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Sample records for airborne polarimetric synthetic

  1. Polarimetric sensor systems for airborne ISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David; Foster, Joseph; Pezzaniti, Joseph; Harchanko, John; Aycock, Todd; Clark, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Over the last decade, polarimetric imaging technologies have undergone significant advancements that have led to the development of small, low-power polarimetric cameras capable of meeting current airborne ISR mission requirements. In this paper, we describe the design and development of a compact, real-time, infrared imaging polarimeter, provide preliminary results demonstrating the enhanced contrast possible with such a system, and discuss ways in which this technology can be integrated with existing manned and unmanned airborne platforms.

  2. Flood disaster monitoring in Thailand by using a airborne L-band SAR: Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band(Pi-SAR-L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, N.; Sobue, S.; Shimada, M.; Ohyoshi, K.

    2012-04-01

    It was heavy rainfall around the northern region of Thailand from July to September 2011, which caused flood disaster to quite wide region of Thailand, it finally reached to the Bangkok central in the end of October 2011. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) conducted an emergency observation by using a airborne L-band SAR: Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band(Pi-SAR-L) from 5th to 27th November to monitor flood area. Pi-SAR-L has a center frequency of 1271.5 MHz, a band width of 50 MHz, a slant range resolution of 3 m, and an acquisition swath of 15 km on the ground. Pi-SAR-L is boarded on an aircraft of the Gulfstream-II operated by the Diamond Air Service(DAS), Japan, and the Gulfstream-II was ferried to the Chieng-Mai airport in the North Thailand, from Japan. In our presentation, we will show flood area around Bangkok and its variations detected by Pi-SAR-L

  3. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940s. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analysts understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  4. Airborne system for multispectral, multiangle polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Jeffrey H; Korwan, Daniel R; Montes, Marcos J; Gray, Deric J; Gillis, David B; Lamela, Gia M; Miller, W David

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication, calibration, and deployment of an airborne multispectral polarimetric imager. The motivation for the development of this instrument was to explore its ability to provide information about water constituents, such as particle size and type. The instrument is based on four 16 MP cameras and uses wire grid polarizers (aligned at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°) to provide the separation of the polarization states. A five-position filter wheel provides for four narrow-band spectral filters (435, 550, 625, and 750 nm) and one blocked position for dark-level measurements. When flown, the instrument is mounted on a programmable stage that provides control of the view angles. View angles that range to ±65° from the nadir have been used. Data processing provides a measure of the polarimetric signature as a function of both the view zenith and view azimuth angles. As a validation of our initial results, we compare our measurements, over water, with the output of a Monte Carlo code, both of which show neutral points off the principle plane. The locations of the calculated and measured neutral points are compared. The random error level in the measured degree of linear polarization (8% at 435) is shown to be better than 0.25%.

  5. The Next Generation Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Salazar, Jorge; Chandrasekar, V.

    2013-04-01

    NCAR's Electra Doppler radar (ELDORA) with a dual-beam slotted waveguide array using dual-transmitter, dual-beam, rapid scan and step-chirped waveform significantly improved the spatial scale to 300m (Hildebrand et al. 1996). However, ELDORA X-band radar's penetration into precipitation is limited by attenuation and is not designed to collect polarimetric measurements to remotely estimate microphysics. ELDORA has been placed on dormancy because its airborne platform (P3 587) was retired in January 2013. The US research community has strongly voiced the need to continue measurement capability similar to the ELDORA. A critical weather research area is quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting (QPE/QPF). In recent years, hurricane intensity change involving eye-eyewall interactions has drawn research attention (Montgomery et al., 2006; Bell and Montgomery, 2006). In the case of convective precipitation, two issues, namely, (1) when and where convection will be initiated, and (2) determining the organization and structure of ensuing convection, are key for QPF. Therefore collocated measurements of 3-D winds and precipitation microphysics are required for achieving significant skills in QPF and QPE. Multiple radars in dual-Doppler configuration with polarization capability estimate dynamical and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation are mostly available over land. However, storms over complex terrain, the ocean and in forest regions are not observable by ground-based radars (Bluestein and Wakimoto, 2003). NCAR/EOL is investigating potential configurations for the next generation airborne radar that is capable of retrieving dynamic and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. ELDORA's slotted waveguide array radar is not compatible for dual-polarization measurements. Therefore, the new design has to address both dual-polarization capability and platform requirements to replace the ELDORA system. NCAR maintains a C-130

  6. Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) Polarimetric Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Perrine, Martin; McLinden, Matthew; Valett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) is a state-of-the-art radar system developed at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for the development and implementation of digital beamforming radar techniques. DBSAR was recently upgraded to polarimetric operation in order to enhance its capability as a science instrument. Two polarimetric approaches were carried out which will be demonstrated in upcoming flight campaigns.

  7. Analysis of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar and passive visible light polarimetric imaging data fusion for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Sanjit

    The recent launch of spaceborne (TerraSAR-X, RADARSAT-2, ALOS-PALSAR, RISAT) and airborne (SIRC, AIRSAR, UAVSAR, PISAR) polarimetric radar sensors, with capability of imaging through day and night in almost all weather conditions, has made polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) image interpretation and analysis an active area of research. PolSAR image classification is sensitive to object orientation and scattering properties. In recent years, significant work has been done in many areas including agriculture, forestry, oceanography, geology, terrain analysis. Visible light passive polarimetric imaging has also emerged as a powerful tool in remote sensing for enhanced information extraction. The intensity image provides information on materials in the scene while polarization measurements capture surface features, roughness, and shading, often uncorrelated with the intensity image. Advantages of visible light polarimetric imaging include high dynamic range of polarimetric signatures and being comparatively straightforward to build and calibrate. This research is about characterization and analysis of the basic scattering mechanisms for information fusion between PolSAR and passive visible light polarimetric imaging. Relationships between these two modes of imaging are established using laboratory measurements and image simulations using the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool. A novel low cost laboratory based S-band (2.4GHz) PolSAR instrument is developed that is capable of capturing 4 channel fully polarimetric SAR image data. Simple radar targets are formed and system calibration is performed in terms of radar cross-section. Experimental measurements are done using combination of the PolSAR instrument with visible light polarimetric imager for scenes capturing basic scattering mechanisms for phenomenology studies. The three major scattering mechanisms studied in this research include single, double and multiple bounce. Single

  8. On-board Polarimetric Calibration of Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Harten, G.; Diner, D. J.; Bull, M. A.; Tkatcheva, I. N.; Jovanovic, V. M.; Seidel, F. C.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Davis, A. B.; Rheingans, B. E.; Chipman, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) aims at characterizing atmospheric aerosols and clouds using highly accurate imaging polarimetry. The instrument is deployed regularly onboard the NASA ER2 high-altitude aircraft, which is an ideal testbed for satellite remote sensing. Flying at 20 km altitude, AirMSPI's pushbroom camera typically provides 11×11 km images at 10 m resolution. The target is observed from multiple along-track angles within ±67° using a gimbal mount. Eight spectral bands within 355-935 nm are recorded simultaneously in different detector rows, 3 of which also measure linear polarization: 470, 660 and 865 nm. Photoelastic modulators (PEMs) encode the polarized and total intensities in each polarimetric pixel as the amplitude and offset of a wavelike intensity pattern, such that the ratio of the two is insensitive to pixel-to-pixel differences. This enables an accuracy in the degree of linear polarization of ~0.001, as measured in the lab. To maintain this accuracy in-flight, an optical probe continuously monitors the PEMs' retardances and controls their driving signals. Before and after observing a target, the instrument also observes a validator, which is an extended, polarized light source, located inside the instrument housing. These data are now incorporated in the data processing pipeline to further improve the calibration of the modulation functions. Highly polarized pixels in Earth data are utilized to transfer the validator results to meet the illumination in Earth scenes, as well as to make fine adjustments at higher temporal resolution. The reprocessed polarization products for the PODEX campaign show significant improvements when intercompared with the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP, Goddard Institute for Space Studies). We currently evaluate the impact of the on-board polarimetric calibration on aerosol retrievals, and compare against AERONET reference measurements.

  9. Classification And Monitoring Of Salt Marsh Habitats With Multi-Polarimetric Airborne SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Comber, Alexis; Lamb, Alistair

    2013-12-01

    Within the Copernicus programme there is much interest in the ability of remote sensing technology to deliver operational solutions to many areas of life including environmental management. This paper describes research focused on the application of Earth Observation for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. The main topic of this research is to explore to which extent salt marsh vegetation habitats can be identified from polarimetric SAR remotely sensed data. Multi- frequency, multi-polarimetric SAR images from airborne (S- and X-Band quad-polarimetric from the Astrium airborne SAR Demonstrator) is used to examine salt marsh habitat classification potential in the Llanrhidian salt marshes in South Wales, UK. This is achieved by (1) using both supervised and unsupervised classification routines, using several polarimetric SAR data layers as backscatter intensity, band ratios and polarimetric decomposition products, and by (2) statistical analysis by regression of these different SAR data layers and botanical parameters acquired from recent ecological fieldwork.

  10. Design and performance of a multiwavelength airborne polarimetric lidar for vegetation remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Songxin; Narayanan, Ram M

    2004-04-10

    The University of Nebraska has developed a multiwavelength airborne polarimetric lidar (MAPL) system to support its Airborne Remote Sensing Program for vegetation remote sensing. The MAPL design and instrumentation are described in detail. Characteristics of the MAPL system include lidar waveform capture and polarimetric measurement capabilities, which provide enhanced opportunities for vegetation remote sensing compared with current sensors. Field tests were conducted to calibrate the range measurement. Polarimetric calibration of the system is also discussed. Backscattered polarimetric returns, as well as the cross-polarization ratios, were obtained from a small forested area to validate the system's ability for vegetation canopy detection. The system has been packaged to fly abroad a Piper Saratoga aircraft for airborne vegetation remote sensing applications.

  11. Efficient parallel implementation of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Sergio S.; Marpu, Prashanth R.; Plaza, Antonio J.

    2014-10-01

    This work investigates the parallel implementation of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (POLSAR) data processing chain. Such processing can be computationally expensive when large data sets are processed. However, the processing steps can be largely implemented in a high performance computing (HPC) environ- ment. In this work, we studied different aspects of the computations involved in processing the POLSAR data and developed an efficient parallel scheme to achieve near-real time performance. The algorithm is implemented using message parsing interface (MPI) framework in this work, but it can be easily adapted for other parallel architectures such as general purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs).

  12. Oil detection in a coastal marsh with polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Suzuoki, Yukihiro; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's airborne Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) was deployed in June 2010 in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. UAVSAR is a fully polarimetric L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensor for obtaining data at high spatial resolutions. Starting a month prior to the UAVSAR collections, visual observations confirmed oil impacts along shorelines within northeastern Barataria Bay waters in eastern coastal Louisiana. UAVSAR data along several flight lines over Barataria Bay were collected on 23 June 2010, including the repeat flight line for which data were collected in June 2009. Our analysis of calibrated single-look complex data for these flight lines shows that structural damage of shoreline marsh accompanied by oil occurrence manifested as anomalous features not evident in pre-spill data. Freeman-Durden (FD) and Cloude-Pottier (CP) decompositions of the polarimetric data and Wishart classifications seeded with the FD and CP classes also highlighted these nearshore features as a change in dominant scattering mechanism. All decompositions and classifications also identify a class of interior marshes that reproduce the spatially extensive changes in backscatter indicated by the pre- and post-spill comparison of multi-polarization radar backscatter data. FD and CP decompositions reveal that those changes indicate a transform of dominant scatter from primarily surface or volumetric to double or even bounce. Given supportive evidence that oil-polluted waters penetrated into the interior marshes, it is reasonable that these backscatter changes correspond with oil exposure; however, multiple factors prevent unambiguous determination of whether UAVSAR detected oil in interior marshes.

  13. Use of airborne polarimetric SAR, optical and elevation data for mapping and monitoring of salt marsh vegetation habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Comber, Alexis; Lamb, Alistair

    2014-10-01

    Within the Copernicus programme there is much interest in the ability of remote sensing technology to deliver operational solutions to many areas of life including environmental management. This paper describes research focused on the application of Earth Observation for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. The main topic of this research is to explore to which extent salt marsh vegetation habitats can be identified from polarimetric SAR remotely sensed data. Multi-frequency, multi-polarimetric SAR images from airborne (S- and X-Band quad-polarimetric from the Astrium airborne SAR Demonstrator) is used to examine salt marsh habitat classification potential in the Llanrhidian salt marshes in South Wales, UK. This is achieved by (1) using both supervised and unsupervised classification routines, using several polarimetric SAR data layers as backscatter intensity, band ratios and polarimetric decomposition products, and by (2) statistical analysis by regression of these different SAR data layers and botanical parameters acquired from recent ecological fieldwork.

  14. Unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric SAR data using the covariance matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J. M.; Chellappa, Rama; Dubois, Pascale C.

    1992-01-01

    A method for unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data into classes of homogeneous microwave polarimetric backscatter characteristics is presented. Classes of polarimetric backscatter are selected on the basis of a multidimensional fuzzy clustering of the logarithm of the parameters composing the polarimetric covariance matrix. The clustering procedure uses both polarimetric amplitude and phase information, is adapted to the presence of image speckle, and does not require an arbitrary weighting of the different polarimetric channels; it also provides a partitioning of each data sample used for clustering into multiple clusters. Given the classes of polarimetric backscatter, the entire image is classified using a maximum a posteriori polarimetric classifier. Four-look polarimetric SAR complex data of lava flows and of sea ice acquired by the NASA/JPL airborne polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) are segmented using this technique. The results are discussed and compared with those obtained using supervised techniques.

  15. Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar data for Crop Cover Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, K. V.; Srikanth, P.; Deepika, U.; Sesha Sai, M. V. R.

    2014-11-01

    The interest in crop inventory through the use of microwave sensors is on the rise owing to need for accurate crop forecast and the availability of multi polarization data. Till recently, the temporal amplitude data has been used for crop discrimination as well as acreage estimation. With the availability of dual and quadpol data, the differential response of crop geometry at various crop growth stages to various polarizations is being exploited for discrimination and classification of crops. An attempt has been made in the current study with RISAT1 and Radarsat2 C-band single, dual, fully and hybrid polarimetric data for crop inventory. The single date hybrid polarimetric data gave comparable results to the three date single polarization data as well as with the single date fully polarimetric data for crops like rice and cotton.

  16. Classification of earth terrain using polarimetric synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. H.; Swartz, A. A.; Yueh, H. A.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.; Van Zyl, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Supervised and unsupervised classification techniques are developed and used to classify the earth terrain components from SAR polarimetric images of San Francisco Bay and Traverse City, Michigan. The supervised techniques include the Bayes classifiers, normalized polarimetric classification, and simple feature classification using discriminates such as the absolute and normalized magnitude response of individual receiver channel returns and the phase difference between receiver channels. An algorithm is developed as an unsupervised technique which classifies terrain elements based on the relationship between the orientation angle and the handedness of the transmitting and receiving polariation states. It is found that supervised classification produces the best results when accurate classifier training data are used, while unsupervised classification may be applied when training data are not available.

  17. Forest Stand Volume Estimation Using Airborne LIDAR And Polarimetric SAR Over Hilly Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fengyun; Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Liu, Qingwang; Li, Shiming; Ling, Feilong

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the potential capability of mapping forest stand volume using the multi-sources data, ALOS PALSAR, airborne LiDAR and high resolution CCD image in forest stand level, one test site located in the warm temperate hilly forest region of Shandong Province in China was established. Airborne LiDAR and CCD campaign was carried out in the end of May, 2005. One scene of ALOS PALSAR quad-polarization image was acquired in May 19th,2007. Ground forest plot data for Black Locust and Chinese Pine dominated forest stands were collected through field work from May to June of 2008. The correlations of forest stand volume to PALSAR backscattering coefficient of HH, HV, VH,VV, their ratio and some H-Alpha polarimetric decomposition parameters were analyzed in stand level through regression analysis. Mean forest stand volume of each polygons (forest stand) was finally estimated based on the regression model established using ground measured forest volume data and the corresponding parameters (polygon mean) derived from LiDAR CHM and polarimetric SAR data. Results show that it is feasible to combine low density LiDAR data, L-band SAR data and forest polygon data from high resolution CCD image for stand level forest volume estimation in hilly regions, the RMSE is 20.064m3/ha for Black Locust and 24.730m3/ha for Chinese Pine .

  18. Forest Stand Volume Estimation Using Airborne LIDAR And Polarimetric SAR Over Hilly Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fengyun; Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Liu, Qingwang; Li, Shiming; Ling, Feilong; Pottier, Eric; Cloude, Shane

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the potential capability of mapping forest stand volume using the multi-sources data, ALOS PALSAR, airborne LiDAR and high resolution CCD image in forest stand level, one test site located in the warm temperate hilly forest region of Shandong Province in China was established. Airborne LiDAR and CCD campaign was carried out in the end of May, 2005. One scene of ALOS PALSAR quad-polarization image was acquired in May 19th,2007. Ground forest plot data for Black Locust and Chinese Pine dominated forest stands were collected through field work from May to June of 2008. The correlations of forest stand volume to PALSAR backscattering coefficient of HH, HV,VH,VV, their ratio and some H-Alpha polarimetric decomposition parameters were analyzed in stand level through regression analysis. Mean forest stand volume of each polygons (forest stand) was finally estimated based on the regression model established using ground measured forest volume data and the corresponding parameters (polygon mean) derived from LiDAR CHM and polarimetric SAR data. Results show that it is feasible to combine low density LiDAR data, L-band SAR data and forest polygon data from high resolution CCD image for stand level forest volume estimation in hilly regions, the RMSE is 20.064m3/ha for Black Locust and 24.730m3/ha for Chinese Pine .

  19. Agricultural crop harvest progress monitoring by fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Zhao, Chunjiang; Yang, Guijun; Li, Zengyuan; Chen, Erxue; Yuan, Lin; Yang, Xiaodong; Xu, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mapping and monitoring of crop harvest on a large spatial scale will provide critical information for the formulation of optimal harvesting strategies. This study evaluates the feasibility of C-band polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) for monitoring the harvesting progress of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) fields. Five multitemporal, quad-pol Radarsat-2 images and one optical ZY-1 02C image were acquired over a farmland area in China during the 2013 growing season. Typical polarimetric signatures were obtained relying on polarimetric decomposition methods. Temporal evolutions of these signatures of harvested fields were compared with the ones of unharvested fields in the context of the entire growing cycle. Significant sensitivity was observed between the specific polarimetric parameters and the harvest status of oilseed rape fields. Based on this sensitivity, a new method that integrates two polarimetric features was devised to detect the harvest status of oilseed rape fields using a single image. The validation results are encouraging even for the harvested fields covered with high residues. This research demonstrates the capability of PolSAR remote sensing in crop harvest monitoring, which is a step toward more complex applications of PolSAR data in precision agriculture.

  20. STORM: A New Airborne Polarimetric Real-Aperture Radar for Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podvin, D. Hauser. T.; Dechambre, M.; Valentin, R.; Caudal, G.; Daloze, J.-F.

    2003-04-01

    The successful launch of the Envisat in March 2002 offers new possibilities for estimating geophysical quantities characterizing continental or sea surface using the multi-polarization ASAR. In addition, in the context of the preparation of future missions which will embark polarimetric SAR (e.g. RADARSAT2) it is important to better assess the benefit of multi-polarization or polarimetric SAR systems. Airborne radar systems remain a very useful way to validate satellite measurements and to develop or validate algorithms needed to retrieve geophysical quantities from the radar measurements. CETP has designed and developed a new airborne radar called STORM] , which has a full polarimetric capability. STORM is derived from two previous versions of airborne radars developed at CETP, namely RESSAC (Hauser et al, JGR 1992) and RENE (Leloch-Duplex et al, Annales of Telecommunications, 1996). STORM is a real-aperture, C-Band system with a FM/CW transmission and with a rotating antenna to explore in azimuth. It offers a polarization diversity, receiving the complex signal in amplitude and phase simultaneously in H and V polarizations, which makes it possible to analyze the radar cross-section in HH, VV, HV, and other cross-polarized terms related to the scattering matrix. The antenna are pointed towards the surface with a mean incidence angle of 20° and a 3-dB aperture of about 30° in elevation and 8° in azimuth. The backscattered signal is analyzed from nadir to about 35° along the look-direction in 1012 range gates every 1.53m. The first tests with this system have been carried out in October 2001 over corner reflectors , over grass and ocean. In this workshop, we will present a validation of this system based on the results obtained with this first data set. In particular, we will present the calibration method of the complex signal (amplitude, phase), and distribution of phase differences (HH/VV, HV/VH) obtained over the different scatters (corner reflectors, grass

  1. a Robust Change Detector for Multilook Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari; Akbari; Abkar; Sahebi; Liu

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust unsupervised change detection algorithm for multilook polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data. The Hotelling-Lawley trace (HLT) statistic is used as a test statistic to measure the similarity of two covariance matrices. The generalized Kittler and Illingworth (K&I) minimum-error thresholding algorithm is then applied on the test statistic image to accurately discriminates changed and unchanged areas. The algorithm, tested on real PolSAR images, provides satisfactory results.

  2. Detection of Built-Up Areas Using Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Data and Hyperspectral Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordbari, R.; Maghsoudi, Y.; Salehi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (POLSAR) is an advantageous data for information extraction about objects and structures by using the wave scattering and polarization properties. Hyperspectral remote sensing exploits the fact that all materials reflect, absorb, and emit electromagnetic energy, at specific wavelengths, in distinctive patterns related to their molecular composition. As a result of their fine spectral resolution, Hyperspectral image (HIS) sensors provide a significant amount of information about the physical and chemical composition of the materials occupying the pixel surface. In target detection applications, the main objective is to search the pixels of an HSI data cube for the presence of a specific material (target). In this research, a hierarchical constrained energy minimization (hCEM) method using 5 different adjusting parameters has been used for target detection from hyperspectral data. Furthermore, to detect the built-up areas from POLSAR data, building objects discriminated from surrounding natural media presented on the scene using Freeman polarimetric target decomposition (PTD) and the correlation coefficient between co-pol and cross-pol channels. Also, target detection method has been implemented based on the different polarization basis for using the more information. Finally a majority voting method has been used for fusing the target maps. The polarimetric image C-band SAR data acquired by Radarsat-2, over San Francisco Bay area was used for the evaluation of the proposed method.

  3. Assessing Natural Disaster Impacts and Recovery Using Multifrequency, Fully-Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuchlewski, K. R.; Kim, Y.; Weissel, J. K.

    2003-04-01

    Many natural disasters involving landslides, volcanic eruptions, fires, or flo o ds entail terrain resurfacing, followed by subsequent recovery. Mo dern satellite and airborne remote sensing technologies, which combine broad spatial coverage and high spatial resolution with time-sequential site revisit capability, can provide important information on the extent and duration of ma jor landscape disturbance. In humid climate settings, these hazards temporarily remove or replace a natural vegetation cover and in doing so, mo dify the physical properties of the land surface. In optical remote sensing, removal of vegetation alters surface albedo in the visible - near infrared (V-NIR) waveband, particularly the high reflectance from vegetation in the NIR. For SAR remote sensing, removal of vegetation cover causes a change in dominant microwave scattering mechanism for the areas affected. SAR has operational advantages over optical sensors for rapid disaster assessment because of its day/night acquisition capability, the ability to "see through" smoke, clouds and dust, and the side-lo oking viewing geometry, which is an advantage whenever data collection directly above the site would prove dangerous. We show how multifrequency, fully-polarimetric airborne SAR data can be "inverted" for parameters that reflect scattering mechanism signatures diagnostic of different surface cover types. We apply a uniform approach to map landslides resulting from the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan and volcanic flows from the ma jor 1996 eruption of Manam volcano in Papua New Guinea. In addition, earlier work has shown that multifrequency SAR polarimetric backscatter is sensitive to total above-ground biomass. This attribute can be exploited to calculate vegetation loss during a disaster and for assessment of regrowth during the recovery phase.

  4. Poyang Lake wetland vegetation biomass inversion using polarimetric RADARSAT-2 synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guozhuang; Liao, Jingjuan; Guo, Huadong; Liu, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake in China and one of the most important wetlands in the world. Vegetation, an important component of wetland ecosystems, is one of the main sources of the carbon in the atmosphere. Biomass can quantify the contribution of wetland vegetation to carbon sinks and carbon sources. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR), which can operate in all day and weather conditions and penetrate vegetation to some extent, can be used to retrieve information about vegetation structure and the aboveground biomass. In this study, RADARSAT-2 polarimetric SAR data were used to retrieve aboveground vegetation biomass in the Poyang Lake wetland. Based on the canopy backscatter model, the vegetation backscatter characteristics in the C-band were studied, and a good relation between simulated backscatter and backscatter in the RADARSAT-2 imagery was achieved. Using the backscatter model, pairs of training data were built and used to train the back propagation artificial neural network. The biomass was retrieved using this ANN and compared with the field survey results. The root-mean-square error in the biomass estimation was 45.57 g/m2. This shows that the combination of the model and polarimetric decomposition components can efficiently improve the inversion precision.

  5. Unsupervised polarimetric synthetic aperture radar classification of large-scale landslides caused by Wenchuan earthquake in hue-saturation-intensity color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Wang, Robert; Deng, Yunkai; Liu, Yabo; Li, Bochen; Wang, Chunle; Balz, Timo

    2014-01-01

    A simple and effective approach for unsupervised classification of large-scale landslides caused by the Wenchuan earthquake is developed. The data sets used were obtained by a high-resolution fully polarimetric airborne synthetic aperture radar system working at X-band. In the proposed approach, Pauli decomposition false-color RGB imagery is first transformed to the hue-saturation-intensity (HSI) color space. Then, a good combination of k-means clustering and HSI imagery in different channels is used stage-by-stage for automatic landslides extraction. Two typical case studies are presented to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed scheme. Our approach is an important contribution to the rapid assessment of landslide hazards.

  6. An Analytical Calibration Approach for the Polarimetric Airborne C Band Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Hanh; Kim, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing is sensitive to the quantity and distribution of water in soil and vegetation. During summer 2000, the Microwave Geophysics Group a t the University of Michigan conducted the seventh Radiobrighness Energy Balance Experiment (REBEX-7) over a corn canopy in Michigan. Long time series of brightness temperatures, soil moisture and micrometeorology on the plot were taken. This paper addresses the calibration of the NASA GSFC polarimetric airborne C band microwave radiometer (ACMR) that participated in REBEX-7. These passive polarimeters are typically calibrated using an end-to-end approach based upon a standard artificial target or a well-known geophysical target. Analyzing the major internal functional subsystems offers a different perspective. The primary goal of this approach is to provide a transfer function that not only describes the system in its entire5 but also accounts for the contributions of each subsystem toward the final modified Stokes parameters. This approach does not assume that the radiometric system is linear as it does not take polarization isolation for granted, and it also serves as a realistic instrument simulator, a useful tool for future designs. The ACMR architecture can be partitioned into functional subsystems. The characteristics of each subsystem was extensively measured and the estimated parameters were imported into the overall dosed form system model. Inversion of the model yields a calibration for the modeled Stokes parameters with uncertainties of 0.2 K for the V and H polarizations and 2.4 K for the 3rd and 4th parameters. Application to the full Stokes parameters over a senescent cornfield is presented.

  7. Airborne Polarimetric, Two-Color Laser Altimeter Measurements of Lake Ice Cover: A Pathfinder for NASA's ICESat-2 Spaceflight Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David; Dabney, Philip; Valett, Susan; Yu, Anthony; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Kelly, April

    2011-01-01

    The ICESat-2 mission will continue NASA's spaceflight laser altimeter measurements of ice sheets, sea ice and vegetation using a new measurement approach: micropulse, single photon ranging at 532 nm. Differential penetration of green laser energy into snow, ice and water could introduce errors in sea ice freeboard determination used for estimation of ice thickness. Laser pulse scattering from these surface types, and resulting range biasing due to pulse broadening, is assessed using SIMPL airborne data acquired over icecovered Lake Erie. SIMPL acquires polarimetric lidar measurements at 1064 and 532 nm using the micropulse, single photon ranging measurement approach.

  8. Target-adaptive polarimetric synthetic aperture radar target discrimination using maximum average correlation height filters.

    PubMed

    Sadjadi, Firooz A; Mahalanobis, Abhijit

    2006-05-01

    We report the development of a technique for adaptive selection of polarization ellipse tilt and ellipticity angles such that the target separation from clutter is maximized. From the radar scattering matrix [S] and its complex components, in phase and quadrature phase, the elements of the Mueller matrix are obtained. Then, by means of polarization synthesis, the radar cross section of the radar scatters are obtained at different transmitting and receiving polarization states. By designing a maximum average correlation height filter, we derive a target versus clutter distance measure as a function of four transmit and receive polarization state angles. The results of applying this method on real synthetic aperture radar imagery indicate a set of four transmit and receive angles that lead to maximum target versus clutter discrimination. These optimum angles are different for different targets. Hence, by adaptive control of the state of polarization of polarimetric radar, one can noticeably improve the discrimination of targets from clutter.

  9. Marsh dieback, loss, and recovery mapped with satellite optical, airborne polarimetric radar, and field data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Chi, Zhaohui; Jones, Cathleen E.; Bannister, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper and Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite based optical sensors, NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle synthetic aperture radar (UAVSAR) polarimetric SAR (PolSAR), and field data captured the occurrence and the recovery of an undetected dieback that occurred between the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 in the Spartina alterniflora marshes of coastal Louisiana. Field measurements recorded the dramatic biomass decrease from 2010 to 2011 and a biomass recovery in 2012 dominated by a decrease of live biomass, and the loss of marsh as part of the dieback event. Based on an established relationship, the near-infrared/red vegetation index (VI) and site-specific measurements delineated a contiguous expanse of marsh dieback encompassing 6649.9 ha of 18,292.3 ha of S. alterniflora marshes within the study region. PolSAR data were transformed to variables used in biophysical mapping, and of this variable suite, the cross-polarization HV (horizontal send and vertical receive) backscatter was the best single indicator of marsh dieback and recovery. HV backscatter exhibited substantial and significant changes over the dieback and recovery period, tracked measured biomass changes, and significantly correlated with the live/dead biomass ratio. Within the context of regional trends, both HV and VI indicators started higher in pre-dieback marshes and exhibited substantially and statistically higher variability from year to year than that exhibited in the non-dieback marshes. That distinct difference allowed the capturing of the S. alterniflora marsh dieback and recovery; however, these changes were incorporated in a regional trend exhibiting similar but more subtle biomass composition changes.

  10. The Ecosystems SAR (EcoSAR) an Airborne P-band Polarimetric InSAR for the Measurement of Vegetation Structure, Biomass and Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Ranson, K. Jon; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sun, Guoqing; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Perrine, Martin L.; Du Toit, Cornelis F.; Bonds, Quenton; Beck, Jaclyn; Lu, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    EcoSAR is a new synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument being developed at the NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the polarimetric and interferometric measurements of ecosystem structure and biomass. The instrument uses a phased-array beamforming architecture and supports full polarimetric measurements and single pass interferometry. This Instrument development is part of NASA's Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program (ESTO IIP).

  11. Observation of Planetary Oceans with Fully Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Wooil M.

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most cost effective and powerful all weather tools for observation of planetary surface without sun light. The SAR systems can observe planetary surfaces with the very high resolution and large spatial coverage. We have developed and improved the algorithms for extracting quantitative information on geophysical parameters using various types of SAR data available on Earth's surface, both space-borne SAR (ERS-1/2, RADARSAT, and ENVISAT ASAR) and airborne SAR (NASA(JPL) AIRSAR). SAR is the only system that can provide a synoptic view of find wind fields near the coastal area on Earth. Many SAR images including RADARSAT and ENVISAT ASAR's alternating polarization mode and wide swath mode were to investigate the ability of retrieving sea surface wind field and the results are quite accurate and operationally acceptable. We installed corner reflectors on the nearby beach to calibrate the SAR data, and we obtained in-situ measurements from the several coast-based automatic weather systems and ocean buoys. Using the simultaneously acquired polarization ENVISAT ASAR data (HH and VV), the most appropriate polarization ratio was evaluated and applied for improving the wind retrieval model. In addition, the best combinations depending on given sea states and incidence angle ranges were investigated. The characteristics of short-period and long-period (near-inertial) internal waves are also investigated with several space-borne SAR systems. The possibility of inferring characteristics of the interior ocean dynamics from the SAR image associated with internal solitary waves was tested using a hydrodynamic interaction model (action balance equation) and a radar backscattering model (two-scale tilted Bragg model). These models were used iteratively to fit the observed SAR data to the simulated SAR. The estimated results were compared with in-situ measurements. The typical scales and the spatial and temporal characteristics of internal

  12. Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.; Kucera, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by the University of North Dakota (UND) under NASA Grant NAG5-11509, titled Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE. This work focused on the collection of data by two key platforms: the UND Citation II research aircraft and the NASA NPOL radar system. The CRYSTAL-FACE (C-F) mission addresses several key issues from the NASA Earth System Enterprise, including the variability of water in the atmosphere, the forcing provided by tropical cirrus and the response of the Earth system to this forcing. In situ measurements and radar observations of tropical convection, cirrus clouds and their environment are core elements of C-F. One of the primary issues that C-F is addressing is the relationship of tropical cirrus anvils to precipitating deep convection. The in situ measurements from C-F are being used to validate remote sensing of Earth-Atmosphere properties, increase our knowledge of upper tropospheric water vapor and its distribution, and increase our knowledge of tropical cirrus cloud morphology and composition. Radar measurements, especially polarimetric diversity observations available fiom the NASA NPOL radar, are providing essential information about the initiation, modulation, and dissipation of convective cores and the generation of associated anvils in tropical convection. Specifically, NPOL radar measurements contain information about convective intensity and its vertical structure for comparison with thermodynamic and kinematic environmental measurements observed from soundings. Because of the polarimetric diversity of MOL, statistics on bulk microphysical properties can be retrieved and compared to the other characteristics of convection and associated cirrus anvils. In summary, the central objectives of this proposal were to deploy the UND Citation research aircraft as an in situ sensing platform for this mission and to provide collaborative

  13. Proceedings of the Third Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Third Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop was held on 23-24 May 1991 at JPL. Thirty oral presentations were made and 18 poster papers displayed during the workshop. Papers from these 25 presentations are presented which include analyses of AIRSAR operations and studies in SAR remote sensing, ecology, hydrology, soil science, geology, oceanography, volcanology, and SAR mapping and data handling. Results from these studies indicate the direction and emphasis of future orbital radar-sensor missions that will be launched during the 1990's.

  14. Land Use Mapping with Evidential Fusion of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Hyperspectral Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    IDFS High Level Diagram 2. IDFS Image Modules The IDFS polarimetric SAR processor contains a textural classifier (using GLCM features on each plarimetric...classification from Coherence Matrix Grey-Level Cooccurrence Matrix Partial/Fully Polarimetric Parameters from the GLCM Table 1 Textural Features and...polarization response parameters), textural classifiers ( GLCM , backscattering coefficient) that provide hypotheses about the likelihood that some object of

  15. EcoSAR: NASA's P-band fully polarimetric single pass interferometric airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanoglu, B.; Rincon, R. F.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Lee, S. K.; Sun, G.; Daniyan, O.; Harcum, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    EcoSAR is a new airborne synthetic aperture radar imaging system, developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It is a P-band sensor that employs a non-conventional and innovative design. The EcoSAR system was designed as a multi-disciplinary instrument to image the 3-dimensional surface of the earth from a single pass platform with two antennas. EcoSAR's principal mission is to penetrate the forest canopy to return vital information about the canopy structure and estimate biomass. With a maximum bandwidth of 200 MHz in H and 120 MHz in V polarizations it can provide sub-meter resolution imagery of the study area. EcoSAR's dual antenna, 32 transmit and receive channel architecture provides a test-bed for developing new algorithms in InSAR data processing such as single pass interferometry, full polarimetry, post-processing synthesis of multiple beams, simultaneous measurement over both sides of the flight track, selectable resolution and variable incidence angle. The flexible architecture of EcoSAR will create new opportunities in radar remote sensing of forest biomass, permafrost active layer thickness, and topography mapping. EcoSAR's first test flight occurred between March 27th and April 1st, 2014 over the Andros Island in Bahamas and Corcovado and La Selva National Parks in Costa Rica. The 32 channel radar system collected about 6 TB of radar data in about 12 hours of data collection. Due to the existence of radio and TV communications in the operational frequency band, acquired data contains strong radar frequency interference, which had to be removed prior to beamforming and focusing. Precise locations of the antennas are tracked using high-rate GPS and inertial navigation units, which provide necessary information for accurate processing of the imagery. In this presentation we will present preliminary imagery collected during the test campaign, show examples of simultaneous dual track imaging, as well as a single pass interferogram. The

  16. Manmade target extraction based on multistage decision and its application for change detection in polarimetric synthetic aperture radar image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Runmin; Han, Ping; Li, Chongyi; He, Jiaji; Zhang, Zaiji

    2016-09-01

    Targets of interest are different in various applications in which manmade targets, such as aircraft, ships, and buildings, are given more attention. Manmade target extraction methods using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images are designed in response to various demands, which include civil uses, business purposes, and military industries. This plays an increasingly vital role in monitoring, military reconnaissance, and precision strikes. Achieving accurate and complete results through traditional methods is becoming more challenging because of the scattered complexity of polarization in polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) image. A multistage decision-based method is proposed composed of power decision, dominant scattering mechanism decision, and reflection symmetry decision. In addition, the theories of polarimetric contrast enhancement, generalized Y decomposition, and maximum eigenvalue ratio are applied to assist the decision. Fully PolSAR data are adopted to evaluate and verify the approach. Experimental results show that the method can achieve an effective result with a lower false alarm rate and clear contours. Finally, on this basis, a universal framework of change detection for manmade targets is presented as an application of our method. Two sets of measured data are also used to evaluate and verify the effectiveness of the change-detection algorithm.

  17. Assessing Natural Disaster Impacts and Recovery Using Multifrequency, Fully-Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Optical Remote Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissel, J. K.; Czuchlewski, K. R.; Kim, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Many natural disasters involving landslides, volcanic eruptions, fires, or floods entail terrain resurfacing, followed by subsequent recovery. Modern satellite and airborne remote sensing technologies, which combine broad spatial coverage and high spatial resolution with time-sequential site revisit capability, can provide important information on the extent and duration of major landscape disturbance. In humid climate settings, these hazards temporarily remove or replace a natural vegetation cover and in doing so, modify the physical properties of the land surface. In optical remote sensing, removal of vegetation alters surface albedo in the visible -- near infrared (V-NIR) waveband, particularly the high reflectance from vegetation in the NIR. For SAR remote sensing, removal of vegetation cover causes a change in dominant microwave scattering mechanism for the areas affected. SAR has operational advantages over optical sensors for rapid disaster assessment because of its day/night acquisition capability, the ability to ``see through'' smoke, clouds and dust, and the side-looking viewing geometry, which is an advantage whenever data collection directly above the site would prove dangerous. We show how multifrequency, fully-polarimetric airborne SAR data can be ``inverted'' for parameters that reflect scattering mechanism signatures diagnostic of different surface cover types. We apply a uniform approach to map landslides resulting from the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan, volcanic flows from the major 1996 eruption of Manam volcano in Papua New Guinea, and the extent of damage from the summer 2002 Rodeo -- Chediski wildfire in Arizona. In addition, earlier work has shown that multifrequency SAR polarimetric backscatter is sensitive to total above-ground biomass. This attribute can be exploited to calculate vegetation loss during a disaster and for assessment of regrowth during the recovery phase.

  18. Ice island detection and characterization with airborne synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, M.O.; Sackinger, W.M. )

    1990-04-15

    A 1:300,000 scale airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of an area of the Arctic Ocean adjacent to the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Canadian High Arctic, is examined to determine the number and characteristics of ice islands in the image and to assess the capability of airborne and satellite SAR to detect ice islands. Twelve ice islands have been identified, and their dimensions range from as large as 5.7 km by 8.7 km to as small as 0.15 km by 0.25 km. A significant SAR characteristic of the shelf ice portions of ice islands is a return with a ribbed texture of alternating lighter and darker grey tones resulting from the indulating shelf ice surfaces of the ice islands. The appearance of the ribbed texture varies according to the ice islands' orientation relative to the illumination direction and consequently the incidence angle. Some ice islands also include extensive areas of textureless dark tone attached to the shelf ice. The weak returns correspond to (1) multiyear landfast sea ice that was attached to the front of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf at the time of calving and which has remained attached since then and (2) multiyear pack ice that has become attached and consolidated since the calving, indicating that ice islands can increase their area and mass significantly as they drift. Ice islands are easily discernible in SAR images and for the future SAR represents a promising technique to obtain a census of ice islands in the Arctic Ocean. However, any SAR-based census probably will be conservative because ice islands smaller than 300-400 m across are likely to remain undetected, particularly in areas of heavy ice ridging which produces strong SAR clutter.

  19. Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) on left rear fuselage of DC-8 Airborne Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A view of the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) antenna on the left rear fuselage of the DC-8. The AIRSAR captures images of the ground from the side of the aircraft and can provide precision digital elevation mapping capabilities for a variety of studies. The AIRSAR is one of a number of research systems that have been added to the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  20. Polarimetric remote sensing of geophysical medium structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.; Nguyen, D. T.

    1993-11-01

    Polarimetric remote sensing of structures in geophysical media is studied in this paper based on their symmetry properties. Orientations of spheroidal scatterers described by spherical, uniform, planophile, plagiothile, erectophile, and extremophile distributions are considered to derive their polarimetric backscattering characteristics. These distributions can be identified from the observed scattering coefficients by comparison with theoretical symmetry calculations. A new parameter is defined to study scattering structures in geophysical media. Experimental observations from polarimetric data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne synthetic aperture radar over forests, sea ice, and sea surface are presented to illustrate the use of symmetry properties. For forests, the coniferous forest in Mount Shasta area and mixed forests near Presque Isle show evidence of the centrical symmetry at C band. In sea ice from the Beaufort Sea, multiyear sea ice has a cross-polarized ratio e close to e0, calculated from symmetry, due to the randomness in the scattering structure. For first-year sea ice, e is much smaller than e0 as a result of preferential alignment of the columnar structure of the ice. From polarimetric data of a sea surface in the Bering sea, it is observed that e and e0 are increasing with incident angle and e is greater than e0 at L band because of the directional feature of sea surface waves. Use of symmetry properties of geophysical media for polarimetric radar calibration is also suggested.

  1. Quantitative investigations of geologic surfaces utilizing airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data for Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data were collected over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. These two data sets were used to quantitatively characterize both the mineralogy and surface structure of the valley floor. Field mapping and characterization of the salt flats across the valley identified 16 separate units. The AVIRIS data were calibrated using the 'empirical line' method, and spectra extracted for the 16 units. A water vapor map was generated from the AVIRIS data and showed spatial variations in its distribution due to evaporation of surface water. Unmixing of the 16 spectral units produced maps of endmember abundance.

  2. Analysis of polarimetric SAR signatures of vegetated areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Nancy H. F.; Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura L.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Sheen, Daniel R.

    1991-01-01

    Several techniques to quantitatively analyze the information in the polarimetric signature are discussed, including: (1) a shape (texture) parameter; (2) fractional polarization; (3) the phase difference signature; and (4) the correlation coefficient. These techniques are applied to airborne synthetic aperture radar imagery collected over several different vegetation communities, including a mangrove swamp, a mixed-age loblolly pine forest, and a flooded bald cypress forest.

  3. Object-oriented fusion of RADARSAT-2 polarimetric synthetic aperture radar and HJ-1A multispectral data for land-cover classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yan; Jiang, Qigang; Wang, Bin; Li, Yuanhua; Liu, Shu; Cui, Can

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of the integration of optical and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data to accurate land-cover classification was investigated. For this purpose, an object-oriented classification methodology that consisted of polarimetric decomposition, hybrid feature selection, and a support vector machine (SVM) was proposed. A RADARSAT-2 Fine Quad-Pol image and an HJ-1A CCD2 multispectral image were used as data sources. First, polarimetric decomposition was implemented for the RADARSAT-2 image. Sixty-one polarimetric parameters were extracted using different polarimetric decomposition methods and then merged with the main diagonal elements (T11, T22, T33) of the coherency matrix to form a multichannel image with 64 layers. Second, the HJ-1A and the multichannel images were divided into numerous image objects by implementing multiresolution segmentation. Third, 1104 features were extracted from the HJ-1A and the multichannel images for each image object. Fourth, the hybrid feature selection method that combined the ReliefF filter approach and the genetic algorithm (GA) wrapper approach (ReliefF-GA) was used. Finally, land-cover classification was performed by an SVM classifier on the basis of the selected features. Five other classification methodologies were conducted for comparison to verify the contribution of optical and PolSAR data integration and to test the superiority of the proposed object-oriented classification methodology. Comparison results show that HJ-1A data, RADARSAT-2 data, polarimetric decomposition, ReliefF-GA, and SVM have a significant contribution by improving land-cover classification accuracy.

  4. Forest height estimation from mountain forest areas using general model-based decomposition for polarimetric interferometric synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Nghia Pham; Zou, Bin; Cai, Hongjun; Wang, Chengyi

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of forest parameters over mountain forest areas using polarimetric interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PolInSAR) images is one of the greatest interests in remote sensing applications. For mountain forest areas, scattering mechanisms are strongly affected by the ground topography variations. Most of the previous studies in modeling microwave backscattering signatures of forest area have been carried out over relatively flat areas. Therefore, a new algorithm for the forest height estimation from mountain forest areas using the general model-based decomposition (GMBD) for PolInSAR image is proposed. This algorithm enables the retrieval of not only the forest parameters, but also the magnitude associated with each mechanism. In addition, general double- and single-bounce scattering models are proposed to fit for the cross-polarization and off-diagonal term by separating their independent orientation angle, which remains unachieved in the previous model-based decompositions. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated with simulated data from PolSARProSim software and ALOS-PALSAR spaceborne PolInSAR datasets over the Kalimantan areas, Indonesia. Experimental results indicate that forest height could be effectively estimated by GMBD.

  5. Symmetry in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.

    1993-01-01

    Relationships among polarimetric backscattering coefficients are derived from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. For both reciprocal and non-reciprocal media, symmetry encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered. The derived properties are general and valid to all scattering mechanisms, including volume and surface scatterings and their interactions, in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is also discussed. Orientations of spheroidal scatterers described by spherical, uniform, planophile, plagiothile, erectophile, and extremophile distributions are considered to derive their polarimetric backscattering characteristics. These distributions can be identified from the observed scattering coefficients by comparison with theoretical symmetry calculations. A new parameter is then defined to study scattering structures in geophysical media. Observations from polarimetric data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne synthetic aperture radar over forests, sea ice, and sea surface are presented. Experimental evidences of the symmetry relationships are shown and their use in polarimetric remote sensing is illustrated. For forests, the coniferous forest in Mt. Shasta area (California) and mixed forest near Presque Isle (Maine) exhibit characteristics of the centrical symmetry at C-band. For sea ice in the Beaufort Sea, multi-year sea ice has a cross-polarized ratio e close to e(sub 0), calculated from symmetry, due to the randomness in the scattering structure. First-year sea ice has e much smaller than e(sub 0) due to the preferential alignment of the columnar structure of the ice. From polarimetric data of a sea surface in the Bering Sea, it is

  6. Polarimetric C-/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar Observations of Melting Sea Ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, J. A.; Beckers, J. F.; Brossier, E.; Haas, C.

    2013-12-01

    Operational ice information services rely heavily on space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for the production of ice charts to meet their mandate of providing timely and accurate sea ice information to support safe and efficient marine operations. During the summer melt period, the usefulness of SAR data for sea ice monitoring is limited by the presence of wet snow and melt ponds on the ice surface, which can mask the signature of the underlying ice. This is a critical concern for ice services whose clients (e.g. commercial shipping, cruise tourism, resource exploration and extraction) are most active at this time of year when sea ice is at its minimum extent, concentration and thickness. As a result, there is a need to further quantify the loss of ice information in SAR data during the melt season and to identify what information can still be retrieved about ice surface conditions and melt pond evolution at this time of year. To date the majority of studies have been limited to analysis of single-polarization C-band SAR data. This study will investigate the potential complimentary and unique sea ice information that polarimetric C- and X-band SAR data can provide to supplement the information available from traditional single co-polarized C-band SAR data. A time-series of polarimetric C- and X-band SAR data was acquired over Jones Sound in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, in the vicinity of the Grise Fiord, Nunavut. Five RADARSAT-2 Wide Fine Quad-pol images and 11 TerraSAR-X StripMap dual-pol (HH/VV) images were acquired. The time-series begins at the onset of melt in early June and extends through advanced melt conditions in late July. Over this period several ponding and drainage events and two snowfall events occurred. Field observations of sea ice properties were collected using an Ice Mass Balance (IMB) buoy, hourly photos from a time-lapse camera deployed on a coastal cliff, and manual in situ measurements of snow thickness and melt pond depth

  7. Precipitation observations from high frequency spaceborne polarimetric synthetic aperture radar and ground-based radar: Theory and model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Jason P.

    Global weather monitoring is a very useful tool to better understand the Earth's hydrological cycle and provide critical information for emergency and warning systems in severe cases. Developed countries have installed numerous ground-based radars for this purpose, but they obviously are not global in extent. To address this issue, the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) was launched in 1997 and has been quite successful. The follow-on Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will replace TRMM once it is launched. However, a single precipitation radar satellite is still limited, so it would be beneficial if additional existing satellite platforms can be used for meteorological purposes. Within the past few years, several X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites have been launched and more are planned. While the primary SAR application is surface monitoring, and they are heralded as "all weather'' systems, strong precipitation induces propagation and backscatter effects in the data. Thus, there exists a potential for weather monitoring using this technology. The process of extracting meteorological parameters from radar measurements is essentially an inversion problem that has been extensively studied for radars designed to estimate these parameters. Before attempting to solve the inverse problem for SAR data, however, the forward problem must be addressed to gain knowledge on exactly how precipitation impacts SAR imagery. This is accomplished by simulating storms in SAR data starting from real measurements of a storm by ground-based polarimetric radar. In addition, real storm observations by current SAR platforms are also quantitatively analyzed by comparison to theoretical results using simultaneous acquisitions by ground radars even in single polarization. For storm simulation, a novel approach is presented here using neural networks to accommodate the oscillations present when the particle scattering requires the Mie solution, i

  8. Determining the mixing of oil and sea water using polarimetric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchew, Brent

    2012-08-01

    Knowledge of the characteristics of spilled oil in the ocean is important for cleanup operations, predictions of the impact on wildlife, and studies of the nature of the ocean surface and currents. Herein I discuss a method for evaluating the characteristics of oil in a marine environment using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and present a new, simple classification, called the oil/water mixing index (Mdex), to quickly assess the results. I link the Mdex results to the Bonn Agreement for Oil Appearance Codes (BAOAC) for aerial observers and demonstrate the Mdex on Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) data collected June 23, 2010 over the former site of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) drilling rig. The Mdex map shows a more heterogeneous oil swath than do radar backscatter images and features within the oil are consistent with features present in previously published, near-coincident optical imagery. The Mdex results indicate that most of the oil near the DWH was mixed with sea water to a minimum depth of a few millimeters, though some areas containing relatively thin films are observed.

  9. Case Studies for UV, O2-A Band and Polarimetric Airborne Remote Sensing Observations of Coastal Waters: Implications for Atmospheric Correction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, J.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Cairns, B.; Wasilewski, A. P.; Mccubbin, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for spaceborne observations of ocean color is to correct for atmospheric scattering, which typically contributes ≥85% to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance and varies substantially with aerosols. Ocean color missions traditionally analyze TOA radiance in the near-infrared (NIR), where the ocean is black, to constrain the TOA atmospheric scattering in the visible (VIS). However, this procedure is limited by insufficient sensitivity of NIR radiance to absorption and vertical distribution of aerosols, and by uncertainties in the extrapolation of aerosol properties from the NIR to the VIS. To improve atmospheric correction for ocean color observations, one needs to change the traditional procedure for this correction and/or increase the aerosol information. The instruments proposed for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission include ultraviolet and Oxygen A-band observations, as well as multispectral and multiangle polarimetry, to increase the aerosol information content. However no studies have been performed on whether such observations contain sufficient aerosol information, and on how to use this information, to substantially improve atmospheric correction. To study the atmospheric correction capabilities of PACE-like instruments, we are conducting field experiments off the Coast of California to obtain high-altitude airborne and in-situ observations of water-leaving radiance. The airborne data sets consist of hyperspectral radiance between 380-2500 nm by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, and narrow-band multiangle polarimetric data between 410-2250 nm by the Research Scanning Polarimeter. We discuss the quality of and comparisons between these data sets, and their differential sensitivities to variations in aerosol properties and ocean color.

  10. Offshore platform sourced pollution monitoring using space-borne fully polarimetric C and X band synthetic aperture radar.

    PubMed

    Singha, Suman; Ressel, Rudolf

    2016-11-15

    Use of polarimetric SAR data for offshore pollution monitoring is relatively new and shows great potential for operational offshore platform monitoring. This paper describes the development of an automated oil spill detection chain for operational purposes based on C-band (RADARSAT-2) and X-band (TerraSAR-X) fully polarimetric images, wherein we use polarimetric features to characterize oil spills and look-alikes. Numbers of near coincident TerraSAR-X and RADARSAT-2 images have been acquired over offshore platforms. Ten polarimetric feature parameters were extracted from different types of oil and 'look-alike' spots and divided into training and validation dataset. Extracted features were then used to develop a pixel based Artificial Neural Network classifier. Mutual information contents among extracted features were assessed and feature parameters were ranked according to their ability to discriminate between oil spill and look-alike spots. Polarimetric features such as Scattering Diversity, Surface Scattering Fraction and Span proved to be most suitable for operational services.

  11. Retrievals of Stratocumulus Drop Size Distributions from Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, Michael; Diner, David

    2013-04-01

    Data from the Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) satellite instruments have been used for many years to retrieve information about the mean and dispersion of cloud droplet size distributions. The position of specific features in scattering angle space corresponding to supernumerary bows in the polarized phase function are extremely sensitive to the effective radius of the cloud droplets, while the amplitude of these features carries information on the dispersion of droplet sizes. Due to the relatively coarse angular sampling of POLDER multiangular views (~10°), variations in scattering angle from pixel to pixel are used instead to obtain fine sampling in angle, which requires the clouds to be homogeneous on scales of 150 km × 150 km in the POLDER retrievals. We will describe high-resolution polarimetric observations of marine stratocumulus clouds made off the coast of California by the AirMSPI instrument, which files on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude research aircraft. AirMSPI is an eight-band pushbroom camera mounted on a controllable gimbal, which allows the instrument to make observations over a ±67° range in the direction of aircraft motion. AirMSPI's eight spectral bands are 355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, 865, and 935 nm in the ultraviolet to the near-infrared range. Polarimetric observations are made in the 470, 660, and 865 nm bands using photoelastic modulators (PEMs) to rapidly vary the orientation of the linearly polarized component (Stokes Q and U) of the incoming light, enabling measurement of the relative ratios of these parameters to intensity from individual pixels. From the nominal 20 km altitude of the aircraft, AirMSPI can provide imagery mapped to a 25 m grid using a sweep scanning strategy in which the gimbal controlling the pointing of the instrument is slewed back and forth along the direction of aircraft motion. The AirMSPI observations of the polarimetric features of marine stratocumulus clouds have been

  12. Conventional and synthetic aperture processing for airborne ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert M.; Simkins, William L.; Brown, Russell D.

    1994-07-01

    For the past four years Airborne Environmental Surveys, a division of Era Aviation, Inc., has used unique and patented airborne frequency modulated, continuous wave radars and processes for detection and mapping subsurface phenomena. Primary application has focused on the detection of manmade objects in landfills, hazardous waste sites (some of which contain unexploded ordnance), and subsurface plumes of refined free- floating hydrocarbons. Recently, MSB Technologies, Inc. has developed a form of synthetic aperture radar processing, called GPSAR, that is tailored especially for the AES radars. Used as an adjunct to more conventional airborne ground-penetrating radar data processing techniques, GPSAR takes advantage of the radars' coherent transmission and produces imagery that is better focused and more accurate in determining an object's range and true depth. This paper describes the iterative stages of data processing and analysis used with the radars and shows the added advantages that GPSAR processing offers.

  13. Offshore pollution monitoring using fully polarimetric X- and C-band synthetic aperture radar: a near-real-time perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Suman; Ressel, Rudolf; Lehner, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Use of polarimetric features for oil spill characterization is relatively new and have not been used for operational services until now. In the last decade, a number of semi-automatic and automatic techniques have been proposed in order to differentiate oil spill and look-alike spots based on single pol SAR data, however these techniques suffer from a high miss-classification rate which is undesirable for operational services. In addition to that, small operational spillages from offshore platforms are often ignored as it appears insignificant on traditional ScanSAR (wide) images. In order to mitigate this situation a major focus of research in this area is the development of automated algorithms based on polarimetric images to distinguish oil spills from look-alikes. This paper describes the development of an automated Near Real Time (NRT) oil spill detection processing chain based on quad-pol RADARSAT-2 and quad-pol TerraSAR-X images using polarimetric features (e.g. Lexicographic and Pauli Based features). Number TerraSAR-X images acquired over known offshore platforms with same day ascending and descending configuration along with near coincident RADARSAT-2 acquisition. A total number of 10 polarimetric feature parameters were extracted from different types of oil (e.g. crude oil, emulsion etc) and look-alike spots and divided into training and validation dataset. Extracted features were then used for training and validation of a pixel based Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifier. Initial performance estimation was carried out for the proposed methodology in order to evaluate its suitability for NRT operational service. Mutual information contents among extracted features were assessed and feature parameters were ranked according to their ability to discriminate between oil spill and look- alike. Polarimetric features such as Scattering diversity, Surface scattering fraction, Entropy and Span proved to be more discriminative than other polarimetric features.

  14. A model for forming airborne synthetic aperture radar images of underground targets

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from an airborne platform has been proposed for imaging targets beneath the earth`s surface. The propagation of the radar`s energy within the ground, however, is much different than in the earth`s atmosphere. The result is signal refraction, echo delay, propagation losses, dispersion, and volumetric scattering. These all combine to make SAR image formation from an airborne platform much more challenging than a surface imaging counterpart. This report treats the ground as a lossy dispersive half-space, and presents a model for the radar echo based on measurable parameters. The model is then used to explore various imaging schemes, and image properties. Dynamic range is discussed, as is the impact of loss on dynamic range. Modified window functions are proposed to mitigate effects of sidelobes of shallow targets overwhelming deeper targets.

  15. MAX-91: Polarimetric SAR results on Montespertoli site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baronti, S.; Luciani, S.; Moretti, S.; Paloscia, S.; Schiavon, G.; Sigismondi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a powerful sensor for high resolution ocean and land mapping and particularly for monitoring hydrological parameters in large watersheds. There is currently much research in progress to assess the SAR operational capability as well as to estimate the accuracy achievable in the measurements of geophysical parameters with the presently available airborne and spaceborne sensors. An important goal of this research is to improve our understanding of the basic mechanisms that control the interaction of electro-magnetic waves with soil and vegetation. This can be done both by developing electromagnetic models and by analyzing statistical relations between backscattering and ground truth data. A systematic investigation, which aims at a better understanding of the information obtainable from the multi-frequency polarimetric SAR to be used in agro-hydrology, is in progress by our groups within the framework of SIR-C/X-SAR Project and has achieved a most significant milestone with the NASA/JPL Aircraft Campaign named MAC-91. Indeed this experiment allowed us to collect a large and meaningful data set including multi-temporal multi-frequency polarimetric SAR measurements and ground truth. This paper presents some significant results obtained over an agricultural flat area within the Montespertoli site, where intensive ground measurements were carried out. The results are critically discussed with special regard to the information associated with polarimetric data.

  16. Polarimetric Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Comparison with conventional single- polarization estimates illustrates the significant processing gains that are possible if there is access to full...polarimetric interferometric data. A comparison with conventional single- polarization presented in former lectures illustrates the significant processing...gains that are possible if access to full polarimetric interferometric data is possible. The strong polarization dependence of the coherence will be

  17. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  18. Phase calibration of polarimetric radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheen, Dan R.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Freeman, Anthony

    1989-01-01

    The problem of phase calibration between polarization channels of an imaging radar is studied. The causes of various types of phase errors due to the radar system architecture and system imperfections are examined. A simple model is introduced to explain the spatial variation in phase error as being due to a displacement between the phase centers of the vertical and horizontal antennas. It is also shown that channel leakage can cause a spatial variation in phase error. Phase calibration using both point and distributed ground targets is discussed and a method for calibrating phase using only distributed target is verified, subject to certain constraints. Experimental measurements using the NADC/ERIM P-3 synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system and NASA/JPL DC-8 SAR, which operates at C-, L-, and P-bands, are presented. Both of these systems are multifrequency, polarimetric, airborne, SAR systems.

  19. Automatic oil spill detection on quad polarimetric UAVSAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnemoonfar, Maryam; Dhakal, Shanti

    2016-05-01

    Oil spill on the water bodies has adverse effects on coastal and marine ecology. Oil spill contingency planning is of utmost importance in order to plan for mitigation and remediation of the oceanic oil spill. Remote sensing technologies are used for monitoring the oil spills on the ocean and coastal region. Airborne and satellite sensors such as optical, infrared, ultraviolet, radar and microwave sensors are available for remote surveillance of the ocean. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is used most extensively for oil-spill monitoring because of its capability to operate during day/night and cloud-cover condition. This study detects the possible oil spill regions on fully polarimetric Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle - Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) images. The UAVSAR image is decomposed using Cloude-Pottier polarimetric decomposition technique to obtain entropy and alpha parameters. In addition, other polarimetric features such as co-polar correlation and degree of polarization are obtained for the UAVSAR images. These features are used to with fuzzy logic based classification to detect oil spill on the SAR images. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Operations Manager Tim Miller checks out software for the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Tim Miller checks out software for the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR). He was the AIRSAR operations manager for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The AIRSAR produces imaging data for a range of studies conducted by the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  1. Enhanced Feature Based Mosaicing Technique for Visually and Geometrically Degraded Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, S.; Vardhini, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    In airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR), there was a major problem encountered in the area of image mosaic in the absence of platform information and sensor information (geocoding), when SAR is applied in large-scale scene and the platform faces large changes. In order to enhance real-time performance and robustness of image mosaic, enhancement based Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) mosaic method for airborne SAR is proposed in this paper. SURF is a novel scale-invariant and rotation-invariant feature. It is perfect in its high computation, speed and robustness. In this paper, When the SAR image is acquired, initially the image is enhanced by using local statistic techniques and SURF is applied for SAR image matching accord to its characteristic, and then acquires its invariant feature for matching. In the process of image matching, the nearest neighbor rule for initial matching is used, and the wrong points of the matches are removed through RANSAC fitting algorithm. The proposed algorithm is implemented in different SAR images with difference in scale change, rotation change and noise. The proposed algorithm is compared with other existing algorithms and the quantitative and qualitative measures are calculated and tabulated. The proposed algorithm is robust to changes and the threshold is varied accordingly to increase the matching rate more than 95 %.

  2. Disaster phenomena of Wenchuan earthquake in high resolution airborne synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Bo; Tang, Yixian; Wu, Hongan; Wen, Xiaoyang; Yan, Dongmei

    2009-05-01

    The devastating Wenchuan Earthquake occurred in Sichuan Province, Southwestern China, with a magnitude of 8.0 on May 12, 2008. Most buildings along the seismic zone were ruined, resulting in infrastructure damage to factories, traffic facilities and power supplies. The earthquake also triggered geological disasters, such as landslides, debris flow, landslide lakes, etc. During the rescue campaign the remote sensing aircrafts of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), equipped with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and optical sensors, flew over the disaster area and acquired many high resolution airborne SAR images. We first describe the basic characteristics of SAR imagery. The SAR images of buildings are simulated, and the backscattering mechanism of the buildings is analyzed. Finally, the various disaster phenomena are described and analyzed in the high resolution airborne SAR images. It is shown that certain phenomena of ruins could be identified clearly in high resolution SAR images in proper imaging conditions, while the functional destruction is quite difficult to detect. With calibrated data, the polarmetric SAR interferometry could be used to analyze the scattering mechanism and 3D distribution of the scattering center, which are redound to earthquake damage assessment.

  3. Progress report on the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Y.; Imel, D.; Chu, A.; Miller, T.; Moller, D.; Skotnicki, W.

    2001-01-01

    AIRSAR has served as a test-bed for both imaging radar techniques and radar technologies for over a decade. In fact, the polarimetric, cross-track interferometric, and along-track introferometric radar techniques were all developed using AIRSAR.

  4. Remote sensing of land scenarios with an airborne 94-GHz synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, Helmut; Makaruschka, R.; Baars, E. Peter

    1996-06-01

    The scattering process of electromagnetic waves is dominated by the match between wavelength and the geometric dimensions of surface structures. With respect to the microwave radar bands millimeter-waves are better matched to small surface features of terrain. Therefore this frequency band is able to gain additional information on the terrain of interest. For high resolution imaging SAR is the favorite solution also for millimeter-wave frequencies. Compared to more classical radar bands millimeter-waves offer advantages in the SAR processing, because due to the higher primary resolution at a given antenna aperture sources of image distortions such as range migration or depth of focus can be neglected at these frequencies. Moreover the inherently short aperture time for a given resolution improves the relation to the time constant of flight instabilities and makes motion compensation a simple process. A coherent, polarimetric, high range resolution radar, operating at a nominal frequency of 94 GHz, has been installed onboard an aircraft to allow remote sensing measurements in a side looking synthetic aperture approach. The radar-raw-data were registered together with time code and inertial data of the aircraft and later on evaluated by an off-line SAR-processor. The resulting images then had to undergo an automatic recognition process to extract certain complex targets using a knowledge based production system. The paper describes the measurement system and discusses the evaluation procedures with emphasis on the applied SAR algorithm. Examples of radar images at 94 GHz are shown and samples of pattern recognition derived from the SAR images are shown.

  5. 3-D airborne ultrasound synthetic aperture imaging based on capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we present an airborne 3-D volumetric imaging system based on capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs). For this purpose we fabricated 89-kHz CMUTs where each CMUT is made of a circular single-crystal silicon plate with a radius of 1mm and a thickness of 20 μm, which is actuated by electrostatic force through a 20-μm vacuum gap. The measured transmit sensitivity at 300-V DC bias is 14.6 Pa/V and 24.2 Pa/V, when excited by a 30-cycle burst and a continuous wave, respectively. The measured receive sensitivity at 300-V DC bias is 16.6 mV/Pa (-35.6 dB re 1 V/Pa) for a 30-cycle burst. A 26×26 2-D array was implemented by mechanical scanning a co-located transmitter and receiver using the classic synthetic aperture (CSA) method. The measurement of a 1.6λ-size target at a distance of 500 mm presented a lateral resolution of 3.17° and also showed good agreement with the theoretical point spread function. The 3-D imaging of two plates at a distance of 350 mm and 400 mm was constructed to exhibit the capability of the imaging system. This study experimentally demonstrates that a 2-D CMUT array can be used for practical 3-D imaging applications in air, such as a human-machine interface.

  6. Space-borne polarimetric SAR sensors or the golden age of radar polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottier, E.

    2010-06-01

    SAR Polarimetry represents an active area of research in Active Earth Remote Sensing. This interest is clearly supported by the fact that nowadays there exists, or there will exist in a very next future, a non negligible quantity of launched Polarimetric SAR Spaceborne sensors. The ENVISAT satellite, developed by ESA, was launched on March 2002, and was the first Spaceborne sensor offering an innovative dualpolarization Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) system operating at C-band. The second Polarimetric Spaceborne sensor is ALOS, a Japanese Earth-Observation satellite, developed by JAXA and was launched in January 2006. This mission includes an active L-band polarimetric radar sensor (PALSAR) whose highresolution data may be used for environmental and hazard monitoring. The third Polarimetric Spaceborne sensor is TerraSAR-X, a new German radar satellite, developed by DLR, EADS-Astrium and Infoterra GmbH, was launched on June 2007. This sensor carries a dual-polarimetric and high frequency X-Band SAR sensor that can be operated in different modes and offers features that were not available from space before. At least, the Polarimetric Spaceborne sensor, developed by CSA and MDA, and named RADARSAT-2 was launched in December 2007 The Radarsat program was born out the need for effective monitoring of Canada’s icy waters, and some Radarsat-2 capabilities that benefit sea- and river ice applications are the multi-polarization options that will improve ice-edge detection, ice-type discrimination and structure information. The many advances in these different Polarimetric Spaceborne platforms were developed to respond to specific needs for radar data in environmental monitoring applications around the world, like : sea- and river-ice monitoring, marine surveillance, disaster management, oil spill detection, snow monitoring, hydrology, mapping, geology, agriculture, soil characterisation, forestry applications (biomass, allometry, height…), urban mapping etc

  7. Synthetic aperture radar imagery of airports and surrounding areas: Study of clutter at grazing angles and their polarimetric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.; Clinthorne, James T.

    1991-01-01

    The statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area is addressed. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic aperture radar data were collected at the Denver Stapleton Airport. Mountain terrain data were examined to determine if they may potentially contribute to range ambiguity problems and degrade microburst detection. Results suggest that mountain clutter may not present a special problem source. The examination of clutter at small grazing angles was continued by examining data collected at especially low altitudes. Cultural objects such as buildings produce strong sources of backscatter at angles of about 85 deg, with responses of 30 dB to 60 dB above the background. Otherwise there are a few sources which produce significant scatter. The polarization properties of hydrospheres and clutter were examined with the intent of determining the optimum polarization. This polarization was determined to be dependent upon the ratio of VV and HH polarizations of both rain and ground clutter.

  8. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  9. Properties of radar backscatter of forests measured with a multifrequency polarimetric SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, F.; Karam, M. A.; Fung, A. K.; De Grandi, G.; Lavalle, C.; Sieber, A.

    1992-01-01

    Fully polarimetric airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) data, collected in Germany during the MAC Europe campaign, are calibrated using software packages developed at the Joint Research Center (JRC) in Italy for both L- and C-bands. During the period of the overflight dates, extensive ground truth was collected in order to describe the physical and statistical parameters of the canopy, the understory, and the soil. These parameters are compiled and converted into electromagnetic parameters suitable for input to the new polarimetric three-layer canopy model developed at the Wave Scattering Research Center (WSRC) at the University of Texas at Arlington. Comparisons between the theoretical predictions from the model and the calibrated data are carried out. Initial results reveal that the trend of the average phase difference can be predicted by the model, and that the backscattering ratio *shh/ svv is sensitive to the distribution of the primary branches.

  10. Unsupervised Segmentation Of Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Dubois, Pascale; Van Zyl, Jakob; Kwok, Ronald; Chellappa, Rama

    1994-01-01

    Method of unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) image data into classes involves selection of classes on basis of multidimensional fuzzy clustering of logarithms of parameters of polarimetric covariance matrix. Data in each class represent parts of image wherein polarimetric SAR backscattering characteristics of terrain regarded as homogeneous. Desirable to have each class represent type of terrain, sea ice, or ocean surface distinguishable from other types via backscattering characteristics. Unsupervised classification does not require training areas, is nearly automated computerized process, and provides nonsubjective selection of image classes naturally well separated by radar.

  11. Unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric SAR data using the covariance matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric; Chellappa, Rama; Dubois, Pascale; Kwok, Ronald; Van Zyl, Jacob

    1991-01-01

    An unsupervised selection of polarimetric features useful for the segmentation and analysis of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is presented. The technique is based on multidimensional clustering of the parameters composing the polarimetric covariance matrix of the data. Clustering is performed on the logarithm of these quantities. Once the polarimetric cluster centers have been determined, segmentation of the polarimetric data into regions is performed using a maximum likelihood polarimetric classifier. Segmentation maps are further improved using a Markov random field to describe the statistics of the regions and computing the maximum of the product of the local conditional densities. Examples with real polarimetric SAR imagery are given to illustrate the potential of this method.

  12. Estimation of Bridge Height over Water from Polarimetric SAR Image Data Using Mapping and Projection Algorithm and De-Orientation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haipeng; Xu, Feng; Jin, Ya-Qiu; Ouchi, Kazuo

    An inversion method of bridge height over water by polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is developed. A geometric ray description to illustrate scattering mechanism of a bridge over water surface is identified by polarimetric image analysis. Using the mapping and projecting algorithm, a polarimetric SAR image of a bridge model is first simulated and shows that scattering from a bridge over water can be identified by three strip lines corresponding to single-, double-, and triple-order scattering, respectively. A set of polarimetric parameters based on the de-orientation theory is applied to analysis of three types scattering, and the thinning-clustering algorithm and Hough transform are then employed to locate the image positions of these strip lines. These lines are used to invert the bridge height. Fully polarimetric image data of airborne Pi-SAR at X-band are applied to inversion of the height and width of the Naruto Bridge in Japan. Based on the same principle, this approach is also applicable to spaceborne ALOSPALSAR single-polarization data of the Eastern Ocean Bridge in China. The results show good feasibility to realize the bridge height inversion.

  13. MAPSAR Image Simulation Based on L-band Polarimetric Data from the SAR-R99B Airborne Sensor (SIVAM System)

    PubMed Central

    Mura, José Claudio; Paradella, Waldir Renato; Dutra, Luciano Vieira; dos Santos, João Roberto; Rudorff, Bernardo Friedrich Theodor; de Miranda, Fernando Pellon; da Silva, Mario Marcos Quintino; da Silva, Wagner Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology applied to generate simulated multipolarized L-band SAR images of the MAPSAR (Multi-Application Purpose SAR) satellite from the airborne SAR R99B sensor (SIVAM System). MAPSAR is a feasibility study conducted by INPE (National Institute for Space Research) and DLR (German Aerospace Center) targeting a satellite L-band SAR innovative mission for assessment, management and monitoring of natural resources. Examples of simulated products and their applications are briefly discussed. PMID:22389590

  14. On evaluating the accuracy of SAR sea-ice classification using multifrequency polarimetric AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Rignot, Eric

    1993-01-01

    We investigate how multifrequency and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery enhances present capability to discriminate different ice conditions in single-frequency, single-polarization satellite SAR data. Frequencies considered are C- (lambda = 5.6cm), L- (lambda = 24cm) and P- (lambda = 68cm) band. Radar backscatter characteristics of six radiometrically and polarimetrically distinct ice types are selected from a cluster analysis of the multifrequency polarimetric SAR data and used to classify SAR images. Validation of these ice conditions is based on information provided by aerial photos, weather and ice surface measurements acquired at an ice camp, together with airborne passive microwave imagery, and visual analysis of the SAR data. The six identified sea-ice types are: (1) multiyear sea-ice; (2) compressed first year ice; (3) first year rubble and ridges; (4) first year rough ice; (5) first year smooth ice; and (6) thin ice. Open water is absent in all analyzed data. Classification of the SAR imagery into those six ice types is performed using a Bayesian Maximum A Posteriori classifier. Two complete scenes acquired at different dates in different locations are classified. The scenes were chosen such that they are representative of typical ice conditions in the Beaufort Sea in March 1988 and because ancillary information is available for validating the segmentation of various ice surface conditions.

  15. Recent Advances in Radar Polarimetry and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    2005-01-01

    The development of Radar Polarimetry and Radar Interferometry is advancing rapidly, and these novel radar technologies are revamping Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging decisively. In this exposition the successive advancements are sketched; beginning with the fundamental formulations and high-lighting the salient points of these diverse remote sensing techniques. Whereas with radar polarimetry the textural fine-structure, target-orientation and shape, symmetries and material constituents can be recovered with considerable improvements above that of standard amplitude-only Polarization Radar ; with radar interferometry the spatial (in depth) structure can be explored. In Polarimetric-Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (POL-IN-SAR) Imaging it is possible to recover such co-registered textural plus spatial properties simultaneously. This includes the extraction of Digital Elevation Maps (DEM) from either fully Polarimetric (scattering matrix) or Interferometric (dual antenna) SAR image data takes with the additional benefit of obtaining co-registered three-dimensional POL-IN-DEM information. Extra-Wide-Band POL-IN-SAR Imaging - when applied to Repeat-Pass Image Overlay Interferometry - provides differential background validation and measurement, stress assessment, and environmental stress-change monitoring capabilities with hitherto unattained accuracy, which are essential tools for improved global biomass estimation. More recently, by applying multiple parallel repeat-pass EWB-POL-D(RP)-IN-SAR imaging along stacked (altitudinal) or displaced (horizontal) flight-lines will result in Tomographic (Multi- Interferometric) Polarimetric SAR Stereo-Imaging , including foliage and ground penetrating capabilities. It is shown that the accelerated advancement of these modern EWB-POL-D(RP)-IN-SAR imaging techniques is of direct relevance and of paramount priority to wide-area dynamic homeland security surveillance and local-to-global environmental ground-truth measurement

  16. Supervised fully polarimetric classification of the Black Forest test site: From MAESTROI to MAC Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degrandi, G.; Lavalle, C.; Degroof, H.; Sieber, A.

    1992-01-01

    A study on the performance of a supervised fully polarimetric maximum likelihood classifier for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data when applied to a specific classification context: forest classification based on age classes and in the presence of a sloping terrain is presented. For the experimental part, the polarimetric AIRSAR data at P, L, and C-band, acquired over the German Black Forest near Freiburg in the frame of the 1989 MAESTRO-1 campaign and the 1991 MAC Europe campaign was used, MAESTRO-1 with an ESA/JRC sponsored campaign, and MAC Europe (Multi-sensor Aircraft Campaign); in both cases the multi-frequency polarimetric JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) radar was flown over a number of European test sites. The study is structured as follows. At first, the general characteristics of the classifier and the dependencies from some parameters, like frequency bands, feature vector, calibration, using test areas lying on a flat terrain are investigated. Once it is determined the optimal conditions for the classifier performance, we then move on to the study of the slope effect. The bulk of this work is performed using the Maestrol data set. Next the classifier performance with the MAC Europe data is considered. The study is divided into two stages: first some of the tests done on the Maestro data are repeated, to highlight the improvements due to the new processing scheme that delivers 16 look data. Second we experiment with multi images classification with two goals: to assess the possibility of using a training set measured from one image to classify areas in different images; and to classify areas on critical slopes using different viewing angles. The main points of the study are listed and some of the results obtained so far are highlighted.

  17. Application of symmetry properties to polarimetric remote sensing with JPL AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, Simon H.; Kwok, R.; Li, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    Based on symmetry properties, polarimetric remote sensing of geophysical media is studied. From the viewpoint of symmetry groups, media with reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetries are considered. The symmetries impose relations among polarimetric scattering coefficients, which are valid to all scattering mechanisms in the symmetrical configurations. Various orientation distributions of non-spherical scatterers can be identified from the scattering coefficients by a comparison with the symmetry calculations. Experimental observations are then analyzed for many geophysical scenes acquired with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne polarimetric SAR at microwave frequencies over sea ice and vegetation. Polarimetric characteristics of different ice types are compared with symmetry behaviors. The polarimetric response of a tropical rain forest reveals characteristics close to the centrical symmetry properties, which can be used as a distributed target to relatively calibrate polarimetric radars without any deployment of manmade calibration targets.

  18. Airborne synthetic aperture radar observations of “spiral eddy” slick patterns in the Southern California Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorino, George O.; Holt, Benjamin; Molemaker, M. Jeroen; Digiacomo, Paul M.; Sletten, Mark A.

    2010-05-01

    Repeat sampling on hourly time scales using an airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is used to investigate the occurrence and evolving characteristics of spiral-shaped slick patterns, commonly presumed to be indicators of submesoscale ocean eddies, in the area around Santa Catalina Island, California (˜33.4°N, 118.4°W). Simultaneous SAR imagery and boat survey data are examined over two ˜5 h long periods spaced 3 days apart in April 2003. The SAR imagery reveals several spiral-like patterns, roughly 5 km in diameter, occurring downstream of the western end of Catalina. We believe that the most likely formation mechanism for these patterns is current-wake instability related to the flow of the Southern California Countercurrent along the north shore of Catalina. In one case, there is an observed cold-core eddy and vortex sheet attached to the tip of the island, similar to island-wake simulations done by Dong and McWilliams (2007). In another case, the SAR imagery shows a series of slick patterns that, at least initially, resemble spiral eddies, but the data show no clear evidence of actual ocean eddies being present either at depth or through a rotating surface expression. A speculation is that such features signify island-wake eddies that are relatively weak and dissipate quickly. An unexpected finding was how quickly a spiral slick pattern could deteriorate, suggesting a time scale for the surface feature of the order of only several hours. An implication of this result is that care is needed when interpreting a single satellite SAR imagery for evidence of active submesoscale eddies. Recommendations are made for future field studies.

  19. Classification Of Terrain In Polarimetric SAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Kong, Jin A.; Shin, Robert T.; Lim, Harold; Swartz, Albert; Yueh, Simon H.

    1993-01-01

    Two algorithms processing polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar data found effective in assigning various parts of SAR images to classes representing different types of terrain. Partially automate interpretation of SAR imagery, reducing amount of photointerpretation needed and putting whole interpretation process on more quantitative and systematic basis. First algorithm implements Bayesian classification scheme "supervised" by use of training data. Second algorithm implements classification procedure unsupervised.

  20. Land cover classification comparisons among dual polarimetric, pseudo-fully polarimetric, and fully polarimetric SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhogendra; Susaki, Junichi

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, an approach is proposed that predicts fully polarimetric data from dual polarimetric data, and then applies selected supervised algorithm for dual polarimetric, pseudo-fully polarimetric and fully polarimetric dataset for the land cover classification comparison. A regression model has been developed to predict the complex variables of VV polarimetric component and amplitude independently using corresponding complex variables and amplitude in HH and HV bands. Support vector machine (SVM)is implemented for the land cover classification. Coherency matrix and amplitude were used for all dataset for the land cover classification independently.They are used to compare the data from different perspective. Finally, a post processing technique is implemented to remove the isolated pixels appeared as a noise. AVNIR-2 optical data over the same area is used as ground truth data to access the classification accuracy.The result from SVM indicates that the fully polarimetric mode gives the maximum classification accuracy followed by pseudo-fully polarimetric and dual polarimetric datasets using coherency matrix input for fully polarimetric image and pseudo-fully polarimetric image and covariance matrix input for dual polarimetric image. Additionally, it is observed that pseudo-fully polarimetric image with amplitude input does not show the significant improvement over dual polarimetric image with same input.

  1. Imaging of buried and foliage-obscured objects with an ultrawide-bandwidth polarimetric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Dan R.; Lewis, Terry B.; Wei, Susan C.; Kletzli, D. W., Jr.

    1993-11-01

    The Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) has developed a unique ground- based, portable, synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This SAR images targets in their natural backgrounds without the expense of an airborne sensor and with higher performance (bandwidth, resolution) than existing airborne systems. A horizontal 36-foot long aluminum truss supports a rail and an antenna cartridge, which is moved along the rail to allow synthetic aperture focusing. The system is fully-polarimetric and has collected data over the frequency band of 400 - 1300 MHz resulting in a nominal resolution of 0.17 m in range and 0.5 m in cross-range. The low frequency range of the system allows for penetration of soil (to shallow depths) as well as foliage and the system has been used to collect images of buried and foliage- obscured targets. The ground imagery collected to date includes steel oil drums buried at depths of up to one-meter. Both the drums as well as the disturbances due to digging the holes are visible in the imagery. Foliage imagery includes portions of a Lear jet under a mature hardwood forest. Due to the low frequency and wide bandwidth of the sensor (400 - 1300 MHz), obscured objects are clearly visible in the SAR imagery. Other responses in the foliage imagery are due to the dihedral-like ground-trunk reflections.

  2. Overview and Applications of UAVSAR's Multi-Squint Polarimetric Imaging Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott Hensley; Chen, Curtis; Michel, Thierry; Jones, Cathleen; Chapman, Bruce; Muellerschoen, Ron

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a reconfigurable polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track interferometric (RTI) SAR data for application to monitoring surface deformation and vegetation structure measurements. The system employs a precision autopilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the plane to fly precise trajectories usually within a 5 m tube. Also required for robust repeat pass applications is the ability to point the antenna in the same direction on repeat passes to a fraction of an azimuth beamwidth (8? for UAVSAR). This precise pointing is achieved using an electronically scanned antenna whose pointing is based on inertial navigation unit (INU) attitude angle data. The radar design is fully polarimetric with an 80 MHz bandwidth (2 m range resolution) and has a greater than 20 km range swath when flying at its nominal altitude of 12500 m. The ability to electronically steer the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis has allowed a new mode of SAR data acquisition whereby the radar beam is steered to different squint angles on successive pulses thereby simultaneously generating images at multiple squint angles. This mode offers the possibility of generating vector deformation measurements with a single pair of repeat passes and to obtain greater kz diversity for vegetation studies with a reduced number of passes. This paper will present an overview of the mode, discuss its potential for deformation and vegetation, and show some examples using UAVSAR data.

  3. Experiments of Tomography-Based SAR Techniques with P-Band Polarimetric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardini, F.; Pardini, M.

    2009-04-01

    New opportunities are arising in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observation of forest scenarios, especially with decimetric and metric radio wavelengths, which possess the capability of penetrating into volumes. Given its capabilities in the three-dimensional imaging of the scattering properties of the observed scene, SAR Tomography (Tomo-SAR) constitutes a good candidate for the analysis of the vertical structure of the forest. In this work, the results are presented of the application of tomography-based SAR techniques to P-band airborne data over a boreal forest from the ESA BioSAR-1 project. Results of an adaptive tomographic analysis are presented, also with a low resolution dataset, which emulates a satellite acquisition. In order to mitigate the geometric perspective effects due to the poor range resolution, the principle is introduced of the application of a common band pre-filtering to tomography. Then, a coherent layer canceller is derived to possibly apply interferometric techniques conceived for single layer scenarios to two layer scenarios. Finally, a stabilized adaptive polarimetric Tomo-SAR (PolTomo-SAR) method is proposed for estimating the 3D polarimetric scattering mechanism of the scene with low distorsions.

  4. Development and Validation of a Polarimetric-MCScene 3D Atmospheric Radiation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Alexander; Hawes, Frederick; Fox, Marsha

    2016-03-15

    Polarimetric measurements can substantially enhance the ability of both spectrally resolved and single band imagery to detect the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, providing data for locating and identifying facilities, materials, and processes of undeclared and proliferant nuclear weapons programs worldwide. Unfortunately, models do not exist that efficiently and accurately predict spectral polarized signatures for the materials of interest embedded in complex 3D environments. Having such a model would enable one to test hypotheses and optimize both the enhancement of scene contrast and the signal processing for spectral signature extraction. The Phase I set the groundwork for development of fully validated polarimetric spectral signature and scene simulation models. This has been accomplished 1. by (a) identifying and downloading state-of-the-art surface and atmospheric polarimetric data sources, (b) implementing tools for generating custom polarimetric data, and (c) identifying and requesting US Government funded field measurement data for use in validation; 2. by formulating an approach for upgrading the radiometric spectral signature model MODTRAN to generate polarimetric intensities through (a) ingestion of the polarimetric data, (b) polarimetric vectorization of existing MODTRAN modules, and (c) integration of a newly developed algorithm for computing polarimetric multiple scattering contributions; 3. by generating an initial polarimetric model that demonstrates calculation of polarimetric solar and lunar single scatter intensities arising from the interaction of incoming irradiances with molecules and aerosols; 4. by developing a design and implementation plan to (a) automate polarimetric scene construction and (b) efficiently sample polarimetric scattering and reflection events, for use in a to be developed polarimetric version of the existing first-principles synthetic scene simulation model, MCScene; and 5. by planning a validation field

  5. Pyxis handheld polarimetric imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David B.; Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Vaden, Justin P.

    2016-05-01

    The instrumentation for measuring infrared polarization signatures has seen significant advancement over the last decade. Previous work has shown the value of polarimetric imagery for a variety of target detection scenarios including detection of manmade targets in clutter and detection of ground and maritime targets while recent work has shown improvements in contrast for aircraft detection and biometric markers. These data collection activities have generally used laboratory or prototype systems with limitations on the allowable amount of target motion or the sensor platform and usually require an attached computer for data acquisition and processing. Still, performance and sensitivity have been steadily getting better while size, weight, and power requirements have been getting smaller enabling polarimetric imaging for a greater or real world applications. In this paper, we describe Pyxis®, a microbolometer based imaging polarimeter that produces live polarimetric video of conventional, polarimetric, and fused image products. A polarization microgrid array integrated in the optical system captures all polarization states simultaneously and makes the system immune to motion artifacts of either the sensor or the scene. The system is battery operated, rugged, and weighs about a quarter pound, and can be helmet mounted or handheld. On board processing of polarization and fused image products enable the operator to see polarimetric signatures in real time. Both analog and digital outputs are possible with sensor control available through a tablet interface. A top level description of Pyxis® is given followed by performance characteristics and representative data.

  6. Effect of Medium Symmetries on Limiting the Number of Parameters Estimated with Polarimetric SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, M.

    1999-01-01

    The addition of interferometric backscattering pairs to the conventional polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data over forests and other vegetated areas increases the dimensionality of the data space, in principle enabling the estimation of a larger number of parameters.

  7. General adaptive-neighborhood technique for improving synthetic aperture radar interferometric coherence estimation.

    PubMed

    Vasile, Gabriel; Trouvé, Emmanuel; Ciuc, Mihai; Buzuloiu, Vasile

    2004-08-01

    A new method for filtering the coherence map issued from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometric data is presented. For each pixel of the interferogram, an adaptive neighborhood is determined by a region-growing technique driven by the information provided by the amplitude images. Then pixels in the derived adaptive neighborhood are complex averaged to yield the filtered value of the coherence, after a phase-compensation step is performed. An extension of the algorithm is proposed for polarimetric interferometric SAR images. The proposed method has been applied to both European Remote Sensing (ERS) satellite SAR images and airborne high-resolution polarimetric interferometric SAR images. Both subjective and objective performance analysis, including coherence edge detection, shows that the proposed method provides better results than the standard phase-compensated fixed multilook filter and the Lee adaptive coherence filter.

  8. ISRO's dual frequency airborne SAR pre-cursor to NISAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, V. Manavala; Suneela, T. J. V. D.; Bhan, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have jointly embarked on NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) operating in L-band and S-band, which will map Earth's surface every 12 days. As a pre-cursor to the NISAR mission, ISRO is planning an airborne SAR (L&S band) which will deliver NISAR analogue data products to the science community. ISRO will develop all the hardware with the aim of adhering to system design aspects of NISAR to the maximum extent possible. It is a fully polarimetric stripmap SAR and can be operated in single, dual, compact, quasi-quad and full polarimetry modes. It has wide incidence angle coverage from 24°-77° with swath coverage from 5.5km to 15 km. Apart from simultaneous imaging operations, this system can also operate in standalone L/S SAR modes. This system is planned to operate from an aircraft platform with nominal altitude of 8000meters. Antenna for this SAR will be rigidly mounted to the aircraft, whereas, motion compensation will be implemented in the software processor to generate data products. Data products for this airborne SAR will be generated in slant & ground range azimuth dimension and geocoded in HDF5/Geotiff formats. This airborne SAR will help to prepare the Indian scientific community for optimum utilization of NISAR data. In-order to collect useful science data, airborne campaigns are planned from end of 2016 onwards.

  9. Polarimetric Tornado Detection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkov, Alexander V.; Schuur, Terry J.; Burgess, Donald W.; Zrnic, Dusan S.

    2005-05-01

    Polarimetric radars are shown to be capable of tornado detection through the recognition of tornadic debris signatures that are characterized by the anomalously low cross-correlation coefficient ρhv and differential reflectivity ZDR. This capability is demonstrated for three significant tornadic storms that struck the Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, metropolitan area. The first tornadic debris signature, based on the measurements with the National Severe Storms Laboratory's Cimarron polarimetric radar, was reported for a storm on 3 May 1999. Similar signatures were identified for two significant tornadic events during the Joint Polarization Experiment (JPOLE) in May 2003. The data from these storms were collected with a polarimetric prototype of the Next-Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD). In addition to a small-scale debris signature, larger-scale polarimetric signatures that might be relevant to tornadogenesis were persistently observed in tornadic supercells. The latter signatures are likely associated with lofted light debris (leaves, grass, dust, etc.) in the inflow region and intense size sorting of hydrometeors in the presence of strong wind shear and circulation.

  10. Polarimetric assist to HSI atmospheric compensation and material identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibney, Mark

    2016-05-01

    In this effort, we investigated how polarimetric HyperSpectral Imaging (pHSI) data might benefit specified Material Identification of diffuse materials in the VNIR. The experiment compared paint reflectivities extracted from polarimetric hyperspectral data acquired in the field to a database of truth reflectivities measured in the lab. Both the polarimetric hyperspectral data and the reflectivities were acquired using an Ocean Optics spectrometer which was polarized using a fast filter wheel loaded with high extinction polarizers. During the experiment, we discovered that the polarized spectra from the polarimetric hyper spectral data could be used to estimate the relative spectral character of the field source (the exo-atmospheric sun plus the atmosphere). This benefit, which strongly parallels the QUAC atmospheric correction method, relies on the natural spectral flatness of the polarized spectrum that originates in the spectral flatness of the index of refraction in the reflective regime. Using this estimate of the field source, excellent estimates of the paint reflectivities (matching 10 paint reflectivities to <= 0.5% RSS) were obtained. The impact of atmospheric upwell on performance was then investigated using these ground based polarimetric hyper spectral data in conjunction with modeled atmospheric path effects. The path effects were modeled using the high fidelity Polarimetry Phenomenology Simulation (PPS) plate model developed by AFRL, which includes polarized Modtran. We conclude with a discussion of actual and potential applications of this method, and how best to convert an existing VNIR HSI sensor into a pHSI sensor for an airborne Proof Of Concept experiment.

  11. Fitting a Two-Component Scattering Model to Polarimetric SAR Data from Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Two simple scattering mechanisms are fitted to polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations of forests. The mechanisms are canopy scatter from a reciprocal medium with azimuthal symmetry and a ground scatter term that can represent double-bounce scatter from a pair of orthogonal surfaces with different dielectric constants or Bragg scatter from a moderately rough surface, which is seen through a layer of vertically oriented scatterers. The model is shown to represent the behavior of polarimetric backscatter from a tropical forest and two temperate forest sites by applying it to data from the National Aeronautic and Space Agency/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Airborne SAR (AIRSAR) system. Scattering contributions from the two basic scattering mechanisms are estimated for clusters of pixels in polarimetric SAR images. The solution involves the estimation of four parameters from four separate equations. This model fit approach is justified as a simplification of more complicated scattering models, which require many inputs to solve the forward scattering problem. The model is used to develop an understanding of the ground-trunk double-bounce scattering that is present in the data, which is seen to vary considerably as a function of incidence angle. Two parameters in the model fit appear to exhibit sensitivity to vegetation canopy structure, which is worth further exploration. Results from the model fit for the ground scattering term are compared with estimates from a forward model and shown to be in good agreement. The behavior of the scattering from the ground-trunk interaction is consistent with the presence of a pseudo-Brewster angle effect for the air-trunk scattering interface. If the Brewster angle is known, it is possible to directly estimate the real part of the dielectric constant of the trunks, a key variable in forward modeling of backscatter from forests. It is also shown how, with a priori knowledge of the forest height, an estimate for the

  12. Synthetic polarimetric spectra from stellar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felipe, T.; Martínez González, M. J.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2017-02-01

    Stellar prominences detected in rapidly rotating stars serve as probes of the magnetism in the corona of cool stars. We have synthesized the temporal evolution of the Stokes profiles generated in the He I 10 830 and 5876 Å triplets during the rotation of a prominence around a star. The synthesis was performed with the HAZEL code using a cloud model in which the prominence is characterized by a slab located at a fixed latitude and height. It accounts for the scattering polarization and Zeeman and Hanle effects. Several cases with different prominence magnetic field strengths and orientations have been analysed. The results show an emission feature that drifts across the profile while the prominence is out of the stellar disc. When the prominence eclipses the star, the intensity profile shows an absorption. The scattering induced by the prominence generates linear polarization signals in Stokes Q and U profiles, which are modified by the Hanle effect when a magnetic field is present. Due to the Zeeman effect, Stokes V profiles show a signal with very low amplitude when the magnetic field along the line of sight is different from zero. The estimated linear polarization signals could potentially be detected with the future spectropolarimeter Mid-resolution InfRAreD Astronomical Spectrograph, to be attached to Gran Telescopio Canarias telescope.

  13. Compact polarimetric SAR product and calibration considerations for target analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabry, Ramin

    2016-10-01

    Compact polarimetric (CP) data exploitation is currently of growing interest considering the new generation of such Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems. These systems offer target detection and classification capabilities comparable to those of polarimetric SARs (PolSAR) with less stringent requirements. A good example is the RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM). In this paper, some characteristic CP products are described and effects of CP mode deviation from ideal circular polarization transmit on classifications are modeled. The latter is important for operation of typical CP modes (e.g., RCM). The developed model can be used to estimate the ellipticity variation from CP measured data, and hence, calibrate the classification products.

  14. Mueller polarimetric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laude-Boulesteix, Blandine; De Martino, Antonello; Le Naour, Gilles; Genestie, Catherine; Schwartz, Laurent; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Drevillon, Bernard

    2004-07-01

    We present a multispectral polarimetric imaging system well suited for complete Mueller matrix microscopy. The source is a spectrally filtered halogen light bulb, and the image is formed on a fast CCD camera The light polarization is modulated before the sample and analyzed after the sample by using nematic liquid crystal modulators.. The whole Mueller matrix image of the sample is typically measured over 5 seconds for a good signal-to-noise ratio. The instrument design, together with an original and easy-to-operate calibration procedure provides a high polarimetric accuracy over wide ranges of wavelengths and magnifications. Mueller polarimetry provides separate images of scalar and vector retardation and dichroism of the sample, together with its depolarizing power, while all these effects do contribute simultaneously to the contrasts observed in standard polarized microsopy. Polarimetric images of several samples, namely an unstained rabbit cornea, a picrosirius red stained hepatic biopsy, and a rat artery specifically stained for collagen III are shown and discussed

  15. Polarimetric imagery collection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Joao M.; Felton, Melvin; Chenault, David; Sohr, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) is a collaborative effort between the US Army ARDEC and ARL that is focused on the collection of mid-wave and long-wave infrared imagery using hyperspectral, polarimetric, and broadband sensors. The objective of the program is to collect a comprehensive database of the different modalities over the course of 1 to 2 years to capture sensor performance over a wide variety of weather conditions, diurnal, and seasonal changes inherent to Picatinny's northern New Jersey location. Using the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) tower at Picatinny Arsenal, the sensors will autonomously collect the desired data around the clock at different ranges where surrogate 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer targets are positioned at different viewing perspectives in an open field. The database will allow for: 1) Understanding of signature variability under adverse weather conditions; 2) Development of robust algorithms; 3) Development of new sensors; 4) Evaluation of polarimetric technology; and 5) Evaluation of fusing the different sensor modalities. In this paper, we will present the SPICE data collection objectives, the ongoing effort, the sensors that are currently deployed, and how this work will assist researches on the development and evaluation of sensors, algorithms, and fusion applications.

  16. Sea Oil Slick Observation by Means of Fully-Polarimetric ALOS PALSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambardella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Nunziata, F.; Shimada, M.; Isoguchi, O.

    2009-04-01

    A study on sea oil slick observation by means of L- band polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is accomplished. It is based on the different sea surface scattering mechanism expected with and without surface slicks. Polarimetric measurements are processed by means of a simple and very effective filtering technique which is electromagnetically based on the Mueller scattering matrix. Moreover, some polarimetric features, evaluated on both the slick-free and slick-covered sea surface, are analyzed for confirming the filter output. Experiments are accomplished on polarimetric SAR data acquired by the PALSAR sensor, mounted on board of the ALOS satellite, and are relevant to an oil slick, due to a tank accident, and a look-alike. Results demonstrate, for the first time, that L-band polarimetric SAR measurements are useful for oil slick observation purposes and witness the capability of ALOS PALSAR data for such application.

  17. Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR): Performance Analysis During the Eco-3D 2011 and Summer 2012 Flight Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Carter, Lynn; Ranson, K. Jon; Vega, Manuel; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, SeungKuk; Sun, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture radar (DBSAR) is a state-of-the-art airborne radar developed at NASA/Goddard for the implementation, and testing of digital beamforming techniques applicable to Earth and planetary sciences. The DBSAR measurements have been employed to study: The estimation of vegetation biomass and structure - critical parameters in the study of the carbon cycle; The measurement of geological features - to explore its applicability to planetary science by measuring planetary analogue targets. The instrument flew two test campaigns over the East coast of the United States in 2011, and 2012. During the campaigns the instrument operated in full polarimetric mode collecting data from vegetation and topography features.

  18. Estimating lava volume by precision combination of multiple baseline spaceborne and airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar: The 1997 eruption of Okmok Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Fielding, E.; Patrick, M.R.; Trautwein, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques are used to calculate the volume of extrusion at Okmok volcano, Alaska by constructing precise digital elevation models (DEMs) that represent volcano topography before and after the 1997 eruption. The posteruption DEM is generated using airborne topographic synthetic aperture radar (TOPSAR) data where a three-dimensional affine transformation is used to account for the misalignments between different DEM patches. The preeruption DEM is produced using repeat-pass European Remote Sensing satellite data; multiple interferograms are combined to reduce errors due to atmospheric variations, and deformation rates are estimated independently and removed from the interferograms used for DEM generation. The extrusive flow volume associated with the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano is 0.154 ?? 0.025 km3. The thickest portion is approximately 50 m, although field measurements of the flow margin's height do not exceed 20 m. The in situ measurements at lava edges are not representative of the total thickness, and precise DEM data are absolutely essential to calculate eruption volume based on lava thickness estimations. This study is an example that demonstrates how InSAR will play a significant role in studying volcanoes in remote areas.

  19. Detailed Aerosol Characterization using Polarimetric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasekamp, Otto; di Noia, Antonio; Stap, Arjen; Rietjens, Jeroen; Smit, Martijn; van Harten, Gerard; Snik, Frans

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are believed to cause the second most important anthropogenic forcing of climate change after greenhouse gases. In contrast to the climate effect of greenhouse gases, which is understood relatively well, the negative forcing (cooling effect) caused by aerosols represents the largest reported uncertainty in the most recent assessment of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). To reduce the large uncertainty on the aerosol effects on cloud formation and climate, accurate satellite measurements of aerosol optical properties (optical thickness, single scattering albedo, phase function) and microphysical properties (size distribution, refractive index, shape) are essential. There is growing consensus in the aerosol remote sensing community that multi-angle measurements of intensity and polarization are essential to unambiguously determine all relevant aerosol properties. This presentations adresses the different aspects of polarimetric remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, including retrieval algorithm development, validation, and data needs for climate and air quality applications. During past years, at SRON-Netherlands Instite for Space Research retrieval algorithms have been developed that make full use of the capabilities of polarimetric measurements. We will show results of detailed aerosol properties from ground-based- (groundSPEX), airborne- (NASA Research Scanning Polarimeter), and satellite (POLDER) measurements. Also we will discuss observational needs for future instrumentation in order to improve our understanding of the role of aerosols in climate change and air quality.

  20. Classification and Monitoring of Salt Marsh Habitats with Multi-Polarimetric and Multi-Frequency SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Comber, Alexis; Lamb, Alistair; Brown, Sarah

    2013-08-01

    Within GMES there is much interest in the ability of remote sensing technology to deliver operational solutions to many areas of life including environmental management. This paper describes research focused on the application for Earth Observation for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. The main topic of this research is to explore to which extent salt marsh habitats from can be identified from SAR remotely sensed data. Multi-frequency, multi-polarimetric SAR images from airborne (S- and X-Band quad-polarimetric from the Astrium airborne SAR Demonstrator) is used to examine salt marsh habitat classification potential in the Llanrhidian salt marshes in South Wales, UK. This is achieved by characterizing their botanical and structural composition, flooding regimes as well as fluctuations in soil moisture. Different SAR features as backscatter coefficient, band ratios and polarimetric decomposition are extracted.

  1. Polarimetric Signatures of Initiating Convection During MC3E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emory, Amber

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was to provide constraints for space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land. This study used datasets collected during the 2011 field campaign to combine radiometer and ground-based radar polarimetric retrievals in order to better understand hydrometeor type, habit and distribution for initiating continental convection. Cross-track and conically scanning nadir views from the Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) were compared with ground-based polarimetric radar retrievals along the ER-2 flight track. Polarimetric signatures for both airborne radiometers and ground-based radars were well co-located with deep convection to relate radiometric signatures with low-level polarimetric radar data for hydrometeor identification and diameter estimation. For the time period of study, Z(sub DR) values indicated no presence of hail at the surface. However, the Z(sub DR) column extended well above the melting level into the mixed phase region, suggesting a possible source of frozen drop embryos for the future formation of hail. The results shown from this study contribute ground truth datasets for GPM PR algorithm development for convective events, which is an improvement upon previous stratiform precipitation centered framework.

  2. Polarimetric Palsar Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzi, R.; Shimada, M.

    2008-11-01

    Polarimetric PALSAR system parameters are assessed using data sets collected over various calibration sites. The data collected over the Amazonian forest permits validating the zero Faraday rotation hypotheses near the equator. The analysis of the Amazonian forest data and the response of the corner reflectors deployed during the PALSAR acquisitions lead to the conclusion that the antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB). Theses results are confirmed using data collected over the Sweden and Ottawa calibration sites. The 5-m height trihedrals deployed in the Sweden calibration site by the Chalmers University of technology permits accurate measurement of antenna parameters, and detection of 2-3 degree Faraday rotation during day acquisition, whereas no Faraday rotation was noted during night acquisition. Small Faraday rotation angles (2-3 degree) have been measured using acquisitions over the DLR Oberpfaffenhofen and the Ottawa calibration sites. The presence of small but still significant Faraday rotation (2-3 degree) induces a CR return at the cross-polarization HV and VH that should not be interpreted as the actual antenna cross-talk. PALSAR antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB), and diagonal antenna distortion matrices (with zero cross-talk terms) can be used for accurate calibration of PALSAR polarimetric data.

  3. Polarimetric Multispectral Imaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, L.-J.; Chao, T.-H.; Dowdy, M.; Mahoney, C.; Reyes, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is developing a remote sensing technology on which a new generation of compact, lightweight, high-resolution, low-power, reliable, versatile, programmable scientific polarimetric multispectral imaging instruments can be built to meet the challenge of future planetary exploration missions. The instrument is based on the fast programmable acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) of tellurium dioxide (TeO2) that operates in the wavelength range of 0.4-5 microns. Basically, the AOTF multispectral imaging instrument measures incoming light intensity as a function of spatial coordinates, wavelength, and polarization. Its operation can be in either sequential, random access, or multiwavelength mode as required. This provides observation flexibility, allowing real-time alternation among desired observations, collecting needed data only, minimizing data transmission, and permitting implementation of new experiments. These will result in optimization of the mission performance with minimal resources. Recently we completed a polarimetric multispectral imaging prototype instrument and performed outdoor field experiments for evaluating application potentials of the technology. We also investigated potential improvements on AOTF performance to strengthen technology readiness for applications. This paper will give a status report on the technology and a prospect toward future planetary exploration.

  4. An Integrated Navigation System using GPS Carrier Phase for Real-Time Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J. Rick; Kim, Theodore J.; Kohler, Stewart M.

    1999-06-24

    A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires accu- rate measurement of the motion of the imaging plat- form to produce well-focused images with minimal absolute position error. The motion measurement (MoMeas) system consists of a inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a P-code GPS receiver that outputs corrected ephemeris, L1 & L2 pseudoranges, and L1 & L2 carrier phase measurements. The unknown initial carrier phase biases to the GPS satellites are modeled as states in an extended Kalman filter and the resulting integrated navigation solution has po- sition errors that change slowly with time. Position error drifts less than 1- cm/sec have been measured from the SAR imagery for various length apertures.

  5. Refining the asteroid taxonomy by polarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belskaya, I. N.; Fornasier, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Cellino, A.; Antonyuk, K.; Krugly, Yu. N.; Dovgopol, A. N.; Faggi, S.

    2017-03-01

    We present new results of polarimetric observations of 15 main belt asteroids of different composition. By merging new and published data we determined polarimetric parameters characterizing individual asteroids and mean values of the same parameters characterizing different taxonomic classes. The majority of asteroids show polarimetric phase curves close to the average curve of the corresponding class. We show that using polarimetric data it is possible to refine asteroid taxonomy and derive a polarimetric classification for 283 main belt asteroids. Polarimetric observations of asteroid (21) Lutetia are found to exhibit possible variations of the position angle of the polarization plane over the surface.

  6. A new method to extract forest height from repeat-pass polarimetric and interferometric radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, M.; Hensley, S.; Dubayah, R.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a new remote sensing method and a new physical model that will potentially enable estimating forest height and vegetation 3D structure using radar technology. The method is based on repeat-pass polarimetric-interferometric radar technique; the model is termed random-motion-over-ground (RMoG) model [1, 2]. We will describe a step-by-step procedure that will help the ecosystem community to monitor ecosystems at regional and global scale using radar data available from the forthcoming radar missions. We will show first results of forest height estimated from UAVSAR data and compared against LVIS data. We will quantify the error associated to our method. We will also discuss the improvements that we plan on including in future works. Our ultimate goal is to measure low and large biomass stocks using the large amount of radar data that will be available in the near future. The Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a fully polarimetric L-band airborne radar developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). UAVSAR acquires repeat-pass interferometric data for measuring vegetation structure and monitoring crustal deformations. The UAVSAR team at JPL has acquired and processed several polarimetric-interferometric (Pol-InSAR) datasets over the Harvard Forest in Massachusetts (United States) that allows testing repeat-pass Pol-InSAR technique. Pol-InSAR technique was proposed 15 years ago to estimate vegetation biomass and overcome the inherent saturation of radar backscatter versus biomass [3]. The advantage of Pol-InSAR is the ability to estimate the 3D structure of vegetation using a small number of interferometric acquisitions. In order to extract vegetation properties from Pol-InSAR UAVSAR data, we use a model of temporal-volumetric coherence, the RMoG model, suitable for repeat-pass interferometry. In the RMoG model the vegetation is idealized as a two-layer scattering scenario constituted by a

  7. Geologic Studies of Planetary Surfaces Using Radar Polarimetric Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Lynn M.; Campbell, Donald B.; Campbell, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Radar is a useful remote sensing tool for studying planetary geology because it is sensitive to the composition, structure, and roughness of the surface and can penetrate some materials to reveal buried terrain. The Arecibo Observatory radar system transmits a single sense of circular polarization, and both senses of circular polarization are received, which allows for the construction of the Stokes polarization vector. From the Stokes vector, daughter products such as the circular polarization ratio, the degree of linear polarization, and linear polarization angle are obtained. Recent polarimetric imaging using Arecibo has included Venus and the Moon. These observations can be compared to radar data for terrestrial surfaces to better understand surface physical properties and regional geologic evolution. For example, polarimetric radar studies of volcanic settings on Venus, the Moon and Earth display some similarities, but also illustrate a variety of different emplacement and erosion mechanisms. Polarimetric radar data provides important information about surface properties beyond what can be obtained from single-polarization radar. Future observations using polarimetric synthetic aperture radar will provide information on roughness, composition and stratigraphy that will support a broader interpretation of surface evolution.

  8. Bird Migration Echoes Observed by Polarimetric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minda, Haruya; Furuzawa, Fumie A.; Satoh, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Kenji

    A C-band polarimetric radar on Okinawa Island successfully observed large-scale bird migrations over the western Pacific Ocean. The birds generated interesting polarimetric signatures. This paper describes the signatures and speculates bird behavior.

  9. Polarimetric ISAR: Simulation and image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, David H.

    2016-03-21

    In polarimetric ISAR the illumination platform, typically airborne, carries a pair of antennas that are directed toward a fixed point on the surface as the platform moves. During platform motion, the antennas maintain their gaze on the point, creating an effective aperture for imaging any targets near that point. The interaction between the transmitted fields and targets (e.g. ships) is complicated since the targets are typically many wavelengths in size. Calculation of the field scattered from the target typically requires solving Maxwell’s equations on a large three-dimensional numerical grid. This is prohibitive to use in any real-world imaging algorithm, so the scattering process is typically simplified by assuming the target consists of a cloud of independent, non-interacting, scattering points (centers). Imaging algorithms based on this scattering model perform well in many applications. Since polarimetric radar is not very common, the scattering model is often derived for a scalar field (single polarization) where the individual scatterers are assumed to be small spheres. However, when polarization is important, we must generalize the model to explicitly account for the vector nature of the electromagnetic fields and its interaction with objects. In this note, we present a scattering model that explicitly includes the vector nature of the fields but retains the assumption that the individual scatterers are small. The response of the scatterers is described by electric and magnetic dipole moments induced by the incident fields. We show that the received voltages in the antennas are linearly related to the transmitting currents through a scattering impedance matrix that depends on the overall geometry of the problem and the nature of the scatterers.

  10. Through-the-wall polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Fauzia; Amin, Moeness G.

    2008-04-01

    Through-the-Wall Imaging is emerging as an affordable sensor technology supporting a variety of applications, such as surveillance and reconnaissance, emergency rescue, and firefighting. Motivated by the desire to understand the underlying phenomenology and performance bounds associated with imaging targets behind walls, several through-the-wall imaging experiments were conducted at the Center for Advanced Communications (CAC), Villanova University. These experiments aimed at supporting resolution, polarization, and localization of indoor targets and objects behind walls, and provided valuable dual-polarized synthetic aperture data measurements of indoor scenes of different complexity and population. In this paper, we present full-polarization imaging results, for a setting of calibrated reflectors behind a typical exterior grade wall. These imaging results provide polarimetric scene characterization and are shown to be in good agreement with the ground truth.

  11. Polarimetric observations of Hungaria asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; Lazzaro, D.; Benavidez, P.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:We present the results of a polarimetric program at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (Casleo), San Juan, Argentina. The aim of this campaign is to estimate the polarimetric properties of asteroids belonging to the Hungaria dynamical group. Methods: The data were obtained with the Casprof polarimeter at the 2.15 m telescope. The Casprof polarimeter is a two-hole aperture polarimeter with rapid modulation. The campaign began in 2000, and data on a sample of 24 members of the Hungaria group were obtained. We use the slope - albedo or P_min - albedo relationships to get polarimetric albedos for 18 of these objects. Results: Only two Xe-type objects, 434 Hungaria and 3447 Burkhalter, shown a polarimetric behavior compatible with a high albedo object. The A-type asteroid 1600 Vyssotsky has a polarimetric behavior similar to what was observed by Fornasier et al. (2006) for 863 Benkolea, and four objects show P_min values consistent with dark surfaces. Based on observations carried out at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  12. Real time polarimetric dehazing.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Jason; Virgen, Miguel

    2013-03-20

    Remote sensing is a rich topic due to its utility in gathering detailed accurate information from locations that are not economically feasible traveling destinations or are physically inaccessible. However, poor visibility over long path lengths is problematic for a variety of reasons. Haze induced by light scatter is one cause for poor visibility and is the focus of this article. Image haze comes about as a result of light scattering off particles and into the imaging path causing a haziness to appear on the image. Image processing using polarimetric information of light scatter can be used to mitigate image haze. An imaging polarimeter which provides the Stokes values in real time combined with a "dehazing" algorithm can automate image haze removal for instant applications. Example uses are to improve visual display providing on-the-spot detection or imbedding in an active control loop to improve viewing and tracking while on a moving platform. In addition, removing haze in this manner allows the trade space for a system operational waveband to be opened up to bands which are object matched and not necessarily restricted by scatter effects.

  13. Change detection in a time series of polarimetric SAR data by an omnibus test statistic and its factorization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Allan A.; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2016-10-01

    Test statistics for comparison of real (as opposed to complex) variance-covariance matrices exist in the statistics literature [1]. In earlier publications we have described a test statistic for the equality of two variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution with an associated p-value [2]. We showed their application to bitemporal change detection and to edge detection [3] in multilook, polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in the covariance matrix representation [4]. The test statistic and the associated p-value is described in [5] also. In [6] we focussed on the block-diagonal case, we elaborated on some computer implementation issues, and we gave examples on the application to change detection in both full and dual polarization bitemporal, bifrequency, multilook SAR data. In [7] we described an omnibus test statistic Q for the equality of k variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution. We also described a factorization of Q = R2 R3 … Rk where Q and Rj determine if and when a difference occurs. Additionally, we gave p-values for Q and Rj. Finally, we demonstrated the use of Q and Rj and the p-values to change detection in truly multitemporal, full polarization SAR data. Here we illustrate the methods by means of airborne L-band SAR data (EMISAR) [8,9]. The methods may be applied to other polarimetric SAR data also such as data from Sentinel-1, COSMO-SkyMed, TerraSAR-X, ALOS, and RadarSat-2 and also to single-pol data. The account given here closely follows that given our recent IEEE TGRS paper [7]. Selected References [1] Anderson, T. W., An Introduction to Multivariate Statistical Analysis, John Wiley, New York, third ed. (2003). [2] Conradsen, K., Nielsen, A. A., Schou, J., and Skriver, H., "A test statistic in the complex Wishart distribution and its application to change detection in polarimetric SAR data," IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 41(1): 4-19, 2003. [3] Schou, J

  14. Characterization of wetland, forest, and agricultural ecosystems in Belize with airborne radar (AIRSAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Kevin O.; Rey-Benayas, Jose Maria; Paris, Jack F.

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar-C/X-SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) Experiment includes the study of wetland dynamics in the seasonal tropics. In preparation for these wetland studies, airborne P, L, and C band radar (AIRSAR) data of Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico acquired by NASA and JPL in March 1990 were analyzed. The first phase of our study focuses on AIRSAR data from the Gallon Jug test site in northwestern Belize, for which ground data were also collected during the three days prior to the overflight. One of the main objectives of the Gallon Jug study is to develop a method for characterizing wetland vegetation types and their flooding status with multifrequency polarimetric radar data.

  15. Forest Structure Characterization Using Jpl's UAVSAR Multi-Baseline Polarimetric SAR Interferometry and Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Maxim; Hensley, Scott; Lavalle, Marco; Ahmed, Razi

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns forest remote sensing using JPL's multi-baseline polarimetric interferometric UAVSAR data. It presents exemplary results and analyzes the possibilities and limitations of using SAR Tomography and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (PolInSAR) techniques for the estimation of forest structure. Performance and error indicators for the applicability and reliability of the used multi-baseline (MB) multi-temporal (MT) PolInSAR random volume over ground (RVoG) model are discussed. Experimental results are presented based on JPL's L-band repeat-pass polarimetric interferometric UAVSAR data over temperate and tropical forest biomes in the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, and in the La Amistad Park, Panama and Costa Rica. The results are partially compared with ground field measurements and with air-borne LVIS lidar data.

  16. Forest Structure Characterization Using JPL's UAVSAR Multi-Baseline Polarimetric SAR Interferometry and Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Maxim; Hensley, Scott; Lavalle, Marco; Ahmed, Razi

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns forest remote sensing using JPL's multi-baseline polarimetric interferometric UAVSAR data. It presents exemplary results and analyzes the possibilities and limitations of using SAR Tomography and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (PolInSAR) techniques for the estimation of forest structure. Performance and error indicators for the applicability and reliability of the used multi-baseline (MB) multi-temporal (MT) PolInSAR random volume over ground (RVoG) model are discussed. Experimental results are presented based on JPL's L-band repeat-pass polarimetric interferometric UAVSAR data over temperate and tropical forest biomes in the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, and in the La Amistad Park, Panama and Costa Rica. The results are partially compared with ground field measurements and with air-borne LVIS lidar data.

  17. Metamaterials for terahertz polarimetric devices

    SciTech Connect

    O'hara, John F; Taylor, Antoinette J; Smirnova, Evgenya; Azad, Abul; Chen, Hou-tong; Peralta, Xomalin G; Brener, Igal

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental and numerical investigations of planar terahertz metamaterial structures designed to interact with the state of polarization. The dependence of metamaterial resonances on polarization results in unique amplitude and phase characteristics of the terahertz transmission, providing the basis for polarimetric terahertz devices. We highlight some potential applications for polarimetric devices and present simulations of a terahertz quarter-wave plate and a polarizing terahertz beam splitter. Although this work was performed at tcrahertz frequencies, it may find applications in other frequency ranges as well.

  18. Metamaterials for terahertz polarimetric devices

    SciTech Connect

    O'hara, John F; Taylor, Antoinette J; Smirnova, Evgenya; Azad, Abul

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental and numerical investigations of planar terahertz metamaterial structures designed to interact with the state of polarization. The dependence of metamaterial resonances on polarization results in unique amplitude and phase characteristics of the terahertz transmission, providing the basis for polarimetric terahertz devices. We highlight some potential applications for polarimetric devices and present simulations of a terahertz quarter-wave plate and a polarizing terahertz beam splitter. Although this work was performed at terahertz frequencies, it may find applications in other frequency ranges as well.

  19. A novel framework for change detection in bi-temporal polarimetric SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrone, Davide; Bovolo, Francesca; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    Last years have seen relevant increase of polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data availability, thanks to satellite sensors like Sentinel-1 or ALOS-2 PALSAR-2. The augmented information lying in the additional polarimetric channels represents a possibility for better discriminate different classes of changes in change detection (CD) applications. This work aims at proposing a framework for CD in multi-temporal multi-polarization SAR data. The framework includes both a tool for an effective visual representation of the change information and a method for extracting the multiple-change information. Both components are designed to effectively handle the multi-dimensionality of polarimetric data. In the novel representation, multi-temporal intensity SAR data are employed to compute a polarimetric log-ratio. The multitemporal information of the polarimetric log-ratio image is represented in a multi-dimensional features space, where changes are highlighted in terms of magnitude and direction. This representation is employed to design a novel unsupervised multi-class CD approach. This approach considers a sequential two-step analysis of the magnitude and the direction information for separating non-changed and changed samples. The proposed approach has been validated on a pair of Sentinel-1 data acquired before and after the flood in Tamil-Nadu in 2015. Preliminary results demonstrate that the representation tool is effective and that the use of polarimetric SAR data is promising in multi-class change detection applications.

  20. Polarimetric Interferometry - Remote Sensing Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    This lecture is mainly based on the work of S.R. Cloude and presents examples for remote sensing applications Polarimetric SAR Interferometry...PolInSAR). PolInSAR has its origins in remote sensing and was first developed for applications in 1997 using SIRC L-Band data [1,2]. In its original form it

  1. Optical Polarimetric Mapping of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Li, Jian-Yang; Kelley, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    The dwarf planet Ceres, with one quarter of its mass possibly as water, is of particular importance to understanding the origin and the evolution history of water in the inner solar system. It is also a real-life laboratory to study astrobiology. NASA's Dawn is returning detailed geological maps of Ceres until the end of this year. As a complement to the Dawn mission, using SPHERE/ZIMPOL at one of Very Large Telescopes in Chile, we obtained the optical polarimetric maps in the I and V band of the whole surface of Ceres in July and August, 2015. Polarimetric maps of Ceres are sensitive to the physical conditions (such as packing density and particle size distribution) and composition of its surface regolith. The comparative studies between our polarimetric maps and Dawn maps help us to understand the geological evolution and the space weathering processes on Ceres' surface. At the time of the ZIMPOL observations, with the best spatial resolution of about 0.02 arcsecond (equivalent to 30 km), we effectively obtained about 700 independent measurements of the surface in one polarimetric set. I will present the SPHERE observations and discuss our major findings.

  2. Cluster membership probability: polarimetric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhi, Biman J.; Tamura, Motohide

    2013-04-01

    Interstellar polarimetric data of the six open clusters Hogg 15, NGC 6611, NGC 5606, NGC 6231, NGC 5749 and NGC 6250 have been used to estimate the membership probability for the stars within them. For proper-motion member stars, the membership probability estimated using the polarimetric data is in good agreement with the proper-motion cluster membership probability. However, for proper-motion non-member stars, the membership probability estimated by the polarimetric method is in total disagreement with the proper-motion cluster membership probability. The inconsistencies in the determined memberships may be because of the fundamental differences between the two methods of determination: one is based on stellar proper motion in space and the other is based on selective extinction of the stellar output by the asymmetric aligned dust grains present in the interstellar medium. The results and analysis suggest that the scatter of the Stokes vectors q (per cent) and u (per cent) for the proper-motion member stars depends on the interstellar and intracluster differential reddening in the open cluster. It is found that this method could be used to estimate the cluster membership probability if we have additional polarimetric and photometric information for a star to identify it as a probable member/non-member of a particular cluster, such as the maximum wavelength value (λmax), the unit weight error of the fit (σ1), the dispersion in the polarimetric position angles (overline{ɛ }), reddening (E(B - V)) or the differential intracluster reddening (ΔE(B - V)). This method could also be used to estimate the membership probability of known member stars having no membership probability as well as to resolve disagreements about membership among different proper-motion surveys.

  3. Multiangular L-band Datasets for Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Salinity Retrieval Measured by Airborne HUT-2D Synthetic Aperture Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainulainen, J.; Rautiainen, K.; Seppänen, J.; Hallikainen, M.

    2009-04-01

    SMOS is the European Space Agency's next Earth Explorer satellite due for launch in 2009. It aims for global monitoring of soil moisture and ocean salinity utilizing a new technology concept for remote sensing: two-dimensional aperture synthesis radiometry. The payload of SMOS is Microwave Imaging Radiometer by Aperture Synthesis, or MIRAS. It is a passive instrument that uses 72 individual L-band receivers for measuring the brightness temperature of the Earth. From each acquisition, i.e. integration time or snapshot, MIRAS provides two-dimensional brightness temperature of the scene in the instrument's field of view. Thus, consecutive snapshots provide multiangular measurements of the target once the instrument passes over it. Depending on the position of the target in instrument's swath, the brightness temperature of the target at incidence angles from zero up to 50 degrees can be measured with one overpass. To support the development MIRAS instrument, its calibration, and soil moisture and sea surface salinity retrieval algorithm development, Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) has designed, manufactured and tested a radiometer which operates at L-band and utilizes the same two-dimensional methodology of interferometery and aperture synthesis as MIRAS does. This airborne instrument, called HUT-2D, was designed to be used on board the University's research aircraft. It provides multiangular measurements of the target in its field of view, which spans up to 30 degrees off the boresight of the instrument, which is pointed to the nadir. The number of independent measurements of each target point depends on the flight speed and altitude. In addition to the Spanish Airborne MIRAS demonstrator (AMIRAS), HUT-2D is the only European airborne synthetic aperture radiometer. This paper presents the datasets and measurement campaigns, which have been carried out using the HUT-2D radiometer and are available for the scientific community. In April 2007 HUT-2D participated

  4. Space-Based Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols: The Multi-Angle Spectro-Polarimetric Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Davis, A. B.; Cairns, B.; Dubovik, O.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Sano, I.; Mukai, S.; Rozanov, V. V.; Litvinov, P.; Lapyonok, T.; Martin, W.; Wasilewski, A.; Xu, F.; Natraj, V.

    2015-01-01

    The review of optical instrumentation, forward modeling, and inverse problem solution for the polarimetric aerosol remote sensing from space is presented. The special emphasis is given to the description of current airborne and satellite imaging polarimeters and also to modern satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms based on the measurements of the Stokes vector of reflected solar light as detected on a satellite. Various underlying surface reflectance models are discussed and evaluated.

  5. UAVSAR: A New NASA Airborne SAR System for Science and Technology Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Sadowy, Greg; Miller, Tim; Shaffer, Scott; Muellerschoen, Ron; Jones, Cathleen; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently building a reconfigurable, polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track SAR data for differential interferometric measurements. Differentian interferometry can provide key deformation measurements, important for studies of earthquakes, volcanoes and other dynamically changing phenomena. Using precision real-time GPS and a sensor controlled flight management system, the system will be able to fly predefined paths with great precision. The expected performance of the flight control system will constrain the flight path to be within a 10 m diameter tube about the desired flight track. The radar will be designed to be operable on a UAV (Unpiloted Aria1 Vehicle) but will initially be demonstrated on a NASA Gulfstream III. The radar will be fully polarimetric, with a range bandwidth of 80 MHz (2 m range resolution), and will support a 16 km range swath. The antenna will be electronically steered along track to assure that the antenna beam can be directed independently, regardless of the wind direction and speed. Other features supported by the antenna include elevation monopulse and pulse-to-pulse re-steering capabilities that will enable some novel modes of operation. The system will nominally operate at 45,000 ft (13800 m). The program began as an Instrument Incubator Project (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science and Technology Office (ESTO).

  6. Advanced Polarimetric Concepts - Part 2 (Polarimetric Target Classification)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    polarization and single polarization /single polarization modes, and the C- band RADARSAT II [Meisl 2000] and L- band ALOS ...likelihood classifiers to a. Each individual polarization , | HH |2, |VV|2 and |HV|2, for all three bands . b. Combinations of dual polarizations without the...advanced satellite radar systems such as PALSAR, an L- band SAR sensor on board the NASDA ALOS satellite and Radarsat II, a C- band polarimetric

  7. Potentials of polarimetric SAR interferometry for agriculture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Juan M.; Ballester-Berman, J. David

    2009-04-01

    This paper is aimed to define the main specifications and system requirements of a future spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mission with polarimetric and interferometric capabilities, to be applied in agriculture monitoring. Firstly, a previous discussion concerning the applications of remote sensing to agriculture and the requirements demanded by end users is introduced. Then, a review of polarimetric SAR and interferometric SAR techniques employed in agriculture is performed in order to explore and justify the potential contributions to crop parameter retrieval of polarimetric SAR interferometry (PolInSAR). The current status of the research about PolInSAR when applied to the retrieval of biophysical parameters of agricultural crops is also addressed, covering recent advances in theoretical modeling aspects (both direct and inverse models), the validation carried out so far with indoor data, and complementary information provided by other different but related experiments. From this experience, we describe some system specifications that will be important for the success of this technique. Among them it is emphasized the need of baselines larger than usual, medium-high frequency band, and a mandatory single-pass mode for overcoming temporal decorrelation. Finally, a set of future experiments is also proposed for additional testing and confirmation of observations made so far regarding minimum baseline requirements, temporal evolution of observables and modeling issues, among others.

  8. Polarimetric Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Number Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, K.; Cairns, B.; Hair, J. W.; Hu, Y.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is one of the most significant microphysical properties of liquid clouds and is essential for the understanding of aerosol-cloud interaction. It impacts radiative forcing, cloud evolution, precipitation, global climate and, through observation, can be used to monitor the cloud albedo effect, or the first indirect effect. The IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report continues to consider aerosol-cloud interactions as one of the largest uncertainties in radiative forcing of climate. The SABOR experiment, which was a NASA-led ship and air campaign off the east coast of the United States during July and August of 2014, provided an opportunity for the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) to develop and cross-validate a new approach of sensing CDNC with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The RSP is an airborne prototype of the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS) that was on-board the Glory satellite. It is a scanning sensor that provides high-precision measurements of polarized and full-intensity radiances at multiple angles over a wide spectral range. The distinctive feature of the polarimetric technique is that it does not make any assumption of the liquid water profile within the cloud. The approach involves (1) estimating the droplet size distribution from polarized reflectance observations in the rainbow, (2) using polarized reflectance to estimate above cloud water vapor and total reflectance to find how much near infra-red light is being absorbed in clouds, (3) finding cloud physical thickness from the absorption and cloud top pressure retrievals assuming a saturated mixing ratio for water vapor and (4) determining the cloud droplet number concentration from the physical thickness and droplet size distribution retrievals. An overview of the polarimetric technique will be presented along with the results of applying the new approach to SABOR campaign data. An analysis of the algorithm's performance when compared with the HSRL

  9. Information content of polarimetric SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Ian G.; Small, David L.; Vanzyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    The information content of the compressed Stoke's matrix data from the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) is examined in two ways - by measuring how each feature separates classes of terrain in an image, and by measuring how well a classifier performs with and without each feature. In this way, the features may then be ranked in order of information content (or in order of utility to the classifier). Suggestions are made regarding those variables that can be omitted in a data compression scheme or in a future simplified radar system.

  10. A fine resolution multifrequency polarimetric FM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bredow, J.; Gogineni, S.; Leung, T.; Moore, R. K.

    1988-01-01

    A fine resolution polarimetric FM SAR was developed for optimization of polarimetric SARs and interpretation of SAR data via controlled experiments with surface-base sensors. The system is designed for collecting polarimetric data at 5.3 and 10 GHz over incidence angles from 0 to 60 deg. Features of the system include broad bandwidth to obtain fine range resolution, phase stabilization and linearization loop circuitry, and digital signal processing capability. The system is used in a research program to collect polarimetric backscatter data from artificial sea ice research and design trade-offs, laboratory and field evaluation, as well as results from experiments on artificial sea ice are presented.

  11. The NASA Polarimetric Radar (NPOL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Wolff, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of the NASA NPOL S-band dual-polarimetric radar are presented including its operating characteristics, field configuration, scanning capabilities and calibration approaches. Examples of precipitation science data collections conducted using various scan types, and associated products, are presented for different convective system types and previous field campaign deployments. Finally, the NASA NPOL radar location is depicted in its home base configuration within the greater Wallops Flight Facility precipitation research array supporting NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Mission ground validation.

  12. Accounting For Gains And Orientations In Polarimetric SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Calibration method accounts for characteristics of real radar equipment invalidating standard 2 X 2 complex-amplitude R (receiving) and T (transmitting) matrices. Overall gain in each combination of transmitting and receiving channels assumed different even when only one transmitter and one receiver used. One characterizes departure of polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system from simple 2 X 2 model in terms of single parameter used to transform measurements into format compatible with simple 2 X 2 model. Data processed by applicable one of several prior methods based on simple model.

  13. The Potential of Polarimetric and Compact SAR Data in Rice Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Y.; Li, K.; Brisco, B.; Liu, L.; Yang, Z.

    2014-03-01

    Rice is a major food staple in the world, and provides food for more than one-third of the global population. The monitoring and mapping of paddy rice in a timely and efficient manner is very important for governments and decision makers. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has been proved to be a significant data source in rice monitoring. In this study, RADARSAT-2 polarimetric data were used to simulate compact polarimetry data. The simulated compact data and polarimetric data were then used to evaluate the information content for rice identification. The results indicate that polarimetric SAR can be used for rice identification based on the scattering mechanisms. The compact polarization RH and the RH/RL ratio are very promising for the discrimination of transplanted rice and direct-sown rice. These results require verification in further research.

  14. Techniques and Tools for Estimating Ionospheric Effects in Interferometric and Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P.; Lavalle, M.; Pi, X.; Buckley, S.; Szeliga, W.; Zebker, H.; Gurrola, E.

    2011-01-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a flexible, extensible software tool designed for the end-to-end processing and analysis of synthetic aperture radar data. ISCE inherits the core of the ROI_PAC interferometric tool, but contains improvements at all levels of the radar processing chain, including a modular and extensible architecture, new focusing approach, better geocoding of the data, handling of multi-polarization data, radiometric calibration, and estimation and correction of ionospheric effects. In this paper we describe the characteristics of ISCE with emphasis on the ionospheric modules. To detect ionospheric anomalies, ISCE implements the Faraday rotation method using quadpolarimetric images, and the split-spectrum technique using interferometric single-, dual- and quad-polarimetric images. The ability to generate co-registered time series of quad-polarimetric images makes ISCE also an ideal tool to be used for polarimetric-interferometric radar applications.

  15. Polarimetric radar data decomposition and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guoqing; Ranson, K. Jon

    1993-01-01

    Significant efforts have been made to decompose polarimetric radar data into several simple scattering components. The components which are selected because of their physical significance can be used to classify SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) image data. If particular components can be related to forest parameters, inversion procedures may be developed to estimate these parameters from the scattering components. Several methods have been used to decompose an averaged Stoke's matrix or covariance matrix into three components representing odd (surface), even (double-bounce) and diffuse (volume) scatterings. With these decomposition techniques, phenomena, such as canopy-ground interactions, randomness of orientation, and size of scatters can be examined from SAR data. In this study we applied the method recently reported by van Zyl (1992) to decompose averaged backscattering covariance matrices extracted from JPL SAR images over forest stands in Maine, USA. These stands are mostly mixed stands of coniferous and deciduous trees. Biomass data have been derived from field measurements of DBH and tree density using allometric equations. The interpretation of the decompositions and relationships with measured stand biomass are presented in this paper.

  16. Remote topographic sensing using polarimetric SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Dale L.; Ainsworth, Thomas L.; Lee, Jong-Sen; Grunes, Mitchell R.; de Grandi, Gianfranco D.

    1997-12-01

    A new remote sensing technique using polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data has been developed which can measure terrain slopes in the azimuthal, or along-track, direction. Terrain elevation maps can then be generated by integrating these slopes. The processing of both single- pass, and orthogonal two-pass, datasets is investigated. When single-pass SAR data is used elevation groundtruth must be available for at least one point of each profile formed in the azimuthal direction. When orthogonal two-pass slope data is employed, the elevation surface may be generated as an iterative solution of the Poisson equation and only a single elevation tie-point is required. The study presented uses orthogonal two-pass NASA/JPL AIRSAR P-band data as a test of the Poisson equation approach for an area in Death Valley National Park, California. The orthogonal two-pass results have been compared with a co-registered, conventional, U.S. Geological Survey product. Technique accuracy and potential applications are discussed.

  17. Polarimetric thermal emission from periodic water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Wilson, W. J.; Li, F. K.; Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results and theoretical calculations are presented to study the polarimetric emission from water surfaces with directional features. For our ground-based Ku-band radiometer measurements, a water pool was constructed on the roof of a building in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and a fiberglass surface with periodic corrugations in one direction was impressed on the top of the water surface to create a stationary water surface underneath it. It is observed that the measured Stokes parameters of corrugated fiberglass-covered water surfaces are functions of azimuth angles and agree very well with the theoretical calculations. The theory, after being verified by the experimental data, was then used to calculate the Stokes parameters of periodic surfaces without fiberglass surface layer and with rms height of the order of wind-generated water ripples. The magnitudes of the azimuthal variation of the calculated emissivities at horizontal and vertical polarizations corresponding to the first two Stokes parameters are found to be comparable to the values measured by airborne radiometers and SSM/I. In addition, the third Stokes parameter not shown in the literature is seen to have approximately twice the magnitude of the azimuth variation of either T(sub h) or T(sub v), which may make it more sensitive to the row direction, while less susceptive to noises because the atmospheric and system noises tend to be unpolarized and are expected to be cancelled out when the third Stokes parameter is derived as the difference of two or three power measurements, as indicated by another experiment carried out at a swimming pool with complicated surroundings. The results indicate that passive polarimetry is a potential technology in the remote sensing of ocean wind vector which is a crucial component in the understanding of global climate change. Issues related to the application of microwave passive polarimetry to ocean wind are also discussed.

  18. The NASA/JPL three-frequency polarimetric AIRSAR system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, J.; Carande, R.; Lou, Y.; Miller, T.; Wheeler, K.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (JPL AIRSAR) system has now completed four flight campaigns. The authors describe the current state of this system and provide insight into how flight seasons are planned for this instrument. The data processors and data products are described. A table containing relevant system parameters is provided.

  19. Long-range polarimetric imaging through fog.

    PubMed

    Fade, Julien; Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Carré, Anthony; Frein, Ludovic; Hamel, Cyril; Bretenaker, Fabien; Ramachandran, Hema; Alouini, Mehdi

    2014-06-20

    We report an experimental implementation of long-range polarimetric imaging through fog over kilometric distance in real field atmospheric conditions. An incoherent polarized light source settled on a telecommunication tower is imaged at a distance of 1.3 km with a snapshot polarimetric camera including a birefringent Wollaston prism, allowing simultaneous acquisition of two images along orthogonal polarization directions. From a large number of acquisitions datasets and under various environmental conditions (clear sky/fog/haze, day/night), we compare the efficiency of using polarized light for source contrast increase with different signal representations (intensity, polarimetric difference, polarimetric contrast, etc.). With the limited-dynamics detector used, a maximum fourfold increase in contrast was demonstrated under bright background illumination using polarimetric difference image.

  20. Detection and Monitoring of Inundation with Polarimetric L-Band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, B. D.; Celi, J. E.; Hamilton, S. K.; McDonald, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    It has been known for decades that at wavelengths L-band or longer, SAR is a sensitive indicator of inundation underneath forest canopies. The high resolution detection of below-canopy inundation is difficult to accomplish at regional to continental scales using other types of remote sensing sensors, making it a compelling SAR measurement especially useful for studying wetland inundation dynamics, particularly in difficult-to-reach access, canopy-covered tropical forest environments. Most results have utilized spaceborne SAR observations with less than fully polarimetric data. Since one of the objectives of the NISAR mission is to characterize and understand the fundamental process that drives changes to ecosystems such as wetland inundated areas, we will discuss the sensitivity of L-band SAR to inundation. We will illustrate the detection of inundation using fully polarimetric L-band SAR data from UAVSAR, NASA's airborne SAR, over a tropical forest region in Ecuador and Peru. At the same time as the data collection, measurements were made on the ground to characterize vegetation and inundation characteristics. The field data were used to validate the results of classifying the vanZyl decomposition of the polarimetric data. We compare this classification with that possible with a reduced subset of the polarimetric observations.

  1. Polarimetric microlensing of circumstellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe; Rahvar, Sohrab

    2015-12-01

    We study the benefits of polarimetry observations of microlensing events to detect and characterize circumstellar discs around the microlensed stars located at the Galactic bulge. These discs which are unresolvable from their host stars make a net polarization effect due to their projected elliptical shapes. Gravitational microlensing can magnify these signals and make them be resolved. The main aim of this work is to determine what extra information about these discs can be extracted from polarimetry observations of microlensing events in addition to those given by photometry ones. Hot discs which are closer to their host stars are more likely to be detected by microlensing, owing to more contributions in the total flux. By considering this kind of discs, we show that although the polarimetric efficiency for detecting discs is similar to the photometric observation, but polarimetry observations can help to constraint the disc geometrical parameters e.g. the disc inner radius and the lens trajectory with respect to the disc semimajor axis. On the other hand, the time-scale of polarimetric curves of these microlensing events generally increases while their photometric time-scale does not change. By performing a Monte Carlo simulation, we show that almost four optically thin discs around the Galactic bulge sources are detected (or even characterized) through photometry (or polarimetry) observations of high-magnification microlensing events during 10-yr monitoring of 150 million objects.

  2. Feature utility in polarimetric radar image classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Ian G.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1989-01-01

    The information content in polarimetric SAR images is examined, and the polarimetric image variables containing the information that is important to the classification of terrain features in the images are determined. It is concluded that accurate classification can be done when just over half of the image variables are retained. A reduction in image data dimensionality gives storage savings, and can lead to the improvement of classifier performance. In addition, it is shown that a simplified radar system with only phase-calibrated CO-POL or SINGLE TX channels can give classification performance which approaches that of a fully polarimetric radar.

  3. Accumulation of airborne trace elements in mosses, lichens and synthetic materials exposed at urban monitoring stations: towards a harmonisation of the moss-bag technique.

    PubMed

    Giordano, S; Adamo, P; Spagnuolo, V; Tretiach, M; Bargagli, R

    2013-01-01

    Mosses, lichens and cellulose filters were exposed for 17 weeks at four urban monitoring stations in Naples (S Italy) to assess the accumulation of airborne Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Ti, V, and Zn. In each site, the element accumulation was significantly higher in the moss Hypnum cupressiforme than in the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea. Acid washed mosses accumulated the highest amount of trace elements, but the differences in element concentrations among the moss samples exposed after water washing and different devitalisation treatments (acid washing, oven drying and water boiling) and between the lichen samples exposed with and without the nylon bag were not statistically significant. The cellulose filters showed the lowest accumulation capability. The reciprocal ordination of sites and exposed materials showed an increasing contamination gradient (especially for Pb, Cu and Zn) from the background site to the trafficked city streets; this pattern was undetectable from PM(10) data recorded by the automatic monitoring devices operating in the four exposure sites. The element profile in exposed materials did not change substantially throughout the urban area and particles of polluted urban soils seem the main source of airborne metals in Naples. Through a comprehensive evaluation of the results from this and previous studies, a protocol is suggested for the moss-bag monitoring of trace element deposition in urban environments.

  4. Investigation of the Capability of Compact Polarimetric SAR Interferometry to Estimate Forest Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Xie, Lei; Wang, Chao; Chen, Jiehong

    2013-08-01

    The main objective of this paper is to investigate the capability of compact Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (C-PolInSAR) on forest height estimation. For this, the pseudo fully polarimetric interferomteric (F-PolInSAR) covariance matrix is firstly reconstructed, then the three- stage inversion algorithm, hybrid algorithm, Music and Capon algorithm are applied to both C-PolInSAR covariance matrix and pseudo F-PolInSAR covariance matrix. The availability of forest height estimation is demonstrated using L-band data generated by simulator PolSARProSim and X-band airborne data acquired by East China Research Institute of Electronic Engineering, China Electronics Technology Group Corporation.

  5. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yun-Jin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996, was divided into two smaller workshops:(1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop. This current paper, Volume 2 of the Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, presents the summaries for The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop.

  6. Detection of land degradation with polarimetric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Farr, Tom G.; van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1992-08-01

    Land degradation is a crucial problem facing the human race. With an ever-increasing population placing increasing stress on agricultural lands, land impoverishment has the potential for adversely impacting the food supply in many regions of the world. The Manix Basin Area of the Mojave desert has been cropped using center pivot irrigation, but since 1973 many fields have been abandoned for economic reasons. Data were collected using the JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), a multi-spectral radar polarimeter. Analysis of these data revealed unusual polarization responses which we attribute to the formation of wind ripples on the surfaces of fields which had been abandoned for more than 5 years. This conjecture was confirmed through field observations, and the observed polarization responses were effectively modelled using a second-order small perturbation model. These results demonstrate the usefulness of remote sensing techniques supported by limited field work for study of land degradation at synoptic scales.

  7. Contrast optimization in broadband passive polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Boffety, Matthieu; Hu, Haofeng; Goudail, François

    2014-12-01

    Polarimetric imaging is often performed using light with a narrow spectrum for the sake of polarization measurement accuracy. However, due to the use of narrowband filters, this reduces the amount of light entering the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. This may not be the best choice for target detection applications, where a high target contrast is required rather than polarimetric accuracy. We address contrast optimization for broadband passive polarimetric imaging. We show through simulation and experiments that polarimetric contrast can be significantly increased by broadening the spectrum of analyzed light. In addition, we show that the contrast can be optimized by taking into account the spectral dependence of the scene and of the polarization analysis devices.

  8. Polarimetric passive millimeter-wave sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikner, David A.; Samples, Greg

    2001-08-01

    The US Army Research Laboratory has developed a 93-Ghz Stokes radiometer that is currently being used to quantify the polarimetric signature of various objects and materials. Preliminary measurement using the radiometer have been made of various terrain types and objects, which have included an asphalt aircraft runway, a gravel road, water, grass a tank, and a truck. A description of the development of the radiometer, its performance, and some initial results are presented. These results are the first step in assessing the utility of polarimetric radiometry and specifically how missions can be enhanced using this information. The results show that polarimetric radiometry may be useful for eliminating water as a false target in the imagery. It is also shown that asphalt aircraft runways do have a polarimetric signature that is different than short dormant grass at a 3-deg glide slope angle.

  9. Investigations on polarimetric terahertz frequency domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yandong; Zhang, Banghong; Notake, Takashi; Minamide, Hiroaki; Olivo, Malini; Sugii, Shigeki

    2014-04-01

    A polarimetric Terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy system is presented which has an additional polarization measurement function at the Terahertz band. The achromatic Terahertz waveplate, which acts as the key device in the system, is also presented.

  10. The polarimetric capabilities of NICMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, D. C.; Schmidt, G. D.; Lytle, Dyer

    1997-01-01

    The polarimetric capabilities of Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) are demonstrated from data obtained during the Early Release Observations of IRC+10216 and CRL 2688 (the Egg Nebula). Preflight Thermal Vacuum tests revealed that each polarizer has a unique polarizing efficiency, and that the position angle offsets differ from the nominal positions of O deg, 120 deg and 240 deg. Therefore an algorithm different from that of an ideal polarizer is required for proper reduction of astronomical polarimetry data. We discuss this new algorithm and the results of its application to NICMOS data. We also present preliminary estimates of the Instrumental Polarization, the sensitivity of the grisms to polarized light, and the accuracy of NICMOS imaging polarimetry for faint and low polarization objects. Finally, we suggest strategies for maximizing the success of NICMOS polarimetry observations.

  11. Rice growth monitoring using simulated compact polarimetric C band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Li, Kun; Liu, Long; Shao, Yun; Brisco, Brian; Li, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a set of nine compact polarimetric (CP) images were simulated from polarimetric RADARSAT-2 data acquired over a test site containing two types of rice field in Jiangsu province, China. The types of rice field in the test site were (1) transplanted hybrid rice fields, and (2) direct-sown japonica rice fields. Both types have different yields and phenological stages. As a first step, the two types of rice field were distinguished with 94% and 86% accuracy respectively through analyzing CP synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations and their behavior in terms of scattering mechanisms during the rice growth season. The focus was then on phenology retrieval for each type of rice field. A decision tree (DT) algorithm was built to fulfill the precise retrieval of rice phenological stages, in which seven phenological stages were discriminated. The key criterion for each phenological stage was composed of 1-4 CP parameters, some of which were first used for rice phenology retrieval and found to be very sensitive to rice phenological changes. The retrieval results were verified at parcel level for a set of 12 stands of rice and up to nine observation dates per stand. This gave an accuracy of 88-95%. Throughout the phenology retrieval process, only simulated CP data were used, without any auxiliary data. These results demonstrate the potential of CP SAR for rice growth monitoring applications.

  12. Classification of Polarimetric SAR Image Based on the Subspace Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Li, Z.; Tian, B.; Chen, Q.; Zhang, P.

    2013-07-01

    Land cover classification is one of the most significant applications in remote sensing. Compared to optical sensing technologies, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can penetrate through clouds and have all-weather capabilities. Therefore, land cover classification for SAR image is important in remote sensing. The subspace method is a novel method for the SAR data, which reduces data dimensionality by incorporating feature extraction into the classification process. This paper uses the averaged learning subspace method (ALSM) method that can be applied to the fully polarimetric SAR image for classification. The ALSM algorithm integrates three-component decomposition, eigenvalue/eigenvector decomposition and textural features derived from the gray-level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM). The study site, locates in the Dingxing county, in Hebei Province, China. We compare the subspace method with the traditional supervised Wishart classification. By conducting experiments on the fully polarimetric Radarsat-2 image, we conclude the proposed method yield higher classification accuracy. Therefore, the ALSM classification method is a feasible and alternative method for SAR image.

  13. Urban area mapping from polarimetric SAR data using fuzzy inference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Asmeet; Manickam, Surendar; Bhattacharya, Avik; Porwal, Alok

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present urban area mapping from full-polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data using fuzzy inference system (FIS). In particular, our aim is to utilize the profound knowledge available about scattering mechanism from urban targets to delineate urban environment. In this approach, we have utilized the recently developed polarimetric SAR scattering power decomposition technique (SD-Y4O) given in Bhattacharya et. al. The improved powers along with some other polarimetric parameters were used in this study. A suitable normalization procedure was adapted to handle the skewness in the estimated parameters. The fuzzy if-then rules were constructed from the in-depth knowledge of scattering mechanisms from an urban environment. Suitable methods were introduced to define the fuzzy inference system. The defuzzified membership values were thresholded using an unsupervised clustering method (k-means). The pixels lying in the range [μmax-σ, μmax+σ] corresponds to urban areas where µmax is the largest cluster center and σ is the standard deviation of the cluster corresponding to µmax. The extracted urban area is in visually good agreement with the high resolution optical image. ALOS PALSAR full-polarimetric L-band SAR data has been used in this study.

  14. Change Detection in a Short Time Sequence of Polarimetric C-Band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Based on an omnibus likelihood ratio test statistic for the equality of several variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution and a factorization of this test statistic with associated p-values, change analysis in a time series of multilook, polarimetric SAR data in the covariance matrix representation is carried out. The omnibus test statistic and its factorization detect if and when change(s) occur. The technique is demonstrated on airborne EMISAR C-band data but may be applied to ALOS, COSMO-SkyMed, RadarSat-2 Sentinel-1, TerraSAR-X, and Yaogan data also.

  15. Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar utilized to track oil spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliaccio, Maurizio; Nunziata, Ferdinando; Brown, Carl E.; Holt, Benjamin; Li, Xiaofeng; Pichel, William; Shimada, Masanobu

    2012-04-01

    The continued demand for crude oil and related petroleum products along with the resulting upward spiral of the market price of oil have forced oil exploration and production companies to seek out new reserves farther offshore and in deeper waters. The United States is among the top five nations globally in terms of estimated offshore oil reserves and petroleum production. Yet deepwater drilling to extract these reserves is a major engineering challenge for oil companies. Moreover, such drilling activity also comes with a significant environmental risk, and the extremely high pressures associated with deepwater oil wells mean that the mitigation of accidental releases from a deepwater spill is truly a challenging endeavor.

  16. Target Classification Using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) Polarimetric Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    3-8 3.4. SarTool’rn Target Orientation .. .. .. .... ... .... ...... 3-i1S .5.. Single Layer Perceptron .. .. .. .... ... .... ... ...... 3-20 .1. 1...Rosenblatt’s algorithm is based on the 3-18 single layer perceptron . This type of network can employ continuous as well as discrete inputs and is capable...X0 InputYout Decision Boundary ,- N I Perceptron Perceptron Logic Decision Region Figure 3.5. Single Layer Perceptron described in Lippman’s article

  17. The NASA/JPL multifrequency, multipolarisation airborne SAR system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Held, D. N.; Brown, W. E.; Freeman, A.; Klein, J. D.; Zebker, H. A.; Sato, T.; Miller, T.; Nguyen, Q.; Lou, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radars, operating at L-, C- and P-band, were designed to replace and upgrade a system destroyed in an aircraft accident. Ground and flight tests were conducted, and the radar was flown over a calibration site in a sequence of experiments designed to calibrate the system. The radar also took part in science campaigns.

  18. Polarimetric analysis of snow-covered and bare lake ice from Ku and X-band scatterometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Khadhra, K.; Gunn, G. E.; Duguay, C. R.; Kelly, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Lake ice plays a key role in regional climate, and has significant physical, biological and socio-economic impacts (e.g. fish overwintering habitat, winter-road transportation, public safety). In the last two decades, there has been growing interest by the international remote sensing community to explore radar polarimetry for glaciological investigations, mainly for glaciers and ice sheet. Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) could be a potential tool for lake ice cover mapping and ice thickness estimation. In this paper, we represent results from the first investigation of fully polarimetric Ku and X-band (9.6 and 17.2 GHz, respectively) scatterometer data collected over lake near Churchill, Manitoba. Several controlled and calibrated experimental measurements were carried out during winter 2010-2011, as a contribution to the Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory (CoReH2O) candidate mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). Scatterometer scans were made on several occasions at five undisturbed static sites on Ramsey Lake. Measurements characterizing snow and ice properties were also gathered immediately after scatterometer scans. Snow depth and density, snow water equivalent, gain size, ice thickness, ice composition and air inclusion in ice volume were determined at each site. This field data set was very important for the interpretation of the polarimetric parameters, e.g. the copolarization ratio, the copolarization phase and the depolarization ratio. First, the polarimetric parameters have been analysed for the two layers (snow and ice) covariance matrix and where snow subsequently removed. Thus, the influence of the snow layer on the polarimetric data could be quantified. Also, the Pauli and Cloude/Pottier polarimetric decompositions were applied for the two-layer and one-layer scattering mechanisms (removed snow) to quantify the effectiveness of these decompositions. Results show that the polarimetric SAR could explain the different

  19. Contrast optimization in broadband polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Lijo; Hu, Haofeng; Boffety, Matthieu; Goudail, François

    2016-05-01

    For the sake of polarimetric accuracy, polarization imaging systems based on liquid crystal modulators often work at one given wavelength due to the strong chromatic properties of the liquid crystal retarders. This often requires the use of narrowband filters which reduces the amount of light in the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. For applications where the main parameter of interest is the target/background discriminability rather than polarimetric accuracy, spectral filtering may not be the best option. In this work, we investigate the impact of broadening the spectrum of the light entering the system on the discriminability performance of passive and active polarimetric systems. Through simulations, we show that broadening the bandwidth of the illumination can increase the contrast between two regions, as the increase of light flux compensates for the loss of polarimetric precision. Moreover, we show that taking into account the chromatic characteristics of the components of the imaging system can further enhance the contrast. We validate these findings through experiments in passive and active configurations, and demonstrate that the illumination bandwidth can be seen as an additional parameter to optimize polarimetric imaging set-ups.

  20. Passive Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Snow and Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-30

    In recent years, polarimetric radiometry has shown great potential to revolutionize passive remote sensing of the ocean surface. As a result, several...polarimetric radiometer, in 2001. This project explores the possibility of applying this new technology to remote sensing in the Polar Regions by investigating the polarimetric signature of ice and snow.

  1. Sensing soil moisture and vegetation using GNSS-R polarimetric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yan; Savi, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry is an efficient tool for remote sensing and plays a key role in several applications. The estimation of soil moisture and vegetation in the land field is attracting widespread interest in hydrology, climatology and carbon cycles. In order to investigate the scattering polarization properties from different types of surface environments, an airborne measurement was performed, equipped with a new 4-channel prototype for collecting the direct, reflected left-hand circular polarization (LHCP) and right-hand circular polarization (RHCP) signals. Both the reflected LHCP and RHCP signals were acquired at the same time by a dual polarization antenna. A data averaging procedure was used to reduce the incoherent part of the received power and two reflected signals were normalized by direct signals obtained from each front-end (FE). Then three polarimetric observables were used to analyze vegetation biomass and soil moisture fluctuations. It was concluded that the polarimetric ratio (PR) is sensitive to soil moisture content (SMC) and considerably independent of roughness and vegetation biomass. The trunk component is confirmed to be the most important factor affecting the amplitude of scattering polarizations. Furthermore, the measurement results showed that the PR variation between different elevation angles was affected by roughness and biomass. The PR variation in forests with big biomass shows the least amount of changes when compared to other geographical environments. The results show another possibility of further geophysical parameter evaluations employing polarimetric applications in GNSS-R.

  2. Symmetry properties in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.; Li, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the relations among polarimetric backscattering coefficients from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. Symmetry of geophysical media encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered for both reciprocal and nonreciprocal cases. On the basis of the invariance under symmetry transformations in the linear polarization basis, the scattering coefficients are related by a set of equations which restrict the number of independent parameters in the polarimetric covariance matrix. The properties derived under these transformations are general and apply to all scattering mechanisms in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the derived symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is discussed. As a practical application, the results from this paper provide new methods for the external calibration of polarimetric radars without the deployment of man-made calibration targets.

  3. Stellar Rotation Effects in Polarimetric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the polarization signal in microlensing events of hot stars is larger than that of main-sequence stars. Most hot stars rotate rapidly around their stellar axes. The stellar rotation creates ellipticity and gravity-darkening effects that break the spherical symmetry of the source's shape and the circular symmetry of the source's surface brightness respectively. Hence, it causes a net polarization signal for the source star. This polarization signal should be considered in polarimetric microlensing of fast rotating stars. For moderately rotating stars, lensing can magnify or even characterize small polarization signals due to the stellar rotation through polarimetric observations. The gravity-darkening effect due to a rotating source star creates asymmetric perturbations in polarimetric and photometric microlensing curves whose maximum occurs when the lens trajectory crosses the projected position of the rotation pole on the sky plane. The stellar ellipticity creates a time shift (i) in the position of the second peak of the polarimetric curves in transit microlensing events and (ii) in the peak position of the polarimetric curves with respect to the photometric peak position in bypass microlensing events. By measuring this time shift via polarimetric observations of microlensing events, we can evaluate the ellipticity of the projected source surface on the sky plane. Given the characterizations of the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2) polarimeter at the Very Large Telescope, the probability of observing this time shift is very small. The more accurate polarimeters of the next generation may well measure these time shifts and evaluate the ellipticity of microlensing source stars.

  4. Polarimetric applications to identify bee honey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Luna, Rafael; Saucedo-Orozco, Izcoatl; Santiago-Lona, Cynthia V.; Franco-Sánchez, Juan M.; Magallanes-Luján, Alejandro

    2011-10-01

    A polarimetric characterization, consisting of the Mueller matrix determination and the measurement of the refractive index, is employed to study bee honey and corn syrup differences. Two samples of commercial marks of bee honey and one sample of commercial mark corn syrup are studied. Results show the corn syrup and one of the bee honey samples have a similar polarimetric behavior, which differs from the second bee honey sample. This behavior can be employed as a simple, qualitative test, to discriminate true bee honey from corn syrup or from adulterated bee honey.s-powe

  5. Polarimetric target detection under uneven illumination.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingjing; Liu, Tiegen; Han, Jiahui; Hu, Haofeng

    2015-09-07

    In polarimetric imaging, the uneven illumination could cause the significant spatial intensity fluctuations in the scene, and thus hampers the target detection. In this paper, we propose a method of illumination compensation and contrast optimization for Stokes polarimetric imaging, which allows significantly increasing the performance of target detection under uneven illumination. We show with numerical simulation and real-world experiment that, based on the intensity information contained in the polarization information, the contrast can be effectively enhanced by proper approach, which is of particular importance in practical applications with spatial illumination fluctuations, such as remote sensing.

  6. Classification and monitoring of reed belts using dual-polarimetric TerraSAR-X time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Iris; Jagdhuber, Thomas; Itzerott, Sibylle

    2016-04-01

    The shorelines of lakes in northeastern Germany are often covered by reed. These reed belts fulfill an important function as erosion protection, biotope for animals, carbon storage, and as cleaning filter for lake water. However, despite their importance for the limnic ecosystem, reed vegetation in northeastern Germany is not regularly monitored. In this research study we investigate the potential of synthetic aperture radar polarimetry (PolSAR) for seasonal monitoring of reed vegetation. SAR imagery enables sunlight- and (almost) weather-independent monitoring. Polarimetric decomposition techniques allow the physical characterization of the scattering scenario and the involved scatterers. Our study is based on 19 dual-polarimetric (HH/VV) TerraSAR-X images acquired between August 2014 and May 2015. We calculated different polarimetric indices comprising the HH and VV intensities, the dual-polarimetric coherency matrix with dominant and mean alpha scattering angles, entropy and anisotropy (normalized eigen-value difference) as well as combinations of entropy and anisotropy for the analysis of the scattering scenarios. The reed areas in the TerraSAR-X images were classified using a random forest algorithm and validated with high-resolution digital orthophotos. The time series analysis of the reed belts revealed significant seasonal changes in the double bounce sensitive parameters (intensity ratio HH/VV and intensity difference HH-VV, the co-polarimetric coherence phase and the dominant and mean alpha scattering angles). Additionally, the dual-polarimetric coherence (amplitude), anisotropy, entropy, and anisotropy-entropy-combinations showed seasonal changes of reed. In summer, the reed areas are characterized within the X-band SAR data by volume scattering, whereas in winter double-bounce scattering dominates. The volume scattering in summer is caused predominantly by reed leaves. In autumn, the leaves start to wither and fall off, so that in winter predominately

  7. UAVASAR L-Band Polarimetric Data to Analyze BP Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliacciio, M.; Nunziata, F.; Holt, B.

    2011-03-01

    Two polarimetric approaches are presented to observe oil spills in polarimetric SAR data gathered during UAVSAR flights over the polluted area of Gulf of Mexico. The approaches, based on the co-polarized pedestal height and on the co-polarized phase difference (CPD), are able to work on full-polarized and dual-polarized Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data, respectively.The approaches have been shown to be both able to distinguish the oil for the surrounding sea surface and to classify it according to its damping properties. Results, compared with ancillary data provided by independent aircraft surveys, witness the very heterogeneous damping properties of the oil spilled after the BP oil platform accident.

  8. Adaptive polarimetric sensing for optimum radar signature classification using a genetic search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sadjadi, Firooz A

    2006-08-01

    An automated technique for adaptive radar polarimetric pattern classification is described. The approach is based on a genetic algorithm that uses a probabilistic pattern separation distance function and searches for those transmit and receive states of polarization sensing angles that optimize this function. Seven pattern separation distance functions--the Rayleigh quotient, the Bhattacharyya, divergence, Kolmogorov, Matusta, Kullback-Leibler distances, and the Bayesian probability of error--are used on real, fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar target signatures. Each of these signatures is represented as functions of transmit and receive polarization ellipticity angles and the angle of polarization ellipse. The results indicate that, based on the majority of the distance functions used, there is a unique set of state of polarization angles whose use will lead to improved classification performance.

  9. Tropical forest tree stands characterization with L-band polarimetric radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shih-Tseng

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness of using L-band polarimetric data to determine tropical tree-stand parameters is discussed with specific attention given to the correction of the radar data. Tree-parameter data from ground studies is compared to L-band polarimetric data (in both uncorrected and topographically corrected forms) for two test areas. The test sites are at two different elevations but both include 81 test plots with topographic data and tree-characteristic data given. Synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) data are found to be related to bole volume and tree volume, and the topographically corrected data show results similar to the uncorrected data. Similar r-values are given for both data sets because the data with incidence-angle values below 35 and above 55 are removed. Topographical correction is important when local incidence angles exceed the limits.

  10. Advanced Polarimetric Concepts - Part 1 (Polarimetric Target Description, Speckle filtering and Decomposition Theorems)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    with p=3 for the reciprocal case (SHV=SVH) and p=4 for the non-reciprocal case. The distribution functions for dual polarization ( HH , VH), (HV...and scene description difficult. The speckle reduction problem is more complicated for polarimetric SAR than a single polarization SAR, because of the...changes in wave polarization basis. Among the existing Polarimetric Target Decomposition theorems - coherent (Krogager, Cameron ...), non-coherent (Huynen

  11. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  12. SAR Polarimetric Signatures for Urban Targets - Polarimetric Signature Calculation and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, A.; Sashtri, B.

    2012-08-01

    Various urban targets (land use) from Ahmedabad city were chosen, followed by generation of polarimetric signatures for each target using the developed tool. These polarimetric signatures were then studied and analyzed in detail. An attempt has been to develop a Polarimetric Signature Calculation and Visual Representation Tool assigned name "POLSIC", to generate Co-polarized and Cross polarized signatures, based on the calculation of Stokes Matrix and the backscattered power at various ellipticity and orientation angles. The input parameters required for the developed tool, are the amplitude and phase values of all the four polarizations, for each target using any quadpol radar imagery. In this study, RADARSAT-2 imagery has been used to obtain the amplitude and phase values of each target, in all four polarization states. Polarimetric signatures were generated for various urban targets using the developed tool. Vegetated land, built up in the city, built up within lake, and road were found to have an overall higher polarimetric response (backscattered power) as compared to grass lawn, fallow land and minimum in case of water body. Such Polarimetric responses were obtained due to factors like surface roughness and orientation of the target with respect to the radar look angle. The shape of the signature also indicates the scattering characteristics.

  13. Passive Polarimetric Microwave Signatures Observed Over Antarctica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WindSat satellite-based fully polarimetric passive microwave observations, expressed in the form of the Stokes vector, were analyzed over the Antarctic ice sheet. The vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (first two Stokes components) from WindSat are shown to be consistent w...

  14. Phase Calibration Of Polarimetric Radar Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony; Sheen, Dan R.; Kasischke, Erik S.

    1992-01-01

    Report addresses problem of calibration of differences between phases (relative to transmitted signals) of signals received in two polarization channels of polarimetric imaging radar system. Causes of various types of errors discussed. Calibration necessary to deduce information about target area - type of terrain, presence of vegetation, and land/water boundaries.

  15. Photometric and polarimetric mapping of water turbidity and water depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halajian, J.; Hallock, H.

    1973-01-01

    A Digital Photometric Mapper (DPM) was used in the Fall of 1971 in an airborne survey of New York and Boston area waters to acquire photometric, spectral and polarimetric data. The object of this study is to analyze these data with quantitative computer processing techniques to assess the potential of the DPM in the measurement and regional mapping of water turbidity and depth. These techniques have been developed and an operational potential has been demonstrated. More emphasis is placed at this time on the methodology of data acquisition, analysis and display than on the quantity of data. The results illustrate the type, quantity and format of information that could be generated operationally with the DPM-type sensor characterized by high photometric stability and fast, accurate digital output. The prototype, single-channel DPM is suggested as a unique research tool for a number of new applications. For the operational mapping of water turbidity and depth, the merits of a multichannel DPM coupled with a laser system are stressed.

  16. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  17. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  18. Contour-Mapping Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Caro, E. R.; Wu, C.

    1985-01-01

    Airborne two-antenna synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) interferometric system provides data processed to yield terrain elevation as well as reflectedintensity information. Relative altitudes of terrain points measured to within error of approximately 25 m.

  19. Evaluation of applicability of high-resolution multiangle imaging photo-polarimetric observations for aerosol atmospheric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Olga; Garay, Michael; Xu, Feng; Diner, David; Seidel, Felix

    2016-07-01

    Multiangle spectro-polarimetric measurements have been advocated as an additional tool for better understanding and quantifying the aerosol properties needed for atmospheric correction for ocean color retrievals. The central concern of this work is the assessment of the effects of absorbing aerosol properties on remote sensing reflectance measurement uncertainty caused by neglecting UV-enhanced absorption of carbonaceous particles and by not accounting for dust nonsphericity. In addition, we evaluate the polarimetric sensitivity of absorbing aerosol properties in light of measurement uncertainties achievable for the next generation of multi-angle polarimetric imaging instruments, and demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of wavelength selection in the UV/VNIR range. In this work a vector Markov Chain radiative transfer code including bio-optical models was used to quantitatively evaluate in water leaving radiances between atmospheres containing realistic UV-enhanced and non-spherical aerosols and the SEADAS carbonaceous and dust-like aerosol models. The phase matrices for the spherical smoke particles were calculated using a standard Mie code, while those for non-spherical dust particles were calculated using the numerical approach developed for modeling dust for the AERONET network of ground-based sunphotometers. As a next step, we have developed a retrieval code that employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) and adding/doubling radiative transfer method for joint retrieval of aerosol properties and water leaving radiance from Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager-1 (AirMSPI-1) polarimetric observations. The AirMSPI-1 instrument has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° at 10 m resolution. AirMSPI spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, and 865 nm, with 470, 660, and 865 reporting linear polarization. We

  20. Object-oriented change detection based on weighted polarimetric scattering differences on POLSAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Lu, L.; Yang, S.; Huang, G.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-06-01

    For wide application of change detection with SAR imagery, current processing technologies and methods are mostly based on pixels. It is difficult for pixel-based technologies to utilize spatial characteristics of images and topological relations of objects. Object-oriented technology takes objects as processing unit, which takes advantage of the shape and texture information of image. It can greatly improve the efficiency and reliability of change detection. Recently, with the development of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR), more backscattering features on different polarization state can be available for usage of object-oriented change detection study. In this paper, the object-oriented strategy will be employed. Considering the fact that the different target or target's state behaves different backscattering characteristics dependent on polarization state, an object-oriented change detection method that based on weighted polarimetric scattering difference of PolSAR images is proposed. The method operates on the objects generated by generalized statistical region merging (GSRM) segmentation processing. The merit of GSRM method is that image segmentation is executed on polarimetric coherence matrix, which takes full advantages of polarimetric backscattering features. And then, the measurement of polarimetric scattering difference is constructed by combining the correlation of covariance matrix and the difference of scattering power. Through analysing the effects of the covariance matrix correlation and the scattering echo power difference on the polarimetric scattering difference, the weighted method is used to balance the influences caused by the two parts, so that more reasonable weights can be chosen to decrease the false alarm rate. The effectiveness of the algorithm that proposed in this letter is tested by detection of the growth of crops with two different temporal radarsat-2 fully PolSAR data. First, objects are produced by GSRM algorithm

  1. Method for providing a polarization filter for processing synthetic aperture radar image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C. (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A polarization filter can maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of a polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and help discriminate between targets or enhance image features, e.g., enhance contrast between different types of target. The method disclosed is based on the Stokes matrix/ Stokes vector representation, so the targets of interest can be extended targets, and the method can also be applied to the case of bistatic polarimetric radars.

  2. Mueller Polarimetric Imaging System with Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laude-Boulesteix, Blandine; de Martino, Antonello; Drévillon, Bernard; Schwartz, Laurent

    2004-05-01

    We present a new polarimetric imaging system based on liquid-crystal modulators, a spectrally filtered white-light source, and a CCD camera. The whole Mueller matrix image of the sample is measured in approximately 5 s in the transmission mode. The instrument design, together with an original and easy-to-operate calibration procedure, provides high accuracy over a wide spectral range (500-700 nm). This accuracy has been assessed by measurement of a linear polarizer at different orientations and a thick wedged quartz plate as an example of a partially depolarized retarder. Polarimetric images of a stained hepatic biopsy with significant fibrosis have been taken at several wavelengths. The optical properties of Picrosirius Red stained collagen (diattenuation, retardance, and polarizance) have been measured independently from each other between 500 and 700 nm.

  3. Polarimetric Observation of Pulsars with Hexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, M.; Bhat, R.; Tremblay, S.; Ord, S.; Sobey, C.; Kirsten, F.

    2016-07-01

    The MWA VCS pipeline is now reliably generating high time resolution observations of radio pulsars in all four Stokes parameters. Here, we are proposing to test the polarimetric response of and our ability to calibrate the new Hex array currently under construction. These observation will provide data that will be used to study the pulsars themselves (including their emission mechanism and beam geometry), the interstellar medium and towards understanding the Galactic magnetic field. We are proposing a set of observations of three pulsars (J0034-0534, J0437-4715, and J2145-0750) at a wide range of hour angles to characterise the fidelity and stability of the polarimetric solutions with the hexes. The observation would be performed between 170-200 MHz and 140-170 MHz respectively. This project will form part of the PhD program of Mengyao Xue.

  4. Advanced Unsupervised Classification Methods to Detect Anomalies on Earthen Levees Using Polarimetric SAR Imagery.

    PubMed

    Marapareddy, Ramakalavathi; Aanstoos, James V; Younan, Nicolas H

    2016-06-16

    Fully polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (polSAR) data analysis has wide applications for terrain and ground cover classification. The dynamics of surface and subsurface water events can lead to slope instability resulting in slough slides on earthen levees. Early detection of these anomalies by a remote sensing approach could save time versus direct assessment. We used L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to screen levees for anomalies. SAR technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice for identifying problematic areas on earthen levees. Using the parameters entropy (H), anisotropy (A), alpha (α), and eigenvalues (λ, λ₁, λ₂, and λ₃), we implemented several unsupervised classification algorithms for the identification of anomalies on the levee. The classification techniques applied are H/α, H/A, A/α, Wishart H/α, Wishart H/A/α, and H/α/λ classification algorithms. In this work, the effectiveness of the algorithms was demonstrated using quad-polarimetric L-band SAR imagery from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The study area is a section of the lower Mississippi River valley in the Southern USA, where earthen flood control levees are maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers.

  5. Advanced Unsupervised Classification Methods to Detect Anomalies on Earthen Levees Using Polarimetric SAR Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Marapareddy, Ramakalavathi; Aanstoos, James V.; Younan, Nicolas H.

    2016-01-01

    Fully polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (polSAR) data analysis has wide applications for terrain and ground cover classification. The dynamics of surface and subsurface water events can lead to slope instability resulting in slough slides on earthen levees. Early detection of these anomalies by a remote sensing approach could save time versus direct assessment. We used L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to screen levees for anomalies. SAR technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice for identifying problematic areas on earthen levees. Using the parameters entropy (H), anisotropy (A), alpha (α), and eigenvalues (λ, λ1, λ2, and λ3), we implemented several unsupervised classification algorithms for the identification of anomalies on the levee. The classification techniques applied are H/α, H/A, A/α, Wishart H/α, Wishart H/A/α, and H/α/λ classification algorithms. In this work, the effectiveness of the algorithms was demonstrated using quad-polarimetric L-band SAR imagery from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s (JPL’s) Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The study area is a section of the lower Mississippi River valley in the Southern USA, where earthen flood control levees are maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers. PMID:27322270

  6. Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Saturn V rocket located at the Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville, Alabama shown in figure 4 is an actual image taken with the system from the air...polarimetric sensors were placed inside the PAL laboratory elevator on top of a Quickset QTP-500 Pan and Tilt positioner (fig. 9). The QTP-500 can...The Pan and Tilt system positions the sensors to collect data of the mid and long range target sites, and two background-only sites by receiving

  7. Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    the Saturn V rocket located at the Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville, Alabama shown in figure 4 is an actual image taken with the system from the...hyperspectral and polarimetric sensors were placed inside the PAL laboratory elevator on top of a Quickset QTP-500 Pan and Tilt positioner (fig. 9). The...cameras from Polaris (5), and blower to protect sensors from rain and snow (6). Figure 9 SPICE setup inside the PAL elevator The Pan and Tilt

  8. Polarimetric Backscattering Behavior of River Ice Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermoz, S.; Gherboudj, I.; Allain, S.; Bernier, M.; Pottier, E.

    2009-04-01

    In many northern rivers of Canada, the formation of the ice covers leads to important situations: ice jamming, and then flooding of large areas. Thus, the monitoring of river ice is necessary. Gherboudj has developed a model in order to understand the interactions of the radar signal with the river ice cover. The model is improved to simulate the fully polarimetric response of a river ice cover. The aim of this work is to analyse the results of the simulations.

  9. Polarimetric Hyperspectral Imaging Systems and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Mahoney, Colin; Reyes, George; Baw, Clayton La; Li, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports activities in the development of AOTF Polarimetric Hyperspectral Imaging (PHI) Systems at JPL along with field observation results for illustrating the technology capabilities and advantages in remote sensing. In addition, the technology was also used to measure thickness distribution and structural imperfections of silicon-on-silicon wafers using white light interference phenomenon for demonstrating the potential in scientific and industrial applications.

  10. Can Compressed Sensing Be Applied To Dual-Polarimetric Weather Radars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, K.; Kruger, A.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    The recovery of sparsely-sampled signals has long attracted considerable research interest in various fields such as reflection seismology, microscopy, and astronomy. Recently, such recovery techniques have been formalized as a sampling method called compressed sensing (CS) which uses few linear and non-adaptive measurements to reconstruct a signal that is sparse in a known domain. Many radar and remote sensing applications require efficient and rapid data acquisition. CS techniques have, therefore, enormous potential in dramatically changing the way the radar samples and processes data. A number of recent studies have investigated CS for radar applications with emphasis on point target radars, and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. CS radar holds the promise of compressing-while-sampling, and may yield simpler receiver hardware which uses low-rate ADCs and eliminates pulse compression/matched filter. The need of fewer measurements also implies that a CS radar may need smaller dwell times without significant loss of information. Finally, CS radar data could be used for improving the quality of low-resolution radar observations. In this study, we explore the feasibility of using CS for dual-polarimetric weather radars. In order to recover a signal in CS framework, two conditions must be satisfied: sparsity and incoherence. The sparsity of weather radar measurements can be modeled in several domains such as time, frequency, joint time-frequency domain, or polarimetric measurement domains. The condition of incoherence relates to the measurement process which, in a radar scenario, would imply designing an incoherent transmit waveform or an equivalent scanning strategy with an existing waveform. In this study, we formulate a sparse signal model for precipitation targets as observed by a polarimetric weather radar. The applicability of CS for such a signal model is then examined through simulations of incoherent measurements along with real weather data obtained

  11. Water-Body types identification in urban areas from radarsat-2 fully polarimetric SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lei; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Chao; Chen, Fulong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel method for supervised water-body extraction and water-body types identification from Radarsat-2 fully polarimetric (FP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in complex urban areas. First, supervised water-body extraction using the Wishart classifier is performed, and the false alarms that are formed in built-up areas are removed using morphological processing methods and spatial contextual information. Then, the support vector machine (SVM), the classification and regression tree (CART), TreeBagger (TB), and random forest (RF) classifiers are introduced for water-body types (rivers, lakes, ponds) identification. In SAR images, certain other objects that are misclassified as water are also considered in water-body types identification. Several shape and polarimetric features of each candidate water-body are used for identification. Radarsat-2 PolSAR data that were acquired over Suzhou city and Dongguan city in China are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, and the experimental results are evaluated at both the object and pixel levels. We compared the water-body types classification results using only shape features and the combination of shape and polarimetric features, the experimental results show that the polarimetric features can eliminate the misclassifications from certain other objects like roads to water areas, and the increasement of classification accuracy embodies at both the object and pixel levels. The experimental results show that the proposed methods can achieve satisfactory accuracies at the object level [89.4% (Suzhou), 95.53% (Dongguan)] and the pixel level [96.22% (Suzhou), 97.95% (Dongguan)] for water-body types classification, respectively.

  12. Polarimetric studies of polyethylene terephtalate flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stchakovsky, M.; Garcia-Caurel, E.; Warenghem, M.

    2008-12-01

    Polymer sheets are currently used worldwide in a wide range of applications. The manufacturing process of these sheets involves extruding machines that stretch the material in both lateral and longitudinal directions with respect to the machine direction, thus inducing birefringence. In most cases, the film obtained is optically biaxial. Polarimetric spectroscopy (Ellipsometry and Mueller Matrix) combined with conoscopic observation are the methods of choice to study these properties. In this work we report an analysis of commercially available polyethylene terephtalate (PET) films used as substrate for food packaging as well as for embedded electronic devices such as solar cells or flexible displays. Initial observation of these films through polarizing microscope in conoscopic mode reveals first the trace of optical axis plane with respect to the film surface and second, whether the optical axis is acute or not. This preliminary study allows optimal sample positioning for further polarimetric studies. The measurements and modelling are done in both reflection and transmission mode on several spectroscopic polarimetric setups from UV to NIR. The models give as a main result, the dielectric tensor of the film as well as its orientation with respect to the laboratory reference frame.

  13. Random Forest Classification of Sediments on Exposed Intertidal Flats Using ALOS-2 Quad-Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Yang, X.; Liu, G.; Zhou, H.; Ma, W.; Yu, Y.; Li, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Coastal zones are one of the world's most densely populated areas and it is necessary to propose an accurate, cost effective, frequent, and synoptic method of monitoring these complex ecosystems. However, misclassification of sediments on exposed intertidal flats restricts the development of coastal zones surveillance. With the advent of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) satellites, polarimetric SAR satellite imagery plays an increasingly important role in monitoring changes in coastal wetland. This research investigated the necessity of combining SAR polarimetric features with optical data, and their contribution in accurately sediment classification. Three experimental groups were set to make assessment of the most appropriate descriptors. (i) Several SAR polarimetric descriptors were extracted from scattering matrix using Cloude-Pottier, Freeman-Durden and Yamaguchi methods; (ii) Optical remote sensing (RS) data with R, G and B channels formed the second feature combinations; (iii) The chosen SAR and optical RS indicators were both added into classifier. Classification was carried out using Random Forest (RF) classifiers and a general result mapping of intertidal flats was generated. Experiments were implemented using ALOS-2 L-band satellite imagery and GF-1 optical multi-spectral data acquired in the same period. The weights of descriptors were evaluated by VI (RF Variable Importance). Results suggested that optical data source has few advantages on sediment classification, and even reduce the effect of SAR indicators. Polarimetric SAR feature sets show great potentials in intertidal flats classification and are promising in classifying mud flats, sand flats, bare farmland and tidal water.

  14. Characterization and discrimination of evolving mineral and plant oil slicks based on L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Cathleen E.; Espeseth, Martine M.; Holt, Benjamin; Brekke, Camilla; Skrunes, Stine

    2016-10-01

    Evolution of the damping ratio for Bragg wavenumbers in the range 32-43 rad/m is evaluated for oil slicks of different composition released in the open ocean and allowed to develop naturally. The study uses quad-polarimetric L-band airborne synthetic aperture radar data acquired over three mineral oil emulsion releases of different, known oil-to-water ratio, and a near-coincident release of 2-ethylhexyl oleate that served as a biogenic look-alike. The experiment occurred during the 2015 Norwegian oil-on-water exercise in the North Sea during a period of relatively high winds ( 12 m/s). NASA's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) was used to repeatedly image the slicks over a period of eight hours, capturing the slicks' early development and providing a time series from which to track the evolution of the slicks' size, position, and radiometric characteristics. Particular emphasis is given in this analysis to identification of zones of higher damping ratio within the slicks (zoning) as potential indicators of thicker oil, and to comparison of the evolution of emulsion and plant oil damping ratios. It was found that all mineral oil slicks initially exhibited zoning apparent in VV, HH, and HV intensities, and that the areas of higher damping ratio persisted the longest for the highest oil content emulsion (80% oil by volume). In contrast, zoning was not unambiguously evident for plant oil at any time from 44 minutes to 8.5 hours after release.

  15. Polarimetric Imaging for the Detection of Disturbed Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) This work tested the ability of the fast time-division SALSA polarimetric camera of Bossa Nova Technologies, Ltd. to...Department of Physics iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT This work tested the ability of the fast time-division SALSA polarimetric...1978)...................................18 Figure 11. The SALSA Camera (from Lefaudeux et al., 2007)........................................20

  16. Field observations using an AOTF polarimetric imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Hamilton, Mike; Mahoney, Colin; Reyes, George

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of recent field observations using a prototype acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) polarimetric imaging spectrometer. The data illustrate application potentials for geoscience. The operation principle of this instrument is different from that of current airborne multispectral imaging instruments, such as AVIRIS. The AOTF instrument takes two orthogonally polarized images at a desired wavelength at one time, whereas AVIRIS takes a spectrum over a predetermined wavelength range at one pixel at a time and the image is constructed later. AVIRIS does not have any polarization measuring capability. The AOTF instrument could be a complement tool to AVIRIS. Polarization measurement is a desired capability for many applications in remote sensing. It is well know that natural light is often polarized due to various scattering phenomena in the atmosphere. Also, scattered light from canopies is reported to have a polarized component. To characterize objects of interest correctly requires a remote sensing imaging spectrometer capable of measuring object signal and background radiation in both intensity and polarization so that the characteristics of the object can be determined. The AORF instrument has the capability to do so. The AOTF instrument has other unique properties. For example, it can provide spectral images immediately after the observation. The instrument can also allow observations to be tailored in real time to perform the desired experiments and to collect only required data. Consequently, the performance in each mission can be increased with minimal resources. The prototype instrument was completed in the beginning of this year. A number of outdoor field experiments were performed with the objective to evaluate the capability of this new technology for remote sensing applications and to determine issues for further improvements.

  17. Polarimetric 3D integral imaging in photon-starved conditions.

    PubMed

    Carnicer, Artur; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-03-09

    We develop a method for obtaining 3D polarimetric integral images from elemental images recorded in low light illumination conditions. Since photon-counting images are very sparse, calculation of the Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization should be handled carefully. In our approach, polarimetric 3D integral images are generated using the Maximum Likelihood Estimation and subsequently reconstructed by means of a Total Variation Denoising filter. In this way, polarimetric results are comparable to those obtained in conventional illumination conditions. We also show that polarimetric information retrieved from photon starved images can be used in 3D object recognition problems. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D polarimetric photon counting integral imaging.

  18. Utilization of AERONET polarimetric measurements for improving retrieval of aerosol microphysics: GSFC, Beijing and Dakar data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedarenka, Anton; Dubovik, Oleg; Goloub, Philippe; Li, Zhengqiang; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Litvinov, Pavel; Barel, Luc; Gonzalez, Louis; Podvin, Thierry; Crozel, Didier

    2016-08-01

    The study presents the efforts on including the polarimetric data to the routine inversion of the radiometric ground-based measurements for characterization of the atmospheric aerosols and analysis of the obtained advantages in retrieval results. First, to operationally process the large amount of polarimetric data the data preparation tool was developed. The AERONET inversion code adapted for inversion of both intensity and polarization measurements was used for processing. Second, in order to estimate the effect from utilization of polarimetric information on aerosol retrieval results, both synthetic data and the real measurements were processed using developed routine and analyzed. The sensitivity study has been carried out using simulated data based on three main aerosol models: desert dust, urban industrial and urban clean aerosols. The test investigated the effects of utilization of polarization data in the presence of random noise, bias in measurements of optical thickness and angular pointing shift. The results demonstrate the advantage of polarization data utilization in the cases of aerosols with pronounced concentration of fine particles. Further, the extended set of AERONET observations was processed. The data for three sites have been used: GSFC, USA (clean urban aerosol dominated by fine particles), Beijing, China (polluted industrial aerosol characterized by pronounced mixture of both fine and coarse modes) and Dakar, Senegal (desert dust dominated by coarse particles). The results revealed considerable advantage of polarimetric data applying for characterizing fine mode dominated aerosols including industrial pollution (Beijing). The use of polarization corrects particle size distribution by decreasing overestimated fine mode and increasing the coarse mode. It also increases underestimated real part of the refractive index and improves the retrieval of the fraction of spherical particles due to high sensitivity of polarization to particle shape

  19. Polarimetric thermal emission from rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.; Staelin, D. H.; Yueh, S. H.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Oneill, K.; Lohanick, A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical works have suggested the potential of passive polarimetry in the remote sensing of geophysical media. It was shown that the third Stokes parameter U of the thermal emission may become larger for azimuthally asymmetric fields of observation. In order to investigate the potential applicability of passive polarimetry to the remote sensing of ocean surface, measurements of the polarimetric thermal emission from a sinusoidal water surface and a numerical study of the polarimetric thermal emission from randomly rough ocean surfaces were performed. Measurements of sinusoidal water surface thermal emission were performed using a sinusoidal water surface which was created by placing a thin sheet of fiberglass with a sinusoidal profile in two dimensions extended infinitely in the third dimension onto a water surface. The theory of thermal emission from a 'two-layer' periodic surface is derived and the exact solution is performed using both the extended boundary condition method (EBC) and the method of moments (MOM). The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results once the effects of the radiometer antenna pattern are included and the contribution of background noise to the measurements is modeled. The experimental results show that the U parameter indicates the direction of periodicity of the water surface and can approach values of up to 30 K for the surface observed. Next, a numerical study of polarimetric thermal emission from randomly rough surfaces was performed. A Monte Carlo technique utilizing an exact method for calculating thermal emission was chosen for the study to avoid any of the limitations of the commonly used approximate methods in rough surface scattering. In this Monte Carlo technique, a set of finite rough surface profiles in two dimensions with desired statistics was generated and extended periodically. The polarimetric thermal emission from each surface of the set was then calculated using

  20. Polarimetric clutter modeling: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, J. A.; Lin, F. C.; Borgeaud, M.; Yueh, H. A.; Swartz, A. A.; Lim, H. H.; Shim, R. T.; Novak, L. M.

    1988-01-01

    The two-layer anisotropic random medium model is used to investigate fully polarimetric scattering properties of earth terrain media. The polarization covariance matrices for the untilted and tilted uniaxial random medium are evaluated using the strong fluctuation theory and distorted Born approximation. In order to account for the azimuthal randomness in the growth direction of leaves in tree and grass fields, an averaging scheme over the azimuthal direction is also applied. It is found that characteristics of terrain clutter can be identified through the analysis of each element of the covariance matrix. Theoretical results are illustrated by the comparison with experimental data provided by MIT Lincoln Laboratory for tree and grass fields.

  1. Polarimetric properties of the Reiner Gamma swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Minsup; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Choi, Young-Jun; Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    2016-12-01

    In order to understand the regolith characteristics of the Reiner Gamma swirl, one of the most prominent lunar swirls, we analyze the correlation between the linear polarization flux Q and the intensity I of the swirl. We present comparisons between the phase function (the intensity variation with the phase angle) of the swirl and the phase functions of its neighbors using polarimetric data. We find that the swirl has unusually large Q values for given I values. We also show that the phase function of the swirl is relatively shallow compared to its neighbors. We suggest that the microstructure of the regolith on the Reiner Gamma swirl has been disrupted.

  2. Localized Optimization and Effectiveness Analysis of Medium PRF Airborne Pulse Doppler Radars in the Turkish Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISAR Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ITU International Telecommunications Union LOS Line of...Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) • Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) • Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ( ISAR ) • Weapon control radar 18...can be detected and tracked. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ( ISAR ) pulse Doppler designs are capable of

  3. Preliminary Results of Estimating Soil Moisture Over Bare Soil Using Full-Polarimetric ALOS-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekertekin, A.; Marangoz, A. M.; Abdikan, S.; Esetlili, M. T.

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging system is one of the most effective way for Earth observation. The aim of this study is to present the preliminary results about estimating soil moisture using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. Full-polarimetric (HH, HV, VV, VH) ALOS-2 data, acquired on 22.04.2016 with the incidence angle of 30.4o, were used in the study. Simultaneously with the SAR acquisition, in-situ soil moisture samples over bare agricultural lands were collected and evaluated using gravimetric method. Backscattering coefficients for all polarizations were obtained and linear regression analysis was carried out with in situ moisture measurements. The best correlation coefficient was observed with VV polarization. Cross-polarized backscattering coefficients were not so sensitive to soil moisture content. In the study, it was observed that soil moisture maps can be retrieved with the accuracy about 14% (RMSE).

  4. Analysis of polarimetric terahertz imaging for non-destructive detection of subsurface defects in wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert Warren

    During the manufacture of wind turbine blades, internal defects can form which negatively affect their structural integrity and can lead to premature failure. These defects are often not detected before the final installation of the blades onto wind turbines in the field. The purpose of this research was to investigate the advantages of using fully-polarimetric inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) terahertz imaging techniques for scanning the interior structure of the wind turbine blades in order to detect and identify any defects in the blade's internal structure before the blade leaves the manufacturer. Additionally, the research has investigated the use of the Euler parameter polarimetric transformation in improving defect detection, and increasing understanding of the scattering properties of such defects. Use of an image compositing algorithm and of the Euler parameters was found to enhance defect detection.

  5. Polarimetric PALSAR System Model Assessment and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzi, R.; Shimada, M.

    2009-04-01

    Polarimetric PALSAR system parameters are assessed using data sets collected over various calibration sites. The data collected over the Amazonian forest permits validating the zero Faraday rotation hypotheses near the equator. The analysis of the Amazonian forest data and the response of the corner reflectors deployed during the PALSAR acquisitions lead to the conclusion that the antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB). Theses results are confirmed using data collected over the Sweden and Ottawa calibration sites. The 5-m height trihedrals deployed in the Sweden calibration site by the Chalmers University of technology permits accurate measurement of antenna parameters, and detection of 2-3 degree Faraday rotation during day acquisition, whereas no Faraday rotation was noted during night acquisition. Small Faraday rotation angles (2-3 degree) have been measured using acquisitions over the DLR Oberpfaffenhofen and the Ottawa calibration sites. The presence of small but still significant Faraday rotation (2-3 degree) induces a CR return at the crosspolarization HV and VH that should not be interpreted as the actual antenna cross-talk. PALSAR antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB), and diagonal antenna distortion matrices (with zero cross-talk terms) can be used for accurate calibration of PALSAR polarimetric data.

  6. [Modeling and Simulation of Spectral Polarimetric BRDF].

    PubMed

    Ling, Jin-jiang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Ren-bin; Tang, Qian; Ye, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Under the conditions of the polarized light, The reflective surface of the object is affected by many factors, refractive index, surface roughness, and so the angle of incidence. For the rough surface in the different wavelengths of light exhibit different reflection characteristics of polarization, a spectral polarimetric BRDF based on Kirchhof theory is proposee. The spectral model of complex refraction index is combined with refraction index and extinction coefficient spectral model which were got by using the known complex refraction index at different value. Then get the spectral model of surface roughness derived from the classical surface roughness measuring method combined with the Fresnel reflection function. Take the spectral model of refraction index and roughness into the BRDF model, then the spectral polarimetirc BRDF model is proposed. Compare the simulation results of the refractive index varies with wavelength, roughness is constant, the refraction index and roughness both vary with wavelength and origin model with other papers, it shows that, the spectral polarimetric BRDF model can show the polarization characteristics of the surface accurately, and can provide a reliable basis for the application of polarization remote sensing, and other aspects of the classification of substances.

  7. Polarimetric VLBI with the Event Horizon Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Lu, R.; Wardle, J. F.; EHT Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope is a collaboration to observe the innermost accretion and outflow regions around supermassive black holes with an array of millimeter-wavelength telescopes. EHT observations have detected emission on scales of tens of microarcseconds around the black holes in the center of the Milky Way and M87. Non-polarimetric measurements have successfully been used to identify and model the Schwarzschild-radius-scale emission around these sources as well as to identify previously unresolvable structures in more distant AGNs and blazars, but new polarimetric data can provide additional information on the magnetic field strength and geometry in the jet launch and collimation region. Recent full-polarization VLBI observations with the EHT have detected polarized 1.3 mm emission arising on extremely small angular scales in a variety of extragalactic sources. We report on the results of these detections and detail the prospects for precision polarimetry thanks to the substantial EHT sensitivity improvements that will be realized over the next few years.

  8. Polarimetric remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snik, Frans

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols constitute the largest unknown factor within climate change, and may pose severe health hazards. Remote sensing of aerosols can be performed by analyzing the sunlight that has been scattered by them. Many aerosol properties are accessible by measuring the polarization of the scattered light as a function of scattering angle and wavelength. Information on the number density, size distribution and the chemical composition (through the refractive index) can thus be obtained. I provide an overview of ground-based and space-based polarimetric instrumentation that is built for remote observations of aerosols. In particular, I introduce our range of SPEX instruments. One version currently operates on the ground, and the development for operation of SPEX on a satellite platform is ongoing. Now we also have a version that operates on a smartphone: iSPEX. In the summer of 2013 we will organize a large citizen science experiment in the Netherlands during which thousands of participants perform a polarimetric measurement of the blue sky. The goal is to create a flexible measurement network that can produce detailed maps of aerosols.

  9. Polarimetric Radar Scattering Analysis in a Maritime Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Thomas Jerome

    This dissertation evaluates multiple effects that will cause a satellite borne radar to observe transformation of the transmitted polarization by an ocean surface. Knowing the surface conditions over large swaths of ocean is very important for both global weather prediction and for safety of navigation at sea. Fully polarimetric linearly polarized ocean observation radars use the linear cross-polarized ocean response to obtain an assessment of the surface wind vectors. However, radar technology is evolving. More compact hybrid polarization radars that transmit a single circular polarization, and then simultaneously receive two orthogonal linear polarizations are expected to obtain near fully polarimetric capability with a significant savings in weight, volume, and complexity. The models used by fully polarimetric linearly polarized radars to obtain the surface wind vectors are empirical, and not usable for hybrid compact polarimetric radars. The literature survey indicated two areas needed investigation to develop ocean observation capabilities for hybrid compact polarimetric radar. The first is for antenna cross-polarization isolation models specific to hybrid polarization radars. The second is for improved understanding of the nature of the ocean's polarimetric response to hybrid polarizations. Conclusions include that hybrid polarizations provide opportunities to polarimetrically isolate surface features, including surface roughness, the surface specular response, and breaking waves. These features should provide insight into surface winds, wave steepness, and sea state.

  10. MCM Polarimetric Radiometers for Planar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Dawson, Douglas; Gaier, Todd

    2007-01-01

    A polarimetric radiometer that operates at a frequency of 40 GHz has been designed and built as a prototype of multiple identical units that could be arranged in a planar array for scientific measurements. Such an array is planned for use in studying the cosmic microwave background (CMB). All of the subsystems and components of this polarimetric radiometer are integrated into a single multi-chip module (MCM) of substantially planar geometry. In comparison with traditional designs of polarimetric radiometers, the MCM design is expected to greatly reduce the cost per unit in an array of many such units. The design of the unit is dictated partly by a requirement, in the planned CMB application, to measure the Stokes parameters I, Q, and U of the CMB radiation with high sensitivity. (A complete definition of the Stokes parameters would exceed the scope of this article. In necessarily oversimplified terms, I is a measure of total intensity of radiation, while Q and U are measures of the relationships between the horizontally and vertically polarized components of radiation.) Because the sensitivity of a single polarimeter cannot be increased significantly, the only way to satisfy the high-sensitivity requirement is to make a large array of polarimeters that operate in parallel. The MCM includes contact pins that can be plugged into receptacles on a standard printed-circuit board (PCB). All of the required microwave functionality is implemented within the MCM; any required supporting non-microwave ("back-end") electronic functionality, including the provision of DC bias and control signals, can be implemented by standard PCB techniques. On the way from a microwave antenna to the MCM, the incoming microwave signal passes through an orthomode transducer (OMT), which splits the radiation into an h + i(nu) beam and an h - i(nu) beam (where, using complex-number notation, h denotes the horizontal component, nu denotes the vertical component, and +/-i denotes a +/-90deg phase

  11. Nonlinear Polarimetric Microscopy for Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samim, Masood

    A framework for the nonlinear optical polarimetry and polarimetric microscopy is developed. Mathematical equations are derived in terms of linear and nonlinear Stokes Mueller formalism, which comprehensively characterize the polarization properties of the incoming and outgoing radiations, and provide structural information about the organization of the investigated materials. The algebraic formalism developed in this thesis simplifies many predictions for a nonlinear polarimetry study and provides an intuitive understanding of various polarization properties for radiations and the intervening medium. For polarimetric microscopy experiments, a custom fast-scanning differential polarization microscope is developed, which is also capable of real-time three-dimensional imaging. The setup is equipped with a pair of high-speed resonant and galvanometric scanning mirrors, and supplemented by advanced adaptive optics and data acquisition modules. The scanning mirrors when combined with the adaptive optics deformable mirror enable fast 3D imaging. Deformable membrane mirrors and genetic algorithm optimization routines are employed to improve the imaging conditions including correcting the optical aberrations, maximizing signal intensities, and minimizing point-spread-functions of the focal volume. A field-programmable-gate array (FPGA) chip is exploited to rapidly acquire and process the multidimensional data. Using the nonlinear optical polarimetry framework and the home-built polarization microscope, a few biologically important tissues are measured and analyzed to gain insight as to their structure and dynamics. The structure and distribution of muscle sarcomere myosins, connective tissue collagen, carbohydrate-rich starch, and fruit fly eye retinal molecules are characterized with revealing polarization studies. In each case, using the theoretical framework, polarization sensitive data are analyzed to decipher the molecular orientations and nonlinear optical

  12. Integrated, Dual Orthogonal Antennas for Polarimetric Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Mario; Wiesbeck, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Ground penetrating radar systems are mostly equipped with single polarized antennas, for example with single linear polarization or with circular polarization. The radiated waves are partly reflected at the ground surface and very often the penetrating waves are distorted in their polarization. The distortion depends on the ground homogeneity and the orientation of the antennas relative to the ground structure. The received signals from the reflecting objects may most times only be classified according to their coverage and intensity. This makes the recognition of the objects difficult or impossible. In airborne and spaceborne Remote Sensing the systems are meanwhile mostly equipped with front ends with dual orthogonal polarized antennas for a full polarimetric operation. The received signals, registered in 2x2 scattering matrices according to co- and cross polarization, are processed for the evaluation of all features of the targets. Ground penetrating radars could also profit from the scientific results of Remote Sensing. The classification of detected objects for their structure and orientation requires more information in the reflected signal than can be measured with a single polarization [1, 2]. In this paper dual linear, orthogonal polarized antennas with a common single, frequency independent phase center, are presented [3]. The relative bandwidth of these antennas can be 1:3, up to 1:4. The antenna is designed to work in the frequency range between 3 GHz and 11 GHz, but can be easily adapted to the GPR frequency range by scaling. The size of the antenna scaled for operation in typical GPR frequencies would approximately be 20 by 20 cm2. By the implementation in a dielectric carrier it could be reduced in size if required. The major problem for ultra wide band, dual polarized antennas is the frequency independent feed network, realizing the required phase shifts. For these antennas a network, which is frequency independent over a wide range, has been

  13. Infrared polarimetric sensing of oil on water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David B.; Vaden, Justin P.; Mitchell, Douglas A.; DeMicco, Erik D.

    2016-10-01

    Infrared polarimetry is an emerging sensing modality that offers the potential for significantly enhanced contrast in situations where conventional thermal imaging falls short. Polarimetric imagery leverages the different polarization signatures that result from material differences, surface roughness quality, and geometry that are frequently different from those features that lead to thermal signatures. Imaging of the polarization in a scene can lead to enhanced understanding, particularly when materials in a scene are at thermal equilibrium. Polaris Sensor Technologies has measured the polarization signatures of oil on water in a number of different scenarios and has shown significant improvement in detection through the contrast improvement offered by polarimetry. The sensing improvement offers the promise of automated detection of oil spills and leaks for routine monitoring and accidents with the added benefit of being able to continue monitoring at night. In this paper, we describe the instrumentation, and the results of several measurement exercises in both controlled and uncontrolled conditions.

  14. Be Star Disks from a Polarimetric Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Halonen, R. J.; Demers, Z. T.

    2016-11-01

    The intrinsic linearly polarized light arising from electron scattering of stellar radiation in a non-spherically symmetric distribution of gas is a characterizing feature of classical Be stars. The spectropolarimetric signature provides a means for directly probing the physical and geometric properties of the gaseous material enveloping these rapidly rotating massive stars. Using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer computation and a self-consistent radiative equilibrium solution for the circumstellar gas, we explore the role of this observable property in investigating the dynamic nature of classical Be star disks. In particular, we focus on the potential for providing polarimetric diagnostics of mass-loss events and for tracing the evolution of the gas in a circumstellar disk. This context for interpreting the observed linear polarization signature can play an important role in identifying the physical process(es) which govern the formation and dissipation of these disks.

  15. Joint contrast optimization and object segmentation in active polarimetric images.

    PubMed

    Anna, Guillaume; Bertaux, Nicolas; Galland, Frédéric; Goudail, François; Dolfi, Daniel

    2012-08-15

    We present a method for automatic target detection based on the iterative interplay between an active polarimetric imager with adaptive capabilities and a snake-based image segmentation algorithm. It successfully addresses the difficult situations where the target and the background differ only by their polarimetric properties. This method illustrates the benefits of integrating digital processing algorithms at the heart of the image acquisition process rather than using them only for postprocessing.

  16. Detecting oil on water using polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iler, Amber L.; Hamilton, Patrick D.

    2015-05-01

    Integrity Applications Incorporated (IAI) collected electro-optical polarimetric imagery (PI) to evaluate its effectiveness for detecting oil on water. Data was gathered at multiple sun angles for vegetable oil and crude oil to demonstrate PI sensitivity to different liquids and collection geometries. Unique signatures for oil relative to water were observed. Both oils consistently displayed higher degree of linear polarization (DOLP) values than water, which was expected based on the lower index of refraction of water (1.33) relative to vegetable oil and crude oil (1.47 and 1.47-1.57, respectively). The strength of the polarimetric signatures was found to vary as a function of collection angle relative to the sun, with peak linear polarizations ranging from 40-70% for crude oil and 20-50% for vegetable oil. IAI found that independently scaled DOLP was particularly useful for discriminating these liquids, because it demonstrated the least sensitivity to collection angle, compared to other PI products. Specifically, the DOLP signature of vegetable oil was approximately 20% lower than for crude oil, regardless of collection angle. This finding is consistent with the lower index of refraction values for vegetable oil compared to crude. Based on the promising results presented here, IAI recommends further testing and development of PI for oceanic remote sensing applications such as oil spill/leak detection and for supporting oil cleanup efforts. With additional work, PI may also be applicable to other oceanic environmental issues such as detection of agricultural runoff or effluent from industrial facilities or watercraft.

  17. Oil Detection in a Coastal Marsh with Polarimetric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, E., III; Rangoonwala, A.; Suzuoki, Y.; Bannister, T.

    2011-09-01

    The NASA UAVSAR was deployed June 2010 to support Deep Water Horizon oil spill response activities specifically, oil detection and characterization, oil extent mapping in wetlands, coastal resource impact detection, and ecosystem recovery. The UAVSAR platform demonstrated enhanced capability to act rapidly and provide targeted mapping response. Our research focused on the effectiveness of high spatial resolution and fully polarimetric L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) for mapping oil in wetlands, specifically within Barataria Bay in eastern coastal Louisiana. Barataria Bay contained a numerous site observations confirming spatially extensive shoreline oil impacts, multiple oil spill UAVSAR collections, and a near anniversary 2009 collection. PolSAR oil detection relied on decomposition and subsequent classifications of the single look complex (SLC) calibrated radar cross sections representing the complex elements of the scattering matrix. Initial analyses results found that shoreline marsh structural damage as well as oil on marsh plants and sediments without canopy structural damage were exhibited as anomalous features on post-spill SLC scenes but were not evident on the pre-spill SLC scene collected in 2009. Pre-spill and post-spill Freeman-Durden (FD) and Cloude-Pottier (CP) decompositions and the Wishart classifications seeded with the FD and CP classes (Wishart-FD) also highlighted these nearshore features as a change in dominate scatter from pre-spill to post-spill. SLC analyses also indicated penetration of oil ladened waters into interior marshes well past the immediate shorelines; however, these post-spill SLC analyses results could not be validated due to the lack of observational data and possible flooding in the pre-spill SLC scene.

  18. Screening of Earthen Levees Using Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aanstoos, J. V.; O'Hara, C.; Prasad, S.; Dabbiru, L.; Nobrega, R.; Lee, M.

    2009-12-01

    Earthen levees protect large areas of populated and cultivated land in the US from flooding. As shown recently with hurricanes Katrina and Ike and the recent floods in the Midwest, the potential loss of life and property associated with the catastrophic failure of levees can be extremely large. Over the entire US, there are over 100,000 miles of levee structures of varying designs and conditions. Currently, there are limited processes in place to prioritize the monitoring of large numbers of dam and levee structures. Levee managers and federal agencies need to assess levee health rapidly with robust techniques that identify, classify and prioritize levee vulnerabilities with lower costs than traditional soil-boring programs, which can cost many of millions of dollars and provide information about the subsurface only in the immediate vicinity of a small-diameter borehole. This paper reports preliminary results of a project studying the use of airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as an aid to the levee screening process. The SAR sensor being studied is the NASA UAVSAR (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle SAR), a fully polarimetric L-band SAR which is specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track SAR data for differential interferometric measurements. The instrument is capable of sub-meter ground sample distance. NASA has imaged with this instrument 230 km of levees along the lower Mississippi River for use in this study. SAR interferometric mode is capable of identifying vertical displacements on the order of a few millimeters. Its multipolarization measurements can penetrate soil to as much as one meter depth. Thus it is valuable in detecting changes in levees that will be key inputs to a levee vulnerability classification system. Once vulnerable levee reaches have been identified, further actions such as more detailed examination or repairs can be focused on these higher-priority sections. We report on the use of various feature detection algorithms being applied

  19. Comparison of different active polarimetric imaging modes for target detection in outdoor environment.

    PubMed

    Vannier, Nicolas; Goudail, François; Plassart, Corentin; Boffety, Matthieu; Feneyrou, Patrick; Leviandier, Luc; Galland, Frédéric; Bertaux, Nicolas

    2016-04-10

    We address the detection of manufactured objects in different types of environments with active polarimetric imaging. Using an original, fully adaptive imager, we compare several imaging modes having different numbers of polarimetric degrees of freedom. We demonstrate the efficiency of active polarimetric imaging for decamouflage and hazardous object detection, and underline the characteristics that a polarimetric imager aimed at this type of application should possess. We show that in most encountered scenarios the Mueller matrices are nearly diagonal, and sufficient detection performance can be obtained with simple polarimetric imaging systems having reduced degrees of freedom. Moreover, intensity normalization of images is of paramount importance to better reveal polarimetric contrast.

  20. Polarimetric SAR Data for Urban Land Cover Classification Using Finite Mixture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdianpari, Masoud; Akbari, Vahid; Mohammadimanesh, Fariba; Alioghli Fazel, Mohammad

    2013-04-01

    Image classification techniques play an important role in automatic analysis of remote sensing data. This paper demonstrates the potential of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) for urban land cover mapping using an unsupervised classification approach. Analysis of PolSAR images often shows that non-Gaussian models give better representation of the scattering vector statistics. Hence, processing algorithms based on non-Gaussian statistics should improve performance, compared to complex Gaussian distributions. Several distributions could be used to model SAR image texture with different spatial correlation properties and various degrees of inhomogeneity [1-3]. Statistical properties are widely used for image segmentation and land cover classification of PolSAR data. The pixel-based approaches cluster individual pixels through analysis of their statistical properties. Those methods work well on the relatively coarse spatial resolution images. But classification results based on pixelwise analysis demonstrate the pepper-salt effect of speckle in medium and high resolution applications such as urban area monitoring [4]. Therefore, the expected improvement of the classification results is hindered by the increase of textural differences within a class. In such situation, enhancement could be made through exploring the contextual correlation among pixels by Markov random field (MRF) models [4, 5]. The potential of MRF models to retrieve spatial contextual information is desired to improve the accuracy and reliability of image classification. Unsupervised contextual polarimetric SAR image segmentation is addressed by combining statistical modeling and spatial context within an MRF framework. We employ the stochastic expectation maximization (SEM) algorithm [6] to jointly perform clustering of the data and parameter estimation of the statistical distribution conditioned to each image cluster and the MRF model. This classification method is applied on medium

  1. Polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids. V. The unusual polarimetric behavior of V-type asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; López-Sisterna, C.; Calandra, M. F.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: We present the results of a polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), San Juan, Argentina. The aims of this survey are to increase the database of asteroid polarimetry, to estimate diversity in polarimetric properties of asteroids that belong to different taxonomic classes, and to search for objects that exhibit anomalous polarimetric properties. Methods: The data were obtained using the CASPROF and CASPOL polarimeters at the 2.15 m telescope. The CASPROF polarimeter is a two-hole aperture polarimeter with rapid modulation and CASPOL is a polarimeter based on a CCD detector, which allows us to observe fainter objects with better signal-to-noise ratio. Results: The survey began in 1995 and data on a large sample of asteroids were obtained until 2012. A second period began in 2013 using a polarimeter with a more sensitive detector in order to study small asteroids, families, and special taxonomic groups. We obtained 55 polarimetric measurements for 28 V-type main belt asteroids, all of them polarimetrically observed for the first time. The data obtained in this survey let us find polarimetric parameters for (1459) Magnya and for a group of 11 small V-type objects with similar polarimetric behavior. These polarization curves are unusual since they show a shallow minimum and a small inversion angle in comparison with (4) Vesta, although they have a steeper slope at α0. This polarimetric behavior could be explained by differences in the regoliths of these asteroids. The observations of (2579) Spartacus, and perhaps also (3944) Halliday, indicate a inversion angle larger than 24-25°. Based on observations carried out at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  2. Agricultural Land Classification Based on Statistical Analysis of Full Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, M.; Homayouni, S.; Fazel, M. A.; Mohammadimanesh, F.

    2013-09-01

    The discrimination capability of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data makes them a unique source of information with a significant contribution in tackling problems concerning environmental applications. One of the most important applications of these data is land cover classification of the earth surface. These data type, make more detailed classification of phenomena by using the physical parameters and scattering mechanisms. In this paper, we have proposed a contextual unsupervised classification approach for full PolSAR data, which allows the use of multiple sources of statistical evidence. Expectation-Maximization (EM) classification algorithm is basically performed to estimate land cover classes. The EM algorithm is an iterative algorithm that formalizes the problem of parameters estimation of a mixture distribution. To represent the statistical properties and integrate contextual information of the associated image data in the analysis process we used Markov random field (MRF) modelling technique. This model is developed by formulating the maximum posteriori decision rule as the minimization of suitable energy functions. For select optimum distribution which adapts the data more efficiently we used Mellin transform which is a natural analytical tool to study the distribution of products and quotients of independent random variables. Our proposed classification method is applied to a full polarimetric L-band dataset acquired from an agricultural region in Winnipeg, Canada. We evaluate the classification performance based on kappa and overall accuracies of the proposed approach and compared with other well-known classic methods.

  3. Super-resolution Polarimetric Imaging of Black Holes using the Event Horizon Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleau, Mollie; Akiyama, Kazunori; Fish, Vincent L.

    2017-01-01

    Black holes are thought to reside in the centers of many galaxies; however, due to their diminutive size, we have yet to directly detect and image a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a global array for 1.3mm very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), has been designed to observe and image the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way (Sagittarius A*), as well as the one in the center of the nearby giant elliptical galaxy M87. The nominal resolution of the EHT is around 30 μas, comparable to the size of the black hole’s event horizon. For this reason, we require super-resolution to accurately reconstruct images in total intensity and linear polarization. High fidelity polarimetric imaging can be used to test general relativity and to characterize the magnetic field structure surrounding black holes, which is important for understanding its role in mediating the innermost accretion and outflow region. We employ new sparse imaging techniques based on compressed sensing for linear polarimetry. Using synthetic data of M87 observations with the EHT, we find that our new techniques improve upon the standard CLEAN by a factor of ten regardless of resolution, as measured by the differences in mean squared error (MSE). We conclude that compressed sensing proves to be an effective method for linear polarimetric imaging.

  4. Cross-calibration between airborne SAR sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Manfred; Olivier, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    As Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system performance and experience in SAR signature evaluation increase, quantitative analysis becomes more and more important. Such analyses require an absolute radiometric calibration of the complete SAR system. To keep the expenditure on calibration of future multichannel and multisensor remote sensing systems (e.g., X-SAR/SIR-C) within a tolerable level, data from different tracks and different sensors (channels) must be cross calibrated. The 1989 joint E-SAR/DC-8 SAR calibration campaign gave a first opportunity for such an experiment, including cross sensor and cross track calibration. A basic requirement for successful cross calibration is the stability of the SAR systems. The calibration parameters derived from different tracks and the polarimetric properties of the uncalibrated data are used to describe this stability. Quality criteria for a successful cross calibration are the agreement of alpha degree values and the consistency of radar cross sections of equally sized corner reflectors. Channel imbalance and cross talk provide additional quality in case of the polarimetric DC-8 SAR.

  5. Mapping Exposed and Buried Lava Flows Using Synthetic Aperture and Ground-Penetrating Radar in Craters of the Moon Lava Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. D.; Heggy, E.; Fernandez, J.

    2007-10-01

    The Craters of the Moon (COM) lava field in central Idaho has a multiple eruptive history. Burial of older flows by younger eruptive events has resulted in complex surface geomorphology and subsurface stratigraphy. For the older eruptive periods, the locations of source vents and the extension of lava flows are either speculative or unknown, as they are buried under earlier pyroclastistics. In this study, we used surface and subsurface backscatter characteristics of the P- and L-band polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data and Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) soundings to resolve different exposed and buried lava flows. Our primary objective is to define the most effective polarization and frequency for mapping, resolving, and characterizing different lava types in the volcanic field. Polarimetric analysis of AIRSAR images from COM allows a clear recognition of the aa' and pahoehoe lava types as a result of the variability in their roughness. Our results suggest that the HV cross-polarized, AIRSAR L band is capable of producing a detailed map delineating surface lava with different surface backscattering properties. An accuracy assessment utilizing the geological map of the Inferno Cone area and in situ observations showed a significant reliability of differentiating lava types and mapping the lava flows extension below loose pyroclastics using AIRSAR data. The P-band, results suggest a constrained ability for mapping buried structures up to 3 meters deep under loose and dry cinder and ash deposits, resolving buried fissures, outcrops, and lava flows that were validated with ground-truth GPR surveys. Investigating subsurface stratigraphy with remote sensing and GPR techniques can be applied in other arid locations on Earth and other planets. Analyzing the radar backscattering penetration depth at higher frequencies is valuable for future planetary subsurface exploration missions for telluric planets.

  6. Mapping exposed and buried lava flows using synthetic aperture and ground-penetrating radar in Craters of the Moon lava field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shuhab D.; Heggy, Essam; Fernandez, Jaime

    2007-11-01

    The Craters of the Moon (COM) lava field has a multiple eruptive history. Burial of older flows has resulted in complex subsurface stratigraphy. For the older eruptive periods, the locations of source vents and the extension of lava flows are either speculative or unknown, because they are buried under more recent pyroclastics. In this study, we used surface and subsurface backscatter characteristics of the P- and L-band polarimetric airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) data and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) soundings to resolve different exposed and buried lava flows. Our primary objective is to define the most effective polarization and frequency for mapping, resolving, and characterizing different lava types in the volcanic field. Polarimetric analysis of AIRSAR images from COM allows a clear recognition of the aa and pahoehoe lava types as a result of the variability in their roughness. Our results suggest that the HV cross-polarized, AIRSAR L-band is capable of producing a detailed map delineating surface lava with different surface backscattering properties. An accuracy assessment utilizing the geological map of the Inferno Cone area was performed to quantify the reliability of differentiating lava types and mapping the lava flows extension below loose pyroclastics using AIRSAR data. Results shows an ability of P-band SAR to map buried structures up to 3 meters deep under loose cinder and ash deposits, resolving buried fissures, outcrops, and lava flows that were validated with ground-truth GPR surveys. The techniques used in this study provide a tool to assess volcanic hazards in remote and inaccessible places. Also it could be an aid in the study of other planets and planetary bodies in the solar system.

  7. Polarimetric radars and polarimetric SAR data in tasks of detection and identification of marine oil pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sineva, A. A.; Ivanov, A. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    Detecting and distinguishing different kinds of oil pollution, including spills of crude oil on the sea surface, is one important problem of modern remote sensing. The wide use of imaging radars is not always effective. In this review paper, the main principles and methods of polarization radar imaging and radar data processing are discussed based on present theoretical and experimental approaches and ideas. The efficiency of polarimetric methods for oil-spill detection and accurate identification on the sea surface is demonstrated as well. As is shown, modern methods of multipolarimetric radar-signal processing is a powerful means for improving oil-pollution detection and discrimination algorithms.

  8. Post disaster monitoring for the Great East Japan Earthquake with a new L-band airborne SAR "Pi-SAR-L2"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Noriyuki

    2013-04-01

    A new L-band airborne SAR, Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band type-2 (Pi-SAR-L2) was developed in April 2012 by Japan Aerospace exploration Agency(JAXA). Pi-SAR-L2 employs a L-band with a band width of 85 MHz (1,215 - 1,300 MHz) with a peak power of 3.5 kW boarded on the Galfstream II. Pi-SAR-L2 conducted its first acquisitions for calibrations and validations over Tomakomai, Hokkaido, where is a test site with some corner reflectors in April 2012. The Great East Japan Earthquake with a magnitude 9.0 occurred at 14:46 on 11 Mar. 2011 and terribly big Tsunami attacked Tohoku district after the earthquake. The tsunami caused huge damage along its coast in Touhoku. Pi-SAR-L2 acquired these post disaster regions in Fukushima and Miyagi Prefectures along the coast on the way to Hokkaido in April 2012, some region still remain flooded area and debris caused by Tsumani. We will present Pi-SAR-L2 systems and specifications, and discuss monitoring these damages.

  9. Rapid Landslide Mapping by Means of Post-Event Polarimetric SAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, Simon; Martinis, Sandro; Twele, Andre

    2016-08-01

    Rapid mapping of landslides, quickly providing information about the extent of the affected area and type and grade of damage, is crucial to enable fast crisis response. Reviewing the literature shows that most synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data-based landslide mapping procedures use change detection techniques. However, the required very high resolution (VHR) pre-event SAR imagery, acquired shortly before the landslide event, is commonly not available. Due to limitations in onboard disk space and downlink transmission rates modern VHR SAR missions do not systematically cover the entire world. We present a fast and robust procedure for mapping of landslides, based on change detection between freely available and systematically acquired pre-event optical and post-event polarimetric SAR data.

  10. Sensitivity of PARASOL multi-angle photo-polarimetric aerosol retrievals to cloud contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stap, F. A.; Hasekamp, O.; Röckmann, T.

    2014-10-01

    An important problem in satellite remote sensing of aerosols is related to the need to perform an adequate cloud screening. If a cloud screening is applied that is not strict enough, the ground scene has the probability of residual cloud cover which causes large errors on the retrieved aerosol parameters. On the other hand, if the cloud screening procedure is too strict, too many clear sky cases, especially near-cloud scenes, will falsely be flagged cloudy. The detrimental effects of cloud contamination as well as the importance of aerosol cloud interactions that can be studied in these near-cloud scenes call for new approaches to cloud screening. Multi-angle, multi-wavelength photo-polarimetric measurements have a unique capability to distinguish between scattering by (liquid) cloud droplets and aerosol particles. In this paper the sensitivity of aerosol retrievals from multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements to cloud contamination is investigated and the ability to intrinsically filter the cloud contaminated scenes based on a goodness-of-fit criteria is evaluated. Hereto, an aerosol retrieval algorithm is applied to a partially clouded, synthetic data-set including partial cloud cover as well as non-cloud screened POLDER-3/PARASOL observations It is found that a goodness-of-fit filter, together with a filter on the coarse mode refractive index (mrcoarse > 1.335) and a cirrus screening adequately reject the cloud contaminated scenes. No bias nor larger SD are found in the retrieved parameters for this intrinsic cloud filter compared to the parameters retrieved in a priori cloud screened data-set (using MODIS/AQUA cloud masks) of PARASOL observations. Moreover, less high aerosol load scenes are misinterpreted as cloud contaminated. The retrieved aerosol optical thickness, single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent show good agreement with AERONET observations. Furthermore, the synthetic retrievals give confidence in the ability of the algorithm to

  11. Automated Data Production For A Novel Airborne Multiangle Spectropolarimetric Imager (AIRMSPI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovanovic, V .M.; Bull, M.; Diner, D. J.; Geier, S.; Rheingans, B.

    2012-01-01

    A novel polarimetric imaging technique making use of rapid retardance modulation has been developed by JPL as a part of NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. It has been built into the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) under NASA's Airborne Instrument Technology Transition Program, and is aimed primarily at remote sensing of the amounts and microphysical properties of aerosols and clouds. AirMSPI includes an 8-band (355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, 865, 935 nm) pushbroom camera that measures polarization in a subset of the bands (470, 660, and 865 nm). The camera is mounted on a gimbal and acquires imagery in a configurable set of along-track viewing angles ranging between +67 deg and -67 deg relative to nadir. As a result, near simultaneous multi-angle, multi-spectral, and polarimetric measurements of the targeted areas at a spatial resolution ranging from 7 m to 20 m (depending on the viewing angle) can be derived. An automated data production system is being built to support high data acquisition rate in concert with co-registration and orthorectified mapping requirements. To date, a number of successful engineering checkout flights were conducted in October 2010, August-September 2011, and January 2012. Data products resulting from these flights will be presented.

  12. Modeling of polarimetric BRDF characteristics of painted surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Zeying; Zhao, Huijie

    2014-11-01

    In this paper a pBRDF (polarimetric Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) model of painted surfaces coupled with atmospheric polarization characteristics is built and the method of simulating polarimetric radiation reaching the imaging system is advanced. Firstly, the composition of the radiation reaching the sensor is analyzed. Then, the pBRDF model of painted surfaces is developed according to the microfacet theory presented by G. Priest and the downwelled skylight polarization is modeled based on the vector radiative transfer model RT3. Furthermore, the modeled polarization state of reflected light from the surfaces was achieved through integrating the directional polarimetric information of the whole hemisphere, adding the modeled polarimetric factors of incident diffused skylight. Finally, the polarimetric radiance reaching the sensor is summed up with the assumption that the target-sensor path is assumed to be negligible since it is relatively short in the current imaging geometry. The modeled results are related to the solar-sensor geometry, atmospheric conditions and the features of the painted surfaces. This result can be used to simulate the imaging under different weather conditions and further work for the validation experiments of the model need to be done.

  13. Observations on the polarimetric imagery collection experiment database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Mark; Michalson, Jacob; Romano, Joao

    2011-10-01

    The Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) is an ongoing collaborative effort that commenced in February 2010 between the US Army ARDEC and Army Research Laboratory (ARL). SPICE is focused on the collection of mid-wave and long-wave infrared imagery using hyperspectral, polarimetric, and broadband sensors. The overall objective of SPICE is to collect a comprehensive database of the different modalities spanning multiple years to capture sensor performance encompassing a wide variety of meteorological (MET) conditions, diurnal, and seasonal changes inherent to Picatinny's northern New Jersey location. Utilizing the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) tower at Picatinny Arsenal, the sensors are autonomously collecting the desired data around the clock at multiple ranges containing surrogate 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer targets positioned at different orientations in an open woodland field. This database allows for: 1) Understanding of signature variability under adverse weather conditions; 2) Development of robust algorithms; 3) Development of new sensors; 4) Evaluation of polarimetric technology; and 5) Evaluation of fusing the different sensor modalities. In this paper, we will revisit the SPICE data collection objectives and the sensors deployed. We will present, in a statistical sense, the integrity of the data in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) polarimetric database collected from February through September 2010 and issues and lessons learned associated with a fully autonomous, around the clock data collection. We will also demonstrate sample LWIR polarimetric imagery and the performance of the Stokes parameters under adverse weather conditions.

  14. The classification of ambiguity in polarimetric reconstruction of coronal mass ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xinghua; Wang, Huaning; Huang, Xin; Du, Zhanle; He, Han

    2014-01-10

    The Thomson scattering theory indicates that there exist explicit and implicit ambiguities in polarimetric analyses of coronal mass ejection (CME) observations. We suggest a classification for these ambiguities in CME reconstruction. Three samples, including double explicit, mixed, and double implicit ambiguity, are shown with the polarimetric analyses of STEREO CME observations. These samples demonstrate that this classification is helpful for improving polarimetric reconstruction.

  15. Radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Han, H. C.; Shin, Robert T.; Kong, Jin AU; Beaudoin, A.; Letoan, T.

    1992-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to interpret polarimetric radar backscatter from pine forest with clustered vegetation structures. To take into account the clustered structures with the radiative transfer theory, the scattering function of each cluster is calculated by incorporating the phase interference of scattered fields from each component. Subsequently, the resulting phase matrix is used in the radiative transfer equations to evaluate the polarimetric backscattering coefficients from random medium layers embedded with vegetation clusters. Upon including the multi-scale structures, namely, trunks, primary and secondary branches, as well as needles, we interpret and simulate the polarimetric radar responses from pine forest for different frequencies and looking angles. The preliminary results are shown to be in good agreement with the measured backscattering coefficients at the Landes maritime pine forest during the MAESTRO-1 experiment.

  16. Radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Han, H. C.; Shin, R. T.; Kong, J. A.; Beaudoin, A.; Le Toan, T.

    1992-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to interpret polarimetric radar backscatter from pine forest with clustered vegetation structures. The scattering function of each cluster is calculated by incorporating the phase interference of scattered fields from each component. The resulting phase matrix is used in the radiative transfer equations to evaluate the polarimetric backscattering coefficients from random medium layers embedded with vegetation clusters. Upon including multiscale structures (trunks, primary and secondary branches, and needles), polarimetric radar responses from pine forest for different frequencies and looking angles are interpreted and simulated. Preliminary results are shown to be in good agreement with the measured backscattering coefficients at the Landes maritime pine forest during the MAESTRO-1 experiment.

  17. Polarimetric SAR Interferometry to Monitor Land Subsidence in Tehran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Zahra; Valadan Zoej, Mohammad Javad; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-08-01

    This letter uses a combination of ADInSAR with a coherence optimization method. Polarimetric DInSAR is able to enhance pixel phase quality and thus coherent pixel density. The coherence optimization method is a search-based approach to find the optimized scattering mechanism introduced by Navarro-Sanchez [1]. The case study is southwest of Tehran basin located in the North of Iran. It suffers from a high-rate of land subsidence and is covered by agricultural fields. Usually such an area would significantly decorrelate but applying polarimetric ADInSAR it is possible to obtain a more coherent pixel coverage. A set of dual-pol TerraSAR-X images was ordered for polarimetric ADInSAR procedure. The coherence optimization method is shown to have increased the density and phase quality of coherent pixels significantly.

  18. A new polarimetric active radar calibrator and calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaojian

    2015-10-01

    Polarimetric active radar calibrator (PARC) is one of the most important calibrators with high radar cross section (RCS) for polarimetry measurement. In this paper, a new double-antenna polarimetric active radar calibrator (DPARC) is proposed, which consists of two rotatable antennas with wideband electromagnetic polarization filters (EMPF) to achieve lower cross-polarization for transmission and reception. With two antennas which are rotatable around the radar line of sight (LOS), the DPARC provides a variety of standard polarimetric scattering matrices (PSM) through the rotation combination of receiving and transmitting polarization, which are useful for polarimatric calibration in different applications. In addition, a technique based on Fourier analysis is proposed for calibration processing. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed DPARC and processing technique.

  19. Narrow band 3 × 3 Mueller polarimetric endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ji; Ye, Menglong; Singh, Mohan; Clancy, Neil T.; Elson, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetric imaging has shown potential in tissue diagnosis but is challenging to implement endoscopically. In this work, a narrow band 3 × 3 Mueller matrix polarimetric endoscope was designed by rotating the endoscope to generate 0°, 45° and 90° linearly polarized illumination and positioning a rotating filter wheel in front of the camera containing three polarisers to permit polarization state analysis for backscattered light. The system was validated with a rotating linear polarizer and a diffuse reflection target. Initial measurements of 3 × 3 Mueller matrices on a rat are demonstrated, followed by matrix decomposition into the depolarization and retardance matrices for further analysis. Our work shows the feasibility of implementing polarimetric imaging in a rigid endoscope conveniently and economically in order to reveal diagnostic information. PMID:24298405

  20. Polarimetric monopulse radar scattering measurements of targets at 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, R. J.; Nemarich, J.; Dropkin, H.; Hutchins, D. R.; Silvious, J. L.; Wikner, D. A.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a 95-GHz polarimetric monopulse instrumentation radar and selected scattering measurement results for an armored vehicle. The radar is all-solid-state, coherent, frequency steppable over a 640-MHz bandwidth, and completely polarimetric for linearly or circularly polarized radiation. Details of the methods used to perform the amplitude and phase calibrations and the effectiveness of polarization distortion matrix corrections are included in the paper. Measurements made with the radar of various vehicles on a turntable have allowed quasi-three-dimensional polarimetric ISAR images of the targets to be generated. Sample images for an infantry combat vehicle are presented together with high-resolution range profiles of the target for all monopulse channels.

  1. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 1; AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  2. Detection of land degradation with polarimetric SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Farr, Tom G.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1992-01-01

    Multispectral radar polarimeter data were collected over the Manix Basin Area of the Mojave desert using an airborne SAR. An analysis of the data reveals unusual polarization responses which are attributed to the formation of wind ripples on the surfaces of fields that have been abandoned for more than 5 years. This hypothesis has been confirmed through field observations, and a second-order perturbation model is shown to effectively model the polarization responses. The results demonstrate the usefulness of remote sensing techniques for the study of land degradation at synoptic scales.

  3. Authentication of gold nanoparticle encoded pharmaceutical tablets using polarimetric signatures.

    PubMed

    Carnicer, Artur; Arteaga, Oriol; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-10-01

    The counterfeiting of pharmaceutical products represents concerns for both industry and the safety of the general public. Falsification produces losses to companies and poses health risks for patients. In order to detect fake pharmaceutical tablets, we propose producing film-coated tablets with gold nanoparticle encoding. These coated tablets contain unique polarimetric signatures. We present experiments to show that ellipsometric optical techniques, in combination with machine learning algorithms, can be used to distinguish genuine and fake samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report using gold nanoparticles encoded with optical polarimetric classifiers to prevent the counterfeiting of pharmaceutical products.

  4. Snapshot spectral and polarimetric imaging; target identification with multispectral video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Brent D.; Rodriguez, Mikel D.

    2013-05-01

    As the number of pixels continue to grow in consumer and scientific imaging devices, it has become feasible to collect the incident light field. In this paper, an imaging device developed around light field imaging is used to collect multispectral and polarimetric imagery in a snapshot fashion. The sensor is described and a video data set is shown highlighting the advantage of snapshot spectral imaging. Several novel computer vision approaches are applied to the video cubes to perform scene characterization and target identification. It is shown how the addition of spectral and polarimetric data to the video stream allows for multi-target identification and tracking not possible with traditional RGB video collection.

  5. Quasi-distributed single-length polarimetric sensor.

    PubMed

    Gusmeroli, V; Martinelli, M; Vavassori, P

    1989-12-01

    A quasi-distributed polarimetric sensor employing a single length of polarization-preserving fiber is described. The sensing segments are identified by miniature rings that squeeze the fiber to couple power from one optical mode to the orthogonal mode while avoiding any mechanical damage to the fiber. A superluminescent-diode source allows us to exploit the coherent-multiplexing concept, which yields high resolution and high precision. Experimental results confirm this approach and point toward the development of a quasi-distributed sensor with polarimetric sensitivity, high spatial resolution, and fiber-optic mechanical integrity.

  6. Polarimetric aspects in antenna related superposition of multipath signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichon, D. J.; Kuerner, T.; Wiesbeck, W.

    Polarimetry in radio wave propagation is very important and has been thoroughly investigated for radar systems, which are mainly related to single path propagation. Many theoretical approaches and results cannot be directly applied to problems dealing with wave propagation in a strong multipath environment, for example mobile communication in urban and suburban areas. In this paper the basic polarimetric mechanisms considering multipath propagation and its interaction with antennas are described. Results of a multipath simulation and its proper visualization are presented. The polarization signature for a radio link in a real 3D terrain is calculated based on the briefly described polarimetric propagation model.

  7. MAPIR: An Airborne Polarmetric Imaging Radiometer in Support of Hydrologic Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, C.; Al-Hamdan, M.; Crosson, W.; Limaye, A.; McCracken, J.; Meyer, P.; Richeson, J.; Sims, W.; Srinivasan, K.; Varnevas, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this age of dwindling water resources and increasing demands, accurate estimation of water balance components at every scale is more critical to end users than ever before. Several near-term Earth science satellite missions are aimed at global hydrologic observations. The Marshall Airborne Polarimetric Imaging Radiometer (MAPIR) is a dual beam, dual angle polarimetric, scanning L band passive microwave radiometer system developed by the Observing Microwave Emissions for Geophysical Applications (OMEGA) team at MSFC to support algorithm development and validation efforts in support of these missions. MAPIR observes naturally-emitted radiation from the ground primarily for remote sensing of land surface brightness temperature from which we can retrieve soil moisture and possibly surface or water temperature and ocean salinity. MAPIR has achieved Technical Readiness Level 6 with flight heritage on two very different aircraft, the NASA P-3B, and a Piper Navajo.

  8. Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasekamp, O. P.; Stap, A.; di Noia, A.; Rietjens, J.; Smit, M.; van Harten, G.; Snik, F.

    2014-12-01

    To reduce the large uncertainty on the aerosol effects on cloud formation and climate, accurate satellite measurements of aerosol optical properties (optical thickness, single scattering albedo, phase function) and microphysical properties (size distribution, refractive index, shape) are essential. Satellite instruments that perform multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements have the capability to provide these aerosol properties with sufficient accuracy. The only satellite instrument that provided a multi-year data set of multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements is the POLDER-3 instrument onboard the PARASOL microsatellite that operated between 2005-2013. PARASOL provides measurements of a ground scene under (up to) 16 viewing geometries in 9 spectral bands (3 for polarization). In order to make full use of the capability of PARASOL measurements of intensity and polarization properties of reflected light at multiple viewing angles and multiple wavelengths, we developed a retrieval algorithm that considers a continuous parameter space for aerosol microphysical properties (size distribution and refractive index) and properly accounts for land or ocean reflection by retrieving land and ocean parameters simultaneously with aerosol properties. Here, we present the key aspects of our PARASOL retrievals (inverse method, forward model, information content, cloud screening, computational aspects) as well as a validation of retrieved aerosol properties with ground-based measurements of the AERONET network. Also, we discuss required improvements for the next generation of polarimetric instruments dedicated to aerosol remote sensing and introduce a new spectropolarimetric instrument named SPEX. We will demonstrate the capabilities of SPEX based on ground based field measurements and characterization measurements in the labatory.

  9. Polarimetric Scatterometry using Unconventional Polarization States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Brandon Gregory

    one dimensional Poincare beam and measured with the image sampling polarimeter yields the phase matrix elements of the scatterers in a single polarimetric measurement.

  10. POLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF {sigma} ORIONIS E

    SciTech Connect

    Carciofi, A. C.; Faes, D. M.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    2013-03-20

    Some massive stars possess strong magnetic fields that confine plasma in the circumstellar environment. These magnetospheres have been studied spectroscopically, photometrically, and, more recently, interferometrically. Here we report on the first firm detection of a magnetosphere in continuum linear polarization, as a result of monitoring {sigma} Ori E at the Pico dos Dias Observatory. The non-zero intrinsic polarization indicates an asymmetric structure whose minor elongation axis is oriented 150. Degree-Sign 0 east of the celestial north. A modulation of the polarization was observed with a period of half of the rotation period, which supports the theoretical prediction of the presence of two diametrally opposed, corotating blobs of gas. A phase lag of -0.085 was detected between the polarization minimum and the primary minimum of the light curve, suggestive of a complex shape of the plasma clouds. We present a preliminary analysis of the data with the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere model, which could not reproduce simultaneously the photometric and polarimetric data. A toy model comprising two spherical corotating blobs joined by a thin disk proved more successful in reproducing the polarization modulation. With this model we were able to determine that the total scattering mass of the thin disk is similar to the mass of the blobs (2M{sub b}/M{sub d} = 1.2) and that the blobs are rotating counterclockwise on the plane of the sky. This result shows that polarimetry can provide a diagnostic of the geometry of clouds, which will serve as an important constraint for improving the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere model.

  11. Meterwavelength Single-pulse Polarimetric Emission Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Dipanjan; Basu, Rahul; Maciesiak, Krzysztof; Skrzypczak, Anna; Melikidze, George I.; Szary, Andrzej; Krzeszowski, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    We have conducted the Meterwavelength Single-pulse Polarimetric Emission Survey to study the radio emission properties of normal pulsars. A total of 123 pulsars with periods between 0.1 and 8.5 s were observed in the survey at two different frequencies: 105 profiles at 333 MHz, 118 profiles at 618 MHz, and 100 pulsars at both. In this work we concentrate primarily on the time-averaged properties of the pulsar emission. The measured widths of the pulsar profiles in our sample usually exhibit the radius-to-frequency mapping. We validate the existence of lower bounds for the distribution of profile widths with pulsar period (P), which is seen for multiple definitions of the width, namely, a lower boundary line (LBL) at 2.°7P ‑0.5 with width measured at 50% level of profile peak, an LBL at 5.°7 P ‑0.5 for 10% level of peak, and an LBL at 6.°3P ‑0.5 for width defined as 5σ above the baseline level. In addition, we have measured the degree of linear polarization in the average profile of pulsars and confirmed their dependence on pulsar spin-down energy loss (\\dot{E}). The single-pulse polarization data show interesting trends, with the polarization position angle (PPA) distribution exhibiting the simple rotating vector model for high-\\dot{E} pulsars, while the PPA becomes more complex for medium- and low-\\dot{E} pulsars. The single-pulse total intensity data are useful for studying a number of emission properties from pulsars like subpulse drifting, nulling, and mode changing, which are being explored in separate works.

  12. UAVSAR: Airborne L-band Radar for Repeat Pass Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    The primary objectives of the UAVSAR Project were to: a) develop a miniaturized polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for use on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or piloted vehicle. b) develop the associated processing algorithms for repeat-pass differential interferometric measurements using a single antenna. c) conduct measurements of geophysical interest, particularly changes of rapidly deforming surfaces such as volcanoes or earthquakes. Two complete systems were developed. Operational Science Missions began on February 18, 2009 ... concurrent development and testing of the radar system continues.

  13. Microphysics in West African squall line with an Xband polarimetric radar and an Hydrometeor Identification Scheme: comparison with in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazenave, F.; Gosset, M.; Kacou, M.; Alcoba, M.; Fontaine, E.

    2015-12-01

    A better knowledge on the microphysics of tropical continental convective systems is needed in order to improve quantitative precipitation measurements in the Tropics. Satellite passive microwave estimation of tropical rainfall could be improved with a better parameterization of the icy hydrometeors in the Bayesian RAIN estimation algorithm (BRAIN, Viltard et al., 2006) used over continental tropics. To address this important issue specific campaigns that combine aircraft based in situ microphysics probing and polarimetric radar have been organized as part of the CNES/ISRO satellite mission Megha-Tropiques. The first microphysics validation campaign was set up in Niamey in August 2010. The field deployment included the AMMA-CATH 56 rain gages, 3 disdrometers, 2 meteorological radars including the C-band MIT and the Xport X-band dual polarisation radar, and a 4 weeks campaign with the instrumented Falcon 20 from the french operator for environmental research aircrafts equipped with several microphysics probes and the 94Ghz cloud radar RASTA. The objective is to combine scales and methods to converge towards a parameterization of the ice size, mass and density laws inside continental Mesoscale Convective System (MCS). The Particle IDentification algorithm (PID) developed by the Colorado State University (CSU) adapted to the band X by B. Dolan (Dolan et al. 2009) is used to classify seven kind of particles: drizzle or light rain, moderate to heavy rain, wet and dry graupel, wet and dry aggregates and ice crystals. On a limited number of systems, the airborne microphysics sensors provide a detailed in situ reference on the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) that can be compared with the radar PID in the radar pixels located along the flight trajectory. An original approach has been developed for the radar - in situ comparison: it consists in simulating synthetic radar variables from the microphysics probe information and compare the 2 data sets in a common 'radar space

  14. Sampling for Airborne Radioactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    compared to betas, gammas and neutrons. For an airborne radioactivity detection system, it is most important to be able to detect alpha particles and... Airborne radioactive particles may emit alpha, beta, gamma or neutron radiation, depending on which radioisotope is present. From a health perspective...

  15. Airborne Ku-Band Polarimetric Radar Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Snow Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon; Cline, Donald; Elder, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary analyses of the POLSCAT data acquired from the CLPX-II in winter 2006-2007 are described in this paper. The data showed the response of the Ku-band radarechoes to snowpack changes for various types of background vegetation. We observed about 0.2 to 0.4 dB increases in backscatter for every 1 cm SWE accumulation for sage brush and agricultural fields. The co-polarized VV and HH radar resposnes are similar, while the corss-polarized (VH or HV) echoes showedgreater resposne to the change of SWE. The data also showed the impact of surface hoar growth and freeze/thaw cycles, whichcreated large snow grain sizes and ice lenses, respectively, and consequently increased the radar signals by a few dBs.

  16. Fully-polarimetric passive MMW imaging systems for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peichl, Markus; Dill, Stephan; Jirousek, Matthias; Anthony, John-Walter; Süß, Helmut

    2010-10-01

    Increasing terroristic attacks raise the danger to the public and create a new and more complex dimension of threat. This evolution must and can only be combat by the application of new counter-measures like advanced imaging technologies for wide-area surveillance and the detection of concealed dangerous objects. Passive microwave remote sensing allows a daytime independent non-destructive observation and examination of the objects of interest under nearly all weather conditions. The acquisition of polarimetric object characteristics can increase the detection capability by gathering complementary object information. Over years the DLR Microwaves and Radar Institute developed several problem-orientated radiometer imaging systems covering nearly the whole frequency spectrum between 1 GHz and 100 GHz for a multitude of applications. Actually a fully-polarimetric radiometer receiver at W band is developed in order to explore the polarimetric information content of interesting objects simultaneously. Some important theoretical characteristics of polarimetric radiometry at millimeterwaves are introduced and discussed. The actual design and construction of the receiver system is outlined and first experimental imaging results are presented.

  17. Conceptual design of a polarimetric Thomson scattering diagnostic in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Bassan, M.; Orsitto, F. P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Kempenaars, M.; Flanagan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Polarimetric Thomson scattering (TS) is a novel diagnostic technique proposed as an alternative to conventional (spectral) TS, for the measurement of the electron temperature Te and density ne in very hot fusion plasmas. Contrary to spectral TS, which is based on the reconstruction of the Doppler broadened frequency spectrum, in polarimetric TS Te is determined from the depolarization of the scattered radiation. The technique is suitable for ITER, where it is expected to be competitive with conventional spectral TS for measurements in the highest Te range, specially in backward-like conditions with the scattering angle 90° ll θ <= 180°. In this paper we consider a hypothetical polarimetric TS diagnostic for ITER and evaluate its performance for the θ = 145° scattering condition typical of the core TS system and also for a different scattering geometry in which, using a tangential laser beam, the central region of the ITER plasma can be observed under a scattering angle θ ~ 75°. In both cases we calculate the expected errors on the measured Te and ne that can be obtained with a simple, two-channel polarimeter, and taking into account that only a fraction of the TS wavelength spectrum is detected. In both cases the expected performances are compared with those of the conventional spectral core TS diagnostic to determine the plasma conditions in which the polarimetric technique is more advantageous. A measurement of the depolarization effect of the TS radiation using the JET High Resolution TS system of JET is also discussed.

  18. New cases of unusual polarimetric behavior in asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; Mesa, V.; Cellino, A.; Bendjoya, P.; Peñaloza, L.; Lovos, F.

    2008-04-01

    Aims: Results of different polarimetric campaigns at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (Casleo), San Juan, Argentina are presented. The aim of these campaigns was to search for objects exhibiting anomalous polarimetric properties, similar to those shown by the Ld-class asteroid (234) Barbara, among members of the same or similar taxonomic classes. Methods: The data have been obtained with Torino and CASPROF polarimeters at the 2.15 m telescope. The Torino polarimeter is an instrument that allows simultaneous measurement of polarization in five different bands, and CASPROF polarimeter is a two-hole aperture polarimeter with rapid modulation. Results: The campaigns began in 2005, and we found four new asteroids with Barbara-like polarimetric properties: the L-class objects (172) Baucis, (236) Honoria and (980) Anacostia, and the K-class asteroid (679) Pax. The polarimetric properties of the phase-polarization curves of these objects may be produced by a mixture of high- and low-albedo particles in their regolith as a result of the fragmentation of a substrate that is spectrally analog to the CO3/CV3 chondrites. Based on observations carried out at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  19. Polarimetric Signatures of Sea Ice. Part 1; Theoretical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.; Drinkwater, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    Physical, structural, and electromagnetic properties and interrelating processes in sea ice are used to develop a composite model for polarimetric backscattering signatures of sea ice. Physical properties of sea ice constituents such as ice, brine, air, and salt are presented in terms of their effects on electromagnetic wave interactions. Sea ice structure and geometry of scatterers are related to wave propagation, attenuation, and scattering. Temperature and salinity, which are determining factors for the thermodynamic phase distribution in sea ice, are consistently used to derive both effective permittivities and polarimetric scattering coefficients. Polarimetric signatures of sea ice depend on crystal sizes and brine volumes, which are affected by ice growth rates. Desalination by brine expulsion, drainage, or other mechanisms modifies wave penetration and scattering. Sea ice signatures are further complicated by surface conditions such as rough interfaces, hummocks, snow cover, brine skim, or slush layer. Based on the same set of geophysical parameters characterizing sea ice, a composite model is developed to calculate effective permittivities and backscattering covariance matrices at microwave frequencies for interpretation of sea ice polarimetric signatures.

  20. Inference of geophysical parameters from multifrequency polarimetric radar observations and model inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, J. J.; Burnette, C. F.; Farr, T. G.

    1989-01-01

    In summer 1988 an intensive field experiment was conducted in the vicinity of the Pisgah lava flow in the Mojave Desert. Physical properties such as microtopography, composition, soil moisture, and dielectric constant were measured at five sites representing surfaces with rms heights varying from less than one centimeter to tens of centimeters. In addition, polarimetric radar images at P-band, L-band, and C-band were acquired at three different incidence angles with the NASA/JPL airborne imaging radar polarimeter. Using trihedral corner reflectors deployed in the area prior to imaging, the L- and C-band images were calibrated to provide sigma0 values for each resolution element in the scene. The results of inferring geophysical parameters such as rms surface height and correlation length of the measured surfaces by fitting the observed signatures with those predicted by the small-perturbation model are presented: for smoother surfaces, the rms height values inferred are in good agreement with in situ measurements.

  1. Unsupervised polarimetric SAR urban area classification based on model-based decomposition with cross scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Deliang; Tang, Tao; Ban, Yifang; Su, Yi; Kuang, Gangyao

    2016-06-01

    Since it has been validated that cross-polarized scattering (HV) is caused not only by vegetation but also by rotated dihedrals, in this study, we use rotated dihedral corner reflectors to form a cross scattering matrix and propose an extended four-component model-based decomposition method for PolSAR data over urban areas. Unlike other urban area decomposition techniques which need to discriminate the urban and natural areas before decomposition, this proposed method is applied on PolSAR image directly. The building orientation angle is considered in this scattering matrix, making it flexible and adaptive in the decomposition. Therefore, we can separate cross scattering of urban areas from the overall HV component. Further, the cross and helix scattering components are also compared. Then, using these decomposed scattering powers, the buildings and natural areas can be easily discriminated from each other using a simple unsupervised K-means classifier. Moreover, buildings aligned and not aligned along the radar flight direction can be also distinguished clearly. Spaceborne RADARSAT-2 and airborne AIRSAR full polarimetric SAR data are used to validate the performance of our proposed method. The cross scattering power of oriented buildings is generated, leading to a better decomposition result for urban areas with respect to other state-of-the-art urban decomposition techniques. The decomposed scattering powers significantly improve the classification accuracy for urban areas.

  2. Classification of High Resolution C-Band PolSAR Data on Polarimetric and Texture Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Feng, Qi; Li, Lan

    2014-11-01

    PolSAR image classification is an important technique in the remote sensing area. For high resolution PolSAR image, polarimetric and texture features are equally important for the high resolution PolSAR image classification. The texture features are mainly extracted through Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) method, but this method has some deficiencies. First, GLCM method can only work on gray-scale images; Secondly, the number of texture features extracted by GLCM method is generally up dozens, or even hundreds. Too many features may exist larger redundancy and will increase the complexity of classification. Therefore, this paper introduces a new texture feature factor-RK that derived from PolSAR image non-Gaussian statistic model.Using the domestic airborne C-band PolSAR image data, we completed classification combined the polarization and texture characteristics.The results showed that this new texture feature factor-RK can overcome the above drawbacks and can achieve same performance compared with GLCM method.

  3. Inference of surface power spectra from inversion of multifrequency polarimetric radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, Jacob J.; Burnette, Charles F.; Farr, Tom G.

    1991-01-01

    During the summer of 1988 an intensive field experiment was conducted in the vicinity of Pisgah lava field in the Mojave Desert. As part of the experiment, physical properties such as microtopography, composition, soil moisture, and dielectric constant at five different sites representing surfaces with rms heights varying from less than one centimeter to tens of centimeters were measured. In addition, polarimetric radar images at P-band, L-band and C-band were acquired at three different incidence angles with the NASA/JPL airborne imaging radar polarimeter. Using trihedral corner reflectors deployed in the area prior to imaging, the radar images were calibrated to provide values for each resolution element in each scene. This paper reports on the derivation of the power spectrum of surface microtopography by solution of the small perturbation model for multiple incidence angle and multiple frequency radar data. Power-law fits to the power spectra have exponents that are nearly the same for all surfaces. These values are close to those from measured microtopography profiles.

  4. Lightning Initiation Forecasting: An Operational Dual-Polarimetric Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Crystal J.; Carey, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.; Roeder, W. P.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this NASA MSFC and NOAA CSTAR funded study is to develop and test operational forecast algorithms for the prediction of lightning initiation utilizing the C-band dual-polarimetric radar, UAHuntsville's Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR). Although there is a rich research history of radar signatures associated with lightning initiation, few studies have utilized dual-polarimetric radar signatures (e.g., Z(sub dr) columns) and capabilities (e.g., fuzzy-logic particle identification [PID] of precipitation ice) in an operational algorithm for first flash forecasting. The specific goal of this study is to develop and test polarimetric techniques that enhance the performance of current operational radar reflectivity based first flash algorithms. Improving lightning watch and warning performance will positively impact personnel safety in both work and leisure environments. Advanced warnings can provide space shuttle launch managers time to respond appropriately to secure equipment and personnel, while they can also provide appropriate warnings for spectators and players of leisure sporting events to seek safe shelter. Through the analysis of eight case dates, consisting of 35 pulse-type thunderstorms and 20 non-thunderstorm case studies, lightning initiation forecast techniques were developed and tested. The hypothesis is that the additional dual-polarimetric information could potentially reduce false alarms while maintaining high probability of detection and increasing lead-time for the prediction of the first lightning flash relative to reflectivity-only based techniques. To test the hypothesis, various physically-based techniques using polarimetric variables and/or PID categories, which are strongly correlated to initial storm electrification (e.g., large precipitation ice production via drop freezing), were benchmarked against the operational reflectivity-only based approaches to find the best compromise between

  5. Disaster debris estimation using high-resolution polarimetric stereo-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Christian N.; Gokon, Hideomi; Jimbo, Masaru; Koshimura, Shunichi; Sato, Motoyuki

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of debris estimation which is one of the most important initial challenges in the wake of a disaster like the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. Reasonable estimates of the debris have to be made available to decision makers as quickly as possible. Current approaches to obtain this information are far from being optimal as they usually rely on manual interpretation of optical imagery. We have developed a novel approach for the estimation of tsunami debris pile heights and volumes for improved emergency response. The method is based on a stereo-synthetic aperture radar (stereo-SAR) approach for very high-resolution polarimetric SAR. An advanced gradient-based optical-flow estimation technique is applied for optimal image coregistration of the low-coherence non-interferometric data resulting from the illumination from opposite directions and in different polarizations. By applying model based decomposition of the coherency matrix, only the odd bounce scattering contributions are used to optimize echo time computation. The method exclusively considers the relative height differences from the top of the piles to their base to achieve a very fine resolution in height estimation. To define the base, a reference point on non-debris-covered ground surface is located adjacent to the debris pile targets by exploiting the polarimetric scattering information. The proposed technique is validated using in situ data of real tsunami debris taken on a temporary debris management site in the tsunami affected area near Sendai city, Japan. The estimated height error is smaller than 0.6 m RMSE. The good quality of derived pile heights allows for a voxel-based estimation of debris volumes with a RMSE of 1099 m3. Advantages of the proposed method are fast computation time, and robust height and volume estimation of debris piles without the need for pre-event data or auxiliary information like DEM, topographic maps or GCPs.

  6. SYNTHETIC OIL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent concerns a dicarboxylate-base synthetic oil with antiwear and antioxidation additives. The oil is prepared from the esterification of 2- or 3-methylcyclohexanol and 2-ethylhexanol with adipic acid. (Author)

  7. Synthetic oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Synthetic lubricants are discussed by chemical class and their general strengths and weaknesses in terms of lubrication properties are analyzed. Comparative ratings are given for 14 chemical classes and are used as a guide for lubricant selection. The effects of chemical structure on the properties of the lubricant are described with special emphasis on thermal stability. The diversity of synthetic lubricants which is provided by the wide range of properties permits many applications, some of which are reported.

  8. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  9. Combined synthetic aperture radar/Landsat imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marque, R. E.; Maurer, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into merging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) images using optical and digital merging techniques. The unique characteristics of airborne and orbital SAR and Landsat MSS imagery are discussed. The case for merging the imagery is presented and tradeoffs between optical and digital merging techniques explored. Examples of Landsat and airborne SAR imagery are used to illustrate optical and digital merging. Analysis of the merged digital imagery illustrates the improved interpretability resulting from combining the outputs from the two sensor systems.

  10. Monitoring land use and degradation using satellite and airborne data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Farr, Thomas G.; Blom, Ronald G.; Crippen, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    In July 1990 AVIRIS and AIRSAR data were collected over the Manix Basin Area of the Mojave Desert to study land degradation in an arid area where centerpivot irrigation had been in use. The Manix Basin is located NE of Barstow, California, along Interstate-15 at 34 deg 57 min N 116 deg 35 min W. This region was covered by a series of lakes during the Late Pleistocence and Early Holocene. Beginning in the 1960's, areas were cleared of the native creosote bush-dominated plant community to be used for agricultural purposes. Starting in 1972 fields have been abandoned due to the increased cost of electricity needed to pump the irrigation water, with some fields abandoned as recently as 1988 and 1992. These circumstances provide a time series of abandoned fields which provide the possibility of studying the processes which act on agricultural fields in arid regions when they are abandoned. Ray et al. reported that polarimetric SAR (AIRSAR) could detect that the concentric circular planting furrows plowed on these fields persists for a few years after abandonment and then disappear over time and that wind ripples which form on these fields over time due to wind erosion can be detected with polarimetric radar. Ray et al. used Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) bandpasses to generate NDVI images of the Manix Basin which showed that the fields abandoned for only a few years had higher NDVI's than the undisturbed desert while the fields abandoned for a longer time had NDVI levels lower than that of the undisturbed desert. The purpose of this study is to use a fusion of a time series of satellite data with airborne data to provide a context for the airborne data. The satellite data time series will additionally help to validate the observation and analysis of time-dependent processes observed in the single AVIRIS image of fields abandoned for different periods of time.

  11. Airborne Microwave Imaging of River Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project was to determine whether airborne microwave remote sensing systems can measure river surface currents with sufficient accuracy to make them prospective instruments with which to monitor river flow from space. The approach was to fly a coherent airborne microwave Doppler radar, developed by APL/UW, on a light airplane along several rivers in western Washington state over an extended period of time. The fundamental quantity obtained by this system to measure river currents is the mean offset of the Doppler spectrum. Since this scatter can be obtained from interferometric synthetic aperture radars (INSARs), which can be flown in space, this project provided a cost effective means for determining the suitability of spaceborne INSAR for measuring river flow.

  12. A polarimetric scattering database for non-spherical ice particles at microwave wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yinghui; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Aydin, Kultegin; Verlinde, Johannes; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Botta, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    The atmospheric science community has entered a period in which electromagnetic scattering properties at microwave frequencies of realistically constructed ice particles are necessary for making progress on a number of fronts. One front includes retrieval of ice-particle properties and signatures from ground-based, airborne, and satellite-based radar and radiometer observations. Another front is evaluation of model microphysics by application of forward operators to their outputs and comparison to observations during case study periods. Yet a third front is data assimilation, where again forward operators are applied to databases of ice-particle scattering properties and the results compared to observations, with their differences leading to corrections of the model state. Over the past decade investigators have developed databases of ice-particle scattering properties at microwave frequencies and made them openly available. Motivated by and complementing these earlier efforts, a database containing polarimetric single-scattering properties of various types of ice particles at millimeter to centimeter wavelengths is presented. While the database presented here contains only single-scattering properties of ice particles in a fixed orientation, ice-particle scattering properties are computed for many different directions of the radiation incident on them. These results are useful for understanding the dependence of ice-particle scattering properties on ice-particle orientation with respect to the incident radiation. For ice particles that are small compared to the wavelength, the number of incident directions of the radiation is sufficient to compute reasonable estimates of their (randomly) orientation-averaged scattering properties. This database is complementary to earlier ones in that it contains complete (polarimetric) scattering property information for each ice particle - 44 plates, 30 columns, 405 branched planar crystals, 660 aggregates, and 640 conical

  13. Measurement of Pancharatnam's phase by robust interferometric and polarimetric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Loredo, J. C.; Ortiz, O.; De Zela, F.; Weingaertner, R.

    2009-07-15

    We report on theoretical calculations and experimental observations of Pancharatnam's phase originating from arbitrary SU(2) transformations applied to polarization states of light. We have implemented polarimetric and interferometric methods, which allow us to cover the full Poincare sphere. As a distinctive feature, our interferometric array is robust against mechanical and thermal disturbances, showing that the polarimetric method is not inherently superior over the interferometric one, as previously assumed. Our strategy effectively amounts to feeding an interferometer with two copropagating beams that are orthogonally polarized with respect to each other. It can be applied to different types of standard arrays, such as a Michelson, a Sagnac, or a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. We exhibit the versatility of our arrangement by performing measurements of Pancharatnam's phases and fringe visibilities that closely fit the theoretical predictions. Our approach can be easily extended to deal with mixed states and to study decoherence effects.

  14. Polarimetric Analysis of Scatterometer Data for Ocean Surface Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Yueh, S. H.; Schuler, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using a polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT) has been conducted by JPL for ocean surface wind measurement. It shows that (sigma) (subscript)0 values for HH, W, HV, and VH have the property of even symmetry with respect to the upwind direction, and correlation coefficients between co- and cross-polarizations have the odd symmetry property. In this paper, the symmetry properties will be further examined using polarimetric analysis to investigate the depolarization effect, the scattering mechanism, and the polarization orientation angle. Theoretical results based on a two scale model are used to verify the derived experiment results. The newly derived symmetry property has the potential to solve the 180(deg) ambiguity in wind direction, and to enhance the accuracy of wind vector measurements.

  15. Crop Change Assessment Using Polarimetric RADARSAT-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen; Shang, Jiali; Vachon, Paris W.; McNairn, Heather

    2011-03-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of monitoring crop growth cycles based on a temporal variation analysis of three elementary radar scattering mechanisms. Crop changes are assessed using RADARSAT-2 polarimetric data. The polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) analysis is based on the Pauli decomposition. Multi-temporal analysis is applied to RGB images constructed using surface scattering, double bounce and volume scattering. The crops studied in this paper are corn, cereals and soybeans. Each crop has unique physical structural characteristics and responds differently to these scattering mechanisms. By monitoring the significant changes that occur in these scattering mechanisms, the crop growth to harvest cycle can be observed and the harvest time can be estimated. In addition, a Maximum Likelihood Classification was performed on the RADARSAT-2 data to produce a crop map. An overall classification accuracy of 85% was achieved.

  16. Validation of simulated hurricane drop size distributions using polarimetric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bonnie R.; Bell, Michael M.; Frambach, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent upgrades to the U.S. radar network now allow for polarimetric measurements of landfalling hurricanes, providing a new data set to validate cloud microphysical parameterizations used in tropical cyclone simulations. Polarimetric radar reflectivity and differential reflectivity simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model were compared with real radar observations from 2014 in Hurricanes Arthur and Ana. Six different microphysics parameterizations were tested that were able to capture the major features of both hurricanes, including accurate tracks, precipitation asymmetry, and the approximate intensity of the storms. A high correlation between simulated intensity and rainfall across schemes suggests an intimate link between the latent heating produced by the microphysics and the storm dynamics. Most of the parameterizations produced a higher frequency of larger raindrops than observed. The Thompson aerosol-aware bulk and explicit spectral bin microphysical schemes showed the best fidelity to the observations at a higher computational cost.

  17. Statistical algorithms for target detection in coherent active polarimetric images.

    PubMed

    Goudail, F; Réfrégier, P

    2001-12-01

    We address the problem of small-target detection with a polarimetric imager that provides orthogonal state contrast images. Such active systems allow one to measure the degree of polarization of the light backscattered by purely depolarizing isotropic materials. To be independent of the spatial nonuniformities of the illumination beam, small-target detection on the orthogonal state contrast image must be performed without using the image of backscattered intensity. We thus propose and develop a simple and efficient target detection algorithm based on a nonlinear pointwise transformation of the orthogonal state contrast image followed by a maximum-likelihood algorithm optimal for additive Gaussian perturbations. We demonstrate the efficiency of this suboptimal technique in comparison with the optimal one, which, however, assumes a priori knowledge about the scene that is not available in practice. We illustrate the performance of this approach on both simulated and real polarimetric images.

  18. C-band polarimetric scatterometer for soil studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, Angelo C.; Mongelli, Antonio; Notarnicola, Claudia; Paparella, Giuseppina; Posa, Francesco; Sabatelli, Vincenzo

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the performances of a polarimetric scatterometer. This sensor can measure the module of the electromagnetic backscattering matrix elements. The knowledge of this matrix permits the computation of all the possible polarisation combinations of transmitted and received signals through a Polarisation Synthesis approach. Scatterometer data are useful for monitoring a large number of soil physical parameters. In particular, the sensitivity of a C-band radar to different growing conditions of vegetation depends on the wave polarisation. As consequences, the possibility of acquiringi both polarisation components presents a great advantage in the vegetarian studies. In addition, this type of ground sensor can permit a fast coverage of the areas of interest. A first test of the polarimetric scatterometer has been performed over an asphalt surface, which has a well-known electromagnetic response. Moreover, a calibration procedure has been tested using both passive (Trihedral Corner Reflector, TCR) and active (Active Radar Calibrator, ARC) radar calibrator.

  19. Ensemble polarimetric SAR image classification based on contextual sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lamei; Wang, Xiao; Zou, Bin; Qiao, Zhijun

    2016-05-01

    Polarimetric SAR image interpretation has become one of the most interesting topics, in which the construction of the reasonable and effective technique of image classification is of key importance. Sparse representation represents the data using the most succinct sparse atoms of the over-complete dictionary and the advantages of sparse representation also have been confirmed in the field of PolSAR classification. However, it is not perfect, like the ordinary classifier, at different aspects. So ensemble learning is introduced to improve the issue, which makes a plurality of different learners training and obtained the integrated results by combining the individual learner to get more accurate and ideal learning results. Therefore, this paper presents a polarimetric SAR image classification method based on the ensemble learning of sparse representation to achieve the optimal classification.

  20. Validation of Simulated Hurricane Drop Size Distributions using Polarimetric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. M.; Brown, B. R.; Frambach, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent upgrades to the U.S. radar network now allow for polarimetric measurements of landfalling hurricanes, providing a new dataset to validate cloud microphysical parameterizations used in tropical cyclone simulations. Polarimetric radar variables simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model were compared with real radar observations from 2014 in Hurricanes Arthur and Ana. Six different microphysics parameterizations were tested that were able to capture the major features of both hurricanes, including accurate tracks, asymmetric distributions of precipitation, and the approximate intensity of the storms. However, most of the schemes produced a higher frequency of larger raindrops than observed. The Thompson aerosol-aware bulk and a spectral bin microphysical (SBM) scheme showed the best fidelity to the observed joint probability distribution of horizontal and differential reflectivity. The SBM also produced the most accurate intensity and lowest rainfall accumulation, but required much higher computational resources than the bulk schemes.

  1. Infrared active polarimetric imaging system controlled by image segmentation algorithms: application to decamouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannier, Nicolas; Goudail, François; Plassart, Corentin; Boffety, Matthieu; Feneyrou, Patrick; Leviandier, Luc; Galland, Frédéric; Bertaux, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    We describe an active polarimetric imager with laser illumination at 1.5 µm that can generate any illumination and analysis polarization state on the Poincar sphere. Thanks to its full polarization agility and to image analysis of the scene with an ultrafast active-contour based segmentation algorithm, it can perform adaptive polarimetric contrast optimization. We demonstrate the capacity of this imager to detect manufactured objects in different types of environments for such applications as decamouflage and hazardous object detection. We compare two imaging modes having different number of polarimetric degrees of freedom and underline the characteristics that a polarimetric imager aimed at this type of applications should possess.

  2. Even Shallower Exploration with Airborne Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Kirkegaard, C.; Nyboe, N. S.; Sørensen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne electromagnetics (EM) is in many ways undergoing the same type rapid technological development as seen in the telecommunication industry. These developments are driven by a steadily increasing demand for exploration of minerals, groundwater and geotechnical targets. The latter two areas demand shallow and accurate resolution of the near surface geology in terms of both resistivity and spatial delineation of the sedimentary layers. Airborne EM systems measure the grounds electromagnetic response when subject to either a continuous discrete sinusoidal transmitter signal (frequency domain) or by measuring the decay of currents induced in the ground by rapid transmission of transient pulses (time domain). In the last decade almost all new developments of both instrument hardware and data processing techniques has focused around time domain systems. Here we present a concept for measuring the time domain response even before the transient transmitter current has been turned off. Our approach relies on a combination of new instrument hardware and novel modeling algorithms. The newly developed hardware allows for measuring the instruments complete transfer function which is convolved with the synthetic earth response in the inversion algorithm. The effect is that earth response data measured while the transmitter current is turned off can be included in the inversion, significantly increasing the amount of available information. We demonstrate the technique using both synthetic and field data. The synthetic examples provide insight on the physics during the turn off process and the field examples document the robustness of the method. Geological near surface structures can now be resolved to a degree that is unprecedented to the best of our knowledge, making airborne EM even more attractive and cost-effective for exploration of water and minerals that are crucial for the function of our societies.

  3. Advanced Concepts In Polarimetry. Part 2: Polarimetric Target Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    polarization , | HH |2, |VV|2 and |HV|2, for all three bands . b. Combinations of dual polarizations without the phase differences... polarization complex data with phase differences, complex ( HH , VV), ( HH , HV) and (HV, VV). d. P- band , L- band or C- band fully polarimetric data. e...HV (d) P- band HH and HV intensities (without phase) Fig. 6: Comparisons of dual polarization tree age classifications. 5 - 10

  4. Comprehensive Space-Object Characterization using Spectrally Compressive Polarimetric Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-08

    identification based upon imag- ing using simultaneous measurements at different wavelengths. AMOS sensors can collect simultaneous images ranging from visible...Synthesis Topical 23 Meeting of the Optical Society of America, Toronto, CA (July 11, 2011). Abstract available at http://www.opticsinfobase.org...polarimetric imaging,” Computational Optical Sens- ing and Imaging (COSI) Topical Meeting of the Optical Society of America, Monterey, CA (24-27 June

  5. Noninvasive Polarimetric-Based Glucose Monitoring: An in Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Purvinis, Georgeanne; Cameron, Brent D; Altrogge, Douglas M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Since 1990, there has been significant research devoted toward development of a noninvasive physiological glucose sensor. In this article, we report on the use of optical polarimetry for the noninvasive measurement of physiological glucose concentration in the anterior chamber of the eye of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits. Method: Measurements were acquired using a custom-designed laser-based optical polarimetry system in a total of seven NZW rabbits anesthetized using an isoflurane-only anesthesia protocol. Aqueous humor-based polarimetric measurements were obtained by coupling light through the anterior chamber of the eye. Blood glucose levels were first stabilized and then altered with intravenous dextrose and insulin administration and measured every 3–5 min with a standard glucometer and intermittently with a YSI 2300 glucose analyzer. Acquired polarimetric glucose signals are calibrated to measured blood glucose concentration. Results: Based on a total of 41 data points, Clarke error grid analysis indicated 93% in zone A, 7% in zone B, and 0% in zones C and D, with reference concentrations between 93 and 521 mg/dl. Errors in prediction are shown to be related to gross movement of the rabbit during the procedures, incurring time-varying corneal birefringence effects that directly affect the measured polarimetric signal. These effects can be compensated for with appropriate design modifications. Conclusions: An optical polarimetry technique was used for in vivo physiological glucose monitoring. The technique demonstrated provides a basis for the development of a noninvasive polarimetric glucose monitor for home, personal, or hospital use. PMID:21527109

  6. Synthetic multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Maharbiz, Michel M

    2012-12-01

    The ability to synthesize biological constructs on the scale of the organisms we observe unaided is probably one of the more outlandish, yet recurring, dreams humans have had since they began to modify genes. This review brings together recent developments in synthetic biology, cell and developmental biology, computation, and technological development to provide context and direction for the engineering of rudimentary, autonomous multicellular ensembles.

  7. Synthetic DNA

    PubMed Central

    O’ Driscoll, Aisling; Sleator, Roy D.

    2013-01-01

    With world wide data predicted to exceed 40 trillion gigabytes by 2020, big data storage is a very real and escalating problem. Herein, we discuss the utility of synthetic DNA as a robust and eco-friendly archival data storage solution of the future. PMID:23514938

  8. Synthetic Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  9. Synthetic Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  10. Summaries of the Seventh JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop January 12-16, 1998. Volume 1; AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Seventh JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 12-16, 1998. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops, and each workshop has a volume as follows: (1) Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Workshop; (2) Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop; and (3) Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) Workshop. This Volume 1 publication contains 58 papers taken from the AVIRIS workshop.

  11. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, March 4-8, 1996. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yunjin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1. The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  12. Multi-polarimetric textural distinctiveness for outdoor robotic saliency detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, S. A.; Scharfenberger, C.; Kazemzadeh, F.; Wong, A.; Clausi, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile robots that rely on vision, for navigation and object detection, use saliency approaches to identify a set of potential candidates to recognize. The state of the art in saliency detection for mobile robotics often rely upon visible light imaging, using conventional camera setups, to distinguish an object against its surroundings based on factors such as feature compactness, heterogeneity and/or homogeneity. We are demonstrating a novel multi- polarimetric saliency detection approach which uses multiple measured polarization states of a scene. We leverage the light-material interaction known as Fresnel reflections to extract rotationally invariant multi-polarimetric textural representations to then train a high dimensional sparse texture model. The multi-polarimetric textural distinctiveness is characterized using a conditional probability framework based on the sparse texture model which is then used to determine the saliency at each pixel of the scene. It was observed that through the inclusion of additional polarized states into the saliency analysis, we were able to compute noticeably improved saliency maps in scenes where objects are difficult to distinguish from their background due to color intensity similarities between the object and its surroundings.

  13. From Maxwell's Equations to Polarimetric SAR Images: A Simulation Approach.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Sidnei J S; Da S Lacava, J C; Fernandes, David

    2008-11-19

    A new electromagnetic approach for the simulation of polarimetric SAR images is proposed. It starts from Maxwell's equations, employs the spectral domain full-wave technique, the moment method, and the stationary phase method to compute the far electromagnetic fields scattered by multilayer structures. A multilayer structure is located at each selected position of a regular rectangular grid of coordinates, which defines the scene area under imaging. The grid is determined taking into account the elementary scatter size and SAR operational parameters, such as spatial resolution, pixel spacing, look angle and platform altitude. A two-dimensional separable "sinc" function to represent the SAR spread point function is also considered. Multifrequency sets of single-look polarimetric SAR images are generated, in L-, C- and X-bands and the images are evaluated using several measurements commonly employed in SAR data analysis. The evaluation shows that the proposed simulation process is working properly, since the obtained results are in accordance with those presented in the literature. Therefore, this new approach becomes suitable for carrying out theoretical and practical studies using polarimetric SAR images.

  14. From Maxwell's Equations to Polarimetric SAR Images: A Simulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Sidnei J. S.; da S. Lacava, J. C.; Fernandes, David

    2008-01-01

    A new electromagnetic approach for the simulation of polarimetric SAR images is proposed. It starts from Maxwell's equations, employs the spectral domain full-wave technique, the moment method, and the stationary phase method to compute the far electromagnetic fields scattered by multilayer structures. A multilayer structure is located at each selected position of a regular rectangular grid of coordinates, which defines the scene area under imaging. The grid is determined taking into account the elementary scatter size and SAR operational parameters, such as spatial resolution, pixel spacing, look angle and platform altitude. A two-dimensional separable “sinc” function to represent the SAR spread point function is also considered. Multifrequency sets of single-look polarimetric SAR images are generated, in L-, C- and X-bands and the images are evaluated using several measurements commonly employed in SAR data analysis. The evaluation shows that the proposed simulation process is working properly, since the obtained results are in accordance with those presented in the literature. Therefore, this new approach becomes suitable for carrying out theoretical and practical studies using polarimetric SAR images. PMID:27873935

  15. Probing surface properties of Jupiter Trojans by polarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belskaya, I.; Bagnulo, S.; Stinson, A.; Christou, A.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    We present the first polarimetric observations of six Jupiter Trojans, namely (588) Achilles, (1583) Antilochus, (3548) Eurybates, (4543) Phoinix, (6545) 1986 TR_6, and (21601) 1998 XO_{89}. All these objects belong to the L4 population of Jupiter Trojans and have diameters in the range of 50-160 km (Grav et al. 2011). The observations were carried out in 2013 at ESO VLT. Each object was observed at 3-4 different phase angles in the phase-angle range from 7 deg up to 11-12 deg, the largest possible phase angles in the ground-based observations of Trojans. Observations were made in the R band with a typical accuracy of 0.05 %. We have measured negative polarization branch for each object with polarization minima varying from -1 % to -1.3 %. The polarization-phase-angle behavior of the observed Trojans is found to be very similar to that of some low-albedo main-belt asteroids, in particular, the P-type asteroids. We compare photometric and polarimetric phase dependencies of Trojans to the phase curves of inner and outer Solar System bodies. Possible relationships of phase-curve parameters with albedos and spectral properties are investigated. Constraints on the surface properties of Jupiter Trojans from the polarimetric observations are discussed.

  16. Polarimetric signatures of sea ice. 1: Theoretical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.; Drinkwater, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    Physical, structral, and electromagnetic properties and interrelating processes in sea ice are used to develop a composite model for polarimetric backscattering signatures of sea ice. Physical properties of sea ice constituents such as ice, brine, air, and salt are presented in terms of their effects on electromagnetic wave interactions. Sea ice structure and geometry of scatterers are related to wave propagation, attenuation, and scattering. Temperature and salinity, which are determining factors for the thermodynamic phase distribution in sea ice, are consistently used to derive both effective permittivities and polarimetric scattering coefficients. Polarmetric signatures of sea ice depend on crystal sizes and brine volumes, which are affected by ice growth rates. Desalination by brine expulsion, drainage, or other mechanisms modifies wave penetration and scattering. Sea ice signatures are further complicated by surface conditions such as rough interfaces, hummocks, snow cover, brine skim, or slush layer. Based on the same set of geophysical parameters characterizing sea ice, a composite model is developed to calculate effective permittivities and backscattering covariance matrices at microwave frequencies to interpretation of sea ice polarimetric signatures.

  17. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Gillian

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) allows all-weather, day and night, surface surveillance and has the ability to detect, classify and geolocate objects at long stand-off ranges. Bistatic SAR, where the transmitter and the receiver are on separate platforms, is seen as a potential means of countering the vulnerability of conventional monostatic SAR to electronic countermeasures, particularly directional jamming, and avoiding physical attack of the imaging platform. As the receiving platform can be totally passive, it does not advertise its position by RF emissions. The transmitter is not susceptible to jamming and can, for example, operate at long stand-off ranges to reduce its vulnerability to physical attack. This thesis examines some of the complications involved in producing high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery. The effect of bistatic operation on resolution is examined from a theoretical viewpoint and analytical expressions for resolution are developed. These expressions are verified by simulation work using a simple 'point by point' processor. This work is extended to look at using modern practical processing engines for bistatic geometries. Adaptations of the polar format algorithm and range migration algorithm are considered. The principal achievement of this work is a fully airborne demonstration of bistatic SAR. The route taken in reaching this is given, along with some results. The bistatic SAR imagery is analysed and compared to the monostatic imagery collected at the same time. Demonstrating high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery using two airborne platforms represents what I believe to be a European first and is likely to be the first time that this has been achieved outside the US (the UK has very little insight into US work on this topic). Bistatic target characteristics are examined through the use of simulations. This also compares bistatic imagery with monostatic and gives further insight into the utility of bistatic SAR.

  18. Airborne Next: Rethinking Airborne Organization and Applying New Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    structures since its employment on a large scale during World War II. It is puzzling to consider how little airborne organizational structures and employment...future potential of airborne concepts by rethinking traditional airborne organizational structures and employment concepts. Using a holistic approach in... structures of airborne forces to model a “small and many” approach over a “large and few” approach, while incorporating a “swarming” concept. Utilizing

  19. Joint retrieval of aerosol and water-leaving radiance from multispectral, multiangular and polarimetric measurements over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Dubovik, Oleg; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Diner, David J.; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Seidel, Felix C.; Litvinov, Pavel; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Garay, Michael J.; van Harten, Gerard; Davis, Anthony B.

    2016-07-01

    An optimization approach has been developed for simultaneous retrieval of aerosol properties and normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) from multispectral, multiangular, and polarimetric observations over ocean. The main features of the method are (1) use of a simplified bio-optical model to estimate nLw, followed by an empirical refinement within a specified range to improve its accuracy; (2) improved algorithm convergence and stability by applying constraints on the spatial smoothness of aerosol loading and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration across neighboring image patches and spectral constraints on aerosol optical properties and nLw across relevant bands; and (3) enhanced Jacobian calculation by modeling and storing the radiative transfer (RT) in aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer, pure Rayleigh-scattering layers, and ocean medium separately, then coupling them to calculate the field at the sensor. This approach avoids unnecessary and time-consuming recalculations of RT in unperturbed layers in Jacobian evaluations. The Markov chain method is used to model RT in the aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer and the doubling method is used for the uniform layers of the atmosphere-ocean system. Our optimization approach has been tested using radiance and polarization measurements acquired by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) over the AERONET USC_SeaPRISM ocean site (6 February 2013) and near the AERONET La Jolla site (14 January 2013), which, respectively, reported relatively high and low aerosol loadings. Validation of the results is achieved through comparisons to AERONET aerosol and ocean color products. For comparison, the USC_SeaPRISM retrieval is also performed by use of the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties algorithm (Dubovik et al., 2011). Uncertainties of aerosol and nLw retrievals due to random and systematic instrument errors are analyzed by truth-in/truth-out tests with three Chl a concentrations, five aerosol loadings

  20. Testing a polarimetric cloud imager aboard research vessel Polarstern: comparison of color-based and polarimetric cloud detection algorithms.

    PubMed

    Barta, András; Horváth, Gábor; Horváth, Ákos; Egri, Ádám; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, Pál; Bumke, Karl; Macke, Andreas

    2015-02-10

    Cloud cover estimation is an important part of routine meteorological observations. Cloudiness measurements are used in climate model evaluation, nowcasting solar radiation, parameterizing the fluctuations of sea surface insolation, and building energy transfer models of the atmosphere. Currently, the most widespread ground-based method to measure cloudiness is based on analyzing the unpolarized intensity and color distribution of the sky obtained by digital cameras. As a new approach, we propose that cloud detection can be aided by the additional use of skylight polarization measured by 180° field-of-view imaging polarimetry. In the fall of 2010, we tested such a novel polarimetric cloud detector aboard the research vessel Polarstern during expedition ANT-XXVII/1. One of our goals was to test the durability of the measurement hardware under the extreme conditions of a trans-Atlantic cruise. Here, we describe the instrument and compare the results of several different cloud detection algorithms, some conventional and some newly developed. We also discuss the weaknesses of our design and its possible improvements. The comparison with cloud detection algorithms developed for traditional nonpolarimetric full-sky imagers allowed us to evaluate the added value of polarimetric quantities. We found that (1) neural-network-based algorithms perform the best among the investigated schemes and (2) global information (the mean and variance of intensity), nonoptical information (e.g., sun-view geometry), and polarimetric information (e.g., the degree of polarization) improve the accuracy of cloud detection, albeit slightly.

  1. Snow mapping in alpine regions with synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, J.; Dozier, J. ); Rott, H. . Inst. for Meteorology and Geophysics)

    1994-01-01

    For climatological and hydrological investigations, the areas covered by snow and glacial ice are important parameters. Active microwave sensors can discriminate snow from other surfaces in all weather conditions, and their spatial resolution is compatible with the topographic variation in alpine regions. Using data acquired with the NASA AIRSAR in the Oetztal Alps in 1989 and 1991, the authors examine the usage of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to map snow- and glacier-covered areas. By comparing polarimetric SAR data to images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper obtained under clear conditions one week after the SAR flight, they find that SAR data at 5.3 GHz (C-band) can discriminate between areas covered by snow from those that are ice-free. However, they are less suited to discrimination of glacier ice from snow and rock. The overall pixel-by-pixel accuracies--74% from VV polarization alone with topographic information, 76% from polarimetric SAR without any topographic information, and 79% from polarimetric SAR with topographic information--are high enough to justify the use of SAR as the data source in areas that are too cloud-covered to obtain data from the Thematic Mapper. This is especially true for snow discrimination, where accuracies exceed 80%, because mapping of a transient snow cover during a cloudy melt season is often difficult with an optical sensor. The AIRSAR survey was carried out in summer during a heavy rainstorm, when the snow surfaces were unusually rough.

  2. Synthetic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes.

  3. SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    of synthetic lubricants for use at low and high temperatures. The diesters of straight-chain dibasic acids lead the field of esters mutable as...lubricants for use at both low and high temperatures, because of their desirable combinations of properties and potentially good availability. Adipic ...azelaic, and sebacic acids are the most readily available dibasic acids suitable for ester lubricant production, while the petroleum derived Oxo alcohols

  4. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  5. Fractal Geometry Segmentation of High Resolution Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    far as it is possible, relations between the manifold aspects of our experience (4:18). In 1934, Niels Bohr , in his book Atomic Theory and the...Range Search- ing, and a Correlation Dimension Algorithm of Reduced Complezity. Technical Report, University of Tennessee, April 1989. 4. Bohr , Niels

  6. Airborne SAR imagery to support hydraulic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, S.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite images and airborne SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery are increasingly widespread and they are effective tools for measuring the size of flood events and for assessment of damage. The Hurricane Katrina disaster and the tsunami catastrophe in Indian Ocean countries are two recent and sadly famous examples. Moreover, as well known, the inundation maps can be used as tools to calibrate and validate hydraulic model (e.g. Horritt et al., Hydrological Processes, 2007). We carry out an application of a 1D hydraulic model coupled with a high resolution DTM for predicting the flood inundation processes. The study area is a 16 km reach of the River Severn, in west-central England, for which, four maps of inundated areas, obtained through airborne SAR images, and hydrometric data are available. The inundation maps are used for the calibration/validation of a 1D hydraulic model through a comparison between airborne SAR images and the results of hydraulic simulations. The results confirm the usefulness of inundation maps as hydraulic modelling tools and, moreover, show that 1D hydraulic model can be effectively used when coupled with high resolution topographic information.

  7. Probing the Martian Subsurface with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, B. A.; Maxwell, T. A.; Freeman, A.

    2005-01-01

    Many regions of the martian surface are covered by fine-grained materials emplaced by volcanic, fluvial, or aeolian processes. These mantling deposits likely hide ancient channel systems (particularly at smaller scale lengths) and volcanic, impact, glacial, or shoreline features. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) offers the capability to probe meters below the surface, with imaging resolution in the 10 s of m range, to reveal the buried terrain and enhance our understanding of Mars geologic and climate history. This presentation focuses on the practical applications of a Mars orbital SAR, methods for polarimetric and interferometric radar studies, and examples of such techniques for Mars-analog sites on the Moon and Earth.

  8. When is polarimetric imaging preferable to intensity imaging for target detection?

    PubMed

    Goudail, François; Tyo, J Scott

    2011-01-01

    We consider target detection in images perturbed with additive noise. We determine the conditions in which polarimetric imaging, which consists of analyzing of the polarization of the light scattered by the scene before forming the image, yields better performance than classical intensity imaging. These results give important information to assess the interest of polarimetric imaging in a given application.

  9. The influence of thermal expansion of a composite material on embedded polarimetric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Lesiak, Piotr; Domanski, Andrzej; Wolinski, Tomasz; Boczkowska, Anna; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-12-01

    Some of the most critical issues of the influence of the thermal expansion of composite materials on embedded polarimetric sensors for measurements of strain and temperature are studied in this paper. A composite material sample with polarimetric fiber sensors embedded in two distinct layers of a multi-layer composite structure is fabricated and characterized. The polarimetric fiber sensors used in this study are based on Panda type fiber and polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF). The temperature sensitivities of polarimetric fiber sensors with acrylate buffer coated and buffer stripped polarization maintaining optical fibers are measured in free space and compared with those for sensors embedded in the composite material. It is found that a polarimetric fiber sensor with an acrylate coating embedded in the composite material shows the same response as the one in free space while the coating stripped fiber polarimetric sensor shows significant temperature sensitivity when embedded in the composite material. This is due to the stress induced change in birefringence created by the thermal expansion of the composite material, while in the case of a buffer coated fiber, the effect is considerably reduced as the thermal stress is largely eliminated by the buffer coating. The results obtained in this study demonstrated that thermal expansion of the composite material is the main source of error in strain and temperature measurement using embedded polarimetric fiber sensors and that more accurate strain and temperature measurements can be obtained with buffer coated polarimetric fiber sensors.

  10. Detectability Analysis of Road Vehicles in Radarsat-2 Fully Polarimetric SAR Images for Traffic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Fan; Tang, Yi-Xian

    2017-01-01

    By acquiring information over a wide area regardless of weather conditions and solar illumination, space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has the potential to be a promising application for traffic monitoring. However, the backscatter character of a vehicle in a SAR image is unstable and varies with image parameters, such as aspect and incidence angle. To investigate vehicle detectability in SAR images for traffic monitoring applications, images of four common types of vehicles in China were acquired using the fully polarimetric (FP) SAR of Radarsat-2 in our experiments. Methods for measuring a vehicle’s aspect angle and backscatter intensity are introduced. The experimental FP SAR images are used to analyze the detectability, which is affected by factors such as vehicle size, vehicle shape, and aspect angle. Moreover, a new metric to improve vehicle detectability in FP SAR images is proposed and compared with the well-known intensity metric. The experimental results show that shape is a crucial factor in affecting the backscatter intensity of vehicles, which also oscillates with varying aspect angle. If the size of a vehicle is smaller than the SAR image resolution, using the intensity metric would result in low detectability. However, it could be improved in an FP SAR image by using the proposed metric. Compared with the intensity metric, the overall detectability is improved from 72% to 90% in our experiments. Therefore, this study indicates that FP SAR images have the ability to detect stationary vehicles on the road and are meaningful for traffic monitoring. PMID:28178178

  11. Statistical modeling of targets and clutter in single-look non-polarimetric SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, J.S.; Hush, D.R.; Koch, M.W.; Fogler, R.J.; Hostetler, L.D.

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents a Generalized Logistic (gLG) distribution as a unified model for Log-domain synthetic aperture Radar (SAR) data. This model stems from a special case of the G-distribution known as the G{sup 0}-distribution. The G-distribution arises from a multiplicative SAR model and has the classical K-distribution as another special case. The G{sup 0}-distribution, however, can model extremely heterogeneous clutter regions that the k-distribution cannot model. This flexibility is preserved in the unified gLG model, which is capable of modeling non-polarimetric SAR returns from clutter as well as man-made objects. Histograms of these two types of SAR returns have opposite skewness. The flexibility of the gLG model lies in its shape and shift parameters. The shape parameter describes the differing skewness between target and clutter data while the shift parameter compensates for movements in the mean as the shape parameter changes. A Maximum Likelihood (ML) estimate of the shape parameter gives an optimal measure of the skewness of the SAR data. This measure provides a basis for an optimal target detection algorithm.

  12. Detectability Analysis of Road Vehicles in Radarsat-2 Fully Polarimetric SAR Images for Traffic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Fan; Tang, Yi-Xian

    2017-02-06

    By acquiring information over a wide area regardless of weather conditions and solar illumination, space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has the potential to be a promising application for traffic monitoring. However, the backscatter character of a vehicle in a SAR image is unstable and varies with image parameters, such as aspect and incidence angle. To investigate vehicle detectability in SAR images for traffic monitoring applications, images of four common types of vehicles in China were acquired using the fully polarimetric (FP) SAR of Radarsat-2 in our experiments. Methods for measuring a vehicle's aspect angle and backscatter intensity are introduced. The experimental FP SAR images are used to analyze the detectability, which is affected by factors such as vehicle size, vehicle shape, and aspect angle. Moreover, a new metric to improve vehicle detectability in FP SAR images is proposed and compared with the well-known intensity metric. The experimental results show that shape is a crucial factor in affecting the backscatter intensity of vehicles, which also oscillates with varying aspect angle. If the size of a vehicle is smaller than the SAR image resolution, using the intensity metric would result in low detectability. However, it could be improved in an FP SAR image by using the proposed metric. Compared with the intensity metric, the overall detectability is improved from 72% to 90% in our experiments. Therefore, this study indicates that FP SAR images have the ability to detect stationary vehicles on the road and are meaningful for traffic monitoring.

  13. Structural classification of marshes with Polarimetric SAR highlighting the temporal mapping of marshes exposed to oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey III, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical relationships between field-derived Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Leaf Angle Distribution (LAD) and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) based biophysical indicators were created and applied to map S. alterniflora marsh canopy structure. PolSAR and field data were collected near concurrently in the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 in coastal marshes, and PolSAR data alone were acquired in 2009. Regression analyses showed that LAI correspondence with the PolSAR biophysical indicator variables equaled or exceeded those of vegetation water content (VWC) correspondences. In the final six regressor model, the ratio HV/VV explained 49% of the total 77% explained LAI variance, and the HH-VV coherence and phase information accounted for the remainder. HV/HH dominated the two regressor LAD relationship, and spatial heterogeneity and backscatter mechanism followed by coherence information dominated the final three regressor model that explained 74% of the LAD variance. Regression results applied to 2009 through 2012 PolSAR images showed substantial changes in marsh LAI and LAD. Although the direct cause was not substantiated, following a release of freshwater in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the fairly uniform interior marsh structure of 2009 was more vertical and dense shortly after the oil spill cessation. After 2010, marsh structure generally progressed back toward the 2009 uniformity; however, the trend was more disjointed in oil impact marshes.             

  14. Feasibility of spectro-polarimetric characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres with direct observing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, J.; Matsuo, T.; Itoh, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Spectro-polarimetry of reflected light from exoplanets is anticipated to be a powerful method for probing atmospheric composition and structure. Aims: We aim to evaluate the feasibility of the search for a spectro-polarimetric feature of water vapor using a high-contrast polarimetric instrument on a 30-40 m-class ground-based telescope. Methods: Three types of errors are considered: (a) errors from the difference between efficiencies for two orthogonally polarized states; (b) errors caused by speckle noises; and (c) errors caused by photon noise from scattered starlight. Using the analytically derived error formulas, we estimate the number of planets for which feasible spectro-polarimetric detection of water vapor is possible. Results: Our calculations show that effective spectro-polarimetric searches for water vapor are possible for 5 to 14 known planets. Spectro-polarimetric characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible with an extremely large telescope and a direct observing spectro-polarimeter.

  15. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  16. Synthetic wisdom.

    PubMed

    Kitcher, Philip

    2016-11-01

    Wisdom is a special kind of virtue. It is not to be identified with any outstanding cognitive ability-like having a prodigious memory or knowing a lot. Rather it consists in seeing what is most important and most valuable, either within a particular domain or in life as a whole. In the life of a wise person, that insight should be accompanied by traits of character, enabling the person to pursue what is seen as valuable. Viewing wisdom as a capacity for synthetic understanding, I argue for the need for philosophy, even at a time when all of us have much to learn from the sciences.

  17. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  18. Dependence of Polarimetric Scattering Mechanisms on Land Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, D. K.; Meyer, F.

    2011-03-01

    A method for statistically representing the polarimetric SAR scattering mechanisms of individual land cover classes is introduced and applied to ALOS PALSAR L-band quad-pol data. PALSAR scattering signatures are correlated with land cover classification maps to determine typical scattering mechanisms. The approach utilizes two free, open-source software tools, ESA's PolSARpro and the Alaska Satellite Facility's MapReady Remote Sensing Toolbox as well as Geographic Information System (GIS) tools, to compute the probability density functions of normalized decomposition components for each land cover class.The proposed method provides the ability to compare polarimetric decompositions, investigate scattering mechanisms, detect change in land cover classification, and discover inhomogeneities in the spectral characteristics of individual classes. The approach is first employed to compare the Freeman and Van Zyl three-component decomposition techniques, where the former is shown to introduce many pixels with 100% volume saturation.Ideally, the method yields distinctive scattering peaks for each land cover class with minimal variance in the individual scattering components. However, in some instances, bimodal peaks are found. These are shown to either represent changes between the original land classification and the SAR acquisitions, or the existence of spectral subclasses that were not differentiated in the original classification. Last, the method is used to determine the impact of Polarimetric Orientation Angle (POA) correction on the scattering signatures of urban land cover classes. POA compensation is shown to bring about a significant reduction in the volume scattering component.A method for statistically representing the polarimetric SAR scattering mechanisms of individual land cover classes is introduced and applied to ALOS PALSAR L-band quad-pol data. PALSAR scattering signatures are correlated with land cover classification maps to determine typical

  19. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  20. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  1. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  2. Polarimetric radar characteristics of storms with and without lightning activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattos, Enrique V.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Williams, Earle R.; Albrecht, Rachel I.

    2016-12-01

    This paper analyzes the cloud microphysics in different layers of storms as a function of three-dimensional total lightning density. A mobile X-band polarimetric radar and very high frequency (VHF) sources from Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) observations during the 2011/2012 Brazil spring-summer were used to determine the microphysical signatures of radar vertical profiles and lightning density. This study quantified the behavior of 5.3 million vertical profiles of the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and correlation coefficient (ρHV). The principal changes in the polarimetric variables occurred only for VHF source rate density greater than 14 VHF sources per km2 in 4 min. These storms showed an enhanced positive KDP in the mixed 1 layer (from 0 to -15°C) probably associated with supercooled liquid water signatures, whereas regions with negative ZDR and KDP and moderate ZH in the mixed 2 layer (from -15 to -40°C) were possibly associated with the presence of conical graupel. The glaciated (above -40°C) and upper part of the mixed 2 layers showed a significant trend to negative KDP with an increase in lightning density, in agreement with vertical alignment of ice particle by the cloud electric field. A conceptual model that presents the microphysical signatures in storms with and without lightning activity was constructed. The observations documented in this study provide an understanding of how the combinations of polarimetric variables could help to identify storms with different lightning density and vice versa.

  3. Synthetic chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, M.

    1980-06-01

    The principal function of the chloroplast is to capture solar quanta and to store them in some stable form. We are in the process of trying to construct a totally synthetic system that would simulate some of the reactions of the two photosystems which occur in natural chloroplasts. Toward this end, we have demonstrated a number of the reactions required in separated systems. We have shown that it is possible to transfer electrons across an insulating membrane barrier with a surfactant photosensitizer. Others have shown, and we have confirmed, that it is possible to collect the two electrons necessary for the generation of molecular hydrogen on a heterogeneous catalyst suspended in water and similarly to collect the four holes on another heterogeneous catalyst suspended in water for the generation of molecular oxygen. A synthesis of some of these molecular catalysts for both these purposes is underway, with some partial success. When these partial reactions are assembled in a system, the resulting synthetic chloroplasts will not resemble the natural entity in detailed construction as they will contain no protein.

  4. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  5. Three axis vector atomic magnetometer utilizing polarimetric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Swarupananda

    2016-09-01

    The three axis vector magnetic field measurement based on the interaction of a single elliptically polarized light beam with an atomic system is described. The magnetic field direction dependent atomic responses are extracted by the polarimetric detection in combination with laser frequency modulation and magnetic field modulation techniques. The magnetometer geometry offers additional critical requirements like compact size and large dynamic range for space application. Further, the three axis magnetic field is measured using only the reflected signal (one polarization component) from the polarimeter and thus can be easily expanded to make spatial array of detectors and/or high sensitivity field gradient measurement as required for biomedical application.

  6. Hydrometeor classification using data mining techniques and polarimetric radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berne, A.; Grazioli, J.; Tuia, D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrometeor classification aims at identifying the dominant type of hydrometeors in the sampling volume of a (polarimetric) weather radar. To do so, classical techniques make use of scattering simulations and fuzzy logic. A set of hydrometeor classes must be selected a-priori, and the scattering simulations are used to reproduce radar observations related with each class. Fuzzy logic is eventually used to link actually collected measurements with the simulated sets. With these methods, the number and type of hydrometeor categories undergoing identification is selected arbitrarily, the scattering simulations can be based on unreliable assumptions especially in case of solid particles and the effect of the noise on the measurements is not taken into account. In the present work, we develop a new approach to the classification problem, based on observations instead of scattering simulations. The goal is to provide objective criteria in the selection of the number of hydrometeor classes that can be reliably identified, by looking at how polarimetric observations collected over a set of different precipitation events form clusters in the multi-dimensional space of the polarimetric variables. Additional information is given by the spatial smoothness of the classified fields and by the altitude with respect to the zero degree level. Two polarimetric datasets, collected by an X-band radar are employed in this study. The two datasets cover weather conditions ranging from alpine precipitation collected in the Swiss Alps to Mediterranean orographic events, collected during the special observation period (SOP) 2012 of the HyMeX campaign. The optimal number of clusters is iteratively determined as a trade-off between the spatial smoothness of the classified domains and the complexity of the partitions , using an unsupervised clustering technique based on a correlation metrics. Eight clusters have been identified, 3 of them associated with liquid precipitation, 4 with solid

  7. A Mueller polarimetric imaging system for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laude, Blandine; De Martino, Antonello; Le Naour, Gilles; Genestie, Catherine; Nazac, Andre; Guyot, Steve; Clairac, Bernard; Garcia Caurel, Enric; Drevillon, Bernard; Schwartz, Laurent

    2003-10-01

    We present a new polarimetric imaging system based on liquid crystal modulators, a spectrally filtered white light source and a CCD camera. The whole Mueller matrix image of the sample is measured in around 5 seconds in transmission mode. The instrument design, together with an original and easy-to-operate calibration procedure provides a high accuracy (better than 1.5% for the normalized Mueller matrix) over a wide spectral range. The data can be processed with different algorithms. Results on hepatic biopsies with different grades of fibrosis are presented.

  8. Three axis vector atomic magnetometer utilizing polarimetric technique.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Swarupananda

    2016-09-01

    The three axis vector magnetic field measurement based on the interaction of a single elliptically polarized light beam with an atomic system is described. The magnetic field direction dependent atomic responses are extracted by the polarimetric detection in combination with laser frequency modulation and magnetic field modulation techniques. The magnetometer geometry offers additional critical requirements like compact size and large dynamic range for space application. Further, the three axis magnetic field is measured using only the reflected signal (one polarization component) from the polarimeter and thus can be easily expanded to make spatial array of detectors and/or high sensitivity field gradient measurement as required for biomedical application.

  9. Polarimetric characterisation of histological section of skin with pathological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovira, Ronald H.; Tuzhanskyy, Stanislav Ye.; Pavlov, Sergii V.; Savenkov, Sergii N.; Kolomiets, Ivan S.; Stasenko, Vladyslav A.; Bayas, Marsia M.; Omiotek, Zbigniew; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa; DzierŻak, RóŻa

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the further development of the optical methods based on polarization detection to improve the reliability of the results of evaluation of structural changes in biological tissues. The paper presents an experimental study of tissues with pathological alterations to assess the capacity of differentiation of pathological conditions when using averaged local Mueller matrix elements. Experiments were carried out in direct scattering mode in histological samples of human epidermis. The practical significance of the results is the widespread application of the methodology for laser polarimetric analysis of structural changes in anisotropic tissues to identify and assess the degree of pathology in medical diagnosis of skin diseases.

  10. Quad-Polarimetric SAR for Detection and Characterization of Icebergs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, V.; Brekke, C.; Doulgeris, A. P.; Storvold, R.; Silvertsen, A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of fully polarimetric SAR data in iceberg detection and characterization. The study aims to explore the potential of RADARSAT- 2 SAR data to detect icebergs and growlers in Svalbard that have broken off from the glaciers nearby. To be able to detect iceberg/growlers in a SAR image, a significant contrast between iceberg and background clutter is required. The sublook cross-correlation magnitude (SCM) is extracted from the complex cross-correlation between subapeture images and contrast between iceberg and sea clutter is measured. The results of target-to-clutter ratio from the SCM indicate that the sublook analysis has an impact on detection performance.

  11. Spatially-Resolved System for Polarimetric Measurements at Subwavelength Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-24

    8217 Cj>a:: .. nao .-. ic lie "•eepe no.eve-t ippei :can-«i see be c.-. \\ stepoe: TOIO- :Uje j-" rr-lri-je. Elecii ca conntctor: seep 32’ \\ ::eppe...involve performing near-field tomographic reconstruction, measuring low refractive index contrast materials , measuring the polarimetric response of...field tomography: The fields from an NSOM scan penetrate a finite depth into the material , giving one the ability to see structures below the surface of

  12. Atmospheric correction for ocean spectra retrievals from high-altitude multi-angle, multi-spectral photo-polarimetric remote sensing observations: Results for coastal ocean waters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, J.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Cairns, B.; Wasilewski, A. P.; McCubbin, I.

    2015-12-01

    A major challenge for spaceborne observations of ocean color is to correct for atmospheric scattering, which typically contributes ≥85% to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance and varies substantially with aerosols. Ocean color missions traditionally analyze TOA radiance in the near-infrared (NIR), where the ocean is black, to constrain the TOA atmospheric scattering in the visible (VIS). However, this procedure is limited by insufficient sensitivity of NIR radiance to absorption and vertical distribution of aerosols, and by uncertainties in the extrapolation of aerosol properties from the NIR to the VIS.To improve atmospheric correction for ocean color observations, one needs to change the traditional procedure for this correction and/or increase the aerosol information. The instruments proposed to increase the aerosol information content for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission include ultraviolet and Oxygen A-band observations, as well as multispectral and multiangle polarimetry. However few systematic studies have been performed to quantify the improvement such measurements bring to atmospheric correction. To study the polarimetric atmospheric correction capabilities of PACE-like instruments, we conducted field experiments off the Coast of California to obtain high-altitude (65,000 ft) and ship-based observations of water-leaving radiance. The airborne data sets consist of hyperspectral radiance between 380-2500 nm by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, and multi-spectral multi-angle polarimetric data between 410-2250 nm by the Research Scanning Polarimeter. We discuss examples of retrieved atmosphere and ocean state vectors, and of corresponding ocean color spectra obtained by subtracting the computed atmospheric scattering contribution from the high-altitude radiance measurements. The ocean color spectra thus obtained are compared with those measured from the ship.

  13. L-Band Polarimetric InSAR Observations of Greenland Ice Sheets using ALOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Zebker, H.

    2008-12-01

    The ALOS PALSAR instrument has acquired L-band (23.6 cm wavelength) fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations of Greenland with 10 meter single-look resolution. We examine images from a strip in northern Greenland extending from latitudes of 75 degrees N to 80 degrees N, which covers the dry snow, percolation, and wet snow zones of the Greenland ice sheet, as well as the rocky coastal area. Images for repeat-pass interferometry with a 350 meter baseline were acquired at a 46 day interval in March and April 2007. The images from the two dates are coregistered by cross-correlating the HH observations, and we observe fringes in all polarizations in the dry snow, percolation, and wet snow zones, and also in the stable parts of the rocky coastal area. In the dry snow zone of inner Greenland, we observe significantly higher coherence in the HH-HH interferograms (around 0.7) compared to the HV-HV interferograms (around 0.4), and similarly higher coherence in the VV-VV interferogram compared to the VH-VH interferogram. These differences between co-polarized and cross-polarized signals result from volume scattering and lower SNR in the cross-polarized channels. They indicate that scalar models do not fully describe L-band microwave scattering from firn. On each observation date, the phase difference between the HH and the HV returns is almost constant over the dry snow zone of the interior of Greenland. However, there is significant variability in the phase difference between HH and HV returns closer to the coast. The phase difference between the VV and VH returns shows similar behavior, again indicating a difference between co-polarized and cross-polarized scattering mechanisms. We derive polarization signatures for the various scattering regions in the Greenland ice sheets to better understand the scattering mechanisms involved. We model the firn in the dry snow zone as a layered medium with rough interfaces between the layers, and we use the

  14. Phase of Target Scattering for Wetland Characterization using Polarimetric C-Band SAR

    SciTech Connect

    Touzi, R; Deschamps, Mireille C; Rother, Gernot

    2009-09-01

    Wetlands continue to be under threat, and there is a major need for mapping and monitoring wetlands for better management and protection of these sensitive areas. Only a few studies have been published on wetland characterization using polarimetric synthetic aperture radars (SARs). The most successful results have been obtained using the phase difference between HH and VV polarizations, phi{sub HH} - phi{sub VV}, which has shown promise for separating flooded wetland classes. Recently, we have introduced a new decomposition, the Touzi decomposition, which describes target scattering type in terms of a complex entity, the symmetric scattering type. Huynen's target helicity is used to assess the symmetric nature of target scattering. In this paper, the new complex-scattering-type parameters, the magnitude alphas and phase Phi{sub alpha} s, are investigated for wetland characterization. The use of the dominant-scattering-type phase Phi{sub alpha} s makes it possible to discriminate shrub bogs from poor (sedge or shrub) fens. These two classes cannot be separated using phi{sub HH} - phi{sub VV}, or the radiometric scattering information provided by alphas, the Cloude alpha, the entropy H, and the multipolarization HH-HV-VV channels. phi{sub alpha} s, which cannot detect deep (45 cm below the peat surface) water flow in a bog, is more sensitive to the shallower (10-20-cm) fen beneath water, and this makes possible the separation of poor fens from shrub bogs. Phi{sub alpha} s also permits the discrimination of conifer-dominated treed bog from upland deciduous forest under leafy conditions. Target helicity information is exploited to introduce a new parameter, the target asymmetry. The latter is shown very promising for detection of forest changes between leafy and no-leaf conditions. The analysis of low-entropy marsh scattering showed that both the scattering-type magnitude and phas- - e alphas and Phi{sub alpha} s, respectively, as well as the maximum polarization

  15. Ultrawideband synthetic vision sensor for airborne wire detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Robert J.; Larrick, J. F.; Cade, Jeffrey E.; Rivers, Eugene P., Jr.

    1998-07-01

    A low cost, miniature ultra wideband (UWB) radar has demonstrated the ability to detect suspended wires and other small obstacles at distances exceeding several hundred feet using an average output power of less than 10 microwatts. Originally developed as a high precision UWB radar altimeter for the Navy's Program Executive Office for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Cruise Missiles, an improved sensitivity version was recently developed for the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC Dahlgren Division) as part of the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory's Hummingbird program for rotary wing platforms. Utilizing a short pulse waveform of approximately 2.5 nanoseconds in duration, the receiver processor exploits the leading edge of the radar return pulse to achieve range resolutions of less than one foot. The resultant 400 MHz bandwidth spectrum produces both a broad frequency excitation for enhanced detection, as well as a low probability of intercept and detection (LPI/D) signature for covert applications. This paper describes the design and development of the ultra wideband sensor, as well as performance results achieved during field testing at NSWC's Dahlgren, VA facility. These results are compared with those achieved with a high resolution EHF radar and a laser-based detection system.

  16. Synthetic Brainbows

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Y.; Otsuna, H.; Hansen, C.

    2014-01-01

    Brainbow is a genetic engineering technique that randomly colorizes cells. Biological samples processed with this technique and imaged with confocal microscopy have distinctive colors for individual cells. Complex cellular structures can then be easily visualized. However, the complexity of the Brainbow technique limits its applications. In practice, most confocal microscopy scans use different florescence staining with typically at most three distinct cellular structures. These structures are often packed and obscure each other in rendered images making analysis difficult. In this paper, we leverage a process known as GPU framebuffer feedback loops to synthesize Brainbow-like images. In addition, we incorporate ID shuffing and Monte-Carlo sampling into our technique, so that it can be applied to single-channel confocal microscopy data. The synthesized Brainbow images are presented to domain experts with positive feedback. A user survey demonstrates that our synthetic Brainbow technique improves visualizations of volume data with complex structures for biologists. PMID:25018576

  17. Synthetic Botany.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Christian R; Pollak, Bernardo; Purswani, Nuri; Patron, Nicola; Haseloff, Jim

    2017-02-28

    Plants are attractive platforms for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. Plants' modular and plastic body plans, capacity for photosynthesis, extensive secondary metabolism, and agronomic systems for large-scale production make them ideal targets for genetic reprogramming. However, efforts in this area have been constrained by slow growth, long life cycles, the requirement for specialized facilities, a paucity of efficient tools for genetic manipulation, and the complexity of multicellularity. There is a need for better experimental and theoretical frameworks to understand the way genetic networks, cellular populations, and tissue-wide physical processes interact at different scales. We highlight new approaches to the DNA-based manipulation of plants and the use of advanced quantitative imaging techniques in simple plant models such as Marchantia polymorpha. These offer the prospects of improved understanding of plant dynamics and new approaches to rational engineering of plant traits.

  18. Linear polarizer local characterizations by polarimetric imaging for applications to polarimetric sensors for torque measurement for hybrid cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, F.; Remouche, M.; Meyrueis, P.

    2011-06-01

    Usually manufacturer's specifications do not deal with the ability of linear sheet polarizers to have a constant transmittance function over their geometric area. These parameters are fundamental for developing low cost polarimetric sensors(for instance rotation, torque, displacement) specifically for hybrid car (thermic + electricity power). It is then necessary to specially characterize commercial polarizers sheets to find if they are adapted to this kind of applications. In this paper, we present measuring methods and bench developed for this purpose, and some preliminary characterization results. We state conclusions for effective applications to hybrid car gearbox control and monitoring.

  19. Classification of Forest Regrowth Stage using Polarimetric Decomposition and Foliage Projective Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clewley, D.; Lucas, R.; Bunting, P.; Moghaddam, M.

    2012-12-01

    Within Queensland, Australia extensive clearing of vegetation for agriculture has occurred within the Brigalow Belt Bioregion (BBB), reducing forests dominated by Acacia harpophylla (brigalow) to 10 % of their former extent. Where cleared land is left abandoned or unmanaged regeneration is rapid, Regenerating vegetation represents a more efficient and cost effective method for carbon sequestration than direct planting and offers a number of benefits over plantation forest, particularly in terms of provision of habitat for native fauna. To effectively protect regenerating vegetation, maps of the distribution of forests at different stages of regeneration are required. Whilst mapping approaches have traditionally focused on optical data, the high canopy cover of brigalow regrowth in all but the very early stages limits discrimination of forests at different stages of growth. The combination of optical data, namely Landsat derived Foliage Projective Cover (FPC) and Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) backscatter data have previously been investigated for mapping regrowth. This study therefore aimed to investigate the potential of the alpha-Entropy (α/H) decomposition (S Cloude and E Pottier, "An entropy based classification scheme for land applications of polarimetric SAR," 1997, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 68-78) applied to polarimetric ALOS PALSAR backscatter for mapping regrowth stage combined with FPC data to account for canopy variations. The study focused on the Tara Downs subregion, located in the Western Darling Downs, within the south of the BBB. PALSAR data were acquired over the study site in fully-polarimetric mode (incidence angle mid swath ~ 26 degrees). From these data α/H layers were generated and stacked with FPC data. Considering only those areas known to contain brigalow prior to clearing and with an FPC > 9 %, k-means clustering was applied, with

  20. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  1. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 3: AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the third containing summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  2. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 2: TIMS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, Vincent J. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the second volume of the summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in volume 3; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume.

  3. Summaries of the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 1: AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the preliminary agenda and summaries for the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, on 1-5 June 1992. This main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on June 1 and 2; (2) the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on June 3; and (3) the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on June 4 and 5. The summaries are contained in Volumes 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

  4. Summaries of the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 3: AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the preliminary agenda and summaries for the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, on 1-5 June 1992. This main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on June 1 and 2; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on June 3; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2; and (3) the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on June 4 and 5; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3.

  5. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 1: AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the first of three containing summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  6. Summaries of the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 2: TIMS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, Vincent J. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the preliminary agenda and summaries for the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, on 1-5 June 1992. This main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on June 1 and 2; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on June 3; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2; and (3) the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on June 4 and 5; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3.

  7. Summaries of the 4th Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 1: AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Fourth Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held in Washington, D. C. October 25-29, 1993 The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, October 25-26 (the summaries for this workshop appear in this volume, Volume 1); The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TMIS) workshop, on October 27 (the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2); and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, October 28-29 (the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3).

  8. Summaries of the 4th Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 2: TIMS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, Vincent J. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This is volume 2 of a three volume set of publications that contain the summaries for the Fourth Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held in Washington, D.C. on October 25-29, 1993. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on October 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1. The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on October 27. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2. The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on October 28-29. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3.

  9. Summaries of the 4th Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 3: AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Fourth Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held in Washington, D.C. on October 25-29, 1993. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on October 25-26, whose summaries appear in Volume 1; The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on October 27, whose summaries appear in Volume 2; and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on October 28-29, whose summaries appear in this volume, Volume 3.

  10. Determining index of refraction from polarimetric hyperspectral radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jacob A.; Gross, Kevin C.

    2015-09-01

    Polarimetric hyperspectral imaging (P-HSI) combines two of the most common remote sensing modalities. This work leverages the combination of these techniques to improve material classification. Classifying and identifying materials requires parameters which are invariant to changing viewing conditions, and most often a material's reflectivity or emissivity is used. Measuring these most often requires assumptions be made about the material and atmospheric conditions. Combining both polarimetric and hyperspectral imaging, we propose a method to remotely estimate the index of refraction of a material. In general, this is an underdetermined problem because both the real and imaginary components of index of refraction are unknown at every spectral point. By modeling the spectral variation of the index of refraction using a few parameters, however, the problem can be made overdetermined. A number of different functions can be used to describe this spectral variation, and some are discussed here. Reducing the number of spectral parameters to fit allows us to add parameters which estimate atmospheric downwelling radiance and transmittance. Additionally, the object temperature is added as a fit parameter. The set of these parameters that best replicate the measured data is then found using a bounded Nelder-Mead simplex search algorithm. Other search algorithms are also examined and discussed. Results show that this technique has promise but also some limitations, which are the subject of ongoing work.

  11. Photometric and polarimetric observations and model simulations of (216) Kleopatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Shinokawa, K.; Yoshida, F.; Mukai, T.; Ip, W. H.; Kawabata, K.

    2004-10-01

    We performed photometric and polarimetric observations, on November 8 and 9, 1999, of an M-type main belt asteroid, (216) Kleopatra by using the HBS spectropolarimeter installed at Dodaira observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). Photometric amplitude of lightcurve in the V band was 0.12 mag, and the averaged degree of polarization was -1.01±0.1%. It seems that the polarimetric data might also show a slight change in the degree of polarization ( ~0.2%) at the second minimum of the photometric lightcurve, but we could not confirm that the feature was real because of the large errors of data. With the assumption that the surface is uniform, we have carried out lightcurve simulations based on shape models by Ostro et al. (2000), Tanga et al. (2001) and Roche binary (Cellino et al., 1985). The results of simulations were compared to the configurations of lightcurves which had been obtained at different 4 geometric positions (1980, 1982, 1987 and 1999). The model by Cellino et al. (1985) reproduced almost all the data points without the 1987 observations within ~0.05 mag., which is the best result among the 3 models. The model by Tanga et al. (2001) well reproduced the lightcurves, but failed in reproducing the 1982 amplitude (difference Δdiff ~ 0 2 mag.). We also confirmed that the model by Ostro et al. (2000) could not explain the observed lightcurves.

  12. A high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope for tissue characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ji; Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    The contrast mechanism of medical endoscopy is mainly based on metrics of optical intensity and wavelength. As another fundamental property of light, polarization can not only reveal tissue scattering and absorption information from a different perspective, but can also provide insight into directional tissue birefringence properties to monitor pathological changes in collagen and elastin. Here we demonstrate a low cost wide field high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope with minimal alterations to a rigid endoscope. We show that this novel endoscopic imaging modality is able to provide a number of image contrast mechanisms besides traditional unpolarized radiation intensity, including linear depolarization, circular depolarization, cross-polarization, directional birefringence and dichroism. This enhances tissue features of interest, and additionally reveals tissue micro-structure and composition, which is of central importance for tissue diagnosis and image guidance for surgery. The potential applications of the Mueller polarimetric endoscope include wide field early epithelial cancer diagnosis, surgical margin detection and energy-based tissue fusion monitoring, and could further benefit a wide range of endoscopic investigations through intra-operative guidance.

  13. Polarimetric scattering behavior of rough dielectric materials at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digiovanni, David Anthony

    Technologies in the terahertz region of the spectrum are finding increased usage in areas such as communications, remote sensing, and imaging, For example, driven by the promise of greater data transfer rates, free-space communication that traditionally operate in the radio and microwave bands are being developed at terahertz frequencies. Successful transition of communication systems to higher frequencies, particularly for systems located in indoor or urban environments, will require a thorough understanding of the reflection, transmission, absorption, and scattering behavior of a wide variety of materials and surface types. Scattering properties of rough surfaces have been studied extensively at radio and microwave frequencies, however, such properties have only recently become of interest at higher frequencies. The goal of this thesis was to develop a better understanding of electromagnetic scattering from dielectric rough surfaces at millimeter wavelengths and terahertz frequencies. This goal was achieved by measuring the polarimetric scattering behavior of dielectric materials and comparing the measured data to predictions made by rough surface scattering theory. The dielectric properties and the roughness of the samples were tailored in order to provide a controlled parameter space to investigate. Fully polarimetric radar imagery of the rough surfaces were acquired at 160 GHz, 240 GHz, and 1.55 THz. The backscattering measurements were collected as a function of polarization, incident angle, and frequency. The applicability of various rough surface scattering theories was determined for the different roughness regimes studied.

  14. A high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope for tissue characterisation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ji; Elson, Daniel S

    2016-05-12

    The contrast mechanism of medical endoscopy is mainly based on metrics of optical intensity and wavelength. As another fundamental property of light, polarization can not only reveal tissue scattering and absorption information from a different perspective, but can also provide insight into directional tissue birefringence properties to monitor pathological changes in collagen and elastin. Here we demonstrate a low cost wide field high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope with minimal alterations to a rigid endoscope. We show that this novel endoscopic imaging modality is able to provide a number of image contrast mechanisms besides traditional unpolarized radiation intensity, including linear depolarization, circular depolarization, cross-polarization, directional birefringence and dichroism. This enhances tissue features of interest, and additionally reveals tissue micro-structure and composition, which is of central importance for tissue diagnosis and image guidance for surgery. The potential applications of the Mueller polarimetric endoscope include wide field early epithelial cancer diagnosis, surgical margin detection and energy-based tissue fusion monitoring, and could further benefit a wide range of endoscopic investigations through intra-operative guidance.

  15. A high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope for tissue characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ji; Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    The contrast mechanism of medical endoscopy is mainly based on metrics of optical intensity and wavelength. As another fundamental property of light, polarization can not only reveal tissue scattering and absorption information from a different perspective, but can also provide insight into directional tissue birefringence properties to monitor pathological changes in collagen and elastin. Here we demonstrate a low cost wide field high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope with minimal alterations to a rigid endoscope. We show that this novel endoscopic imaging modality is able to provide a number of image contrast mechanisms besides traditional unpolarized radiation intensity, including linear depolarization, circular depolarization, cross-polarization, directional birefringence and dichroism. This enhances tissue features of interest, and additionally reveals tissue micro-structure and composition, which is of central importance for tissue diagnosis and image guidance for surgery. The potential applications of the Mueller polarimetric endoscope include wide field early epithelial cancer diagnosis, surgical margin detection and energy-based tissue fusion monitoring, and could further benefit a wide range of endoscopic investigations through intra-operative guidance. PMID:27173145

  16. Polarimetric Radar and Electric Field Observations of a Multicell Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, E. C.; Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Schuur, T.; Straka, J.; Krehbiel, P.; Rison, W.

    2004-12-01

    Much prior thunderstorm electrification research uses one-dimensional analyses of vertical profiles of the thunderstorm electric field, often incorporating cloud-to-ground lighting strike data and radar reflectivity observations. New instrumentation has provided the opportunity to investigate thunderstorm electrification and lightning in greater spatial detail. We present data from the late stages of a multicellular storm occurring on 28-29 June 2004 during the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX) field program in central Oklahoma. Three-dimensional (3-D) vector electric field (measured by balloon sounding), total lighting mapping, and polarimetric radar are utilized. The maximum measured electric field exceeded -150 kV m-1. Preliminary charge analysis using the electric field vectors indicates a positive layer below 0\\deg C, followed by a large negative layer just above the melting level. Another positive and negative layer follow this. Polarimetric radar signatures within the melting layer are examined in the context of the electric field observations. Mapped lightning flashes are used to clarify and support the inferred charge structure. An interactive 3-D display is used to combine these data sources. Temporal evolution of the storm is also considered.

  17. Modeling atmospheric precipitation impact on synthetic aperture radar imagery at X and Ka bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Saverio; Polverari, Federica; Pulvirenti, Luca; Montopoli, Mario; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Marzano, Frank S.

    2014-10-01

    Spaceborne synthetic aperture radars (SARs) operating at X-band and above allow observations of Earth surface at very high spatial resolution. Moreover, recent polarimetric SARs enable the complete characterization of target scattering and extinction properties. Nowadays several spaceborne X-band SAR systems are operative, and plans exist for systems operating at higher frequency bands (i.e. Ku, Ka and W). Although higher frequencies may have interesting and distinctive applications, atmospheric effects, especially in precipitating conditions, may affect the surface SAR response in both the signal amplitude and its phase, as assessed by numerous works in the last years. A valid tool to analyze and characterize the SAR response in these conditions is represented by forward modeling, where a known synthetic scenario, which is described by user-selected surface and atmospheric conditions, is considered. Thus, the SAR echoes corresponding to the synthetic scenarios are simulated using electromagnetic models. In this work a 3-D realistic polarimetric SAR response numerical simulator is presented. The proposed model framework accounts for the SAR slant observing geometry and it is able to characterize the polarimetric response both in amplitude and phase. In this work we have considered both X and Ka bands, thus exploring the atmospheric effects for the present and future polarimetric systems. The atmospheric conditions are simulated using the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) which is an high-resolution mesoscale model. SAM is used to define the three-dimensional distribution of hydrometeors which are among the inputs used in the Hydrometeor Ensemble Scattering Simulator (HESS) T-Matrix which allow simulating the SAR signal due to the atmospheric component. The SAR surface component is, instead, simulated by a Semi Empirical Model (SEM) for bare-soils conditions and SEAWIND2 two-scale model for ocean surfaces. The proposed methodology has been applied in this work

  18. Airborne Intercept Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Primary mirror of Zerodur with Pilkington 747 coating • FOV = 0.104 degrees Airborne Intercept Monitoring RTO-MP-SET-105 16 - 3 UNCLASSIFIED...Pointing System (SPS). The STS is a 0.75 meter aperture Mersenne Cassegrain telescope and the SAT is a 0.34 meter aperture 3- mirror anastigmat telescope...UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED • Air Flow to Mitigate Thermal “Seeing” Effects • Light weighted primary mirror to reduce mass The SAT

  19. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  20. Airborne Infrared Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.

    2017-01-01

    A unique program of infrared astronomical observations from aircraft evolved at NASA’s Ames Research Center, beginning in the 1960s. Telescopes were flown on a Convair 990, a Lear Jet, and a Lockheed C-141 - the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) - leading to the planning and development of SOFIA: a 2.7 m telescope now flying on a Boeing 747SP. The poster describes these telescopes and highlights of some of the scientific results obtained from them.

  1. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D [Menan, ID; Schmitt, Michael J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Warren F [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  2. Ground truth measurement for the analysis of airborne SAR data recorded over Oberpfaffenhofen, FRG, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayer, T.; Wieneke, F.; Winter, R.

    1990-01-01

    As a preliminary investigation to the joint multiparameter SIR-C/X-SAR shuttle experiment of NASA/JPL (USA), DLR (FRG), and PSN (Italy) which is scheduled for the year 1992 an airborne SAR campaign was conducted over Oberpfaffenhofen, FRG, in August 1989. Primarily this campaign was planned to test and verify equipment and algorithms developed at the DLR to calibrate multifrequency polarimetric SAR data. Oberpfaffenhofen is designated as one of the super test sites for the SIR-C/X-SAR experiment which will be imaged under all circumstances except severe mission errors. A super test site drives radar parameters and look directions and the recorded SAR data will be calibrated. In addition ancillary data will be available for the site. During the airborne STAR campaign conducted in the week of August 14th 1989 various sensor types were used to record remote sensing data over the calibration test site and its vicinity: the polarimetric DC-8 JPL-SAR (P-, L-, C-band), the DLR airborne SAR (C-, X-band), color infrared aerial photography (DLR), and the truck-mounted scatterometer (C- and X-band) of the Institute for Navigation, University of Stuttgart (INS). Because of this variety of different sensor types used and out of the fact that sufficiently large forested and agriculturally used areas were planned to be covered by these sensors, the interest of several German research groups involved in investigations concerning SAR land applications arose. The following groups carried out different ground-truth measurements: University of Bonn, Institute for plant cultivation (plant morphology and moisture content); University of Braunschweig, Institute for Geography (soil moisture and surface roughness); University of Freiburg, Institute for Geography (dielectric soil properties, landuse); and University of Munich, Institute for Geography (landuse inventory, plant, surface, and soil parameters). This paper presents the joint ground truth activities of the Institute for Geography

  3. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  4. Near-infrared active polarimetric and multispectral laboratory demonstrator for target detection.

    PubMed

    Alouini, Mehdi; Goudail, François; Grisard, Arnaud; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Dolfi, Daniel; Bénière, Arnaud; Baarstad, Ivar; Løke, Trond; Kaspersen, Peter; Normandin, Xavier; Berginc, Gerard

    2009-03-10

    We report on the design and exploitation of a real-field laboratory demonstrator combining active polarimetric and multispectral functions. Its building blocks, including a multiwavelength pulsed optical parametric oscillator at the emission side and a hyperspectral imager with polarimetric capability at the reception side, are described. The results obtained with this demonstrator are illustrated on some examples and discussed. In particular it is found that good detection performances rely on joint use of intensity and polarimetric images, with these images exhibiting complementary signatures in most cases.

  5. Object recognition by use of polarimetric phase-shifting digital holography.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takanori; Javidi, Bahram

    2007-08-01

    Pattern recognition by use of polarimetric phase-shifting digital holography is presented. Using holography, the amplitude distribution and phase difference distribution between two orthogonal polarizations of three-dimensional (3D) or two-dimensional phase objects are obtained. This information contains both complex amplitude and polarimetric characteristics of the object, and it can be used for improving the discrimination capability of object recognition. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the idea. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D polarimetric recognition of objects using digital holography.

  6. Phenomenology Studies Using a Scanning Fully Polarimetric Passive W-Band Millimeter Wave Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kelly, James F.; Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Hall, Thomas E.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2011-05-01

    We present experimental results obtained from a scanning passive W-band fully polarimetric imager. In addition to a conventional approach to polarimetric image analysis in which the Stokes I, Q, U, and V images were formed and displayed, we present an alternative method for polarimetric image exploitation based upon multivariate image analysis (MIA). MIA uses principal component analysis (PCA) and 2D scatter or score plots to identify various pixel classes in the image compared with the more conventional scene-based image analysis approaches. Multivariate image decomposition provides a window into the complementary interplay between spatial and statistical correlations contained in the data.

  7. REMOVAL OF SPECTRO-POLARIMETRIC FRINGES BY TWO-DIMENSIONAL PATTERN RECOGNITION

    SciTech Connect

    Casini, R.; Judge, P. G.; Schad, T. A.

    2012-09-10

    We present a pattern-recognition-based approach to the problem of the removal of polarized fringes from spectro-polarimetric data. We demonstrate that two-dimensional principal component analysis can be trained on a given spectro-polarimetric map in order to identify and isolate fringe structures from the spectra. This allows us, in principle, to reconstruct the data without the fringe component, providing an effective and clean solution to the problem. The results presented in this paper point in the direction of revising the way that science and calibration data should be planned for a typical spectro-polarimetric observing run.

  8. Classification of High Resolution C-Band PolSAR Data Based on Polarimetric and Texture Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Feng, Qi; Li, Lan

    2014-11-01

    PolSAR image classification is an important technique in the remote sensing area. For high resolution PolSAR image, polarimetric and texture features are equally important for the high resolution PolSAR image classification. The texture features are mainly extracted through Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) method, but this method has some deficiencies. First, GLCM method can only work on gray-scale images; Secondly, the number of texture features extracted by GLCM method is generally up dozens, or even hundreds. Too many features may exist larger redundancy and will increase the complexity of classification. Therefore, this paper introduces a new texture feature factor-RK that derived from PolSAR image non-Gaussian statistic model. Using the domestic airborne C-band PolSAR image data, we completed classification combined the polarization and texture characteristics. The results showed that this new texture feature factor-RK can overcome the above drawbacks and can achieve same performance compared with GLCM method.

  9. Synthetic Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2017-01-01

    "Are we alone?" is one of the primary questions of astrobiology, and whose answer defines our significance in the universe. Unfortunately, this quest is hindered by the fact that we have only one confirmed example of life, that of earth. While this is enormously helpful in helping to define the minimum envelope for life, it strains credulity to imagine that life, if it arose multiple times, has not taken other routes. To help fill this gap, our lab has begun using synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - as an enabling technology. One theme, the "Hell Cell" project, focuses on creating artificial extremophiles in order to push the limits for Earth life, and to understand how difficult it is for life to evolve into extreme niches. In another project, we are re-evolving biotic functions using only the most thermodynamically stable amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids.

  10. Synthetic Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    'Are we alone?' is one of the primary questions of astrobiology, and whose answer defines our significance in the universe. Unfortunately, this quest is hindered by the fact that we have only one confirmed example of life, that of earth. While this is enormously helpful in helping to define the minimum envelope for life, it strains credulity to imagine that life, if it arose multiple times, has not taken other routes. To help fill this gap, our lab has begun using synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - as an enabling technology. One theme, the "Hell Cell" project, focuses on creating artificial extremophiles in order to push the limits for Earth life, and to understand how difficult it is for life to evolve into extreme niches. In another project, we are re-evolving biotic functions using only the most thermodynamically stable amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids.

  11. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  12. Multiwaveband polarimetric observations of NRAO 530 on parsec-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Feng, S.-W.

    2010-10-01

    We report on Very Long Baseline Array polarimetric observations of NRAO 530 at 5, 8, 15, 22 and 43 GHz made during one week in 1997 February. We present the total intensity, the fractional polarization and the electric vector position angle (EVPA) distributions at all these frequencies. A model fitting has been performed to the full polarization visibility data. From this, the fitted southernmost component A is confirmed as the core of the radio structure with relatively high brightness temperature and hard spectrum between 15 and 43 GHz in comparison with the central component B of dominant flux. The relatively high degree of polarization for the component A may arise from its complex radio structure, which can be resolved at 86 GHz. In contrast, the component B shows a well-fitted power-law spectrum with a spectral index of about -0.5 (f ~ να), and a linear correlation between EVPAs and wavelength square with an observed rotation measure of about -1062 rad m-2, indicating its structural singleness. Assuming that the component B has a comparable degree of polarization without depolarization at these frequencies, the decrease in fractional polarization with wavelength mainly results from opacity and Faraday rotation, in which the opacity plays quite a large role. A spine-sheath-like structure in fractional polarization (m) is detected, covering almost the whole emission region at 5 and 8 GHz, with a degree of polarization relatively low along the jet spine, becoming higher towards two sides of the jet. The linear polarization at 5 GHz shows three separate polarized emission regions with alternately aligned and orthogonal polarization vectors down the jet. The polarization goes to zero between the top two regions, with the highest polarization level occurring at the top and bottom. The 5- and 8-GHz images show EVPA changes across the width of the jet as well as along the jet. These complex polarimetric properties can be explained in terms of either the presence of

  13. Hydrometeor classification from polarimetric radar measurements: a clustering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioli, Jacopo; Tuia, Devis; Berne, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Hydrometeor classification is the process that aims at identifying the dominant type of hydrometeor (e.g. rain, hail, snow aggregates, hail, graupel, ice crystals) in a domain covered by a polarimetric weather radar during precipitation. The techniques documented in the literature are mostly based on numerical simulations and fuzzy logic. This involves the arbitrary selection of a set of hydrometeor classes and the numerical simulation of theoretical radar observations associated to each class. The information derived from the simulation is then applied to actual radar measurements by means of fuzzy logic input-output association. This approach has some limitations: the number and type of the hydrometeor categories undergoing identification is selected arbitrarily and the scattering simulations are based on constraining assumptions, especially in case of solid hydrometeors. Furthermore, in presence of noise and uncertainties, it is not guaranteed that the selected hydrometeor classes can be effectively identified in actual observations. In the present work we propose a different starting point for the classification task, which is based on observations instead of numerical simulations. We provide criteria for the selection of the number of hydrometeor classes that can be identified, by looking at how polarimetric observations collected over different precipitation events form clusters in the multi-dimensional space of the polarimetric variables. Two datasets, collected by an X-band weather radar, are employed in the study. The first dataset covers mountainous weather conditions (Swiss Alps), while the second includes Mediterranean orographic precipitation events collected during the special observation period (SOP) 2012 of the HyMeX campaign. We employ an unsupervised hierarchical clustering method to group the observations into clusters and we introduce a spatial smoothness constraint for the groups, assuming that the hydrometeor type changes smoothly in space

  14. Supervised Classification Method with Efficient Filter Techniques to Detect Anomalies on Earthen Levees Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marapareddy, Ramakalavathi; Anastoos, James V.; Younan, Nicolas H.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of surface and subsurface water events can lead to slope instability resulting in slough slides or other anomalies on earthen levees. These slough slides are the primary cause for creating levee areas which are vulnerable to seepage and failure during high water events. Early detection of these anomalies by a remote sensing approach could save time versus direct assessment. In this paper, we implemented a supervised classification algorithm the minimum distance classifier with a majority filter and morphology filter for the identification of anomalies on levees using polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (polSAR) data. This study employed remote sensing data from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) instrument, using its fully quad-polarimetric L-band polSAR data. The study area is a section of the lower Mississippi River in the southern USA.

  15. Camouflaged target separation by spectral-polarimetric imagery fusion with shearlet transform and clustering segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pu-cheng; Liu, Cun-chao

    2013-08-01

    Camouflaged targets detection in complex background is a challenging problem. Spectral-polarimetric imaging can offers spectral information and polarization information from the objects in the scene. Fusion of the spectral and polarization information in the images will result in better camouflaged target identification and recognition. In this paper a novel spectral-polarimetric image fusion algorithm based on Shearlet transform is proposed. Firstly, every polarimetric image in each wave band is decomposed into images of low frequency components and high frequency components by Shearlet transform. Then, the fused low frequency approximate coefficients are obtained with weighted average method, and the fused high frequency coefficients are obtained with area-based feature selection method, so features and details from different spectral-polarimetric images are fused successfully. After that, the kernel fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is used for camouflaged object separation from its background. Experimental results have shown that better identification performance was achieved.

  16. Automatic Low-Cost Data Acquisition from Old Polarimetric Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; D'Aliberti, Santi; Coppolino, Salvatore; Villari, Antonino; Micali, Norberto

    2005-03-01

    This article describes the design of an apparatus that allows the digital acquisition of polarimetric data from a Lippich polarimeter. This apparatus consists of a low-cost telecamera applied to the ocular of a double-field polarimeter and connected to a PC. The camera is able to reveal with high sensibility the difference in brightness in the two fields allowing more accurate analytical data to be obtained, without need for the analyser to be rotated. This apparatus allows the execution of either single observations or kinetics, because it is able to save previously obtained analytical data. Experimental tests of the apparatus were performed by measuring the rotation angle of solutions of ( )-adrenaline and by following the kinetics of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose.

  17. Optical encryption using photon-counting polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Maluenda, David; Carnicer, Artur; Martínez-Herrero, Rosario; Juvells, Ignasi; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-01-26

    We present a polarimetric-based optical encoder for image encryption and verification. A system for generating random polarized vector keys based on a Mach-Zehnder configuration combined with translucent liquid crystal displays in each path of the interferometer is developed. Polarization information of the encrypted signal is retrieved by taking advantage of the information provided by the Stokes parameters. Moreover, photon-counting model is used in the encryption process which provides data sparseness and nonlinear transformation to enhance security. An authorized user with access to the polarization keys and the optical design variables can retrieve and validate the photon-counting plain-text. Optical experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the encryption method.

  18. K-distribution and polarimetric terrain radar clutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.; Kong, J. A.; Jao, J. K.; Shin, R. T.; Novak, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    A multivariate K-distribution is proposed to model the statistics of fully polarimetric radar data from earth terrain with polarizations HH, HV, VH, and VV. In this approach, correlated polarizations of radar signals, as characterized by a covariance matrix, are treated as the sum of N n-dimensional random vectors; N obeys the negative binomial distribution with a parameter alpha and mean N-bar. Subsequently, an n-dimensional K-distribution, with either zero or nonzero mean, is developed in the limit of infinite N-bar or illuminated area. The probability density function (PDF) of the K-distributed vector normalized by its Euclidean norm is independent of the parameter alpha and is the same as that derived from a zero-mean Gaussian-distributed random vector.

  19. Enhanced material classification using turbulence-degraded polarimetric imagery.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Milo W; Schmidt, Jason D; Havrilla, Michael J; Cain, Stephen C

    2010-11-01

    An enhanced material-classification algorithm using turbulence-degraded polarimetric imagery is presented. The proposed technique improves upon an existing dielectric/metal material-classification algorithm by providing a more detailed object classification. This is accomplished by redesigning the degree-of-linear-polarization priors in the blind-deconvolution algorithm to include two subclasses of metals--an aluminum group classification (includes aluminum, copper, gold, and silver) and an iron group classification (includes iron, titanium, nickel, and chromium). This new classification provides functional information about the object that is not provided by existing dielectric/metal material classifiers. A discussion of the design of these new degree-of-linear-polarization priors is provided. Experimental results of two painted metal samples are also provided to verify the algorithm's accuracy.

  20. Photometric and polarimetric properties of the Bruderheim chondritic meteorite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Hilgeman, T.; Veverka, J.; Noland, M.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the spectral, photometric, and polarimetric properties of the Bruderheim olivine-hypersthene chondritic meteorite. This meteorite is representative of the most common meteoritic material recovered on earth, and, hence, could also be the most common in interplanetary space. Yet, comparison with astronomical data indicates that none of the asteroids in the main belt for which adequate observations exist can be matched with Bruderheim properties. Only the surface of the Apollo asteroid Icarus does, in light of polarization and photometry data, appear to be consistent with an ordinary chondrite composition. This suggests the possibility that this material, although common in earth-crossing orbits, is rare as a surface constituent in the main asteroid belt.

  1. SEEDS Polarimetric Imagery of the AB Aur Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, John P.; Fukagawa, M.; Grady, C.; Hashimoto, J.; Hodapp, K.; Kudo, T.; Munetake, M.; Okamoto, Y.; Tamura, M.; SEEDS Team

    2011-01-01

    The Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) is a large survey which will be observing roughly 200 protoplanetary and debris disk systems over the next five years using the HiCIAO coronagraph + AO188 system on the Subaru telescope. We present new J-band polarimetric differential imagery of the proto-type Herbig Ae star, AB Aurigae, which diagnoses scattered light from the system between 20 - 540 AU at a resolution of roughly 8 AU. We discuss the morphology we observe in the outer disk region in the context of previous observations of the system, and compare/contrast the morphology in the inner disk region with recent H-band imagery of the system made with HiCIAO (Hashimoto et al 2010). This work was supported in part by NSF grants AST 0802230 and AST 1009314 and the AAS' Chretien International Research Grant.

  2. Impact of CCD camera SNR on polarimetric accuracy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenyue; Wang, Xia; Pacheco, Shaun; Liang, Rongguang

    2014-11-10

    A comprehensive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera noise model is employed to study the impact of CCD camera signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on polarimetric accuracy. The study shows that the standard deviations of the measured degree of linear polarization (DoLP) and angle of linear polarization (AoLP) are mainly dependent on the camera SNR. With increase in the camera SNR, both the measurement errors and the standard deviations caused by the CCD camera noise decrease. When the DoLP of the incident light is smaller than 0.1, the camera SNR should be at least 75 to achieve a measurement error of less than 0.01. When the input DoLP is larger than 0.5, a SNR of 15 is sufficient to achieve the same measurement accuracy. An experiment is carried out to verify the simulation results.

  3. Polarimetric target detection in the presence of spatially fluctuating Mueller matrices.

    PubMed

    Anna, Guillaume; Goudail, François; Dolfi, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    In polarimetric imaging systems, the main source of perturbations may not be detection noise but fluctuations of the Mueller matrices in the scene. In this case, we propose a method for determining the illumination and analysis polarization states that allow reaching the highest target detection performance. We show with simulations and real-world images that, in practical applications, the statistics of Mueller matrix fluctuations have to be taken into account to optimize polarimetric imagery.

  4. Polarimetric Exploration of Solar System Small Bodies: Search for Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.

    2015-08-01

    The overarching goals for the remote sensing and robotic exploration of our solar system and exoplanetary systems are: (1) understanding the formation of planetary systems and their diversity; and (2) search for habitability. These goals can be realized with the inclusion of spectrophotopolarimetry as a complementary approach to standard techniques of imaging and spectroscopy. Since all objects have unique polarimetric signatures, like fingerprints, much can be learned about the scattering object. Although polarization, in general, is elliptical by nature, special cases such as linear and circular polarimetric signatures provide insight into the various types of scattering media and are valuable tools to be developed. Additionally, spectral dependence of polarization is important to separate the macroscopic (bulk) properties of the scattering medium from the microscopic (particulate) properties of the scattering medium. The search for habitability can benefit from spectrophotopolarimetry. While linear polarization of reflected light by solar system objects (planetary atmospheres, satellites, rings systems, comets, asteroids, dust, etc.) provides insight into the scattering characteristics of aerosols and hazes in atmospheres and surficial properties of atmosphereless objects, circular polarization and related chirality) or handedness, a property of molecules that exhibit mirror-image symmetry, similar to right and left hands) can serve as diagnostic of biological activity. All known life forms on earth are chiral and pre-dominantly left-handed. However, many of these applications suffer from lack of detailed observations, instrumentation, dedicated missions and numerical/retrieval methods. I will present a review of the field, with advances made in instrumentation, measurements and applications to prospective missions.

  5. An improved method for polarimetric image restoration in interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratley, Luke; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie

    2016-11-01

    Interferometric radio astronomy data require the effects of limited coverage in the Fourier plane to be accounted for via a deconvolution process. For the last 40 years this process, known as `cleaning', has been performed almost exclusively on all Stokes parameters individually as if they were independent scalar images. However, here we demonstrate for the case of the linear polarization P, this approach fails to properly account for the complex vector nature resulting in a process which is dependent on the axes under which the deconvolution is performed. We present here an improved method, `Generalized Complex CLEAN', which properly accounts for the complex vector nature of polarized emission and is invariant under rotations of the deconvolution axes. We use two Australia Telescope Compact Array data sets to test standard and complex CLEAN versions of the Högbom and SDI (Steer-Dwedney-Ito) CLEAN algorithms. We show that in general the complex CLEAN version of each algorithm produces more accurate clean components with fewer spurious detections and lower computation cost due to reduced iterations than the current methods. In particular, we find that the complex SDI CLEAN produces the best results for diffuse polarized sources as compared with standard CLEAN algorithms and other complex CLEAN algorithms. Given the move to wide-field, high-resolution polarimetric imaging with future telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array, we suggest that Generalized Complex CLEAN should be adopted as the deconvolution method for all future polarimetric surveys and in particular that the complex version of an SDI CLEAN should be used.

  6. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  7. Modeling Surface Roughness to Estimate Surface Moisture Using Radarsat-2 Quad Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurtyawan, R.; Saepuloh, A.; Budiharto, A.; Wikantika, K.

    2016-08-01

    Microwave backscattering from the earth's surface depends on several parameters such as surface roughness and dielectric constant of surface materials. The two parameters related to water content and porosity are crucial for estimating soil moisture. The soil moisture is an important parameter for ecological study and also a factor to maintain energy balance of land surface and atmosphere. Direct roughness measurements to a large area require extra time and cost. Heterogeneity roughness scale for some applications such as hydrology, climate, and ecology is a problem which could lead to inaccuracies of modeling. In this study, we modeled surface roughness using Radasat-2 quad Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data. The statistical approaches to field roughness measurements were used to generate an appropriate roughness model. This modeling uses a physical SAR approach to predicts radar backscattering coefficient in the parameter of radar configuration (wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle) and soil parameters (surface roughness and dielectric constant). Surface roughness value is calculated using a modified Campbell and Shepard model in 1996. The modification was applied by incorporating the backscattering coefficient (σ°) of quad polarization HH, HV and VV. To obtain empirical surface roughness model from SAR backscattering intensity, we used forty-five sample points from field roughness measurements. We selected paddy field in Indramayu district, West Java, Indonesia as the study area. This area was selected due to intensive decreasing of rice productivity in the Northern Coast region of West Java. Third degree polynomial is the most suitable data fitting with coefficient of determination R2 and RMSE are about 0.82 and 1.18 cm, respectively. Therefore, this model is used as basis to generate the map of surface roughness.

  8. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  9. New experiments in inverse synthetic aperture radar image exploitation for maritime surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Firooz A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides a summary of recent experimental study in using signatures obtained via polarimetric inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) for classification of small boats in littoral environments. First step in discerning the intention of any small boat is to classify and fingerprint it so it can be observed over an extended period of time. Currently, ISAR techniques are used for large ship classification. Large ships tend to have a rich set of discernible features making classification straightforward. However, small boats rarely have a rich set of discernible features, and are more vulnerable to motion-based range migration that leads to severe signature blurring, thus making classification more challenging. The emphasis of this paper is on the development and use of several enhancement methods for polarimetric ISAR imagery of small boats followed by a target classification study whereby the enhanced signatures of two boats were used to extract several separability metrics to ascertain the effectiveness of these distance measure for target classification.

  10. Polarimetric phenomenology in the reflective regime: a case study using polarized hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibney, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the phenomenology of polarimetric data is necessary if we want to obtain the maximum benefit when we exploit that data. To first order, polarimetric phenomenology is driven by two things; the target material type (specular or diffuse) and the illuminating source (point (sun) or extended (body emission)). Polarimetric phenomenology can then be broken into three basic categories; ([specular material/sun source], [diffuse/sun], [specular/body]) where we have assigned body emission to the IR passband where materials are generally specular. The task of interest determines the category of interest since the task determines the dominant target material and the illuminating source (eg detecting diffuse targets under trees in VNIR = [diffuse/sun] category). In this paper, a specific case study for the important [diffuse/sun] category will be presented. For the reflective regime (0.3 - 3.0um), the largest polarimetric signal is obtained when the sun illuminates a significant portion of the material BRDF lobe. This naturally points us to problems whose primary target materials are diffuse since the BRDF lobe for specular materials is tiny (low probability of acquiring on the BRDF lobe) and glinty (high probability of saturating the sensor when on lobe). In this case study, we investigated signatures of solar illuminated diffuse paints acquired by a polarimetric hyperspectral sensor. We will discuss the acquisition, reduction and exploitation of that data, and use it to illustrate the primary characteristics of reflective polarimetric phenomenology.

  11. High-resolution Linear Polarimetric Imaging for the Event Horizon Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chael, Andrew A.; Johnson, Michael D.; Narayan, Ramesh; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Wardle, John F. C.; Bouman, Katherine L.

    2016-09-01

    Images of the linear polarizations of synchrotron radiation around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) highlight their projected magnetic field lines and provide key data for understanding the physics of accretion and outflow from supermassive black holes. The highest-resolution polarimetric images of AGNs are produced with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Because VLBI incompletely samples the Fourier transform of the source image, any image reconstruction that fills in unmeasured spatial frequencies will not be unique and reconstruction algorithms are required. In this paper, we explore some extensions of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to linear polarimetric VLBI imaging. In contrast to previous work, our polarimetric MEM algorithm combines a Stokes I imager that only uses bispectrum measurements that are immune to atmospheric phase corruption, with a joint Stokes Q and U imager that operates on robust polarimetric ratios. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our technique on 7 and 3 mm wavelength quasar observations from the VLBA and simulated 1.3 mm Event Horizon Telescope observations of Sgr A* and M87. Consistent with past studies, we find that polarimetric MEM can produce superior resolution compared to the standard CLEAN algorithm, when imaging smooth and compact source distributions. As an imaging framework, MEM is highly adaptable, allowing a range of constraints on polarization structure. Polarimetric MEM is thus an attractive choice for image reconstruction with the EHT.

  12. The ROHP-PAZ mission and the polarimetric and non-polarimetric effects of rain and other fozen hydrometeors on GNSS Radio-Occultation signals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Torre Juarez, M.; Padulles, R.; Cardellach, E.; Tomás, S.; Turk, J.; Ao, C. O.; Oliveras, S.; Rius, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Radio Occultation and Heavy Precipitation experiment aboard the PAZ Low Earth Orbiter (ROHP-PAZ) will test, for the first time, the new polarimetric radio occultation (RO) concept. This is a mission of opportunity: The Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (MICINN) approved in 2009 a proposal to include a polarimetric Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) RO payload on board of the Spanish Earth Observation satellite PAZ. The launch of the satellite is scheduled for October 2015, and it will be followed by a 6-month commissioning phase period and has an expected life of 7 years, with a goal of 10 years.The concept is similar to that used in some polarimetric weather radars: to measure the differential phase shift between the two polarimetric components of the received signal, although in this case we will use the forward scattering geometry instead of the backscattering one. It will allow us to retrieve precipitation and other hydrometeors information, and simultaneous thermodynamic vertical profiles which will help to the understanding of the thermodynamic processes beyond heavy rain events. A sensitivity analysis has been performed, showing that the rain-induced effect is above PAZ detectability threshold in 90% of the events with along-ray averaged rain rate higher than 5 mm/h. Also, a ground field campaign has been conducted prior to the launch of the satellite. The measurements from the campaign have shown the first experimental evidences that precipitation and frozen hydrometeors induce a noticeable effect into the polarimetric RO observables. We will present here the actual status of the mission and the results from the field campaign. We will also discuss the results of the theoretical study of the thermodynamics and the effects of rain and frozen hydrometeors into standard and polarimetric RO, based on a large collocation exercise of COSMIC and TerrasSar-X with TRMM, GPM and CloudSat.

  13. The New Airborne Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Community air pollution is the new airborne disease of our generation's communities. It is caused by the increasing use of fuel, associated with both affluence and careless waste. Photochemical air pollution of the California type involves newly defined atmospheric reactions, is due mostly to motor vehicle exhaust, is oxidizing, and produces ozone, plant damage, impairment of visibility and eye and respiratory symptoms. Aggravation of asthma, impairment of lung function among persons with chronic respiratory disease and a possible causal role, along with cigarette smoking in emphysema and chronic bronchitis, are some of the effects of photochemical pollution. More subtle effects of pollution include impairment of oxygen transport by the blood due to carbon monoxide and interference with porphyrin metabolism due to lead. Carbon monoxide exposures may affect survival of patients who are in hospitals because of myocardial infarction. While many uncertainties in pollution-health reactions need to be resolved, a large number of people in California have health impairment due to airborne disease of this new type. PMID:5485227

  14. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    PubMed Central

    Zribi, Mehrez; Pardé, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline; Fanise, Pascal; Hauser, Daniele; Dechambre, Monique; Kerr, Yann; Leduc-Leballeur, Marion; Reverdin, Gilles; Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten; Albergel, Clement; Calvet, Jean Christophe; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Rius, Antonio; Tenerelli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The “Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies” (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed on board a dedicated French ATR42 research aircraft, in conjunction with other airborne instruments (C-Band scatterometer—STORM, the GOLD-RTR GPS system, the infrared CIMEL radiometer and a visible wavelength camera). Following initial laboratory qualifications, three airborne campaigns involving 21 flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight horizontal flights, circular flights, wing and nose wags over the ocean. Analysis of the first two campaigns in 2007 and 2008 leads us to improve the CAROLS radiometer regarding isolation between channels and filter bandwidth. After implementation of these improvements, results show that the instrument is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity. PMID:22346599

  15. Multiple arrested synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. S.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the formulation and analysis of an airborne synthetic aperture rate scheme which employs a multiplicity of antennas with the displaced phase center antenna technique to detect slowly moving targets embedded in a severe clutter environment. The radar is evaluated using the target to clutter power ratio as the measure of performance. Noise is ignored in the analysis. An optimization scheme which maximizes this ratio is employed to obtain the optimum processor weighting. The performance of the MASAR processor with optimum weights is compared against that using target weights (composed of the target signal) and that using binomial weights (which, effectively, form an n-pulse canceller). Both the target and the clutter are modeled with the electric field backscattering coefficient. The target is modeled simply as a deterministically moving point scatterer with the same albedo as a point of clutter. The clutter is modeled as a homogeneous, isotropic, two dimensional, spatiotemporal random field for which only the correlation properties are required. The analysis shows that this radar, with its optimum weighting scheme, is a promising synthetic aperture concept for the detection of slowly moving targets immersed in strong clutter environments.

  16. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  17. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  18. GLORI: A GNSS-R Dual Polarization Airborne Instrument for Land Surface Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Motte, Erwan; Zribi, Mehrez; Fanise, Pascal; Egido, Alejandro; Darrozes, José; Al-Yaari, Amen; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Baup, Frédéric; Dayau, Sylvia; Fieuzal, Remy; Frison, Pierre-Louis; Guyon, Dominique; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2016-05-20

    Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) has emerged as a remote sensing tool, which is complementary to traditional monostatic radars, for the retrieval of geophysical parameters related to surface properties. In the present paper, we describe a new polarimetric GNSS-R system, referred to as the GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument (GLORI), dedicated to the study of land surfaces (soil moisture, vegetation water content, forest biomass) and inland water bodies. This system was installed as a permanent payload on a French ATR42 research aircraft, from which simultaneous measurements can be carried out using other instruments, when required. Following initial laboratory qualifications, two airborne campaigns involving nine flights were performed in 2014 and 2015 in the Southwest of France, over various types of land cover, including agricultural fields and forests. Some of these flights were made concurrently with in situ ground truth campaigns. Various preliminary applications for the characterisation of agricultural and forest areas are presented. Initial analysis of the data shows that the performance of the GLORI instrument is well within specifications, with a cross-polarization isolation better than -15 dB at all elevations above 45°, a relative polarimetric calibration accuracy better than 0.5 dB, and an apparent reflectivity sensitivity better than -30 dB, thus demonstrating its strong potential for the retrieval of land surface characteristics.

  19. GLORI: A GNSS-R Dual Polarization Airborne Instrument for Land Surface Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Motte, Erwan; Zribi, Mehrez; Fanise, Pascal; Egido, Alejandro; Darrozes, José; Al-Yaari, Amen; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Baup, Frédéric; Dayau, Sylvia; Fieuzal, Remy; Frison, Pierre-Louis; Guyon, Dominique; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) has emerged as a remote sensing tool, which is complementary to traditional monostatic radars, for the retrieval of geophysical parameters related to surface properties. In the present paper, we describe a new polarimetric GNSS-R system, referred to as the GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument (GLORI), dedicated to the study of land surfaces (soil moisture, vegetation water content, forest biomass) and inland water bodies. This system was installed as a permanent payload on a French ATR42 research aircraft, from which simultaneous measurements can be carried out using other instruments, when required. Following initial laboratory qualifications, two airborne campaigns involving nine flights were performed in 2014 and 2015 in the Southwest of France, over various types of land cover, including agricultural fields and forests. Some of these flights were made concurrently with in situ ground truth campaigns. Various preliminary applications for the characterisation of agricultural and forest areas are presented. Initial analysis of the data shows that the performance of the GLORI instrument is well within specifications, with a cross-polarization isolation better than −15 dB at all elevations above 45°, a relative polarimetric calibration accuracy better than 0.5 dB, and an apparent reflectivity sensitivity better than −30 dB, thus demonstrating its strong potential for the retrieval of land surface characteristics. PMID:27213393

  20. Feasibility of inter-comparing airborne and spaceborne observations of radar backscattering coefficients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using an airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to validate spaceborne SAR data. This is directed at soil moisture sensing and the recently launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite. The value of this approach is related to the fact that vicar...

  1. Comparison with CLPX II airborne data using DMRT model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, X.; Liang, D.; Andreadis, K.M.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E.G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we considered a physical-based model which use numerical solution of Maxwell Equations in three-dimensional simulations and apply into Dense Media Radiative Theory (DMRT). The model is validated in two specific dataset from the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX II) at Alaska and Colorado. The data were all obtain by the Ku-band (13.95GHz) observations using airborne imaging polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT). Snow is a densely packed media. To take into account the collective scattering and incoherent scattering, analytical Quasi-Crystalline Approximation (QCA) and Numerical Maxwell Equation Method of 3-D simulation (NMM3D) are used to calculate the extinction coefficient and phase matrix. DMRT equations were solved by iterative solution up to 2nd order for the case of small optical thickness and full multiple scattering solution by decomposing the diffuse intensities into Fourier series was used when optical thickness exceed unity. It was shown that the model predictions agree with the field experiment not only co-polarization but also cross-polarization. For Alaska region, the input snow structure data was obtain by the in situ ground observations, while for Colorado region, we combined the VIC model to get the snow profile. ??2009 IEEE.

  2. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  3. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  4. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  5. Laser multi-spectral polarimetric diffuse-scatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang

    Laser multi-spectral polarimetric diffuse scatter (LAMPODS) imaging is an approach that maps an object intrinsic optical scattering properties rather than the scattered light intensity like in conventional imaging. The technique involves comprehensive measurements of the object scattering response function that is to be parameterized with respect to wavelength, polarization, and angular scattering distribution. The LAMPODS images are mappings of the derived parameters, which are more fundamental than conventional images. The LAMPODS imaging system was built based on a system architecture design configured similarly to an optical wireless network that allows multiple communication connections simultaneously among any number of transmitters and receivers. The imaging system was implemented into several sets of experimental apparatuses that can detect Stokes vectors of backward and forward scattered light with laser sources at seven near infrared (NIR) wavelengths and a continuous mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral range for both macroscopic and microscopic scan imaging applications. The system components, such as transmitters, receivers, image scan unit, and the data acquisition module, were built and/or tested to match the system-design requirements, which involved many optical, opto-mechanical, electronic, and computer programming/interfacing techniques and skills. The experiments performed include the study on the LAMPODS capability with isolated aspects of scattering response, and the test of LAMPODS on uncontrolled subjects. With special-made targets, the results indicate that the LAMPODS system can distinguish consistently the four produced random surface roughnesses, regardless of the subjects? Spectroscopic signature, and can separate the spectroscopic features independently. Various natural and man-made targets were tested to challenge the LAMPODS system capability and found many interesting features regarding spectral response, polarimetric response, and

  6. Airborne Radar Observations of Severe Hailstorms: Implications for Future Spaceborne Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; McLinden, Matthew; Cervantes, Jaime I.

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-frequency (Ku and Ka band) nadir-pointing Doppler radar on the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft, called the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), has collected data over severe thunderstorms in Oklahoma and Kansas during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The overarching motivation for this study is to understand the behavior of the dualwavelength airborne radar measurements in a global variety of thunderstorms and how these may relate to future spaceborne-radar measurements. HIWRAP is operated at frequencies that are similar to those of the precipitation radar on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (Ku band) and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement mission satellite's dual-frequency (Ku and Ka bands) precipitation radar. The aircraft measurements of strong hailstorms have been combined with ground-based polarimetric measurements to obtain a better understanding of the response of the Ku- and Ka-band radar to the vertical distribution of the hydrometeors, including hail. Data from two flight lines on 24 May 2011 are presented. Doppler velocities were approx. 39m/s2at 10.7-km altitude from the first flight line early on 24 May, and the lower value of approx. 25m/s on a second flight line later in the day. Vertical motions estimated using a fall speed estimate for large graupel and hail suggested that the first storm had an updraft that possibly exceeded 60m/s for the more intense part of the storm. This large updraft speed along with reports of 5-cm hail at the surface, reflectivities reaching 70 dBZ at S band in the storm cores, and hail signals from polarimetric data provide a highly challenging situation for spaceborne-radar measurements in intense convective systems. The Ku- and Ka-band reflectivities rarely exceed approx. 47 and approx. 37 dBZ, respectively, in these storms.

  7. Synthetic vision using polarization-sensitive thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Cornell S. L.; Fleming, David L.; Harvey, W. A.; Torok, E. J.; Sadjadi, Firooz A.

    1996-05-01

    Landing of aircraft in inclement weather and taxiing operation in the presence of copious obstacles is a major issues in air traffic control for both military and civilian aviation. Onboard sensors are needed to penetrate smoke, fog, and haze and to provide enough resolution for the automated detection and recognition of runways and obstacles. The performance of automatic target recognition (ATR) systems using thermal infrared (FLIR) images is limited by the low contrast in intensity for terrestrial scenes. We are developing a thermal imaging technique where, in each image pixel, a combination of intensity and polarization data is captured simultaneously. Images of polarization have useful contrast for different surface orientations. This contrast should facilitate image segmentation and classification of objects. In this paper, we will describe a combination of two innovative technologies: a polarization-sensitive thermal imaging sensor and a suite of polarimetric specific automatic object detection and recognition algorithms. The sensor has been able to capture polarization data from thermal emissions of automobiles. Surface orientations can be measured in the same image frame as temperature distribution. For the evaluation of the algorithms a set of performance metrics will be defined. We will discuss our evaluation of the algorithms on synthetic images as would be captured with the polarization-sensitive sensor. We will compare the polarimetric specific ATR performance with the performance of conventional FLIR-based ATR.

  8. Study of Movement and Seepage Along Levees Using DINSAR and the Airborne UAVSAR Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Cathleen E.; Bawden, Gerald; Deverel, Steven; Dudas, Joel; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the utility of high resolution SAR (synthetic aperture radar) for levee monitoring using UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar) data collected along the dikes and levees in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and along the lower Mississippi River. Our study has focused on detecting and tracking changes that are indicative of potential problem spots, namely deformation of the levees, subsidence along the levee toe, and seepage through the levees, making use of polarimetric and interferometric SAR techniques. Here was present some results of those studies, which show that high resolution, low noise SAR imaging could supplement more traditional ground-based monitoring methods by providing early indicators of seepage and deformation.

  9. Synthetic biology, inspired by synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Malinova, V; Nallani, M; Meier, W P; Sinner, E K

    2012-07-16

    The topic synthetic biology appears still as an 'empty basket to be filled'. However, there is already plenty of claims and visions, as well as convincing research strategies about the theme of synthetic biology. First of all, synthetic biology seems to be about the engineering of biology - about bottom-up and top-down approaches, compromising complexity versus stability of artificial architectures, relevant in biology. Synthetic biology accounts for heterogeneous approaches towards minimal and even artificial life, the engineering of biochemical pathways on the organismic level, the modelling of molecular processes and finally, the combination of synthetic with nature-derived materials and architectural concepts, such as a cellular membrane. Still, synthetic biology is a discipline, which embraces interdisciplinary attempts in order to have a profound, scientific base to enable the re-design of nature and to compose architectures and processes with man-made matter. We like to give an overview about the developments in the field of synthetic biology, regarding polymer-based analogs of cellular membranes and what questions can be answered by applying synthetic polymer science towards the smallest unit in life, namely a cell.

  10. A new passive polarimetric imaging system collecting polarization signatures in the visible and infrared bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, Daniel A.; Breton, Mélanie; Fournier, Georges; Pichette, Mario; Rivet, Vincent

    2009-05-01

    Electro-optical imaging systems are frequently employed during surveillance operations and search and rescue missions to detect various targets of interest in both the civilian and military communities. By incorporating the polarization of light as supplementary information to such electro-optical imaging systems, it may be possible to increase the target discrimination performance considering that man-made objects are known to depolarize light in different manners than natural backgrounds. Consequently, many passive Stokes-vector imagers have been developed over the years. These sensors generally operate using one single spectral band at a time, which limits considerably the polarization information collected across a scene over a predefined specific spectral range. In order to improve the understanding of the phenomena that arise in polarimetric signatures of man-made targets, a new passive polarimetric imaging system was developed at Defence Research and Development Canada - Valcartier to collect polarization signatures over an extended spectral coverage. The Visible Infrared Passive Spectral Polarimetric Imager for Contrast Enhancement (VIP SPICE) operates four broad-band cameras concomitantly in the visible (VIS), the shortwave infrared (SWIR), the midwave infrared (MWIR), and the longwave infrared (LWIR) bands. The sensor is made of four synchronously-rotating polarizers mounted in front of each of the four cameras. Polarimetric signatures of man-made objects were acquired at various polarization angles in the four spectral bands. Preliminary results demonstrate the utility of the sensor to collect significant polarimetric signatures to discriminate man-made objects from their background.

  11. Atmospheric polarimetric effects on GNSS radio occultations: the ROHP-PAZ field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padullés, R.; Cardellach, E.; de la Torre Juárez, M.; Tomás, S.; Turk, F. J.; Oliveras, S.; Ao, C. O.; Rius, A.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the first experimental observations showing that hydrometeors induce polarimetric signatures in global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signals. This evidence is relevant to the PAZ low Earth orbiter, which will test the concept and applications of polarimetric GNSS radio occultation (RO) (i.e. ROs obtained with a dual-polarization antenna). A ground field campaign was carried out in preparation for PAZ to verify the theoretical sensitivity studies on this concept (Cardellach et al., 2015). The main aim of the campaign is to identify and understand the factors that might affect the polarimetric GNSS observables. Studied for the first time, GNSS signals measured with two polarimetric antennas (H, horizontal, and V, vertical) are shown to discriminate between heavy rain events by comparing the measured phase difference between the H and V phase delays (ΔΦ) in different weather scenarios. The measured phase difference indicates higher dispersion under rain conditions. When individual events are examined, significant increases in ΔΦ occur when the radio signals cross rain cells. Moreover, the amplitude of such a signal is much higher than the theoretical prediction for precipitation; thus, other sources of polarimetric signatures have been explored and identified. Modelling of other hydrometeors, such as melting particles and ice crystals, have been proposed to explain the obtained measurements, with good agreement in more than 90 % of the cases.

  12. Atmospheric polarimetric effects on GNSS Radio Occultations: the ROHP-PAZ field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padullés, R.; Cardellach, E.; de la Torre Juárez, M.; Tomás, S.; Turk, F. J.; Oliveras, S.; Ao, C. O.; Rius, A.

    2015-07-01

    This study describes the first experimental observations showing that hydrometeors induce polarimetric signatures in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals. This evidence is relevant to the PAZ Low Earth Orbiter, which will test the concept and applications of polarimetric GNSS Radio Occultation (RO) (i.e. ROs obtained with a two-polarization antenna). A ground field campaign was carried out in preparation for PAZ to verify the theoretical sensitivity studies about this concept (Cardellach et al., 2015). The main aim of the campaign is to identify and understand the factors that might affect the polarimetric GNSS observables. Studied for the first time, GNSS signals measured with two polarimetric antennas (H, horizontal and V, vertical) are shown to discriminate heavy rain events, by comparing the measured phase difference between the H and V phase delays (Δ Φ) in different weather scenarios. The measured phase difference indicates higher dispersion under rain conditions. When individual events are examined, significant increases of Δ Φ occur when the radio signals cross rain cells. Moreover, the amplitude of such signal is much higher than the theoretical prediction for precipitation; thus other sources of polarimetric signatures have been explored and identified. Modelling of other hydrometeors like melting particles and ice crystals have been proposed to explain the obtained measurements, with good agreement in more than 90 % of the cases.

  13. Fitting a Two-Component Scattering Model to Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.

    1998-01-01

    Classification, decomposition and modeling of polarimetric SAR data has received a great deal of attention in the recent literature. The objective behind these efforts is to better understand the scattering mechanisms which give rise to the polarimetric signatures seen in SAR image data. In this Paper an approach is described, which involves the fit of a combination of two simple scattering mechanisms to polarimetric SAR observations. The mechanisms am canopy scatter from a cloud of randomly oriented oblate spheroids, and a ground scatter term, which can represent double-bounce scatter from a pair of orthogonal surfaces with different dielectric constants or Bragg scatter from a moderately rough surface, seen through a layer of vertically oriented scatterers. An advantage of this model fit approach is that the scattering contributions from the two basic scattering mechanisms can be estimated for clusters of pixels in polarimetric SAR images. The solution involves the estimation of four parameters from four separate equations. The model fit can be applied to polarimetric AIRSAR data at C-, L- and P-Band.

  14. Photometric, astrometric and polarimetric observations of gravitational microlensing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe; Rahvar, Sohrab

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational microlensing can be used as a unique astrophysical tool to study the atmospheres of stars thousands of parsec away from us. This capability results from the bending of light rays in the gravitational field of a lens that can magnify the light of a background source star during the lensing. Moreover, one of the consequences of this light bending is that the circular symmetry of the source is broken because distorted images are produced at either side of the lens position. This property makes it possible to observe polarization, and also the light centroid shift of images. Assigning vectors for these two parameters, they are perpendicular to each other in simple and binary microlensing events, except in fold singularities. In this work, we investigate the advantages of polarimetric and astrometric observations during microlensing events (i) for studying the surface of the source star and spots on it and (ii) for obtaining extra information to determine the trajectory of source stars with respect to the lens. Finally, we analyse the largest sample of microlensing events from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) catalogue and show that, for almost ˜4.3 per cent of events in the direction of the Galactic bulge, the polarization signals would be observable with large telescopes.

  15. Architectures for Rainfall Property Estimation From Polarimetric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collis, S. M.; Giangrande, S. E.; Helmus, J.; Troemel, S.

    2014-12-01

    Radars that transmit and receive signals in polarizations aligned both horizontal and vertical to the horizon collect a number of measurements. The relation both between these measurements and between measurements and desired microphysical quantities (such as rainfall rate) is complicated due to a number of scattering mechanisms. The result is that there ends up being an intractable number of often incompatible techniques for extracting geophysical insight. This presentation will discuss methods developed by the Atmospheric Measurement Climate (ARM) Research Facility to streamline the creation of application chains for retrieving rainfall properties for the purposes of fine scale model evaluation. By using a Common Data Model (CDM) approach and working in the popular open source Python scientific environment analysis techniques such as Linear Programming (LP) can be bought to bear on the task of retrieving insight from radar signals. This presentation will outline how we have used these techniques to detangle polarimetric phase signals, estimate a three-dimensional precipitation field and then objectively compare to cloud resolving model derived rainfall fields from the NASA/DoE Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). All techniques show will be available, open source, in the Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART).

  16. Photometric and polarimetric properties of the Bruderheim chondritic meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Veverka, J.; Noland, M.; Hilgeman, T.

    1973-01-01

    Photometric and polarimetric laboratory measurements were made as a function of phase angle in the U(0.36 microns), G(0.54 microns) and R(0.67 microns) bands for 0, 30 and 60 deg incident illumination on four particle size ranges of Bruderheim, an L6 olivine-hypersthene chondritic meteorite. The four particle size ranges were: 0.25-4.76 mm coated with less than 74 microns powder, 74-250 microns, and less than 37 microns. In addition, normal reflectance measurements were made in the spectral range from 0.31 to 1.1 microns. Comparison with astronomical data reveals that none of the asteroids in the main belt for which adequate observations exist can be matched with Bruderheim, which is representative of the most common meteoritic material encountered by the Earth. However, it appears from the polarization and photometry data that the surface of the Apollo asteroid Icarus is consistent with an ordinary chondrite composition. This suggests the possibility that this material, although common in Earth-crossing orbits, is rare as a surface constituent in the main asteroid belt.

  17. Estimating index of refraction from polarimetric hyperspectral imaging measurements.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jacob A; Gross, Kevin C

    2016-08-08

    Current material identification techniques rely on estimating reflectivity or emissivity which vary with viewing angle. As off-nadir remote sensing platforms become increasingly prevalent, techniques robust to changing viewing geometries are desired. A technique leveraging polarimetric hyperspectral imaging (P-HSI), to estimate complex index of refraction, N̂(ν̃), an inherent material property, is presented. The imaginary component of N̂(ν̃) is modeled using a small number of "knot" points and interpolation at in-between frequencies ν̃. The real component is derived via the Kramers-Kronig relationship. P-HSI measurements of blackbody radiation scattered off of a smooth quartz window show that N̂(ν̃) can be retrieved to within 0.08 RMS error between 875 cm-1 ≤ ν̃ ≤ 1250 cm-1. P-HSI emission measurements of a heated smooth Pyrex beaker also enable successful N̂(ν̃) estimates, which are also invariant to object temperature.

  18. Polarimetric glucose sensing in an artificial eye anterior chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Bilal H.; Pirnstill, Casey W.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2012-03-01

    The application of optical polarimetry to glucose sensing in the anterior chamber of the eye has emerged as a potential technique to noninvasively ascertain blood glucose levels. One of the major limiting factors preventing the realization of such a device is the time varying corneal birefringence due to motion artifact in the eye. The varying birefringence confounds the optical activity of glucose, and thus, needs to be taken into account in order to successfully predict the glucose concentration in the aqueous humor of the eye. Our group has developed a multi-spectral optical polarimetric approach which can minimize the effect of corneal birefringence coupled with motion artifact by treating it as common mode noise to multiple wavelengths. Here, we present the application of a real-time closed-loop dual wavelength polarimeter to ex vivo glucose sensing in excised New Zealand White rabbits' corneas mounted on an artificial anterior chamber. Our PID control system can reach stability in less than 100 ms which is fast enough to overcome motion artifact due to heart beat and respiration. The system can predict the glucose concentration with a standard error of less than 26 mg/dL in the physiologic glucose range of 0 - 500 mg/dL. Our results indicate that dualwavelength polarimetry has the potential to noninvasively probe glucose through the anterior chamber of the eye.

  19. Design and characterization of composite planar polarimetric interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyszkiewicz, Cuma; Karasiński, Paweł; Rogoziński, Roman; Szponik, Michał

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the design and theoretical characterization of a composite uniform-gradient planar waveguide polarimetric interferometer. Presented structure is composed of an Ag+↔Na+ ion-exchange based waveguide formed in Borosilicate 33 glass substrate and a uniform, sol-gel based, silica-titania film. Characteristics of homogeneous sensitivity difference for TE0-TM0, TE0-TE1 and TM0-TM1 modes in function of the uniform film refractive index and the gradient waveguide refractive index profile are given. Because thermal annealing is an inseparable part of the sol-gel process, the gradient index waveguide is subjected to a rediffusion process. The original refractive index profile is flattened. It was shown that a presence of the gradient waveguide increases sensitivity differences over values which can be obtained for single layer uniform silica-titania waveguides. Moreover, it was shown that a range of uniform film thickness values, for which sensitivity difference of the composite structure is maximized, is downshifted to a range which can be much easier obtained with a sol-gel process.

  20. Polarimetric spectra analysis for tokamak pitch angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Chung, J.; Lange, A. G. G.; de Bock, M. F. M.

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of the internal magnetic field structures using conventional polarimetric approaches are considered extremely challenging in fusion-reactor environments whereas the information on current density profiles is essential to establish steady-state and advance operation scenarios in such reactor-relevant devices. Therefore, on ITER a hybrid system is proposed for the current density measurements that uses both polarimetry and spectral measurements. The spectrum-based approaches have been tested in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) during the past two plasma campaigns. As such, KSTAR is a test-bed for the proposed ITER hybrid system. Measurements in the plasma core are based on the motional Stark effect (MSE) spectrum of the neutral beam emission. For the edge profiles, the Zeeman effect (ZE) acting on the lithium emission spectrum of the newly installed (2013) Lithium-beam-diagnostic is exploited. The neutral beam emission spectra, complicated by the multi-ion-source beam injection, are successfully fitted making use of the data provided by the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) database package. This way pitch angle profiles could be retrieved from the beam emission spectra. With the same spectrometer/CCD hardware as on MSE, but with a different wavelength range and different lines of sight, the first ZE spectrum measurements have been made. The Zeeman splitting comparable to and greater than the instrumental broadening has been routinely detected at high toroidal field operations ( ~ 3 Tesla).

  1. Dehazing method through polarimetric imaging and multi-scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lei; Shao, Xiaopeng; Liu, Fei; Wang, Lin

    2015-05-01

    An approach for haze removal utilizing polarimetric imaging and multi-scale analysis has been developed to solve one problem that haze weather weakens the interpretation of remote sensing because of the poor visibility and short detection distance of haze images. On the one hand, the polarization effects of the airlight and the object radiance in the imaging procedure has been considered. On the other hand, one fact that objects and haze possess different frequency distribution properties has been emphasized. So multi-scale analysis through wavelet transform has been employed to make it possible for low frequency components that haze presents and high frequency coefficients that image details or edges occupy are processed separately. According to the measure of the polarization feather by Stokes parameters, three linear polarized images (0°, 45°, and 90°) have been taken on haze weather, then the best polarized image min I and the worst one max I can be synthesized. Afterwards, those two polarized images contaminated by haze have been decomposed into different spatial layers with wavelet analysis, and the low frequency images have been processed via a polarization dehazing algorithm while high frequency components manipulated with a nonlinear transform. Then the ultimate haze-free image can be reconstructed by inverse wavelet reconstruction. Experimental results verify that the dehazing method proposed in this study can strongly promote image visibility and increase detection distance through haze for imaging warning and remote sensing systems.

  2. Alternative to Four-Component Decomposition for Polarimetric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. X.; Huang, G. M.; Wei, J. J.; Zhao, Z.

    2016-06-01

    There are more unknowns than equations to solve for previous four-component decomposition methods. In this case, the nonnegative power of each scattering mechanism has to be determined with some assumptions and physical power constraints. This paper presents a new decomposition scheme, which models the measured matrix after polarimetric orientation angle (POA) compensation as a linear sum of five scattering mechanisms (i.e., odd-bounce scattering, double-bounce scattering, diffuse scattering, volume scattering, and helix scattering). And the volume scattering power is calculated by a slight modified NNED method, owing to this method considering the external volume scattering model from oblique dihedral structure. After the helix and volume scattering powers have been determined sequentially, the other three scattering powers are estimated by combining the generalized similarity parameter (GSP) and the eigenvalue decomposition. Among them, due to POA compensation, the diffuse scattering induced from a dihedral with a relative orientation of 45º has negligible scattering power. Thus, the new method can be reduced as four-component decomposition automatically. And then the ALOS-2 PolSAR data covering Guiyang City, Guizhou Province, China were used to evaluate the performance of the new method in comparison with some classical decomposition methods (i.e. Y4R, S4R and G4U).

  3. Monitoring Surface Deformation using Polarimetric Ground Based Interferometric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarsky, J. J.; Gomez, F.; Rosenblad, B.; Loehr, E.; Cherukumilli, S.; Deng, H.; Held, B.; Jenkins, W.

    2012-12-01

    Surface deformation monitoring using ground based interferometric radar (GBIR) measurements may be desirable for a number of applications in the earth sciences. The University of Missouri (MU) research team has ongoing efforts to use the MU GBIR for monitoring surface deformation at a number of sites. Measurements have been collected at sites requiring access by various transportation means such as using off-road vehicle, hiking, and helicopter. Once on site, initial setup takes about 10 minutes. After setup, an image may be acquired by azimuth scan about every 20 seconds. The highly portable system lends itself to rapid deployment in remote environments and repeat survey sites. The MU GBIR's high portability and fast imaging capabilities allow rapid surveying and long-term surveying potential of surface deformation. Imagery may be formed in near real time for initial quick looks. After data collection, imagery data may be further enhanced by radiometric calibration, polarimetric calibration, and time-series analysis. Imaging may be acquired at the electromagnetic spectral bands of C-band and Ku-band. Prior demonstration of millimeter and better sensitivity to deformation over the course of a day of data collects has been performed using the MU GBIR. In addition, the MU GBIR can be removed and re-positioned at the same point with geodetic-grade precision for repeat surveys. Study results and additional development progress will be presented. This project is sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

  4. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  5. Oil source-fingerprinting in support of polarimetric radar mapping of Macondo-252 oil in Gulf Coast marshes.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Elijah; Meyer, Buffy M; Rangoonwala, Amina; Overton, Edward; Jones, Cathleen E; Bannister, Terri

    2014-12-15

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data exhibited dramatic, spatially extensive changes from June 2009 to June 2010 in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. To determine whether these changes were associated with the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, twenty-nine sediment samples were collected in 2011 from shoreline and nearshore-interior coastal marsh locations where oil was not observed visually or with optical sensors during the spill. Oil source-fingerprinting and polytopic vector analysis were used to link DWH oil to PolSAR changes. Our results prove that DWH oil extended beyond shorelines and confirm the association between presence of DWH oil and PolSAR change. These results show that the DWH oil spill probably affected much more of the southeastern Louisiana marshland than originally concluded from ground and aerial surveys and verify that PolSAR is a powerful tool for tracking oil intrusion into marshes with high probability even where contamination is not visible from above the canopy.

  6. Geology Structure Identification based on Polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) Data and Field Based Observation at Ciwidey Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R. A.; Saepuloh, A.; Suryantini

    2016-09-01

    Geological structure observation is difficult to be conducted at Quaternary volcanic field due to the classical problem at tropical region such as intensive erosion, dense vegetation covers, and rough terrain. The problem hampers the field observation especially for geological structures mapping. In order to overcome the problems, an active remote sensing technology based on Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data was used in this study. The longer wavelength of microwave than optical region caused the SAR layer penetration higher than optics. The Ciwidey Geothermal Field, Indonesia was selected as study area because of the existence of surface manifestations with lack information about the control of geological structures to the geothermal system. Visual interpretation based on composite polarization modes was applied to identify geological structures at study area. The color composite Red-Green-Blue for HV-HH-VV polarizations provided highest texture and structural features among the other composite combination. The Linear Features Density (LFD) map was also used to interpret the fractures zones. The calculated LFD showed high anomaly about 3.6 km/km2 with two strike directions NW-SE and NE-SW. Interestingly, the surface geothermal manifestation agreed with the low anomaly of LFD. The geological structures consisted of ten faults were successfully detected and mapped. The faults type mainly are oblique-slip with strike directions NE-SW and NW-SE.

  7. Oil source-fingerprinting in support of polarimetric radar mapping of Macondo-252 oil in Gulf Coast marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey III, Elijah W.; Meyer, Buffy M.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Overton, Edward; Jones, Cathleen E.; Bannister, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data exhibited dramatic, spatially extensive changes from June 2009 to June 2010 in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. To determine whether these changes were associated with the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, twenty-nine sediment samples were collected in 2011 from shoreline and nearshore–interior coastal marsh locations where oil was not observed visually or with optical sensors during the spill. Oil source-fingerprinting and polytopic vector analysis were used to link DWH oil to PolSAR changes. Our results prove that DWH oil extended beyond shorelines and confirm the association between presence of DWH oil and PolSAR change. These results show that the DWH oil spill probably affected much more of the southeastern Louisiana marshland than originally concluded from ground and aerial surveys and verify that PolSAR is a powerful tool for tracking oil intrusion into marshes with high probability even where contamination is not visible from above the canopy.

  8. A comparison of real and simulated airborne multisensor imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloechl, Kevin; De Angelis, Chris; Gartley, Michael; Kerekes, John; Nance, C. Eric

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a methodology and results for the comparison of simulated imagery to real imagery acquired with multiple sensors hosted on an airborne platform. The dataset includes aerial multi- and hyperspectral imagery with spatial resolutions of one meter or less. The multispectral imagery includes data from an airborne sensor with three-band visible color and calibrated radiance imagery in the long-, mid-, and short-wave infrared. The airborne hyperspectral imagery includes 360 bands of calibrated radiance and reflectance data spanning 400 to 2450 nm in wavelength. Collected in September 2012, the imagery is of a park in Avon, NY, and includes a dirt track and areas of grass, gravel, forest, and agricultural fields. A number of artificial targets were deployed in the scene prior to collection for purposes of target detection, subpixel detection, spectral unmixing, and 3D object recognition. A synthetic reconstruction of the collection site was created in DIRSIG, an image generation and modeling tool developed by the Rochester Institute of Technology, based on ground-measured reflectance data, ground photography, and previous airborne imagery. Simulated airborne images were generated using the scene model, time of observation, estimates of the atmospheric conditions, and approximations of the sensor characteristics. The paper provides a comparison between the empirical and simulated images, including a comparison of achieved performance for classification, detection and unmixing applications. It was found that several differences exist due to the way the image is generated, including finite sampling and incomplete knowledge of the scene, atmospheric conditions and sensor characteristics. The lessons learned from this effort can be used in constructing future simulated scenes and further comparisons between real and simulated imagery.

  9. Plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wusheng; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-05-01

    Plant synthetic biology is an emerging field that combines engineering principles with plant biology toward the design and production of new devices. This emerging field should play an important role in future agriculture for traditional crop improvement, but also in enabling novel bioproduction in plants. In this review we discuss the design cycles of synthetic biology as well as key engineering principles, genetic parts, and computational tools that can be utilized in plant synthetic biology. Some pioneering examples are offered as a demonstration of how synthetic biology can be used to modify plants for specific purposes. These include synthetic sensors, synthetic metabolic pathways, and synthetic genomes. We also speculate about the future of synthetic biology of plants.

  10. Synthetic aperture radar and natural disasters: Hazard mapping using full polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuchlewski, Kristina Rodriguez

    This thesis focuses on developing algorithms for radar-based natural disaster response. We demonstrate that fully-polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) can be used to assess natural disasters involving terrain resurfacing such as landslides, volcanic eruptions and fires. These hazards often temporarily remove a natural vegetation cover and, in doing so, modify the physical properties of the land surface. This land-cover disturbance causes a detectable change in dominant microwave scattering mechanism for the areas affected. SAR has operational advantages over optical sensors for rapid disaster assessment because of its day/night acquisition capability; its ability to "see through" smoke, clouds and dust; and its side-looking viewing geometry, which is an advantage whenever data collection directly above the site would prove dangerous. To assess the usefulness of fully-polarimetric SAR, we apply a uniform approach to map (1) landslides resulting from the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan, (2) volcanic flows from the major 1996 eruption of Manam Volcano in Papua New Guinea, and (3) the extent of damage from the summer 2002 Rodeo-Chediski wildfire in Arizona, USA. We then reexamine the data from Manam Island and Taiwan to determine the effects of a polarization preserving speckle reduction filter. Our results demonstrate the potential utility of fully polarimetric SAR for hazard mapping and disaster response.

  11. Airborne rescue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The airborne rescue system includes a boom with telescoping members for extending a line and collar to a rescue victim. The boom extends beyond the tip of the helicopter rotor so that the victim may avoid the rotor downwash. The rescue line is played out and reeled in by winch. The line is temporarily retained under the boom. When the boom is extended, the rescue line passes through clips. When the victim dons the collar and the tension in the line reaches a predetermined level, the clips open and release the line from the boom. Then the rescue line can form a straight line between the victim and the winch, and the victim can be lifted to the helicopter. A translator is utilized to push out or pull in the telescoping members. The translator comprises a tape and a rope. Inside the telescoping members the tape is curled around the rope and the tape has a tube-like configuration. The tape and rope are provided from supply spools.

  12. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  13. [From synthetic biology to synthetic humankind].

    PubMed

    Nouvel, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an historical survey of the expression "synthetic biology" in order to identify its main philosophical components. The result of the analysis is then used to investigate the meaning of the notion of "synthetic man". It is shown that both notions share a common philosophical background that can be summed up by the short but meaningful assertion: "biology is technology". The analysis allows us to distinguish two notions that are often confused in transhumanist literature: the notion of synthetic man and the notion of renewed man. The consequences of this crucial distinction are discussed.

  14. Polarimetric Ku-Band Scatterometer for High Accuracy, Large Swath Global Wind Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Wu-Yang; Nghiem, Son V.; Huddleston, James; Spencer, Michael; Stiles, Bryan; West, Richard

    2000-01-01

    In the past, wind measurements from space using fan-beam antennas, such as Seasat Scatterometer (SASS-1), ERS-1 &2, and NASA scatterometer (NSCAT), required up to six large stick-like antennas and suffered a nadir gap of up to 400 km. In the near future, a spinning pencil-beam scatterometer system is to be used for the SeaWinds scatterometer on QuikSCAT (QSCAT) and on ADEOS-2 (SeaWinds). This scatterometer, though offering wind measurements in the nadir region, still suffers from degraded performance in the nadir and outer swath. The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced polarimetric spinning pencil-beam scatterometer system, which can significantly improve the wind performance across the entire swath. The polarimetric scatterometer simultaneously measures co-polarized backscatter and the polarimetric correlation of co- and cross-polarized radar returns from the ocean surface. The advantage over the conventional scatterometer system is that, while the co-polarization radar returns are even function of the wind direction, the polarimetric correlation is an odd function of wind direction due to the reflection symmetry of the wind roughened surface. Therefore, this polarimetric scatterometer system can provide additional, equivalent measurements at azimuth angle 45degree away from the corresponding co-polarization measurements. The combined co-polarization and correlation measurements enable good wind performance across the whole swath to be obtained. In this paper, we will first present the theoretical formulation of all of the key components required for designing a polarimetric scatterometer. Then, we show that good wind performance can be achieved by a slight improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the current QSCAT/SeaWinds design. We then present the predicated wind performance using computer simulation based on a model function for the co-polarized backscatter obtained from actual spaceborne scatterometer data and an estimated model function for

  15. Orientation-recognized rotation measurement using single polarimetric multi-mode tilted fiber grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu; Guo, Tuan; Shang, Libin; Zhang, Zhaochuan; Du, Fa; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    The polarimetric sensing characteristics of multi-mode-fiber based tilted fiber Bragg grating (MMF-TFBG) have been analyzed and experimentally demonstrated. The physical "enlarged" fiber core enables the tilted gratings to excite multi high-order core modes with significantly different polarization dependence and well-defined "comb" profiles which are spectrally separated at different wavelength. Orientation-recognized twist/rotation measurement (-90o to 90o) has been achieved with sensitivity of 0.075 dB/deg by using a cost-effective double-path power detection (power monitoring of two orthogonal-polarimetric odd core-modes, i.e. LP11 and LP12).

  16. Polarimetric radar and aircraft observations of saggy bright bands during MC3E

    DOE PAGES

    Matthew R. Kumjian; Giangrande, Scott E.; Mishra, Subashree; ...

    2016-03-19

    Polarimetric radar observations increasingly are used to understand cloud microphysical processes, which is critical for improving their representation in cloud and climate models. In particular, there has been recent focus on improving representations of ice collection processes (e.g., aggregation, riming), as these influence precipitation rate, heating profiles, and ultimately cloud life cycles. However, distinguishing these processes using conventional polarimetric radar observations is difficult, as they produce similar fingerprints. This necessitates improved analysis techniques and integration of complementary data sources. Furthermore, the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) provided such an opportunity.

  17. A covariance-based anomaly detector for polarimetric remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Joao M.; Rosario, Dalton

    2014-05-01

    The proposed paper recommends a new anomaly detection algorithm for polarimetric remote sensing applications based on the M-Box covariance test by taking advantage of key features found in a multi-polarimetric data cube. The paper demonstrates: 1) that independent polarization measurements contain information suitable for manmade object discrimination from natural clutter; 2) analysis between the variability exhibited by manmade objects relative to natural clutter; 3) comparison between the proposed M-Box covariance test with Stokes parameters S0 and S1, DoLP, RX­ Stokes, and PCA RX-Stokes; and finally 4) the data used for the comparison spans a full24-hour measurement.

  18. Data fusion: a consideration of metrics and the implications for polarimetric imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, Michael J.; Pugh, Mark L.

    2005-08-01

    The increasing availability of multispectral, hyperspectral, and multisensor imagery during the past decade has motivated rapid growth in image fusion research for remote sensing application. While it is generally the goal of image fusion methods to obtain more information fiom the combination of multiple images than could be obtained from individual images, the measure of how well fused images actually achieve this goal is still largely subjective. Furthermore, in the selection of image data, and the analytical procedures to process this data, we make a sequence of implicit assumptions that need to be reviewed. Metrics are used to specify image characteristics necessary to perform specified tasks. New metrics are necessary to characterize the performance of image fusion techniques and also to determine the extent to which these techniques may provide more useful information than could be derived fiom non-fused imagery. Without metics, we cannot predict what data we need, or how to collect and to analyze it. There is currently no metric that encompasses both spatial and spectral resolution characteristics. A metric describing the quality of polarimetric imagery is an example of the larger problem of metrics required to specify the necessary characteristics of fused, multidimensional image data. Since polarimetric imagery is based upon the differences of image pairs obtained with the polarizer oriented orthogonally about the optic axis, misregistration introduces a false clutter that degrades information content of polarimetric imagery, so that a polarimetric image characteristic will depend upon registration accuracy. A General Image Quality Equation (GIQE) is a multivariate regression of the image quality metric against the independent imaging ammeters, such as registration in the case of polarimetric imagery. We need a General Image Quality Equation (GIQE) for polarimetric images in which one regression term describes misregistration. We need image quality

  19. Polarimetric Glucose Sensing Using Brewster Reflection off of Eye Lens: Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boeckle, Stefan; Rovati, Luigi; Ansari, Rafat R.

    2002-01-01

    An important task of in vivo polarimetric glucose sensing is to find an appropriate way to optically access the aqueous humor of the human eye. In this paper two different approaches are analyzed theoretically and applied to the eye model of Le Grand. First approach is the tangential path of Cote, et al. (G.L. Cot6, M.D. Fox, and R.B. Northrop: Noninvasive Optical Polarimetric Glucose Sensing Using a True Phase Measurement Technique. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, vol. 39, no. 7, pp. 752-756, 1992.) and the second is a new scheme of this paper of applying Brewster reflection off the eye lens.

  20. Estimation of Canopy Water Content in Konza Parry Grasslands Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Measurements During FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; van Zyl, Jacob J.; Asrar, Ghassem

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an algorithm to retrieve the canopy water contents of natural grasslands and pasture from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. The development on this algorithm involves three interrelated steps: (1) calibration of SAR data for ground topographic variations, (2) development and validation of backscatter model for cross-polarized ratio. The polarimetric radar data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory AIRSAR system during the 1989 First International Satellite land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) used for this study. The SAR data have been calibrated and corrected for the topographical effects by using the digital elevation map of the study area.

  1. Toward automated face detection in thermal and polarimetric thermal imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Christopher; Acosta, Mark; Short, Nathan; Hu, Shuowen; Chan, Alex L.

    2016-05-01

    Visible spectrum face detection algorithms perform pretty reliably under controlled lighting conditions. However, variations in illumination and application of cosmetics can distort the features used by common face detectors, thereby degrade their detection performance. Thermal and polarimetric thermal facial imaging are relatively invariant to illumination and robust to the application of makeup, due to their measurement of emitted radiation instead of reflected light signals. The objective of this work is to evaluate a government off-the-shelf wavelet based naïve-Bayes face detection algorithm and a commercial off-the-shelf Viola-Jones cascade face detection algorithm on face imagery acquired in different spectral bands. New classifiers were trained using the Viola-Jones cascade object detection framework with preprocessed facial imagery. Preprocessing using Difference of Gaussians (DoG) filtering reduces the modality gap between facial signatures across the different spectral bands, thus enabling more correlated histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) features to be extracted from the preprocessed thermal and visible face images. Since the availability of training data is much more limited in the thermal spectrum than in the visible spectrum, it is not feasible to train a robust multi-modal face detector using thermal imagery alone. A large training dataset was constituted with DoG filtered visible and thermal imagery, which was subsequently used to generate a custom trained Viola-Jones detector. A 40% increase in face detection rate was achieved on a testing dataset, as compared to the performance of a pre-trained/baseline face detector. Insights gained in this research are valuable in the development of more robust multi-modal face detectors.

  2. Estimating Forest Vertical Structure from Multialtitude, Fixed-Baseline Radar Interferometric and Polarimetric Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.; Law, Beverly E.; Siqueira, Paul R.

    2000-01-01

    Parameters describing the vertical structure of forests, for example tree height, height-to-base-of-live-crown, underlying topography, and leaf area density, bear on land-surface, biogeochemical, and climate modeling efforts. Single, fixed-baseline interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) normalized cross-correlations constitute two observations from which to estimate forest vertical structure parameters: Cross-correlation amplitude and phase. Multialtitude INSAR observations increase the effective number of baselines potentially enabling the estimation of a larger set of vertical-structure parameters. Polarimetry and polarimetric interferometry can further extend the observation set. This paper describes the first acquisition of multialtitude INSAR for the purpose of estimating the parameters describing a vegetated land surface. These data were collected over ponderosa pine in central Oregon near longitude and latitude -121 37 25 and 44 29 56. The JPL interferometric TOPSAR system was flown at the standard 8-km altitude, and also at 4-km and 2-km altitudes, in a race track. A reference line including the above coordinates was maintained at 35 deg for both the north-east heading and the return southwest heading, at all altitudes. In addition to the three altitudes for interferometry, one line was flown with full zero-baseline polarimetry at the 8-km altitude. A preliminary analysis of part of the data collected suggests that they are consistent with one of two physical models describing the vegetation: 1) a single-layer, randomly oriented forest volume with a very strong ground return or 2) a multilayered randomly oriented volume; a homogeneous, single-layer model with no ground return cannot account for the multialtitude correlation amplitudes. Below the inconsistency of the data with a single-layer model is followed by analysis scenarios which include either the ground or a layered structure. The ground returns suggested by this preliminary analysis seem

  3. Curved PVDF airborne transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Toda, M

    1999-01-01

    In the application of airborne ultrasonic ranging measurement, a partially cylindrical (curved) PVDF transducer can effectively couple ultrasound into the air and generate strong sound pressure. Because of its geometrical features, the ultrasound beam angles of a curved PVDF transducer can be unsymmetrical (i.e., broad horizontally and narrow vertically). This feature is desired in some applications. In this work, a curved PVDF air transducer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Two resonances were observed in this transducer. They are length extensional mode and flexural bending mode. Surface vibration profiles of these two modes were measured by a laser vibrometer. It was found from the experiment that the surface vibration was not uniform along the curvature direction for both vibration modes. Theoretical calculations based on a model developed in this work confirmed the experimental results. Two displacement peaks were found in the piezoelectric active direction of PVDF film for the length extensional mode; three peaks were found for the flexural bending mode. The observed peak positions were in good agreement with the calculation results. Transient surface displacement measurements revealed that vibration peaks were in phase for the length extensional mode and out of phase for the flexural bending mode. Therefore, the length extensional mode can generate a stronger ultrasound wave than the flexural bending mode. The resonance frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the two modes strongly depend on the structure parameters as well as the material properties. For the transducer design, the theoretical model developed in this work can be used to optimize the ultrasound performance.

  4. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  5. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  6. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  7. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  8. Airborne transmission of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Jason M; Beren, Joel; Merkel, Tod J

    2012-09-15

    Pertussis is a contagious, acute respiratory illness caused by the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Although it is widely believed that transmission of B. pertussis occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets, no controlled study has ever documented airborne transmission of pertussis. We set out to determine if airborne transmission occurs between infected and naive animals, utilizing the baboon model of pertussis. Our results showed that 100% of exposed naive animals became infected even when physical contact was prevented, demonstrating that pertussis transmission occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets.

  9. Investigation of the effect of vibration amplitude on vibration measurements of polarimetric fiber sensors embedded in composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Callaghan, Dean; Farrell, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    Glass fiber reinforced composite material beams embedded with two types of polarimetric sensors are fabricated by the hand layup method and characterized. Two types of polarimetric sensors, a high strain sensitive Panda type fiber and a low strain sensitive polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF), are compared for low frequency vibration measurements from 0 to 100 Hz. Different lengths of glass fiber reinforced composite samples with embedded polarimetric sensors are fabricated and compared for different vibration amplitudes and vibration frequencies. The influence of the vibration amplitude of the composite beams on the accuracy of vibration measurements using the two types of polarimetric sensors is investigated. At high amplitude vibrations the low strain sensitive PM-PCF polarimetric sensors offer a wider linear range and thus reproduce the vibration frequency and vibration amplitude accurately. However for high amplitude vibrations the high sensitivity and low dynamic strain range of Panda type fibers result in a multiple-peak intensity pattern within one vibration cycle which leads to inaccurate vibration frequency and vibration amplitude measurements. The experimental results show that the strain sensitivity of polarimetric sensors limits the vibration measurements to a certain range of vibration amplitudes. The vibration amplitude range over which the polarimetric sensors provide accurate information about the vibration frequency is experimentally investigated and the results are presented. Also, for a composite beam undergoing deflections in the ‘simply-simply supported’ configuration, a theoretical method to predict the allowable maximum measurable vibration amplitude for any type of polarimetric sensor, is derived in this paper. It is envisaged that the results from the studies will provide significant information, which can be used in composite material applications such as marine and aerospace for selecting an appropriate type and

  10. Extraction of Benthic Fauna Habitat in Tidal Flats Using Multi-Frequency Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Byung-Hun; Kim, Duk-Jin; Hwang, Ji-Hwan; Moon, Wooil M.

    2011-03-01

    Benthic faunas form a relatively rough surface structure in tidal flats by their unique surface structure or their survival activities. In particular, oyster reefs are exposed and distributed intensively on those tidal flats at low tide. In this study, we investigated the microwave scattering signatures occurred by the regional distribution of oysters in tidal flats, applying polarimetric analysis techniques to fully polarimetric RADARSAT-2 (C-band) and ALOS PALSAR (L-band) data. Tidal flats of Jebu Island in the western coastal region of the Korean peninsula were selected for the investigation. The scattering mechanisms in tidal flats were analyzed by Freeman-Durden target decomposition and the target depolarization effects were quantitatively measured using the cross- polarized ratio, co-polarized correlation coefficient, and phase difference between HH and VV. From C-band SAR data, we observed strong volume (or multiple) scattering and depolarization effects in the oyster reefs, while only surface scattering was dominant in mud flat areas. These scattering signatures were also verified in-situ measurenments using a ground-based polarimetric scatterometer system. However, no difference was observed between the scattering signatures of oyster reefs and mud flat areas from L-band data, which have a relatively longer wavelength. In conclusion, this study suggests that multi-frequency polarimetric SAR measurements can be used to detect the naturally distributed oysters in tidal flats.

  11. A Model with Ellipsoidal Scatterers for Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Anisotropic Layered Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a model with ellipsoidal scatterers for applications to polarimetric remote sensing of anisotropic layered media at microwave frequencies. The physical configuration includes an isotropic layer covering an anisotropic layer above a homogeneous half space. The isotropic layer consists of randomly oriented spheroids. The anisotropic layer contains ellipsoidal scatterers with a preferential vertical alignment and random azimuthal orientations. Effective permittivities of the scattering media are calculated with the strong fluctuation theory extended to account for the nonspherical shapes and the scatterer orientation distributions. On the basis of the analytic wave theory, dyadic Green's functions for layered media are used to derive polarimetric backscattering coefficients under the distorted Born approximation. The ellipsoidal shape of the scatterers gives rise to nonzero cross-polarized returns from the untilted anisotropic medium in the first-order approximation. Effects of rough interfaces are estimated by an incoherent addition method. Theoretical results and experimental data are matched at 9 GHz for thick first-year sea ice with a bare surface and with a snow cover at Point Barrow, Alaska. The model is then used to study the sensitivity of polarimetric backscattering coefficients with respect to correlation lengths representing the geometry of brine inclusions. Polarimetric signatures of bare and snow-covered sea ice are also simulated based on the model to investigate effects of different scattering mechanisms.

  12. Total Lightning Observations within Electrified Snowfall using Polarimetric Radar LMA, and NWN Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Bruning, Eric C.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Tall structures play and important role in development of winter time lightning flashes.To what extent still needs to be assessed. Tower initiated flashes typically occur as banded structures pass near/overhead. Hi resolution RHI s from polarimetric radar show that the lightning has a tendency to propagate through layered structures within these snowstorms.

  13. Disturbance Detection in Snow Using Polarimetric Imagery of the Visible Spectrum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    for the detection of distrubed surfaces. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. Feynman , R. P. (2006). The Feynman lectures on physics ...requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED PHYSICS from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL December 2010 Author: David C...Department of Physics iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT Optical polarimetric data were analyzed to determine their utility for

  14. Image enhancement of surface micro-structure on mucosa for polarimetric endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Katsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a novel image processing method for endoscopy that enhances the appearance of microstructures on mucosa. The new technique employs two pairs of parallel- and crossed-nicols polarimetric images, from which an averaged subtracted polarization image (AVSPI) is calculated. Experiments were first executed using a manual experimental setup with ring-type lighting, two rotating polarizers and a color camera. A new objective evaluation method that uses texture analysis (GLCM) was developed and applied to evaluation of the enhanced microstructure images. Experiments using excised porcine stomach tissue showed better results than with conventional color intensity image processing. Next, an online rigid-type polarimetric endoscope system using a polarized ring-shaped LED and a special three-CCD color polarimetric camera was developed. The two types of equipment described above are quite different as to extinction ratio values, but show similarly enhanced image quality. Our results show that polarimetric endoscopy is not only effective but also practical for hardware implementation.

  15. Bistatic Polarimetric SAR Decomposition in Terms of Roll-Invariant Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombrun, Lionel

    2011-03-01

    This paper introduces a new bistatic Polarimetric SAR decomposition in terms of roll-invariant parameters. The proposed decomposition is an extension of the Target Scattering Vector Model to the bistatic case, where the cross-polarization terms of the scattering matrix are not necessary equal.

  16. Passive polarimetric imagery-based material classification robust to illumination source position and viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Thilak Krishna, Thilakam Vimal; Creusere, Charles D; Voelz, David G

    2011-01-01

    Polarization, a property of light that conveys information about the transverse electric field orientation, complements other attributes of electromagnetic radiation such as intensity and frequency. Using multiple passive polarimetric images, we develop an iterative, model-based approach to estimate the complex index of refraction and apply it to target classification.

  17. Polarimetric Microwave Emission from Snow Surface: 4th Strokes Component Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of ice on the polarimetric 4th Stokes component observations is investigated using WindSat data over Antarctica. The difference in the magnitude of the signal observed during (July 2003) and summer (February 2004) months is investigated using a second harmonic sine function of the azimuth...

  18. Estimation of Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Direction From Polarimetric Radiometry Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    project is to formulate algebraic solutions for the quantities of interest, based on analytical models which have been developed using numerical... Grossman , W.L. Jones, D. Spencer, G. Golba, J. Cleveland, L. Choy, R.M. Bevilacqua, and P.S. Chang, “The WindSat spaceborne polarimetric microwave

  19. Modeling of Wind Direction Signals in Polarimetric Sea Surface Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Sea surface brightness temperatures are the radiometric power measure of blackbody radiation from sea water. This radiation is the electromagnetic waves excited by the random thermal motion of charged particles in the sea water. The energy transmitted through the air- water interface produces a scattering of electromagnetic waves into the atmosphere. Polarimetric microwave emissions are investigated.

  20. Three-Dimensional Road Network by Fusion of Polarimetric and Interferometric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamba, P.; Houshmand, B.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper a fuzzy classification procedure is applied to polarimetric radar measurements, and street pixels are detected. These data are successively grouped into consistent roads by means of a dynamic programming approach based on the fuzzy membership function values. Further fusion of the 2D road network extracted and 3D TOPSAR measurements provides a powerful way to analyze urban infrastructures.

  1. Information enhancement, metrics, and data fusion in spectral and polarimetric images of natural scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, Michael J.; Glass, William R.; Cabot, Elizabeth R.; Bowers, David; Wellems, David; Alsing, Paul

    2007-09-01

    In order to understand the phenomenology of optimum data acquisition and analysis and to develop an understanding of capabilities, field measurements of multiband, polarimetric data can substantially assist in developing a methodology to collect and to exploit feature signatures. In 1999, Duggin showed that images obtained with an 8-bit camera used as a polarimeter could yield additional information to that contained in a radiometric (S 0) image. It should be noted that Walraven and Curran had performed some very fine experiments almost two decades earlier, using photographic film, and North performed careful polarimetric measurements of the skydome using a four-lens polarimetric film camera and convex mirror in 1997. There have been a number of papers dealing with polarimetric field measurements since that time. Recently, commercial color cameras have become available that have 12-bit depth per channel. Here, we perform radiometric and chromatic calibrations and examine the possible use of a Nikon D200 10.2 mega pixel, 3 channel, 12-bit per channel camera fitted with a zoom lens as a potential field imaging polarimeter. We show that there are still difficulties in using off-the-shelf technology for field applications, but list some reasons why we need to address these challenges, in order to understand the phenomenology of data collection and analysis metrics for multiple data streams.

  2. Advancement in polarimetric glucose sensing: simulation and measurement of birefringence properties of cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Bilal H.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2011-03-01

    Clinical guidelines dictate that frequent blood glucose monitoring in diabetic patients is critical towards proper management of the disease. Although, several different types of glucose monitors are now commercially available, most of these devices are invasive, thereby adversely affecting patient compliance. To this end, optical polarimetric glucose sensing through the eye has been proposed as a potential noninvasive means to aid in the control of diabetes. Arguably, the most critical and limiting factor towards successful application of such a technique is the time varying corneal birefringence due to eye motion artifact. We present a spatially variant uniaxial eye model to serve as a tool towards better understanding of the cornea's birefringence properties. The simulations show that index-unmatched coupling of light is spatially limited to a smaller range when compared to the index-matched situation. Polarimetric measurements on rabbits' eyes indicate relative agreement between the modeled and experimental values of corneal birefringence. In addition, the observed rotation in the plane of polarized light for multiple wavelengths demonstrates the potential for using a dual-wavelength polarimetric approach to overcome the noise due to timevarying corneal birefringence. These results will ultimately aid us in the development of an appropriate eye coupling mechanism for in vivo polarimetric glucose measurements.

  3. Imager-to-Radiometer In-flight Cross Calibration: RSP Radiometric Comparison with Airborne and Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), which takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI). First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  4. Oil Detection in a Coastal Marsh with Polarimetric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, E.; Rangoonwala, A.; Suzuoki, Y.; Bannister, T.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA UAVSAR was deployed June 2010 to support Deep Water Horizon oil spill response activities expressly, oil characterization, oil detection in wetlands, and coastal resource impact detection and recovery. The UAVSAR demonstrated enhanced capability to act rapidly and provide targeted mapping responses. Our research focused on the effectiveness of high spatial resolution and fully polarimetric L-band SAR for mapping oil in wetlands, specifically within Barataria Bay in eastern coastal Louisiana (Fig.). The Bay contained numerous site observations confirming spatially extensive shoreline oil impacts, multiple UAVSAR collections, and a near anniversary 2009 collection. PolSAR oil detection relied on decomposition and subsequent classifications of the single look complex (SLC) scenes. Initial analyses results found that shoreline marsh structural damage accompanied by oil occurrence were exhibited as anomalous features on post-spill SLC flightlines but were not evident on the pre-spill SLC flightline collected in 2009. Pre-spill and post-spill Freeman-Durden (FD) and Cloude-Pottier (CP) decompositions and Wishart classifications seeded with the FD and CP classes (Wishart-FD, Wishart-CP)also highlighted these nearshore features as a change in dominate scatter. In addition, all decompositions and classifications identify a class of interior marshes within the central core of the study region that reproduce spatially extensive changes in backscatter exhibited on the pre-spill and post-spill SLC image comparisons and on all post-spill SLC images. The FD and CP decompositions revealed that the change is associated with a transform of dominant scatter from primarily surface or volume to double or even bounce. As a preponderance of evidence supports the penetration of oil-polluted waters into interior marshes, it is reasonable that marshes exhibiting different backscatter in the pre-spill and post-spill SLC renditions, identify interior marshes exposed to flushing

  5. Characterising soil surface roughness with a frequency modulated polarimetric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Manuel; Gronz, Oliver; Beiske, Joshua; Klein, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    electromagnetic waves. A systematic change of the signals with changing roughness is also observed. Measurements show a significant influence of the angle of observation. Soil moisture shows also an influence on the reflected signal, but is quite well differentiable to the effects of the shape of the soil's surface. The results show that polarimetric radar technology may be suitable to characterise the surface of soils, but still faces a big lack of knowledge on how to quantify and differentiate the different signals, how to handle variable observation angles, and finally how to characterise roughness.

  6. Comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR): Polarimetric and photometric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbush, V. K.; Velichko, F. P.; Kiselev, N. N.; Velichko, S. F.; Shakhovskoy, N. M.; Efimov, Yu. S.; Antonyuk, K. A.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Shakhovskoy, D. N.

    2006-05-01

    We present the results of polarimetric and photometric observations of dynamically new comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) at phase angles from 6° to 26°. During the observations, the comet was at a distance of 2.7 1.3 AU from the Sun and 1.7 2.0 AU from the Earth. The aperture polarimetry was made with the 2.6-m Shain telescope and the 1.25-m AZT-11 telescope of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and with the 0.7-m telescope of the Astronomical Institute of the Kharkiv National University during the period from November 21, 2003, to February 21, 2004. The wideband UBVRI and WRC (λ7228/1142 Å) filters and the narrowband GC (λ5260/56 Å) filter were used. The photometric observations of the comet were carried out on February 21, 2004, with narrowband filters isolated the BC (λ4845/65 Å) and RC (λ6840/90 Å) continuum and the C2 emission (λ5140/90 Å). The phase-angle dependence of linear polarization of the comet has been obtained, and its parameters, such as the minimal polarization P min = -1.63%, the phase angle of the minimal polarization αmin = 10.6°, the inversion angle αinv = 22.7°, and the slope of the phase curve at the inversion angle h = 0.24% per degree, were found. From the photometric observations, the following quantities have been obtained: the column density of molecules C2 in the line of sight logN (C2) = -9.15 mol/cm2 and their production rate log Q (C2) = 27.11 mol/s, the spectral gradient of reflectivity for the dust S‧(BC, RC) ≈ 3%/1000 Å, and the dust production parameter Afρ equal to 371 and 273 cm for the blue and red continuum ranges, respectively. According to these results, the physical parameters of comet C/2002 T7 are close to the average characteristics of typical dusty comets.

  7. Analysis of Radarsat-2 Full Polarimetric Data for Forest Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Yasser

    Forests are a major natural resource of the Earth and control a wide range of environmental processes. Forests comprise a major part of the planet's plant biodiversity and have an important role in the global hydrological and biochemical cycles. Among the numerous potential applications of remote sensing in forestry, forest mapping plays a vital role for characterization of the forest in terms of species. Particularly, in Canada where forests occupy 45% of the territory, representing more than 400 million hectares of the total Canadian continental area. In this thesis, the potential of polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) Radarsat-2 data for forest mapping is investigated. This thesis has two principle objectives. First is to propose algorithms for analyzing the PolSAR image data for forest mapping. There are a wide range of SAR parameters that can be derived from PolSAR data. In order to make full use of the discriminative power offered by all these parameters, two categories of methods are proposed. The methods are based on the concept of feature selection and classifier ensemble. First, a nonparametric definition of the evaluation function is proposed and hence the methods NFS and CBFS. Second, a fast wrapper algorithm is proposed for the evaluation function in feature selection and hence the methods FWFS and FWCBFS. Finally, to incorporate the neighboring pixels information in classification an extension of the FWCBFS method i.e. CCBFS is proposed. The second objective of this thesis is to provide a comparison between leaf-on (summer) and leaf-off (fall) season images for forest mapping. Two Radarsat-2 images acquired in fine quad-polarized mode were chosen for this study. The images were collected in leaf-on and leaf-off seasons. We also test the hypothesis whether combining the SAR parameters obtained from both images can provide better results than either individual datasets. The rationale for this combination is that every dataset has some parameters which may be

  8. Assimilation of Dual-Polarimetric Radar Observations with WRF GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Fehnel, Traci; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Dual-polarimetric (dual-pol) radar typically transmits both horizontally and vertically polarized radio wave pulses. From the two different reflected power returns, more accurate estimate of liquid and solid cloud and precipitation can be provided. The upgrade of the traditional NWS WSR-88D radar to include dual-pol capabilities will soon be completed for the entire NEXRAD network. Therefore, the use of dual-pol radar network will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The assimilation of dual-pol radar data is especially challenging as few guidelines have been provided by previous research. It is our goal to examine how to best use dual-pol radar data to improve forecast of severe storm and forecast initialization. In recent years, the Development Testbed Center (DTC) has released the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) DA system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this study explores regional assimilation of the dual-pol radar variables from the WSR-88D radars for real case storms. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on incorporating the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and radial velocity (VR) data for initializing convective storms, with a significant focus being on an improved representation of hydrometeor fields. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to dual-pol variables. Beyond the dual-pol variable assimilation procedure developing within a GSI framework, highresolution (=1 km) WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast

  9. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  10. Synthetic cathinone abuse

    PubMed Central

    Capriola, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The abuse of synthetic cathinones, widely known as bath salts, has been increasing since the mid-2000s. These substances are derivatives of the naturally occurring compound cathinone, which is the primary psychoactive component of khat. The toxicity of synthetic cathinones includes significant sympathomimetic effects, as well as psychosis, agitation, aggression, and sometimes violent and bizarre behavior. Mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone are currently the predominantly abused synthetic cathinones. PMID:23869180

  11. Detection of oyster habitat in tidal flats using multi-frequency polarimetric SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Byung-Hun; Kim, Duk-jin; Hwang, Ji-Hwan; Oh, Yisok; Moon, Wooil M.

    2012-01-01

    Exposed oyster reefs in tidal flats have complex and rough surfaces because of their unique surface texture, which are quite distinct from the surrounding mud or sand flats. Here we investigate the microwave signatures, backscattered from naturally distributed oyster reefs in tidal flats, utilizing the polarimetric analysis techniques to fully polarimetric RADARSAT-2 (C-band) and ALOS PALSAR (L-band) data. The study areas include the tidal flats around Jebu Island and Hampyung Bay on the west coast of the Korean peninsula. We analyzed the microwave scattering mechanisms associated with oyster reefs and surrounding areas using the polarimetric target decomposition theorem and quantitatively measu ρHHVV red target depolarization effects (the cross-polarized ratio (HV/VV), the co-polarized correlation coefficient ( ρHHVV), and the co-polarized phase difference between HH and VV). On the basis of a large increase in the cross-polarized backscattering (HV) in the C-band SAR data, one can observe strong volume (or multiple) scattering and depolarization effects over oyster reefs areas, whereas only surface scattering was dominant in most parts of the background tidal areas. In oyster reefs, the proportion of volume scattering and the cross-polarized ratio were greater than 0.7 and -8 dB, respectively. These scattering characteristics were also verified from in-situ measurements in the field using a ground-based polarimetric scatterometer system. However, almost no difference was observed between the scattering signatures of oyster reefs and background mudflat areas from L-band data, which have a considerably longer wavelength than C-band. The study clearly suggests that multi-frequency (C- and L-band) polarimetric SAR systems can be used to detect the naturally distributed oyster reefs in tidal flats.

  12. Hydrometeor classification through statistical clustering of polarimetric radar measurements: a semi-supervised approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besic, Nikola; Ventura, Jordi Figueras i.; Grazioli, Jacopo; Gabella, Marco; Germann, Urs; Berne, Alexis

    2016-09-01

    Polarimetric radar-based hydrometeor classification is the procedure of identifying different types of hydrometeors by exploiting polarimetric radar observations. The main drawback of the existing supervised classification methods, mostly based on fuzzy logic, is a significant dependency on a presumed electromagnetic behaviour of different hydrometeor types. Namely, the results of the classification largely rely upon the quality of scattering simulations. When it comes to the unsupervised approach, it lacks the constraints related to the hydrometeor microphysics. The idea of the proposed method is to compensate for these drawbacks by combining the two approaches in a way that microphysical hypotheses can, to a degree, adjust the content of the classes obtained statistically from the observations. This is done by means of an iterative approach, performed offline, which, in a statistical framework, examines clustered representative polarimetric observations by comparing them to the presumed polarimetric properties of each hydrometeor class. Aside from comparing, a routine alters the content of clusters by encouraging further statistical clustering in case of non-identification. By merging all identified clusters, the multi-dimensional polarimetric signatures of various hydrometeor types are obtained for each of the studied representative datasets, i.e. for each radar system of interest. These are depicted by sets of centroids which are then employed in operational labelling of different hydrometeors. The method has been applied on three C-band datasets, each acquired by different operational radar from the MeteoSwiss Rad4Alp network, as well as on two X-band datasets acquired by two research mobile radars. The results are discussed through a comparative analysis which includes a corresponding supervised and unsupervised approach, emphasising the operational potential of the proposed method.

  13. Investigation of Polarimetric and Electrical Characteristics of Natural and Triggered Lightning Strikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, P. T.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Hill, J. D.; Pilkey, J. T.; Ngin, T.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Winn, W. P.; Eack, K.; Trueblood, J.; Edens, H. E.

    2013-12-01

    For the past three summers, the University of Oklahoma has deployed three mobile, polarimetric radars to the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) at Camp Blanding, Florida and Langmuir Laboratory near Socorro, New Mexico for the purpose of investigating the relationship between cloud structure and the propagation of triggered and natural lightning channels. This presentation will highlight observations from select natural and triggered events at these two facilities. During the summer of 2012, University of Oklahoma radar operators made a launch recommendation to the ICLRT during the passage of Tropical Storm Debby over northeast Florida that resulted in a successful triggered flash with 11 return strokes. The trigger was attempted as precipitation streamers within the stratiform rainbands of Tropical Storm Debby approached the launch site. According to the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), there were no reported natural cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes within 60 km of the ICLRT 20 hours before and eight hours after the triggered flash. The recommendation was made based on previous analyses of the storm structure of trigger attempts from the ICLRT that indicated the coincidence of several successful triggers with descending regions of enhanced radar reflectivity, or descending precipitation packets (DePPs). Polarimetric data from the frequency-agile Rapid-scanning X-band Polarimetric (RaXPol) radar as well as data from the lightning mapping array (LMA) and electric field meter (EFM) networks from the ICLRT for this event will be presented. Past analyses also revealed ice alignment signatures in differential phase and specific differential phase as strong electric fields near the top of electrified clouds cause small ice particles to become vertically aligned. These signatures are especially noticeable for circularly polarized radars. Polarimetric data from the Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching (SMART) radar and Ra

  14. Polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids⋆. III. Results for 33 X-type objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañada-Assandri, M.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Benavidez, P.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: We present results of a polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (Casleo), San Juan, Argentina. The aims of this survey are to increase the database of asteroid polarimetry, to estimate diversity in polarimetric properties of asteroids that belong to different taxonomic classes, and to search for objects that exhibit anomalous polarimetric properties. Methods: The data were obtained with the Torino and CASPROF polarimeters at the 2.15 m telescope. The Torino polarimeter is an instrument that allows the simultaneous measurement of polarization in five different bands, and the CASPROF polarimeter is a two-hole aperture polarimeter with rapid modulation. Results: The survey began in 2003, and up to 2009 data of a sample of more than 170 asteroids were obtained. In this paper the results for 33 X-type objects are presented, several of them are being polarimetrically observed for the first time. Using these data we found polarization curves and polarimetric parameters for different groups among this taxonomic class and that there are objects with very different albedo in the sub-classes of the X taxonomic complex. Based on observations carried out at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/542/A11

  15. Towards automated mapping of lake ice using RADARSAT-2 and simulated RCM compact polarimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, Claude

    2016-04-01

    The Canadian Ice Service (CIS) produces a weekly ice fraction product (a text file with a single lake-wide ice fraction value, in tenth, estimated for about 140 large lakes across Canada and northern United States) created from the visual interpretation of RADARSAT-2 ScanSAR dual-polarization (HH and HV) imagery, complemented by optical satellite imagery (AVHRR, MODIS and VIIRS). The weekly ice product is generated in support of the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) needs for lake ice coverage in their operational numerical weather prediction model. CIS is interested in moving from its current (manual) way of generating the ice fraction product to a largely automated process. With support from the Canadian Space Agency, a project was recently initiated to assess the potential of polarimetric SAR data for lake ice cover mapping in light of the upcoming RADARSAT Constellation Mission (to be launched in 2018). The main objectives of the project are to evaluate: 1) state-of-the-art image segmentation algorithms and 2) RADARSAT-2 polarimetric and simulated RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM) compact polarimetric SAR data for ice/open water discrimination. The goal is to identify the best segmentation algorithm and non-polarimetric/polarimetric parameters for automated lake ice monitoring at CIS. In this talk, we will present the background and context of the study as well as initial results from the analysis of RADARSAT-2 Standard Quad-Pol data acquired during the break-up and freeze-up periods of 2015 on Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories.

  16. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  17. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  18. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  19. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  20. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-jin; Jung, Jungkyo; Kang, Ki-mook; Kim, Seung Hee; Xu, Zhen; Hensley, Scott; Swan, Aaron; Duersch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge. PMID:26437413

  1. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-jin; Jung, Jungkyo; Kang, Ki-mook; Kim, Seung Hee; Xu, Zhen; Hensley, Scott; Swan, Aaron; Duersch, Michael

    2015-09-30

    Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge.

  2. 3D parallel inversion of time-domain airborne EM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun-He; Yin, Chang-Chun; Ren, Xiu-Yan; Qiu, Chang-Kai

    2016-12-01

    To improve the inversion accuracy of time-domain airborne electromagnetic data, we propose a parallel 3D inversion algorithm for airborne EM data based on the direct Gauss-Newton optimization. Forward modeling is performed in the frequency domain based on the scattered secondary electrical field. Then, the inverse Fourier transform and convolution of the transmitting waveform are used to calculate the EM responses and the sensitivity matrix in the time domain for arbitrary transmitting waves. To optimize the computational time and memory requirements, we use the EM "footprint" concept to reduce the model size and obtain the sparse sensitivity matrix. To improve the 3D inversion, we use the OpenMP library and parallel computing. We test the proposed 3D parallel inversion code using two synthetic datasets and a field dataset. The time-domain airborne EM inversion results suggest that the proposed algorithm is effective, efficient, and practical.

  3. Routing architecture and security for airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei; Xie, Peng; Li, Jason; Xu, Roger; Levy, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Airborne networks are envisioned to provide interconnectivity for terrestial and space networks by interconnecting highly mobile airborne platforms. A number of military applications are expected to be used by the operator, and all these applications require proper routing security support to establish correct route between communicating platforms in a timely manner. As airborne networks somewhat different from traditional wired and wireless networks (e.g., Internet, LAN, WLAN, MANET, etc), security aspects valid in these networks are not fully applicable to airborne networks. Designing an efficient security scheme to protect airborne networks is confronted with new requirements. In this paper, we first identify a candidate routing architecture, which works as an underlying structure for our proposed security scheme. And then we investigate the vulnerabilities and attack models against routing protocols in airborne networks. Based on these studies, we propose an integrated security solution to address routing security issues in airborne networks.

  4. Data Integration: Airborne Data Collections Provide Opportunity for Creative Data Management at ASF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanches, R. R.; Wolf, V. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) archives and distributes processed airborne data collections, including the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), the Alaska High Altitude Photography (AHAP) Collection, the USGS Glacier Collection, and various other photo collections over Alaska. Each dataset presents different management challenges that are being solved using a variety of technological methods. The mechanism for collecting Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data differs greatly from the methods used to collect satellite-borne SAR data. As a result, metadata for airborne SAR are more complex and are have larger file size than other SAR datasets at ASF. Variations in data format require the need to manipulate the data products as they are ingested at ASF, creating zipped files to reduce the overall volume of individual products, to develop new data products, and tools to promote inter-operability. A goal of the facility is to offer all of the collections through web based interfaces, provide the opportunity for faster download speed, to download the data at several different resolutions, provide bulk download options, and allow for easy data discovery over the customer's selected area of interest. The UAVSAR and AirSAR data collections are digital and fully available online through the ASF data pool. The data are downloaded through a new web interface, designed to facilitate the discovery of online data resources. The aerial photo collections are dominantly hard copies of images, or in film format. Creating logical, systematic, minimum metadata standards for airborne data is a critical step for easy data discovery.

  5. Designing synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2014-03-21

    Synthetic biology is frequently defined as the application of engineering design principles to biology. Such principles are intended to streamline the practice of biological engineering, to shorten the time required to design, build, and test synthetic gene networks. This streamlining of iterative design cycles can facilitate the future construction of biological systems for a range of applications in the production of fuels, foods, materials, and medicines. The promise of these potential applications as well as the emphasis on design has prompted critical reflection on synthetic biology from design theorists and practicing designers from many fields, who can bring valuable perspectives to the discipline. While interdisciplinary connections between biologists and engineers have built synthetic biology via the science and the technology of biology, interdisciplinary collaboration with artists, designers, and social theorists can provide insight on the connections between technology and society. Such collaborations can open up new avenues and new principles for research and design, as well as shed new light on the challenging context-dependence-both biological and social-that face living technologies at many scales. This review is inspired by the session titled "Design and Synthetic Biology: Connecting People and Technology" at Synthetic Biology 6.0 and covers a range of literature on design practice in synthetic biology and beyond. Critical engagement with how design is used to shape the discipline opens up new possibilities for how we might design the future of synthetic biology.

  6. Application of a New Polarimetric Filter to RADARSAT-2 Data of Deception Island (antarctic Peninsula Region) for Surface Cover Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaso, S.; Schmid, T.; Lopez-Martinez, J.; D'Hondt, O.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach to analyse and quantify land surface covers on Deception Island, a volcanic island located in the Northern Antarctic Peninsula region by means of fully polarimetric RADARSAT-2 (C-Band) SAR image. Data have been filtered by a new polarimetric speckle filter (PolSAR-BLF) that is based on the bilateral filter. This filter is locally adapted to the spatial structure of the image by relying on pixel similarities in both the spatial and the radiometric domains. Thereafter different polarimetric features have been extracted and selected before being geocoded. These polarimetric parameters serve as a basis for a supervised classification using the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. Finally, a map of landform is generated based on the result of the SVM results.

  7. Construction of Polarimetric Radar-Based Reference Rain Maps for the Iowa Flood Studies Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter; Wolff, David; Krajewski, Witek; Gatlin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) campaign was conducted in central and northeastern Iowa during the months of April-June, 2013. Specific science objectives for IFloodS included quantification of uncertainties in satellite and ground-based estimates of precipitation, 4-D characterization of precipitation physical processes and associated parameters (e.g., size distributions, water contents, types, structure etc.), assessment of the impact of precipitation estimation uncertainty and physical processes on hydrologic predictive skill, and refinement of field observations and data analysis approaches as they pertain to future GPM integrated hydrologic validation and related field studies. In addition to field campaign archival of raw and processed satellite data (including precipitation products), key ground-based platforms such as the NASA NPOL S-band and D3R Ka/Ku-band dual-polarimetric radars, University of Iowa X-band dual-polarimetric radars, a large network of paired rain gauge platforms, and a large network of 2D Video and Parsivel disdrometers were deployed. In something of a canonical approach, the radar (NPOL in particular), gauge and disdrometer observational assets were deployed to create a consistent high-quality distributed (time and space sampling) radar-based ground "reference" rainfall dataset, with known uncertainties, that could be used for assessing the satellite-based precipitation products at a range of space/time scales. Subsequently, the impact of uncertainties in the satellite products could be evaluated relative to the ground-benchmark in coupled weather, land-surface and distributed hydrologic modeling frameworks as related to flood prediction. Relative to establishing the ground-based "benchmark", numerous avenues were pursued in the making and verification of IFloodS "reference" dual-polarimetric radar-based rain maps, and this study documents the process and results as they pertain specifically

  8. Construction of Polarimetric Radar-Based Reference Rain Maps for the Iowa Flood Studies Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Walt; Krajewski, Witek; Wolff, David; Gatlin, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) campaign was conducted in central and northeastern Iowa during the months of April-June, 2013. Specific science objectives for IFloodS included quantification of uncertainties in satellite and ground-based estimates of precipitation, 4-D characterization of precipitation physical processes and associated parameters (e.g., size distributions, water contents, types, structure etc.), assessment of the impact of precipitation estimation uncertainty and physical processes on hydrologic predictive skill, and refinement of field observations and data analysis approaches as they pertain to future GPM integrated hydrologic validation and related field studies. In addition to field campaign archival of raw and processed satellite data (including precipitation products), key ground-based platforms such as the NASA NPOL S-band and D3R Ka/Ku-band dual-polarimetric radars, University of Iowa X-band dual-polarimetric radars, a large network of paired rain gauge platforms, and a large network of 2D Video and Parsivel disdrometers were deployed. In something of a canonical approach, the radar (NPOL in particular), gauge and disdrometer observational assets were deployed to create a consistent high-quality distributed (time and space sampling) radar-based ground "reference" rainfall dataset, with known uncertainties, that could be used for assessing the satellite-based precipitation products at a range of space/time scales. Subsequently, the impact of uncertainties in the satellite products could be evaluated relative to the ground-benchmark in coupled weather, land-surface and distributed hydrologic modeling frameworks as related to flood prediction. Relative to establishing the ground-based "benchmark", numerous avenues were pursued in the making and verification of IFloodS "reference" dual-polarimetric radar-based rain maps, and this study documents the process and results as they pertain specifically

  9. Polarimetric Models of Circumstellar Discs Including Aggregate Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Mahesh

    The work conducted in this thesis examines the nature of circumstellar discs by investigating irradiance and polarization of scattered light. Two circumstellar discs are investigated. Firstly, H-band high contrast imaging data on the transitional disc of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD169142 are presented. The images were obtained through the polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) technique on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the adaptive optics system NACO. Our observations use longer exposure times, allowing us to examine the edges of the disc. Analysis of the observations shows distinct signs of polarization due to circumstellar material, but due to excessive saturation and adaptive optics errors further information on the disc could not be inferred. The HD169142 disc is then modelled using the 3D radiative transfer code Hyperion. Initial models were constructed using a two disc structure, however recent PDI has shown the existence of an annular gap. In addition to this the annular gap is found not to be devoid of dust. This then led to the construction of a four-component disc structure. Estimates of the mass of dust in the gap (2.10E-6 Msun) are made as well as for the planet (1.53E-5 Msun (0.016 Mjupiter)) suspected to be responsible for causing the gap. The predicted polarization was also estimated for the disc, peaking at ~14 percent. The use of realistic dust grains (ballistic aggregate particles) in Monte Carlo code is also examined. The fortran code DDSCAT is used to calculate the scattering properties for aggregates which are used to replace the spherical grain models used by the radiative transfer code Hyperion. Currently, Hyperion uses four independent elements to define the scattering matrix, therefore the use of rotational averaging and a 50/50 percent population of grains and their enantiomers were explored to reduce the number of contributing scattering elements from DDSCAT. A python script was created to extract the scattering data from the DDSCAT

  10. Determining the Index of Refraction of an Unknown Object using Passive Polarimetric Imagery Degraded by Atmospheric Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-09

    are visible in the polarimetric image. For more on polarimetric target detection see Ref. [51]. 3.1.2.2 Material Classification . Material...for ma- terial classification and object recognition in computer vision”. volume 2599, 54–63. SPIE, 1996. URL http://link.aip.org/link/?PSI/2599/54/1...remove atmospheric distortion and correctly classify the unknown object . The sec- ond classification algorithm, an enhanced version of the first

  11. Dark SPOT Detection Using Intensity and the Degree of Polarization in Fully Polarimetric SAR Images for Oil Polution Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, F.; Amini, J.

    2015-12-01

    Oil spill surveillance is of great environmental and economical interest, directly contributing to improve environmental protection. Monitoring of oil spills using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has received a considerable attention over the past few years, notably because of SAR data abilities like all-weather and day-and-night capturing. The degree of polarization (DoP) is a less computationally complex quantity characterizing a partially polarized electromagnetic field. The key to the proposed approach is making use of DoP as polarimetric information besides intensity ones to improve dark patches detection as the first step of oil spill monitoring. In the proposed approach first simple intensity threshold segmentation like Otsu method is applied to the image. Pixels with intensities below the threshold are regarded as potential dark spot pixels while the others are potential background pixels. Second, the DoP of potential dark spot pixels is estimated. Pixels with DoP below a certain threshold are the real dark-spot pixels. Choosing the threshold is a critical and challenging step. In order to solve choosing the appropriate threshold, we introduce a novel but simple method based on DoP of potential dark spot pixels. Finally, an area threshold is used to eliminate any remaining false targets. The proposed approach is tested on L band NASA/JPL UAVSAR data, covering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Comparing the obtained results from the new method with conventional approaches like Otsu, K-means and GrowCut shows better achievement of the proposed algorithm. For instance, mean square error (MSE) 65%, Overall Accuracy 20% and correlation 40% are improved.

  12. Charge-coupled device data processor for an airborne imaging radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, W. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Processing of raw analog echo data from synthetic aperture radar receiver into images on board an airborne radar platform is discussed. Processing is made feasible by utilizing charge-coupled devices (CCD). CCD circuits are utilized to perform input sampling, presumming, range correlation and azimuth correlation in the analog domain. These radar data processing functions are implemented for single-look or multiple-look imaging radar systems.

  13. Microphysical processes observed by X band polarimetric radars during the evolution of storm systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Troemel, Silke; Simmer, Clemens

    2014-05-01

    Polarimetric radars are now widely used for characterizing storm systems since they offer significant information for the improvement for atmospheric models and numerical weather prediction. Their observations allow a detailed insight into macro- and micro-physical processes during the spatial and temporal evolution of storm systems. In the frame of the initiative for High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2), which focuses on improving the accuracy of climate models in relation to cloud and precipitation processes, the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) was designed to provide a critical model evaluation at scales covered by Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models, which in turn will be used to better understand sub-grid variability and microphysical properties and processes parameterized by larger scale models. Three X-band polarimetric radars deployed in Bonn (BoXPol) and in the vicinity of Juelich (JuXPol and KiXPol), Germany, were operated together with other instruments during the HOPE campaign, in order to obtain a holistic view of precipitation systems covering both macro- and microscopic processes. Given the variability of polarimetric moments observed by polarimetric radars, the corresponding microphysical processes occurring during the development of storm cells thus can be inferred accordingly. This study focuses on the microscopic processes of storm systems which were observed by RHI (range-height indicator) scans of the three X band radars. The two frequently observed microphysical processes during the HOPE campaign, coalescence and differential sedimentation, will be shown, and the evolution of droplet size distributions (DSDs) will be also analyzed. The associated DSDs which are retrieved using radar measured polarimetric moments are further verified by the polarimetric forward operator where the assumptions of non-spherical hydrometeors have been embedded. The results indicate that the estimated

  14. Detection of airborne polyoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGarrity, G. J.; Dion, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Polyoma virus was recovered from the air of an animal laboratory housing mice infected with the virus. Air samples were obtained by means of a high volume air sampler and further concentrated by high speed centrifugation. Total concentration of the air samples was 7.5 x 10(7). Assay for polyoma virus was by mouse antibody production tests. Airborne polyoma virus was detected in four of six samples. PMID:211163

  15. The Future of Airborne Reconnaissance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    biplanes to the worldwide Cold War missions of the U - 2 and SR-71, airborne reconnaissance has become an indispensable tool to the intelligence community...Reconnaissance Operations (SRO) procedures, such as the U - 2 , RC- 135, and the EP-3, and traditional theater/fleet tactical reconnaissance systems like...upgraded sensor package on the U -2.14 The Army Staffs argument centers around command and control of the asset. The Army agreed that the U - 2 ’s

  16. Synthetic biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Eric; Süel, Gürol M.

    2013-09-01

    Despite their obvious relationship and overlap, the field of physics is blessed with many insightful laws, while such laws are sadly absent in biology. Here we aim to discuss how the rise of a more recent field known as synthetic biology may allow us to more directly test hypotheses regarding the possible design principles of natural biological networks and systems. In particular, this review focuses on synthetic gene regulatory networks engineered to perform specific functions or exhibit particular dynamic behaviors. Advances in synthetic biology may set the stage to uncover the relationship of potential biological principles to those developed in physics.

  17. Synthetic aperture ladar concept for infrastructure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Marchese, Linda; Terroux, Marc; Bergeron, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Long range surveillance of infrastructure is a critical need in numerous security applications, both civilian and military. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) continues to provide high resolution radar images in all weather conditions from remote distances. As well, Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and Differential Interferometric SAR (D-InSAR) have become powerful tools adding high resolution elevation and change detection measurements. State of the art SAR systems based on dual-use satellites are capable of providing ground resolutions of one meter; while their airborne counterparts obtain resolutions of 10 cm. D-InSAR products based on these systems could produce cm-scale vertical resolution image products. Deformation monitoring of railways, roads, buildings, cellular antennas, power structures (i.e., power lines, wind turbines, dams, or nuclear plants) would benefit from improved resolution, both in the ground plane and vertical direction. The ultimate limitation to the achievable resolution of any imaging system is its wavelength. State-of-the art SAR systems are approaching this limit. The natural extension to improve resolution is to thus decrease the wavelength, i.e. design a synthetic aperture system in a different wavelength regime. One such system offering the potential for vastly improved resolution is Synthetic Aperture Ladar (SAL). This system operates at infrared wavelengths, ten thousand times smaller than radar wavelengths. This paper presents a laboratory demonstration of a scaled-down infrastructure deformation monitoring with an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Ladar (IFSAL) system operating at 1.5 μm. Results show sub-millimeter precision on the deformation applied to the target.

  18. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  19. Performance Considerations for the SIMPL Single Photon, Polarimetric, Two-Color Laser Altimeter as Applied to Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Philip W.; Harding, David J.; Valett, Susan R.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Yu, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) is a multi-beam, micropulse airborne laser altimeter that acquires active and passive polarimetric optical remote sensing measurements at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. SIMPL was developed to demonstrate advanced measurement approaches of potential benefit for improved, more efficient spaceflight laser altimeter missions. SIMPL data have been acquired for wide diversity of forest types in the summers of 2010 and 2011 in order to assess the potential of its novel capabilities for characterization of vegetation structure and composition. On each of its four beams SIMPL provides highly-resolved measurements of forest canopy structure by detecting single-photons with 15 cm ranging precision using a narrow-beam system operating at a laser repetition rate of 11 kHz. Associated with that ranging data SIMPL provides eight amplitude parameters per beam unlike the single amplitude provided by typical laser altimeters. Those eight parameters are received energy that is parallel and perpendicular to that of the plane-polarized transmit pulse at 532 nm (green) and 1064 nm (near IR), for both the active laser backscatter retro-reflectance and the passive solar bi-directional reflectance. This poster presentation will cover the instrument architecture and highlight the performance of the SIMPL instrument with examples taken from measurements for several sites with distinct canopy structures and compositions. Specific performance areas such as probability of detection, after pulsing, and dead time, will be highlighted and addressed, along with examples of their impact on the measurements and how they limit the ability to accurately model and recover the canopy properties. To assess the sensitivity of SIMPL's measurements to canopy properties an instrument model has been implemented in the FLIGHT radiative transfer code, based on Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport. SIMPL data collected in 2010 over

  20. Polarimetric Decomposition Analysis of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Slick Using L-Band UAVSAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Cathleen; Minchew, Brent; Holt, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    We report here an analysis of the polarization dependence of L-band radar backscatter from the main slick of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, with specific attention to the utility of polarimetric decomposition analysis for discrimination of oil from clean water and identification of variations in the oil characteristics. For this study we used data collected with the UAVSAR instrument from opposing look directions directly over the main oil slick. We find that both the Cloude-Pottier and Shannon entropy polarimetric decomposition methods offer promise for oil discrimination, with the Shannon entropy method yielding the same information as contained in the Cloude-Pottier entropy and averaged in tensity parameters, but with significantly less computational complexity