMAX model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling Sheng Chang, Albert; Ramba, Haya; Mohd. Jaaffar, Ahmad Kamil; Kim Phin, Chong; Chong Mun, Ho

    2016-06-01

    Cocoa black pod disease is one of the major diseases affecting the cocoa production in Malaysia and also around the world. Studies have shown that the climate variables have influenced the cocoa black pod disease incidence and it is important to quantify the black pod disease variation due to the effect of climate variables. Application of time series analysis especially auto-regressive moving average (ARIMA) model has been widely used in economics study and can be used to quantify the effect of climate variables on black pod incidence to forecast the right time to control the incidence. However, ARIMA model does not capture some turning points in cocoa black pod incidence. In order to improve forecasting performance, other explanatory variables such as climate variables should be included into ARIMA model as ARIMAX model. Therefore, this paper is to study the effect of climate variables on the cocoa black pod disease incidence using ARIMAX model. The findings of the study showed ARIMAX model using MA(1) and relative humidity at lag 7 days, RHt - 7 gave better R square value compared to ARIMA model using MA(1) which could be used to forecast the black pod incidence to assist the farmers determine timely application of fungicide spraying and culture practices to control the black pod incidence.

  8. Root vs pod infection by root-knot nematodes on aflatoxin contamination of peanut.

    PubMed

    Timper, P; Holbrook, C; Wilson, D

    2007-01-01

    Aflatoxins are potent carcinogens produced by some Aspergillus spp. Infection of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) by root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne arenaria) can lead to an increase in aflatoxin contamination of kernels when the plants are subjected to drought stress during pod maturation. It is not clear whether the increased aflatoxin contamination is primarily due to greater invasion of the galled pods by toxigenic Aspergillus spp. or whether root galling is also involved. Our objective was to determine the contribution of root and pod galling caused by root-knot nematodes to the increase in aflatoxin contamination in peanut. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted in which pods and roots were physically separated. Pod set was restricted to soil-filled pans (41 cm dia. x 10 cm depth), while the roots grew underneath the pan into a pot. The experiments had a factorial arrangement of treatments: pod zone with and without nematodes, and root zone with and without nematodes. In Experiment 1, 5000 eggs of M. arenaria were added to the root zone14 days after planting (DAP) and 8000 eggs were added to the pod zone 60 and 80 DAP. In Experiment 2, 3000 eggs were added to the root zone 30 DAP and 8000 eggs were added to the pod zone every week starting 60 DAP. The four treatment combinations were replicated 10 to 13 times. Conidia of Aspergillus flavus/A. parasiticus was added to the soil surface (pods zone) at mid bloom. Plants were subjected to drought stress 40 days before harvest. In Experiment 1, adding nematodes to the pod zone had no effect on aflatoxin concentrations in the peanut kernel. However, the lack of an effect may have been to due to the low occurrence of galling on the hulls. In pots where nematodes were added to the root zone, 50 to 80% of the root system was galled. Adding nematodes to the root zone increased aflatoxin concentrations in the peanut kernels from 34 ppb in the control to 71 ppb. In Experiment 2, there was heavy pod galling with galls present

  9. NDE reliability and probability of detection (POD) evolution and paradigm shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Surendra

    2014-02-01

    The subject of NDE Reliability and POD has gone through multiple phases since its humble beginning in the late 1960s. This was followed by several programs including the important one nicknamed "Have Cracks - Will Travel" or in short "Have Cracks" by Lockheed Georgia Company for US Air Force during 1974-1978. This and other studies ultimately led to a series of developments in the field of reliability and POD starting from the introduction of fracture mechanics and Damaged Tolerant Design (DTD) to statistical framework by Bernes and Hovey in 1981 for POD estimation to MIL-STD HDBK 1823 (1999) and 1823A (2009). During the last decade, various groups and researchers have further studied the reliability and POD using Model Assisted POD (MAPOD), Simulation Assisted POD (SAPOD), and applying Bayesian Statistics. All and each of these developments had one objective, i.e., improving accuracy of life prediction in components that to a large extent depends on the reliability and capability of NDE methods. Therefore, it is essential to have a reliable detection and sizing of large flaws in components. Currently, POD is used for studying reliability and capability of NDE methods, though POD data offers no absolute truth regarding NDE reliability, i.e., system capability, effects of flaw morphology, and quantifying the human factors. Furthermore, reliability and POD have been reported alike in meaning but POD is not NDE reliability. POD is a subset of the reliability that consists of six phases: 1) samples selection using DOE, 2) NDE equipment setup and calibration, 3) System Measurement Evaluation (SME) including Gage Repeatability &Reproducibility (Gage R&R) and Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA), 4) NDE system capability and electronic and physical saturation, 5) acquiring and fitting data to a model, and data analysis, and 6) POD estimation. This paper provides an overview of all major POD milestones for the last several decades and discuss rationale for using Integrated

  10. NDE reliability and probability of detection (POD) evolution and paradigm shift

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Surendra

    2014-02-18

    The subject of NDE Reliability and POD has gone through multiple phases since its humble beginning in the late 1960s. This was followed by several programs including the important one nicknamed “Have Cracks – Will Travel” or in short “Have Cracks” by Lockheed Georgia Company for US Air Force during 1974–1978. This and other studies ultimately led to a series of developments in the field of reliability and POD starting from the introduction of fracture mechanics and Damaged Tolerant Design (DTD) to statistical framework by Bernes and Hovey in 1981 for POD estimation to MIL-STD HDBK 1823 (1999) and 1823A (2009). During the last decade, various groups and researchers have further studied the reliability and POD using Model Assisted POD (MAPOD), Simulation Assisted POD (SAPOD), and applying Bayesian Statistics. All and each of these developments had one objective, i.e., improving accuracy of life prediction in components that to a large extent depends on the reliability and capability of NDE methods. Therefore, it is essential to have a reliable detection and sizing of large flaws in components. Currently, POD is used for studying reliability and capability of NDE methods, though POD data offers no absolute truth regarding NDE reliability, i.e., system capability, effects of flaw morphology, and quantifying the human factors. Furthermore, reliability and POD have been reported alike in meaning but POD is not NDE reliability. POD is a subset of the reliability that consists of six phases: 1) samples selection using DOE, 2) NDE equipment setup and calibration, 3) System Measurement Evaluation (SME) including Gage Repeatability and Reproducibility (Gage R and R) and Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA), 4) NDE system capability and electronic and physical saturation, 5) acquiring and fitting data to a model, and data analysis, and 6) POD estimation. This paper provides an overview of all major POD milestones for the last several decades and discuss rationale for using

  11. [Occurrence characteristics and molecular genetic basis of pod shattering in soybean].

    PubMed

    Dezhi, Han; Yulong, Ren; Yong, Guo; Hongrui, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Wencheng, Lu; Lijuan, Qiu

    2015-06-01

    Pod shattering is a natural property of wild soybean (Glycine soja) for propagation and also a major cause of yield loss in cultivated soybean (Glycine max L. Merr). Thus, studies on occurrence characteristics and molecular genetic basis of pod shattering in soybean can provide insights into both molecular mechanisms and potential application in legume crop improvement. In this review, we summarize the occurrence features and phenotypic identification methods of pod shattering based on analysis of the cellular microstructure of shattering-resistant soybean pod. We also introduced the identification and breeding of shattering-resistant germplasms, the progress of molecular genetic studies on shattering-resistant phenotype in soybean as well as perspectives on future studies of pod-shattering trait and application in crop improvement.

  12. EpiPOD : community vaccination and dispensing model user's guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.; Samsa, M.; Walsh, D.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2009-01-09

    EpiPOD is a modeling system that enables local, regional, and county health departments to evaluate and refine their plans for mass distribution of antiviral and antibiotic medications and vaccines. An intuitive interface requires users to input as few or as many plan specifics as are available in order to simulate a mass treatment campaign. Behind the input interface, a system dynamics model simulates pharmaceutical supply logistics, hospital and first-responder personnel treatment, population arrival dynamics and treatment, and disease spread. When the simulation is complete, users have estimates of the number of illnesses in the population at large, the number of ill persons seeking treatment, and queuing and delays within the mass treatment system--all metrics by which the plan can be judged.

  13. Passive Orbital Disconnect Strut (PODS 3) structural test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    A passive orbital disconnect strut (PODS-3) was analyzed structurally and thermally. Development tests on a graphite/epoxy orbit tube and S glass epoxy launch tube provided the needed data to finalize the design. A detailed assembly procedure was prepared. One strut was fabricated. Shorting loads in both the axial and lateral direction (vs. load angle and location) were measured. The strut was taken to design limit loads at both ambient and 78 K (cold end only). One million fatigue cycles were performed at predicted STS loads (half in tension, half in compression) with the cold end at 78 K. The fatigue test was repeated at design limit loads. Six struts were then fabricated and tested as a system. Axial loads, side loads, and simulated asymmetric loads due to temperature gradients around the vacuum shell were applied. Shorting loads were measured for all tests.

  14. Multi-Sensor Analysis of Overshooting Tops in Tornadic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, N. B.; Goldberg, R.; Hartline, M.

    2012-12-01

    The disastrous 2011 tornado season focused much attention on the ~75% false alarm rate for NWS-issued tornado warnings. Warnings are correctly issued on ~80% of verified tornados, but the false alarm rate has plateaued at near 75%. Any additional clues that may signal tornadogenesis would be of great benefit to the public welfare. We have performed statistical analyses of the structure and time-evolution of convective overshooting tops for tornadic storms occurring in the continental United States since 2006. An amalgam of case studies and theory has long suggested that overshooting tops may often collapse just prior to the onset of tornado touchdown. Our new results suggest that this view is supported by a broad set of new statistical evidence. Our approach to the analysis makes use of a high resolution, multi-sensor data set, and seeks to gather statistics on a large set of storms. Records of 88-D NEXRAD radar Enhanced-Resolution Echo Tops (product available since 2009) have been analyzed for an hour prior to and following touchdown of all EF1 and stronger storms. In addition, a coincidence search has been performed for the NASA A-Train satellite suite and tornadic events since 2006. Although the paths of the polar-orbiting satellites do not aid in analyses of temporal storm-top evolution, Aqua-MODIS, CALIPSO, and Cloud-Sat have provided a detailed structural picture of overshooting tops in tornadic and non-tornadic supercell thunderstorms. 250 m resolution AQUA-MODIS image at 1950Z on 4/27/2011, color-enhanced to emphasize overshooting tops during tornado outbreak.

  15. A numerical study of scale effects on performance of a tractor type podded propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jung-Kyu; Park, Hyoung-Gil; Kim, Hyoung-Tae

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the scale effect on the performance of the podded propeller of tractor type is investigated. Turbulent flow computations are carried out for Reynolds numbers increasing progressively from model scale to full scale using the CFD analysis. The result of the flow calculation for model scale Reynolds numbers agrees well with that of the experiment of a large cavitation tunnel. The existing numerical analysis indicates that the performance of the podded propeller blades is mainly influenced by the advance coefficient and relatively little by the Reynolds number. However, the drag of pod housing with propeller in operation is different from that of pod housing without propeller due to the acceleration and swirl of propeller slipstream which is altered by propeller loading as well as the pressure recovery and friction according to Reynolds number, which suggests that the pod housing drag under the condition of propeller in operation is the key factor of the scale effect on the performance between model and full scale podded propellers. The so called `drag ratio', which is the ratio of pod housing drag to total thrust of podded propeller, increases as the advance coefficient increases due to accelerated flow in the slipstream of the podded propeller. However, the increasing rate of the drag ratio reduces continuously as the Reynolds number increases from model to full scale progressively. The contribution of hydrodynamic forces, which acts on the parts composed of the pod housing with propeller operating in various loading conditions, to the thrust and the torque of the total propeller unit are presented for a range of Reynolds numbers from model to full scales.

  16. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  17. Laboratory evaluation of dual-frequency multisensor capacitance probes to monitor soil water and salinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Real-time information on salinity levels and transport of fertilizers are generally missing from soil profile knowledge bases. A dual-frequency multisensor capacitance probe (MCP) is now commercially available for sandy soils that simultaneously monitor volumetric soil water content (VWC, ') and sa...

  18. Synthesis and study of transparent multicomponent metal oxide for use in multisensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrashova, E. V.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Maraeva, E. V.; Kononova, I. E.; Vorob'ev, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    The thin films on the basis of metal oxides of SnO2-ZnO-SiO2 were prepared by sol-gel techniques, and CVD. During the experiment optical and morphological characteristics of materials were investigated. According to the study we can say that this system is promising for use in transparent multisensor devices.

  19. How Well Do Data from Multisensor Capacitance Probes Represent Plot-Scale-Average Soil Water Contents?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multisensor capacitance probes have shown great promises in irrigation scheduling, evaluating water needs of plants, estimating soil hydraulic properties, estimating groundwater recharge and infiltration losses, and other soil water-related fields. It is often beneficial to know how representative a...

  20. An adaptive Hidden Markov Model for activity recognition based on a wearable multi-sensor device

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human activity recognition is important in the study of personal health, wellness and lifestyle. In order to acquire human activity information from the personal space, many wearable multi-sensor devices have been developed. In this paper, a novel technique for automatic activity recognition based o...

  1. Design of 3D measurement system based on multi-sensor data fusion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiguang; Han, Jun; Yu, Xun

    2009-05-01

    With the rapid development of shape measurement technique, multi-sensor approach becomes one of valid way to improve the accuracy, to expend measuring range, to reduce occlusion, to realize multi-resolution measurement, and to increase measuring speed simultaneously. Sensors in multi-sensor system can have different system parameters, and they may have different measuring range and different precision. Light sectioning method is one of useful measurement technique for 3D profile measurement. It is insensitive to the surface optical property of 3D object, has scarcely any demand on surrounding. A multi-sensor system scheme, which uses light sectioning method and multi-sensor data fusion techniques, is presented for blade of aviation engine and spiral bevel gear measurement. The system model is developed to build the relationship between measuring range & precision and system parameters. The system parameters were set according to system error analysis, measuring range and precision. The result shows that the system is more universal than it's ancestor, and that the accuracy of the system is about 0.05mm for the 60× 60mm2 measuring range, and that the system is successful for the aero-dynamical data curve of blade of aviation engine and tooth profile of spiral bevel gear measurement with 3600 multi-resolution measuring character.

  2. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions in Support of Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guild, Liane S.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Kudela, Raphael; Morrow, John; Russell, Philip; Myers, Jeffrey; Dunagan, Stephen; Palacios, Sherry; Livingston, John; Negrey, Kendra; Torres-Perez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, coastal marine ecosystems are exposed to land-based sources of pollution and sedimentation from anthropogenic activities including agriculture and coastal development. Ocean color products from satellite sensors provide information on chlorophyll (phytoplankton pigment), sediments, and colored dissolved organic material. Further, ship-based in-water measurements and emerging airborne measurements provide in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation satellite ocean color sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems. The primary goal of the airborne missions was to demonstrate the following in support of calibration and validation exercises for satellite coastal ocean color products: 1) the utility of a multi-sensor airborne instrument suite to assess the bio-optical properties of coastal California, including water quality; and 2) the importance of contemporaneous atmospheric measurements to improve atmospheric correction in the coastal zone. Utilizing an imaging spectrometer optimized in the blue to green spectral domain enables higher signal for detection of the relatively dark radiance measurements from marine and freshwater ecosystem features. The novel airborne instrument, Coastal Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) provides measurements of apparent optical properties with high dynamic range and fidelity for deriving exact water leaving radiances at the land-ocean boundary, including radiometrically shallow aquatic

  3. Airborne GLM Simulator (FEGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Stewart, M. F.; Podgorny, S.; Corredor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Real time lightning observations have proven to be useful for advanced warning and now-casting of severe weather events. In anticipation of the launch of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard GOES-R that will provide continuous real time observations of total (both cloud and ground) lightning, the Fly's Eye GLM Simulator (FEGS) is in production. FEGS is an airborne instrument designed to provide cal/val measurements for GLM from high altitude aircraft. It consists of a 5 x 5 array of telescopes each with a narrow passband filter to isolate the 777.4 nm neutral oxygen emission triplet radiated by lightning. The telescopes will measure the optical radiance emitted by lightning that is transmitted through the cloud top with a temporal resolution of 10 μs. When integrated on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, the FEGS array with its 90° field-of-view will observe a cloud top area nearly equal to a single GLM pixel. This design will allow FEGS to determine the temporal and spatial variation of light that contributes to a GLM event detection. In addition to the primary telescope array, the instrument includes 5 supplementary optical channels that observe alternate spectral emission features and will enable the use of FEGS for interesting lightning physics applications. Here we present an up-to-date summary of the project and a description of its scientific applications.

  4. On a framework for generating PoD curves assisted by numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subair, S. Mohamed; Agrawal, Shweta; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Kumar, Anish; Rao, Purnachandra B.; Tamanna, Jayakumar

    2015-03-01

    The Probability of Detection (PoD) curve method has emerged as an important tool for the assessment of the performance of NDE techniques, a topic of particular interest to the nuclear industry where inspection qualification is very important. The conventional experimental means of generating PoD curves though, can be expensive, requiring large data sets (covering defects and test conditions), and equipment and operator time. Several methods of achieving faster estimates for PoD curves using physics-based modelling have been developed to address this problem. Numerical modelling techniques are also attractive, especially given the ever-increasing computational power available to scientists today. Here we develop procedures for obtaining PoD curves, assisted by numerical simulation and based on Bayesian statistics. Numerical simulations are performed using Finite Element analysis for factors that are assumed to be independent, random and normally distributed. PoD curves so generated are compared with experiments on austenitic stainless steel (SS) plates with artificially created notches. We examine issues affecting the PoD curve generation process including codes, standards, distribution of defect parameters and the choice of the noise threshold. We also study the assumption of normal distribution for signal response parameters and consider strategies for dealing with data that may be more complex or sparse to justify this. These topics are addressed and illustrated through the example case of generation of PoD curves for pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection of vertical surface-breaking cracks in SS plates.

  5. A POD reduced order model for resolving angular direction in neutron/photon transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, A.G.; Calloo, A.A.; Goffin, M.G.; Dargaville, S.; Fang, F.; Pain, C.C.; Navon, I.M.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the first Reduced Order Model (ROM) that efficiently resolves the angular dimension of the time independent, mono-energetic Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). It is based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and uses the method of snapshots to form optimal basis functions for resolving the direction of particle travel in neutron/photon transport problems. A unique element of this work is that the snapshots are formed from the vector of angular coefficients relating to a high resolution expansion of the BTE's angular dimension. In addition, the individual snapshots are not recorded through time, as in standard POD, but instead they are recorded through space. In essence this work swaps the roles of the dimensions space and time in standard POD methods, with angle and space respectively. It is shown here how the POD model can be formed from the POD basis functions in a highly efficient manner. The model is then applied to two radiation problems; one involving the transport of radiation through a shield and the other through an infinite array of pins. Both problems are selected for their complex angular flux solutions in order to provide an appropriate demonstration of the model's capabilities. It is shown that the POD model can resolve these fluxes efficiently and accurately. In comparison to high resolution models this POD model can reduce the size of a problem by up to two orders of magnitude without compromising accuracy. Solving times are also reduced by similar factors.

  6. On a framework for generating PoD curves assisted by numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Subair, S. Mohamed Agrawal, Shweta Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Kumar, Anish; Rao, Purnachandra B.; Tamanna, Jayakumar

    2015-03-31

    The Probability of Detection (PoD) curve method has emerged as an important tool for the assessment of the performance of NDE techniques, a topic of particular interest to the nuclear industry where inspection qualification is very important. The conventional experimental means of generating PoD curves though, can be expensive, requiring large data sets (covering defects and test conditions), and equipment and operator time. Several methods of achieving faster estimates for PoD curves using physics-based modelling have been developed to address this problem. Numerical modelling techniques are also attractive, especially given the ever-increasing computational power available to scientists today. Here we develop procedures for obtaining PoD curves, assisted by numerical simulation and based on Bayesian statistics. Numerical simulations are performed using Finite Element analysis for factors that are assumed to be independent, random and normally distributed. PoD curves so generated are compared with experiments on austenitic stainless steel (SS) plates with artificially created notches. We examine issues affecting the PoD curve generation process including codes, standards, distribution of defect parameters and the choice of the noise threshold. We also study the assumption of normal distribution for signal response parameters and consider strategies for dealing with data that may be more complex or sparse to justify this. These topics are addressed and illustrated through the example case of generation of PoD curves for pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection of vertical surface-breaking cracks in SS plates.

  7. FaPOD27 functions in the metabolism of polyphenols in strawberry fruit (Fragaria sp.).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Su-Ying; Huang, Fong-Chin; Hoffmann, Thomas; Mayershofer, Mechthild; Schwab, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    The strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is one of the most preferred fresh fruit worldwide, accumulates numerous flavonoids but has limited shelf life due to excessive tissue softening caused by cell wall degradation. Since lignin is one of the polymers that strengthen plant cell walls and might contribute to some extent to fruit firmness monolignol biosynthesis was studied in strawberry fruit. Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), and a peroxidase (POD27) gene were strongly expressed in red, ripe fruit whereas a second POD gene was primarily expressed in green, immature fruit. Moreover, FaPOD27 transcripts were strongly and constitutively induced in fruits exposed to Agrobacterium infection. Gene expression levels and enzymatic activities of FaCCR and FaCAD were efficiently suppressed through RNAi in FaCCR- and FaCAD-silenced strawberries. Besides, significantly elevated FaPOD transcript levels were detected after agroinfiltration of pBI-FaPOD constructs in fruits. At the same time, levels of G-monomers were considerably reduced in FaCCR-silenced fruits whereas the proportion of both G- and S-monomers decisively decreased in FaCAD-silenced and pBI-FaPOD fruits. Development, firmness, and lignin level of the treated fruits were similar to pBI-intron control fruits, presumably attributed to increased expression levels of FaPOD27 upon agroinfiltration. Additionally, enhanced firmness, accompanied with elevated lignin levels, was revealed in chalcone synthase-deficient fruits (CHS(-)), independent of down- or up-regulation of individual and combined FaCCR. FaCAD, and FaPOD genes by agroinfiltration, when compared to CHS(-)/pBI-intron control fruits. These approaches provide further insight into the genetic control of flavonoid and lignin synthesis in strawberries. The results suggest that FaPOD27 is a key gene for lignin biosynthesis in strawberry fruit and thus to improving the firmness of strawberries. PMID:25346738

  8. FaPOD27 functions in the metabolism of polyphenols in strawberry fruit (Fragaria sp.).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Su-Ying; Huang, Fong-Chin; Hoffmann, Thomas; Mayershofer, Mechthild; Schwab, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    The strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is one of the most preferred fresh fruit worldwide, accumulates numerous flavonoids but has limited shelf life due to excessive tissue softening caused by cell wall degradation. Since lignin is one of the polymers that strengthen plant cell walls and might contribute to some extent to fruit firmness monolignol biosynthesis was studied in strawberry fruit. Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), and a peroxidase (POD27) gene were strongly expressed in red, ripe fruit whereas a second POD gene was primarily expressed in green, immature fruit. Moreover, FaPOD27 transcripts were strongly and constitutively induced in fruits exposed to Agrobacterium infection. Gene expression levels and enzymatic activities of FaCCR and FaCAD were efficiently suppressed through RNAi in FaCCR- and FaCAD-silenced strawberries. Besides, significantly elevated FaPOD transcript levels were detected after agroinfiltration of pBI-FaPOD constructs in fruits. At the same time, levels of G-monomers were considerably reduced in FaCCR-silenced fruits whereas the proportion of both G- and S-monomers decisively decreased in FaCAD-silenced and pBI-FaPOD fruits. Development, firmness, and lignin level of the treated fruits were similar to pBI-intron control fruits, presumably attributed to increased expression levels of FaPOD27 upon agroinfiltration. Additionally, enhanced firmness, accompanied with elevated lignin levels, was revealed in chalcone synthase-deficient fruits (CHS(-)), independent of down- or up-regulation of individual and combined FaCCR. FaCAD, and FaPOD genes by agroinfiltration, when compared to CHS(-)/pBI-intron control fruits. These approaches provide further insight into the genetic control of flavonoid and lignin synthesis in strawberries. The results suggest that FaPOD27 is a key gene for lignin biosynthesis in strawberry fruit and thus to improving the firmness of strawberries.

  9. Performance Demonstration Based Probablity of Detection (POD) Curves for Fatigue Cracks in Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gosselin, Stephen R.; Simonen, Fredric A.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Becker, F. L.; Doctor, Steven R.; Carter, R. G.

    2005-07-01

    This paper evaluates non-destructive examination (NDE) detection capabilities for fatigue cracks in piping. Industry performance demonstration initiative (PDI) data for fatigue crack detection were used to develop a matrix of statistically based probability of detection (POD) curves that consider various NDE performance factors. Seven primary performance factors were identified – Material, Crack Geometry/Type, NDE Examination Access, NDE Procedure, Examiner Qualification, Pipe Diameter, and Pipe Wall Thickness. A database of 16,181 NDE performance observations, with 18 fields associated with each observation, was created and used to develop statistically based POD curves for 42 stainless steel and 14 carbon steel performance cases. Subsequent comparisons of the POD fits for each of the cases showed that excellent NDE performance for fatigue cracks can be expected for ferritic materials. Very little difference was observed between the POD curves for the 14 carbon steel performance cases considered in this study and NDE performance could therefore be represented by a single POD curve. For stainless steel, very good performance can also be expected for circumferential cracks located on the same side of the weld from which the NDE examination is made. POD depended primarily on component thickness. Three POD curves for stainless steel were prepared. Best estimate and the associated 95% confidence bounds for POD versas through-wall depth logistic regression digital data are provided. Probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) calculations were performed to compare best estimate leak probabilities obtained from both the new performance-based POD curves and previous PFM models. This work was performed under joint funding by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy Science and Technology’s Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) program.

  10. FaPOD27 functions in the metabolism of polyphenols in strawberry fruit (Fragaria sp.)

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Su-Ying; Huang, Fong-Chin; Hoffmann, Thomas; Mayershofer, Mechthild; Schwab, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    The strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is one of the most preferred fresh fruit worldwide, accumulates numerous flavonoids but has limited shelf life due to excessive tissue softening caused by cell wall degradation. Since lignin is one of the polymers that strengthen plant cell walls and might contribute to some extent to fruit firmness monolignol biosynthesis was studied in strawberry fruit. Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), and a peroxidase (POD27) gene were strongly expressed in red, ripe fruit whereas a second POD gene was primarily expressed in green, immature fruit. Moreover, FaPOD27 transcripts were strongly and constitutively induced in fruits exposed to Agrobacterium infection. Gene expression levels and enzymatic activities of FaCCR and FaCAD were efficiently suppressed through RNAi in FaCCR- and FaCAD-silenced strawberries. Besides, significantly elevated FaPOD transcript levels were detected after agroinfiltration of pBI-FaPOD constructs in fruits. At the same time, levels of G-monomers were considerably reduced in FaCCR-silenced fruits whereas the proportion of both G- and S-monomers decisively decreased in FaCAD-silenced and pBI-FaPOD fruits. Development, firmness, and lignin level of the treated fruits were similar to pBI-intron control fruits, presumably attributed to increased expression levels of FaPOD27 upon agroinfiltration. Additionally, enhanced firmness, accompanied with elevated lignin levels, was revealed in chalcone synthase-deficient fruits (CHS−), independent of down- or up-regulation of individual and combined FaCCR. FaCAD, and FaPOD genes by agroinfiltration, when compared to CHS−/pBI-intron control fruits. These approaches provide further insight into the genetic control of flavonoid and lignin synthesis in strawberries. The results suggest that FaPOD27 is a key gene for lignin biosynthesis in strawberry fruit and thus to improving the firmness of strawberries. PMID:25346738

  11. Analysis of Airborne Radar Altimetry Measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, Ellen J.

    1994-01-01

    This dissertation presents an analysis of airborne altimetry measurements taken over the Greenland ice sheet with the 13.9 GHz Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) pulse compression radar altimeter. This Ku-band instrument was refurbished in 1990 by the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts to obtain high-resolution altitude measurements and to improve the tracking, speed, storage and display capabilities of the radar. In 1991 and 1993, the AAFE altimeter took part in the NASA Multisensor Airborne Altimetry Experiments over Greenland, along with two NASA laser altimeters. Altitude results from both experiments are presented along with comparisons to the laser altimeter and calibration passes over the Sondrestroem runway in Greenland. Although it is too early to make a conclusion about the growth or decay of the ice sheet, these results show that the instrument is capable of measuring small-scale surface changes to within 14 centimeters. In addition, results from these experiments reveal that the radar is sensitive to the different diagenetic regions of the ice sheet. Return waveforms from the wet- snow, percolation and dry-snow zones show varying effects of both surface scattering and sub-surface or volume scattering. Models of each of the diagenetic regions of Greenland are presented along with parameters such as rms surface roughness, rms surface slope and attenuation coefficient of the snow pack obtained by fitting the models to actual return waveforms.

  12. Potential Application of Airborne Passive Microwave Observations for Monitoring Inland Flooding Caused by Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Radley, C.D.; LaFontaine, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Inland flooding from tropical cyclones can be a significant factor in storm-related deaths in the United States and other countries. Information collected during NASA tropical cyclone field studies suggest surface water and flooding induced by tropical cyclone precipitation can be detected and therefore monitored using passive microwave airborne radiometers. In particular, the 10.7 GHz frequency of the NASA Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) flown on the NASA ER-2 has demonstrated high resolution detection of anomalous surface water and flooding in numerous situations. This presentation will highlight the analysis of three cases utilizing primarily satellite and airborne radiometer data. Radiometer data from the 1998 Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) are utilized to detect surface water during landfalling Hurricane Georges in both the Dominican Republic and Louisiana. A third case is landfalling Tropical Storm Gert in Eastern Mexico during the Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) experiment in 2005. AMPR data are compared to topographic data and vegetation indices to evaluate the significance of the surface water signature visible in the 10.7 GHz information. The results of this study suggest the benefit of an aircraft 10 GHz radiometer to provide real-time observations of surface water conditions as part of a multi-sensor flood monitoring network.

  13. Sea Ice Thickness, Freeboard, and Snow Depth products from Operation IceBridge Airborne Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, N. T.; Farrell, S. L.; Studinger, M.; Galin, N.; Harbeck, J. P.; Lindsay, R.; Onana, V. D.; Panzer, B.; Sonntag, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    The study of sea ice using airborne remote sensing platforms provides unique capabilities to measure a wide variety of sea ice properties. These measurements are useful for a variety of topics including model evaluation and improvement, assessment of satellite retrievals, and incorporation into climate data records for analysis of interannual variability and long-term trends in sea ice properties. In this paper we describe methods for the retrieval of sea ice thickness, freeboard, and snow depth using data from a multisensor suite of instruments on NASA's Operation IceBridge airborne campaign. We assess the consistency of the results through comparison with independent data sets that demonstrate that the IceBridge products are capable of providing a reliable record of snow depth and sea ice thickness. We explore the impact of inter-campaign instrument changes and associated algorithm adaptations as well as the applicability of the adapted algorithms to the ongoing IceBridge mission. The uncertainties associated with the retrieval methods are determined and placed in the context of their impact on the retrieved sea ice thickness. Lastly, we present results for the 2009 and 2010 IceBridge campaigns, which are currently available in product form via the National Snow and Ice Data Center

  14. Identification of genome regions controlling cotyledon, pod wall/seed coat and pod wall resistance to pea weevil through QTL mapping.

    PubMed

    Aryamanesh, N; Zeng, Y; Byrne, O; Hardie, D C; Al-Subhi, A M; Khan, T; Siddique, K H M; Yan, G

    2013-11-15

    Pea weevil, Bruchus pisorum, is one of the limiting factors for field pea (Pisum sativum) cultivation in the world with pesticide application the only available method for its control. Resistance to pea weevil has been found in an accession of Pisum fulvum but transfer of this resistance to cultivated pea (P. sativum) is limited due to a lack of easy-to-use techniques for screening interspecific breeding populations. To address this problem, an interspecific population was created from a cross between cultivated field pea and P. fulvum (resistance source). Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed to discover the regions associated with resistance to cotyledon, pod wall/seed coat and pod wall resistance. Three major QTLs, located on linkage groups LG2, LG4 and LG5 were found for cotyledon resistance explaining approximately 80 % of the phenotypic variation. Two major QTLs were found for pod wall/seed coat resistance on LG2 and LG5 explaining approximately 70 % of the phenotypic variation. Co-linearity of QTLs for cotyledon and pod wall/seed coat resistance suggested that the mechanism of resistance for these two traits might act through the same pathways. Only one QTL was found for pod wall resistance on LG7 explaining approximately 9 % of the phenotypic variation. This is the first report on the development of QTL markers to probe Pisum germplasm for pea weevil resistance genes. These flanking markers will be useful in accelerating the process of screening when breeding for pea weevil resistance.

  15. Engine Power Turbine and Propulsion Pod Arrangement Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robuck, Mark; Zhang, Yiyi

    2014-01-01

    A study has been conducted for NASA Glenn Research Center under contract NNC10BA05B, Task NNC11TA80T to identify beneficial arrangements of the turboshaft engine, transmissions and related systems within the propulsion pod nacelle of NASA's Large Civil Tilt-Rotor 2nd iteration (LCTR2) vehicle. Propulsion pod layouts were used to investigate potential advantages, disadvantages, as well as constraints of various arrangements assuming front or aft shafted engines. Results from previous NASA LCTR2 propulsion system studies and tasks performed by Boeing under NASA contracts are used as the basis for this study. This configuration consists of two Fixed Geometry Variable Speed Power Turbine Engines and related drive and rotor systems (per nacelle) arranged in tilting nacelles near the wing tip. Entry-into-service (EIS) 2035 technology is assumed for both the engine and drive systems. The variable speed rotor system changes from 100 percent speed for hover to 54 percent speed for cruise by the means of a two speed gearbox concept developed under previous NASA contracts. Propulsion and drive system configurations that resulted in minimum vehicle gross weight were identified in previous work and used here. Results reported in this study illustrate that a forward shafted engine has a slight weight benefit over an aft shafted engine for the LCTR2 vehicle. Although the aft shafted engines provide a more controlled and centered CG (between hover and cruise), the length of the long rotor shaft and complicated engine exhaust arrangement outweighed the potential benefits. A Multi-Disciplinary Analysis and Optimization (MDAO) approach for transmission sizing was also explored for this study. This tool offers quick analysis of gear loads, bearing lives, efficiencies, etc., through use of commercially available RomaxDESIGNER software. The goal was to create quick methods to explore various concept models. The output results from RomaxDESIGNER have been successfully linked to Boeing

  16. Autonomous Multi-Sensor Coordination: The Science Goal Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koratkar, Anuradha; Grosvenor, Sandy; Jung, John; Hess, Melissa; Jones, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Many dramatic earth phenomena are dynamic and coupled. In order to fully understand them, we need to obtain timely coordinated multi-sensor observations from widely dispersed instruments. Such a dynamic observing system must include the ability to Schedule flexibly and react autonomously to sciencehser driven events; Understand higher-level goals of a sciencehser defined campaign; Coordinate various space-based and ground-based resources/sensors effectively and efficiently to achieve goals. In order to capture transient events, such a 'sensor web' system must have an automated reactive capability built into its scientific operations. To do this, we must overcome a number of challenges inherent in infusing autonomy. The Science Goal Monitor (SGM) is a prototype software tool being developed to explore the nature of automation necessary to enable dynamic observing. The tools being developed in SGM improve our ability to autonomously monitor multiple independent sensors and coordinate reactions to better observe dynamic phenomena. The SGM system enables users to specify what to look for and how to react in descriptive rather than technical terms. The system monitors streams of data to identify occurrences of the key events previously specified by the scientisther. When an event occurs, the system autonomously coordinates the execution of the users' desired reactions between different sensors. The information can be used to rapidly respond to a variety of fast temporal events. Investigators will no longer have to rely on after-the-fact data analysis to determine what happened. Our paper describes a series of prototype demonstrations that we have developed using SGM and NASA's Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite and Earth Observing Systems' Aqua/Terra spacecrafts' MODIS instrument. Our demonstrations show the promise of coordinating data from different sources, analyzing the data for a relevant event, autonomously updating and rapidly obtaining a follow-on relevant image

  17. Multisensor monitoring of sea surface state of the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrova, Olga; Mityagina, Marina; Bocharova, Tatina

    Results of many-year monitoring of the state of coastal zone based on a multisensor approach are presented. The monitoring is aimed at solving the following tasks: operational mapping of parameters characterizing the state and pollution (coastal, ship and biogenic) of water; analysis of meteorological state and its effect on the drift and spread of pollutants; study of coastal circulation patterns and their impact on the drift and spread of pollutants; deriving typical pollution distribution patterns in the coastal zone.Processing and analysis is performed using data in visual, infrared and microwave ranges from ERS-2 SAR, Envisat ASAR/MERIS, Terra and Aqua MODIS and NOAA AVHRR instruments. These are complimented with ground data from meteorological stations on the shore and results of satellite data processing of previous periods. The main regions of interest are the Russian sectors of the Black and Azov Seas, southeastern part of the Baltic Sea, and northern and central regions of the Caspian Sea. Adjacent coasts are extremely populated and have well-developed industry, agriculture and rapidly growing tourist sectors. The necessity of constant monitoring of the sea state there is obvious.The monitoring activities allow us to accumulate extensive material for the study of hydrodynamic processes in the regions, in particular water circulation. Detailing the occurrence, evolution and drift of smalland meso-scale vortex structures is crucial for the knowledge of the mechanisms determining mixing and circulation processes in the coastal zone. These mechanisms play an important role in ecological, hydrodynamic and meteorological status of a coastal zone. Special attention is paid to the sea surface state in the Kerch Strait, where a tanker catastrophe took place on November 11, 2007 causing a spillage of over 1.5 thousand tons of heavy oil. The Kerch Strait is characterized by a complex current system with current directions changing to their opposites depending on

  18. Implementing Patient-Oriented Discharge Summaries (PODS): A Multisite Pilot Across Early Adopter Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Goldberg, Shoshana; Okrainec, Karen; Damba, Cynthia; Huynh, Tai; Lau, Davina; Maxwell, Joanne; McGuire, Ryan; Yang, Lily; Abrams, Howard B

    2016-01-01

    Communication gaps when patients transition from hospital to either home or community can be problematic. Partnership between Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (TC LHIN) and OpenLab addressed this through the Patient-Oriented Discharge Summaries (PODS) project. From January through March 2015, eight hospital departments across Toronto came together to implement the PODS, a tool previously developed through a co-design process involving patients, caregivers and providers. This paper presents data on how the hospitals came together and the impact of PODS on the patient and provider experience across these hospitals and discusses it implications. PMID:27133607

  19. Size variation of Acacia caven (leguminosae) pods along a climatic gradient in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, J. R.; Armesto, J. J.

    1981-06-01

    A southward tendency of increment in pod-length is shown for 11 populations of Acacia caven (Mol.) Hook et Arn. localized along a climatic gradient of increasing annual rainfall in Chile. This fact would suggest that A. caven populations occurring in the south are in better conditions for reproduction than northern populations, since pod-length is related to the amount of seeds inside the pods. The possible bearing of this southward tendency of increasing seed production upon the expansion of A. caven toward the more humid zones in southern Chile is discussed.

  20. Application of Model-Assisted Pod Using a Transfer Function Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, C. A.; Hugo, G. R.; Bowles, S. J.

    2009-03-01

    A transfer function approach to model-assisted probability of detection (POD) has been applied to the detection of fatigue cracks at fastener holes. The model uses data obtained from field trials and laboratory experiments and takes into account the effects of structural geometry, the natural variability in fatigue cracks and human factors in the inspection process. A fully representative POD trial was not feasible for this inspection procedure, and so this application provides an important real-world context for the development of model-assisted POD.

  1. Probability of Detection (POD) as a statistical model for the validation of qualitative methods.

    PubMed

    Wehling, Paul; LaBudde, Robert A; Brunelle, Sharon L; Nelson, Maria T

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model is presented for use in validation of qualitative methods. This model, termed Probability of Detection (POD), harmonizes the statistical concepts and parameters between quantitative and qualitative method validation. POD characterizes method response with respect to concentration as a continuous variable. The POD model provides a tool for graphical representation of response curves for qualitative methods. In addition, the model allows comparisons between candidate and reference methods, and provides calculations of repeatability, reproducibility, and laboratory effects from collaborative study data. Single laboratory study and collaborative study examples are given.

  2. Airborne Laser Polar Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Gerald W.

    1973-01-01

    A polar nephelometer has been developed at NCAR to measure the angular variation of the intensity of light scattered by air molecules and particles. The system has been designed for airborne measurements using outside air ducted through a 5-cm diameter airflow tube; the sample volume is that which is common to the intersection of a collimated source beam and the detector field of view within the airflow tube. The source is a linearly polarized helium-neon laser beam. The optical system defines a collimated field-of-view (0.5deg half-angle) through a series of diaphragms located behind a I72-mm focal length objective lens. A photomultiplier tube is located immediately behind an aperture in the focal plane of the objective lens. The laser beam is mechanically chopped (on-off) at a rate of 5 Hz; a two-channel pulse counter, synchronized to the laser output, measures the photomultiplier pulse rate with the light beam both on and off. The difference in these measured pulse rates is directly proportional to the intensity of the scattered light from the volume common to the intersection of the laser beam and the detector field-of-view. Measurements can be made at scattering angles from 15deg to 165deg with reference to the direction of propagation of the light beam. Intermediate angles are obtained by selecting the angular increments desired between these extreme angles (any multiple of 0.1deg can be selected for the angular increment; 5deg is used in normal operation). Pulses provided by digital circuits control a stepping motor which sequentially rotates the detector by pre-selected angular increments. The synchronous photon-counting system automatically begins measurement of the scattered-light intensity immediately after the rotation to a new angle has been completed. The instrument has been flown on the NASA Convair 990 airborne laboratory to obtain data on the complex index of refraction of atmospheric aerosols. A particle impaction device is operated simultaneously

  3. Payload Operations Director (POD) Views STS-42 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. In this photograph the Payload Operations Director (POD) views the launch.

  4. Trauma Pod: A Semi-Automated Robotic Surgery System

    SciTech Connect

    Noakes, Mark W; Garcia, Pablo; Rosen, Jacob; Kapoor, Chetan; Elbert, Greg

    2009-01-01

    The Trauma Pod (TP) vision is to develop a rapidly deployable robotic system to perform critical acute stabilization and/or surgical procedures autonomously or in a teleoperative mode on wounded soldiers in the battlefield who might otherwise die before treatment in a combat hospital can be provided. In the first phase of a project pursuing this vision, a robotic TP system was developed and its capability demonstrated by performing select surgical procedures on a patient phantom. The system demonstrates the feasibility of performing acute stabilization procedures with the patient being the only human in the surgical cell. The teleoperated surgical robot is supported by autonomous arms that carry out scrub-nurse and circulating-nurse functions. Tool change and supply delivery are performed automatically and at least as fast as those performed manually by nurses. The TP system also includes tomographic X-ray facility for patient diagnosis and 2-D fluoroscopic data to support interventions. The vast amount of clinical protocols generated in the TP system are recorded automatically. These capabilities form the basis for a more comprehensive acute diagnostic and management platform that will provide life-saving care in environments where surgical personnel are not present.

  5. Airborne laser topographic mapping results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Collins, J. G.; Link, L. E.; Swift, R. N.; Butler, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of terrain mapping experiments utilizing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) over forested areas are presented. The flight tests were conducted as part of a joint NASA/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (CE) investigation aimed at evaluating the potential of an airborne laser ranging system to provide cross-sectional topographic data on flood plains that are difficult and expensive to survey using conventional techniques. The data described in this paper were obtained in the Wolf River Basin located near Memphis, TN. Results from surveys conducted under winter 'leaves off' and summer 'leaves on' conditions, aspects of day and night operation, and data obtained from decidous and coniferous tree types are compared. Data processing techniques are reviewed. Conclusions relative to accuracy and present limitations of the AOL, and airborne lidar systems in general, to terrain mapping over forested areas are discussed.

  6. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  7. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  8. [Effects of chemical ripeners on chlorophyll content and antioxidant enzyme activities of rapeseed pod].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ke-jin; Guan, Chun-yun; Xiao, Wen-na

    2009-12-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of ripeners Diguat and Roundup on the chlorophyll content, activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and peroxidase (POD), cell membrane permeability, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content of rapeseed pods. Under effects of Diquat, the chlorophyll content decreased, while the activities of SOD, POD, and CAT, cell membrane permeability, and MDA content increased significantly, leading to the peroxidation of membrane lipid. These effects increased with increasing Diquat concentration. After treated with Roundup, the chlorophyll content had less change, activities of SOD, POD, and CAT increased slowly, and cell membrane permeability and MDA content had no obvious increase. With the increasing time of ripeners treatment, the activities of protective enzymes were inhibited to different degree, possibly due to the changes of molecular structure of antioxidant enzyme system under effects of the ripeners.

  9. Test-retest reliability of the Bod Pod: the effect of multiple assessments.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Larry A; Lecheminant, James D; Bailey, Bruce W

    2014-04-01

    The Bod Pod uses air-displacement plethysmography to estimate body fat percentage (BF%). This study was designed to assess the test-retest reliability of the Bod Pod. The study included 283 women (M age = 41.0 yr., SD = 3.0). Each participant was tested at least twice in the Bod Pod. Results showed no significant mean difference between the test and the retest. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was .991. However, the absolute value of the initial trial differences (absolute mean difference) was .96 (SD = .90). A third assessment of BF% was taken when the initial trial difference was greater than 1 percentage point, and the two closest values were compared. This strategy resulted in a significant decrease in the absolute mean difference, from .96 to .55 percentage point, and ICC increased to .998. The Bod Pod appears to measure body fat percentage reliably; however, findings suggest that multiple trials may be necessary to detect small treatment effects.

  10. Assessing the POD of Hard-Alpha Inclusions from Field Data

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R. Bruce; Meeker, William Q.

    2007-03-21

    The update of the Default POD curves for the detection of hard-alpha inclusions in titanium alloy billet, is summarized. Included is a discussion of the data available, the analysis techniques used, and the results obtained. The results show that the Multizone technique is clearly superior to the conventional-inspection technique and the estimated POD is significantly different from previous estimates, particularly for the conventional-inspection technique. Although the final results obtained are specific to the hard-alpha detection process, a number of the analysis issues encountered have generic interest. Included are the challenges associated with the estimation of POD from finds information (i.e. without full knowledge of misses), the assessment of POD when accept/reject decisions are based on multiple criteria, and treating situations in which a single regression line does not fit plots of log a versus log a.

  11. Hypersonic shock tunnel heat transfer tests of the Space Shuttle SILTS pod configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittliff, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements have been made on a 0.0175-scale NASA Space Shuttle orbiter model having a simulated SILTS (Shuttle Infrared Leeside Temperature Sensor) pod on top of the vertical tail. Heat transfer distributions were measured both on the pod and on the vertical tail. The test program covered Mach numbers of 8, 11 and 16 in air, at Reynolds numbers from 100,000 to 18 million, based on model length. The angle of attack ranged from 30 deg to 40 deg at sideslip angles from -2 to +2 deg. Data were obtained with 92 thin film assistance thermometers located on the SILTS pod and on the upper 30 percent of the vertical tail. Heat transfer rates measured on the vertical tail show good agreement with flight data obtained from missions STS-1, -2 and -3. The variation of heat transfer to the pod with Reynolds number, Mach number and angle of attack is discussed.

  12. Airborne Transmission of Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Warfel, Jason M.; Beren, Joel; Merkel, Tod J.

    2012-01-01

    Pertussis is a contagious, acute respiratory illness caused by the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Although it is widely believed that transmission of B. pertussis occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets, no controlled study has ever documented airborne transmission of pertussis. We set out to determine if airborne transmission occurs between infected and naive animals, utilizing the baboon model of pertussis. Our results showed that 100% of exposed naive animals became infected even when physical contact was prevented, demonstrating that pertussis transmission occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets. PMID:22807521

  13. Reliability and validity of the lung volume measurement made by the BOD POD body composition system.

    PubMed

    Davis, James A; Dorado, Silvia; Keays, Kathleen A; Reigel, Kimberly A; Valencia, Kristoffer S; Pham, Patrick H

    2007-01-01

    The BOD POD Body Composition System uses air-displacement plethysmography to measure body volume. To correct the body volume measurement for the subject's lung volume, the BOD POD utilizes pulmonary plethysmography to measure functional residual capacity (FRC) at mid-exhalation as that is the subject's lung volume during the body volume measurement. Normally, FRC is measured at end-exhalation. The BOD POD FRC measurement can be corrected to an end-exhalation volume by subtracting approximately one-half of the measured tidal volume. Our purpose was to determine the reliability and validity of the BOD POD FRC measurement at end-exhalation. Ninety-two healthy adults (half female) underwent duplicate FRC measurements by the BOD POD and one FRC measurement by a traditional gas dilution technique. The latter method was used as the reference method for the validity component of the study. The order of the FRC measurements by the two methods was randomized. The test-retest correlation coefficients for the duplicate BOD POD FRC measurements for the male and female subjects were 0.966 and 0.948, respectively. The mean differences between the BOD POD FRC trial #1 measurement and gas dilution FRC measurement for the male and female subjects were -32 and -23 ml, respectively. Neither difference was statistically significant. The correlation coefficients for these two measurements in the male and female subjects were 0.925 and 0.917, respectively. Based on these results, we conclude that the BOD POD FRC measurement in healthy males and females is both reliable and valid.

  14. Model-Assisted POD for Ultrasonic Detection of Cracks at Fastener Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, C. A.; Hugo, G. R.; Bowles, S. J.

    2006-03-01

    To reduce the cost of conducting experimental probability of detection (POD) trials, methods which utilize models to account for factors that influence the inspection reliability are being developed. This paper reports the application of POD modeling to ultrasonic detection of cracks emanating from fastener holes. The differences between ultrasonic responses from EDM notches compared to fatigue cracks are examined, including the effects of natural variation in fatigue cracks and crack closure due to residual stresses.

  15. NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights Data from the 1982 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of El Chichon ... continuing to January 1984. Transcribed from the following NASA Tech Reports: McCormick, M. P., and M. T. Osborn, Airborne lidar ...

  16. Model-based POD study of manual ultrasound inspection and sensitivity analysis using metamodel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribay, Guillemette; Artusi, Xavier; Jenson, Frédéric; Reece, Christopher; Lhuillier, Pierre-Emile

    2016-02-01

    The reliability of NDE can be quantified by using the Probability of Detection (POD) approach. Former studies have shown the potential of the model-assisted POD (MAPOD) approach to replace expensive experimental determination of POD curves. In this paper, we make use of CIVA software to determine POD curves for a manual ultrasonic inspection of a heavy component, for which a whole experimental POD campaign was not available. The influential parameters were determined by expert analysis. The semi-analytical models used in CIVA for wave propagation and beam-defect interaction have been validated in the range of variation of the influential parameters by comparison with finite element modelling (Athena). The POD curves are computed for « hit/miss » and « â versus a » analysis. The verification of Berens hypothesis is evaluated by statistical tools. A sensitivity study is performed to measure the relative influence of parameters on the defect response amplitude variance, using the Sobol sensitivity index. A meta-model is also built to reduce computing cost and enhance the precision of estimated index.

  17. Changes in free polyamines and related enzymes during stipule and pod wall development in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Soumen; Lahiri, Kajari; Bharati, Ghosh

    2002-08-01

    Level of free polyamines, their key metabolic enzymes, and other features related to ageing were examined during stipule and pod wall development in pea (Pisum sativum). Free polyamine titre (per unit fresh mass) in both the organs, the specific activities of arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase in the pod wall, gradually decreased with maturation. In stipule, these enzymes attained peak activity at 15 days after pod emergence and declined thereafter. Ornithine decarboxylase activity was greater in pod wall than in stipule; while, arginine decarboxylase activity was higher in stipule. Activity of degradative enzyme diamine oxidase increased with the onset of senescence in both the organs. Chlorophyll and electrical conductance had a inverse relationship throughout the experimental period, whereas, the chlorophyll content was directly related with polyamine levels in both stipule and pod wall during aging. On the other hand, protein and RNA contents were positively correlated with free polyamines throughout the test period in stipule, but in the pod wall this was true only for the later stages of development.

  18. Protecting the Public from H1N1 through Points of Dispensing (PODs).

    PubMed

    Rinchiuso-Hasselmann, Anne; McKay, Ryan L; Williams, Christopher A; Starr, David T; Morgenthau, Beth Maldin; Zucker, Jane R; Raphael, Marisa

    2011-03-01

    In fall 2009, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) operated 58 points of dispensing (PODs) over 5 weekends to provide influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccination to New Yorkers. Up to 7 sites were opened each day across the 5 boroughs, with almost 50,000 New Yorkers being vaccinated. The policies and protocols used were based on those developed for New York City's POD Plan, the cornerstone of the city's mass prophylaxis planning. Before the H1N1 experience, NYC had not opened more than 5 PODs simultaneously and had only experienced the higher patient volume seen with the H1N1 PODs on 1 prior occasion. Therefore, DOHMH identified factors that contributed to the success of POD operations, as well as areas for improvement to inform future mass prophylaxis planning and response. Though this was a relatively small-scale, preplanned operation, during which a maximum of 7 PODs were operated on a given day, the findings have implications for larger-scale mass prophylaxis planning for emergencies. PMID:21361797

  19. Laser hazard analysis for airborne AURA (Big Sky variant) Proteus platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-02-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the airborne AURA (Big Sky Laser Technology) lidar system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standard Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for the Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for the Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The AURA lidar system is installed in the instrument pod of a Proteus airframe and is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites. The targets are located at various distances or ranges from the airborne platform. In order to protect personnel, who may be in the target area and may be subjected to exposures, it was necessary to determine the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) for each laser wavelength, calculate the Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD), and determine the maximum 'eye-safe' dwell times for various operational altitudes and conditions. It was also necessary to calculate the appropriate minimum Optical Density (ODmin) of the laser safety eyewear used by authorized personnel who may receive hazardous exposures during ground base operations of the airborne AURA laser system (system alignment and calibration).

  20. Irma 5.1 multisensor signature prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Coker, Charles; Edwards, Dave; Thai, Bea; Aboutalib, Omar; Chow, Anthony; Yamaoka, Neil; Kim, Charles

    2006-05-01

    The Irma synthetic signature prediction code is being developed to facilitate the research and development of multi-sensor systems. Irma was one of the first high resolution, physics-based Infrared (IR) target and background signature models to be developed for tactical weapon applications. Originally developed in 1980 by the Munitions Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/MN), the Irma model was used exclusively to generate IR scenes. In 1988, a number of significant upgrades to Irma were initiated including the addition of a laser (or active) channel. This two-channel version was released to the user community in 1990. In 1992, an improved scene generator was incorporated into the Irma model, which supported correlated frame-to-frame imagery. A passive IR/millimeter wave (MMW) code was completed in 1994. This served as the cornerstone for the development of the co-registered active/passive IR/MMW model, Irma 4.0. In 2000, Irma version 5.0 was released which encompassed several upgrades to both the physical models and software. Circular polarization was added to the passive channel, and a Doppler capability was added to the active MMW channel. In 2002, the multibounce technique was added to the Irma passive channel. In the ladar channel, a user-friendly Ladar Sensor Assistant (LSA) was incorporated which provides capability and flexibility for sensor modeling. Irma 5.0 runs on several platforms including Windows, Linux, Solaris, and SGI Irix. Irma is currently used to support a number of civilian and military applications. The Irma user base includes over 130 agencies within the Air Force, Army, Navy, DARPA, NASA, Department of Transportation, academia, and industry. In 2005, Irma version 5.1 was released to the community. In addition to upgrading the Ladar channel code to an object oriented language (C++) and providing a new graphical user interface to construct scenes, this new release significantly improves the modeling of the ladar channel and

  1. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  2. Airborne fungi--a resurvey

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.H.; Prince, H.E.; Raymer, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    A 15-month survey of airborne fungi at 14 geographical stations was conducted to determine the incidence of different fungal genera. Five of these stations were surveyed 25 years earlier. A comparison between previous studies and present surveys revealed similar organisms at each station with slight shifts in frequency of dominant genera.

  3. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  4. Airborne chemicals and forest health

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, J.N.; Cowling, E.B.

    1987-02-01

    Over the past few years the possible contribution of acid rain to the problem of forest decline has been a cause of increasing public concern. Research has begun to determine whether airborne chemicals are causing or contributing to visible damage and mortality in eastern spruce-fir and sugar maple forests and to changes in tree growth, usually without visible symptoms, in other parts of North America. This paper describes some of the complex biological relationships that determine health and productivity of forests and that make it difficult to distinguish effects of airborne chemicals from effects of natural stress. It describes four major research approaches for assessment of the effects of airborne chemicals on forests, and it summarizes current understanding of the known and possible effects of airborne chemicals on forest trees in North America and Europe. It also briefly describes the major air quality and forest health research programs in North America, and it assesses how ell these programs are likely to meet information needs during the coming decade. 69 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  5. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  6. A Vision for an International Multi-Sensor Snow Observing Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Discussions within the international snow remote sensing community over the past two years have led to encouraging consensus regarding the broad outlines of a dedicated snow observing mission. The primary consensus - that since no single sensor type is satisfactory across all snow types and across all confounding factors, a multi-sensor approach is required - naturally leads to questions about the exact mix of sensors, required accuracies, and so on. In short, the natural next step is to collect such multi-sensor snow observations (with detailed ground truth) to enable trade studies of various possible mission concepts. Such trade studies must assess the strengths and limitations of heritage as well as newer measurement techniques with an eye toward natural sensitivity to desired parameters such as snow depth and/or snow water equivalent (SWE) in spite of confounding factors like clouds, lack of solar illumination, forest cover, and topography, measurement accuracy, temporal and spatial coverage, technological maturity, and cost.

  7. An adaptive Hidden Markov model for activity recognition based on a wearable multi-sensor device.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Wei, Zhiqiang; Yue, Yaofeng; Wang, Hao; Jia, Wenyan; Burke, Lora E; Baranowski, Thomas; Sun, Mingui

    2015-05-01

    Human activity recognition is important in the study of personal health, wellness and lifestyle. In order to acquire human activity information from the personal space, many wearable multi-sensor devices have been developed. In this paper, a novel technique for automatic activity recognition based on multi-sensor data is presented. In order to utilize these data efficiently and overcome the big data problem, an offline adaptive-Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is proposed. A sensor selection scheme is implemented based on an improved Viterbi algorithm. A new method is proposed that incorporates personal experience into the HMM model as a priori information. Experiments are conducted using a personal wearable computer eButton consisting of multiple sensors. Our comparative study with the standard HMM and other alternative methods in processing the eButton data have shown that our method is more robust and efficient, providing a useful tool to evaluate human activity and lifestyle.

  8. Breath analysis system for early detection of lung diseases based on multi-sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jin-Young; Yu, Joon-Boo; Shin, Jeong-Suk; Byun, Hyung-Gi; Lim, Jeong-Ok

    2013-05-01

    Expiratory breath contains various VOCs(Volatile Organic Compounds) produced from the human. When a certain disease exists, the exhalation has specific VOCs which may be generated from diseases. Many researchers have been actively working to find different types of biomarkers which are characteristic for particular diseases. Research regarding the identification of specific diseases from exhalation is still in progress. The aim of this research is to implement early detection of lung disease such as lung cancer and COPD(Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease), which was nominated on the 6th of domestic death rate in 2010, based on multi-sensor array system. The system has been used to acquire sampled expiratory gases data and PCA(Principle Component Analysis) technique was applied to analyze signals from multi-sensor array. Throughout the experimental trials, a clearly distinguishable difference between lung disease patients and healthy controls was found from the measurement and analysis of their respective expiratory gases.

  9. Registering a non-rigid multi-sensor ensemble of images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwa Young; Orchard, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The majority of image registration methods deal with registering only two images at a time. Recently, a clustering method that concurrently registers more than two multi-sensor images was proposed, dubbed ensemble clustering. In this paper, we apply the ensemble clustering method to a deformable registration scenario for the first time. Non-rigid deformation is implemented by a free-form deformation model based on B-splines with a regularization term. However, the increased degrees of freedom in the transformations caused the Newton-type optimization process to become ill-conditioned. This made the registration process unstable. We solved this problem by using the matrix approximation afforded by the singular value decomposition (SVD). Experiments show that the method is successfully applied to non-rigid multi-sensor ensembles and overall yields better registration results than methods that register only two images at a time.

  10. Multi-Sensor Integration to Map Odor Distribution for the Detection of Chemical Sources.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Acar, Levent

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of mapping odor distribution derived from a chemical source using multi-sensor integration and reasoning system design. Odor localization is the problem of finding the source of an odor or other volatile chemical. Most localization methods require a mobile vehicle to follow an odor plume along its entire path, which is time consuming and may be especially difficult in a cluttered environment. To solve both of the above challenges, this paper proposes a novel algorithm that combines data from odor and anemometer sensors, and combine sensors' data at different positions. Initially, a multi-sensor integration method, together with the path of airflow was used to map the pattern of odor particle movement. Then, more sensors are introduced at specific regions to determine the probable location of the odor source. Finally, the results of odor source location simulation and a real experiment are presented. PMID:27384568

  11. A supervised multi-sensor matched filter for the detection of extracellular action potentials.

    PubMed

    Szymanska, Agnieszka F; Doty, Michael; Scannell, Kathryn V; Nenadic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Multi-sensor extracellular recording takes advantage of several electrode channels to record from multiple neurons at the same time. However, the resulting low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) combined with biological noise makes signal detection, the first step of any neurophysiological data analysis, difficult. A matched filter was therefore designed to better detect extracellular action potentials (EAPs) from multi-sensor extracellular recordings. The detector was tested on tetrode data from a locust antennal lobe and assessed against three trained analysts. 25 EAPs and noise samples were selected manually from the data and used for training. To reduce complexity, the filter assumed that the underlying noise in the data was spatially white. The detector performed with an average TP and FP rate of 84.62% and 16.63% respectively. This high level of performance indicates the algorithm is suitable for widespread use.

  12. Multi-Sensor Integration to Map Odor Distribution for the Detection of Chemical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Acar, Levent

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of mapping odor distribution derived from a chemical source using multi-sensor integration and reasoning system design. Odor localization is the problem of finding the source of an odor or other volatile chemical. Most localization methods require a mobile vehicle to follow an odor plume along its entire path, which is time consuming and may be especially difficult in a cluttered environment. To solve both of the above challenges, this paper proposes a novel algorithm that combines data from odor and anemometer sensors, and combine sensors’ data at different positions. Initially, a multi-sensor integration method, together with the path of airflow was used to map the pattern of odor particle movement. Then, more sensors are introduced at specific regions to determine the probable location of the odor source. Finally, the results of odor source location simulation and a real experiment are presented. PMID:27384568

  13. Multi-Sensor Consensus Estimation of State, Sensor Biases and Unknown Input.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Liang, Yan; Yang, Feng; Xu, Linfeng; Pan, Quan

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the joint estimation of system state and generalized sensor bias (GSB) under a common unknown input (UI) in the case of bias evolution in a heterogeneous sensor network. First, the equivalent UI-free GSB dynamic model is derived and the local optimal estimates of system state and sensor bias are obtained in each sensor node; Second, based on the state and bias estimates obtained by each node from its neighbors, the UI is estimated via the least-squares method, and then the state estimates are fused via consensus processing; Finally, the multi-sensor bias estimates are further refined based on the consensus estimate of the UI. A numerical example of distributed multi-sensor target tracking is presented to illustrate the proposed filter.

  14. Fiber-optic remote multisensor system based on an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, F.; Moreau, S.M.; Hueber, D.M.; Vo-dinh, T.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes a new fiber-optic multisensor based on an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and capable of remote sensing using a multioptical fiber array (MOFA). A two-dimensional charge-coupled device (CCD) was used as a detector, and the AOTF was used as a wavelength selector. Unlike a tunable grating or prism-based monochromator, an AOTF has no moving parts, and an AOTF can be rapidly tuned to any wavelength in its operating range within microseconds. The large aperture of the AOTF allows the optical signal from over 100 fiber-optic sensors to be measured simultaneously. These characteristics, combined with their small size, make AOTFs an important new alternative to conventional monochromators, especially for spectral multisensing and imaging. A prototype fiber-optic multisensor system has been developed, and its feasibility for simultaneous detection of molecular luminescence signal via fiber-optic probes is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  15. Multi-Sensor Consensus Estimation of State, Sensor Biases and Unknown Input

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Liang, Yan; Yang, Feng; Xu, Linfeng; Pan, Quan

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the joint estimation of system state and generalized sensor bias (GSB) under a common unknown input (UI) in the case of bias evolution in a heterogeneous sensor network. First, the equivalent UI-free GSB dynamic model is derived and the local optimal estimates of system state and sensor bias are obtained in each sensor node; Second, based on the state and bias estimates obtained by each node from its neighbors, the UI is estimated via the least-squares method, and then the state estimates are fused via consensus processing; Finally, the multi-sensor bias estimates are further refined based on the consensus estimate of the UI. A numerical example of distributed multi-sensor target tracking is presented to illustrate the proposed filter. PMID:27598156

  16. Graphene- and graphene oxide- based multisensor arrays for selective gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, Alexey; Varezhnikov, Alexey; Sysoev, Victor; Kolmakov, Andrei; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Arrays of nearly identical graphene devices on Si/SiO2 exhibit a substantial device-to-device variation, even in case of a high-quality chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or mechanically exfoliated graphene. We propose that such device-to-device variation could provide a platform for highly selective multisensor electronic olfactory systems. We fabricated a multielectode array of CVD graphene devices on a Si/SiO2 substrate, and demonstrated that the diversity of these devices is sufficient to reliably discriminate different short-chain alcohols: methanol, ethanol and isopropanol. The diversity of graphene devices on Si/SiO2 could possibly be used to construct multisensor systems trained to recognize other analytes as well. Similar multisensory arrays based on graphene oxide (GO) devices are also capable of discriminating these short-chain alcohols. We will discuss the possibility of chemical modification of GO for further increase the selectivity of GO multisensory arrays.

  17. Multi-Sensor Consensus Estimation of State, Sensor Biases and Unknown Input.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Liang, Yan; Yang, Feng; Xu, Linfeng; Pan, Quan

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the joint estimation of system state and generalized sensor bias (GSB) under a common unknown input (UI) in the case of bias evolution in a heterogeneous sensor network. First, the equivalent UI-free GSB dynamic model is derived and the local optimal estimates of system state and sensor bias are obtained in each sensor node; Second, based on the state and bias estimates obtained by each node from its neighbors, the UI is estimated via the least-squares method, and then the state estimates are fused via consensus processing; Finally, the multi-sensor bias estimates are further refined based on the consensus estimate of the UI. A numerical example of distributed multi-sensor target tracking is presented to illustrate the proposed filter. PMID:27598156

  18. A Passive Wireless Multi-Sensor SAW Technology Device and System Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Malocha, Donald C.; Gallagher, Mark; Fisher, Brian; Humphries, James; Gallagher, Daniel; Kozlovski, Nikolai

    2013-01-01

    This paper will discuss a SAW passive, wireless multi-sensor system under development by our group for the past several years. The device focus is on orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) SAW sensors, which use both frequency diversity and pulse position reflectors to encode the device ID and will be briefly contrasted to other embodiments. A synchronous correlator transceiver is used for the hardware and post processing and correlation techniques of the received signal to extract the sensor information will be presented. Critical device and system parameters addressed include encoding, operational range, SAW device parameters, post-processing, and antenna-SAW device integration. A fully developed 915 MHz OFC SAW multi-sensor system is used to show experimental results. The system is based on a software radio approach that provides great flexibility for future enhancements and diverse sensor applications. Several different sensor types using the OFC SAW platform are shown. PMID:23666124

  19. Optimal structural design of the Airborne Infrared Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Keith B.; Cerrati, Vincent J.; Forman, Steven E.; Sultana, John A.

    1995-09-01

    The airborne infrared imager (AIRI) is a dual-band IR sensor designed to study air defense issues while wing mounted in a pod. The sensor consists of an optical bench attached to a two- axis inertially stabilized gimbal structure in elevation and azimuth. The gimbal assembly operates within an 18-inch diameter globe while meeting strict pointing and tracking requirements. Design conditions for the assembly include operational and nonoperational inertial, thermal, and dynamic loads. Primary design efforts centered on limiting the line-of- sight jitter of the optical system to 50 (mu) rad under the operating environment. An MSC/NASTRAN finite element model was developed for structural response predictions and correlated to experimental data. Design changes were aided by MSC/NASTRAN's optimization routine with the goal of maximizing the fundamental frequency of the gimbal assembly. The final structural design resultsed in a first natural frequency of 79 Hz using a titanium azimuthal gimbal, a stainless steel elevation gimbal, and an aluminum optical bench which met the design and performance requirements.

  20. Linkage and regional association analysis reveal two new tightly-linked major-QTLs for pod number and seed number per pod in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqin; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yang, Yuhua; Ye, Jiang; Huang, Shunmou; Li, Ruiyuan; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2015-10-05

    To facilitate the pseudochromosomes assembly and gene cloning in rapeseed, we developed a reference genetic population/map (named BnaZNF2) from two sequenced cultivars, Zhongshuang11 and No.73290, those exhibit significant differences in many traits, particularly yield components. The BnaZNF2 genetic map exhibited perfect collinearity with the physical map of B. napus, indicating its high quality. Comparative mapping revealed several genomic rearrangements between B. napus and B. rapa or B. oleracea. A total of eight and 16 QTLs were identified for pod number and seed number per pod, respectively, and of which three and five QTLs are identical to previously identified ones, whereas the other five and 11 are novel. Two new major QTL respectively for pod number and seed number per pod, qPN.A06-1 and qSN.A06-1 (R(2 )= 22.8% and 32.1%), were colocalised with opposite effects, and only qPN.A06-1 was confirmed and narrowed by regional association analysis to 180 kb including only 33 annotated genes. Conditional QTL analysis and subsequent NILs test indicated that tight linkage, rather than pleiotropy, was the genetic causation of their colocalisation. Our study demonstrates potential of this reference genetic population/map for precise QTL mapping and as a base for positional gene cloning in rapeseed.

  1. Linkage and regional association analysis reveal two new tightly-linked major-QTLs for pod number and seed number per pod in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqin; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yang, Yuhua; Ye, Jiang; Huang, Shunmou; Li, Ruiyuan; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate the pseudochromosomes assembly and gene cloning in rapeseed, we developed a reference genetic population/map (named BnaZNF2) from two sequenced cultivars, Zhongshuang11 and No.73290, those exhibit significant differences in many traits, particularly yield components. The BnaZNF2 genetic map exhibited perfect collinearity with the physical map of B. napus, indicating its high quality. Comparative mapping revealed several genomic rearrangements between B. napus and B. rapa or B. oleracea. A total of eight and 16 QTLs were identified for pod number and seed number per pod, respectively, and of which three and five QTLs are identical to previously identified ones, whereas the other five and 11 are novel. Two new major QTL respectively for pod number and seed number per pod, qPN.A06-1 and qSN.A06-1 (R(2 )= 22.8% and 32.1%), were colocalised with opposite effects, and only qPN.A06-1 was confirmed and narrowed by regional association analysis to 180 kb including only 33 annotated genes. Conditional QTL analysis and subsequent NILs test indicated that tight linkage, rather than pleiotropy, was the genetic causation of their colocalisation. Our study demonstrates potential of this reference genetic population/map for precise QTL mapping and as a base for positional gene cloning in rapeseed. PMID:26434411

  2. Linkage and regional association analysis reveal two new tightly-linked major-QTLs for pod number and seed number per pod in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiaqin; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yang, Yuhua; Ye, Jiang; Huang, Shunmou; Li, Ruiyuan; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate the pseudochromosomes assembly and gene cloning in rapeseed, we developed a reference genetic population/map (named BnaZNF2) from two sequenced cultivars, Zhongshuang11 and No.73290, those exhibit significant differences in many traits, particularly yield components. The BnaZNF2 genetic map exhibited perfect collinearity with the physical map of B. napus, indicating its high quality. Comparative mapping revealed several genomic rearrangements between B. napus and B. rapa or B. oleracea. A total of eight and 16 QTLs were identified for pod number and seed number per pod, respectively, and of which three and five QTLs are identical to previously identified ones, whereas the other five and 11 are novel. Two new major QTL respectively for pod number and seed number per pod, qPN.A06-1 and qSN.A06-1 (R2 = 22.8% and 32.1%), were colocalised with opposite effects, and only qPN.A06-1 was confirmed and narrowed by regional association analysis to 180 kb including only 33 annotated genes. Conditional QTL analysis and subsequent NILs test indicated that tight linkage, rather than pleiotropy, was the genetic causation of their colocalisation. Our study demonstrates potential of this reference genetic population/map for precise QTL mapping and as a base for positional gene cloning in rapeseed. PMID:26434411

  3. Body-Attachable and Stretchable Multisensors Integrated with Wirelessly Rechargeable Energy Storage Devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daeil; Kim, Doyeon; Lee, Hyunkyu; Jeong, Yu Ra; Lee, Seung-Jung; Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Hyoungjun; Lee, Geumbee; Jeon, Sanggeun; Zi, Goangseup; Kim, Jihyun; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2016-01-27

    A stretchable multisensor system is successfully demonstrated with an integrated energy-storage device, an array of microsupercapacitors that can be repeatedly charged via a wireless radio-frequency power receiver on the same stretchable polymer substrate. The integrated devices are interconnected by a liquid-metal interconnection and operate stably without noticeable performance degradation under strain due to the skin attachment, and a uniaxial strain up to 50%. PMID:26641239

  4. Multisensor System for Isotemporal Measurements to Assess Indoor Climatic Conditions in Poultry Farms

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Eliseo; Guijarro, Enrique; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan; Balasch, Sebastián; Hospitaler, Antonio; Torres, Antonio G.

    2012-01-01

    The rearing of poultry for meat production (broilers) is an agricultural food industry with high relevance to the economy and development of some countries. Periodic episodes of extreme climatic conditions during the summer season can cause high mortality among birds, resulting in economic losses. In this context, ventilation systems within poultry houses play a critical role to ensure appropriate indoor climatic conditions. The objective of this study was to develop a multisensor system to evaluate the design of the ventilation system in broiler houses. A measurement system equipped with three types of sensors: air velocity, temperature and differential pressure was designed and built. The system consisted in a laptop, a data acquisition card, a multiplexor module and a set of 24 air temperature, 24 air velocity and two differential pressure sensors. The system was able to acquire up to a maximum of 128 signals simultaneously at 5 second intervals. The multisensor system was calibrated under laboratory conditions and it was then tested in field tests. Field tests were conducted in a commercial broiler farm under four different pressure and ventilation scenarios in two sections within the building. The calibration curves obtained under laboratory conditions showed similar regression coefficients among temperature, air velocity and pressure sensors and a high goodness fit (R2 = 0.99) with the reference. Under field test conditions, the multisensor system showed a high number of input signals from different locations with minimum internal delay in acquiring signals. The variation among air velocity sensors was not significant. The developed multisensor system was able to integrate calibrated sensors of temperature, air velocity and differential pressure and operated succesfully under different conditions in a mechanically-ventilated broiler farm. This system can be used to obtain quasi-instantaneous fields of the air velocity and temperature, as well as differential

  5. A distributed general multi-sensor cardinalized probability hypothesis density (CPHD) filter for sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta Gupta, S.; Nannuru, S.; Coates, M.; Rabbat, M.

    2015-05-01

    We develop a distributed cardinalized probability hypothesis density (CPHD) filter that can be deployed in a sensor network to process the measurements of multiple sensors that make conditionally independent measurements. In contrast to the majority of the related work, which involves performing local filter updates and then exchanging data to fuse the local intensity functions and cardinality distributions, we strive to approximate the update step that a centralized multi-sensor CPHD filter would perform.

  6. Routing architecture and security for airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei; Xie, Peng; Li, Jason; Xu, Roger; Levy, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Airborne networks are envisioned to provide interconnectivity for terrestial and space networks by interconnecting highly mobile airborne platforms. A number of military applications are expected to be used by the operator, and all these applications require proper routing security support to establish correct route between communicating platforms in a timely manner. As airborne networks somewhat different from traditional wired and wireless networks (e.g., Internet, LAN, WLAN, MANET, etc), security aspects valid in these networks are not fully applicable to airborne networks. Designing an efficient security scheme to protect airborne networks is confronted with new requirements. In this paper, we first identify a candidate routing architecture, which works as an underlying structure for our proposed security scheme. And then we investigate the vulnerabilities and attack models against routing protocols in airborne networks. Based on these studies, we propose an integrated security solution to address routing security issues in airborne networks.

  7. Multisensor Super Resolution Using Directionally-Adaptive Regularization for UAV Images.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Ko, Seungyong; Paik, Joonki

    2015-05-22

    In various unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging applications, the multisensor super-resolution (SR) technique has become a chronic problem and attracted increasing attention. Multisensor SR algorithms utilize multispectral low-resolution (LR) images to make a higher resolution (HR) image to improve the performance of the UAV imaging system. The primary objective of the paper is to develop a multisensor SR method based on the existing multispectral imaging framework instead of using additional sensors. In order to restore image details without noise amplification or unnatural post-processing artifacts, this paper presents an improved regularized SR algorithm by combining the directionally-adaptive constraints and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filter. As a result, the proposed method can overcome the physical limitation of multispectral sensors by estimating the color HR image from a set of multispectral LR images using intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) image fusion. Experimental results show that the proposed method provides better SR results than existing state-of-the-art SR methods in the sense of objective measures.

  8. Multi-sensor data fusion for measurement of complex freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M. J.; Liu, M. Y.; Cheung, C. F.; Yin, Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Along with the rapid development of the science and technology in fields such as space optics, multi-scale enriched freeform surfaces are widely used to enhance the performance of the optical systems in both functionality and size reduction. Multi-sensor technology is considered as one of the promising methods to measure and characterize these surfaces at multiple scales. This paper presents a multi-sensor data fusion based measurement method to purposely extract the geometric information of the components with different scales which is used to establish a holistic geometry of the surface via data fusion. To address the key problems of multi-sensor data fusion, an intrinsic feature pattern based surface registration method is developed to transform the measured datasets to a common coordinate frame. Gaussian zero-order regression filter is then used to separate each measured data in different scales, and the datasets are fused based on an edge intensity data fusion algorithm within the same wavelength. The fused data at different scales is then merged to form a new surface with holistic multiscale information. Experimental study is presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. An Asynchronous Multi-Sensor Micro Control Unit for Wireless Body Sensor Networks (WBSNs)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiung-An; Chen, Shih-Lun; Huang, Hong-Yi; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    In this work, an asynchronous multi-sensor micro control unit (MCU) core is proposed for wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs). It consists of asynchronous interfaces, a power management unit, a multi-sensor controller, a data encoder (DE), and an error correct coder (ECC). To improve the system performance and expansion abilities, the asynchronous interface is created for handshaking different clock domains between ADC and RF with MCU. To increase the use time of the WBSN system, a power management technique is developed for reducing power consumption. In addition, the multi-sensor controller is designed for detecting various biomedical signals. To prevent loss error from wireless transmission, use of an error correct coding technique is important in biomedical applications. The data encoder is added for lossless compression of various biomedical signals with a compression ratio of almost three. This design is successfully tested on a FPGA board. The VLSI architecture of this work contains 2.68-K gate counts and consumes power 496-μW at 133-MHz processing rate by using TSMC 0.13-μm CMOS process. Compared with the previous techniques, this work offers higher performance, more functions, and lower hardware cost than other micro controller designs. PMID:22164000

  10. Dempster-Shafer fusion of multisensor signals in nonstationary Markovian context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaren, Mohamed El Yazid; Monfrini, Emmanuel; Pieczynski, Wojciech; Aïssani, Amar

    2012-12-01

    The latest developments in Markov models' theory and their corresponding computational techniques have opened new rooms for image and signal modeling. In particular, the use of Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence within Markov models has brought some keys to several challenging difficulties that the conventional hidden Markov models cannot handle. These difficulties are concerned mainly with two situations: multisensor data, where the use of the Dempster-Shafer fusion is unworkable; and nonstationary data, due to the mismatch between the estimated stationary model and the actual data. For each of the two situations, the Dempster-Shafer combination rule has been applied, thanks to the triplet Markov models' formalism, to overcome the drawbacks of the standard Bayesian models. However, so far, both situations have not been considered in the same time. In this article, we propose an evidential Markov chain that uses the Dempster-Shafer combination rule to bring the effect of contextual information into segmentation of multisensor nonstationary data. We also provide the Expectation-Maximization parameters' estimation and the maximum posterior marginal's restoration procedures. To validate the proposed model, experiments are conducted on some synthetic multisensor data and noised images. The obtained segmentation results are then compared to those obtained with conventional approaches to bring out the efficiency of the present model.

  11. Multisensor systems for security of critical infrastructures: concept, data fusion, and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, M.; Dulski, R.; Życzkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapiński, W.; Firmanty, K.; Pałka, N.; Bieszczad, G.

    2011-08-01

    The paper presents the concept of a multisensor system for perimeter protection, suitable for stationary and moving objects. The system consists of an active ground radar and thermal and visible cameras. The radar allows the system to locate potential intruders and controls an observation area for system cameras. The multi-sensor system concept ensures significant improvement of the probability of intruder detection and reduction of false alarms, thus increasing the functionality and performance of the whole system. Effective ranges of detection depend on the quality of the applied sensors and the observed scene itself. One of the most important devices used in such systems are IR cameras. The paper discusses the technical possibilities and limitations to use uncooled IR cameras in such a multi-sensor system for perimeter protection. The role of IR cameras in the system was discussed as well as a technical possibilities to detect a human being. The operational distances for perimeter protection are rather high, considering the performance of commercially available thermal cameras. The required spatial resolutions for detection, recognition and identification were calculated and then the detection ranges were estimated using NVTherm software. The results of analysis were finally presented and the comparison of exemplary IR cameras.

  12. PMHT Approach for Multi-Target Multi-Sensor Sonar Tracking in Clutter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Li, Yaan; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao; Dai, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Multi-sensor sonar tracking has many advantages, such as the potential to reduce the overall measurement uncertainty and the possibility to hide the receiver. However, the use of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking is challenging because of the complexity of the underwater environment, especially the low target detection probability and extremely large number of false alarms caused by reverberation. In this work, to solve the problem of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking in the presence of clutter, a novel probabilistic multi-hypothesis tracker (PMHT) approach based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed. The PMHT can efficiently handle the unknown measurements-to-targets and measurements-to-transmitters data association ambiguity. The EKF and UKF are used to deal with the high degree of nonlinearity in the measurement model. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the target tracking performance in a cluttered environment greatly, and its computational load is low. PMID:26561817

  13. Multisensor Super Resolution Using Directionally-Adaptive Regularization for UAV Images.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Ko, Seungyong; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    In various unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging applications, the multisensor super-resolution (SR) technique has become a chronic problem and attracted increasing attention. Multisensor SR algorithms utilize multispectral low-resolution (LR) images to make a higher resolution (HR) image to improve the performance of the UAV imaging system. The primary objective of the paper is to develop a multisensor SR method based on the existing multispectral imaging framework instead of using additional sensors. In order to restore image details without noise amplification or unnatural post-processing artifacts, this paper presents an improved regularized SR algorithm by combining the directionally-adaptive constraints and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filter. As a result, the proposed method can overcome the physical limitation of multispectral sensors by estimating the color HR image from a set of multispectral LR images using intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) image fusion. Experimental results show that the proposed method provides better SR results than existing state-of-the-art SR methods in the sense of objective measures. PMID:26007744

  14. PMHT Approach for Multi-Target Multi-Sensor Sonar Tracking in Clutter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Li, Yaan; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao; Dai, Miao

    2015-11-06

    Multi-sensor sonar tracking has many advantages, such as the potential to reduce the overall measurement uncertainty and the possibility to hide the receiver. However, the use of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking is challenging because of the complexity of the underwater environment, especially the low target detection probability and extremely large number of false alarms caused by reverberation. In this work, to solve the problem of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking in the presence of clutter, a novel probabilistic multi-hypothesis tracker (PMHT) approach based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed. The PMHT can efficiently handle the unknown measurements-to-targets and measurements-to-transmitters data association ambiguity. The EKF and UKF are used to deal with the high degree of nonlinearity in the measurement model. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the target tracking performance in a cluttered environment greatly, and its computational load is low.

  15. An enhanced data visualization method for diesel engine malfunction classification using multi-sensor signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiqing; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; Zhang, Mingquan

    2015-10-21

    The various multi-sensor signal features from a diesel engine constitute a complex high-dimensional dataset. The non-linear dimensionality reduction method, t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE), provides an effective way to implement data visualization for complex high-dimensional data. However, irrelevant features can deteriorate the performance of data visualization, and thus, should be eliminated a priori. This paper proposes a feature subset score based t-SNE (FSS-t-SNE) data visualization method to deal with the high-dimensional data that are collected from multi-sensor signals. In this method, the optimal feature subset is constructed by a feature subset score criterion. Then the high-dimensional data are visualized in 2-dimension space. According to the UCI dataset test, FSS-t-SNE can effectively improve the classification accuracy. An experiment was performed with a large power marine diesel engine to validate the proposed method for diesel engine malfunction classification. Multi-sensor signals were collected by a cylinder vibration sensor and a cylinder pressure sensor. Compared with other conventional data visualization methods, the proposed method shows good visualization performance and high classification accuracy in multi-malfunction classification of a diesel engine.

  16. PMHT Approach for Multi-Target Multi-Sensor Sonar Tracking in Clutter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohua; Li, Yaan; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao; Dai, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Multi-sensor sonar tracking has many advantages, such as the potential to reduce the overall measurement uncertainty and the possibility to hide the receiver. However, the use of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking is challenging because of the complexity of the underwater environment, especially the low target detection probability and extremely large number of false alarms caused by reverberation. In this work, to solve the problem of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking in the presence of clutter, a novel probabilistic multi-hypothesis tracker (PMHT) approach based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed. The PMHT can efficiently handle the unknown measurements-to-targets and measurements-to-transmitters data association ambiguity. The EKF and UKF are used to deal with the high degree of nonlinearity in the measurement model. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the target tracking performance in a cluttered environment greatly, and its computational load is low. PMID:26561817

  17. An enhanced data visualization method for diesel engine malfunction classification using multi-sensor signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiqing; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; Zhang, Mingquan

    2015-01-01

    The various multi-sensor signal features from a diesel engine constitute a complex high-dimensional dataset. The non-linear dimensionality reduction method, t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE), provides an effective way to implement data visualization for complex high-dimensional data. However, irrelevant features can deteriorate the performance of data visualization, and thus, should be eliminated a priori. This paper proposes a feature subset score based t-SNE (FSS-t-SNE) data visualization method to deal with the high-dimensional data that are collected from multi-sensor signals. In this method, the optimal feature subset is constructed by a feature subset score criterion. Then the high-dimensional data are visualized in 2-dimension space. According to the UCI dataset test, FSS-t-SNE can effectively improve the classification accuracy. An experiment was performed with a large power marine diesel engine to validate the proposed method for diesel engine malfunction classification. Multi-sensor signals were collected by a cylinder vibration sensor and a cylinder pressure sensor. Compared with other conventional data visualization methods, the proposed method shows good visualization performance and high classification accuracy in multi-malfunction classification of a diesel engine. PMID:26506347

  18. An Enhanced Data Visualization Method for Diesel Engine Malfunction Classification Using Multi-Sensor Signals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiqing; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; Zhang, Mingquan

    2015-01-01

    The various multi-sensor signal features from a diesel engine constitute a complex high-dimensional dataset. The non-linear dimensionality reduction method, t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE), provides an effective way to implement data visualization for complex high-dimensional data. However, irrelevant features can deteriorate the performance of data visualization, and thus, should be eliminated a priori. This paper proposes a feature subset score based t-SNE (FSS-t-SNE) data visualization method to deal with the high-dimensional data that are collected from multi-sensor signals. In this method, the optimal feature subset is constructed by a feature subset score criterion. Then the high-dimensional data are visualized in 2-dimension space. According to the UCI dataset test, FSS-t-SNE can effectively improve the classification accuracy. An experiment was performed with a large power marine diesel engine to validate the proposed method for diesel engine malfunction classification. Multi-sensor signals were collected by a cylinder vibration sensor and a cylinder pressure sensor. Compared with other conventional data visualization methods, the proposed method shows good visualization performance and high classification accuracy in multi-malfunction classification of a diesel engine. PMID:26506347

  19. Multi-sensor for measuring erythemally weighted irradiance in various directions simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Peleg, I.; Peled, A.

    2015-08-01

    Estimating the ultraviolet-B (UV-B) solar irradiance and its angular distribution is a matter of interest to both research and commercial institutes. A static multi-sensor instrument is developed in this paper for a simultaneous measuring of the sky and the reflected erythemally weighted UV-B irradiance on multiple inclined surfaces. The instrument employs a pre-developed simple solar irradiance model and a minimum mean square error method to estimate the various irradiance parameters. The multi-sensor instrument comprises a spherical shaped apparatus with the UV-B sensors mounted as follows: seven sky-facing sensors to measure the hemispherical sky irradiance and six sensors facing downwards to measure the reflection from ground. This work aims to devise and outline an elementary, low-cost multi-sensor instrument. The sensor may usefully serve research, commercial, and medical institutes to sample and measure the UV-B irradiance on horizontal as well as on inclined surfaces. The various UV-B calculations for inclined surfaces are aided by the sensor's integrated software.

  20. Distinctive Order Based Self-Similarity descriptor for multi-sensor remote sensing image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, Amin; Ebadi, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    Robust, well-distributed and accurate feature matching in multi-sensor remote sensing image is a difficult task duo to significant geometric and illumination differences. In this paper, a robust and effective image matching approach is presented for multi-sensor remote sensing images. The proposed approach consists of three main steps. In the first step, UR-SIFT (Uniform robust scale invariant feature transform) algorithm is applied for uniform and dense local feature extraction. In the second step, a novel descriptor namely Distinctive Order Based Self Similarity descriptor, DOBSS descriptor, is computed for each extracted feature. Finally, a cross matching process followed by a consistency check in the projective transformation model is performed for feature correspondence and mismatch elimination. The proposed method was successfully applied for matching various multi-sensor satellite images as: ETM+, SPOT 4, SPOT 5, ASTER, IRS, SPOT 6, QuickBird, GeoEye and Worldview sensors, and the results demonstrate its robustness and capability compared to common image matching techniques such as SIFT, PIIFD, GLOH, LIOP and LSS.

  1. Multi-sensor for measuring erythemally weighted irradiance in various directions simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Peleg, I.; Peled, A.

    2016-10-01

    Estimating the ultraviolet-B (UV-B) solar irradiance and its angular distribution is a matter of interest to both research and commercial institutes. A static multi-sensor instrument is developed in this paper for a simultaneous measuring of the sky and the reflected erythemally weighted UV-B irradiance on multiple inclined surfaces. The instrument employs a pre-developed simple solar irradiance model and a minimum mean square error method to estimate the various irradiance parameters. The multi-sensor instrument comprises a spherical shaped apparatus with the UV-B sensors mounted as follows: seven sky-facing sensors to measure the hemispherical sky irradiance and six sensors facing downwards to measure the reflection from ground. This work aims to devise and outline an elementary, low-cost multi-sensor instrument. The sensor may usefully serve research, commercial, and medical institutes to sample and measure the UV-B irradiance on horizontal as well as on inclined surfaces. The various UV-B calculations for inclined surfaces are aided by the sensor's integrated software.

  2. Dynamic PROOF clusters with PoD: architecture and user experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manafov, Anar

    2011-12-01

    PROOF on Demand (PoD) is a tool-set, which sets up a PROOF cluster on any resource management system. PoD is a user oriented product with an easy to use GUI and a command-line interface. It is fully automated. No administrative privileges or special knowledge is required to use it. PoD utilizes a plug-in system, to use different job submission front-ends. The current PoD distribution is shipped with LSF, Torque (PBS), Grid Engine, Condor, gLite, and SSH plug-ins. The product is to be extended. We therefore plan to implement a plug-in for AliEn Grid as well. Recently developed algorithms made it possible to efficiently maintain two types of connections: packet-forwarding and native PROOF connections. This helps to properly handle most kinds of workers, with and without firewalls. PoD maintains the PROOF environment automatically and, for example, prevents resource misusage in case when workers idle for too long. As PoD matures as a product and provides more plug-ins, it's used as a standard for setting up dynamic PROOF clusters in many different institutions. The GSI Analysis Facility (GSIAF) is in production since 2007. The static PROOF cluster has been phased out end of 2009. GSIAF is now completely based on PoD. Users create private dynamic PROOF clusters on the general purpose batch farm. This provides an easier resource sharing between interactive local batch and Grid usage. The main user communities are FAIR and ALICE.

  3. Mesquite pod extract modifies the reproductive physiology and behavior of the female rat.

    PubMed

    Retana-Márquez, S; Aguirre, F García; Alcántara, M; García-Díaz, E; Muñoz-Gutiérrez, M; Arteaga-Silva, M; López, G; Romero, C; Chemineau, P; Keller, M; Delgadillo, J A

    2012-04-01

    Phytoestrogens are non steroidal compounds that can bind to estrogen receptors, mimicking some effects of estradiol (E(2)). These compounds are widespread among legumes, which are used as pasture, and their importance in animal agriculture has increased. Mesquite (Prosopis sp) is a widespread legume, widely used to feed several livestock species in Mexico. The main product of mesquite is the pod, which is considered high quality food. As a legume, it could be assumed that mesquite contains some amounts of phytoestrogens which might induce potential estrogenic effects. However, to our knowledge, there are no reports regarding the possible estrogenic activity of this legume either in livestock or in animal models such as the rat. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the potential estrogenic effects of mesquite pod extract on several aspects of behavior and reproductive physiology of the female rat. The effects of the extract were compared with those of E(2) and two isoflavones: daidzein (DAI) and genistein (GEN). The following treatments were given to groups of intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats: vehicle; mesquite pod extract; E(2); GEN; DAI. Compared to vehicle groups, mesquite pod extract, DAI, GEN, and E(2) increased uterine weight and induced growth in vaginal and uterine epithelia. In intact rats, mesquite pod extract, GEN and DAI altered estrous cyclicity, decreased lordotic quotient and intensity of lordosis. In OVX rats, mesquite pod extract, DAI and GEN induced vaginal estrus, increased vaginal epithelium height, and induced lordosis, although its intensity was reduced, compared with intact rats in estrus and E2-treated rats. These results suggest that mesquite pod extract could have estrogenic activity. However, the presence of phytoestrogens in this legume remains to be confirmed.

  4. Nutrient Digestibility and Metabolizable Energy Content of Mucuna pruriens Whole Pods Fed to Growing Pelibuey Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Loyra-Tzab, Enrique; Sarmiento-Franco, Luis Armando; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos Alfredo; Santos-Ricalde, Ronald Herve

    2013-01-01

    The nutrient digestibility, nitrogen balance and in vivo metabolizable energy supply of Mucuna pruriens whole pods fed to growing Pelibuey lambs was investigated. Eight Pelibuey sheep housed in metabolic crates were fed increasing levels of Mucuna pruriens pods: 0 (control), 100 (Mucuna100), 200 (Mucuna200) and 300 (Mucuna300) g/kg dry matter. A quadratic (p<0.002) effect was observed for dry matter (DM), neutral detergent fibre (aNDF), nitrogen (N) and gross energy (GE) intakes with higher intakes in the Mucuna100 and Mucuna200 treatments. Increasing M. pruriens in the diets had no effect (p>0.05) on DM and GE apparent digestibility (p<0.05). A linear reduction in N digestibility and N retention was observed with increasing mucuna pod level. This effect was accompanied by a quadratic effect (p<0.05) on fecal-N and N-balance which were higher in the Mucuna100 and Mucuna200 treatments. Urine-N excretion, GE retention and dietary estimated nutrient supply (metabolizable protein and metabolizable energy) were not affected (p>0.05). DM, N and GE apparent digestibility coefficient of M. pruriens whole pods obtained through multiple regression equations were 0.692, 0.457, 0.654 respectively. In vivo DE and ME content of mucuna whole pod were estimated in 11.0 and 9.7 MJ/kg DM. It was concluded that whole pods from M. pruriens did not affect nutrient utilization when included in an mixed diet up to 200 g/kg DM. This is the first in vivo estimation of mucuna whole pod ME value for ruminants. PMID:25049876

  5. Cadmium re-distribution from pod and root zones and accumulation by peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Kairong; Song, Ningning; Zhao, Qiaoqiao; van der Zee, S E A T M

    2016-01-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genotypes may differ greatly with regard to cadmium (Cd) accumulation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To determine the key factors that may contribute to Cd re-distribution and accumulation in peanut genotypes with different Cd accumulating patterns, a split-pot soil experiment was conducted with three common Chinese peanut cultivars (Fenghua-6, Huayu-20, and Huayu-23). The growth medium was separated into pod and root zones with varied Cd concentrations in each zone to determine the re-distribution of Cd after it is taken up via different routes. The peanut cultivars were divided into two groups based on Cd translocation efficiency as follows: (1) high internal Cd translocation efficiency cultivar (Fenghua-6) and (2) low internal Cd translocation efficiency cultivars (Huayu-20 and Huayu-23). Compared with Fenghua-6, low Cd translocation cultivars Huayu-20 and Huayu-23 showed higher biomass production, especially in stems and leaves, leading to dilution of metal concentrations. Results also showed that Cd concentration in roots increased significantly with increasing Cd concentrations in soils when Cd was applied in the root zone. However, there were no significant differences in the root Cd concentrations between different pod zone Cd treatments and the control, suggesting that root uptake, rather than pod uptake, is responsible for Cd accumulation in the roots of peanuts. Significant differences of Cd distribution were observed between pod and root zone Cd exposure treatments. The three peanut cultivars revealed higher kernel over total Cd fractions for pod than for root zone Cd exposure if only extra applied Cd was considered. This suggests that uptake through peg and pod shell might, at least partially, be responsible for the variation in Cd re-distribution and accumulation among peanut cultivars. Cd uptake by plants via two routes (i.e., via roots and via pegs and pods, respectively) and internal Cd translocation

  6. Nutrient Digestibility and Metabolizable Energy Content of Mucuna pruriens Whole Pods Fed to Growing Pelibuey Lambs.

    PubMed

    Loyra-Tzab, Enrique; Sarmiento-Franco, Luis Armando; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos Alfredo; Santos-Ricalde, Ronald Herve

    2013-07-01

    The nutrient digestibility, nitrogen balance and in vivo metabolizable energy supply of Mucuna pruriens whole pods fed to growing Pelibuey lambs was investigated. Eight Pelibuey sheep housed in metabolic crates were fed increasing levels of Mucuna pruriens pods: 0 (control), 100 (Mucuna100), 200 (Mucuna200) and 300 (Mucuna300) g/kg dry matter. A quadratic (p<0.002) effect was observed for dry matter (DM), neutral detergent fibre (aNDF), nitrogen (N) and gross energy (GE) intakes with higher intakes in the Mucuna100 and Mucuna200 treatments. Increasing M. pruriens in the diets had no effect (p>0.05) on DM and GE apparent digestibility (p<0.05). A linear reduction in N digestibility and N retention was observed with increasing mucuna pod level. This effect was accompanied by a quadratic effect (p<0.05) on fecal-N and N-balance which were higher in the Mucuna100 and Mucuna200 treatments. Urine-N excretion, GE retention and dietary estimated nutrient supply (metabolizable protein and metabolizable energy) were not affected (p>0.05). DM, N and GE apparent digestibility coefficient of M. pruriens whole pods obtained through multiple regression equations were 0.692, 0.457, 0.654 respectively. In vivo DE and ME content of mucuna whole pod were estimated in 11.0 and 9.7 MJ/kg DM. It was concluded that whole pods from M. pruriens did not affect nutrient utilization when included in an mixed diet up to 200 g/kg DM. This is the first in vivo estimation of mucuna whole pod ME value for ruminants. PMID:25049876

  7. Soil properties mapping with the DIGISOIL multi-sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, G.

    2012-04-01

    The multidisciplinary DIGISOIL project aimed to integrate and improve in situ and proximal measurement technologies for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators, going from the sensing technologies to their integration and their application in (digital) soil mapping (DSM). In order to assess and prevent soil degradation and to benefit from the different ecological, economical and historical functions of the soil in a sustainable way, high resolution and quantitative maps of soil properties are needed. The core objective of the project is to explore and exploit new capabilities of advanced geophysical technologies for answering this societal demand. To this aim, DIGISOIL addresses four issues covering technological, soil science and economic aspects: (i) the validation of geophysical (in situ, proximal and airborne) technologies and integrated pedo-geophysical inversion techniques (mechanistic data fusion) (ii) the relation between the geophysical parameters and the soil properties, (iii) the integration of the derived soil properties for mapping soil functions and soil threats, (iv) the pre-evaluation, standardisation and sub-industrialization of the proposed methodologies, including technical and economical studies related to the societal demand. With respect to these issues, the DIGISOIL project allows to develop, test and validate the most relevant geophysical technologies for mapping soil properties. The system was tested on different field tests, and validated the proposed technologies and solutions for each of the identified methods: geoelectric, GPR, EMI, seismics, magnetic and hyperspectral. After data acquisition systems, sensor geometry, and advanced data processing techniques have been developed and validated, we present now the solutions for going from geophysical data to soil properties maps. For two test sites, located respectively in Luxembourg (LU) and Mugello (IT) a set of soil properties maps have been produced. They give

  8. The iPod Experiments: Michael Stephens Investigates Ways that Librarians Are Using This Popular Consumer Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Michael

    2005-01-01

    No other consumer electronic device has created such an impact on popular culture in recent years as the Apple iPod. Since iPod's release in November 2001, music fans have been able to carry upwards of 15,000 song files on those sleek devices with their trendy white headphones. Over ten million iPods have been sold--nearly half of them in the last…

  9. Improved resistivity imaging of groundwater solute plumes using POD-based inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oware, E. K.; Moysey, S. M.; Khan, T.

    2012-12-01

    We propose a new approach for enforcing physics-based regularization in electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) problems. The approach utilizes a basis-constrained inversion where an optimal set of basis vectors is extracted from training data by Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). The key aspect of the approach is that Monte Carlo simulation of flow and transport is used to generate a training dataset, thereby intrinsically capturing the physics of the underlying flow and transport models in a non-parametric form. POD allows for these training data to be projected onto a subspace of the original domain, resulting in the extraction of a basis for the inversion that captures characteristics of the groundwater flow and transport system, while simultaneously allowing for dimensionality reduction of the original problem in the projected space We use two different synthetic transport scenarios in heterogeneous media to illustrate how the POD-based inversion compares with standard Tikhonov and coupled inversion. The first scenario had a single source zone leading to a unimodal solute plume (synthetic #1), whereas, the second scenario had two source zones that produced a bimodal plume (synthetic #2). For both coupled inversion and the POD approach, the conceptual flow and transport model used considered only a single source zone for both scenarios. Results were compared based on multiple metrics (concentration root-mean square error (RMSE), peak concentration, and total solute mass). In addition, results for POD inversion based on 3 different data densities (120, 300, and 560 data points) and varying number of selected basis images (100, 300, and 500) were compared. For synthetic #1, we found that all three methods provided qualitatively reasonable reproduction of the true plume. Quantitatively, the POD inversion performed best overall for each metric considered. Moreover, since synthetic #1 was consistent with the conceptual transport model, a small number of basis

  10. Modeling the X-ray Process, and X-ray Flaw Size Parameter for POD Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2014-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method reliability can be determined by a statistical flaw detection study called probability of detection (POD) study. In many instances, the NDE flaw detectability is given as a flaw size such as crack length. The flaw is either a crack or behaving like a crack in terms of affecting the structural integrity of the material. An alternate approach is to use a more complex flaw size parameter. The X-ray flaw size parameter, given here, takes into account many setup and geometric factors. The flaw size parameter relates to X-ray image contrast and is intended to have a monotonic correlation with the POD. Some factors such as set-up parameters, including X-ray energy, exposure, detector sensitivity, and material type that are not accounted for in the flaw size parameter may be accounted for in the technique calibration and controlled to meet certain quality requirements. The proposed flaw size parameter and the computer application described here give an alternate approach to conduct the POD studies. Results of the POD study can be applied to reliably detect small flaws through better assessment of effect of interaction between various geometric parameters on the flaw detectability. Moreover, a contrast simulation algorithm for a simple part-source-detector geometry using calibration data is also provided for the POD estimation.

  11. Comparison of the Bod Pod and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in men.

    PubMed

    Ball, Stephen D; Altena, Thomas S

    2004-06-01

    The majority of studies investigating the accuracy of the Bod Pod have compared it to hydrostatic weighing (HW), the long held, and perhaps outdated 'gold standard' method of body composition analysis. Much less research has compared the Bod Pod to dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), a technique that is becoming popular as an alternative reference method. The purpose of this study was to compare per cent fat estimates by the Bod Pod to those of DXA in a large number of men. Participants were 160 men (32 +/- 11 years). Per cent body fat was estimated to be 19.4 +/- 6.8 and 21.6 +/- 8.4 for DXA and the Bod Pod, respectively. Although the two methods were highly correlated (0.94), the mean difference of 2.2% was significant (p < 0.01). The amount of difference increased as body fatness increased (p < 0.0001). The results of this study indicate that a difference between methods existed for our sample of men. It is uncertain exactly where the difference lies. Practitioners should be aware that even with the use of technologically sophisticated methods (i.e., Bod Pod, DXA), differences between methods exist and the determination of body composition is at best, an estimation.

  12. An Evaluation of the Pea Pod System for Assessing Body Composition of Moderately Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Forsum, Elisabet; Olhager, Elisabeth; Törnqvist, Caroline

    2016-04-22

    (1) BACKGROUND: Assessing the quality of growth in premature infants is important in order to be able to provide them with optimal nutrition. The Pea Pod device, based on air displacement plethysmography, is able to assess body composition of infants. However, this method has not been sufficiently evaluated in premature infants; (2) METHODS: In 14 infants in an age range of 3-7 days, born after 32-35 completed weeks of gestation, body weight, body volume, fat-free mass density (predicted by the Pea Pod software), and total body water (isotope dilution) were assessed. Reference estimates of fat-free mass density and body composition were obtained using a three-component model; (3) RESULTS: Fat-free mass density values, predicted using Pea Pod, were biased but not significantly (p > 0.05) different from reference estimates. Body fat (%), assessed using Pea Pod, was not significantly different from reference estimates. The biological variability of fat-free mass density was 0.55% of the average value (1.0627 g/mL); (4) CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the Pea Pod system is accurate for groups of newborn, moderately premature infants. However, more studies where this system is used for premature infants are needed, and we provide suggestions regarding how to develop this area.

  13. An Evaluation of the Pea Pod System for Assessing Body Composition of Moderately Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Forsum, Elisabet; Olhager, Elisabeth; Törnqvist, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Assessing the quality of growth in premature infants is important in order to be able to provide them with optimal nutrition. The Pea Pod device, based on air displacement plethysmography, is able to assess body composition of infants. However, this method has not been sufficiently evaluated in premature infants; (2) Methods: In 14 infants in an age range of 3–7 days, born after 32–35 completed weeks of gestation, body weight, body volume, fat-free mass density (predicted by the Pea Pod software), and total body water (isotope dilution) were assessed. Reference estimates of fat-free mass density and body composition were obtained using a three-component model; (3) Results: Fat-free mass density values, predicted using Pea Pod, were biased but not significantly (p > 0.05) different from reference estimates. Body fat (%), assessed using Pea Pod, was not significantly different from reference estimates. The biological variability of fat-free mass density was 0.55% of the average value (1.0627 g/mL); (4) Conclusion: The results indicate that the Pea Pod system is accurate for groups of newborn, moderately premature infants. However, more studies where this system is used for premature infants are needed, and we provide suggestions regarding how to develop this area. PMID:27110820

  14. Green bean biofortification for Si through soilless cultivation: plant response and Si bioaccessibility in pods.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Francesco Fabiano; D'Imperio, Massimiliano; Parente, Angelo; Cardinali, Angela; Renna, Massimiliano; Serio, Francesco

    2016-08-17

    Food plants biofortification for micronutrients is a tool for the nutritional value improvement of food. Soilless cultivation systems, with the optimal control of plant nutrition, represent a potential effective technique to increase the beneficial element content in plant tissues. Silicon (Si), which proper intake is recently recommended for its beneficial effects on bone health, presents good absorption in intestinal tract from green bean, a high-value vegetable crop. In this study we aimed to obtain Si biofortified green bean pods by using a Si-enriched nutrient solution in soilless system conditions, and to assess the influence of boiling and steaming cooking methods on Si content, color parameters and Si bioaccessibility (by using an in vitro digestion process) of pods. The Si concentration of pods was almost tripled as a result of the biofortification process, while the overall crop performance was not negatively influenced. The Si content of biofortified pods was higher than unbiofortified also after cooking, despite the cooking method used. Silicon bioaccessibility in cooked pods was more than tripled as a result of biofortification, while the process did not affect the visual quality of the product. Our results demonstrated that soilless cultivation can be successfully used for green bean Si biofortification.

  15. Green bean biofortification for Si through soilless cultivation: plant response and Si bioaccessibility in pods.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Francesco Fabiano; D'Imperio, Massimiliano; Parente, Angelo; Cardinali, Angela; Renna, Massimiliano; Serio, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Food plants biofortification for micronutrients is a tool for the nutritional value improvement of food. Soilless cultivation systems, with the optimal control of plant nutrition, represent a potential effective technique to increase the beneficial element content in plant tissues. Silicon (Si), which proper intake is recently recommended for its beneficial effects on bone health, presents good absorption in intestinal tract from green bean, a high-value vegetable crop. In this study we aimed to obtain Si biofortified green bean pods by using a Si-enriched nutrient solution in soilless system conditions, and to assess the influence of boiling and steaming cooking methods on Si content, color parameters and Si bioaccessibility (by using an in vitro digestion process) of pods. The Si concentration of pods was almost tripled as a result of the biofortification process, while the overall crop performance was not negatively influenced. The Si content of biofortified pods was higher than unbiofortified also after cooking, despite the cooking method used. Silicon bioaccessibility in cooked pods was more than tripled as a result of biofortification, while the process did not affect the visual quality of the product. Our results demonstrated that soilless cultivation can be successfully used for green bean Si biofortification. PMID:27530434

  16. Krylov-subspace recycling via the POD-augmented conjugate-gradient method

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Forstall, Virginia; Tuminaro, Raymond S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new Krylov-subspace-recycling method for efficiently solving sequences of linear systems of equations characterized by varying right-hand sides and symmetric-positive-definite matrices. As opposed to typical truncation strategies used in recycling such as deflation, we propose a truncation method inspired by goal-oriented proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) from model reduction. This idea is based on the observation that model reduction aims to compute a low-dimensional subspace that contains an accurate solution; as such, we expect the proposed method to generate a low-dimensional subspace that is well suited for computing solutions that can satisfy inexact tolerances. In particular, we propose specific goal-oriented POD `ingredients' that align the optimality properties of POD with the objective of Krylov-subspace recycling. To compute solutions in the resulting 'augmented' POD subspace, we propose a hybrid direct/iterative three-stage method that leverages 1) the optimal ordering of POD basis vectors, and 2) well-conditioned reduced matrices. Numerical experiments performed on solid-mechanics problems highlight the benefits of the proposed method over existing approaches for Krylov-subspace recycling.

  17. Krylov-subspace recycling via the POD-augmented conjugate-gradient method

    DOE PAGES

    Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Forstall, Virginia; Tuminaro, Raymond S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new Krylov-subspace-recycling method for efficiently solving sequences of linear systems of equations characterized by varying right-hand sides and symmetric-positive-definite matrices. As opposed to typical truncation strategies used in recycling such as deflation, we propose a truncation method inspired by goal-oriented proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) from model reduction. This idea is based on the observation that model reduction aims to compute a low-dimensional subspace that contains an accurate solution; as such, we expect the proposed method to generate a low-dimensional subspace that is well suited for computing solutions that can satisfy inexact tolerances. In particular, we proposemore » specific goal-oriented POD `ingredients' that align the optimality properties of POD with the objective of Krylov-subspace recycling. To compute solutions in the resulting 'augmented' POD subspace, we propose a hybrid direct/iterative three-stage method that leverages 1) the optimal ordering of POD basis vectors, and 2) well-conditioned reduced matrices. Numerical experiments performed on solid-mechanics problems highlight the benefits of the proposed method over existing approaches for Krylov-subspace recycling.« less

  18. Process design and economic analysis of a hypothetical bioethanol production plant using carob pod as feedstock.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Segado, S; Lozano, L J; de Los Ríos, A P; Hernández-Fernández, F J; Godínez, C; Juan, D

    2012-01-01

    A process for the production of ethanol from carob (Ceratonia siliqua) pods was designed and an economic analysis was carried out for a hypothetical plant. The plant was assumed to perform an aqueous extraction of sugars from the pods followed by fermentation and distillation to produce ethanol. The total fixed capital investment for a base case process with a capacity to transform 68,000 t/year carob pod was calculated as 39.61 millon euros (€) with a minimum bioethanol production cost of 0.51 €/L and an internal rate of return of 7%. The plant was found to be profitable at carob pod prices lower than 0.188 €/kg. An increase in the transformation capacity of the plant from 33,880 to 135,450 t/year was calculated to result in an increase in the internal rate of return from 5.50% to 13.61%. The obtained results show that carob pod is a promising alternative source for bioethanol production.

  19. Green bean biofortification for Si through soilless cultivation: plant response and Si bioaccessibility in pods

    PubMed Central

    Montesano, Francesco Fabiano; D’Imperio, Massimiliano; Parente, Angelo; Cardinali, Angela; Renna, Massimiliano; Serio, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Food plants biofortification for micronutrients is a tool for the nutritional value improvement of food. Soilless cultivation systems, with the optimal control of plant nutrition, represent a potential effective technique to increase the beneficial element content in plant tissues. Silicon (Si), which proper intake is recently recommended for its beneficial effects on bone health, presents good absorption in intestinal tract from green bean, a high-value vegetable crop. In this study we aimed to obtain Si biofortified green bean pods by using a Si-enriched nutrient solution in soilless system conditions, and to assess the influence of boiling and steaming cooking methods on Si content, color parameters and Si bioaccessibility (by using an in vitro digestion process) of pods. The Si concentration of pods was almost tripled as a result of the biofortification process, while the overall crop performance was not negatively influenced. The Si content of biofortified pods was higher than unbiofortified also after cooking, despite the cooking method used. Silicon bioaccessibility in cooked pods was more than tripled as a result of biofortification, while the process did not affect the visual quality of the product. Our results demonstrated that soilless cultivation can be successfully used for green bean Si biofortification. PMID:27530434

  20. Large aperture scanning airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Bindschadler, R.; Boers, R.; Bufton, J. L.; Clem, D.; Garvin, J.; Melfi, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    A large aperture scanning airborne lidar facility is being developed to provide important new capabilities for airborne lidar sensor systems. The proposed scanning mechanism allows for a large aperture telescope (25 in. diameter) in front of an elliptical flat (25 x 36 in.) turning mirror positioned at a 45 degree angle with respect to the telescope optical axis. The lidar scanning capability will provide opportunities for acquiring new data sets for atmospheric, earth resources, and oceans communities. This completed facility will also make available the opportunity to acquire simulated EOS lidar data on a near global basis. The design and construction of this unique scanning mechanism presents exciting technological challenges of maintaining the turning mirror optical flatness during scanning while exposed to extreme temperatures, ambient pressures, aircraft vibrations, etc.

  1. Magnetic airborne survey - geophysical flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros Camara, Erick; Nei Pereira Guimarães, Suze

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a technical review process in the area of airborne acquisition of geophysical data, with emphasis for magnetometry. In summary, it addresses the calibration processes of geophysical equipment as well as the aircraft to minimize possible errors in measurements. The corrections used in data processing and filtering are demonstrated with the same results as well as the evolution of these techniques in Brazil and worldwide.

  2. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  3. NASA Student Airborne Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, E. L.; Shetter, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) is a unique summer internship program for advanced undergraduates and early graduate students majoring in the STEM disciplines. SARP participants acquire hands-on research experience in all aspects of an airborne research campaign, including flying onboard an major NASA resource used for studying Earth system processes. In summer 2012, thirty-two participants worked in four interdisciplinary teams to study surface, atmospheric, and oceanographic processes. Participants assisted in the operation of instruments onboard the NASA P-3B aircraft where they sampled and measured atmospheric gases and imaged land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Along with airborne data collection, students participated in taking measurements at field sites. Mission faculty and research mentors helped to guide participants through instrument operation, sample analysis, and data reduction. Over the eight-week program, each student developed an individual research project from the data collected and delivered a conference-style final presentation on his/her results. We will discuss the results and effectiveness of the program from the first four summers and discuss plans for the future.

  4. Significant chemical burns associated with dermal exposure to laundry pod detergent.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jason L; Wiles, Devin A; Kenney, Brian; Spiller, Henry A

    2014-09-01

    Concentrated laundry pods have been reported to cause significant clinical effects including oropharyngeal burns and respiratory distress requiring intubation. Dermal burns have been reported, but no incidents of serious isolated dermal injury have been published. We report a case of significant, isolated dermal injury as a result of dermal exposure to a concentrated laundry detergent pod. Total body surface area partial thickness burns in this case were estimated at approximately 2 % with an additional 4-5 % of total body surface area (TBSA) displaying superficial burns/chemical dermatitis. Health-care providers should be aware of this complication and should perform thorough dermal decontamination in the event of an exposure. Parents should be educated regarding the dangers associated with dermal exposure to laundry pod compounds and the need to secure these items away from children as well as proper decontamination techniques should an exposure occur.

  5. [Effect of 1-MCP on senescence and quality in cold-stored edible podded pea].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Zheng, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Lan; Feng, Lei; Su, Xin-Guo; Jiang, Yue-Ming

    2004-04-01

    The effects of 1-MCP (1-methylcyclo-propene) at 0.5, 1 and 2 muL/L on senescence and quality attributes in edible podded pea (Pisum sativum L.var.Saccharatum) during cold storage at 1 degrees C were investigated. The results indicated that treatments with 1 and 2 microL/L 1-MCP significantly inhibited respiratory rate, ethylene production and superoxide production, maintained higher levels of SOD, AsA-POD activities and chlorophyll and AsA contents, reduced the increases in MDA and fiber contents and decay index, thereby delayed the senescence process and quality deterioration. Treatment with 0.5 microL/L 1-MCP showed no significant effects on senescence and quality changes in harvested edible podded pea.

  6. POD-Galerkin reduced-order modeling with adaptive finite element snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Sebastian; Rotkvic, Marko; Lang, Jens

    2016-11-01

    We consider model order reduction by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for parametrized partial differential equations, where the underlying snapshots are computed with adaptive finite elements. We address computational and theoretical issues arising from the fact that the snapshots are members of different finite element spaces. We propose a method to create a POD-Galerkin model without interpolating the snapshots onto their common finite element mesh. The error of the reduced-order solution is not necessarily Galerkin orthogonal to the reduced space created from space-adapted snapshot. We analyze how this influences the error assessment for POD-Galerkin models of linear elliptic boundary value problems. As a numerical example we consider a two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation with a parametrized convective direction. To illustrate the applicability of our techniques to non-linear time-dependent problems, we present a test case of a two-dimensional viscous Burgers equation with parametrized initial data.

  7. Continuous 30-day measurements utilizing the monkey metabolism pod. [study of weightlessness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Grunbaum, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    A fiberglass system was previously described, using which quantitative physiological measurements could be made to study the effects of weightlessness on 10 to 14 kg adult monkeys maintained in comfortable restraint under space flight conditions. Recent improvements in the system have made it possible to obtain continuous measurements of respiratory gas exchange, cardiovascular function, and mineral balance for periods of up to 30 days on pig-tailed monkeys. It has also been possible to operate two pods which share one set of instrumentation, thereby permitting simultaneous measurements to be made on two animals by commutating signal outputs from the pods. In principle, more than two pods could be operated in this fashion. The system is compatible with Spacelab design. Representative physiological data from ground tests of the system are presented.

  8. Structure analysis of turbulent liquid phase by POD and LSE techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Munir, S. Muthuvalu, M. S.; Siddiqui, M. I.; Heikal, M. R. Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2014-10-24

    In this paper, vortical structures and turbulence characteristics of liquid phase in both single liquid phase and two-phase slug flow in pipes were studied. Two dimensional velocity vector fields of liquid phase were obtained by Particle image velocimetry (PIV). Two cases were considered one single phase liquid flow at 80 l/m and second slug flow by introducing gas at 60 l/m while keeping liquid flow rate same. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and Linear stochastic estimation techniques were used for the extraction of coherent structures and analysis of turbulence in liquid phase for both cases. POD has successfully revealed large energy containing structures. The time dependent POD spatial mode coefficients oscillate with high frequency for high mode numbers. The energy distribution of spatial modes was also achieved. LSE has pointed out the coherent structured for both cases and the reconstructed velocity fields are in well agreement with the instantaneous velocity fields.

  9. Microbiological and aflatoxin evaluation of Brazil nut pods and the effects of unit processing operations.

    PubMed

    Arrus, Katia; Blank, Greg; Clear, Randall; Holley, Richard A; Abramson, David

    2005-05-01

    Harvesting of Brazil nuts not only helps to preserve the Amazon rainforest but also provides income to individuals who would otherwise have little means of making a livelihood. Recently, the European Community has tightened the quality requirements for Brazil nuts, particularly with regard to aflatoxin levels and microbiological contamination. The objectives of this research were to gain a better understanding of the origin of aflatoxins on Brazil nuts and to microbiologically evaluate some of the operations involved in processing. In this regard, five Brazil nut pods were aseptically picked from trees located in each of three concessions of the Peruvian Amazon rainforest (Madre de Dios province). The exteriors of the pods and the nuts were examined for yeast and molds, including Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, and for bacteria, including Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Brazil nuts obtained from various commercial process operations located in Peru were similarly evaluated. Exteriors of all Brazil nut pods did not contain A. parasiticus, and only pods from one concession yielded A. flavus isolates. All isolates tested were aflatoxigenic (630 to 915 ppb total aflatoxin). Coliforms, E. coli, and salmonellae were not recovered from any of the pods. Whole, in-shell nuts obtained after opening the pods yielded no A. flavus or A. parasiticus. Aflatoxins were not detected (detection limit 1.75 ppb) in any of the nuts. Whole, in-shell and shelled nuts from various process operations were all positive for A. flavus but negative for E. coli and salmonellae. Soaking of whole, in-shell nuts before cracking or shelling increased coliform numbers, whereas levels of A. flavus decreased. In order to gain a better understanding of the sanitary performance of the unit process operations, additional evaluations should be conducted on product lots processed on different days. Also, the microbiology of product processed from common lots should be followed through the

  10. GammaPod-A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao Xinyu; Deng Jianchun; Duan Zhengcheng; Zhang Jin; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Regine, William

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%-95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously.

  11. A novel method using adaptive hidden semi-Markov model for multi-sensor monitoring equipment health prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinming; Dong, Ming; Lv, Wenyuan; Geng, Xiuli; Li, Yupeng

    2015-12-01

    Health prognosis for equipment is considered as a key process of the condition-based maintenance strategy. This paper presents an integrated framework for multi-sensor equipment diagnosis and prognosis based on adaptive hidden semi-Markov model (AHSMM). Unlike hidden semi-Markov model (HSMM), the basic algorithms in an AHSMM are first modified in order for decreasing computation and space complexity. Then, the maximum likelihood linear regression transformations method is used to train the output and duration distributions to re-estimate all unknown parameters. The AHSMM is used to identify the hidden degradation state and obtain the transition probabilities among health states and durations. Finally, through the proposed hazard rate equations, one can predict the useful remaining life of equipment with multi-sensor information. Our main results are verified in real world applications: monitoring hydraulic pumps from Caterpillar Inc. The results show that the proposed methods are more effective for multi-sensor monitoring equipment health prognosis.

  12. Flower numbers, pod production, pollen viability, and pistil function are reduced and flower and pod abortion increased in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) under terminal drought.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiangwen; Turner, Neil C; Yan, Guijun; Li, Fengmin; Siddique, Kadambot H M

    2010-01-01

    Terminal drought during the reproductive stage is a major constraint to yield of chickpea in many regions of the world. Termination of watering (WS) during podding in a small-seeded desi chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) cultivar, Rupali, and a large-seeded kabuli chickpea cultivar, Almaz, induced a decrease in predawn leaf water potential (LWP), in the rate of photosynthesis, and in stomatal conductance. Compared to well-watered (WW) controls, the WS treatment reduced flower production by about two-thirds. In the WW treatment, about 15% of the flowers aborted and 42% (Rupali) and 67% (Almaz) of the pods aborted, whereas in the WS treatment 37% and 56% of the flowers aborted and 54% and 73% of the pods aborted, resulting in seed yields of 33% and 15% of the yields in WW plants in Rupali and Almaz, respectively. In vitro pollen viability and germination in Rupali decreased by 50% and 89% in the WS treatment, and pollen germination decreased by 80% in vivo when pollen from a WS plant was placed on a stigma of a WW plant. While about 37% of the germinated pollen tubes from WW plants and 22% from the WS plants reached the ovary in the WW plants, less than 3% of pollen grains reached the ovary when pollen from either WS or WW plants was placed on a stigma of a WS plant. It is concluded that, in addition to pod abortion, flower abortion is an important factor limiting yield in chickpea exposed to terminal drought and that water deficit impaired the function of the pistil/style more than the pollen.

  13. POD/MAC-Based Modal Basis Selection for a Reduced Order Nonlinear Response Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Przekop, Adam

    2007-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to explore the applicability of a POD/MAC basis selection technique to a nonlinear structural response analysis. For the case studied the application of the POD/MAC technique resulted in a substantial improvement of the reduced order simulation when compared to a classic approach utilizing only low frequency modes present in the excitation bandwidth. Further studies are aimed to expand application of the presented technique to more complex structures including non-planar and two-dimensional configurations. For non-planar structures the separation of different displacement components may not be necessary or desirable.

  14. Open-Source Conceptual Sizing Models for the Hyperloop Passenger Pod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Jeffrey C.; Gray, Justin S.; Jones, Scott M.; Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperloop is a new mode of transportation proposed as an alternative to California's high speed rail project, with the intended benefits of higher performance at lower overall costs. It consists of a passenger pod traveling through a tube under a light vacuum and suspended on air bearings. The pod travels up to transonic speeds resulting in a 35 minute travel time between the intended route from Los Angeles and San Francisco. Of the two variants outlined, the smaller system includes a 1.1 meter tall passenger capsule traveling through a 2.2 meter tube at 700 miles per hour. The passenger pod features water-based heat exchangers as well as an on-board compression system that reduces the aerodynamic drag as it moves through the tube. Although the original proposal looks very promising, it assumes that tube and pod dimensions are independently sizable without fully acknowledging the constraints of the compressor system on the pod geometry. This work focuses on the aerodynamic and thermodynamic interactions between the two largest systems; the tube and the pod. Using open-source toolsets, a new sizing method is developed based on one-dimensional thermodynamic relationships that accounts for the strong interactions between these sub-systems. These additional considerations require a tube nearly twice the size originally considered and limit the maximum pod travel speed to about 620 miles per hour. Although the results indicate that Hyperloop will need to be larger and slightly slower than originally intended, the estimated travel time only increases by approximately five minutes, so the overall performance is not dramatically affected. In addition, the proposed on-board heat exchanger is not an ideal solution to achieve reasonable equilibrium air temperatures within the tube. Removal of this subsystem represents a potential reduction in weight, energy requirements and complexity of the pod. In light of these finding, the core concept still remains a compelling

  15. IcePod: Imaging Ice-Ocean Process from Top to Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. E.; Frearson, N.; Zappa, C. J.; Tinto, K. J.; Das, I.; Dhakal, T.; Bertinato, C.; Dong, L.; Brown, S.; Le Bel, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Resolving the future of the ice in the polar regions requires understanding of the changing ice from top to bottom from the center of the ice sheets to the margin where ice interacts with the polar oceans. The IcePod is an imaging system developed to study the ice sheets and polar oceans in a comprehensive fashion from an LC-130. The system has been developed for initial deployment on the New York National Guard's ski-equipped LC-130s. The IcePod can resolve high resolution surface elevation with a scanning laser and visual cameras, the temperature of the surface with an infrared camera, the thickness and layering of the shallow snow and ice with a high frequency radar and the thickness of the ice sheet with an ice penetrating radar. The IcePod can be moved between aircraft in less than four hours and can be operated on aircraft on routine cargo missions to skiways. Here we present IcePod ice-ocean imaging from the top to the bottom of several major outlet glaciers in western Greenland. The data, acquired in July 2014, demonstrates the broad capabilities of the IcePod instrumentation suite. The IcePod resolved the structure of the ice sheet from the accumulation zone to the calving front of Eqip Glacier and 4 adjacent outlet glacier systems. High resolution mapping of the calving front and the upwelling meltwater plumes provides new insights into the structure and dynamics of the turbulent mixing at the ice-ocean interface. Mapping of the ice sheet margin provides insights into the connections between the surface meltwater and the fate of the subglacial water at the ice sheet base. The Greenland data includes airport passes in every flight for calibration of both the lidar and camera systems. An expanded IcePod instrumentation suite will include a gravity meter and a magnetometer. The gravity meter can be used to determine the bathymetry beneath ice shelves. Together the gravimeter and the magnetometer can be used to constrain the regional tectonic frameworks. In

  16. Observability considerations for multi-sensor and product fusion: Bias, information content, and validation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Hyer, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Christopher, S. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Stackhouse, P. W.

    2009-12-01

    With the successful development of many aerosol products from the NASA A-train as well as new operational geostationary and polar orbiting sensors, the scientific community now has a host of new parameters to use in their analyses. The variety and quality of products has reached a point where the community has moved from basic observation-based science to sophisticated multi-component research that addresses the complex atmospheric environment. In order for these satellite data contribute to the science their uncertainty levels must move from semi-quantitative to quantitative. Initial attempts to quantify uncertainties have led to some recent debate in the community as to the efficacy of aerosol products from current and future NASA satellite sensors. In an effort to understand the state of satellite product fidelity, the Naval Research Laboratory and a newly reformed Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) aerosol panel have both initiated assessments of the nature of aerosol remote sensing uncertainty and bias. In this talk we go over areas of specific concern based on the authors’ experiences with the data, emphasizing the multi-sensor problem. We first enumerate potential biases, including retrieval, sampling/contextual, and cognitive bias. We show examples of how these biases can subsequently lead to the pitfalls of correlated/compensating errors, tautology, and confounding. The nature of bias is closely related to the information content of the sensor signal and its subsequent application to the derived aerosol quantity of interest (e.g., optical depth, flux, index of refraction, etc.). Consequently, purpose-specific validation methods must be employed, especially when generating multi-sensor products. Indeed, cloud and lower boundary condition biases in particular complicate the more typical methods of regressional bias elimination and histogram matching. We close with a discussion of sequestration of uncertainty in multi-sensor applications of

  17. Accuracy of a Novel Noninvasive Multisensor Technology to Estimate Glucose in Diabetic Subjects During Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Sandra I.; Chomentowski, Peter J.; Vyas, Nisarg; Andre, David

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an approach of multisensor technology with integrated data analysis in an armband system (SenseWear® Pro Armband, SWA) can provide estimates of plasma glucose concentration in diabetes. In all, 41 subjects with diabetes participated. On day 1 subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and on day 2 a 60-minute treadmill test (TT). SWA plasma glucose estimates were compared against reference peripheral venous glucose concentrations. A continuous glucose monitoring device (CGM) was also placed on each subject to serve as a reference for clinical comparison. Pearson coefficient, Clarke error grid (CEG), and mean absolute relative difference (MARD) analyses were used to compare the performance of plasma glucose estimation. There were significant correlations between plasma glucose concentrations estimated by the SWA and the reference plasma glucose concentration during the OGTT (r = .65, P < .05) and the TT (r = .91, P < .05). CEG analysis revealed that during the OGTT, 93% of plasma glucose concentration readings were in the clinically acceptable zone A+B for the SWA and 95% for the CGM. During the TT, the SWA had 96% of readings in zone A+B, compared to 97% for the CGM. During OGTTs, MARDs for the SWA and CGM were 26% and 18%, respectively. During TTs, MARDs were 16% and 12%, respectively. Plasma glucose concentration estimation by the SWA’s noninvasive multisensor approach appears to be feasible and its performance in estimating glucose approaches that of a CGM. The success of this pilot study suggests that multisensor technology holds promising potential for the development of a wearable, noninvasive, painless glucose monitor. PMID:24876538

  18. Emergent, Self-Directed, and Self-Organized Learning: Literacy, Numeracy, and the iPod Touch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricci, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses narrative and storying to retell how two girls ages 5 and 7 continue to make use of an iPod touch to expand their literacy and numeracy. The paper explores the stopwatch and alarm features within the clock application, as well as the weather application, and the Internet browsing capability of the iPod touch. It also explores some…

  19. Ecology of the cocoa pod borer, Conopomorpha cramerella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae), a major pest for the cocoa industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conopomorpha cramerella, the cocoa pod borer (CPB), has been known to damage cocoa pods for more than 100 years, but information on the ecology of this species is scant in the scientific literature. That which does exist is scattered in obscure local journals, not readily accessible, and often unve...

  20. Decontamination of mesquite pod flour, naturally contaminated with Bacillus cereus and formation of furan by ionizing irradiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mesquite pod flour produced from nitrogen-fixing trees of Prosopis species has a unique aroma and flavor which is preferred by some consumers. Due to the presence of wildlife, grazing domestic animals and insects, the pods have a high potential of being contaminated with human pathogenic bacteria su...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. 25.1182 Section 25.1182 Aeronautics and..., and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. (a) Each nacelle area... fluid lines, must meet each requirement of §§ 25.1103(b), 25.1165 (d) and (e), 25.1183, 25.1185(c),...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. 25.1182 Section 25.1182 Aeronautics and..., and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. (a) Each nacelle area... fluid lines, must meet each requirement of §§ 25.1103(b), 25.1165 (d) and (e), 25.1183, 25.1185(c),...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. 25.1182 Section 25.1182 Aeronautics and..., and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. (a) Each nacelle area... fluid lines, must meet each requirement of §§ 25.1103(b), 25.1165 (d) and (e), 25.1183, 25.1185(c),...

  4. POD Nanoparticles Expressing GDNF Provide Structural and Functional Rescue of Light-induced Retinal Degeneration in an Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Read, Sarah P; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Peptide for ocular delivery (POD) is a novel cationic cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) which, when conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-POD), can deliver plasmid DNA to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of adult murine retina. PEG-POD nanoparticles containing an expression cassette for glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (PEG–POD~GDNF) were investigated for their ability to inhibit light-induced photoreceptor apoptosis. PEG-POD~GDNF, control nanoparticles, or buffer were injected into the subretinal space of adult murine retina and retinal degeneration induced by blue light. Animals injected with PEG-POD~GDNF showed a significant reduction (3.9–7.7 fold) in apoptosis relative to control-injected animals. The thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of the superior retina of PEG-POD~GDNF-injected eyes was significantly greater (23.6–39.3%) than control-injected retina 14 days post-light treatment. PEG-POD~GDNF-injected eyes showed a 27–39% greater functional response relative to controls, as measured by electroretinogram (ERG) 7 days post-light treatment. This is one of only two studies demonstrating histological and functional rescue of a mouse model of retinal degeneration following nonviral administration of a transgene into adult retina. Although rescue is short lived for clinical application, this study represents an important step in the development of nonviral gene therapy for retinal diseases. PMID:20700110

  5. Development of a multi-sensor elevation time series pole-ward of 86°S in support of altimetry validation and ice sheet mass balance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studinger, M.; Brunt, K. M.; Casey, K.; Medley, B.; Neumann, T.; Manizade, S.; Linkswiler, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In order to produce a cross-calibrated long-term record of ice-surface elevation change for input into ice sheet models and mass balance studies it is necessary to "link the measurements made by airborne laser altimeters, satellite measurements of ICESat, ICESat-2, and CryoSat-2" [IceBridge Level 1 Science Requirements, 2012] and determine the biases and the spatial variations between radar altimeters and laser altimeters using different wavelengths. The convergence zones of all ICESat tracks (86°S) and all ICESat-2 and CryoSat-2 tracks (88°S) are in regions of relatively low accumulation, making them ideal for satellite altimetry calibration. In preparation for ICESat-2 validation, the IceBridge and ICESat-2 science teams have designed IceBridge data acquisitions around 86°S and 88°S. Several aspects need to be considered when comparing and combining elevation measurements from different radar and laser altimeters, including: a) foot print size and spatial sampling pattern; b) accuracy and precision of each data sets; c) varying signal penetration into the snow; and d) changes in geodetic reference frames over time, such as the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). The presentation will focus on the analysis of several IceBridge flights around 86 and 88°S with the LVIS and ATM airborne laser altimeters and will evaluate the accuracy and precision of these data sets. To properly interpret the observed elevation change (dh/dt) as mass change, however, the various processes that control surface elevation fluctuations must be quantified and therefore future work will quantify the spatial variability in snow accumulation rates pole-ward of 86°S and in particular around 88°S. Our goal is to develop a cross-validated multi-sensor time series of surface elevation change pole-ward of 86°S that, in combination with measured accumulation rates, will support ICESat-2 calibration and validation and ice sheet mass balance studies.

  6. Comparing metabolic energy expenditure estimation using wearable multi-sensor network and single accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Montoye, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Karin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation details, system architecture and performance of a wearable sensor network that was designed for human activity recognition and energy expenditure estimation. We also included ActiGraph GT3X+ as a popular single sensor solution for detailed comparison with the proposed wearable sensor network. Linear regression and Artificial Neural Network are implemented and tested. Through a rigorous system study and experiment, it is shown that the wearable multi-sensor network outperforms the single sensor solution in terms of energy expenditure estimation.

  7. Application of adaptive optics in complicated and integrated spatial multisensor system and its measurement analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Quanxin; Guo, Chunjie; Cai, Meng; Liu, Hua

    2007-12-01

    Adaptive Optics Expand System is a kind of new concept spatial equipment, which concerns system, cybernetics and informatics deeply, and is key way to improve advanced sensors ability. Traditional Zernike Phase Contrast Method is developed, and Accelerated High-level Phase Contrast Theory is established. Integration theory and mathematical simulation is achieved. Such Equipment, which is based on some crucial components, such as, core optical system, multi mode wavefront sensor and so on, is established for AOES advantageous configuration and global design. Studies on Complicated Spatial Multisensor System Integratation and measurement Analysis including error analysis are carried out.

  8. Optimum Sensors Integration for Multi-Sensor Multi-Target Environment for Ballistic Missile Defense Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob; Glover, Charles Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Multi-sensor networks may face resource limitations in a dynamically evolving multiple target tracking scenario. It is necessary to task the sensors efficiently so that the overall system performance is maximized within the system constraints. The central sensor resource manager may control the sensors to meet objective functions that are formulated to meet system goals such as minimization of track loss, maximization of probability of target detection, and minimization of track error. This paper discusses the variety of techniques that may be utilized to optimize sensor performance for either near term gain or future reward over a longer time horizon.

  9. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues. PMID:22163518

  10. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

  11. Airborne wavemeter validation and calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, Joseph H., Jr.; Rinsland, Pamela L.; Kist, Edward H., Jr.; Geier, Erika B.; Banziger, Curtis G.

    1992-01-01

    This manuscript outlines a continuing effort to validate and verify the performance of an airborne autonomous wavemeter for tuning solid state lasers to a desired wavelength. The application is measuring the vertical profiles of atmospheric water vapor using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. Improved wavemeter performance data for varying ambient temperatures are presented. This resulted when the electronic grounding and shielding were improved. The results with short pulse duration lasers are also included. These lasers show that similar performance could be obtained with lasers operating in the continuous and the pulsed domains.

  12. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  13. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  14. Cyberinfrastructure for Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004 the NASA Airborne Science Program has been prototyping and using infrastructure that enables researchers to interact with each other and with their instruments via network communications. This infrastructure uses satellite links and an evolving suite of applications and services that leverage open-source software. The use of these tools has increased near-real-time situational awareness during field operations, resulting in productivity improvements and the collection of better data. This paper describes the high-level system architecture and major components, with example highlights from the use of the infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of ongoing efforts to transition to operational status.

  15. Requirements for airborne vector gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Colombo, O.; Hein, G.; Knickmeyer, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

  16. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  17. Toolsets for Airborne Data - URS and New Documentation

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-03-23

    ... airborne field missions, documentation, and EOSDIS User Registration System (URS) authentication. This web application features an intuitive user interface for variable selection across different airborne field studies and ...

  18. Pod development and depodding produce parallel effects on xylem sap cytokinin levels and monocarpic leaf senescence in soybean

    SciTech Connect

    Nooden, L.D. ); Singh, S.; Letham, D.S. )

    1989-04-01

    Depodding at full pod extension (prepodfill) prevents the rapid leaf yellowing and death of the soybean plant, whereas pod removal in late podfill does not. Xylem sap was collected from rootstocks under pressure over 50 min, and after purification, the sap CKS were measured by radioimmunoassay. The major CKs (DZR, ZR, DZ and Z) drop from 229 nM to 15 during pod extension. Removal of pods reaching full extension causes a large increase in DZR and ZR levels, less increase in Z and no increase in DZ, DZMP or the O-glucosides. Depodding at the late podfill does not increase the CKs significantly. CKs change independently in response to senescence and pod removal suggesting differences in their metabolism and perhaps their functions. A decline in CK production by the roots and in CK flux into the shoot system appears to be an important factor in monocarpic senescence of soybean.

  19. Measuring Geophysical Parameters of the Greenland Ice Sheet using Airborne Radar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, Ellen J.; Swift. Calvin T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents radar-altimeter scattering models for each of the diagenetic zones of the Greenland ice sheet. AAFE radar- altimeter waveforms obtained during the 1991 and 1993 NASA multi-sensor airborne altimetry experiments over Greenland reveal that the Ku-band return pulse changes significantly with the different diagenetic zones. These changes are due to varying amounts of surface and volume scattering in the return waveform. In the ablation and soaked zones, where surface scattering dominates the AAFE return, geophysical parameters such as rms surface height and rms surface slope are obtained by fitting the waveforms to a surface-scattering model. Waveforms from the percolation zone show that the sub-surface ice features have a much more significant effect on the return pulse than the surrounding snowpack. Model percolation waveforms, created using a combined surface- and volume-scattering model and an ice-feature distribution obtained during the 1993 field season, agree well with actual AAFE waveforms taken in the same time period. Using a combined surface- and volume-scattering model for the dry-snow-zone return waveforms, the rms surface height and slope and the attenuation coefficient of the snowpack are obtained. These scattering models not only allow geophysical parameters of the ice sheet to be measured but also help in the understanding of satellite radar-altimeter data.

  20. Rigorous Strip Adjustment of Airborne Laserscanning Data Based on the Icp Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glira, P.; Pfeifer, N.; Briese, C.; Ressl, C.

    2015-08-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is an efficient method for the acquisition of dense and accurate point clouds over extended areas. To ensure a gapless coverage of the area, point clouds are collected strip wise with a considerable overlap. The redundant information contained in these overlap areas can be used, together with ground-truth data, to re-calibrate the ALS system and to compensate for systematic measurement errors. This process, usually denoted as strip adjustment, leads to an improved georeferencing of the ALS strips, or in other words, to a higher data quality of the acquired point clouds. We present a fully automatic strip adjustment method that (a) uses the original scanner and trajectory measurements, (b) performs an on-the-job calibration of the entire ALS multisensor system, and (c) corrects the trajectory errors individually for each strip. Like in the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, correspondences are established iteratively and directly between points of overlapping ALS strips (avoiding a time-consuming segmentation and/or interpolation of the point clouds). The suitability of the method for large amounts of data is demonstrated on the basis of an ALS block consisting of 103 strips.

  1. Meeting Review: Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Huebert, Barry; Wilson, Chuck

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings from the Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop are presented. The two central topics of discussion were the role of aerosols in atmospheric processes and the difficulties in characterizing aerosols. The following topics were discussed during the working sessions: airborne observations to date; identification of inlet design issues; inlet modeling needs and directions; objectives for aircraft experiments; and future laboratory and wind tunnel studies.

  2. Airborne Relay-Based Regional Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuman; Noh, Hongjun; Lim, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based pseudolite systems have some limitations, such as low vertical accuracy, multipath effects and near-far problems. These problems are not significant in airborne-based pseudolite systems. However, the monitoring of pseudolite positions is required because of the mobility of the platforms on which the pseudolites are mounted, and this causes performance degradation. To address these pseudolite system limitations, we propose an airborne relay-based regional positioning system that consists of a master station, reference stations, airborne relays and a user. In the proposed system, navigation signals are generated from the reference stations located on the ground and are relayed via the airborne relays. Unlike in conventional airborne-based systems, the user in the proposed system sequentially estimates both the locations of airborne relays and his/her own position. Therefore, a delay due to monitoring does not occur, and the accuracy is not affected by the movement of airborne relays. We conducted several simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. Based on the simulation results, we demonstrated that the proposed system guarantees a higher accuracy than airborne-based pseudolite systems, and it is feasible despite the existence of clock offsets among reference stations. PMID:26029953

  3. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  4. Global Test Range: Toward Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Freudinger, Larry; DelFrate John H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planned global sensor network that will monitor the Earth's climate, and resources using airborne sensor systems. The vision is an intelligent, affordable Earth Observation System. Global Test Range is a lab developing trustworthy services for airborne instruments - a specialized Internet Service Provider. There is discussion of several current and planned missions.

  5. A Simple Method for Collecting Airborne Pollen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Peter G.; DiGiovanni, Franco; Ho, Rong H.; Taki, Hisatomo; Ferguson, Kristyn A.; Pawlowski, Agata K.

    2006-01-01

    Pollination is a broad area of study within biology. For many plants, pollen carried by wind is required for successful seed set. Airborne pollen also affects human health. To foster studies of airborne pollen, we introduce a simple device--the "megastigma"--for collecting pollen from the air. This device is flexible, yielding easily obtained data…

  6. The Continuous wavelet in airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Liu, L.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne gravimetry is an efficient method to recover medium and high frequency band of earth gravity over any region, especially inaccessible areas, which can measure gravity data with high accuracy,high resolution and broad range in a rapidly and economical way, and It will play an important role for geoid and geophysical exploration. Filtering methods for reducing high-frequency errors is critical to the success of airborne gravimetry due to Aircraft acceleration determination based on GPS.Tradiontal filters used in airborne gravimetry are FIR,IIR filer and so on. This study recommends an improved continuous wavelet to process airborne gravity data. Here we focus on how to construct the continuous wavelet filters and show their working principle. Particularly the technical parameters (window width parameter and scale parameter) of the filters are tested. Then the raw airborne gravity data from the first Chinese airborne gravimetry campaign are filtered using FIR-low pass filter and continuous wavelet filters to remove the noise. The comparison to reference data is performed to determinate external accuracy, which shows that continuous wavelet filters applied to airborne gravity in this thesis have good performances. The advantages of the continuous wavelet filters over digital filters are also introduced. The effectiveness of the continuous wavelet filters for airborne gravimetry is demonstrated through real data computation.

  7. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  8. Mitochondrial genome sequence and expression profiling for the legume pod borer Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the assembly of the 14,146 base pairs (bp) near complete mitochondrial sequencing of the legume pod borer (LPB), Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), which was used to estimate divergence and relationships within the lepidopteran lineage. Arrangement and orientation of 13 protein c...

  9. Exploring Students' Intuitive Ideas of Randomness Using an iPod Shuffle Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Laura; Garfield, Joan

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an activity that engages students in considering characteristics of a random sequence, in this case, a randomly generated playlist of songs using the iPod shuffle feature. Students examine simulated sequences of randomly generated songs from a small music library in order to identify characteristics that are used to develop…

  10. Integrating the iPod Touch in K-12 Education: Visions and Vices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banister, Savilla

    2010-01-01

    Advocates of ubiquitous computing have long been documenting classroom benefits of one-to-one ratios of students to handheld or laptop computers. The recent sophisticated capabilities of the iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad have encouraged further speculation on exactly how K-12 teaching and learning might be energized by such devices. This paper…

  11. Carob pod water extracts as feedstock for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Margarida; Roca, Christophe; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-10-01

    Carob pods are a by-product of locust bean gum industry containing more than 50% (w/w) sucrose, glucose and fructose. In this work, carob pod water extracts were used, for the first time, for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z. Kinetic studies of glucose, fructose and sucrose consumption as individual carbon sources till 30g/L showed no inhibition on cell growth, sugar consumption and SA production rates. Sugar extraction from carob pods was optimized varying solid/liquid ratio and extraction time, maximizing sugar recovery while minimizing the extraction of polyphenols. Batch fermentations containing 10-15g/L total sugars resulted in a maximum specific SA production rate of 0.61Cmol/Cmol X.h, with a yield of 0.55Cmol SA/Cmol sugar and a volumetric productivity of 1.61g SA/L.h. Results demonstrate that carob pods can be a promising low cost feedstock for bio-based SA production.

  12. Dietary carob pods on growth performance and meat quality of fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Kotrotsios, Nikolaos; Christaki, Efterpi; Bonos, Eleftherios; Florou-Paneri, Panagiota

    2012-06-01

    In this experiment the effect of dietary carob pods in the growth performance of fattening pigs and their meat quality, including steak chemical composition and fatty acid profile, were examined. A total of 160 weaning piglets, 30 days old, were allocated into four equal groups with 4 subgroups of 5 female and 5 males each. The animals were fed with isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets, containing either 0 or 75 or 100 or 125 g of carob pods per kg of feed. At the end of the experiment, on the 180 day of age, carcass subcutaneous fat thickness, steak chemical composition and steak fatty acid profile were determined. The results of the experiment showed that the dietary addition of 75 or 100 g/kg carob pods increased body weight at slaughter and carcass weight. No significant effect was noticed on the other examined carcass parameters. Consequently, carob pods could be suggested as a potential feed for fattening pigs without any adverse effect on their meat quality.

  13. Lewis and Clark in Action: Using Video iPods in Eighth Grade Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennex, Lesia

    2008-01-01

    The use of video iPods in middle schools was explored through research in two social studies classrooms. This study measured achievement differences in Spring 2007 between two groups of eighth-grade social studies classrooms. Groups were chosen for similarity between numbers of IEP's and/or 504 classifications, and relative class size. Both groups…

  14. Library iTour: Introducing the iPod Generation to the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, Virginia; Dean, Toni C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For many years, the Lupton Library offered a traditional library introduction class to first year students participating in the Freshman Seminar Program at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. In 2007, the library applied for and received a campus grant to purchase thirty iPod Touches, along with accompanying hardware and software.…

  15. First report of frosty pod rot caused by Moniliophthora roreri on cacao in Bolivia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frosty pod rot (FPR) is a devastating cacao disease caused by the basidiomycete Moniliophthora roreri (Aime and Phillips-Mora, 2005). The disease is confined to 13 countries in Central and South America and constitutes a permanent threat for cacao cultivation worldwide. In July 2012, FPR was detect...

  16. Functional vegetable guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. Taub.) accessions for improving flavonoid concentrations in immature pods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. Taub) seed are primarily used to extract galactomannan gum for oil fracking, however the immature pods are used as a vegetable in India and sold in ethnic grocery stores in the Atlanta, GA area. Twenty-two guar genotypes were grown in the field at Griffin, GA, US...

  17. Effects of Picture Prompts Delivered by a Video iPod on Pedestrian Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Kelly R.; Test, David W.; Cooke, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Transportation access is a major contributor to independence, productivity, and societal inclusion for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities (IDD). This study examined the effects of pedestrian navigation training using picture prompts displayed through a video iPod on travel route completion with 4 adults and IDD. Results…

  18. Effect of Curing Time on Moisture Content and Mechanical Properties of Peanut Pods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to study the damage mechanisms of peanut pods and kernels during picking up and picking, and determine the optimal harvest time by two-stage, peanut samples were taken from the western of Liaoning Province, and the peanut plants just being dug out were put in the field curing for 7~8 days, ...

  19. Phytophthora megakarya, a causal agent of black pod rot in Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most parts of the world where Theobroma cacao is grown, Phytophthora palmivora is the major concern for causing black pod rot (BPR). Phytophthora megakarya, on the other hand, occurs only in Africa, but represents a major threat to cacao production, the countries of West Africa being the largest ...

  20. Iron encapsulated within pod-like carbon nanotubes for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dehui; Yu, Liang; Chen, Xiaoqi; Wang, Guoxiong; Jin, Li; Pan, Xiulian; Deng, Jiao; Sun, Gongquan; Bao, Xinhe

    2013-01-01

    Chainmail for catalysts: a catalyst with iron nanoparticles confined inside pea-pod-like carbon nanotubes exhibits a high activity and remarkable stability as a cathode catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), even in presence of SO(2). The approach offers a new route to electro- and heterogeneous catalysts for harsh conditions.

  1. PodCastle: A Spoken Document Retrieval System Improved by User Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Masataka; Ogata, Jun; Eto, Kouichirou

    In this paper, we describe a public web service, ``PodCastle'', that provides full-text searching of speech data (Japanese podcasts) on the basis of automatic speech recognition technologies. This is an instance of our research approach, ``Speech Recognition Research 2.0'', which is aimed at providing users with a web service based on Web 2.0 so that they can experience state-of-the-art speech recognition performance, and at promoting speech recognition technologies in cooperation with anonymous users. PodCastle enables users to find podcasts that include a search term, read full texts of their recognition results, and easily correct recognition errors by simply selecting from a list of candidates. Even if a state-of-the-art speech recognizer is used to recognize podcasts on the web, a number of errors will naturally occur. PodCastle therefore encourages users to cooperate by correcting these errors so that those podcasts can be searched more reliably. Furthermore, using the resulting corrections to train the speech recognizer, it implements a mechanism whereby the speech recognition performance is gradually improved. Our experience with this web service showed that user contributions we collected actually improved the performance of PodCastle.

  2. Expression divergence of FRUITFULL homeologs enhanced pod shatter resistance in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Peng, P F; Li, Y C; Mei, D S; Colasanti, J; Fu, L; Liu, J; Chen, Y F; Hu, Q

    2015-02-02

    To improve pod shatter resistance in the important oilseed crop Brassica napus, the phenotypic diversity of B. napus was tested using 80 B. napus varieties for pod shatter resistance by a random impact test. Among these varieties, R1-1 was identified as resistant, while R2, 8908B was susceptible to shatter. To understand the molecular basis for this phenotypic difference based on the candidate gene approach, B. napus FRUITFULL (FUL) homologs were identified and characterized. Two FUL loci in the A and C genomes of B. napus were identified. In the susceptible variety, both BnaA.FUL and BnaC.FUL were expressed in the same tissues. However, the expression level of BnaC.FUL differed in varieties with different pod shatter resistance. In the most resistant variety, R1-1, only BnaA.FUL was expressed, while BnaC.FUL was silenced. Therefore, the functional divergence and differing expression of BnaX.FUL homeologs may significantly affect phenotypic variation, which is an important consequence of allopolyploid evolution. This expression level divergence may be useful for selecting pod shatter resistant lines through marker-assisted selection in B. napus-breeding programs.

  3. A comparison of rearing Creontiades signatus distant on green bean pods or pea plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory procedure for mass rearing Creontiades signatus Distant, a relatively new plant bug pest of south Texas cotton, was compared using green bean pods versus whole cowpea plants to determine which would provide for the easiest most efficient method for producing the insect in culture. The n...

  4. The Effectiveness of Using a Video iPod as a Prompting Device in Employment Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Laarhoven, Toni; Johnson, Jesse W.; Van Laarhoven-Myers, Traci; Grider, Kristin L.; Grider, Katie M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a video iPod as a prompting device for teaching three job-related tasks to a young man with developmental disabilities in a community-based employment setting. The effectiveness of the prompting device was evaluated using a multiple probe across behaviors design. Results…

  5. Expression divergence of FRUITFULL homeologs enhanced pod shatter resistance in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Peng, P F; Li, Y C; Mei, D S; Colasanti, J; Fu, L; Liu, J; Chen, Y F; Hu, Q

    2015-01-01

    To improve pod shatter resistance in the important oilseed crop Brassica napus, the phenotypic diversity of B. napus was tested using 80 B. napus varieties for pod shatter resistance by a random impact test. Among these varieties, R1-1 was identified as resistant, while R2, 8908B was susceptible to shatter. To understand the molecular basis for this phenotypic difference based on the candidate gene approach, B. napus FRUITFULL (FUL) homologs were identified and characterized. Two FUL loci in the A and C genomes of B. napus were identified. In the susceptible variety, both BnaA.FUL and BnaC.FUL were expressed in the same tissues. However, the expression level of BnaC.FUL differed in varieties with different pod shatter resistance. In the most resistant variety, R1-1, only BnaA.FUL was expressed, while BnaC.FUL was silenced. Therefore, the functional divergence and differing expression of BnaX.FUL homeologs may significantly affect phenotypic variation, which is an important consequence of allopolyploid evolution. This expression level divergence may be useful for selecting pod shatter resistant lines through marker-assisted selection in B. napus-breeding programs. PMID:25730026

  6. Third Graders' Understanding of Air Concepts Facilitated by the iPod Inquiry Teaching Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ching-san

    2016-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to determine the learning performance of the air concept unit for third graders in a primary school facilitated by the iPod inquiry teaching method. This study adopts a quasi-experimental method. Participants were third graders in a primary school in New Taipei city. The experimental group consisted of 53…

  7. Beyond Survival: Educational Development and the Maturing of the POD Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortquist-Ahrens, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Scholarship about the growth of educational development has charted major shifts in developers' focuses and roles through time and, especially in recent years, has explored the professionalization of the field around the globe. This essay uses a lifecycle analogy to consider the development of one organization, the POD Network (The Professional…

  8. Effectiveness of Video Modeling to Teach "iPod" Use to Students with Moderate Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Diana L.; Whatley, Abigail D.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Gast, David L.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of video modeling delivered via computer on accurate and independent use of an iPod by three participants with moderate intellectual disabilities. In the context of combined multiple probes across participants and replicated across tasks, three female middle school students learned to…

  9. Invitro Antibacterial Activity of the Prosopis Juliflora Seed Pods on Some Common Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tajbakhsh, Saeed; Barmak, Alireza; Vakhshiteh, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prosopis juliflora is probably the most widespread species of genus Prosopis and it is a good source of compounds that have been shown to be pharmacologically active. This plant has been used as a traditional treatment for several diseases. Aim To investigate the in-vitro antibacterial activity of the P. juliflora seed pods from Bushehr, South West of Iran. Materials and Methods In the present study, the antibacterial activity of P. juliflora seed pods extract was tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extract was determined for each test microorganism. Results P. juliflora seed pods extract exhibited antibacterial activity against all four test organisms. The MIC of the extract was 0.312 mg/ml and 0.078 mg/ml for S. aureus and S. epidermidis, respectively and 1.25 mg/ml for both E.coli and P.aeruginosa. Conclusion P. juliflora seed pods from Bushehr, South West of Iran could be an appropriate source of antibacterial compounds that makes it a promising candidate for further studies. PMID:26435943

  10. Microsatellite Diversity of Soybean Genotypes Differing in Bean Pod Mottle Virus Leaf Symptom

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr, is the most important source of vegetable oil and protein meal in the world. Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) is a threat to soybean yield and productivity in most soybean growing states of the USA. In the absence of complete resistance to BPMV, partial resistance of so...

  11. Carob pod water extracts as feedstock for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Margarida; Roca, Christophe; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-10-01

    Carob pods are a by-product of locust bean gum industry containing more than 50% (w/w) sucrose, glucose and fructose. In this work, carob pod water extracts were used, for the first time, for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z. Kinetic studies of glucose, fructose and sucrose consumption as individual carbon sources till 30g/L showed no inhibition on cell growth, sugar consumption and SA production rates. Sugar extraction from carob pods was optimized varying solid/liquid ratio and extraction time, maximizing sugar recovery while minimizing the extraction of polyphenols. Batch fermentations containing 10-15g/L total sugars resulted in a maximum specific SA production rate of 0.61Cmol/Cmol X.h, with a yield of 0.55Cmol SA/Cmol sugar and a volumetric productivity of 1.61g SA/L.h. Results demonstrate that carob pods can be a promising low cost feedstock for bio-based SA production. PMID:25164341

  12. Reliability analysis of laser ultrasonics for train axle diagnostics based on model assisted POD curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, M. S.; Cavuto, A.; Martarelli, M.; Pandarese, G.; Revel, G. M.

    2014-05-01

    High speed train axles are integrated for a lifetime and it is time and resource consuming to conduct in service inspection with high accuracy. Laser ultrasonics is a proposed solution as a subset of non-contact measuring methods effective also for hard to reach areas and even recently proved to be effective using Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) or air-coupled probes in reception. A reliability analysis of laser ultrasonics for this specific application is here performed. The research is mainly based on numerical study of the effect of high energy laser pulses on the surface of a steel axle and of the behavior of the ultrasonic waves in detecting possible defects. Probability of Detection (POD) concept is used as an estimated reliability of the inspection method. In particular Model Assisted Probability of Detection (MAPOD), a modified form of POD where models are used to infer results for making a decisive statistical approach of POD curve, is here adopted. This paper implements this approach by taking the inputs from limited experiments conducted on a high speed train axle using laser ultrasonics (source pulsed Nd:Yag, reception by high-frequency LDV) to calibrate a multiphysics FE model and by using the calibrated model to generate data samples statistically representative of damaged train axles. The simulated flaws are in accordance with the real defects present on the axle. A set of flaws of different depth has been modeled in order to assess the laser ultrasonics POD for this specific application.

  13. Top of the Pods--In Search of a Podcasting "Podagogy" for Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosell-Aguilar, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The popularization of portable media players such as the "iPod," and the delivery of audio and video content through content management software such as "iTunes" mean that there is a wealth of language learning resources freely available to users who may download them and use them anywhere at any time. These resources vary greatly in quality and…

  14. Tracing the Evolution of Educational Development through the POD Network's Institute for New Faculty Developers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Educational development is a unique professional field in that it is not defined by content taught in a single degree that qualifies individuals to be in it. The resulting heterogeneity in newcomers' knowledge and skills is addressed in different ways by different national networks. Since 1997, the POD Network has held a biennial Institute for New…

  15. Analysis of Pendulum Period with an iPod Touch/iPhone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggle, Justin

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of Apple's iPod touch/iPhone, acting as the pendulum bob, as a means of measuring pendulum period, making use of the device's three-axis digital accelerometer and the freely available SPARKvue app from PASCO scientific. The method can be readily incorporated into an introductory physics laboratory experiment.…

  16. Stability analysis of the POD reduced order method for solving the bidomain model in cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Cesare; Lassoued, Jamila; Mahjoub, Moncef; Zemzemi, Néjib

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we show the numerical stability of the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) reduced order method used in cardiac electrophysiology applications. The difficulty of proving the stability comes from the fact that we are interested in the bidomain model, which is a system of degenerate parabolic equations coupled to a system of ODEs representing the cell membrane electrical activity. The proof of the stability of this method is based on a priori estimates controlling the gap between the reduced order solution and the Galerkin finite element one. We present some numerical simulations confirming the theoretical results. We also combine the POD method with a time splitting scheme allowing a faster solving of the bidomain problem and show numerical results. Finally, we conduct numerical simulation in 2D illustrating the stability of the POD method in its sensitivity to the ionic model parameters. We also perform 3D simulation using a massively parallel code. We show the computational gain using the POD reduced order model. We also show that this method has a better scalability than the full finite element method. PMID:26723278

  17. Use of Physics-Based Models in the Determination of POD for 3D Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. Bruce

    2005-04-01

    Motivated by the desire to reduce the time and costs and to improve the accuracy of POD studies, there is an increasing interest in incorporating information from physics-based models of flaw response. This paper will concentrate on the case of internal defects. As compared to surface-breaking fatigue cracks, internal defects, generally inclusions or voids, have a 3-dimensional shape and are hard to simulate in simple fabricated reference samples. Hence, empirical studies pose many problems. This paper will summarize experiences in the development of Model-Assisted POD predictions. After an introduction to some of the fundamental issues, an approach of Model-Assisted POD determination will be introduced, supported by experience obtained in applications to the ultrasonic inspection of aircraft engine components and welds in pipelines. Attention will be paid to the interplay of information provided by the physics-based models and empirical measurements. Of particular importance for internal defects are the effects of flaw morphology and orientation, information that can significantly affect signal strength. Examples will be given regarding how models can be used to understand and quantify these effects. A distinction is noted between the POD that would be obtained in survey and characterization modes, and the importance of models in interpreting multiple pieces of information in the latter case is emphasized.

  18. POD-1/Tcf21 overexpression reduces endogenous SF-1 and StAR expression in rat adrenal cells

    PubMed Central

    França, M. M.; Abreu, N. P.; Vrechi, T. A. M.; Lotfi, C. F.

    2015-01-01

    During gonad and adrenal development, the POD-1/capsulin/TCF21transcription factor negatively regulates SF-1/NR5A1expression, with higher SF-1 levels being associated with increased adrenal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In adrenocortical tumor cells, POD-1 binds to the SF-1 E-box promoter region, decreasing SF-1 expression. However, the modulation of SF-1 expression by POD-1 has not previously been described in normal adrenal cells. Here, we analyzed the basal expression of Pod-1 and Sf-1 in primary cultures of glomerulosa (G) and fasciculata/reticularis (F/R) cells isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats, and investigated whether POD-1 overexpression modulates the expression of endogenous Sf-1 and its target genes in these cells. POD-1 overexpression, following the transfection of pCMVMycPod-1, significantly decreased the endogenous levels of Sf-1 mRNA and protein in F/R cells, but not in G cells, and also decreased the expression of the SF-1 target StAR in F/R cells. In G cells overexpressing POD-1, no modulation of the expression of SF-1 targets, StAR and CYP11B2, was observed. Our data showing that G and F/R cells respond differently to ectopic POD-1 expression emphasize the functional differences between the outer and inner zones of the adrenal cortex, and support the hypothesis that SF-1 is regulated by POD-1/Tcf21 in normal adrenocortical cells lacking the alterations in cellular physiology found in tumor cells. PMID:26421867

  19. Aerosol Remote Sensing Applications for Airborne Multiangle, Multispectral Shortwave Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bismarck, Jonas; Ruhtz, Thomas; Starace, Marco; Hollstein, André; Preusker, René; Fischer, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol particles have an important impact on the surface net radiation budget by direct scattering and absorption (direct aerosol effect) of solar radiation, and also by influencing cloud formation processes (semi-direct and indirect aerosol effects). To study the former, a number of multispectral sky- and sunphotometers have been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Free University of Berlin in the past two decades. The latest operational developments were the multispectral aureole- and sunphotometer FUBISS-ASA2, the zenith radiometer FUBISS-ZENITH, and the nadir polarimeter AMSSP-EM, all designed for a flexible use on moving platforms like aircraft or ships. Currently the multiangle, multispectral radiometer URMS/AMSSP (Universal Radiation Measurement System/ Airborne Multispectral Sunphotometer and Polarimeter) is under construction for a Wing-Pod of the high altitude research aircraft HALO operated by DLR. The system is expected to have its first mission on HALO in 2011. The algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol and trace gas properties from the recorded multidirectional, multispectral radiation measurements allow more than deriving standard products, as for instance the aerosol optical depth and the Angstrom exponent. The radiation measured in the solar aureole contains information about the aerosol phasefunction and therefore allows conclusions about the particle type. Furthermore, airborne instrument operation allows vertically resolved measurements. An inversion algorithm, based on radiative transfer simulations and additionally including measured vertical zenith-radiance profiles, allows conclusions about the aerosol single scattering albedo and the relative soot fraction in aerosol layers. Ozone column retrieval is performed evaluating measurements from pixels in the Chappuis absorption band. A retrieval algorithm to derive the water-vapor column from the sunphotometer measurements is currently under development. Of the various airborne

  20. Icepod: A modular approach to the development of an airborne remote sensing and data acquisition platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frearson, N.; Bell, R. E.; Tinto, K. J.; Zappa, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    The New York Air National Guard [NYANG] provides regular airborne support to the National Science Foundation [NSF] moving science parties and their equipment onto and around the ice-sheets in both polar regions during the respective summer seasons. Icepod has been developed to utilize this readily available resource, providing the aircraft with a modular external pod attached to the rear-paratrooper door on either side of the NYANG's ski-equipped LC-130s. The pod is divided into five separate bays each approximately a 2ft cube within which can be mounted an array of remote sensors. Power, heating, sensor control and data management services are provided to each bay. An Ethernet network is used to transfer commands and data packets between the individual sensors and data acquisition system located inside the aircraft. Data for each sensor is stored on ruggedized and removable hard-drives that can be taken off the aircraft at the end of a flight for further analysis. In its current configuration the pod is equipped for the remote sensing of ice sheets and their margins and the bay's contain two radar systems, radar antennas, a vibration isolated optics bay including a scanning laser, Infra-red camera and high-definition visible wave camera. Sensor data is geo-referenced using GNSS and orientation sensors located inside the pod. A Pyrometer provides the downward looking IR Camera with the current sky temperature. In January 2013, the Icepod system was flight certified at the Stratton air base in Schenectady, New York. The system deployed to Greenland in April and July 2013 to test the instrumentation suite over ice and its ease of deployment with the NYANG. Icepod can be operated in two modes, a traditional dedicated science flight mode and a piggy-back mode. In piggy-back mode science parties and their cargo are delivered to their destinations with Icepod installed but stowed. Once they have been delivered the Icepod is deployed and measurements can be taken on the

  1. Proximate, mineral, and antinutrient compositions of indigenous Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) pod accessions: implications for mineral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Gemede, Habtamu Fekadu; Haki, Gulelat Desse; Beyene, Fekadu; Woldegiorgis, Ashagrie Z; Rakshit, Sudip Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The promotion and consumption of indigenous vegetables could help to mitigate food insecurity and alleviate malnutrition in developing countries. Nutrient and antinutrient compositions of eight accessions of Okra Pods were investigated. Molar ratios and mineral bioavailability of Okra pod accessions were also calculated and compared to the critical values to predict the implications for mineral bioavailability. Proximate and mineral composition of Okra pod accessions were determined using standard methods of Association of Official Analytical Chemists. The result of the study revealed that the proximate composition (g/100 g) in dry weight basis was significantly (P < 0.05) varied and ranged: moisture/dry matter 9.69-13.33, crude protein 10.25-26.16, crude fat 0.56-2.49, crude fiber 11.97-29.93, crude ash 5.37-11.30, utilizable carbohydrate 36.66-50.97, and gross energy 197.26-245.55 kcal/100 g. The mineral concentrations (mg/100 g) were also significantly (P < 0.05) varied and ranged: calcium (111.11-311.95), Iron (18.30-36.68), potassium (122.59-318.20), zinc (3.83-6.31), phosphorus (25.62-59.72), and sodium (3.33-8.31) on dry weight bases. The Okra Pods of "OPA#6" accession contained significantly higher amounts of crude protein, total ash, crude fat, calcium, iron, and zinc than all other accessions evaluated in this study. The results of antinutrients analysis showed that, except phytate, tannin, and oxalate contents of all the accessions were significantly (P < 0.05) varied. The range of phytate, tannin, and oxalate contents (mg/100 g) for Okra pod accessions studied were as follows: 0.83-0.87, 4.93-9.90, and 0.04-0.53, respectively. The calculated molar ratios of phytate: calcium, phytate: iron, phytate: zinc, oxalate: calcium and [Phytate][Calcium]/[Zinc] were below the critical value and this indicate that the bioavailability of calcium, iron, and zinc in these accessions could be high. The results of the study revealed that Okra pod contain

  2. Proximate, mineral, and antinutrient compositions of indigenous Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) pod accessions: implications for mineral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Gemede, Habtamu Fekadu; Haki, Gulelat Desse; Beyene, Fekadu; Woldegiorgis, Ashagrie Z; Rakshit, Sudip Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The promotion and consumption of indigenous vegetables could help to mitigate food insecurity and alleviate malnutrition in developing countries. Nutrient and antinutrient compositions of eight accessions of Okra Pods were investigated. Molar ratios and mineral bioavailability of Okra pod accessions were also calculated and compared to the critical values to predict the implications for mineral bioavailability. Proximate and mineral composition of Okra pod accessions were determined using standard methods of Association of Official Analytical Chemists. The result of the study revealed that the proximate composition (g/100 g) in dry weight basis was significantly (P < 0.05) varied and ranged: moisture/dry matter 9.69-13.33, crude protein 10.25-26.16, crude fat 0.56-2.49, crude fiber 11.97-29.93, crude ash 5.37-11.30, utilizable carbohydrate 36.66-50.97, and gross energy 197.26-245.55 kcal/100 g. The mineral concentrations (mg/100 g) were also significantly (P < 0.05) varied and ranged: calcium (111.11-311.95), Iron (18.30-36.68), potassium (122.59-318.20), zinc (3.83-6.31), phosphorus (25.62-59.72), and sodium (3.33-8.31) on dry weight bases. The Okra Pods of "OPA#6" accession contained significantly higher amounts of crude protein, total ash, crude fat, calcium, iron, and zinc than all other accessions evaluated in this study. The results of antinutrients analysis showed that, except phytate, tannin, and oxalate contents of all the accessions were significantly (P < 0.05) varied. The range of phytate, tannin, and oxalate contents (mg/100 g) for Okra pod accessions studied were as follows: 0.83-0.87, 4.93-9.90, and 0.04-0.53, respectively. The calculated molar ratios of phytate: calcium, phytate: iron, phytate: zinc, oxalate: calcium and [Phytate][Calcium]/[Zinc] were below the critical value and this indicate that the bioavailability of calcium, iron, and zinc in these accessions could be high. The results of the study revealed that Okra pod contain

  3. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  4. Airborne cw Doppler lidar (ADOLAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Stefan; Werner, Christian; Nagel, E.; Herrmann, H.; Klier, M.; Knott, H. P.; Haering, R.; Wildgruber, J.

    1994-12-01

    During the last 10 years the DLR container LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometer) was used for many wind related measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. The experience out of this were used to construct an airborne Doppler lidar ADOLAR. Based on the available Doppler lidars it is now proposed to perform a campaign to demonstrate the concept of the spaceborne sensor ALADIN, and to answer some questions concerning the signal quality from clouds, water and land. For the continuous wave CO2 laser, the energy is focused by the telescope into the region of investigation. Some of the radiation is back scattered by small aerosol particles drifting with the wind speed through the sensing volume. The back scattered radiation is collected by the telescope and detected by coherent technique. With the laser Doppler method one gets the radial wind component. To determine the magnitude and direction of the horizontal wind, some form of scanning in azimuth and elevation is required. To keep the airborne system compact, the transceiver optics is directly coupled to a wedge scanner which provides the conical scan with the axis in Nadir direction from the aircraft. The system ADOLAR was tested in 1994. Results of the flight over the lake Ammersee are presented and are compared with the data of the inertial reference system of the aircraft.

  5. Airborne thermography applications in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Eduardo H.; Selles, Eduardo J.; Costanzo, Marcelo; Franco, Oscar; Diaz, Jose

    2002-03-01

    Forest fires in summer and sheep buried under the snow in winter have become important problems in the south of our country, in the region named Patagonia. We are studying to find a solution by means of an airborne imaging system whose construction we have just finished. It is a 12 channel multispectral airborne scanner system that can be mounted in a Guarani airplane or in a Learjet; the first is a non- pressurized aircraft for flight at low height and the second is a pressurized one for higher flights. The scanner system is briefly described. Their sensors can detect radiation from the ultra violet to the thermal infrared. The images are visualized in real time in a monitor screen and can be stored in the hard disc of the PC for later processing. The use of this scanner for some applications that include the prevention and fighting of forest fires and the study of the possibility of detection of sheep under snow in the Patagonia is now being accomplished. Theoretical and experimental results in fire detection and a theoretical model for studying the possibility of detection of the buried sheep are presented.

  6. Reliability of BOD POD Measurements Remains High After a Short-Duration Low-Carbohydrate Diet.

    PubMed

    Greer, Beau Kjerulf; Edsall, Kathleen M; Greer, Anna E

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine whether expected changes in body weight via a 3-day low-carbohydrate (LC) diet will disrupt the reliability of air displacement plethysmography measurements via BOD POD. Twenty-four subjects recorded their typical diets for 3 days before BOD POD and 7-site skinfold analyses. Subjects were matched for lean body mass and divided into low-CHO (LC) and control (CON) groups. The LC group was given instruction intended to prevent more than 50 grams/day of carbohydrate consumption for 3 consecutive days, and the CON group replicated their previously recorded diet. Body composition measurements were repeated after dietary intervention. Test-retest reliability measures were significant (p < .01) and high for body fat percentage in both the LC and the CON groups (rs = .993 and .965, respectively). Likewise, skinfold analysis for body fat percentage reliability was high in both groups (rs = .996 and .997, respectively). There were significant differences between 1st and 2nd BOD POD measurements for body mass (72.9 ± 13.3 vs. 72.1 ± 13.0 kg [M ± SD]) and body volume (69.0 ± 12.7-68.1 ± 12.2 L) in the LC group (p < .05). However, there were no differences (p > .05) in BOD POD-determined body fat percentage, lean body mass, or fat mass between the 1st and 2nd trial in either group. Body composition measures via BOD POD and 7-site skinfolds remain reliable after 3 days of an LC diet despite significant decreases in body mass.

  7. Nonlinear model reduction of unconfined groundwater flow using POD and DEIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanko, Zachary P.; Boyce, Scott E.; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear groundwater flow models have the propensity to be overly complex leading to burdensome computational demands. Reduced modeling techniques are used to develop an approximation of the original model that has smaller dimensionality and faster run times. The reduced model proposed is a combination of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and the discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM). Solutions of the full model (snapshots) are collected to represent the physical dynamics of the system and Galerkin projection allows the formulation of a reduced model that lies in a subspace of the full model. Interpolation points are added through DEIM to eliminate the reduced model's dependence on the dimension of the full model. POD is shown to effectively reduce the dimension of the full model and DEIM is shown to speed up the solution by further reducing the dimension of the nonlinear calculations. To show the concept can work for unconfined groundwater flow model, with added nonlinear forcings, one-dimensional and two-dimensional test cases are constructed in MODFLOW-OWHM. POD and DEIM are added to MODFLOW as a modular package. Comparing the POD and the POD-DEIM reduced models, the experimental results indicate similar reduction in dimension size with additional computation speed up for the added interpolation. The hyper-reduction method presented is effective for models that have fine discretization in space and/or time as well as nonlinearities with respect to the state variable. The dual reduction approach ensures that, once constructed, the reduced model can be solved in an equation system that depends only on reduced dimensions.

  8. POD of ultrasonic detection of synthetic hard alpha inclusions in titanium aircraft engine forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R. B.; Meeker, W. Q.; Brasche, L. J. H.

    2011-06-23

    The probability of detection (POD) of inspection techniques is a key input to estimating the lives of structural components such as aircraft engines. This paper describes work conducted as a part of the development of POD curves for the ultrasonic detection of synthetic hard alpha (SHA) inclusions in titanium aircraft engine forgings. The sample upon which the POD curves are to be based contains four types of right circular SHAs that have been embedded in a representative titanium forging, as well as a number of flat bottomed holes (FBHs). The SHAs were of two sizes, number 3 and number 5, with each size including seeds with nominal nitrogen concentrations of both 3 and 17 wt. %. The FBHs included sizes of number 1, number 3, and number 5. This discreteness of the data poses a number of challenges to standard processes for determining POD. For example, at each concentration of nitrogen, there are only two sizes, with 10 inspection opportunities each. Fully empirical, standard methodologies such as a circumflex versus a provide less than an ideal framework for such an analysis. For example, there is no way to describe the beam limiting effect whereby the signal no longer increases the flaw grows larger than the beam, one can only determine POD at the two concentration levels present in the block, and confidence bounds tend to be broad because of the limited data available for each case. In this paper, we will describe strategies involving the use of physics-based models to overcome these difficulties by allowing the data from all reflectors to be analyzed by a single statistical model. Included will be a discussion of the development of the physics-based model, its comparison to the experimental data (obtained at multiple sites with multiple operators) and its implications regarding the statistical analysis, whose details will be given in a separate article by Li et al. in this volume.

  9. Analysis and reconstruction of a pulsed jet in crossflow by multi-plane snapshot POD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernet, Romain; Thomas, Lionel; David, Laurent

    2009-10-01

    In this work, snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is used to study a pulsed jet in crossflow where the velocity fields are extracted from stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) results. The studied pulsed jet is characterized by a frequency f = 1 Hz, a Reynolds number Re j = 500 (based on the mean jet velocity {overline{U}j} = 1.67 cm/s and a mean velocity ratio of R = 1). Pulsed jet and continuous jet are compared via mean velocity field trajectory and Q criterion. POD results of instantaneous, phase-averaged and fluctuating velocity fields are presented and compared in this paper. Snapshot POD applied on one plane allows us to distinguish an organization of the first spatial eigenmodes. A distinction between “natural modes” and “pulsed modes” is achieved with the results obtained by the pulsed and unforced jet. Secondly, the correlation tensor is established with four parallel planes (multi-plane snapshot POD) for the evaluation of volume spatial modes. These resulting modes are interpolated and the volume velocity field is reconstructed with a minimal number of modes for all the times of the pulsation period. These reconstructions are compared to orthogonal measurements to the transverse jet in order to validate the obtained three-dimensional velocity fields. Finally, this POD approach for the 3D flow field reconstruction from experimental data issued from planes parallel to the flow seems capable to extract relevant information from a complex three-dimensional flow and can be an alternative to tomo-PIV for large volume of measurement.

  10. RheoStim: Development of an Adaptive Multi-Sensor to Prevent Venous Stasis

    PubMed Central

    Weyer, Sören; Weishaupt, Fabio; Kleeberg, Christian; Leonhardt, Steffen; Teichmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is often underestimated and, in the absence of therapy, results in increasingly severe complications, including therapy-resistant tissue defects. Therefore, early diagnosis and adequate therapy is of particular importance. External counter pulsation (ECP) therapy is a method used to assist the venous system. The main principle of ECP is to squeeze the inner leg vessels by muscle contractions, which are evoked by functional electrical stimulation. A new adaptive trigger method is proposed, which improves and supplements the current therapeutic options by means of pulse synchronous electro-stimulation of the muscle pump. For this purpose, blood flow is determined by multi-sensor plethysmography. The hardware design and signal processing of this novel multi-sensor plethysmography device are introduced. The merged signal is used to determine the phase of the cardiac cycle, to ensure stimulation of the muscle pump during the filling phase of the heart. The pulse detection of the system is validated against a gold standard and provides a sensitivity of 98% and a false-negative rate of 2% after physical exertion. Furthermore, flow enhancement of the system has been validated by duplex ultrasonography. The results show a highly increased blood flow in the popliteal vein at the knee. PMID:27023544

  11. Cooperative multisensor system for real-time face detection and tracking in uncontrolled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesotti, Luca; Piva, Stefano; Turolla, Andrea; Minetti, Deborah; Regazzoni, Carlo S.

    2005-03-01

    The presented work describes an innovative architecture for multi-sensor distributed video surveillance applications. The aim of the system is to track moving objects in outdoor environments with a cooperative strategy exploiting two video cameras. The system also exhibits the capacity of focusing its attention on the faces of detected pedestrians collecting snapshot frames of face images, by segmenting and tracking them over time at different resolution. The system is designed to employ two video cameras in a cooperative client/server structure: the first camera monitors the entire area of interest and detects the moving objects using change detection techniques. The detected objects are tracked over time and their position is indicated on a map representing the monitored area. The objects" coordinates are sent to the server sensor in order to point its zooming optics towards the moving object. The second camera tracks the objects at high resolution. As well as the client camera, this sensor is calibrated and the position of the object detected on the image plane reference system is translated in its coordinates referred to the same area map. In the map common reference system, data fusion techniques are applied to achieve a more precise and robust estimation of the objects" track and to perform face detection and tracking. The work novelties and strength reside in the cooperative multi-sensor approach, in the high resolution long distance tracking and in the automatic collection of biometric data such as a person face clip for recognition purposes.

  12. Operational Use of and Problems Associated with Multisensor Precipitation Estimation at the Southeast River Forecast Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradberry, J. S.; Palmer, J. M.; Bushong, J.; Kim, D.

    2008-05-01

    The Southeast River Forecast Center produces manually quality-controlled hourly 4 km gridded multisensor quantitative precipitation estimates using data from the network of WSR-88D weather radars, automated hourly rain gauges, and automated hourly satellite precipitation estimates. These estimates are used as input to the operational hydrologic model; as input for hydrologic calibration activities; in the quality control of 24-hour rain gauge data; to verify quantitative precipitation forecasts; to create a variety of products for display on internal NWS computer systems and/or on external computer systems; and to create a precipitation climatology. Some of these operational uses will be described in detail. There are many problems associated with producing high-quality multisensor quantitative precipitation estimates. The raw radar estimates may contain errors due to radars that are out of calibration, clutter from ground targets, bright band contamination, and the use of an inappropriate Z-R relationship to convert reflectivity to rainfall rate. There may also be problems associated with a lack of well-distributed, high-quality hourly rain gauge reports under each WSR-88D weather radar. Examples of such problems encountered at the Southeast River Forecast Center, and how the staff attempts to compensate for them will be discussed.

  13. Infrared uncooled cameras used in multi-sensor systems for perimeter protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulski, R.; Szustakowski, M.; Kastek, M.; Ciurapiński, W.; Trzaskawka, P.; Życzkowski, M.

    2010-10-01

    The recent necessity to protect military bases, convoys and patrols gave serious impact to the development of security systems for perimeter protection. The application of multi-sensor increases functionality and performance of the whole system. Effective ranges of detection depend on the class of the sensor used and the observed scene itself. One of the most important devices used in such systems are IR cameras. Application of IR camera increases the probability of intruder detection regardless of the time of day or weather conditions. It also increases the probability of intruder detection and simultaneously decreased the false alarm rate produced by the system. The paper discusses technical possibilities and limitations to use uncooled IR camera in a multi-sensor system for perimeter protection. The role of IR cameras in the system was discussed as well as technical possibilities to detect human being. The operational distances for perimeter protection are rather high, considering parameters of commercially available thermal cameras. Comparison of exemplary IR cameras, capable to achieve desired ranges was done. The required spatial resolution for detection, recognition and identification was calculated. The simulation of detection ranges was done using NVTherm software. The results of analysis and simulations were finally presented.

  14. Medical decision-making inspired from aerospace multisensor data fusion concepts.

    PubMed

    Pombo, Nuno; Bousson, Kouamana; Araújo, Pedro; Viana, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Internet-delivered treatments have been largely used for pain monitoring, offering healthcare professionals and patients the ability to interact anywhere and at any time. Electronic diaries have been increasingly adopted as the preferred methodology to collect data related to pain intensity and symptoms, replacing traditional pen-and-paper diaries. This article presents a multisensor data fusion methodology based on the capabilities provided by aerospace systems to evaluate the effects of electronic and pen-and-paper diaries on pain. We examined English-language studies of randomized controlled trials that use computerized systems and the Internet to collect data about chronic pain complaints. These studies were obtained from three data sources: BioMed Central, PubMed Central and ScienceDirect from the year 2000 until 30 June 2012. Based on comparisons of the reported pain intensity collected during pre- and post-treatment in both the control and intervention groups, the proposed multisensor data fusion model revealed that the benefits of technology and pen-and-paper are qualitatively equivalent [Formula: see text]. We conclude that the proposed model is suitable, intelligible, easy to implement, time efficient and resource efficient.

  15. Application of multi-sensor images for detecting land cover change and analysis of urban expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jinsong; Wang, Ke; Deng, Yanhua; Li, Jun

    2005-10-01

    Zhejiang province is playing an increasingly vital role in China's overall economic growth. Concomitant with the dramatic economic development, this region has been undergoing tremendous urban growth on an unprecedented scale and rate. Many urbanization-related problems have been identified, including agricultural land and wetland loss, water pollution and soil erosion. There is an urgent need to detect and monitor the land cover change and analyze the magnitude and pattern, accurately and timely for planning and management. Remote sensing is a powerful tool for monitoring rapid change in the landscape resulting from urban development. However, change detection capabilities are intrinsically limited by the spatial resolution of the digital imagery in urban. The application of multi-sensor data provides the potential to more accurately detect land-cover changes through integration of different features of sensor data. Taking Hangzhou city as case study, this paper presents a method that combines principal component analysis (PCA) of multi-sensor data (SPOT-5 XS and ETM Pan data) and a hybrid classification involving unsupervised and supervised classier to detect and analysis land cover change. The study demonstrates that this method provides a very useful way in monitoring rapid land cover change in urban environment.

  16. RheoStim: Development of an Adaptive Multi-Sensor to Prevent Venous Stasis.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Sören; Weishaupt, Fabio; Kleeberg, Christian; Leonhardt, Steffen; Teichmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is often underestimated and, in the absence of therapy, results in increasingly severe complications, including therapy-resistant tissue defects. Therefore, early diagnosis and adequate therapy is of particular importance. External counter pulsation (ECP) therapy is a method used to assist the venous system. The main principle of ECP is to squeeze the inner leg vessels by muscle contractions, which are evoked by functional electrical stimulation. A new adaptive trigger method is proposed, which improves and supplements the current therapeutic options by means of pulse synchronous electro-stimulation of the muscle pump. For this purpose, blood flow is determined by multi-sensor plethysmography. The hardware design and signal processing of this novel multi-sensor plethysmography device are introduced. The merged signal is used to determine the phase of the cardiac cycle, to ensure stimulation of the muscle pump during the filling phase of the heart. The pulse detection of the system is validated against a gold standard and provides a sensitivity of 98% and a false-negative rate of 2% after physical exertion. Furthermore, flow enhancement of the system has been validated by duplex ultrasonography. The results show a highly increased blood flow in the popliteal vein at the knee. PMID:27023544

  17. Automatic parameter selection for feature-based multi-sensor image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelMarco, Stephen; Tom, Victor; Webb, Helen; Chao, Alan

    2006-05-01

    Accurate image registration is critical for applications such as precision targeting, geo-location, change-detection, surveillance, and remote sensing. However, the increasing volume of image data is exceeding the current capacity of human analysts to perform manual registration. This image data glut necessitates the development of automated approaches to image registration, including algorithm parameter value selection. Proper parameter value selection is crucial to the success of registration techniques. The appropriate algorithm parameters can be highly scene and sensor dependent. Therefore, robust algorithm parameter value selection approaches are a critical component of an end-to-end image registration algorithm. In previous work, we developed a general framework for multisensor image registration which includes feature-based registration approaches. In this work we examine the problem of automated parameter selection. We apply the automated parameter selection approach of Yitzhaky and Peli to select parameters for feature-based registration of multisensor image data. The approach consists of generating multiple feature-detected images by sweeping over parameter combinations and using these images to generate estimated ground truth. The feature-detected images are compared to the estimated ground truth images to generate ROC points associated with each parameter combination. We develop a strategy for selecting the optimal parameter set by choosing the parameter combination corresponding to the optimal ROC point. We present numerical results showing the effectiveness of the approach using registration of collected SAR data to reference EO data.

  18. Near real-time, on-the-move multisensor integration and computing framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, Chris; Schneider, Matt; Agarwal, Sanjeev; Deterline, Diane; Geyer, Chris; Phan, Chung D.; Lydic, Richard M.; Green, Kevin; Swett, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    Implanted mines and improvised devices are a persistent threat to Warfighters. Current Army countermine missions for route clearance need on-the-move standoff detection to improve the rate of advance. Vehicle-based forward looking sensors such as electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) devices can be used to identify potential threats in near real-time (NRT) at safe standoff distance to support route clearance missions. The MOVERS (Micro-Cloud for Operational, Vehicle-Based EO-IR Reconnaissance System) is a vehicle-based multi-sensor integration and exploitation system that ingests and processes video and imagery data captured from forward-looking EO/IR and thermal sensors, and also generates target/feature alerts, using the Video Processing and Exploitation Framework (VPEF) "plug and play" video processing toolset. The MOVERS Framework provides an extensible, flexible, and scalable computing and multi-sensor integration GOTS framework that enables the capability to add more vehicles, sensors, processors or displays, and a service architecture that provides low-latency raw video and metadata streams as well as a command and control interface. Functionality in the framework is exposed through the MOVERS SDK which decouples the implementation of the service and client from the specific communication protocols.

  19. Development of automated image co-registration techniques: Part II - multisensor imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeen, T.F.; Andrews, A.K.; Perry, E.M.; Whyatt, M.V.; Steinmaus, K.L.

    1996-10-01

    This is the second in a series of PNNL Multispectral Imagery (ST474D) reports on automated co-registration and rectification of multisensor imagery. In the first report, a semi-automated registration procedure was introduced based on methods proposed by Chen and Lee which emphasized registration of same sensor imagery. The Chen and Lee approach is outlined in Figure 1, and is described in detail in the first report. PNNL made several enhancements to the Chen and Lee approach; these modifications are outlined in Figure 2 and are also described in detail in the first report. The PNNL enhancements to the Chen and Lee approach introduced in the first phase have been named Multisensor Image Registration Automation (MIRA). These improvements increased computational efficiency and offered additional algorithms for coarse matching of disparate image types. In the MIRA approach, one set of optimum GCP locations are determined based on a Delaunay triangulation technique using an initial set of GCPs provided by the user, rather than repeating this step for each added control point as is proposed by Chen and Lee. The Chen and Lee approach uses an adjacent pixel difference algorithm for coarse matching patches of the reference image with the source image, while the MIRA approach adds other algorithms. Also the MIRA approach checks to determine if the a newly determined GCP fits the existing warping equation.

  20. Polynomial fitting-based shape matching algorithm for multi-sensors remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yujie; Ren, Kan; Wang, Pengcheng; Gu, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    According to the characteristics of multi-sensors remote sensing images, a new registration algorithm based on shape contour feature is proposed. Firstly, the edge features of remote sensing images are extracted by Canny operator, and the edge of the main contour is retained. According to the characteristics of the contour pixels, a new feature extraction algorithm based on polynomial fitting is proposed and it is used to determine the principal directions of the feature points. On this basis, we improved the shape context descriptor and completed coarse registration by minimizing the matching cost between the feature points. The shape context has been found to be robust in Simple object registration, and in this paper, it is applied to remote sensing image registration after improving the circular template with rotation invariance. Finally, the fine registration is accomplished by the RANSAC algorithm. Experiments show that this algorithm can realize the automatic registration of multi-sensors remote sensing images with high accuracy, robustness and applicability.

  1. Introducing Multisensor Satellite Radiance-Based Evaluation for Regional Earth System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, T.; Santanello, J.; Shi, J. J.; Tao, W.-K.; Wu, D.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kemp, E.; Chin, M.; Starr, D.; Sekiguchi, M.; Aires, F.

    2014-01-01

    Earth System modeling has become more complex, and its evaluation using satellite data has also become more difficult due to model and data diversity. Therefore, the fundamental methodology of using satellite direct measurements with instrumental simulators should be addressed especially for modeling community members lacking a solid background of radiative transfer and scattering theory. This manuscript introduces principles of multisatellite, multisensor radiance-based evaluation methods for a fully coupled regional Earth System model: NASA-Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model. We use a NU-WRF case study simulation over West Africa as an example of evaluating aerosol-cloud-precipitation-land processes with various satellite observations. NU-WRF-simulated geophysical parameters are converted to the satellite-observable raw radiance and backscatter under nearly consistent physics assumptions via the multisensor satellite simulator, the Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit. We present varied examples of simple yet robust methods that characterize forecast errors and model physics biases through the spatial and statistical interpretation of various satellite raw signals: infrared brightness temperature (Tb) for surface skin temperature and cloud top temperature, microwave Tb for precipitation ice and surface flooding, and radar and lidar backscatter for aerosol-cloud profiling simultaneously. Because raw satellite signals integrate many sources of geophysical information, we demonstrate user-defined thresholds and a simple statistical process to facilitate evaluations, including the infrared-microwave-based cloud types and lidar/radar-based profile classifications.

  2. Quaternion-based unscented Kalman filter for accurate indoor heading estimation using wearable multi-sensor system.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xuebing; Yu, Shuai; Zhang, Shengzhi; Wang, Guoping; Liu, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Inertial navigation based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) inertial measurement units (IMUs) has attracted numerous researchers due to its high reliability and independence. The heading estimation, as one of the most important parts of inertial navigation, has been a research focus in this field. Heading estimation using magnetometers is perturbed by magnetic disturbances, such as indoor concrete structures and electronic equipment. The MEMS gyroscope is also used for heading estimation. However, the accuracy of gyroscope is unreliable with time. In this paper, a wearable multi-sensor system has been designed to obtain the high-accuracy indoor heading estimation, according to a quaternion-based unscented Kalman filter (UKF) algorithm. The proposed multi-sensor system including one three-axis accelerometer, three single-axis gyroscopes, one three-axis magnetometer and one microprocessor minimizes the size and cost. The wearable multi-sensor system was fixed on waist of pedestrian and the quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for heading estimation experiments in our college building. The results show that the mean heading estimation errors are less 10° and 5° to multi-sensor system fixed on waist of pedestrian and the quadrotor UAV, respectively, compared to the reference path. PMID:25961384

  3. Quaternion-Based Unscented Kalman Filter for Accurate Indoor Heading Estimation Using Wearable Multi-Sensor System

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xuebing; Yu, Shuai; Zhang, Shengzhi; Wang, Guoping; Liu, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Inertial navigation based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) inertial measurement units (IMUs) has attracted numerous researchers due to its high reliability and independence. The heading estimation, as one of the most important parts of inertial navigation, has been a research focus in this field. Heading estimation using magnetometers is perturbed by magnetic disturbances, such as indoor concrete structures and electronic equipment. The MEMS gyroscope is also used for heading estimation. However, the accuracy of gyroscope is unreliable with time. In this paper, a wearable multi-sensor system has been designed to obtain the high-accuracy indoor heading estimation, according to a quaternion-based unscented Kalman filter (UKF) algorithm. The proposed multi-sensor system including one three-axis accelerometer, three single-axis gyroscopes, one three-axis magnetometer and one microprocessor minimizes the size and cost. The wearable multi-sensor system was fixed on waist of pedestrian and the quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for heading estimation experiments in our college building. The results show that the mean heading estimation errors are less 10° and 5° to multi-sensor system fixed on waist of pedestrian and the quadrotor UAV, respectively, compared to the reference path. PMID:25961384

  4. Quaternion-based unscented Kalman filter for accurate indoor heading estimation using wearable multi-sensor system.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xuebing; Yu, Shuai; Zhang, Shengzhi; Wang, Guoping; Liu, Sheng

    2015-05-07

    Inertial navigation based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) inertial measurement units (IMUs) has attracted numerous researchers due to its high reliability and independence. The heading estimation, as one of the most important parts of inertial navigation, has been a research focus in this field. Heading estimation using magnetometers is perturbed by magnetic disturbances, such as indoor concrete structures and electronic equipment. The MEMS gyroscope is also used for heading estimation. However, the accuracy of gyroscope is unreliable with time. In this paper, a wearable multi-sensor system has been designed to obtain the high-accuracy indoor heading estimation, according to a quaternion-based unscented Kalman filter (UKF) algorithm. The proposed multi-sensor system including one three-axis accelerometer, three single-axis gyroscopes, one three-axis magnetometer and one microprocessor minimizes the size and cost. The wearable multi-sensor system was fixed on waist of pedestrian and the quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for heading estimation experiments in our college building. The results show that the mean heading estimation errors are less 10° and 5° to multi-sensor system fixed on waist of pedestrian and the quadrotor UAV, respectively, compared to the reference path.

  5. The conserved polarity factor podJ1 impacts multiple cell envelope-associated functions in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alexander T; Navarrete, Charlene S; Zare, Alaa Ziad; Huang, Zhenzhong; Mostafavi, Mina; Lewis, Jainee C; Rezaeihaghighi, Yasha; Brezler, Benjamin J; Ray, Shatarupa; Rizzacasa, Anne L; Barnett, Melanie J; Long, Sharon R; Chen, Esther J; Chen, Joseph C

    2012-06-01

    Although diminutive in size, bacteria possess highly diverse and spatially confined cellular structures. Two related alphaproteobacteria, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Caulobacter crescentus, serve as models for investigating the genetic basis of morphological variations. S. meliloti, a symbiont of leguminous plants, synthesizes multiple flagella and no prosthecae, whereas C. crescentus, a freshwater bacterium, has a single polar flagellum and stalk. The podJ gene, originally identified in C. crescentus for its role in polar organelle development, is split into two adjacent open reading frames, podJ1 and podJ2, in S. meliloti. Deletion of podJ1 interferes with flagellar motility, exopolysaccharide production, cell envelope integrity, cell division and normal morphology, but not symbiosis. As in C. crescentus, the S. meliloti PodJ1 protein appears to act as a polarity beacon and localizes to the newer cell pole. Microarray analysis indicates that podJ1 affects the expression of at least 129 genes, the majority of which correspond to observed mutant phenotypes. Together, phenotypic characterization, microarray analysis and suppressor identification suggest that PodJ1 controls a core set of conserved elements, including flagellar and pili genes, the signalling proteins PleC and DivK, and the transcriptional activator TacA, while alternative downstream targets have evolved to suit the distinct lifestyles of individual species.

  6. Geology, petrography, geochemistry, and genesis of sulfide-rich pods in the Lac des Iles palladium deposits, western Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Charley J.; Barnes, Sarah-Jane; Corkery, John T.

    2016-04-01

    The Lac des Iles Pd deposits are known for their Pd-rich sulfide-poor mineralization. However, previously undocumented sulfide-rich pods also occur within the intrusion that hosts the deposits. Given the complex magmatic and hydrothermal history of the mineralization at Lac des Iles, the sulfide-rich pods could have crystallized from magmatic sulfide liquids or precipitated from hydrothermal fluids. Sulfide-rich pods occur throughout the stratigraphy, in all rock types, and along comagmatic shear zones, and contain net-textured to massive sulfides. They can be divided into four main groups based on the variation in mineral assemblages: (1) pyrrhotite-pentlandite ± pyrite-chalcopyrite-magnetite-ilmenite; (2) chalcopyrite ± pyrrhotite-pentlandite-pyrite-magnetite-ilmenite; (3) pyrite ± pentlandite-chalcopyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite-ilmenite; and (4) magnetite ± ilmenite-pyrrhotite-pentlandite-pyrite-chalcopyrite. Whole rock metal contents and S isotopic compositions do not change with the amount of pyrite present, except for slight enrichments in As and Bi. The presence of an essentially magmatic sulfide mineral assemblage (pyrrhotite-pentlandite ± chalcopyrite) with pentlandite exsolution flames in pyrrhotite in some pods suggests that the pods crystallized from magmatic sulfide liquids. The very low Cu contents of the pods suggests that they are mainly cumulates of monosulfide solid solution (MSS). We propose a model whereby sulfide liquids were concentrated into dilation zones prior to crystallizing cumulus MSS. Intermediate solid solution crystallized from the fractionated liquids at the edges of some pods leaving residual liquids enriched in Pt, Pd, Au, As, Bi, Sb, and Te. These residual liquids are no longer associated with the pods. During subsequent alteration, pyrite replaced MSS/pyrrhotite, but this did not affect the platinum-group element contents of the pods.

  7. Global deposition of airborne dioxin.

    PubMed

    Booth, Shawn; Hui, Joe; Alojado, Zoraida; Lam, Vicky; Cheung, William; Zeller, Dirk; Steyn, Douw; Pauly, Daniel

    2013-10-15

    We present a global dioxin model that simulates one year of atmospheric emissions, transport processes, and depositions to the earth's terrestrial and marine habitats. We map starting emission levels for each land area, and we also map the resulting deposits to terrestrial and marine environments. This model confirms that 'hot spots' of deposition are likely to be in northern Europe, eastern North America, and in parts of Asia with the highest marine dioxin depositions being the northeast and northwest Atlantic, western Pacific, northern Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean. It also reveals that approximately 40% of airborne dioxin emissions are deposited to marine environments and that many countries in Africa receive more dioxin than they produce, which results in these countries being disproportionately impacted. Since human exposure to dioxin is largely through diet, this work highlights food producing areas that receive higher atmospheric deposits of dioxin than others.

  8. The Sandia Airborne Computer (SANDAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Nava, E.J.

    1992-06-01

    The Sandia Airborne Computer (SANDAC) is a small, modular, high performance, multiprocessor computer originally designed for aerospace applications. It can use a combination of Motorola 68020 and 68040 based processor modules along with AT&T DSP32C based signal processing modules. The system is designed to use up to 15 processors in almost any combination and a complete system can include up to 20 modules. Depending on the mix of processors, total computational throughput can range from 2.5 to greater than 225 Million Instructions Per Second (MIPS). The system is designed so that processors can access all resources in the machine and the inter-processor communication details are completely transparent to the software. In addition to processors, the system includes input/output, memory, and special function modules. Because of its ease of use, small size, durability, and configuration flexibility, SANDAC has been used on applications ranging from missile navigation, guidance, and control systems to medical imaging systems.

  9. Modis-N airborne simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cech, Steven D.

    1992-01-01

    All required work associated with the above referenced contract has been successfully completed at this time. The Modis-N Airborne Simulator has been developed from existing AB184 Wildfire spectrometer parts as well as new detector arrays, optical components, and associated mechanical and electrical hardware. The various instrument components have been integrated into an operational system which has undergone extensive laboratory calibration and testing. The instrument has been delivered to NASA Ames where it will be installed on the NASA ER-2. The following paragraphs detail the specific tasks performed during the contract effort, the results obtained during the integration and testing of the instrument, and the conclusions which can be drawn from this effort.

  10. Airborne thermography or infrared remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Goillot, C C

    1975-01-01

    Airborne thermography is part of the more general remote sensing activity. The instruments suitable for image display are infrared line scanners. A great deal of interest has developed during the past 10 years in airborne thermal remote sensing and many applications are in progress. Infrared scanners on board a satellite are used for observation of cloud cover; airborne infrared scanners are used for forest fire detection, heat budget of soils, detecting insect attack, diseases, air pollution damage, water stress, salinity stress on vegetation, only to cite some main applications relevant to agronomy. Using this system it has become possible to get a 'picture' of our thermal environment.

  11. Relation of Topography to Airborne Gravity in Afghanistan and the Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, W.; Brozena, J. M.; Peters, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    As part of a multi-sensor, multi-disciplinary aerogeophysical survey, the US Naval Research Laboratory collected airborne gravity over most of Afghanistan in 2006 (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1089/Afghan_grv.html). The data were measured using a pair of ZLS Corporation air-sea gravimeters 7 km altitude above mean sea level aboard an NP-3D Orion aircraft operated by the US Navy's Scientific Development Squadron One (VXS-1). Aircraft positions were determined from kinematic GPS measurements in the aircraft relative to five base stations using differential interferometric techniques. Track spacing was set to 4 km over much of Afghanistan, but was increased to 8 km in the northern block of the survey area. Aircraft ground speed averaged between 300 and 380 knots, faster than ideal for high resolution gravity, but enabled approximately 113,000-km of data tracks to be flown in 220 flight hours, covering more than 330000 km2. In this presentation, we investigate the implications of the airborne gravity data for the tectonic development history of Afghanistan. Afghanistan is described as comprising three different platforms (Wheeler et al., 2005): 1) the north Afghanistan platform north of the Hari-Rud fault (HRF), a part of the Eurasian plate for 250-350 my; 2) the accreted terranes south of the HRF including low flats, formed as island arcs and fragments of continental and oceanic crust collided with the Eurasian plate during the closure of the Tethys Ocean in the past 250 my; and 3) the transpressional plate in the east, formed as the Indian plate moves northward since Cretaceous. The Bouguer anomaly map reveals elongated negative values along the east-west striking HRF, which seems to manifest different tectonic developmental histories across the boundary. Over the southern flats in the accreted terranes platform, the Bouguer anomaly map appears to show a continuation of alternating southwest-northeast trending highs and lows like those over the northern high

  12. Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, Linda L.; Howard, Richard T.; Johnston, A. S.; Carrington, Connie; Mitchell, Jennifer D.; Cryan, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success ofthe Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-Ioop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of "pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL

  13. Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, L.; Johnston, A.; Howard, R.; Mitchell, J.; Cryan, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-loop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of"pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL

  14. Recent Advances of Portable Multi-Sensor Technique of Volcanic Plume Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.

    2005-12-01

    A technique has been developed to estimate chemical composition volcanic gases based on the measurement of volcanic plumes at distance from a source vent by the use of a portable multi-sensor system consisting a humidity sensor, an SO2 electrochemical sensor and a CO2 IR analyzer (Shinohara, 2005). Since volcanic plume is a mixture of the atmosphere and volcanic gases, the volcanic gas composition can be estimated by subtracting the atmospheric background from the plume data. This technique enabled us to estimate concentration ratios of major volcanic gas species (i.e., H2O, CO2 and SO2) without any complicated chemical analyses even for gases emitted from an inaccessible open vent. Since the portable multi-sensor system was light (~ 5 kg) and small enough to carry in a medium size backpack, we could apply this technique to measure volcanic plumes at summit of various volcanoes including those which require us a tough climbing, such as Villarrica volcano, Chile. We further improved the sensor system and the measurements techniques, including application of LI-840 IR H2O and CO2 analyzer, H2S electrochemical sensor and H2 semi-conductor sensor. Application of the new LI-840 analyzer enabled us to measure H2O concentration in the plume with similar response time with CO2 concentration. The H2S electrochemical sensor of Komyo Co. has a chemical filter to removed SO2 to achieve a low sensitivity (0.1%) to SO2, and we can measure a high SO2/H2S ratio up to 1000. The semi-conductor sensor can measure H2 concentration in the range from the background level in the atmosphere (~0.5 ppm) to ~50 ppm. Response of the H2 sensor is slower (90% response time = ~90 sec) than other sensors in particular in low concentration range, and the measurement is still semi-quantitative with errors up to ±50%. The H2/H2O ratios are quite variable in volcanic gases ranging from less than 10-5 up to 10-1, and the ratio is largely controlled by temperature and pressure condition of the

  15. Large-Scale, Multi-Sensor Atmospheric Data Fusion Using Hybrid Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brian; Manipon, Gerald; Hua, Hook; Fetzer, Eric

    2014-05-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is an ambitious facility for studying global climate change. The mandate now is to combine measurements from the instruments on the "A-Train" platforms (AIRS, AMSR-E, MODIS, MISR, MLS, and CloudSat) and other Earth probes to enable large-scale studies of climate change over decades. Moving to multi-sensor, long-duration analyses of important climate variables presents serious challenges for large-scale data mining and fusion. For example, one might want to compare temperature and water vapor retrievals from one instrument (AIRS) to another (MODIS), and to a model (ECMWF), stratify the comparisons using a classification of the "cloud scenes" from CloudSat, and repeat the entire analysis over 10 years of data. To efficiently assemble such datasets, we are utilizing Elastic Computing in the Cloud and parallel map-reduce-based algorithms. However, these problems are Data Intensive computing so the data transfer times and storage costs (for caching) are key issues. SciReduce is a Hadoop-like parallel analysis system, programmed in parallel python, that is designed from the ground up for Earth science. SciReduce executes inside VMWare images and scales to any number of nodes in a hybrid Cloud (private eucalyptus & public Amazon). Unlike Hadoop, SciReduce operates on bundles of named numeric arrays, which can be passed in memory or serialized to disk in netCDF4 or HDF5. Multi-year datasets are automatically "sharded" by time and space across a cluster of nodes so that years of data (millions of files) can be processed in a massively parallel way. Input variables (arrays) are pulled on-demand into the Cloud using OPeNDAP URLs or other subsetting services, thereby minimizing the size of the cached input and intermediate datasets. We are using SciReduce to automate the production of multiple versions of a ten-year A-Train water vapor climatology under a NASA MEASURES grant. We will present the architecture of SciReduce, describe the

  16. Large-Scale, Multi-Sensor Atmospheric Data Fusion Using Hybrid Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Hua, H.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is an ambitious facility for studying global climate change. The mandate now is to combine measurements from the instruments on the "A-Train" platforms (AIRS, MODIS, MLS, and CloudSat) and other Earth probes to enable large-scale studies of climate change over decades. Moving to multi-sensor, long-duration presents serious challenges for large-scale data mining and fusion. For example, one might want to compare temperature and water vapor retrievals from one instrument (AIRS) to another (MODIS), and to a model (ECMWF), stratify the comparisons using a classification of the "cloud scenes" from CloudSat, and repeat the entire analysis over 10 years of data. HySDS is a Hybrid-Cloud Science Data System that has been developed and applied under NASA AIST, MEaSUREs, and ACCESS grants. HySDS uses the SciFlow workflow engine to partition analysis workflows into parallel tasks (e.g. segmenting by time or space) that are pushed into a durable job queue. The tasks are "pulled" from the queue by worker Virtual Machines (VM's) and executed in an on-premise Cloud (Eucalyptus or OpenStack) or at Amazon in the public Cloud or govCloud. In this way, years of data (millions of files) can be processed in a massively parallel way. Input variables (arrays) are pulled on-demand into the Cloud using OPeNDAP URLs or other subsetting services, thereby minimizing the size of the transferred data. We are using HySDS to automate the production of multiple versions of a ten-year A-Train water vapor climatology under a MEASURES grant. We will present the architecture of HySDS, describe the achieved "clock time" speedups in fusing datasets on our own nodes and in the Amazon Cloud, and discuss the Cloud cost tradeoffs for storage, compute, and data transfer. Our system demonstrates how one can pull A-Train variables (Levels 2 & 3) on-demand into the Amazon Cloud, and cache only those variables that are heavily used, so that any number of compute jobs can be

  17. Enzymatic extraction and transformation of glucovanillin to vanillin from vanilla green pods.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Terán, F; Perez-Amador, I; López-Munguia, A

    2001-11-01

    Glucovanillin was extracted from green pods and simultaneously transformed to vanillin by a combination of enzyme activities involving cell wall degradation and glucovanillin hydrolysis. The reaction is best carried out with 47.5% v/v aqueous ethanol solution during 8 h at 70 degrees C, in a two-step enzymatic reaction using Viscozyme followed by Celluclast, two commercial enzymatic products containing mainly pectinase and cellulase activities, respectively. The extractive reaction proceeded with high efficiency with an amount of extracted vanillin 3.13 times higher than the one obtained with the Soxhlet method. The classical curing/extraction process results in 1.1-1.8 g of vanillin/100 g of dry pods. It is concluded that the enzymatic reaction may substitute the microbial process involved in tissue fermentation previous to vanillin extraction with the simultaneous hydrolysis of glucovanillin.

  18. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  19. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-07

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  20. SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE PAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposures to airborne particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in several populations in the US, Japan, and Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors, developed for human exposure biomonitoring studies were used to collect fine particles (<_ 1....

  1. Columbia: The first five flights entry heating data series. Volume 2: The OMS Pod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    Entry heating flight data and wind tunnel data on the OMS Pod are presented for the first five flights of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The heating rate data are presented in terms of normalized film heat transfer coefficients as a function of angle-of-attack, Mach number, and normal shock Reynolds number. The surface heating rates and temperatures were obtained via the JSC NONLIN/INVERSE computer program. Time history plots of the surface heating rates and temperatures are also presented.

  2. Derivation of an optomechanical tolerance budget for a bistatic sensor pod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbeau, Nicolas R.

    1996-06-01

    Pointing errors can compromise the performance of laser systems and cause numerous operational problems. In this paper, alignment tolerances for a bistatic sensor pod are derived from first principles. The method applies to a sizeable class of problems but is particularly relevant to military applications like laser target designation and rangefinding. It yields exact or conservative estimates in most cases of practical interest. Various results are explored from the point-of-view of employment methods and military deployment.

  3. Dietary fibre concentrate from Chilean algarrobo (Prosopis chilensis (Mol.) Stuntz) pods: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Ana María; Figuerola, Fernando; Bernuy, Enrique; Sáenz, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Prosopis species are generally fast-growing, drought-resistant, nitrogen-fixing trees or shrubs. Fruits of Prosopis spp are indehiscent pods, where pericarp is formed by the epicarp, light brown in colour, and fibrous nature; the mesocarp known as pulp, which is rich in sugars; and the endocarp. The aim of this work was to obtain a fibre concentrate from the pods of Prosopis chilensis Mol. (Stuntz) and to determine the chemical, physical, and technological properties of the pod flour (PF) and of a fibre concentrate or pod purified flour (PPF). Acetone, ethanol, and water at different conditions of time and temperature were used in the purification process. PF showed 53.7 g/100 g of total sugar content, 4.2 g/100 g of reducing sugar content, 41.8 g/100 g of total dietary fibre, 35.8 g/100 g of insoluble fibre, and 6.0 g/100 g of soluble fibre content. The PPF has a total sugar content of 3.8 g/100 g, reducing sugar content of 2.2 g/100 g, total dietary fibre content of 80.8 g/100 g, insoluble fibre content of 75.1 g/100 g, and soluble fibre content of 5.7 g/100 g. The scanning electron microscopy analysis showed the existence of voids in the structure of PPF flour, which reveals the efficiency of the purification process with a high decrease in the total sugar content.

  4. Improving succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes from raw industrial carob pods.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Margarida; Roca, Christophe; Reis, Maria A M

    2016-10-01

    Carob pods are an inexpensive by-product of locust bean gum industry that can be used as renewable feedstock for bio-based succinic acid. Here, for the first time, unprocessed raw carob pods were used to extract a highly enriched sugar solution, afterwards used as substrate to produce succinic acid using Actinobacillus succinogenes. Batch fermentations containing 30g/L sugars resulted in a production rate of 1.67gSA/L.h and a yield of 0.39gSA/g sugars. Taking advantage of A. succinogenes' metabolism, uncoupling cell growth from succinic acid production, a fed-batch mode was implemented to increase succinic acid yield and reduce by-products formation. This strategy resulted in a succinic acid yield of 0.94gSA/g sugars, the highest yield reported in the literature for fed-batch and continuous experiments, while maintaining by-products at residual values. Results demonstrate that raw carob pods are a highly efficient feedstock for bio-based succinic acid production.

  5. Partly transparent young legume pods: Do they mimic caterpillars for defense and simultaneously enable better photosynthesis?

    PubMed

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2015-01-01

    Being partly or fully transparent as a defense from predation is mostly known in various groups of aquatic animals and various terrestrial arthropods. Plants, being photosynthetic and having cell walls made of various polymers, cannot be wholly transparent. In spite of these inherent limitations, some succulent plant species of arid zones have partially transparent "windows" in order to perform photosynthesis in their below-ground leaves, as defense from herbivores as well as for protection from harsh environmental conditions. Similarly, transparent "windows" or even wholly transparent leaves are found in certain thick or thin, above-ground organs irrespective of aridity. The young pods of various wild annual Mediterranean legume species belonging to the genera Lathyrus, Pisum and Vicia are partly transparent and may therefore look like caterpillars when viewed with back illumination. I propose that this character serves 2 functions: (1) being a type of defensive caterpillar mimicry that may reduce their consumption by various herbivores in that very sensitive stage, and (2) simultaneously allowing better photosynthesis in the rapidly growing seeds and pods. Unlike animals that are transparent for either defensive or aggressive crypsis, in the case of young legume pods it allows them to visually mimic caterpillars for defense.

  6. Changes in Cell Wall Polysaccharides of Green Bean Pods during Development

    PubMed Central

    Stolle-Smits, Trinette; Beekhuizen, Jan Gerard; Kok, Matthieu T.C.; Pijnenburg, Mary; Recourt, Kees; Derksen, Jan; Voragen, Alphons G.J.

    1999-01-01

    The changes in cell wall polysaccharides and selected cell wall-modifying enzymes were studied during the development of green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) pods. An overall increase of cell wall material on a dry-weight basis was observed during pod development. Major changes were detected in the pectic polymers. Young, exponentially growing cell walls contained large amounts of neutral, sugar-rich pectic polymers (rhamnogalacturonan), which were water insoluble and relatively tightly connected to the cell wall. During elongation, more galactose-rich pectic polymers were deposited into the cell wall. In addition, the level of branched rhamnogalacturonan remained constant, while the level of linear homogalacturonan steadily increased. During maturation of the pods, galactose-rich pectic polymers were degraded, while the accumulation of soluble homogalacturonan continued. During senescence there was an increase in the amount of ionically complexed pectins, mainly at the expense of freely soluble pectins. The most abundant of the enzymes tested for was pectin methylesterase. Peroxidase, β-galactosidase, and α-arabinosidase were also detected in appreciable amounts. Polygalacturonase was detected only in very small amounts throughout development. The relationship between endogenous enzyme levels and the properties of cell wall polymers is discussed with respect to cell wall synthesis and degradation. PMID:10517827

  7. Deciphering Transcriptional Programming during Pod and Seed Development Using RNA-Seq in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan)

    PubMed Central

    Pazhamala, Lekha T.; Agarwal, Gaurav; Bajaj, Prasad; Kumar, Vinay; Kulshreshtha, Akanksha; Saxena, Rachit K.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Seed development is an important event in plant life cycle that has interested humankind since ages, especially in crops of economic importance. Pigeonpea is an important grain legume of the semi-arid tropics, used mainly for its protein rich seeds. In order to understand the transcriptional programming during the pod and seed development, RNA-seq data was generated from embryo sac from the day of anthesis (0 DAA), seed and pod wall (5, 10, 20 and 30 DAA) of pigeonpea variety “Asha” (ICPL 87119) using Illumina HiSeq 2500. About 684 million sequencing reads have been generated from nine samples, which resulted in the identification of 27,441 expressed genes after sequence analysis. These genes have been studied for their differentially expression, co-expression, temporal and spatial gene expression. We have also used the RNA-seq data to identify important seed-specific transcription factors, biological processes and associated pathways during seed development process in pigeonpea. The comprehensive gene expression study from flowering to mature pod development in pigeonpea would be crucial in identifying candidate genes involved in seed traits directly or indirectly related to yield and quality. The dataset will serve as an important resource for gene discovery and deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying various seed related traits. PMID:27760186

  8. Huizache (Acacia farnesiana) whole pods (flesh and seeds) as an alternative feed for sheep in Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Winder, L R; Goñi-Cedeño, S; Olguín-Lara, P A; Díaz-Salgado, G; Arriaga-Jordán, C M

    2009-12-01

    Two experiments were undertaken to evaluate the use of pods from Huizache (Acacia farnesiana), common in the arid and semiarid regions of Mexico, on the perfromance and apparent digestibility in Pelibuey Mexican hair growing ewe lambs. Twenty-four Pelibuey ewe lambs were used in the animal performance experiment, with a mean live weight of 14.91 +/- 1.48 kg, randomnly allocated to three groups which received ad libitum for 77 days (11 weeks) experimental whole rations T0 with 0%, T12 with 12% or T24 with 24% inclusión of dried and ground Huizache pods. Dry matter intakes (g/kg (0.75) daily) were 83, 95, 90 for T0, T12, and T24 respectively (P > 0.05). Mean daily live-weight gain was 90, 75, and 63 g/day for T0, T12, and T24 (P < 0.001). Nine Pelibuey ewe lambs were used to determine apparent digestibility in vivo of the experimental diets using a 3 x 3 latin square design repeated three times. There were differences in the digestibility of dry matter (P < 0.001), organic matter (P < 0.001), nitrogen (P < 0.031), neutral detergent fibre (P < 0.002), and acid detergent fibre (P < 0.001) being lower in T24. Huizache pods may be an alternative feed when included up to 12% of dry matter in the diets for sheep growing moderately. PMID:19390982

  9. POD/DEIM reduced-order strategies for efficient four dimensional variational data assimilation

    SciTech Connect

    Ştefănescu, R.; Sandu, A.; Navon, I.M.

    2015-08-15

    This work studies reduced order modeling (ROM) approaches to speed up the solution of variational data assimilation problems with large scale nonlinear dynamical models. It is shown that a key requirement for a successful reduced order solution is that reduced order Karush–Kuhn–Tucker conditions accurately represent their full order counterparts. In particular, accurate reduced order approximations are needed for the forward and adjoint dynamical models, as well as for the reduced gradient. New strategies to construct reduced order based are developed for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) ROM data assimilation using both Galerkin and Petrov–Galerkin projections. For the first time POD, tensorial POD, and discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) are employed to develop reduced data assimilation systems for a geophysical flow model, namely, the two dimensional shallow water equations. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical framework for Galerkin projection. In the case of Petrov–Galerkin projection, stabilization strategies must be considered for the reduced order models. The new reduced order shallow water data assimilation system provides analyses similar to those produced by the full resolution data assimilation system in one tenth of the computational time.

  10. POD-based analysis of combustion images in optically accessible engines

    SciTech Connect

    Bizon, K.; Continillo, G.; Mancaruso, E.; Merola, S.S.; Vaglieco, B.M.

    2010-04-15

    This paper reports on 2D images of combustion-related luminosity taken in two optically accessible automobile engines of the most recent generation. The results are discussed to elucidate physical phenomena in the combustion chambers. Then, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is applied to the acquired images. The coefficients of the orthogonal modes are then used for the analysis of cycle variability, along with data of dynamic in-cylinder pressure and rate of heat release. The advantage is that statistical analysis can be run on a small number of scalar coefficients rather than on the full data set of pixel luminosity values. Statistics of the POD coefficients provide information on cycle variations of the luminosity field. POD modes are then discriminated by means of normality tests, to separate the mean from the coherent and the incoherent parts of the fluctuation of the luminosity field, in a non-truncated representation of the data. The morphology of the fluctuation components can finally be reconstructed by grouping coherent and incoherent modes. The structure of the incoherent component of the fluctuation is consistent with the underlying turbulent field. (author)

  11. Control of a HexaPOD treatment couch for robot-assisted radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Christian; Ma, Lei; Wilbert, Jürgen; Baier, Kurt; Schilling, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Moving tumors, for example in the vicinity of the lungs, pose a challenging problem in radiotherapy, as healthy tissue should not be irradiated. Apart from gating approaches, one standard method is to irradiate the complete volume within which a tumor moves plus a safety margin containing a considerable volume of healthy tissue. This work deals with a system for tumor motion compensation using the HexaPOD® robotic treatment couch (Medical Intelligence GmbH, Schwabmünchen, Germany). The HexaPOD, carrying the patient during treatment, is instructed to perform translational movements such that the tumor motion, from the beams-eye view of the linear accelerator, is eliminated. The dynamics of the HexaPOD are characterized by time delays, saturations, and other non-linearities that make the design of control a challenging task. The focus of this work lies on two control methods for the HexaPOD that can be used for reference tracking. The first method uses a model predictive controller based on a model gained through system identification methods, and the second method uses a position control scheme useful for reference tracking. We compared the tracking performance of both methods in various experiments with real hardware using ideal reference trajectories, prerecorded patient trajectories, and human volunteers whose breathing motion was compensated by the system.

  12. Development of 1 MW-class HTS motor for podded ship propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, K.; Aizawa, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshikawa, K.; Kimura, Y.; Izumi, M.; Ohashi, K.; Numano, M.; Okumura, K.; Yamaguchi, M.; Gocho, Y.; Kosuge, E.

    2010-06-01

    To reduce fuel consumption and lead to a major reduction of pollution from NOx, SOx and CO2, the electric ship propulsion system is one of the most prospective substitutes for conventional ship propulsion systems. In order to spread it, innovative technologies for the improvement of the power transmission are required. The high temperature superconducting technology has the possibility for a drastic reduction of power transmission loss. Recently, electric podded propulsions have become popular for large cruise vessels, icebreakers and chemical tankers because of the flexibility of the equipment arrangement and the stern hull design, and better maneuverability in harbour, etc. In this paper, a 1 MW-class High temperature superconducting (HTS) motor with high efficiency, smaller size and simple structure, which is designed and manufactured for podded propulsion, is reported. For the case of a coastal ship driven by the optimized podded propulsion in which the 1MW HTS motor is equipped, the reductions of fluid dynamic resistance and power transmission losses are demonstrated. The present research & development has been supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO).

  13. Total observed fluorescent penetrant inspection (FPI) system variabilty and probability of detection (POD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Surendra; Kinney, Andy; Hogan, Robert; Guerra, Rene

    2012-05-01

    The detection of large flaws in a structure (greater than critical flaw size, >aNDE) plays an important role in probabilistic design and life management of parts. Therefore, development of reliable and capable NDT methods for detecting flaws is essential element of any life prediction system. Traditionally, the reliability and capability of NDT methods has been is studied by determining POD data in terms of a90, a90/95, and Confidence Interval (CI). However, POD data and CI are frequently reported but not necessarily well understood by NDT practionars, design, and life prediction engineers. More importantly, the use of samples statistical uncertainties for system (and/or process) variability adds further confusion. In this paper, we describe Minitab advanced statistical tools as an alternative to POD for studying FPI system reliability and capability in terms total observed system variability. The total observed system variability includes measurement errors (includes statistical uncertainty), variations due to operators and inspection processes as well and is calculated by studying Measurement System Evaluation (MSE).

  14. Possible Radio Interference Between Video Capsule Endoscopy and Second-Generation OmniPod Patch Pump.

    PubMed

    Pitocco, Dario; Rizzi, Alessandro; Tortora, Annalisa; Manto, Andrea; Zaccardi, Francesco; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Costamagna, Guido; Riccioni, Maria Elena

    2016-07-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a noninvasive diagnostic tool used to observe the small intestinal mucosa. We report a case of a 57-year-old woman with T2DM, treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion using second-generation OmniPod patch pump, undergoing VCE (Given M2A; VCE Ltd, Yoqneam, Israel) for melena and anemia. During VCE, an abnormal interruption of communication between video capsule and its receiver occurred. Two hours after capsule ingestion, the patient activated the insulin pump infusion through the Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM) because she drank a sugary beverage for the first time after ingestion. Due to this, we decided to repeat VCE after the removal of the insulin pump and PDM: at this time, the capsule recorded for more than 10 h without any interruption. The video capsule and second-generation OmniPod patch pump use the same radio frequency and this may cause interference between these two devices. In patients using second-generation OmniPod patch pump undergoing VCE, we suggest to switch to intravenous insulin infusion or multiple daily injection or to use a different model of VCE, as MiRoCam (Intromedic, Seoul, Korea). PMID:27333334

  15. Partly transparent young legume pods: Do they mimic caterpillars for defense and simultaneously enable better photosynthesis?

    PubMed

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2015-01-01

    Being partly or fully transparent as a defense from predation is mostly known in various groups of aquatic animals and various terrestrial arthropods. Plants, being photosynthetic and having cell walls made of various polymers, cannot be wholly transparent. In spite of these inherent limitations, some succulent plant species of arid zones have partially transparent "windows" in order to perform photosynthesis in their below-ground leaves, as defense from herbivores as well as for protection from harsh environmental conditions. Similarly, transparent "windows" or even wholly transparent leaves are found in certain thick or thin, above-ground organs irrespective of aridity. The young pods of various wild annual Mediterranean legume species belonging to the genera Lathyrus, Pisum and Vicia are partly transparent and may therefore look like caterpillars when viewed with back illumination. I propose that this character serves 2 functions: (1) being a type of defensive caterpillar mimicry that may reduce their consumption by various herbivores in that very sensitive stage, and (2) simultaneously allowing better photosynthesis in the rapidly growing seeds and pods. Unlike animals that are transparent for either defensive or aggressive crypsis, in the case of young legume pods it allows them to visually mimic caterpillars for defense. PMID:26633565

  16. Nutrient utilization and rumen metabolism in sheep fed Prosopis juliflora pods and Cenchrus grass.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Om Hari; Sahoo, Artabandhu

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of replacement of Prosopis juliflora pods (PJP) in the concentrate mixture fed to sheep along with Cenchrus grass (CG). Twenty four adult Malpura rams (3-5 years, 45.4 ± 4.26 kg) were randomly divided into three equal groups on the basis of age and live weight (LW). Mature green Prosopis juliflora pods were collected, dried and ground to replace concentrate mixture at 0 (G1), 30% (G2) or 40% (G3). Cenchrus grass was offered ad libitum whereas the concentrate mixture was fed at the rate of 1% LW. Nutrient digestibility did not differ among the groups while N balance data showed reduced utilization in G3. However, the animals in G1, G2 and G3 maintained LW and their nutritional profile indicated surplus of energy and protein with comparable feed value of all the three diets. Rumen pH decreased and volatile fatty acids increased (P < 0.05) 4 h after feeding in G2 and G3 compared to G1. In summary, Prosopis juliflora pods can replace concentrate mixture up to 40% in sheep feeding without any adverse effect on nutrient intake and utilization as well as rumen fermentation characteristics.

  17. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Free Radical Scavenging Capacities of Polyphenolics from Pods of Caesalpinia pulcherrima

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Feng-Lin; Huang, Wei-Jan; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Chen, Lih-Chi; Lu, Hsiao-Jen; Hou, Wen-Chi; Lin, Mei-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Thirteen polyphenolics were isolated from fresh pods of Caesalpinia pulcherrima using various methods of column chromatography. The structures of these polyphenolics were elucidated as gallic acid (1), methyl gallate (2), 6-O-galloyl-d-glucoside (3), methyl 6-O-galloyl-β-d-glucoside (4), methyl 3,6-di-O-galloyl-α-d-glucopyranoside (5), gentisic acid 5-O-α-d-(6′-O-galloyl)glucopyranoside (6), guaiacylglycerol 4-O-β-d-(6′-O-galloyl)glucopyranoside (7), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenol 1-O-β-d-(6′-O-galloyl) glucopyranoside (8), (+)-gallocatechin (9), (+)-catechin (10), (+)-gallocatechin 3-O-gallate (11), myricetin 3-rhamnoside (12), and ampelopsin (13). All isolated compounds were tested for their antioxidant activities in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl, and peroxynitrite radicals scavenging assays. Among those compounds, 11, 12, and 2 exhibited the best DPPH-, hydroxyl-, and peroxynitrite radical-scavenging activities, respectively. Compound 7 is a new compound, and possesses better scavenging activities towards DPPH but has equivalent hydroxyl radical scavenging activity when compared to BHT. The paper is the first report on free radical scavenging properties of components of the fresh pods of Caesalpinia pulcherrima. The results obtained from the current study indicate that the free radical scavenging property of fresh pods of Caesalpinia pulcherrima may be one of the mechanisms by which this herbal medicine is effective in several free radical mediated diseases. PMID:22754350

  18. Improving succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes from raw industrial carob pods.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Margarida; Roca, Christophe; Reis, Maria A M

    2016-10-01

    Carob pods are an inexpensive by-product of locust bean gum industry that can be used as renewable feedstock for bio-based succinic acid. Here, for the first time, unprocessed raw carob pods were used to extract a highly enriched sugar solution, afterwards used as substrate to produce succinic acid using Actinobacillus succinogenes. Batch fermentations containing 30g/L sugars resulted in a production rate of 1.67gSA/L.h and a yield of 0.39gSA/g sugars. Taking advantage of A. succinogenes' metabolism, uncoupling cell growth from succinic acid production, a fed-batch mode was implemented to increase succinic acid yield and reduce by-products formation. This strategy resulted in a succinic acid yield of 0.94gSA/g sugars, the highest yield reported in the literature for fed-batch and continuous experiments, while maintaining by-products at residual values. Results demonstrate that raw carob pods are a highly efficient feedstock for bio-based succinic acid production. PMID:27394995

  19. Thermal striping in nuclear reactors: POD analysis of LES simulations and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzari, Elia; Alvarez, Andres; Marin, Oana; Obabko, Aleksandr; Lomperski, Steve; Aithal, Shashi

    2015-11-01

    Thermal fatigue caused due to thermal striping impacts design and analyses of a wide-range of industrial apparatus. This phenomena is of particular significance in nuclear reactor applications, primarily in sodium cooled fast reactors. In order to conduct systematic analyses of the thermal striping phenomena a simplified experimental set-up was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory. In this set-up two turbulent jets with a temperature difference of about 20K were mixed in a rectangular tank. The jets entered the tank via 2 hexagonal inlets. Two different inlet geometries were studied, both experimentally and via high-fidelity LES simulations. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) was performed on the turbulent velocity field in the tank to identify the most dominant energetic modes. The POD analyses of the experimental data in both inlet geometrical configurations were compared with LES simulations. Detailed POD analyses are presented to highlight the impact of geometry on the velocity and thermal fields. These can be correlated with experimental and numerical data to assess the impact of thermal striping on the design of the upper plenum of sodium-cooled nuclear reactors. ALCF.

  20. Partly transparent young legume pods: Do they mimic caterpillars for defense and simultaneously enable better photosynthesis?

    PubMed Central

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2015-01-01

    Being partly or fully transparent as a defense from predation is mostly known in various groups of aquatic animals and various terrestrial arthropods. Plants, being photosynthetic and having cell walls made of various polymers, cannot be wholly transparent. In spite of these inherent limitations, some succulent plant species of arid zones have partially transparent “windows” in order to perform photosynthesis in their below-ground leaves, as defense from herbivores as well as for protection from harsh environmental conditions. Similarly, transparent “windows” or even wholly transparent leaves are found in certain thick or thin, above-ground organs irrespective of aridity. The young pods of various wild annual Mediterranean legume species belonging to the genera Lathyrus, Pisum and Vicia are partly transparent and may therefore look like caterpillars when viewed with back illumination. I propose that this character serves 2 functions: (1) being a type of defensive caterpillar mimicry that may reduce their consumption by various herbivores in that very sensitive stage, and (2) simultaneously allowing better photosynthesis in the rapidly growing seeds and pods. Unlike animals that are transparent for either defensive or aggressive crypsis, in the case of young legume pods it allows them to visually mimic caterpillars for defense. PMID:26633565

  1. Stomatal Closure and Photosynthetic Inhibition in Soybean Leaves Induced by Petiole Girdling and Pod Removal 1

    PubMed Central

    Setter, Tim L.; Brun, William A.; Brenner, Mark L.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of strong sinks of photoassimilates is thought to stimulate photosynthesis by minimizing photosynthetic end product accumulation in leaves. This hypothesis was examined in soybeans (Glycine max [L] Merr.) with treatments designed to alter the phloem translocation of photoassimilates out of source leaves. Pod removal and petiole girdling resulted in 70 and 90% reductions, respectively, in leaf CO2 exchange rate. Reductions of similar magnitude also were observed in stomatal diffusive conductivity. Time course data showed that CO2 exchange rates as well as stomatal conductivities were significantly reduced 0.5 hour after girdling and 5 hours after pod removal, thus suggesting that stomatal closure was the cause of the reduced rates of photosynthesis. Mesophyll conductivities to CO2, calculated from gas exchange data, were not affected by the treatments. Radiocarbon assimilation rates by leaf slices floated in KH14CO3 solutions were not reduced by pod removal and were reduced only 10% by girdling. It was concluded that treatments which block or slow translocation from source leaves reduce their photosynthetic rate by inducing stomatal closure. PMID:16661301

  2. Passive Orbital Disconnect Strut (PODS 3), structural and thermal test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    A test program is undertaken to verify that the lifetime of a shuttle launchable dewar can be increased by using passive orbital disconnect struts (PODS). A detailed design is performed on the cold end (PODS-III) portion of the strut. Structural analysis of the thin-wall fiberglass tube allows selection of the optimum winding angle and tube dimensions. Structural tests on the thin-wall fiberglass tube measure both the tension and compression modulus at ambient and LN2 temperatures, the radial deflection versus side load, and the ultimate compression strength of the tube at LN2 temperature. The thermal expansion of the fiberglass tube plus Invar is also measured down to 78 K. The axial gap at the wedge portion of the stem is set based on these data. The PODS-III test article parts are fabricated and assembled using a detailed assembly procedure. The thermal conductants in the orbital configuration was measured for body temperatures between 5 and 40 K. This temperature range covers the predicted ground hold and orbit temperatures for vapor-cooled supports. The test results are then compared with heat leak values predicted before the test began. Side load, axial compression load, and tension load tests conclude the test program.

  3. Possible Radio Interference Between Video Capsule Endoscopy and Second-Generation OmniPod Patch Pump.

    PubMed

    Pitocco, Dario; Rizzi, Alessandro; Tortora, Annalisa; Manto, Andrea; Zaccardi, Francesco; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Costamagna, Guido; Riccioni, Maria Elena

    2016-07-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a noninvasive diagnostic tool used to observe the small intestinal mucosa. We report a case of a 57-year-old woman with T2DM, treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion using second-generation OmniPod patch pump, undergoing VCE (Given M2A; VCE Ltd, Yoqneam, Israel) for melena and anemia. During VCE, an abnormal interruption of communication between video capsule and its receiver occurred. Two hours after capsule ingestion, the patient activated the insulin pump infusion through the Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM) because she drank a sugary beverage for the first time after ingestion. Due to this, we decided to repeat VCE after the removal of the insulin pump and PDM: at this time, the capsule recorded for more than 10 h without any interruption. The video capsule and second-generation OmniPod patch pump use the same radio frequency and this may cause interference between these two devices. In patients using second-generation OmniPod patch pump undergoing VCE, we suggest to switch to intravenous insulin infusion or multiple daily injection or to use a different model of VCE, as MiRoCam (Intromedic, Seoul, Korea).

  4. Fish Pectoral Fin Hydrodynamics; Part III: Low Dimensional Models via POD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurttas, M.; Madden, P.

    2005-11-01

    The highly complex kinematics of the pectoral fin and the resulting hydrodynamics does not lend itself easily to analysis based on simple notions of pitching/heaving/paddling kinematics or lift/drag based propulsive mechanisms. A more inventive approach is needed to dissect the fin gait and gain insight into the hydrodynamic performance of the pectoral fin. The focus of the current work is on the hydrodynamics of the pectoral fin of a bluegill sunfish in steady forward motion. The 3D, time-dependent fin kinematics is obtained via a stereo-videographic technique. We employ proper orthogonal decomposition to extract the essential features of the fin gait and then use CFD to examine the hydrodynamics of simplified gaits synthesized from the POD modes. The POD spectrum shows that the first two, three and five POD modes capture 55%, 67%, and 80% of the motion respectively. The first three modes are in particular highly distinct: Mode-1 is a ``cupping'' motion where the fin cups forward as it is abducted; Mode-2 is an ``expansion'' motion where the fin expands to present a larger area during adduction and finally Mode-3 involves a ``spanwise flick'' of the dorsal edge of the fin. Numerical simulation of flow past fin gaits synthesized from these modes lead to insights into the mechanisms of thrust production; these are discussed in detail.

  5. Microsatellite primers for Parkia biglobosa (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae) reveal that a single plant sires all seeds per pod1

    PubMed Central

    Lassen, Kristin Marie; Kjær, Erik Dahl; Ouédraogo, Moussa; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for an indigenous fruit tree, Parkia biglobosa, as a tool to study reproductive biology and population structure. Here we use the primers to determine the number of fathers per pod. • Methods and Results: Microsatellite loci were enriched in a genomic sample and isolated using pyrosequencing. Eleven primer pairs were characterized in two populations of P. biglobosa in Burkina Faso (each with 40 trees). The number of alleles per locus ranged from eight to 15, and one locus had null alleles. We genotyped seeds from 24 open-pollinated pods. The genotypic profiles of seeds per pod suggest that all seeds are outcrossed and that only one pollen donor sires all ovules in a single fruit. • Conclusions: Ten microsatellite markers were highly polymorphic. All seeds per pod of P. biglobosa were full siblings. The markers will be useful for reproductive and population genetic studies. PMID:25202634

  6. Results from the EPL monkey-pod flight experiments conducted aboard the NASA/Ames CV-990, May 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahlmann, D. F.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Pace, N.

    1976-01-01

    The participation of the Environmental Physiology Laboratory (EPL) in the general purpose laboratory concept verification test 3 is documented. The EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment was designed to incorporate a 10-12 kg, pig tailed monkey, Macaca nemestrina, into the pod and measure the physiological responses of the animal continously. Four major elements comprise the EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment System: (1) a fiberglass pod containing the instrumented monkey plus feeder and watering devices, (2) an inner console containing the SKYLAB mass spectrometer with its associated valving and electronic controls, sensing, control and monitoring units for lower body negative pressure, feeder activity, waterer activity, temperatures, and gas metabolism calibration, (3) an umbilical complex comprising gas flow lines and electrical cabling between the inner and outer console and (4) an outer console in principle representing the experiment support to be provided from general space craft sources.

  7. Results from the EPL monkey-pod experiment conducted as part of the 1974 NASA/Ames shuttle CVT-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahlmann, D. F.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Pace, N.

    1974-01-01

    The participation of the Environmental Physiology Laboratory (EPL) in the general purpose laboratory concept verification test 3 is documented. The EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment was designed to incorporate a 10-12 kg, pig tailed monkey, Macaca nemestrina, into the pod and measure the physiological responses of the animal continuously. Four major elements comprise the EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment System: (1) a fiberglass pod containing the instrumented monkey plus feeder and watering devices, (2) an inner console containing the SKYLAB mass spectrometer with its associated valving and electronic controls, sensing, control and monitoring units for lower body negative pressure, feeder activity, waterer activity, temperatures, and gas metabolism calibration, (3) an umbilical complex comprising gas flow lines and electrical cabling between the inner and outer console and (4) an outer console in principle representing the experiment support to be provided from general spacecraft sources.

  8. Downscaling of Airborne Wind Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechner, Uwe; Schmehl, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Airborne wind energy systems provide a novel solution to harvest wind energy from altitudes that cannot be reached by wind turbines with a similar nominal generator power. The use of a lightweight but strong tether in place of an expensive tower provides an additional cost advantage, next to the higher capacity factor and much lower total mass. This paper investigates the scaling effects of airborne wind energy systems. The energy yield of airborne wind energy systems, that work in pumping mode of operation is at least ten times higher than the energy yield of conventional solar systems. For airborne wind energy systems the yield is defined per square meter wing area. In this paper the dependency of the energy yield on the nominal generator power for systems in the range of 1 kW to 1 MW is investigated. For the onshore location Cabauw, The Netherlands, it is shown, that a generator of just 1.4 kW nominal power and a total system mass of less than 30 kg has the theoretical potential to harvest energy at only twice the price per kWh of large scale airborne wind energy systems. This would make airborne wind energy systems a very attractive choice for small scale remote and mobile applications as soon as the remaining challenges for commercialization are solved.

  9. Challenges and opportunities of airborne metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles.

  10. Challenges and Opportunities of Airborne Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles. PMID:25953766

  11. Pose Estimation of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Based on a Vision-Aided Multi-Sensor Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, G.; Samadzadegan, F.; Kurz, F.

    2016-06-01

    GNSS/IMU navigation systems offer low-cost and robust solution to navigate UAVs. Since redundant measurements greatly improve the reliability of navigation systems, extensive researches have been made to enhance the efficiency and robustness of GNSS/IMU by additional sensors. This paper presents a method for integrating reference data, images taken from UAVs, barometric height data and GNSS/IMU data to estimate accurate and reliable pose parameters of UAVs. We provide improved pose estimations by integrating multi-sensor observations in an EKF algorithm with IMU motion model. The implemented methodology has demonstrated to be very efficient and reliable for automatic pose estimation. The calculated position and attitude of the UAV especially when we removed the GNSS from the working cycle clearly indicate the ability of the purposed methodology.

  12. A parallel implementation of a multisensor feature-based range-estimation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suorsa, Raymond E.; Sridhar, Banavar

    1993-01-01

    There are many proposed vision based methods to perform obstacle detection and avoidance for autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicles. All methods, however, will require very high processing rates to achieve real time performance. A system capable of supporting autonomous helicopter navigation will need to extract obstacle information from imagery at rates varying from ten frames per second to thirty or more frames per second depending on the vehicle speed. Such a system will need to sustain billions of operations per second. To reach such high processing rates using current technology, a parallel implementation of the obstacle detection/ranging method is required. This paper describes an efficient and flexible parallel implementation of a multisensor feature-based range-estimation algorithm, targeted for helicopter flight, realized on both a distributed-memory and shared-memory parallel computer.

  13. SAMuS: Service-Oriented Architecture for Multisensor Surveillance in Smart Homes

    PubMed Central

    Van de Walle, Rik

    2014-01-01

    The design of a service-oriented architecture for multisensor surveillance in smart homes is presented as an integrated solution enabling automatic deployment, dynamic selection, and composition of sensors. Sensors are implemented as Web-connected devices, with a uniform Web API. RESTdesc is used to describe the sensors and a novel solution is presented to automatically compose Web APIs that can be applied with existing Semantic Web reasoners. We evaluated the solution by building a smart Kinect sensor that is able to dynamically switch between IR and RGB and optimizing person detection by incorporating feedback from pressure sensors, as such demonstrating the collaboration among sensors to enhance detection of complex events. The performance results show that the platform scales for many Web APIs as composition time remains limited to a few hundred milliseconds in almost all cases. PMID:24778579

  14. Using the internet and multisensor data to map oil traps in south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.; Morgan, K.M.; Donovan, N.; Busbey, A.B.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrocarbon producing structures such as salt domes, serpentine plugs, drape folds, and growth faults exist throughout a large area of south Texas. Surface expressions of known oil producing fields associated with these subsurface features were analyzed with multisensor remote sensing data for anomalous drainage patterns, surface lineations, and geobotanical hydrocarbon alteration. Space Shuttle color imagery and radar data were analyzed and downloaded over the Internet from NASA`s Earth Observation Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas. The Internet access saved considerable time in researching the archives for image selection. Selected Shuttle Imagery were processed and enhanced for analysis and comparison to Landsat MSS, TM and radar data taken over the exploration study areas. Examples are presented to illustrate the comparisons made among the different sensor types.

  15. Robust interacting multiple model algorithms based on multi-sensor fusion criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weidong; Liu, Mengmeng

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the state estimation problem for a class of Markov jump linear discrete-time stochastic systems. Three novel interacting multiple model (IMM) algorithms are proposed based on the H∞ technique, the correlation among estimation errors of mode-conditioned filters and the multi-sensor optimal information fusion criteria. Mode probabilities in the novel algorithms are derived based on the error cross-covariances instead of likelihood functions. The H∞ technique taking the place of Kalman filtering is applied to enhance the robustness of the new approaches. Theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithms are effective and have an obvious advantage in velocity estimation when tracking a maneuvering target.

  16. A discussion on sensor recovery techniques for fault tolerant multisensor schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoican, Florin; Olaru, Sorin; De Doná, José A.; Seron, María M.

    2014-08-01

    The present paper deals with the interplay between healthy and faulty sensor functioning in a multisensor scheme based on a switching control strategy. Fault tolerance guarantees have been recently obtained in this framework based upon the characterisation of invariant sets for state estimations in healthy and faulty functioning. A source of conservativeness of this approach is related to the issue of sensor recovery. A common working hypothesis has been to assume that once a sensor switches to faulty functioning it can no longer be used by the control mechanism even if at an ulterior moment it switches back to healthy functioning. In the current paper, we present necessary and sufficient conditions for the acknowledgement of sensor recovery and we propose and compare different techniques for the reintegration of sensors in the closed-loop decision-making mechanism.

  17. Distributed Wireless Multi-Sensor Technologies, A Novel Approach to Reduce Motor Energy Usage

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Sexton

    2008-03-28

    This report is the final report for the General Electric Distributed Wireless Multi-Sensor Technologies project. The report covers the research activities and benefits surrounding wireless technology used for industrial sensing applications. The main goal of this project was to develop wireless sensor technology that would be commercialized and adopted by industry for a various set of applications. Many of these applications will yield significant energy savings. One application where there was significant information to estimate a potential energy savings was focused on equipment condition monitoring and in particular electric motor monitoring. The results of the testing of the technology developed are described in this report along with the commercialization activities and various new applications and benefits realized.

  18. ZigBee-based wireless multi-sensor system for physical activity assessment.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lingfei; Liu, Shaopeng; Gao, Robert X; John, Dinesh; Staudenmayer, John; Freedson, Patty

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is important for assessing human exposure to the environment. This paper presents a ZigBee-based Wireless wearable multi-sensor Integrated Measurement System (WIMS) for in-situ PA measurement. Two accelerometers, a piezoelectric displacement sensor, and an ultraviolet (UV) sensor have been used for the physical activity assessment. Detailed analysis was performed for the hardware design and embedded program control, enabling efficient data sampling and transmission, compact design, and extended battery life to meet requirements for PA assessment under free-living conditions. Preliminary testing of the WIMS has demonstrated the functionality of the design, while performance comparison of the WIMS with a wired version on an electromagnetic shaker has demonstrated the signal validity.

  19. A data fusion algorithm for multi-sensor microburst hazard assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig R.; Hansman, R. John

    1994-01-01

    A recursive model-based data fusion algorithm for multi-sensor microburst hazard assessment is described. An analytical microburst model is used to approximate the actual windfield, and a set of 'best' model parameters are estimated from measured winds. The winds corresponding to the best parameter set can then be used to compute alerting factors such as microburst position, extent, and intensity. The estimation algorithm is based on an iterated extended Kalman filter which uses the microburst model parameters as state variables. Microburst state dynamic and process noise parameters are chosen based on measured microburst statistics. The estimation method is applied to data from a time-varying computational simulation of a historical microburst event to demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Selection of filter parameters and initial conditions is discussed. Computational requirements and datalink bandwidth considerations are also addressed.

  20. Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Aiden; Renaudin, Valérie; Bancroft, Jared B; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.