Science.gov

Sample records for airborne precision spacing

  1. A Concept for Airborne Precision Spacing for Dependent Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Baxley, Brian T.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Smith, Colin L.; Shay, Richard F.; Hubbs, Clay

    2012-01-01

    The Airborne Precision Spacing concept of operations has been previously developed to support the precise delivery of aircraft landing successively on the same runway. The high-precision and consistent delivery of inter-aircraft spacing allows for increased runway throughput and the use of energy-efficient arrivals routes such as Continuous Descent Arrivals and Optimized Profile Descents. This paper describes an extension to the Airborne Precision Spacing concept to enable dependent parallel approach operations where the spacing aircraft must manage their in-trail spacing from a leading aircraft on approach to the same runway and spacing from an aircraft on approach to a parallel runway. Functionality for supporting automation is discussed as well as procedures for pilots and controllers. An analysis is performed to identify the required information and a new ADS-B report is proposed to support these information needs. Finally, several scenarios are described in detail.

  2. Airborne Precision Spacing for Dependent Parallel Operations Interface Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Paul M.; Takallu, M. A.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Weiser, Jarold; Turner, Dexter

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a usability study of proposed cockpit interfaces to support Airborne Precision Spacing (APS) operations for aircraft performing dependent parallel approaches (DPA). NASA has proposed an airborne system called Pair Dependent Speed (PDS) which uses their Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes (ASTAR) algorithm to manage spacing intervals. Interface elements were designed to facilitate the input of APS-DPA spacing parameters to ASTAR, and to convey PDS system information to the crew deemed necessary and/or helpful to conduct the operation, including: target speed, guidance mode, target aircraft depiction, and spacing trend indication. In the study, subject pilots observed recorded simulations using the proposed interface elements in which the ownship managed assigned spacing intervals from two other arriving aircraft. Simulations were recorded using the Aircraft Simulation for Traffic Operations Research (ASTOR) platform, a medium-fidelity simulator based on a modern Boeing commercial glass cockpit. Various combinations of the interface elements were presented to subject pilots, and feedback was collected via structured questionnaires. The results of subject pilot evaluations show that the proposed design elements were acceptable, and that preferable combinations exist within this set of elements. The results also point to potential improvements to be considered for implementation in future experiments.

  3. Airborne Precision Spacing (APS) Dependent Parallel Arrivals (DPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Colin L.

    2012-01-01

    The Airborne Precision Spacing (APS) team at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has been developing a concept of operations to extend the current APS concept to support dependent approaches to parallel or converging runways along with the required pilot and controller procedures and pilot interfaces. A staggered operations capability for the Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes (ASTAR) tool was developed and designated as ASTAR10. ASTAR10 has reached a sufficient level of maturity to be validated and tested through a fast-time simulation. The purpose of the experiment was to identify and resolve any remaining issues in the ASTAR10 algorithm, as well as put the concept of operations through a practical test.

  4. Simulation Results for Airborne Precision Spacing along Continuous Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a fast-time simulation experiment and a high-fidelity simulator validation with merging streams of aircraft flying Continuous Descent Arrivals through generic airspace to a runway at Dallas-Ft Worth. Aircraft made small speed adjustments based on an airborne-based spacing algorithm, so as to arrive at the threshold exactly at the assigned time interval behind their Traffic-To-Follow. The 40 aircraft were initialized at different altitudes and speeds on one of four different routes, and then merged at different points and altitudes while flying Continuous Descent Arrivals. This merging and spacing using flight deck equipment and procedures to augment or implement Air Traffic Management directives is called Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing, an important subset of a larger Airborne Precision Spacing functionality. This research indicates that Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing initiated while at cruise altitude and well prior to the Terminal Radar Approach Control entry can significantly contribute to the delivery of aircraft at a specified interval to the runway threshold with a high degree of accuracy and at a reduced pilot workload. Furthermore, previously documented work has shown that using a Continuous Descent Arrival instead of a traditional step-down descent can save fuel, reduce noise, and reduce emissions. Research into Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing is a cooperative effort between government and industry partners.

  5. Research Of Airborne Precision Spacing to Improve Airport Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Baxley, Brian T.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In September 2004, the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL) and the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation to mutually develop, modify, test, and evaluate systems, procedures, facilities, and devices to meet the need for safe and efficient air navigation and air traffic control in the future. In the United States and Europe, these efforts are defined within the architectures of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Program and Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) Program respectively. Both programs have identified Airborne Spacing as a critical component, with Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) as a key enabler. Increased interest in reducing airport community noise and the escalating cost of aviation fuel has led to the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures to reduce noise, emissions, and fuel usage compared to current procedures. To provide these operational enhancements, arrival flight paths into terminal areas are planned around continuous vertical descents that are closer to an optimum trajectory than those in use today. The profiles are designed to be near-idle descents from cruise altitude to the Final Approach Fix (FAF) and are typically without any level segments. By staying higher and faster than conventional arrivals, CDAs also save flight time for the aircraft operator. The drawback is that the variation of optimized trajectories for different types and weights of aircraft requires the Air Traffic Controller to provide more airspace around an aircraft on a CDA than on a conventional arrival procedure. This additional space decreases the throughput rate of the destination airport. Airborne self-spacing concepts have been developed to increase the throughput at high-demand airports by managing the inter-arrival spacing to be more precise and consistent using on-board guidance. It has been proposed that the

  6. Performance of Airborne Precision Spacing Under Realistic Wind Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Frederick; Santos, Michel; Krueger, William; Houston, Vincent E.

    2011-01-01

    With the expected worldwide increase of air traffic during the coming decade, both the Federal Aviation Administration s (FAA s) Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), as well as Eurocontrol s Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) program have, as part of their plans, air traffic management solutions that can increase performance without requiring time-consuming and expensive infrastructure changes. One such solution involves the ability of both controllers and flight crews to deliver aircraft to the runway with greater accuracy than is possible today. Previous research has shown that time-based spacing techniques, wherein the controller assigns a time spacing to each pair of arriving aircraft, is one way to achieve this goal by providing greater runway delivery accuracy that produces a concomitant increase in system-wide performance. The research described herein focuses on a specific application of time-based spacing, called Airborne Precision Spacing (APS), which has evolved over the past ten years. This research furthers APS understanding by studying its performance with realistic wind conditions obtained from atmospheric sounding data and with realistic wind forecasts obtained from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) short-range weather forecast. In addition, this study investigates APS performance with limited surveillance range, as provided by the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system, and with an algorithm designed to improve APS performance when an ADS-B signal is unavailable. The results presented herein quantify the runway threshold delivery accuracy of APS un-der these conditions, and also quantify resulting workload metrics such as the number of speed changes required to maintain spacing.

  7. Evaluation of Airborne Precision Spacing in a Human-in-the-Loop Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.

    2005-01-01

    A significant bottleneck in the current air traffic system occurs at the runway. Expanding airports and adding new runways will help solve this problem; however, this comes with significant costs: financially, politically and environmentally. A complementary solution is to safely increase the capacity of current runways. This can be achieved by precisely spacing aircraft at the runway threshold, with a resulting reduction in the spacing bu er required under today s operations. At NASA's Langley Research Center, the Airspace Systems program has been investigating airborne technologies and procedures that will assist the flight crew in achieving precise spacing behind another aircraft. A new spacing clearance allows the pilot to follow speed cues from a new on-board guidance system called Airborne Merging and Spacing for Terminal Arrivals (AMSTAR). AMSTAR receives Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) reports from an assigned, leading aircraft and calculates the appropriate speed for the ownship to fly to achieve the desired spacing interval, time- or distance-based, at the runway threshold. Since the goal is overall system capacity, the speed guidance algorithm is designed to provide system-wide benefits and stability to a string of arriving aircraft. An experiment was recently performed at the NASA Langley Air Traffic Operations Laboratory (ATOL) to test the flexibility of Airborne Precision Spacing operations under a variety of operational conditions. These included several types of merge and approach geometries along with the complementary merging and in-trail operations. Twelve airline pilots and four controllers participated in this simulation. Performance and questionnaire data were collected from a total of eighty-four individual arrivals. The pilots were able to achieve precise spacing with a mean error of 0.5 seconds and a standard deviation of 4.7 seconds. No statistically significant di erences in spacing performance were found between in

  8. Airborne Precision Spacing: A Trajectory-based Approach to Improve Terminal Area Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Airborne Precision Spacing has been developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) over the past seven years as an attempt to benefit from the capabilities of the flight deck to precisely space their aircraft relative to another aircraft. This development has leveraged decades of work on improving terminal area operations, especially the arrival phase. With APS operations, the air traffic controller instructs the participating aircraft to achieve an assigned inter-arrival spacing interval at the runway threshold, relative to another aircraft. The flight crew then uses airborne automation to manage the aircraft s speed to achieve the goal. The spacing tool is designed to keep the speed within acceptable operational limits, promote system-wide stability, and meet the assigned goal. This reallocation of tasks with the controller issuing strategic goals and the flight crew managing the tactical achievement of those goals has been shown to be feasible through simulation and flight test. A precision of plus or minus 2-3 seconds is generally achievable. Simulations of long strings of arriving traffic show no signs of instabilities or compression waves. Subject pilots have rated the workload to be similar to current-day operations and eye-tracking data substantiate this result. This paper will present a high-level review of research results over the past seven years from a variety of tests and experiments. The results will focus on the precision and accuracy achievable, flow stability and some major sources of uncertainty. The paper also includes a summary of the flight crew s procedures and interface and a brief concept overview.

  9. Performance of Airborne Precision Spacing Under Realistic Wind Conditions and Limited Surveillance Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Frederick; Santos, Michel; Krueger, William; Houston, Vincent E.

    2011-01-01

    With the expected worldwide increase of air traffic during the coming decade, both the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), as well as Eurocontrol's Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) program have, as part of their plans, air traffic management (ATM) solutions that can increase performance without requiring time-consuming and expensive infrastructure changes. One such solution involves the ability of both controllers and flight crews to deliver aircraft to the runway with greater accuracy than they can today. Previous research has shown that time-based spacing techniques, wherein the controller assigns a time spacing to each pair of arriving aircraft, can achieve this goal by providing greater runway delivery accuracy and producing a concomitant increase in system-wide performance. The research described herein focuses on one specific application of time-based spacing, called Airborne Precision Spacing (APS), which has evolved over the past ten years. This research furthers APS understanding by studying its performance with realistic wind conditions obtained from atmospheric sounding data and with realistic wind forecasts obtained from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) short-range weather forecast. In addition, this study investigates APS performance with limited surveillance range, as provided by the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system, and with an algorithm designed to improve APS performance when ADS-B surveillance data is unavailable. The results presented herein quantify the runway threshold delivery accuracy of APS under these conditions, and also quantify resulting workload metrics such as the number of speed changes required to maintain spacing.

  10. Precise Point Positioning in the Airborne Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mowafy, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely used for positioning in the airborne mode such as in navigation as a supplementary system and for geo-referencing of cameras in mapping and surveillance by aircrafts and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) approach is an attractive positioning approach based on processing of un-differenced observations from a single GPS receiver. It employs precise satellite orbits and satellite clock corrections. These data can be obtained via the internet from several sources, e.g. the International GNSS Service (IGS). The data can also broadcast from satellites, such as via the LEX signal of the new Japanese satellite system QZSS. The PPP can achieve positioning precision and accuracy at the sub-decimetre level. In this paper, the functional and stochastic mathematical modelling used in PPP is discussed. Results of applying the PPP method in an airborne test using a small fixed-wing aircraft are presented. To evaluate the performance of the PPP approach, a reference trajectory was established by differential positioning of the same GPS observations with data from a ground reference station. The coordinate results from the two approaches, PPP and differential positioning, were compared and statistically evaluated. For the test at hand, positioning accuracy at the cm-to-decimetre was achieved for latitude and longitude coordinates and doubles that value for height estimation.

  11. Technology-enabled Airborne Spacing and Merging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, James; Barmore, Bryan; Abbott, Tetence

    2005-01-01

    Over the last several decades, advances in airborne and groundside technologies have allowed the Air Traffic Service Provider (ATSP) to give safer and more efficient service, reduce workload and frequency congestion, and help accommodate a critically escalating traffic volume. These new technologies have included advanced radar displays, and data and communication automation to name a few. In step with such advances, NASA Langley is developing a precision spacing concept designed to increase runway throughput by enabling the flight crews to manage their inter-arrival spacing from TRACON entry to the runway threshold. This concept is being developed as part of NASA s Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) project under the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies Program. Precision spacing is enabled by Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), which provides air-to-air data exchange including position and velocity reports; real-time wind information and other necessary data. On the flight deck, a research prototype system called Airborne Merging and Spacing for Terminal Arrivals (AMSTAR) processes this information and provides speed guidance to the flight crew to achieve the desired inter-arrival spacing. AMSTAR is designed to support current ATC operations, provide operationally acceptable system-wide increases in approach spacing performance and increase runway throughput through system stability, predictability and precision spacing. This paper describes problems and costs associated with an imprecise arrival flow. It also discusses methods by which Air Traffic Controllers achieve and maintain an optimum interarrival interval, and explores means by which AMSTAR can assist in this pursuit. AMSTAR is an extension of NASA s previous work on in-trail spacing that was successfully demonstrated in a flight evaluation at Chicago O Hare International Airport in September 2002. In addition to providing for precision inter-arrival spacing, AMSTAR

  12. A Brief History of Airborne Self-Spacing Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a history of seven of the more significant airborne and airborne-assisted aircraft spacing concepts that have been developed and evaluated during the past 40 years. The primary focus of the earlier concepts was on enhancing airport terminal area productivity and reducing air traffic controller workload. The more recent efforts were designed to increase runway throughput through improved aircraft spacing precision at landing. The latest concepts are aimed at supporting more fuel efficient and lower community noise operations while maintaining or increasing runway throughput efficiency.

  13. Airborne space laser communication system and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Li-zhong; Meng, Li-Xin

    2015-11-01

    Airborne space laser communication is characterized by its high speed, anti-electromagnetic interference, security, easy to assign. It has broad application in the areas of integrated space-ground communication networking, military communication, anti-electromagnetic communication. This paper introduce the component and APT system of the airborne laser communication system design by Changchun university of science and technology base on characteristic of airborne laser communication and Y12 plan, especially introduce the high communication speed and long distance communication experiment of the system that among two Y12 plans. In the experiment got the aim that the max communication distance 144Km, error 10-6 2.5Gbps - 10-7 1.5Gbps capture probability 97%, average capture time 20s. The experiment proving the adaptability of the APT and the high speed long distance communication.

  14. Airborne-Managed Spacing in Multiple Arrival Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan; Abbott, Terence; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2004-01-01

    A significant bottleneck in the current air traffic system occurs at the runway. Expanding airports and adding new runways will help solve this problem; however, this comes at a significant cost, financially, politically and environmentally. A complementary solution is to safely increase the capacity of current runways. This can be achieved by precise spacing at the runway threshold with a resulting reduction in the spacing buffer required under today s operations. At the NASA Langley Research Center, the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) Project is investigating airborne technologies and procedures that will assist the pilot in achieving precise spacing behind another aircraft. This new spacing clearance instructs the pilot to follow speed cues from a new on-board guidance system called Airborne Merging and Spacing for Terminal Arrivals (AMSTAR). AMSTAR receives Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) reports from the leading aircraft and calculates the appropriate speed for the ownership to fly in order to achieve the desired spacing interval, time or distance-based, at the runway threshold. Since the goal is overall system capacity, the speed guidance algorithm is designed to provide system benefit over individual efficiency. This paper discusses the concept of operations and design of AMSTAR to support airborne precision spacing. Results from the previous stage of development, focused only on in-trail spacing, are discussed along with the evolution of the concept to include merging of converging streams of traffic. This paper also examines how this operation might support future wake vortex-based separation and other advances in terminal area operations. Finally, the research plan for the merging capabilities, to be performed during the summer and fall of 2004 is presented.

  15. Airborne Evaluation and Demonstration of a Time-Based Airborne Inter-Arrival Spacing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary W.; Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Howell, Charles T.

    2005-01-01

    An airborne tool has been developed that allows an aircraft to obtain a precise inter-arrival time-based spacing interval from the preceding aircraft. The Advanced Terminal Area Approach Spacing (ATAAS) tool uses Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data to compute speed commands for the ATAAS-equipped aircraft to obtain this inter-arrival spacing behind another aircraft. The tool was evaluated in an operational environment at the Chicago O'Hare International Airport and in the surrounding terminal area with three participating aircraft flying fixed route area navigation (RNAV) paths and vector scenarios. Both manual and autothrottle speed management were included in the scenarios to demonstrate the ability to use ATAAS with either method of speed management. The results on the overall delivery precision of the tool, based on a target spacing of 90 seconds, were a mean of 90.8 seconds with a standard deviation of 7.7 seconds. The results for the RNAV and vector cases were, respectively, M=89.3, SD=4.9 and M=91.7, SD=9.0.

  16. Airborne Dust in Space Vehicles and Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John

    2006-01-01

    Airborne dust, suspended inside a space vehicle or in future celestial habitats, can present a serious threat to crew health if it is not controlled. During the Apollo missions to the moon, lunar dust brought inside the capsule caused eye irritation and breathing difficulty to the crew when they launched from the moon and re-acquired "microgravity." During Shuttle flights reactive and toxic dusts such as lithium hydroxide have created a risk to crew health, and fine particles from combustion events can be especially worrisome. Under nominal spaceflight conditions, airborne dusts and particles tend to be larger than on earth because of the absence of gravity settling. Aboard the ISS, dusts are effectively managed by HEPA filters, although floating dust in newly-arrived modules can be a nuisance. Future missions to the moon and to Mars will present additional challenges because of the possibility that external dust will enter the breathing atmosphere of the habitat and reach the crew's respiratory system. Testing with simulated lunar and Martian dust has shown that these materials are toxic when placed into the lungs of test animals. Defining and evaluating the physical and chemical properties of Martian dusts through robotic missions will challenge our ability to prepare better dust simulants and to determine the risk to crew health from exposure to such dusts.

  17. Trueness, Precision, and Detectability for Sampling and Analysis of Organic Species in Airborne Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recovery. precision, limits of detection and quantitation, blank levels, calibration linearity, and agreement with certified reference materials were determined for two classes of organic components of airborne particulate matter, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and hopanes usin...

  18. Precision optical interferometry in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    POINTS, an astrometric Optical interferometer with a nominal measurement accuracy of 5 microarcseconds for the angle between a pair of stars separated by about 90 deg, is presently under consideration by two divisions of NASA-OSSA. It will be a powerful new multi-disciplinary tool for astronomical research. If chosen as the TOPS-1 (Toward Other Planetary Systems) instrument by the Solar-System Exploration Division, it will perform a definitive search for extra-solar planetary systems, either finding and characterizing a large number of them or showing that they are far less numerous than now believed. If chosen as the AIM (Astrometric Interferometry Mission) by the Astrophysics Division, POINTS will open new areas of astrophysical research and change the nature of the questions being asked in some old areas. In either case. it will be the first of a new class of powerful instruments in space and will prove the technology for the larger members of that class to follow. Based on a preliminary indication of the observational needs of the two missions, we find that a single POINTS mission will meet the science objectives of both TOPS-1 and AIM. The instrument detects dispersed fringe (channel led spectrum) and therefore can tolerate large pointing errors.

  19. Data fusion techniques for object space classification using airborne laser data and airborne digital photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joong Yong

    The objective of this research is to investigate possible strategies for the fusion of airborne laser data with passive optical data for object space classification. A significant contribution of our work is the development and implementation of a data-level fusion technique, direct digital image georeferencing (DDIG). In DDIG, we use navigation data from an integrated system (composed of global positioning system (GPS) and inertial measurement unit (IMU)) to project three-dimensional data points measured with the University of Florida's airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) system onto digital aerial photographs. As an underlying math model, we use the familiar collinearity condition equations. After matching the ALSM object space points to their corresponding image space pixels, we resample the digital photographs using cubic convolution techniques. We call the resulting images pseudo-ortho-rectified images (PORI) because they are orthographic at the ground surface but still exhibit some relief displacement for elevated objects; and because they have been resampled using a interpolation technique. Our accuracy tests on these PORI images show that they are planimetrically correct to about 0.4 meters. This accuracy is sufficient to remove most of the effects of the central perspective projection and enable a meaningful fusion of the RGB data with the height and intensity data produced by the laser. PORI images may also be sufficiently accurate for many other mapping applications, and may in some applications be an attractive alternative to traditional photogrammetric techniques. A second contribution of our research is the development of several strategies for the fusion of data from airborne laser and camera systems. We have conducted our work within the sensor fusion paradigm formalized in the optical engineering community. Our work explores the fusion of these two types of data for precision mapping applications. Specifically, we combine three different types of

  20. High Resolution Airborne Digital Imagery for Precision Agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herwitz, Stanley R.

    1998-01-01

    The Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program is a NASA initiative that seeks to demonstrate the application of cost-effective aircraft and sensor technology to private commercial ventures. In 1997-98, a series of flight-demonstrations and image acquisition efforts were conducted over the Hawaiian Islands using a remotely-piloted solar- powered platform (Pathfinder) and a fixed-wing piloted aircraft (Navajo) equipped with a Kodak DCS450 CIR (color infrared) digital camera. As an ERAST Science Team Member, I defined a set of flight lines over the largest coffee plantation in Hawaii: the Kauai Coffee Company's 4,000 acre Koloa Estate. Past studies have demonstrated the applications of airborne digital imaging to agricultural management. Few studies have examined the usefulness of high resolution airborne multispectral imagery with 10 cm pixel sizes. The Kodak digital camera integrated with ERAST's Airborne Real Time Imaging System (ARTIS) which generated multiband CCD images consisting of 6 x 106 pixel elements. At the designated flight altitude of 1,000 feet over the coffee plantation, pixel size was 10 cm. The study involved the analysis of imagery acquired on 5 March 1998 for the detection of anomalous reflectance values and for the definition of spectral signatures as indicators of tree vigor and treatment effectiveness (e.g., drip irrigation; fertilizer application).

  1. Evaluation of an Airborne Spacing Concept to Support Continuous Descent Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Barmore, Bryan E.; Baxley, Brian T.; Capron, William R.; Abbott, Terence S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a human-in-the-loop experiment of an airborne spacing concept designed to support Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) operations. The use of CDAs with traditional air traffic control (ATC) techniques may actually reduce an airport's arrival throughput since ATC must provide more airspace around aircraft on CDAs due to the variances in the aircraft trajectories. The intent of airborne self-spacing, where ATC delegates the speed control to the aircraft, is to maintain or even enhance an airport s landing rate during CDA operations by precisely achieving the desired time interval between aircraft at the runway threshold. This paper describes the operational concept along with the supporting airborne spacing tool and the results of a piloted evaluation of this concept, with the focus of the evaluation on pilot acceptability of the concept during off-nominal events. The results of this evaluation show a pilot acceptance of this airborne spacing concept with little negative performance impact over conventional CDAs.

  2. A Simulation Testbed for Airborne Merging and Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Michel; Manikonda, Vikram; Feinberg, Art; Lohr, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The key innovation in this effort is the development of a simulation testbed for airborne merging and spacing (AM&S). We focus on concepts related to airports with Super Dense Operations where new airport runway configurations (e.g. parallel runways), sequencing, merging, and spacing are some of the concepts considered. We focus on modeling and simulating a complementary airborne and ground system for AM&S to increase efficiency and capacity of these high density terminal areas. From a ground systems perspective, a scheduling decision support tool generates arrival sequences and spacing requirements that are fed to the AM&S system operating on the flight deck. We enhanced NASA's Airspace Concept Evaluation Systems (ACES) software to model and simulate AM&S concepts and algorithms.

  3. A Fast-Time Simulation Environment for Airborne Merging and Spacing Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussink, Frank J. L.; Doble, Nathan A.; Barmore, Bryan E.; Singer, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    As part of NASA's Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) effort, NASA Langley Research Center is developing concepts and algorithms for merging multiple aircraft arrival streams and precisely spacing aircraft over the runway threshold. An airborne tool has been created for this purpose, called Airborne Merging and Spacing for Terminal Arrivals (AMSTAR). To evaluate the performance of AMSTAR and complement human-in-the-loop experiments, a simulation environment has been developed that enables fast-time studies of AMSTAR operations. The environment is based on TMX, a multiple aircraft desktop simulation program created by the Netherlands National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR). This paper reviews the AMSTAR concept, discusses the integration of the AMSTAR algorithm into TMX and the enhancements added to TMX to support fast-time AMSTAR studies, and presents initial simulation results.

  4. Development and Utilization of High Precision Digital Elevation Data taken by Airborne Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akutsu, Osamu; Ohta, Masataka; Isobe, Tamio; Ando, Hisamitsu, Noguchi, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masayuki

    2005-03-01

    Disasters caused by heavy rain in urban areas bring a damage such as chaos in the road and railway transport systems, power failure, breakdown of the telephone system and submersion of built up areas, subways and underground shopping arcades, etc. It is important to obtain high precision elevation data which shows the detailed landform because a slight height difference affects damages by flood very considerably. Therefore, The Geographical Survey Institute (GSI) is preparing 5m grid digital terrain model (DTM) based on precise ground elevation data taken by using airborne laser scanner. This paper describes the process and an example of the use of a 5m grid digital data set.

  5. Composite materials for precision space reflector panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.; Funk, Joan G.; Bowles, David E.; Towell, Timothy W.; Connell, John W.

    1992-01-01

    One of the critical technology needs of large precision reflectors for future astrophysical and optical communications satellites lies in the area of structural materials. Results from a materials research and development program at NASA Langley Research Center to provide materials for these reflector applications are discussed. Advanced materials that meet the reflector panel requirements are identified, and thermal, mechanical and durability properties of candidate materials after exposure to simulated space environments are compared. A parabolic, graphite-phenolic honeycomb composite panel having a surface accuracy of 70.8 microinches rms and an areal weight of 1.17 lbm/sq ft was fabricated with T50/ERL1962 facesheets, a PAEI thermoplastic surface film, and Al and SiO(x) coatings.

  6. Precise mapping of annual river bed changes based on airborne laser bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandlburger, Gottfried; Wieser, Martin; Pfeifer, Norbert; Pfennigbauer, Martin; Steinbacher, Frank; Aufleger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Airborne Laser Bathymtery (ALB) is a method for capturing relatively shallow water bodies from the air using a pulsed green laser (wavelength=532nm). While this technique was first used for mapping coastal waters only, recent progress in sensor technology has opened the field to apply ALB to running inland waters. Especially for alpine rivers the precise mapping of the channel topography is a challenging task as the flow velocities are often high and the area is difficult and/or dangerous to access by boat or by feet. Traditional mapping techniques like tachymetry or echo sounding fail in such situations while ALB provides, both, high spot position accuracy in the cm range and high spatial resolution in the dm range. Furthermore, state-of-the-art ALB systems allow simultaneous mapping of the river bed and the riparian area and, therefore, represent a comprehensive and efficient technology for mapping the entire floodplain area. The maximum penetration depth depends on, both, water turbidity and bottom reflectivity. Consequently, ALB provides the highest accuracy and resolution over bright gravel rivers with relatively clear water. We demonstrate the capability of ALB for precise mapping of river bed changes based on three flight campaigns in April, May and October 2013 at the River Pielach (Lower Austria) carried out with Riegl's VQ-820-G topo-bathymetric laser scanner. Operated at a flight height of 600m above ground with a pulse repetition rate of 510kHz (effective measurement rate 200kHz) this yielded a mean point spacing within the river bed of 20cm (i.e. point density: 25 points/m2). The positioning accuracy of the river bed points is approx. 2-5cm and depends on the overall ranging precision (20mm), the quality of the water surface model (derived from the ALB point cloud), and the signal intensity (decreasing with water depth). All in all, the obtained point cloud allowed the derivation of a dense grid model of the channel topography (0.25m cell size) for all

  7. Fast-Time Evaluations of Airborne Merging and Spacing in Terminal Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Karthik; Barmore, Bryan; Bussink, Frank; Weitz, Lesley; Dahlene, Laura

    2005-01-01

    NASA researchers are developing new airborne technologies and procedures to increase runway throughput at capacity-constrained airports by improving the precision of inter-arrival spacing at the runway threshold. In this new operational concept, pilots of equipped aircraft are cleared to adjust aircraft speed to achieve a designated spacing interval at the runway threshold, relative to a designated lead aircraft. A new airborne toolset, prototypes of which are being developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, assists pilots in achieving this objective. The current prototype allows precision spacing operations to commence even when the aircraft and its lead are not yet in-trail, but are on merging arrival routes to the runway. A series of fast-time evaluations of the new toolset were conducted at the Langley Research Center during the summer of 2004. The study assessed toolset performance in a mixed fleet of aircraft on three merging arrival streams under a range of operating conditions. The results of the study indicate that the prototype possesses a high degree of robustness to moderate variations in operating conditions.

  8. Airborne tunable diode laser sensor for high-precision concentration and flux measurements of carbon monoxide and methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, G. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Hill, G. F.; Wade, L. O.; Burney, L. G.; Ritter, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    An airborne tunable diode laser instrument is described that is capable of operating in two measurement modes. One mode provides high precision (0.1 percent CH4; 1 percent CO) measurements of CH4 and CO with a 5 second response time, and a second mode achieves the very fast response time that is necessary to make airborne eddy correlation flux measurements. Examples of data from atmospheric expeditions of the Global Tropospheric Experiment are presented.

  9. Evaluation of an Airborne Spacing Concept, On-Board Spacing Tool, and Pilot Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swieringa, Kurt; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Baxley, Brian; Hubbs, Clay

    2011-01-01

    The number of commercial aircraft operations is predicted to increase in the next ten years, creating a need for improved operational efficiency. Two areas believed to offer significant increases in efficiency are optimized profile descents and dependent parallel runway operations. It is envisioned that during both of these types of operations, flight crews will precisely space their aircraft behind preceding aircraft at air traffic control assigned intervals to increase runway throughput and maximize the use of existing infrastructure. This paper describes a human-in-the-loop experiment designed to study the performance of an onboard spacing algorithm and pilots ratings of the usability and acceptability of an airborne spacing concept that supports dependent parallel arrivals. Pilot participants flew arrivals into the Dallas Fort-Worth terminal environment using one of three different simulators located at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Langley Research Center. Scenarios were flown using Interval Management with Spacing (IM-S) and Required Time of Arrival (RTA) control methods during conditions of no error, error in the forecast wind, and offset (disturbance) to the arrival flow. Results indicate that pilots delivered their aircraft to the runway threshold within +/- 3.5 seconds of their assigned arrival time and reported that both the IM-S and RTA procedures were associated with low workload levels. In general, pilots found the IM-S concept, procedures, speeds, and interface acceptable; with 92% of pilots rating the procedures as complete and logical, 218 out of 240 responses agreeing that the IM-S speeds were acceptable, and 63% of pilots reporting that the displays were easy to understand and displayed in appropriate locations. The 22 (out of 240) responses, indicating that the commanded speeds were not acceptable and appropriate occurred during scenarios containing wind error and offset error. Concerns cited included the occurrence

  10. How to Compute a Slot Marker - Calculation of Controller Managed Spacing Tools for Efficient Descents with Precision Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the underlying principles and algorithms for computing the primary controller managed spacing (CMS) tools developed at NASA for precisely spacing aircraft along efficient descent paths. The trajectory-based CMS tools include slot markers, delay indications and speed advisories. These tools are one of three core NASA technologies integrated in NASAs ATM technology demonstration-1 (ATD-1) that will operationally demonstrate the feasibility of fuel-efficient, high throughput arrival operations using Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) and ground-based and airborne NASA technologies for precision scheduling and spacing.

  11. Multilateration with the wide-angle airborne laser ranging system: positioning precision and atmospheric effects.

    PubMed

    Bock, O

    1999-05-20

    Numerical simulations based on previously validated models for the wide-angle airborne laser ranging system are used here for assessing the precision in coordinate estimates of ground-based cube-corner retroreflectors (CCR's). It is shown that the precision can be optimized to first order as a function of instrument performance, number of laser shots (LS's), and network size. Laser beam divergence, aircraft altitude, and CCR density are only second-order parameters, provided that the number of echoes per LS is greater than 20. Thus precision in the vertical is approximately 1 mm, with a signal-to-noise ratio of 50 at nadir, a 10-km altitude, a 20 degrees beam divergence, and approximately 5 x 10(3) measurements. Scintillation and fair-weather cumulus clouds usually have negligible influence on the estimates. Laser biases and path delay are compensated for by adjustment of aircraft offsets. The predominant atmospheric effect is with mesoscale nonuniform horizontal temperature gradients, which might lead to biases near 0.5 mm. PMID:18319932

  12. Precise leveling, space geodesy and geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilinger, R.

    1981-01-01

    The implications of currently available leveling data on understanding the crustal dynamics of the continental United States are investigated. Neotectonic deformation, near surface movements, systematic errors in releveling measurements, and the implications of this information for earthquake prediction are described. Vertical crustal movements in the vicinity of the 1931 Valentine, Texas, earthquake which may represent coseismic deformation are investigated. The detection of vertical fault displacements by precise leveling in western Kentucky is reported. An empirical basis for defining releveling anomalies and its implications for crustal deformation in southern California is presented. Releveling measurements in the eastern United States and their meaning in the context of possible crustal deformation, including uplift of the Appalachian Mountains, eastward tilting of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, and apparent movements associated with a number of structural features along the east coast, are reported.

  13. Speed Control Law for Precision Terminal Area In-Trail Self Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2002-01-01

    This document describes a speed control law for precision in-trail airborne self-spacing during final approach. This control law was designed to provide an operationally viable means to obtain a desired runway threshold crossing time or minimum distance, one aircraft relative to another. The control law compensates for dissimilar final approach speeds between aircraft pairs and provides guidance for a stable final approach. This algorithm has been extensively tested in Monte Carlo simulation and has been evaluated in piloted simulation, with preliminary results indicating acceptability from operational and workload standpoints.

  14. Simulator Evaluation of Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2001-01-01

    The Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) concept is designed to support independent parallel approach operations to runways spaced as close as 2500 ft. This report describes the AILS operational concept and the results of a ground-based flight simulation experiment of one implementation of this concept. The focus of this simulation experiment was to evaluate pilot performance, pilot acceptability, and minimum miss-distances for the rare situation in which all aircraft oil one approach intrudes into the path of an aircraft oil the other approach. Results from this study showed that the design-goal mean miss-distance of 1200 ft to potential collision situations was surpassed with an actual mean miss-distance of 2236 ft. Pilot reaction times to the alerting system, which was an operational concern, averaged 1.11 sec, well below the design-goal reaction time 2.0 sec.These quantitative results and pilot subjective data showed that the AILS concept is reasonable from an operational standpoint.

  15. From Mars to Greenland: Charting gravity with space and airborne instruments - Fields, tides, methods, results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    This symposium on space and airborne techniques for measuring gravity fields, and related theory, contains papers on gravity modeling of Mars and Venus at NASA/GSFC, an integrated laser Doppler method for measuring planetary gravity fields, observed temporal variations in the earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis, high-resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data, the effect of water vapor corrections for satellite altimeter measurements of the geoid, and laboratory demonstrations of superconducting gravity and inertial sensors for space and airborne gravity measurements. Other papers are on airborne gravity measurements over the Kelvin Seamount; the accuracy of GPS-derived acceleration from moving platform tests; airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors; controlling common mode stabilization errors in airborne gravity gradiometry, GPS/INS gravity measurements in space and on a balloon, and Walsh-Fourier series expansion of the earth's gravitational potential.

  16. From Mars to Greenland: Charting gravity with space and airborne instruments - Fields, tides, methods, results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This symposium on space and airborne techniques for measuring gravity fields, and related theory, contains papers on gravity modeling of Mars and Venus at NASA/GSFC, an integrated laser Doppler method for measuring planetary gravity fields, observed temporal variations in the earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis, high-resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data, the effect of water vapor corrections for satellite altimeter measurements of the geoid, and laboratory demonstrations of superconducting gravity and inertial sensors for space and airborne gravity measurements. Other papers are on airborne gravity measurements over the Kelvin Seamount; the accuracy of GPS-derived acceleration from moving platform tests; airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors; controlling common mode stabilization errors in airborne gravity gradiometry, GPS/INS gravity measurements in space and on a balloon, and Walsh-Fourier series expansion of the earth's gravitational potential.

  17. Simulation of Terminal-Area Flight Management System Arrivals with Airborne Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Lee, Paul U.; Mercer, Joey S.; Palmer, Everett A.; Prevot, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A simulation evaluated the feasibility and potential benefits of using decision support tools to support time-based airborne spacing and merging for aircraft arriving in the terminal area on charted Flight Management System (FMS) routes. Sixteen trials were conducted in each treatment combination of a 2X2 repeated-measures design. In trials 'with ground tools' air traffic controller participants managed traffic using sequencing and spacing tools. In trials 'with air tools' approximately seventy-five percent of aircraft assigned to the primary landing runway were equipped for airborne spacing, including flight simulators flown by commercial pilots. The results indicate that airborne spacing improves spacing accuracy and is feasible for FMS operations and mixed spacing equipage. Controllers and pilots can manage spacing clearances that contain two call signs without difficulty. For best effect, both decision support tools and spacing guidance should exhibit consistently predictable performance, and merging traffic flows should be well coordinated.

  18. Improving the Precision of Astrometry for Space Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rongyu; Zhao, Changyin; Zhang, Xiaoxiang

    2014-03-01

    The data reduction method for optical space debris observations has many similarities with the one adopted for surveying near-Earth objects; however, due to several specific issues, the image degradation is particularly critical, which makes it difficult to obtain precise astrometry. An automatic image reconstruction method was developed to improve the astrometry precision for space debris, based on the mathematical morphology operator. Variable structural elements along multiple directions are adopted for image transformation, and then all the resultant images are stacked to obtain a final result. To investigate its efficiency, trial observations are made with Global Positioning System satellites and the astrometry accuracy improvement is obtained by comparison with the reference positions. The results of our experiments indicate that the influence of degradation in astrometric CCD images is reduced, and the position accuracy of both objects and stellar stars is improved distinctly. Our technique will contribute significantly to optical data reduction and high-order precision astrometry for space debris.

  19. Improving the precision of astrometry for space debris

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Rongyu; Zhao, Changyin; Zhang, Xiaoxiang

    2014-03-01

    The data reduction method for optical space debris observations has many similarities with the one adopted for surveying near-Earth objects; however, due to several specific issues, the image degradation is particularly critical, which makes it difficult to obtain precise astrometry. An automatic image reconstruction method was developed to improve the astrometry precision for space debris, based on the mathematical morphology operator. Variable structural elements along multiple directions are adopted for image transformation, and then all the resultant images are stacked to obtain a final result. To investigate its efficiency, trial observations are made with Global Positioning System satellites and the astrometry accuracy improvement is obtained by comparison with the reference positions. The results of our experiments indicate that the influence of degradation in astrometric CCD images is reduced, and the position accuracy of both objects and stellar stars is improved distinctly. Our technique will contribute significantly to optical data reduction and high-order precision astrometry for space debris.

  20. Control of airborne infectious diseases in ventilated spaces

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    2009-01-01

    We protect ourselves from airborne cross-infection in the indoor environment by supplying fresh air to a room by natural or mechanical ventilation. The air is distributed in the room according to different principles: mixing ventilation, displacement ventilation, etc. A large amount of air is supplied to the room to ensure a dilution of airborne infection. Analyses of the flow in the room show that there are a number of parameters that play an important role in minimizing airborne cross-infection. The air flow rate to the room must be high, and the air distribution pattern can be designed to have high ventilation effectiveness. Furthermore, personalized ventilation may reduce the risk of cross-infection, and in some cases, it can also reduce the source of infection. Personalized ventilation can especially be used in hospital wards, aircraft cabins and, in general, where people are in fixed positions. PMID:19740921

  1. Interval Management: Development and Implementation of an Airborne Spacing Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Penhallegon, William J.; Weitz, Lesley A.; Bone, Randall S.; Levitt, Ian; Flores Kriegsfeld, Julia A.; Arbuckle, Doug; Johnson, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Interval Management is a suite of ADS-B-enabled applications that allows the air traffic controller to instruct a flight crew to achieve and maintain a desired spacing relative to another aircraft. The flight crew, assisted by automation, manages the speed of their aircraft to deliver more precise inter-aircraft spacing than is otherwise possible, which increases traffic throughput at the same or higher levels of safety. Interval Management has evolved from a long history of research and is now seen as a core NextGen capability. With avionics standards recently published, completion of an Investment Analysis Readiness Decision by the FAA, and multiple flight tests planned, Interval Management will soon be part of everyday use in the National Airspace System. Second generation, Advanced Interval Management capabilities are being planned to provide a wider range of operations and improved performance and benefits. This paper briefly reviews the evolution of Interval Management and describes current development and deployment plans. It also reviews concepts under development as the next generation of applications.

  2. Precision Attitude Determination for an Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed performance simulations for a precision attitude determination system using a focal plane star tracker on an infrared space telescope. The telescope is being designed for the Destiny mission to measure cosmologically distant supernovae as one of the candidate implementations for the Joint Dark Energy Mission. Repeat observations of the supernovae require attitude control at the level of 0.010 arcseconds (0.05 microradians) during integrations and at repeat intervals up to and over a year. While absolute accuracy is not required, the repoint precision is challenging. We have simulated the performance of a focal plane star tracker in a multidimensional parameter space, including pixel size, read noise, and readout rate. Systematic errors such as proper motion, velocity aberration, and parallax can be measured and compensated out. Our prediction is that a relative attitude determination accuracy of 0.001 to 0.002 arcseconds (0.005 to 0.010 microradians) will be achievable.

  3. Precision Cosmic Ray physics with space-born experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incagli, Marco

    2016-07-01

    More than 100 years after their discoveries, cosmic rays have been extensively studied, both with balloon experiments and with ground observatories. More recently, the possibility of mounting detectors on satellites or on the International Space Station has allowed for a long duration (several years) continuous observation of primary cosmic rays, i.e. before their interaction with the earth atmosphere, thus opening a new regime of precision measurements. In this review, recent results from major space experiments, as Pamela, AMS02 and Fermi, as well as next generation experiments proposed for the International Space Station, for standalone satellites or for the yet to come Chinese Space Station, will be presented. The impact of these experiment on the knowledge of Cosmic Ray propagation will also be discussed.

  4. A unique approach to fabricating precision space structures elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohan, H.; Johnson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure of fabricating graphite epoxy columns used in the assembly of large space platforms is described. The requirement for precise dimensional control led to a unique hot resin injection process. Dry, high modulus fiber is wound over a vertically mounted steam-heated mandrel. A steam-heated sleeve or caul is slipped over the wound mandrel and resin is injected and cured in place. Approximately 200 column elements have been fabricated using this efficient process.

  5. Composite material technology requirements for large precision space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, P. M.; Helms, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The development of dimensionally stable, precision composite structures has been recognized as a high risk technology driver in NASA's continuing large space structures research. Attempts are being made to understand the influences controlling thermal performance in such composites, and specifically in composite sandwich panels. The necessary tools for such composite panels' deployment, the experimental verification of analytical predictions, and the demonstration of technology in small scale hardware, are presently addressed.

  6. Airborne Laser CO2 Column Measurements: Evaluation of Precision and Accuracy Under a Wide Range of Surface and Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Kooi, S. A.; Fenn, M. A.; Choi, Y.; Vay, S. A.; Harrison, F. W.; Moore, B.

    2011-12-01

    This paper discusses the latest flight test results of a multi-frequency intensity-modulated (IM) continuous-wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) that operates near 1.57 μm for remote CO2 column measurements. This IM-LAS system is under development for a future space-based mission to determine the global distribution of regional-scale CO2 sources and sinks, which is the objective of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions during Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. A prototype of the ASCENDS system, called the Multi-frequency Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), has been flight tested in eleven airborne campaigns since May 2005. This paper compares the most recent results obtained during the 2010 and 2011 UC-12 and DC-8 flight tests, where MFLL remote CO2 column measurements were evaluated against airborne in situ CO2 profile measurements traceable to World Meteorological Organization standards. The major change to the MFLL system in 2011 was the implementation of several different IM modes, which could be quickly changed in flight, to directly compare the precision and accuracy of MFLL CO2 measurements in each mode. The different IM modes that were evaluated included "fixed" IM frequencies near 50, 200, and 500 kHz; frequencies changed in short time steps (Stepped); continuously swept frequencies (Swept); and a pseudo noise (PN) code. The Stepped, Swept, and PN modes were generated to evaluate the ability of these IM modes to desensitize MFLL CO2 column measurements to intervening optically thin aerosols/clouds. MFLL was flown on the NASA Langley UC-12 aircraft in May 2011 to evaluate the newly implemented IM modes and their impact on CO2 measurement precision and accuracy, and to determine which IM mode provided the greatest thin cloud rejection (TCR) for the CO2 column measurements. Within the current hardware limitations of the MFLL system, the "fixed" 50 kHz results produced similar SNR values to those found previously. The SNR decreased as expected

  7. Stratospheric ozone isotopes observed by air-borne and space-borne submillimeter-wave heterodyne radiometry: A sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y.; Urban, J.; Takahashi, C.; Smiles Mission Team

    2003-04-01

    The variation of the isotopic composition of a species in the Earth atmosphere provides us the information on the history of the air masses, because the isotope enrichment or depletion reflects the chemical and physical processes. Since the discovery of the heavy isotope enrichment of ozone in the stratosphere in 1981 considerable progress has been made in understanding the processes that control the isotope enrichment based on atmospheric observations, laboratory experiments, and so on. However, the exact mechanism for the effect remains uncertain and accurate sequentially observations of ozone isotopomer at global scale are still very sparse. Further improvements of measurement precision can be obtained by making use of the new technological development of high-precision submillimeter-wave heterodyne radiometry based on sensitive SIS detector technology. The airborne ASUR instrument (Airborne SUb-millimeter SIS Radiometer) observed lines of asymmetric-18 ozone in the frequency region of 645 GHz with this technology since ~1994. The JEM/SMILES instrument (Japaneses Experiment Module / Superconducting sub-MIllimeter Limb Emission Sounder), to be installed on the International Space Station in 2007, will measure several ozone isotopomer in the stratosphere at global scale from space using very similar frequency bands. An error analysis including the most typical systematic errors is performed.

  8. Airborne measurements of cloud forming nuclei and aerosol particles at Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, L. F.; Langer, G.; Hindman, E. E., II

    1978-01-01

    Results of airborne measurements of the sizes and concentrations of aerosol particles, ice nuclei, and cloud condensation nuclei that were taken at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented along with a detailed description of the instrumentation and measuring capabilities of the University of Washington airborne measuring facility (Douglas B-23). Airborne measurements made at Ft. Collins, Colorado, and Little Rock, Arkansas, during the ferry of the B-23 are presented. The particle concentrations differed significantly between the clean air over Ft. Collins and the hazy air over Little Rock and Kennedy Space Center. The concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei over Kennedy Space Center were typical of polluted eastern seaboard air. Three different instruments were used to measure ice nuclei: one used filters to collect the particles, and the others used optical and acoustical methods to detect ice crystals grown in portable cloud chambers. A comparison of the ice nucleus counts, which are in good agreement, is presented.

  9. Space Technology 7 Disturbance Reduction System - precision control flight Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmain, Andrew J.; Dunn, Charles; Folkner, William; Hruby, Vlad; Spence, Doug; O'Donnell, James; Markley, Landis; Maghami, Peiman; Hsu, Oscar; Demmons, N.; Roy, T.; Gasdaska, C.; Young, J.; Connolly, W.; McCormick, R.; Gasdaska, C.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA New Millennium Program Space Technology 7 (ST7) project will validate technology for precision spacecraft control. The Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) will be part of the European Space Agency's LISA Pathfinder project. The DRS will control the position of the spacecraft relative to a reference to an accuracy of one nanometer over time scales of several thousand seconds. To perform the control, the spacecraft will use a new colloid thruster technology. The thrusters will operate over the range of 5 to 30 micro-Newtons with precision of 0.1 micro- Newton. The thrust will be generated by using a high electric field to extract charged droplets of a conducting colloid fluid and accelerating them with a precisely adjustable voltage. The control reference will be provided by the European LISA Technology Package, which will include two nearly freefloating test masses. The test mass positions and orientations will be measured using a capacitance bridge. The test mass position and attitude will be adjustable using electrostatically applied forces and torques. The DRS will control the spacecraft position with respect to one test mass while minimizing disturbances on the second test mass. The dynamic control system will cover eighteen degrees of freedom: six for each of the test masses and six for the spacecraft. After launch in late 2009 to a low Earth orbit, the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft will be maneuvered to a halo orbit about the Earth-Sun L1 Lagrange point for operations.

  10. Astrophysical Adaptation of Points, the Precision Optical Interferometer in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Babcock, Robert W.; Murison, Marc A.; Noecker, M. Charles; Phillips, James D.; Schumaker, Bonny L.; Ulvestad, James S.; McKinley, William; Zielinski, Robert J.; Lillie, Charles F.

    1996-01-01

    POINTS (Precision Optical INTerferometer in Space) would perform microarcsecond optical astrometric measurements from space, yielding submicroarcsecond astrometric results from the mission. It comprises a pair of independent Michelson stellar interferometers and a laser metrology system that measures both the critical starlight paths and the angle between the baselines. The instrument has two baselines of 2 m, each with two subapertures of 35 cm; by articulating the angle between the baselines, it observes targets separated by 87 to 93 deg. POINTS does global astrometry, i.e., it measures widely separated targets, which yields closure calibration, numerous bright reference stars, and absolute parallax. Simplicity, stability, and the mitigation of systematic error are the central design themes. The instrument has only three moving-part mechanisms, and only one of these must move with sub-milliradian precision; the other two can tolerate a precision of several tenths of a degree. Optical surfaces preceding the beamsplitter or its fold flat are interferometrically critical; on each side of the interferometer, there are only three such. Thus, light loss and wavefront distortion are minimized. POINTS represents a minimalistic design developed ab initio for space. Since it is intended for astrometry, and therefore does not require the u-v-plane coverage of an imaging, instrument, each interferometer need have only two subapertures. The design relies on articulation of the angle between the interferometers and body pointing to select targets; the observations are restricted to the 'instrument plane.' That plane, which is fixed in the pointed instrument, is defined by the sensitive direction for the two interferometers. Thus, there is no need for siderostats and moving delay lines, which would have added many precision mechanisms with rolling and sliding parts that would be required to function throughout the mission. Further, there is no need for a third interferometer

  11. A precision, thermally-activated driver for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Robert C.; Walsh, Robert F.; Kinard, William H.

    1986-01-01

    A space qualified, precision, large force, thermally-activated driver that has been developed jointly by the NASA Langley Research Center and PRC Kentron is described. The driver consists of a sealed hydraulic cylinder containing a metal bellows, a bellows plug, a coil spring, a spring retainer, and output shaft, a shaft guide, and a quantity of silicone oil. Temperature changes cause the silicone oil to expand or contract thus contracting or expanding the bellows/spring assembly thereby extending or retracting the output shaft.

  12. The instrument pointing system: Precision attitude control in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Ralf; Woelker, Albrecht

    1990-06-01

    The Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS) is a three axes gimbal system providing pointing and stabilization in the arcsec range to a variety of space experiments with a mass of up to 7000 kg. The IPS demonstrated its control performance during the maiden flight in July 1985, the Spacelab 2 mission on board the Space Shuttle Challenger. The most challenging problem for attitude control in space is the disturbance compensation in the presence of structural flexibilities. Kalman filtering based on optical sensor and gyro measurements as well as flexible mode attenuation and feedforward control were indispensable to achieve high precision. To further enhance the IPS pointing performance and versatility, a new, more autonomous computer and sensor concept has been conceived providing the capacity for a higher degree of automation as well as improved pointing and closed loop tracking control. The autonomy and control capacity of the enhanced IPS establish the basis to accommodate the IPS as long-term available tracking and pointing platform on the International Space Station Freedom (ISF).

  13. Assessment of a non-dedicated GPS receiver system for precise airborne attitude determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, M.E.; Sun, H.; Owen, T.E.; Meindl, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    The use of a non-dedicated GPS receiver system for attitude determination was assessed in airborne mode through a test conducted at Sandia National Laboratories. Four independent NovAtel GPSCard{trademark} receivers were installed in Sandia`s Twin Engine Otter with two antennas mounted on the fuselage and two on the wing tips at separations of 6 to 18 m. A strapdown INS was also on board the aircraft in order to provide an independent attitude reference at rates between 4 and 10 Hz. During the multi-day test, GPS measurements were recorded between 1 and 10 Hz. Carrier phase measurements were post-processed using a double difference approach developed at The University of Calgary in which integer ambiguities were resolved in seconds using the known antenna separations as constraints. The tracking capability of the system is demonstrated under dynamics consisting of roll and pitch angles up to 45 and 12 degrees, respectively. Comparisons between the GPS and INS attitude angles are presented for two of the test days and show agreement at the several arcminute level. Conclusions are made with respect to system accuracy and performance in an operational airborne environment.

  14. Precision Pulsar Timing with NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Walid; Lazio, Joseph; Teitelbaum, Lawrence

    2015-08-01

    Millisecond pulsars are a class of radio pulsars with extremely stable rotations. The excellent timing stability of millisecond pulsars can be used to study a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. In particular, observations of a large sample of these pulsars can be used to detect the presence of low-frequency gravitational waves. We have developed a precision pulsar timing backend for the Deep Space Network (DSN), which will allow the use of short gaps in tracking schedules to observe and time pulses from an ensemble of millisecond pulsars. The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) operates clusters of large dish antennas (up to 70-m in diameter), located roughly equi-distant around the Earth, for communication and tracking of deep-space spacecraft. The backend system will be capable of removing entirely the dispersive effects of propagation of radio waves through the interstellar medium in real-time. We will describe our development work, initial results, and prospects for future observations over the next few years.

  15. Observational Model for Precision Astrometry with the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Milman, Mark H.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a space-based 10-m baseline Michelson optical interferometer operating in the visible waveband that is designed to achieve astrometric accuracy in the single digits of the microarcsecond domain. Over a narrow field of view SIM is expected to achieve a mission accuracy of 1 microarcsecond. In this mode SIM will search for planetary companions to nearby stars by detecting the astrometric "wobble" relative to a nearby reference star. In its wide-angle mode, SIM will provide 4 microarcsecond precision absolute position measurements of stars, with parallaxes to comparable accuracy, at the end of its 5-year mission. The expected proper motion accuracy is around 3 microarcsecond/year, corresponding to a transverse velocity of 10 m/ s at a distance of 1 kpc. The basic astrometric observable of the SIM instrument is the pathlength delay. This measurement is made by a combination of internal metrology measurements that determine the distance the starlight travels through the two arms of the interferometer, and a measurement of the white light stellar fringe to find the point of equal pathlength. Because this operation requires a non-negligible integration time, the interferometer baseline vector is not stationary over this time period, as its absolute length and orientation are time varying. This paper addresses how the time varying baseline can be "regularized" so that it may act as a single baseline vector for multiple stars, as required for the solution of the astrometric equations.

  16. Prospects for Precision Measurement of CO2 Column from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Burris, John F.; Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, Elena; Miodek, Marty

    2005-01-01

    In order to address the problem of sources and sinks of CO2 measurements are needed on a global scale. Clearly a satellite is a promising approach to meeting this requirement. Unfortunately, most methods for making a CO2 measurement from space involve the whole column. Since sources and sinks at the surface represent a small perturbation to the total column one is faced with the need to measure the column with a precision better than 1%. No species has ever been measured from space at this level. We have developed over the last 3 years a small instrument based upon a Fabry-Perot interferometer that is very sensitive to atmospheric CO2 and has a high signal to noise ratio. We have tested this instrument in a ground based configuration and from aircraft platforms simulating operation from a satellite. We will present results from these tests and discuss ways that this promising new instrument could be used to improve our understanding of the global carbon budget.

  17. High-precision geometric correction of airborne remote sensing revisited: the multiquadric interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Manfred; Fogel, David N.

    1994-12-01

    For a geographic analysis of multispectral scanner data from aircraft and their integration in spatial databases and geographic integration systems (GIS), geometric registration/rectification of the scanner imagery is required as a first step. Usually, one has to rely on global mapping functions such as polynomial equations as provided by most commercial image processing systems. These techniques have been proven to be very effective and accurate for satellite images. However, there are a umber of shortcomings when this method is applied to aircraft data. We see the multiquadric interpolation method as a promising alternative. The multiquadric function was first developed for the interpolation of irregular surfaces. It could be modified, however, to be used for image correction of remotely sensed data. In this form, it is particularly suited for the rectification of remote sensing images of large scale and locally varying geometric distortions. The multiquadric interpolation method yields a perfect fit at the used control points (CPs). With this, it is necessary to withhold independent test points that can be used for accuracy assessment. Within the registration/rectification process, all CPs contribute to the geometric warping of any given pixel in the image. Their effects, however, are weighted inversely to the distances between CPs and the current pixel location. The paper presents the multiquadric interpolation techniques and demonstrates successful application with airborne scanner data.

  18. Reducing airborne pathogens and dust in commercial hatching cabinets with an electrostatic space charge system.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B W; Waltman, W D

    2003-01-01

    Commercial hatcheries typically infuse hydrogen peroxide or formaldehyde gas into hatching cabinets to reduce airborne pathogens that may lead to disease transmission during the hatch. A nonchemical option, an electrostatic space charge system (ESCS), was customized for full-sized commercial hatching cabinets and was tested extensively in broiler hatcheries. The ESCS cleans air by transferring a strong negative electrostatic charge to dust and microorganisms that are aerosolized during the hatch and collecting the charged particles on grounded plates or surfaces. In studies with three poultry companies, the ESCS resulted in significant (P < 0.0001) reductions of airborne dust of 77%-79%, in Enterobacteriaceae and fungus levels not significantly different (P > or = 0.05) from those with formaldehyde, and in 93%-96% lower Enterobacteriaceae than with no treatment or with hydrogen peroxide treatment (P < 0.01). The ESCS significantly (P < 0.05) reduced airborne Salmonella by 33%-83% compared with no treatment or hydrogen peroxide treatment. Results of this study suggest that the ESCS is a viable alternative to chemical treatment for reducing airborne pathogens in full-sized commercial hatchers, and it also provides dust control and containment, which should be helpful in reducing cross contamination and loading of ventilation ducts within different areas of the hatchery. PMID:12887184

  19. Monitoring of space weather and radioactivity using small airborne platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. Giles; Lidgard, Jeffrey; Aplin, Karen L.; Nicoll, Keri A.

    2013-04-01

    Space Weather is increasingly considered as a hazard to society's technological systems, but the effects of energetic particles within the atmosphere - with a potential implication for climate - also present an area in which new scientific knowledge needs to be developed. Routine measurements of energetic particle fluxes made above the surface have been made by the Lebedev Institute, undertaking continuous balloon-carried measurements since 1957. An underexploited measurement opportunity is presented by the conventional weather balloons (radiosondes) launched regularly globally by meteorological services, which could potentially provide a cost-effective alternative to custom balloon flights, as well as the ability to make measurements of particle fluxes at a wide range of latitudes. This work describes the development of a small disposable ionisation sensor, exploiting the well-known response of inexpensive semiconductor devices (e.g. PIN photodiodes) to ionising radiation. Such a Photodiode Radiation Detector (PRD) is particularly suitable for balloon use, as, unlike previous Geiger tube detector systems, only low bias voltages are required, which simplifies the circuitry required, reduces power consumption and entirely removes any high voltage hazard. In addition to providing count rate information, basic energy spectrum information is in principle available from pulse amplitudes generated. We discuss the evaluation and deployment considerations for the use of a PRD on a standard radiosonde platform, to operate within and alongside the existing operational meteorological requirements.

  20. Space-time airborne disease mapping applied to detect specific behaviour of varicella in Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Iftimi, Adina; Montes, Francisco; Santiyán, Ana Míguez; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Airborne diseases are one of humanity's most feared sicknesses and have regularly caused concern among specialists. Varicella is an airborne disease which usually affects children before the age of 10. Because of its nature, varicella gives rise to interesting spatial, temporal and spatio-temporal patterns. This paper studies spatio-temporal exploratory analysis tools to detect specific behaviour of varicella in the city of Valencia, Spain, from 2008 to 2013. These methods have shown a significant association between the spatial and the temporal component, confirmed by the space-time models applied to the data. High relative risk of varicella is observed in economically disadvantaged regions, areas less involved in vaccination programmes. PMID:26530821

  1. The Price of Precision: Large-Scale Mapping of Forest Structure and Biomass Using Airborne Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubayah, R.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing provides one of the best means for acquiring detailed information on forest structure. However, its application over large areas has been limited largely because of its expense. Nonetheless, extant data exist over many states in the U.S., funded largely by state and federal consortia and mainly for infrastructure, emergency response, flood plain and coastal mapping. These lidar data are almost always acquired in leaf-off seasons, and until recently, usually with low point count densities. Even with these limitations, they provide unprecedented wall-to-wall mappings that enable development of appropriate methodologies for large-scale deployment of lidar. In this talk we summarize our research and lessons learned in deriving forest structure over regional areas as part of NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS). We focus on two areas: the entire state of Maryland and Sonoma County, California. The Maryland effort used low density, leaf-off data acquired by each county in varying epochs, while the on-going Sonoma work employs state-of-the-art, high density, wall-to-wall, leaf-on lidar data. In each area we combine these lidar coverages with high-resolution multispectral imagery from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) and in situ plot data to produce maps of canopy height, tree cover and biomass, and compare our results against FIA plot data and national biomass maps. Our work demonstrates that large-scale mapping of forest structure at high spatial resolution is achievable but products may be complex to produce and validate over large areas. Furthermore, fundamental issues involving statistical approaches, plot types and sizes, geolocation, modeling scales, allometry, and even the definitions of "forest" and "non-forest" must be approached carefully. Ultimately, determining the "price of precision", that is, does the value of wall-to-wall forest structure data justify their expense, should consider not only carbon market applications

  2. Fast-Time Analysis Support for the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing (TAPSS) Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulfinger, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This poster describes research conducted using the Stochastic Terminal Area Simulation Software to determine spacing buffers for the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing human-in-the-loop simulation.

  3. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    Airborne research management and shuttle sortie planning at the Ames Research Center are reported. Topics discussed include: basic criteria and procedures for the formulation and approval of airborne missions; ASO management structure and procedures; experiment design, development, and testing aircraft characteristics and experiment interfaces; information handling for airborne science missions; mission documentation requirements; and airborne science methods and shuttle sortie planning.

  4. Precision Linear Actuator for Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) Siderostat Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant; Braun, David; Hankins, Steve; Koenig, John; Moore, Don

    2008-01-01

    'SIM PlanetQuest will exploit the classical measuring tool of astrometry (interferometry) with unprecedented precision to make dramatic advances in many areas of astronomy and astrophysics'(1). In order to obtain interferometric data two large steerable mirrors, or Siderostats, are used to direct starlight into the interferometer. A gimbaled mechanism actuated by linear actuators is chosen to meet the unprecedented pointing and angle tracking requirements of SIM. A group of JPL engineers designed, built, and tested a linear ballscrew actuator capable of performing submicron incremental steps for 10 years of continuous operation. Precise, zero backlash, closed loop pointing control requirements, lead the team to implement a ballscrew actuator with a direct drive DC motor and a precision piezo brake. Motor control commutation using feedback from a precision linear encoder on the ballscrew output produced an unexpected incremental step size of 20 nm over a range of 120 mm, yielding a dynamic range of 6,000,000:1. The results prove linear nanometer positioning requires no gears, levers, or hydraulic converters. Along the way many lessons have been learned and will subsequently be shared.

  5. Concepts, analysis and development for precision deployable space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard K.; Thomson, Mark; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Several issues surrounding the development of large Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) designs are investigated. The concerns include nonlinear dynamics of large unruly masses such as the multi-layer thermal insulation of sunshades for instruments such as the precision pointing 20-m-diameter Large Deployable Reflector (LDR). A study of the residual oscillations after bang-bang reorientation maneuvers of a rigid satellite with a string appendage is presented. Application is made to the design of a sunshade (thermal blanket) for the LDE satellite. Another concern is the development of a deployable truss that has minimum structural redundancy (such as the tetrahedral truss) and that can be configured with planar and doubly curved geometries. A kinematically synchronized articulation scheme for a deployable tetrahedral truss is presented. Called the Tetrapac, this truss is currently limited to a planar configuration that has two rings. The final concern is the development and demonstration of hardware that enables astronauts to attach large, cumbersome, and fragile precision reflector segments to an erectable truss structure. This task must be accomplished with a high degree of precision and with relative ease. A design for a Panel Attachment Device (PAD) was developed and manufactured for neutral buoyancy simulations to be performed by LaRC.

  6. Precision Laser Development for Gravitational Wave Space Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Optical fiber and semiconductor laser technologies have evolved dramatically over the last decade due to the increased demands from optical communications. We are developing a laser (master oscillator) and optical amplifier based on those technologies for interferometric space missions, such as the gravitational-wave mission LISA, and GRACE follow-on, by fully utilizing the mature wave-guided optics technologies. In space, where a simple and reliable system is preferred, the wave-guided components are advantageous over bulk, crystal-based, free-space laser, such as NPRO (Non-planar Ring Oscillator) and bulk-crystal amplifier, which are widely used for sensitive laser applications on the ground.

  7. Precision Requirements for Space-based XCO2 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. E.; Crisp, D.; DeCola, P. C.; Olsen, S. C.; Randerson, J. T.; Rayner, P.; Jacob, D.J.; Jones, D.; Suntharalingam, P.

    2005-01-01

    Precision requirements have been determined for the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction (X(sub CO2)) data products to be delivered by the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO). These requirements result from an assessment of the amplitude and spatial gradients in X(sub CO2), the relationship between X(sub CO2) precision and surface CO2 flux uncertainties calculated from inversions of the X(sub CO2) data, and the effects of X,,Z biases on CO2 flux inversions. Observing system simulation experiments and synthesis inversion modeling demonstrate that the OCO mission design and sampling strategy provide the means to achieve the X(sub CO2) precision requirements. The impact of X(sub CO2) biases on CO2 flux uncertainties depend on their spatial and temporal extent since CO2 sources and sinks are inferred from regional-scale X(sub CO2) gradients. Simulated OCO sampling of the TRACE-P CO2 fields shows the ability of X(sub CO2) data to constrain CO2 flux inversions over Asia and distinguish regional fluxes from India and China.

  8. System Performance of an Integrated Airborne Spacing Algorithm with Ground Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swieringa, Kurt A.; Wilson, Sara R.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) first Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration (ATD-1) was created to facilitate the transition of mature ATM technologies from the laboratory to operational use. The technologies selected for demonstration are the Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering (TMA-TM), which provides precise time-based scheduling in the Terminal airspace; Controller Managed Spacing (CMS), which provides controllers with decision support tools to enable precise schedule conformance; and Interval Management (IM), which consists of flight deck automation that enables aircraft to achieve or maintain precise spacing behind another aircraft. Recent simulations and IM algorithm development at NASA have focused on trajectory-based IM operations where aircraft equipped with IM avionics are expected to achieve a spacing goal, assigned by air traffic controllers, at the final approach fix. The recently published IM Minimum Operational Performance Standards describe five types of IM operations. This paper discusses the results and conclusions of a human-in-the-loop simulation that investigated three of those IM operations. The results presented in this paper focus on system performance and integration metrics. Overall, the IM operations conducted in this simulation integrated well with ground-based decisions support tools and certain types of IM operational were able to provide improved spacing precision at the final approach fix; however, some issues were identified that should be addressed prior to implementing IM procedures into real-world operations.

  9. [Application of target restoration space quantity and quantitative relation in precise esthetic prosthodontics].

    PubMed

    Haiyang, Yu; Tian, Luo

    2016-06-01

    Target restoration space (TRS) is the most precise space required for designing optimal prosthesis. TRS consists of an internal or external tooth space to confirm the esthetics and function of the final restoration. Therefore, assisted with quantitive analysis transfer, TRS quantitative analysis is a significant improvement for minimum tooth preparation. This article presents TRS quantity-related measurement, analysis, transfer, and internal relevance of three TR. classifications. Results reveal the close bond between precision and minimally invasive treatment. This study can be used to improve the comprehension and execution of precise esthetic prosthodontics. PMID:27526443

  10. Precision Gravity Tests with Atom Interferometry in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tino, G. M.; Sorrentino, F.; Aguilera, D.; Battelier, B.; Bertoldi, A.; Bodart, Q.; Bongs, K.; Bouyer, P.; Braxmaier, C.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Gaaloul, N.; Gürlebeck, N.; Hauth, M.; Herrmann, S.; Krutzik, M.; Kubelka, A.; Landragin, A.; Milke, A.; Peters, A.; Rasel, E. M.; Rocco, E.; Schubert, C.; Schuldt, T.; Sengstock, K.; Wicht, A.

    2013-10-01

    Atom interferometry provides extremely sensitive and accurate tools for the measurement of inertial forces. Operation of atom interferometers in microgravity is expected to enhance the performance of such sensors. This paper presents two possible implementations of a dual 85Rb-87Rb atom interferometer to perform differential gravity measurements in space, with the primary goal to test the Weak Equivalence Principle. The proposed scheme is in the framework of two projects of the European Space Agency, namely Q-WEP and STE-QUEST. The paper describes the baseline experimental configuration, and discusses the technology readiness, noise and error budget for the two proposed experiments.

  11. Commercial use of space technologies for precision farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, George A.; Gilmore, Kenneth; Holmes, Bill

    1995-01-01

    Precision farming involves varying the application of fertilizers or chemicals within a field according to different homogeneous units contained within the field. Applying agricultural inputs using variable rate spreading technology relies heavily on the use of Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information system (GIS) and remote sensing. Images obtained from satellites are used to locfate different soil fertility, disease infestation, or insect damage patterns within the field. Each of these patterns is assessed and treated as a stand along unit within the field. GPS is used to get exact location of soil sampling points and also coordinates of the field boundary. Satellite imagery, soil sample laboratory analyses, GPS coordinates, and other databases are input to a farm level GIS. For fertilizer, a modeling routine utilizes these various GIS layers to generate a prescription map for the field. The map contains numerous homogeneous units within the field with each unit prescribed for a specific amount of phosphorous, potassium, nitrogen, and other nutrients. This prescription map is input to an on-board computer inside the cab of the applicator vehicle. A GPS receiver on top the cab is used to monitor the exact location of the applicator as it transverses across the field. Precise application of fertilizer and agricultural chemicals allows the United States farmer to optimize his inputs, strive for maximum economic return, and also reduce environmental concerns.

  12. Adaptive structures for precision controlled large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garba, John A.; Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The stringent accuracy and ground test validation requirements of some of the future space missions will require new approaches in structural design. Adaptive structures, structural systems that can vary their geometric congiguration as well as their physical properties, are primary candidates for meeting the functional requirements for such missions. Research performed in the development of such adaptive structural systems is described.

  13. Mass Efficiencies for Common Large-Scale Precision Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a mass-based trade study for large-scale deployable triangular trusses, where the longerons can be monocoque tubes, isogrid tubes, or coilable longeron trusses. Such structures are typically used to support heavy reflectors, solar panels, or other instruments, and are subject to thermal gradients that can vary a great deal based on orbital altitude, location in orbit, and self-shadowing. While multi layer insulation (MLI) blankets are commonly used to minimize the magnitude of these thermal disturbances, they subject the truss to a nonstructural mass penalty. This paper investigates the impact of these add-on thermal protection layers on selecting the lightest precision structure for a given loading scenario.

  14. Acceleration Disturbances onboard of Geodetic Precision Space Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterseim, Nadja; Jakob, Flury; Schlicht, Anja

    Bartlomiej Oszczak, b@dgps.pl University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland, Olsztyn, Poland Olga Maciejczyk, omaciejczyk@gmail.com Poland In this paper there is presented the study on the parameters of the ASG-EUPOS real-time RTK service NAWGEO such as: accuracy, availability, integrity and continuity. Author's model is used for tests. These parameters enable determination of the quality of received information and practical applications of the service. Paper includes also the subject related to the NAWGEO service and algorithms used in determination of mentioned parameters. The results of accuracy and precision analyses and study on availability demonstrated that NAWGEO service enables a user a position determination with a few centimeters accuracy with high probability in any moment of time.

  15. Precision Pointing for the Laser Interferometry Space Antenna Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, T. Tupper; Maghami, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave detector consisting of three spacecraft in heliocentric orbit. Lasers are used to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard each spacecraft to the picometer level over a 5 million kilometer separation. Each spacecraft and its two laser transmit/receive telescopes must be held stable in pointing to less than 8 nanoradians per root Hertz in the frequency band 0.1-100 mHz. The pointing error is sensed in the received beam and the spacecraft attitude is controlled with a set of micro-Newton thrusters. Requirements, sensors, actuators, control design, and simulations are described.

  16. Precision orbit determination at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Smith, D.; Dunn, P.; Torrence, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the GEODYN computer program developed by the Geodynamics Branch at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and outlines the procedure for accurate satellite orbit and tracking-data analyses. The capabilities of the program allow the development of gravity fields as large as 90 by 90, and a complete modeling of tidal parameters. It is also feasible to numerically integrate a continuous orbit of a satellite such as Lageos for up to 12 years. The evolution of the orbit can be studied, and, by comparison with locally determined orbits, force model improvements can be made. The GEODYN flow diagrams are presented.

  17. Constraining extra space dimensions using precision molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    2015-07-01

    Highly accurate measurements of quantum level energies in molecular systems provide a test ground for new physics, as such effects could manifest themselves as minute shifts in the quantum level structures of atoms and molecules. For the lightest molecular systems, neutral molecular hydrogen (H2, HD and D2) and the molecular hydrogen ions (H+2, HD+ and D+2), weak force effects are several orders weaker than current experimental and theoretical results, while contributions of Newtonian gravity and the strong force at the characteristic molecular distance scale of 1 Å can be safely neglected. Comparisons between experiment and QED calculations for these molecular systems can be interpreted in terms of probing large extra space dimensions, under which gravity could become much stronger than in ordinary 3-D space. Under this assumption, using the spectra of H2 we have derived constraints on the compactification scales for extra dimensions within the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali (ADD) framework, and constraints on the brane separation and bulk curvature within the Randall-Sundrum (RS-I and RS-II) frameworks.

  18. Development of high precision laser measurement to Space Debris and Applications in SHAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongping; Chen, Juping; Xiong, Yaoheng; Han, Xingwei

    2016-07-01

    Artificial space debris has become the focus during the space exploration because of producing the damage for the future active spacecrafts and high precision measurement for space debris are required for debris surveillance and collision avoidance. Laser ranging technology is inherently high accurate and will play an important role in precise orbit determination, accurate catalog of space debris. Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) of CAS, has been developing the technology of laser measurement to space debris for several years. According to characteristics of laser echoes from space debris and the experiences of relevant activities, high repetition rate, high power laser system and low dark noise APD detector with high quantum efficiency and high transmissivity of narrow bandwidth spectral filter are applied to laser measurement to space debris in SHAO. With these configurations, great achievements of laser measurement to space debris are made with hundreds of passes of laser data from space debris in the distance between 500km and 2500km with Radar Cross Section (RCS) of more than 10 m^{2} to less than 0.5m^{2} at the measuring precision of less than 1m (RMS). For better application of laser ranging technology, Chinese Space Debris Observation network, consisting of Shanghai, Changchun and Kunming station, has been preliminary developed and the coordinated observation has been performed to increase the measuring efficiency for space debris. It is referred from data that laser ranging technology can be as the essential high accuracy measurement technology in the study of space debris.

  19. Retrieving High Precision River Stages and Slopes from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Moller, D.

    2005-12-01

    Conventional radar altimetry has been successful in retrieving water level measurements at altimeter crossings with an accuracy of 10cm to 20cm. Although promising, this measurement accuracy is insufficient to provide global monitoring of fresh water bodies, as has been proposed by the WatER mission, for instance. In this paper we examine in detail the error sources that a near-nadir synthetic aperture radar interferometer, such as the KaRIN instrument proposed to meet the WatER requirements, will be subject to and demonstrate that with appropriate calibration techniques, measurements of river stage with an accuracy of approximately 5 cm and river slope with an accuracy of 1 cm/1km can be obtained. In the first part, we examine the main error contributors to the height measurements and quantify the expected magnitude of the errors. The errors sources examined include tropospheric effects, spacecraft orbit and attitude stability, the effect of vegetation, and the effect of topographic lay-over. These sources of error are examined analytically and also with the help of an instrument simulation which includes all error sources to generate simulated measurements. Simulated performance results will be presented for the Ohio river basin and for the Amazon basin at the Solimoes/Puros confluence. In the second part, we examine calibration techniques to mitigate the errors mentioned above and demonstrate the feasibility of achieving the height and slope performance given in the first paragraph. Simulated calibration results will be presented for both Ohio and Amazon basins. Finally, we propose a method for processing the interferometer data to optimally filter random measurement noise and provide high precision estimates of river stage and slope which can be assimilated simply into hydrologic models or used in conjunction with ancillary data or physical assumptions to provide estimates of river discharge.

  20. Precision Astrophysics with a FAME-like Space Astrometry Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olling, R. P.; Gaume, R. A.

    2002-12-01

    Astrometric and photometric data from space missions with designs like the Full Sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME) can be used to determine the properties of 40 million stars in the greater solar neighborhood (d ⪉ 3 kpc) brighter than V=15--16. Parallaxes/distances can be determined to 10% accuracy out to 2 kpc. The astrometric data from a FAME-like mission will be of such quality that the interpretation of the data will be limited by the availability of accurate photometry. It has been proposed to include at least six photometric bands on FAME-like missions so as to be able to estimate the fundamental stellar parameters (Teff, log(g) and [Fe/H]) and the interstellar extinction (AV and RV). Here we report on a possible 6+-band photometric system for a FAME-like mission and also investigate the effectiveness of a 3-band FAME system that is complemented by existing data: Hipparcos BT, VT, Hp photometry; ground-based data (GSC-2, SDSS) and 2MASS near-infrared photometry. A determination of the stellar metallicity for the nearest stars with FAME-parallax errors less than about 0.5% (560,000 stars) will allow the determination of ages of individual stars. Such a sample allows for the determination of the star-formation history of the Milky Way's thin & thick disks and the stellar halo, the history of metal formation, a determination of the primordial Helium abundance, searches (in phase space) for the remnants of minor galactic merger events, and more.

  1. Flight Test Evaluation of the Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2002-01-01

    The Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) concept is designed to support independent parallel approach operations to runways spaced as close as 2,500 feet. This report briefly describes the AILS operational concept and the results of a flight test of one implementation of this concept. The focus of this flight test experiment was to validate a prior simulator study, evaluating pilot performance, pilot acceptability, and minimum miss-distances for the rare situation in which an aircraft on one approach intrudes into the path of an aircraft on the other approach. Although the flight data set was not meant to be a statistically valid sample, the trends acquired in flight followed those of the simulator and therefore met the intent of validating the findings from the simulator. Results from this study showed that the design-goal mean miss-distance of 1,200 feet to potential collision situations was surpassed with an actual mean miss-distance of 1,859 feet. Pilot reaction times to the alerting system, which was an operational concern, averaged 0.65 seconds, were well below the design goal reaction time of 2.0 seconds. From the results of both of these tests, it can be concluded that this operational concept, with supporting technology and procedures, may provide an operationally viable means for conducting simultaneous, independent instrument approaches to runways spaced as close as 2500 ft.

  2. Precision Clocks in Space and α-Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quantum Sciences; Technology Group; Maleki, Lute

    2004-09-01

    Important developments both in theoretical and observational cosmology have fueled considerable interest in searches for variations of the fine structure constant. Experimentally, Webb et al have found evidence for a cosmological variation of the fine structure constant through an analysis of the absorption lines in galactic halos from quasar-emitted light. Recently developed small ion atomic clocks enable Solar System tests for equivalence principle (EP) violating α-variations by way of rate-comparisons of three ultra-stable atomic clocks near-to and far-from the sun where gravitational red-shift changes are more than 104 larger than in low Earth orbit. No space tests of the EP have been made in nearly 30 years, since the GP-A hydrogen maser reached a 10,000 km apogee confirming EP red-shift predictions to 1 part in 104. Today's small ion clocks, nearly 100× more stable and 100× smaller than the GP-A H-maser, could probe for EP violating scalar fields near the sun for mission costs comparable to low Earth orbiters and improve the GP-A sensitivity by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude.

  3. Precision Clocks in Space and alpha-Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    Important developments of both in theoretical and observational cosmology have fueled considerable interest in searches for variations of the fine structure constant. Experimentally, Webb et. al. have found evidence for a cosmological variation of the fine structure constant through an analysis of the absorption lines in galactic halos from quasar-emitted light. Recently developed small ion atomic clocks enable Solar System tests for equivalence principle (EP) violating (alpha)-variations by way of rate-comparisons of three ultra-stable atomic clocks near-to and far-from the sun where gravitational red-shift changes are more than 10(exp 4) larger than in low Earth orbit. No space tests of the EP have been made in nearly 30 years, since the GP-A hydrogen maser reached a 10,000 km apogee confirming EP red-shift predictions 1 part in 10(exp 4). Today's small ion clocks, nearly 100x more stable and 100x smaller then the GP-A H-maser, could probe for EP violating scalar fields near the sun for mission costs comparable to low Earth orbiters and improve the GP-A sensitivity by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude.

  4. Solid-State 2-Micron Laser Transmitter Advancement for Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements From Ground, Airborne, and Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Ismail, Syed

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing 2-micron lidar technologies over a decade for wind measurements, utilizing coherent Doppler wind lidar technique and carbon dioxide measurements, utilizing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. Significant advancements have been made towards developing state-of-the-art technologies towards laser transmitters, detectors, and receiver systems. These efforts have led to the development of solid-state lasers with high pulse energy, tunablility, wavelength-stability, and double-pulsed operation. This paper will present a review of these technological developments along with examples of high resolution wind and high precision CO2 DIAL measurements in the atmosphere. Plans for the development of compact high power lasers for applications in airborne and future space platforms for wind and regional to global scale measurement of atmospheric CO2 will also be discussed.

  5. Evaluation of Operational Procedures for Using a Time-Based Airborne Inter-arrival Spacing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Abbott, Terence S.; Eischeid, Todd M.

    2002-01-01

    An airborne tool has been developed based on the concept of an aircraft maintaining a time-based spacing interval from the preceding aircraft. The Advanced Terminal Area Approach Spacing (ATAAS) tool uses Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) aircraft state data to compute a speed command for the ATAAS-equipped aircraft to obtain a required time interval behind another aircraft. The tool and candidate operational procedures were tested in a high-fidelity, full mission simulator with active airline subject pilots flying an arrival scenario using three different modes for speed control. The objectives of this study were to validate the results of a prior Monte Carlo analysis of the ATAAS algorithm and to evaluate the concept from the standpoint of pilot acceptability and workload. Results showed that the aircraft was able to consistently achieve the target spacing interval within one second (the equivalent of approximately 220 ft at a final approach speed of 130 kt) when the ATAAS speed guidance was autothrottle-coupled, and a slightly greater (4-5 seconds), but consistent interval with the pilot-controlled speed modes. The subject pilots generally rated the workload level with the ATAAS procedure as similar to that with standard procedures, and also rated most aspects of the procedure high in terms of acceptability. Although pilots indicated that the head-down time was higher with ATAAS, the acceptability of head-down time was rated high. Oculometer data indicated slight changes in instrument scan patterns, but no significant change in the amount of time spent looking out the window between the ATAAS procedure versus standard procedures.

  6. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    The management concepts and operating procedures are documented as they apply to the planning of shuttle spacelab operations. Areas discussed include: airborne missions; formulation of missions; management procedures; experimenter involvement; experiment development and performance; data handling; safety procedures; and applications to shuttle spacelab planning. Characteristics of the airborne science experience are listed, and references and figures are included.

  7. Goodard Space Flight Center/Wallops Flight Facility airborne geoscience support capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Roger L.

    1991-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Facility (GSFC/WFF), operates six aircraft which are used as airborne geoscience platforms. The aircraft complement consists of two UH-1B helicopters, one twin engine Skyvan, one twin jet T-39, and two four engine turboprop aircraft (P-3 and Electra) offering the research community a wide range of payload, altitude, speed, and range capabilities. WFF's support to a principal investigator include mission planning of all supporting elements, installation of equipment on the aircraft, fabrication of brackets, and adapters as required to adapt payloads to the aircraft, and planning of mission profiles to meet science objectives. The flight regime includes local, regional, and global missions. The WFF aircraft serve scientists at GSFC, other NASA centers, other government agencies, and universities. The WFF mode of operation features the walk on method of conducting research projects. The principal investigator requests aircraft support by letter to WFF and after approval is granted, works with the assigned mission manager to plan all phases of project support. The instrumentation is installed in WFF electronics racks, mounted on the aircraft, the missions are flown, and the equipment is removed when the scientific objectives are met. The principal investigator reimburses WFF for each flight hours, any overtime and travel expenses generated by the project, and for other mission-related expenses such as aircraft support services required at deployment bases.

  8. An infrared high resolution silicon immersion grating spectrometer for airborne and space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Zhao, Bo; Powell, Scott; Jiang, Peng; Uzakbaiuly, Berik; Tanner, David

    2014-08-01

    Broad-band infrared (IR) spectroscopy, especially at high spectral resolution, is a largely unexplored area for the far IR (FIR) and submm wavelength region due to the lack of proper grating technology to produce high resolution within the very constrained volume and weight required for space mission instruments. High resolution FIR spectroscopy is an essential tool to resolve many atomic and molecular lines to measure physical and chemical conditions and processes in the environments where galaxy, star and planets form. A silicon immersion grating (SIG), due to its over three times high dispersion over a traditional reflective grating, offers a compact and low cost design of new generation IR high resolution spectrographs for space missions. A prototype SIG high resolution spectrograph, called Florida IR Silicon immersion grating spectromeTer (FIRST), has been developed at UF and was commissioned at a 2 meter robotic telescope at Fairborn Observatory in Arizona. The SIG with 54.74 degree blaze angle, 16.1 l/mm groove density, and 50x86 mm2 grating area has produced R=50,000 in FIRST. The 1.4-1.8 um wavelength region is completely covered in a single exposure with a 2kx2k H2RG IR array. The on-sky performance meets the science requirements for ground-based high resolution spectroscopy. Further studies show that this kind of SIG spectrometer with an airborne 2m class telescope such as SOFIA can offer highly sensitive spectroscopy with R~20,000-30,000 at 20 to 55 microns. Details about the on-sky measurement performance of the FIRST prototype SIG spectrometer and its predicted performance with the SOFIA 2.4m telescope are introduced.

  9. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  10. The computation of relative motion with increased precision. [of two orbiting space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nacozy, P.; Szebehely, V.

    1976-01-01

    Encke's method as modified by Potter to increase the accuracy of orbit computations of gravitationally interacting bodies is applied to the problem of relative motion of non-interacting space vehicles. This technique is then combined with a simple transformation of the independent variable to arrive at a system of equations from which the relative motion may be determined with increased precision.

  11. Automatic co-registration of space-based sensors for precision change detection and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N.; Zobrist, A.; Logan, T.

    2003-01-01

    A variety of techniques were developed at JPL to assure sub-pixel co-registration of scenes and ortho-rectification of satellite imagery to other georeferenced information to permit precise change detection and analysis of low and moderate resolution space sensors.

  12. A Concept for In-space, System-level Validation of Spacecraft Precision Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jesse; Carpenter, J. Russell; Naasz, Bo J.; Scharf, Daniel P.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Ahmed, Asif

    2007-01-01

    A number of international space agencies and organizations, to include the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), to name a few, have embraced the concept of spacecraft formation flying to revolutionize the capabilities of astronomy and Earth remote sensing from space. The concept has been around well over a decade and a wide array of technologies and capabilities have been developed to enable multiple spacecraft to collaborate in a highly-coupled manner as would be required for a formation flying mission. Furthermore, many relevant capabilities for formation flying have been demonstrated in the area of rendezvous and docking, loosely-controlled formations, and in missions with collaborating spacecraft with very precise metrology. .However, in considering the case of precision formation flying (PFF), i.e, when the relative geometry of multiple vehicles must be controlled on-board in a continuous and precise manner, there have been several missions proposed, but the realization in space has not yet occurred due to a range of issues. This paper will briefly examine those issues and present a concept for demonstrating a core capability for performing PFF, necessary for virtually any PFF mission concept, that will help to overcome the problems encountered in prior attempts and help to allay the risks to enable future PFF science missions.

  13. Unachievable Region in Precision-Recall Space and Its Effect on Empirical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Kendrick; Santos Costa, Vítor; Davis, Jesse; Page, C. David

    2013-01-01

    Precision-recall (PR) curves and the areas under them are widely used to summarize machine learning results, especially for data sets exhibiting class skew. They are often used analogously to ROC curves and the area under ROC curves. It is known that PR curves vary as class skew changes. What was not recognized before this paper is that there is a region of PR space that is completely unachievable, and the size of this region depends only on the skew. This paper precisely characterizes the size of that region and discusses its implications for empirical evaluation methodology in machine learning. PMID:24350304

  14. A new fabrication method for precision antenna reflectors for space flight and ground test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Wanhainen, Joyce S.; Ketelsen, Dean A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of higher frequencies on communications satellites has led to the requirement for increasingly precise antenna reflectors for use in space. Typical industry fabrication methods for space antenna reflectors employ successive molding techniques for reflector face sheets and a final fit-up to a master mold in order to achieve the required accuracies. However, new missions at much higher frequencies will require greater accuracies than may be achievable using these present methods. A new approach for the fabrication of ground-test antenna reflectors is to machine the reflective surface into a stainless steel and fiberglass composite structure. A 2.7-m diameter ground-test antenna reflector fabricated using this method has an accuracy of better than 0.013 mm (0.0005 in.) rms. A similar design concept for a solid surface reflector for use on spacecraft would involve fabrication in a similar manner but using space-qualified materials. This report describes the design, analysis, and fabrication of the 2.7-m-diameter precision antenna reflector for antenna ground test and the extension of this technology to precision space antenna reflectors.

  15. A new fabrication method for precision antenna reflectors for space flight and ground test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Wanhainen, Joyce S.; Ketelsen, Dean A.

    1991-01-01

    Communications satellites are using increasingly higher frequencies that require increasingly precise antenna reflectors for use in space. Traditional industry fabrication methods for space antenna reflectors employ successive modeling techniques using high- and low-temperature molds for reflector face sheets and then a final fit-up of the completed honeycomb sandwich panel antenna reflector to a master pattern. However, as new missions are planned at much higher frequencies, greater accuracies will be necessary than are achievable using these present methods. A new approach for the fabrication of ground-test solid-surface antenna reflectors is to build a rigid support structure with an easy-to-machine surface. This surface is subsequently machined to the desired reflector contour and coated with a radio-frequency-reflective surface. This method was used to fabricate a 2.7-m-diameter ground-test antenna reflector to an accuracy of better than 0.013 mm (0.0005 in.) rms. A similar reflector for use on spacecraft would be constructed in a similar manner but with space-qualified materials. The design, analysis, and fabrication of the 2.7-m-diameter precision antenna reflector for antenna ground tests and the extension of this technology to precision, space-based antenna reflectors are described.

  16. Characterization of Hertzian rolling microslip in precision revolute joints for deployable space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Sungeun Ki

    2009-09-01

    The capabilities of space-born telescopes are primarily limited by their launch systems, dictating both light-gathering power and resolution, by constricting aperture size. Precision deployable space structure technology enables smaller stowed configurations for launch and a larger deployed operational state in space. The primary engineering difficulties arise from the accuracy and repeatability requirements of the deployed system, where an optical system requires tens of nanometers RMS surface displacement. Recent studies identify that instabilities and errors in a deployable space structure are primarily caused by the stick-slip friction between the contact interfaces of the latches and joints. The intent of this research is to model and characterize the nonlinearities of contact of a precision revolute joint for deployable space structures. The joint is a modified pin-clevis joint, where the deployment mechanism, load-path, and sources of instability are relegated to the contact interfaces of pair of angular contact bearings. This research presents a nonlinear lumped-parameter finite element modeling the nonlinear mechanics of contact to characterize the microdynamic behavior of the angular contact bearings for a precision revolute hinge. The mechanics of contact are based on Hertz contact theory and a numerical simulation subproblem based on the influence function method. The numerical simulation is rigorously validated and is shown to efficiently and effectively model transient rolling contact with varying normal contact forces, where current literature and numerical modeling techniques fail. The in uence of surface roughness and stochastic variations due to manufacturing and assembly are studied in regards to stiffness performance metrics. Rolling hysteresis is identified for various conditions, and a zero-loss rolling mechanism is discovered and investigated. Design implications, capabilities, recommendations, and optimal improvements for the precision hinge

  17. Estimating lava volume by precision combination of multiple baseline spaceborne and airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar: The 1997 eruption of Okmok Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Fielding, E.; Patrick, M.R.; Trautwein, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques are used to calculate the volume of extrusion at Okmok volcano, Alaska by constructing precise digital elevation models (DEMs) that represent volcano topography before and after the 1997 eruption. The posteruption DEM is generated using airborne topographic synthetic aperture radar (TOPSAR) data where a three-dimensional affine transformation is used to account for the misalignments between different DEM patches. The preeruption DEM is produced using repeat-pass European Remote Sensing satellite data; multiple interferograms are combined to reduce errors due to atmospheric variations, and deformation rates are estimated independently and removed from the interferograms used for DEM generation. The extrusive flow volume associated with the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano is 0.154 ?? 0.025 km3. The thickest portion is approximately 50 m, although field measurements of the flow margin's height do not exceed 20 m. The in situ measurements at lava edges are not representative of the total thickness, and precise DEM data are absolutely essential to calculate eruption volume based on lava thickness estimations. This study is an example that demonstrates how InSAR will play a significant role in studying volcanoes in remote areas.

  18. Precision Analysis Based on Complicated Error Simulation for the Orbit Determination with the Space Tracking Ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, YANG; Caifa, GUO; Zhengxu, DAI; Xiaoyong, LI; Shaolin, WANG

    2016-02-01

    The space tracking ship is a moving platform in the TT&C network. The orbit determination precision of the ship plays a key role in the TT&C mission. Based on the measuring data obtained by the ship-borne equipments, the paper presents the mathematic models of the complicated error from the space tracking ship, which can separate the random error and the correction residual error with secondary low frequency from the complicated error. An error simulation algorithm is proposed to analyze the orbit determination precision based on the two set of the different equipments. With this algorithm, a group of complicated error can be simulated from a measured sample. The simulated error groups can meet the requirements of sufficient complicated error for the equipment tests before the mission execution, which is helpful to the practical application.

  19. High Precision Time Transfer in Space with a Hydrogen Maser on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1996-01-01

    An atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long term operation in space will be installed on the Russian space station Mir, in late 1997. The H-maser's frequency stability will be measured using pulsed laser time transfer techniques. Daily time comparisons made with a precision of better than 100 picoseconds will allow an assessment of the long term stability of the space maser at a level on the order of 1 part in 10(sup 15) or better. Laser pulse arrival times at the spacecraft will be recorded with a resolution of 10 picoseconds relative to the space clock's time scale. Cube corner reflectors will reflect the pulses back to the Earth laser station to determine the propagation delay and enable comparison with the Earth-based time scale. Data for relativistic and gravitational frequency corrections will be obtained from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver.

  20. Deciphering the Precision of Stereo IKONOS Canopy Height Models for U.S. Forests with G-LiHT Airborne LiDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudasill-Neigh, Christopher S.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Bourget, Paul; Cook, Bruce; Huang, Chengquan; Rishmawi, Khaldoun; Zhao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the precision of IKONOS stereo data for measuring forest canopy height. The high cost of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data collection for large area studies and the present lack of a spaceborne instrument lead to the need to explore other low cost options. The US Government currently has access to a large archive of commercial high-resolution imagery, which could be quite valuable to forest structure studies. At 1 m resolution, we here compared canopy height models (CHMs) and height data derived from Goddard's airborne LiDAR Hyper-spectral and Thermal Imager (G-LiHT) with three types of IKONOS stereo derived digital surface models (DSMs) that estimate CHMs by subtracting National Elevation Data (NED) digital terrain models (DTMs). We found the following in three different forested regions of the US after excluding heterogeneous and disturbed forest samples: (1) G-LiHT DTMs were highly correlated with NED DTMs with R (sup 2) greater than 0.98 and root mean square errors (RMSEs) less than 2.96 m; (2) when using one visually identifiable ground control point (GCP) from NED, G-LiHT DSMs and IKONOS DSMs had R (sup 2) greater than 0.84 and RMSEs of 2.7 to 4.1 m; and (3) one GCP CHMs for two study sites had R (sup 2) greater than 0.7 and RMSEs of 2.6 to 3 m where data were collected less than four years apart. Our results suggest that IKONOS stereo data are a useful LiDAR alternative where high-quality DTMs are available.

  1. Space-Time Cube Analytics of Evolving Landforms Captured by Airborne and Terrestrial Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitasova, H.; Starek, M. J.; Hardin, E. J.; Wegmann, K. W.; Blundell, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    A multidimensional framework for analysis of land surface dynamics from time series of lidar data is presented. The framework integrates the standard line feature extraction and raster-based statistics with novel volume representation of evolving terrain and defines metrics for quantification of observed change. Within the raster-based approach, the stable core and envelope surfaces are derived by applying per-cell statistics to time series of lidar-based digital elevation models (DEMs). The core and envelope are then used to map the contour displacement range and compute the relative volume intensity graphs that characterize the redistribution of mass in the study area. To fully capture the properties of evolving surfaces in both space and time, a discrete and a continuous space-time cube (STC) approach is introduced. Simple to implement, discrete STC stacks series of DEMs into a voxel model which is then used to derive isosurfaces representing a given contour evolution and to extract space-time crossections that represent evolution of elevation along a given profile. Raster maps representing DEM differences can also be stacked into a voxel model and evolution of change of a given magnitude is then extracted as an isosurface. Continuous STC represents the dynamic surface as a trivariate function where time is the third dimension and elevation is the modeled variable. To compute the continuous STC the time series of point cloud data is merged into a single point cloud that is then interpolated into a voxel model at a desired spatial and temporal resolution. Trivariate regularized smoothing spline with octree-based segmentation is used to compute voxel models of elevation evolution and its first and second order derivatives directly from time series of point cloud data. The resulting voxel models are then used to identify the locations and time of the fastest rate of change, possible acceleration or areas and time intervals of stability. The presented concepts and

  2. An application of space-time adaptive processing to airborne and spaceborne monostatic and bistatic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Richard James

    A challenging problem faced by Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radars on both airborne and spaceborne platforms is the ability to detect slow moving targets due the presence of non-stationary and heterogeneous ground clutter returns. Space-Time Adaptive Processing techniques process both the spatial signals from an antenna array as well as radar pulses simultaneously to aid in mitigating this clutter which has an inherent Doppler shift due to radar platform motion, as well as spreading across Angle-Doppler space attributable to a variety of factors. Additional problems such as clutter aliasing, widening of the clutter notch, and range dependency add additional complexity when the radar is bistatic in nature, and vary significantly as the bistatic radar geometry changes with respect to the targeted location. The most difficult situation is that of a spaceborne radar system due to its high velocity and altitude with respect to the earth. A spaceborne system does however offer several advantages over an airborne system, such as the ability to cover wide areas and to provide access to areas denied to airborne platforms. This dissertation examines both monostatic and bistatic radar performance based upon a computer simulation developed by the author, and explores the use of both optimal STAP and reduced dimension STAP architectures to mitigate the modeled clutter returns. Factors such as broadband jamming, wind, and earth rotation are considered, along with their impact on the interference covariance matrix, constructed from sample training data. Calculation of the covariance matrix in near real time based upon extracted training data is computer processor intensive and reduced dimension STAP architectures relieve some of the computation burden. The problems resulting from extending both monostatic and bistatic radar systems to space are also simulated and studied.

  3. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle. Volume 3: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    Detailed information is presented concerning specific airborne missions in support of the ASSESS program. These missions are the AIDJEX expeditions, meteor shower expeditions, CAT and atmospheric sampling missions, ocean color expeditions, and the Lear Jet missions. For Vol. 2, see N73-31729.

  4. Situational awareness sensor management of space-based EO/IR and airborne GMTI radar for road targets tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fallah, A.; Zatezalo, A.; Mahler, R.; Mehra, R. K.; Pham, K.

    2010-04-01

    Dynamic sensor management of heterogeneous and distributed sensors presents a daunting theoretical and practical challenge. We present a Situational Awareness Sensor Management (SA-SM) algorithm for the tracking of ground targets moving on a road map. It is based on the previously developed information-theoretic Posterior Expected Number of Targets of Interest (PENTI) objective function, and utilizes combined measurements form an airborne GMTI radar, and a space-based EO/IR sensor. The resulting filtering methods and techniques are tested and evaluated. Different scan rates for the GMTI radar and the EO/IR sensor are evaluated and compared.

  5. Streamlined design and self reliant hardware for active control of precision space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, David C.; King, James A.; Phillips, Douglas J.

    1994-01-01

    Precision space structures may require active vibration control to satisfy critical performance requirements relating to line-of-sight pointing accuracy and the maintenance of precise, internal alignments. In order for vibration control concepts to become operational, it is necessary that their benefits be practically demonstrated in large scale ground-based experiments. A unique opportunity to carry out such demonstrations on a wide variety of experimental testbeds was provided by the NASA Control-Structure Integration (CSI) Guest Investigator (GI) Program. This report surveys the experimental results achieved by the Harris Corporation GI team on both Phases 1 and 2 of the program and provides a detailed description of Phase 2 activities. The Phase 1 results illustrated the effectiveness of active vibration control for space structures and demonstrated a systematic methodology for control design, implementation test. In Phase 2, this methodology was significantly streamlined to yield an on-site, single session design/test capability. Moreover, the Phase 2 research on adaptive neural control techniques made significant progress toward fully automated, self-reliant space structure control systems. As a further thrust toward productized, self-contained vibration control systems, the Harris Phase II activity concluded with experimental demonstration of new vibration isolation hardware suitable for a wide range of space-flight and ground-based commercial applications.The CSI GI Program Phase 1 activity was conducted under contract NASA1-18872, and the Phase 2 activity was conducted under NASA1-19372.

  6. Spike timing precision changes with spike rate adaptation in the owl's auditory space map.

    PubMed

    Keller, Clifford H; Takahashi, Terry T

    2015-10-01

    Spike rate adaptation (SRA) is a continuing change of responsiveness to ongoing stimuli, which is ubiquitous across species and levels of sensory systems. Under SRA, auditory responses to constant stimuli change over time, relaxing toward a long-term rate often over multiple timescales. With more variable stimuli, SRA causes the dependence of spike rate on sound pressure level to shift toward the mean level of recent stimulus history. A model based on subtractive adaptation (Benda J, Hennig RM. J Comput Neurosci 24: 113-136, 2008) shows that changes in spike rate and level dependence are mechanistically linked. Space-specific neurons in the barn owl's midbrain, when recorded under ketamine-diazepam anesthesia, showed these classical characteristics of SRA, while at the same time exhibiting changes in spike timing precision. Abrupt level increases of sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) noise initially led to spiking at higher rates with lower temporal precision. Spike rate and precision relaxed toward their long-term values with a time course similar to SRA, results that were also replicated by the subtractive model. Stimuli whose amplitude modulations (AMs) were not synchronous across carrier frequency evoked spikes in response to stimulus envelopes of a particular shape, characterized by the spectrotemporal receptive field (STRF). Again, abrupt stimulus level changes initially disrupted the temporal precision of spiking, which then relaxed along with SRA. We suggest that shifts in latency associated with stimulus level changes may differ between carrier frequency bands and underlie decreased spike precision. Thus SRA is manifest not simply as a change in spike rate but also as a change in the temporal precision of spiking. PMID:26269555

  7. Piezoelectric Polymers Actuators for Precise Shape Control of Large Scale Space Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Qin; Natale, Don; Neese, Bret; Ren, Kailiang; Lin, Minren; Zhang, Q. M.; Pattom, Matthew; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood

    2007-01-01

    Extremely large, lightweight, in-space deployable active and passive microwave antennas are demanded by future space missions. This paper investigates the development of PVDF based piezopolymer actuators for controlling the surface accuracy of a membrane reflector. Uniaxially stretched PVDF films were poled using an electrodeless method which yielded high quality poled piezofilms required for this application. To further improve the piezoperformance of piezopolymers, several PVDF based copolymers were examined. It was found that one of them exhibits nearly three times improvement in the in-plane piezoresponse compared with PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) piezopolymers. Preliminary experimental results indicate that these flexible actuators are very promising in controlling precisely the shape of the space reflectors.

  8. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.

    1999-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs many research and development programs that require hardware and assemblies to be cleaned to levels that are compatible with fuels and oxidizers (liquid oxygen, solid propellants, etc.). Also, the Center is responsible for developing large telescope satellites which requires a variety of optical systems to be cleaned. A precision cleaning shop is operated with-in MSFC by the Fabrication Services Division of the Materials & Processes Division. Verification of cleanliness is performed for all precision cleaned articles in the Analytical Chemistry Branch. Since the Montreal Protocol was instituted, MSFC had to find substitutes for many materials that has been in use for many years, including cleaning agents and organic solvents. As MSFC is a research Center, there is a great variety of hardware that is processed in the Precision Cleaning Shop. This entails the use of many different chemicals and solvents, depending on the nature and configuration of the hardware and softgoods being cleaned. A review of the manufacturing cleaning and verification processes, cleaning materials and solvents used at MSFC and changes that resulted from the Montreal Protocol will be presented.

  9. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.; Cox, Jack A.; McGee, Kathleen A.

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration performs many research and development programs that require hardware and assemblies to be cleaned to levels that are compatible with fuels and oxidizers (liquid oxygen, solid propellants, etc.). Also, MSFC is responsible for developing large telescope satellites which require a variety of optical systems to be cleaned. A precision cleaning shop is operated within MSFC by the Fabrication Services Division of the Materials & Processes Laboratory. Verification of cleanliness is performed for all precision cleaned articles in the Environmental and Analytical Chemistry Branch. Since the Montreal Protocol was instituted, MSFC had to find substitutes for many materials that have been in use for many years, including cleaning agents and organic solvents. As MSFC is a research center, there is a great variety of hardware that is processed in the Precision Cleaning Shop. This entails the use of many different chemicals and solvents, depending on the nature and configuration of the hardware and softgoods being cleaned. A review of the manufacturing cleaning and verification processes, cleaning materials and solvents used at MSFC and changes that resulted from the Montreal Protocol will be presented.

  10. High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuechun; Li, Simin; Chen, Xiangfei; Li, Lianyan; Li, Jingsi; Zhang, Tingting; Zheng, Jilin; Zhang, Yunshan; Tang, Song; Hou, Lianping; Marsh, John H; Qiu, Bocang

    2014-01-01

    Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%. PMID:25488111

  11. High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuechun; Li, Simin; Chen, Xiangfei; Li, Lianyan; Li, Jingsi; Zhang, Tingting; Zheng, Jilin; Zhang, Yunshan; Tang, Song; Hou, Lianping; Marsh, John H.; Qiu, Bocang

    2014-01-01

    Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%. PMID:25488111

  12. Precision Column CO2 Measurement from Space Using Broad Band LIDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand the budget of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere it is necessary to develop a global high precision understanding of the carbon dioxide column. To uncover the missing sink" that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget as we presently understand it, calculation has indicated that measurement accuracy of 1 ppm is necessary. Because typical column average CO2 has now reached 380 ppm this represents a precision on the order of 0.25% for these column measurements. No species has ever been measured from space at such a precision. In recognition of the importance of understanding the CO2 budget to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council in its decadal survey report to NASA recommended planning for a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. The extreme measurement accuracy requirements on this mission places very strong constraints on the laser system used for the measurement. This work presents an overview of the characteristics necessary in a laser system used to make this measurement. Consideration is given to the temperature dependence, pressure broadening, and pressure shift of the CO2 lines themselves and how these impact the laser system characteristics. We are examining the possibility of making precise measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide using a broad band source of radiation. This means that many of the difficulties in wavelength control can be treated in the detector portion of the system rather than the laser source. It also greatly reduces the number of individual lasers required to make a measurement. Simplifications such as these are extremely desirable for systems designed to operate from space.

  13. Atom optical experiments in the drop tower: a pathfinder for space based precision measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Sven; Resch, Andreas; Müntinga, Hauke; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    Recent years have seen much technological progress towards the application of ultra-cold atoms and degenerate quantum gases in future space based precision measurements. A first milestone was achieved by the QUANTUS collaboration with the successful creation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a freely falling compact drop tower experiment. A next step will now be to demonstrate the feasibility of matter wave interferometry with increased precision due to the extended free evolution time available in zero gravity. This is a particular focus of the PRIMUS project, which also explores concepts to apply a fiber based optical frequency comb in such microgravity experiments. Here we report on the current status of this activity, including the first operation of an optical frequency comb in a microgravity environment. We also discuss the perspectives for space based fundamental physics experiments that might be enabled by such earth-bound pathfinder experiments in the long run. PRIMUS is a collaboration of ZARM at the Universitüt Bremen and of the Leibniz Universitüt Hannover. It is supported by the a a German Space Agency DLR with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) under grant number DLR 50 WM 0842.

  14. Design and Evaluation of the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Harry N.; Thipphavong, Jane; Sadovsky, Alex; Chen, Liang; Sullivan, Chris; Martin, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development and results from a high fidelity human-in-the-loop simulation of an integrated set of trajectory-based automation tools providing precision scheduling, sequencing and controller merging and spacing functions. These integrated functions are combined into a system called the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing (TAPSS) system. It is a strategic and tactical planning tool that provides Traffic Management Coordinators, En Route and Terminal Radar Approach Control air traffic controllers the ability to efficiently optimize the arrival capacity of a demand-impacted airport while simultaneously enabling fuel-efficient descent procedures. The TAPSS system consists of four-dimensional trajectory prediction, arrival runway balancing, aircraft separation constraint-based scheduling, traffic flow visualization and trajectory-based advisories to assist controllers in efficient metering, sequencing and spacing. The TAPSS system was evaluated and compared to today's ATC operation through extensive series of human-in-the-loop simulations for arrival flows into the Los Angeles International Airport. The test conditions included the variation of aircraft demand from a baseline of today's capacity constrained periods through 5%, 10% and 20% increases. Performance data were collected for engineering and human factor analysis and compared with similar operations both with and without the TAPSS system. The engineering data indicate operations with the TAPSS show up to a 10% increase in airport throughput during capacity constrained periods while maintaining fuel-efficient aircraft descent profiles from cruise to landing.

  15. Airborne multispectral remote sensing data to estimate several oenological parameters in vineyard production. A case study of application of remote sensing data to precision viticulture in central Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontana, Gianluca; Girard, Filippo; Belli, Claudio; Comandini, Maria Cristina; Pietromarchi, Paolo; Tiberi, Domenico; Papale, Dario

    2010-05-01

    It is widely recognized that environmental differences within the vineyard, with respect to soils, microclimate, and topography, can influence grape characteristics and crop yields. Besides, the central Italy landscape is characterized by a high level of fragmentation and heterogeneity It requires stringent Remote sensing technical features in terms of spectral, geometric and temporal resolution to aimed at supporting applications for precision viticulture. In response to the needs of the Italian grape and wine industry for an evaluation of precision viticulture technologies, the DISAFRI (University of Tuscia) and the Agricultural Research Council - Oenological research unit (ENC-CRA) jointly carried out an experimental study during the year 2008. The study was carried out on 2 areas located in the town of Velletri, near Rome; for each area, two varieties (red and white grape) were studied: Nero d'Avola and Sauvignon blanc in first area , Merlot and Sauvignon blanc in second. Remote sensing data were acquired in different periods using a low cost multisensor Airborne remote sensing platform developed by DISAFRI (ASPIS-2 Advanced Spectroscopic Imager System). ASPIS-2, an evolution of the ASPIS sensor (Papale et al 2008, Sensors), is a multispectral sensor based on 4 CCD and 3 interferential filters per CCD. The filters are user selectable during the flight and in this way Aspis is able to acquire data in 12 bands in the visible and near infrared regions with a bandwidth of 10 or 20 nm. To the purposes of this study 7 spectral band were acquired and 15 vegetation indices calculated. During the ripeness period several vegetative and oenochemical parameters were monitored. Anova test shown that several oenochemical variables, such as sugars, total acidity, polyphenols and anthocyanins differ according to the variety taken into consideration. In order to evaluate the time autocorrelation of several oenological parameters value, a simple linear regression between

  16. Astrometry with Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor number 3: Position-mode stability and precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, G. F.; Mcarthur, B.; Nelan, E.; Story, D.; Whipple, A. L.; Jefferys, W. H.; Wang, Q.; Shelus, P. J.; Hemenway, P. D.; Mccartney, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report results from a test exploring the long- and short-term astrometric stability of Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) #3. A test field was observed 40 times over 522 days to determine the precision and accuracy of FGS astrometry and to measure the character and magnitude of possible secular scale changes. We examine the astrometric data and the associated guide-star data to determine random errors. These data are also explored to find sources of systematic error. After correcting for some systematic effects we obtain a precision of 0.002 arcsec (2 mas) per observation (RSS of x and y). This is relative astrometry within a central 2.5 arcmin FGS field of view for any orientation. We find that the scale varies over time and confirm the sense of the trend with independent data. From the 40 observation sets we produce a catalog of an astrometry test field containing eight stars whose relative positions are known to an average 0.7 and 0.9 mas in x and y. One reference star has a relative parallax of 3.1 plus or minus 0.5 mas. Finally, we report that eleven observation sets acquired over 387 days produce parallaxes and relative positions with 1-mas precision.

  17. A precise spacing between the NPA domains of aquaporins is essential for silicon permeability in plants.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Rupesh Kailasrao; Vivancos, Julien; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica; Guérin, Valérie; Carpentier, Gabriel; Sonah, Humira; Labbé, Caroline; Isenring, Paul; Belzile, Francois J; Bélanger, Richard R

    2015-08-01

    The controversy surrounding silicon (Si) benefits and essentiality in plants is exacerbated by the differential ability of species to absorb this element. This property is seemingly enhanced in species carrying specific nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), a subclass of aquaporins. In this work, our aim was to characterize plant aquaporins to define the features that confer Si permeability. Through comparative analysis of 985 aquaporins in 25 species with differing abilities to absorb Si, we were able to predict 30 Si transporters and discovered that Si absorption is exclusively confined to species that possess NIP-III aquaporins with a GSGR selectivity filter and a precise distance of 108 amino acids (AA) between the asparagine-proline-alanine (NPA) domains. The latter feature is of particular significance since it had never been reported to be essential for Si selectivity. Functionality assessed in the Xenopus oocyte expression system showed that NIPs with 108 AA spacing exhibited Si permeability, while proteins differing in that distance did not. In subsequent functional studies, a Si transporter from poplar mutated into variants with 109- or 107-AA spacing failed to import, and a tomato NIP gene mutated from 109 to 108 AA exhibited a rare gain of function. These results provide a precise molecular basis to classify higher plants into Si accumulators or excluders. PMID:26095507

  18. Progress on Passive Sensor for Ultra-Precise Measurement of Carbon Dioxide from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2002-01-01

    Global measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxides (CO2) are needed to resolve significant discrepancies that exist in our understanding of the global carbon budget and, therefore, man's role in global climate change. The science measurement requirements for CO2 are extremely demanding (precision c .3%) No atmospheric chemical species has ever been measured from space with this precision. We are developing a novel application of a Fabry-Perot interferometer to detect spectral absorption of reflected sunlight by CO2 and O2 in the atmosphere. Preliminary design studies indicate that the method will be able to achieve the sensitivity and signal-to-noise required to measure column CO2 at the target specification. We are presently engaged in the construction of a prototype instrument for deployment on an aircraft to test the instrument performance and our ability to retrieve the data in the real atmosphere. In the first 6 months we have assembled a laboratory bench system to begin testing the optical and electronic components. We are also undertaking some measurements of signal and noise levels for actual sunlight reflecting from the ground. We shall present results from some of these ground based studies and discuss their implications for a space based system.

  19. Tactile display landing safety and precision improvements for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, John M.

    A tactile display belt using 24 electro-mechanical tactile transducers (tactors) was used to determine if a modified tactile display system, known as the Tactile Situation Awareness System (TSAS) improved the safety and precision of a complex spacecraft (i.e. the Space Shuttle Orbiter) in guided precision approaches and landings. The goal was to determine if tactile cues enhance safety and mission performance through reduced workload, increased situational awareness (SA), and an improved operational capability by increasing secondary cognitive workload capacity and human-machine interface efficiency and effectiveness. Using both qualitative and quantitative measures such as NASA's Justiz Numerical Measure and Synwork1 scores, an Overall Workload (OW) measure, the Cooper-Harper rating scale, and the China Lake Situational Awareness scale, plus Pre- and Post-Flight Surveys, the data show that tactile displays decrease OW, improve SA, counteract fatigue, and provide superior warning and monitoring capacity for dynamic, off-nominal, high concurrent workload scenarios involving complex, cognitive, and multi-sensory critical scenarios. Use of TSAS for maintaining guided precision approaches and landings was generally intuitive, reduced training times, and improved task learning effects. Ultimately, the use of a homogeneous, experienced, and statistically robust population of test pilots demonstrated that the use of tactile displays for Space Shuttle approaches and landings with degraded vehicle systems, weather, and environmental conditions produced substantial improvements in safety, consistency, reliability, and ease of operations under demanding conditions. Recommendations for further analysis and study are provided in order to leverage the results from this research and further explore the potential to reduce the risk of spaceflight and aerospace operations in general.

  20. The Space Technology-7 Disturbance Reduction System Precision Control Flight Validation Experiment Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, James R.; Hsu, Oscar C.; Maghami, Peirman G.; Markley, F. Landis

    2006-01-01

    As originally proposed, the Space Technology-7 Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) project, managed out of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was designed to validate technologies required for future missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). The two technologies to be demonstrated by DRS were Gravitational Reference Sensors (GRSs) and Colloidal MicroNewton Thrusters (CMNTs). Control algorithms being designed by the Dynamic Control System (DCS) team at the Goddard Space Flight Center would control the spacecraft so that it flew about a freely-floating GRS test mass, keeping it centered within its housing. For programmatic reasons, the GRSs were descoped from DRS. The primary goals of the new mission are to validate the performance of the CMNTs and to demonstrate precise spacecraft position control. DRS will fly as a part of the European Space Agency (ESA) LISA Pathfinder (LPF) spacecraft along with a similar ESA experiment, the LISA Technology Package (LTP). With no GRS, the DCS attitude and drag-free control systems make use of the sensor being developed by ESA as a part of the LTP. The control system is designed to maintain the spacecraft s position with respect to the test mass, to within 10 nm/the square root of Hz over the DRS science frequency band of 1 to 30 mHz.

  1. Precision-Deployable, Stable, Optical Benches for Cost-Effective Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Pellegrino, S.; Dailey, D.; Marks, G.; Bookbinder, J.

    2012-05-01

    To explore the universe at the arcsecond resolution of Chandra, while increasing collecting area by at least an order of magnitude and maintaining affordability, we will need to make creative use of existing and new technology. Precision-deployable, stable, optical benches that fit inside smaller, lower-cost launch vehicles are a prime example of a technology well within current reach that will yield breakthrough benefits for future astrophysics missions. Deployable optical benches for astrophysical applications have a reputation for complexity; however, we are offering an approach, based on techniques used in space for decades, that reduces overall mission cost. Currently, deployable structures are implemented on JAXA’s Astro-H and NASA’s NuStar high-energy astrophysics missions. We believe it is now time to evolve these structures into precision, stable optical benches that are stiff, lightweight, and suitable for space telescopes with focal lengths of 20 meters or more. Such optical benches are required for advanced observatory class missions and can be scaled to Explorer and medium-class missions. To this end, we have formed a partnership between Space Structures Laboratory (SSL) at the California Institute of Technology, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS), Northrop Grumman Astro Aerospace (Astro), and Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO). Combining the expertise and tools from academia and industry is the most effective approach to take this concept to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. We plan to perform small sub-scale demonstrations, functional tests, and analytical modeling in the academic environment. Using results from SSL, larger prototypes will be developed at facilities at NGAS in Redondo Beach and Carpinteria, CA.

  2. THE APPLICATION OF MULTIVIEW METHODS FOR HIGH-PRECISION ASTROMETRIC SPACE VLBI AT LOW FREQUENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, R.; Rioja, M.; Imai, H.; Asaki, Y.; Hong, X.-Y.; Shen, Z.

    2013-06-15

    High-precision astrometric space very long baseline interferometry (S-VLBI) at the low end of the conventional frequency range, i.e., 20 cm, is a requirement for a number of high-priority science goals. These are headlined by obtaining trigonometric parallax distances to pulsars in pulsar-black hole pairs and OH masers anywhere in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. We propose a solution for the most difficult technical problems in S-VLBI by the MultiView approach where multiple sources, separated by several degrees on the sky, are observed simultaneously. We simulated a number of challenging S-VLBI configurations, with orbit errors up to 8 m in size and with ionospheric atmospheres consistent with poor conditions. In these simulations we performed MultiView analysis to achieve the required science goals. This approach removes the need for beam switching requiring a Control Moment Gyro, and the space and ground infrastructure required for high-quality orbit reconstruction of a space-based radio telescope. This will dramatically reduce the complexity of S-VLBI missions which implement the phase-referencing technique.

  3. Airborne/Space-Based Doppler Lidar Wind Sounders Sampling the PBL and Other Regions of Significant Beta and U Inhomogeneities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, Dave

    1998-01-01

    This final report covers the period from April 1994 through March 1998. The proposed research was organized under four main tasks. Those tasks were: (1) Investigate the vertical and horizontal velocity structures within and adjacent to thin and subvisual cirrus; (2) Investigate the lowest 1 km of the PBL and develop algorithms for processing pulsed Doppler lidar data obtained from single shots into regions of significant inhomogeneities in Beta and U; (3) Participate in OSSEs including those designed to establish shot density requirements for meso-gamma scale phenomena with quasi-persistent locations (e.g., jets, leewaves, tropical storms); and (4) Participate in the planning and execution of an airborne mission to measure winds with a pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar. Over the four year period of this research contract, work on all four tasks has yielded significant results which have led to 38 professional presentations (conferences and publications) and have been folded into the science justification for an approved NASA space mission, SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment), in 2001. Also this research has, through Task 4, led to a funded proposal to work directly on a NASA field campaign, CAMEX III, in which an airborne Doppler wind lidar will be used to investigate the cloud-free circulations near tropical storms. Monthly progress reports required under this contract are on file. This final report will highlight major accomplishments, including some that were not foreseen in the original proposal. The presentation of this final report includes this written document as well as material that is better presented via the internet (web pages). There is heavy reference to appended papers and documents. Thus, the main body of the report will serve to summarize the key efforts and findings.

  4. The research of the high precision universal stable reconnaissance platform in near space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-tao; Cao, Jian-zhong; Fan, Zhe-yuan; Chen, Wei-ning

    2011-08-01

    The appliance of military was recognized more and more ,It is important that pod can bear the weight of the availability payload achieve the observation to the earth in 20km-100km area and work in the all-weather. The stable platform can load high imaging spectrometer, the thermal infrared imager, the infrared radiometer, the millimeter waves radar, the laser weapon and so on,in order to realize reconnaissance and attacking integrative and warning the long-distant missile. The stabilization accuracy of platform is prior to 20μrad and burden heavy load to the best of one's abilities. It used high precision velocity and acceleration gyroscope to fulfill the stabilization of the platform. Light-weight design by using new composite material and optimizing design. It was adapt to the near space environment better by structure design and simulation analysis.Enhance its basic frequency and sure the rigid of the frame platform .In addition, the structure of platform apply the two-axis and four-frame and use the method of FEA to fulfill the optimum design in order to attain the object of light-weight.In consider to the precision of the platform I establish the math model and make use of the monte carlo method to appraise and analysis the error that affect the precision of the platform. After emulating by the software of the Matlab to verify the results. It is apply the method that link the platform and aerocraft by mounting the no angular displacement shock absorbers on the elevator mechanism. This kind of design insulate the angular vibration and minish the linear vibration to ensure the image quality.

  5. PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE MOST DISTANT SPECTROSCOPICALLY CONFIRMED SUPERNOVA Ia WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, D.; Rykoff, E.; Aldering, G.; Barbary, K.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Goldhaber, G.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Knop, R. A.; Amanullah, R.; Goobar, A.; Burns, M. S.; Conley, A.; Connolly, N.; Deustua, S.; Fruchter, A. S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gibbons, R. A.; Huang, X.; Kowalski, M.; Lidman, C.; Collaboration: Supernova Cosmology Project; and others

    2013-01-20

    We report the discovery of a redshift 1.71 supernova in the GOODS-North field. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS spectrum has almost negligible contamination from the host or neighboring galaxies. Although the rest-frame-sampled range is too blue to include any Si II line, a principal component analysis allows us to confirm it as a Type Ia supernova with 92% confidence. A recent serendipitous archival HST WFC3 grism spectrum contributed a key element of the confirmation by giving a host-galaxy redshift of 1.713 {+-} 0.007. In addition to being the most distant SN Ia with spectroscopic confirmation, this is the most distant Ia with a precision color measurement. We present the ACS WFC and NICMOS 2 photometry and ACS and WFC3 spectroscopy. Our derived supernova distance is in agreement with the prediction of {Lambda}CDM.

  6. High-precision optomechanical lens system for space applications assembled by a local soldering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleguezuelo, Pol Ribes; Koechlin, Charlie; Hornaff, Marcel; Kamm, Andreas; Beckert, Erik; Fiault, Guillaume; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Soldering using metallic solder alloys is an alternative to adhesive bonding. Laser-based soldering processes are especially well suited for the joining of optical components made of fragile and brittle materials such as glass, ceramics, and optical crystals. This is due to a localized and minimized input of thermal energy. Solderjet bumping technology has been used to assemble a lens mount breadboard using specifications and requirements found for the optical beam expander for the European Space Agency EarthCare Mission. The silica lens and a titanium barrel have been designed and assembled with this technology in order to withstand the stringent mission demands of handling high mechanical and thermal loads without losing the optical performance. Finally, a high-precision optomechanical lens mount has been assembled with minimal localized stress (<1 MPa) showing outstanding performance in terms of wave-front error and beam depolarization ratio before and after environmental tests.

  7. Evaluation of the Terminal Precision Scheduling and Spacing System for Near-Term NAS Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thipphavong, Jane; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Swenson, Harry N.; Lin, Paul; Nguyen, Jimmy

    2012-01-01

    NASA has developed a capability for terminal area precision scheduling and spacing (TAPSS) to provide higher capacity and more efficiently manage arrivals during peak demand periods. This advanced technology is NASA's vision for the NextGen terminal metering capability. A set of human-in-the-loop experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the TAPSS system for near-term implementation. The experiments evaluated the TAPSS system under the current terminal routing infrastructure to validate operational feasibility. A second goal of the study was to measure the benefit of the Center and TRACON advisory tools to help prioritize the requirements for controller radar display enhancements. Simulation results indicate that using the TAPSS system provides benefits under current operations, supporting a 10% increase in airport throughput. Enhancements to Center decision support tools had limited impact on improving the efficiency of terminal operations, but did provide more fuel-efficient advisories to achieve scheduling conformance within 20 seconds. The TRACON controller decision support tools were found to provide the most benefit, by improving the precision in schedule conformance to within 20 seconds, reducing the number of arrivals having lateral path deviations by 50% and lowering subjective controller workload. Overall, the TAPSS system was found to successfully develop an achievable terminal arrival metering plan that was sustainable under heavy traffic demand levels and reduce the complexity of terminal operations when coupled with the use of the terminal controller advisory tools.

  8. Efficiency Benefits Using the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thipphavong, Jane; Swenson, Harry N.; Lin, Paul; Seo, Anthony Y.; Bagasol, Leonard N.

    2011-01-01

    NASA has developed a capability for terminal area precision scheduling and spacing (TAPSS) to increase the use of fuel-efficient arrival procedures during periods of traffic congestion at a high-density airport. Sustained use of fuel-efficient procedures throughout the entire arrival phase of flight reduces overall fuel burn, greenhouse gas emissions and noise pollution. The TAPSS system is a 4D trajectory-based strategic planning and control tool that computes schedules and sequences for arrivals to facilitate optimal profile descents. This paper focuses on quantifying the efficiency benefits associated with using the TAPSS system, measured by reduction of level segments during aircraft descent and flight distance and time savings. The TAPSS system was tested in a series of human-in-the-loop simulations and compared to current procedures. Compared to the current use of the TMA system, simulation results indicate a reduction of total level segment distance by 50% and flight distance and time savings by 7% in the arrival portion of flight (200 nm from the airport). The TAPSS system resulted in aircraft maintaining continuous descent operations longer and with more precision, both achieved under heavy traffic demand levels.

  9. A Broad Bank Lidar for Precise Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption Measurement from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgieva, E. M.; Heaps, W. S.; Huang, W.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. In order to uncover the "missing sink" that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget the critical precision for a measurement from space needs to be on the order of 1 ppm. To better understand the CO2 budget and to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council (NRC) in its recent decadal survey report (NACP) to NASA recommended a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. That's the goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission - to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. Our current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with a high power broadband source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system and considerably reduces the risk of failure. It also tremendously reduces the requirement for wavelength stability in the source putting this responsibility instead on the Fabry- Perot subsystem.

  10. Measuring High-Precision Astrometry with the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, T. L.; Luhman, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope currently offers the greatest potential for high-precision astrometry of faint mid-IR sources across arcminute-scale fields, which would be especially valuable for measuring parallaxes of cold brown dwarfs in the solar neighborhood and proper motions of obscured members of nearby star-forming regions. To more fully realize IRAC's astrometric capabilities, we have sought to minimize the largest sources of uncertainty in astrometry with its 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands. By comparing different routines that estimate stellar positions, we have found that Point Response Function (PRF) fitting with the Spitzer Science Center's Astronomical Point Source Extractor produces both the smallest systematic errors from varying intra-pixel sensitivity and the greatest precision in measurements of positions. In addition, self-calibration has been used to derive new 7th and 8th order distortion corrections for the 3.6 and 4.5 μm arrays of IRAC, respectively. These corrections are suitable for data throughout the mission of Spitzer when a time-dependent scale factor is applied to the corrections. To illustrate the astrometric accuracy that can be achieved by combining PRF fitting with our new distortion corrections, we have applied them to archival data for a nearby star-forming region, arriving at total astrometric errors of ∼20 and 70 mas at signal to noise ratios of 100 and 10, respectively. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  11. Evaluation of SMART sensor displays for multidimensional precision control of Space Shuttle remote manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Brown, J. W.; Lewis, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    An enhanced proximity sensor and display system was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and tested on the full scale Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The sensor system, integrated with a four-claw end effector, measures range error up to 6 inches, and pitch and yaw alignment errors within + or 15 deg., and displays error data on both graphic and numeric displays. The errors are referenced to the end effector control axes through appropriate data processing by a dedicated microcomputer acting on the sensor data in real time. Both display boxes contain a green lamp which indicates whether the combination of range, pitch and yaw errors will assure a successful grapple. More than 200 test runs were completed in early 1980 by three operators at JSC for grasping static and capturing slowly moving targets. The tests have indicated that the use of graphic/numeric displays of proximity sensor information improves precision control of grasp/capture range by more than a factor of two for both static and dynamic grapple conditions.

  12. How Cities Breathe: Ground-Referenced, Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging Precursor Measurements To Space-Based Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Ira; Tratt, David; Quattrochi, Dale; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John

    2013-01-01

    Methane's (CH4) large global warming potential (Shindell et al., 2012) and likely increasing future emissions due to global warming feedbacks emphasize its importance to anthropogenic greenhouse warming (IPCC, 2007). Furthermore, CH4 regulation has far greater near-term climate change mitigation potential versus carbon dioxide CO2, the other major anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG) (Shindell et al., 2009). Uncertainties in CH4 budgets arise from the poor state of knowledge of CH4 sources - in part from a lack of sufficiently accurate assessments of the temporal and spatial emissions and controlling factors of highly variable anthropogenic and natural CH4 surface fluxes (IPCC, 2007) and the lack of global-scale (satellite) data at sufficiently high spatial resolution to resolve sources. Many important methane (and other trace gases) sources arise from urban and mega-urban landscapes where anthropogenic activities are centered - most of humanity lives in urban areas. Studying these complex landscape tapestries is challenged by a wide and varied range of activities at small spatial scale, and difficulty in obtaining up-to-date landuse data in the developed world - a key desire of policy makers towards development of effective regulations. In the developing world, challenges are multiplied with additional political access challenges. As high spatial resolution satellite and airborne data has become available, activity mapping applications have blossomed - i.e., Google maps; however, tap a minute fraction of remote sensing capabilities due to limited (three band) spectral information. Next generation approaches that incorporate high spatial resolution hyperspectral and ultraspectral data will allow detangling of the highly heterogeneous usage megacity patterns by providing diagnostic identification of chemical composition from solids (refs) to gases (refs). To properly enable these next generation technologies for megacity include atmospheric radiative transfer modeling

  13. Consequences of flight height and line spacing on airborne (helicopter) gravity gradient resolution in the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kass, M. Andy

    2013-01-01

    Line spacing and flight height are critical parameters in airborne gravity gradient surveys; the optimal trade-off between survey costs and desired resolution, however, is different for every situation. This article investigates the additional benefit of reducing the flight height and line spacing though a study of a survey conducted over the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, which is the highest-resolution public-domain airborne gravity gradient data set available, with overlapping high- and lower-resolution surveys. By using Fourier analysis and matched filtering, it is shown that while the lower-resolution survey delineates the target body, reducing the flight height from 80 m to 40 m and the line spacing from 100 m to 50 m improves the recoverable resolution even at basement depths.

  14. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  15. Airborne mass spectrometers: four decades of atmospheric and space research at the Air Force research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A A; Hunton, D E

    1999-11-01

    Mass spectrometry is a versatile research tool that has proved to be extremely useful for exploring the fundamental nature of the earth's atmosphere and ionosphere and in helping to solve operational problems facing the Air Force and the Department of Defense. In the past 40 years, our research group at the Air Force Research Laboratory has flown quadrupole mass spectrometers of many designs on nearly 100 sounding rockets, nine satellites, three Space Shuttles and many missions of high-altitude research aircraft and balloons. We have also used our instruments in ground-based investigations of rocket and jet engine exhaust, combustion chemistry and microwave breakdown chemistry. This paper is a review of the instrumentation and techniques needed for space research, a summary of the results from many of the experiments, and an introduction to the broad field of atmospheric and space mass spectrometry in general. PMID:10548806

  16. High Precision Ranging and Range-Rate Measurements over Free-Space-Laser Communication Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-precision ranging and range-rate measurement system via an optical-ranging or combined ranging-communication link. A complete bench-top optical communication system was built. It included a ground terminal and a space terminal. Ranging and range rate tests were conducted in two configurations. In the communication configuration with 622 data rate, we achieved a two-way range-rate error of 2 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 9 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. Ranging and range-rate as a function of Bit Error Rate of the communication link is reported. They are not sensitive to the link error rate. In the single-frequency amplitude modulation mode, we report a two-way range rate error of 0.8 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 2.6 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. We identified the major noise sources in the current system as the transmitter modulation injected noise and receiver electronics generated noise. A new improved system will be constructed to further improve the system performance for both operating modes.

  17. Micro-precision control/structure interaction technology for large optical space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirlin, Samuel W.; Laskin, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The CSI program at JPL is chartered to develop the structures and control technology needed for sub-micron level stabilization of future optical space systems. The extreme dimensional stability required for such systems derives from the need to maintain the alignment and figure of critical optical elements to a small fraction (typically 1/20th to 1/50th) of the wavelength of detected radiation. The wavelength is about 0.5 micron for visible light and 0.1 micron for ultra-violet light. This lambda/50 requirement is common to a broad class of optical systems including filled aperture telescopes (with monolithic or segmented primary mirrors), sparse aperture telescopes, and optical interferometers. The challenge for CSI arises when such systems become large, with spatially distributed optical elements mounted on a lightweight, flexible structure. In order to better understand the requirements for micro-precision CSI technology, a representative future optical system was identified and developed as an analytical testbed for CSI concepts and approaches. An optical interferometer was selected as a stressing example of the relevant mission class. The system that emerged was termed the Focus Mission Interferometer (FMI). This paper will describe the multi-layer control architecture used to address the FMI's nanometer level stabilization requirements. In addition the paper will discuss on-going and planned experimental work aimed at demonstrating that multi-layer CSI can work in practice in the relevant performance regime.

  18. Airborne laser communication technology and flight test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Li-xin; Zhang, Li-zhong; Li, Xiao-ming; Li, Ying-chao; Jiang, Hui-lin

    2015-11-01

    Reconnaissance aircraft is an important node of the space-air-ground integrated information network, on which equipped with a large number of high-resolution surveillance equipment, and need high speed communications equipment to transmit detected information in real time. Currently RF communication methods cannot meet the needs of communication bandwidth. Wireless laser communication has outstanding advantages high speed, high capacity, security, etc., is an important means to solve the high-speed information transmission of airborne platforms. In this paper, detailed analysis of how the system works, the system components, work processes, link power and the key technologies of airborne laser communication were discussed. On this basis, a prototype airborne laser communications was developed, and high-speed, long-distance communications tests were carried out between the two fixed-wing aircraft, and the airborne precision aiming, atmospheric laser communication impacts on laser communication were tested. The experiments ultimately realize that, the communication distance is 144km, the communication rate is 2.5Gbps. The Airborne laser communication experiments provide technical basis for the application of the conversion equipment.

  19. High-Precision Shape Control of In-Space Deployable Large Membrane/Thin-Shell Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This innovation has been developed to improve the resolutions of future spacebased active and passive microwave antennas for earth-science remote sensing missions by maintaining surface figure precisions of large membrane/thin-shell reflectors during orbiting. The intention is for these sensing instruments to be deployable at orbit altitudes one or two orders of magnitude higher than Low Earth Orbit (LEO), but still being able to acquire measurements at spatial resolution and sensitivity similar to those of LEO. Because active and passive microwave remote sensors are able to penetrate through clouds to acquire vertical profile measurements of geophysical parameters, it is desirable to elevate them to the higher orbits to obtain orbital geometries that offer large spatial coverage and more frequent observations. This capability is essential for monitoring and for detailed understanding of the life cycles of natural hazards, such as hurricanes, tropical storms, flash floods, and tsunamis. Major components of this high-precision antenna-surface-control system include a membrane/thin shell reflector, a metrology sensor, a controller, actuators, and corresponding power amplifier and signal conditioning electronics (see figure). Actuators are attached to the back of the reflector to produce contraction/ expansion forces to adjust the shape of the thin-material reflector. The wavefront-sensing metrology system continuously measures the surface figure of the reflector, converts the surface figure to digital data and feeds the data to the controller. The controller determines the control parameters and generates commands to the actuator system. The flexible, piezoelectric polymer actuators are thus activated, providing the control forces needed to correct any distortions that exist in the reflector surface. Piezoelectric polymer actuators are very thin and flexible. They can be implemented on the back of the membrane/thin-shell reflector without introducing significant

  20. Issues in Airborne Systems for Closely-Spaced Parallel Runway Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, A.; Carpenter, B.; Asari, K.; Kuchar, J.; Hansman, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to increase airport capacity include studies of aircraft systems that would enable simultaneous approaches to closely spaced parallel runways in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The time-critical nature of a parallel approach results in key design issues for current and future collision avoidance systems. These issues are being studied in two ways. First, a part-task flight simulator study has examined the procedural and display issues inherent in such a time-critical task. Second, a prototype collision avoidance logic capable of generating this maneuver guidance has been designed using a recently developed methodology.

  1. Design of an airborne launch vehicle for an air launched space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chin; Choi, Rich; Cohen, Scott; Dumont, Brian; Gibin, Mauricius; Jorden, Rob; Poth, Stefan

    1993-12-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a carrier vehicle for an air launched space booster. This airplane is capable of carrying a 500,000 pound satellite launch system to an altitude over 40,000 feet for launch. The airplane features a twin fuselage configuration for improved payload and landing gear integration, a high aspect ratio wing for maneuverability at altitude, and is powered by six General Electric GE-90 engines. The analysis methods used and the systems employed in the airplane are discussed. Launch costs are expected to be competitive with existing launch systems.

  2. Design of an airborne launch vehicle for an air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Chin; Choi, Rich; Cohen, Scott; Dumont, Brian; Gibin, Mauricius; Jorden, Rob; Poth, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a carrier vehicle for an air launched space booster. This airplane is capable of carrying a 500,000 pound satellite launch system to an altitude over 40,000 feet for launch. The airplane features a twin fuselage configuration for improved payload and landing gear integration, a high aspect ratio wing for maneuverability at altitude, and is powered by six General Electric GE-90 engines. The analysis methods used and the systems employed in the airplane are discussed. Launch costs are expected to be competitive with existing launch systems.

  3. High-precision CTE measurement of hybrid C/SiC composite for cryogenic space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Yamada, N.; Imai, T.; Tange, Y.; Kaneda, H.; Katayama, H.; Kotani, M.; Maruyama, K.; Naitoh, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Onaka, T.; Suganuma, M.; Ozaki, T.; Kume, M.; Krödel, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents highly precise measurements of thermal expansion of a "hybrid" carbon-fiber reinforced silicon carbide composite, HB-Cesic® - a trademark of ECM, in the temperature region of ˜310-10 K. Whilst C/SiC composites have been considered to be promising for the mirrors and other structures of space-borne cryogenic telescopes, the anisotropic thermal expansion has been a potential disadvantage of this material. HB-Cesic® is a newly developed composite using a mixture of different types of chopped, short carbon-fiber, in which one of the important aims of the development was to reduce the anisotropy. The measurements indicate that the anisotropy was much reduced down to 4% as a result of hybridization. The thermal expansion data obtained are presented as functions of temperature using eighth-order polynomials separately for the horizontal (XY-) and vertical (Z-) directions of the fabrication process. The average CTEs and their dispersion (1σ) in the range 293-10 K derived from the data for the XY- and Z-directions were 0.805 ± 0.003 × 10-6 K-1 and 0.837 ± 0.001 × 10-6 K-1, respectively. The absolute accuracy and the reproducibility of the present measurements are suggested to be better than 0.01 × 10-6 K-1 and 0.001 × 10-6 K-1, respectively. The residual anisotropy of the thermal expansion was consistent with our previous speculation regarding carbon-fiber, in which the residual anisotropy tended to lie mainly in the horizontal plane.

  4. Subnanosecond GPS-based clock synchronization and precision deep-space tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. E.; Lichten, S. M.; Jefferson, D. C.; Border, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    Interferometric spacecraft tracking is accomplished by the Deep Space Network (DSN) by comparing the arrival time of electromagnetic spacecraft signals at ground antennas separated by baselines on the order of 8000 km. Clock synchronization errors within and between DSN stations directly impact the attainable tracking accuracy, with a 0.3-nsec error in clock synchronization resulting in an 11-nrad angular position error. This level of synchronization is currently achieved by observing a quasar which is angularly close to the spacecraft just after the spacecraft observations. By determining the differential arrival times of the random quasar signal at the stations, clock offsets and propagation delays within the atmosphere and within the DSN stations are calibrated. Recent developments in time transfer techniques may allow medium accuracy (50-100 nrad) spacecraft tracking without near-simultaneous quasar-based calibrations. Solutions are presented for a worldwide network of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers in which the formal errors for DSN clock offset parameters are less than 0.5 nsec. Comparisons of clock rate offsets derived from GPS measurements and from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), as well as the examination of clock closure, suggest that these formal errors are a realistic measure of GPS-based clock offset precision and accuracy. Incorporating GPS-based clock synchronization measurements into a spacecraft differential ranging system would allow tracking without near-simultaneous quasar observations. The impact on individual spacecraft navigation-error sources due to elimination of quasar-based calibrations is presented. System implementation, including calibration of station electronic delays, is discussed.

  5. HIGH-PRECISION TIMING OF FIVE MILLISECOND PULSARS: SPACE VELOCITIES, BINARY EVOLUTION, AND EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M. E.; Stairs, I. H.; Ferdman, R. D.; Lyne, A. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M.; Nice, D. J.; Demorest, P. B.; Ransom, S. M.; Camilo, F.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2011-12-20

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km s{sup -1}, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems, we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M{sub Sun }. The implications of the results presented here to our understanding of binary pulsar evolution are discussed. The updated parameters for the binary systems studied here, together with recently discovered similar systems, allowed us to update previous limits on the violation of the strong equivalence principle through the parameter |{Delta}| to 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} (95% confidence) and the violation of Lorentz invariance/momentum conservation through the parameter |{alpha}-hat3| to 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} (95% confidence).

  6. Evaluation of a Tool for Airborne-Managed In-Trail Approach Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Abbott, Terence S.; Nadler, Eric D.; Eischeid, Todd

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Terminal Area Approach Spacing (ATAAS) tool uses Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast aircraft state data to compute a speed command for an ATAAS-equipped aircraft to follow and obtain a required time interval behind another aircraft. The ATAAS tool and candidate operational procedures were tested in a high-fidelity, full mission simulator with active airline subject pilots flying an arrival scenario to obtain pilot perceptions of acceptability and workload for the concept. The aircraft consistently achieved the target spacing interval within 1 s when the ATAAS speed guidance was autothrottle-coupled and a slightly greater (4 - 5 s) but consistent interval with pilot-controlled speed changes. The subject pilots rated the ATAAS workload as similar to one with standard procedures for a nominal Instrument Landing System (ILS) approach. They also rated highly various procedural aspects (including amount of head-down time required). Eyetracker data showed only slight changes in instrument scan patterns for ATAAS versus standard ILS procedures.

  7. Backscatter Modeling at 2.1 Micron Wavelength for Space-Based and Airborne Lidars Using Aerosol Physico-Chemical and Lidar Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, V.; Rothermel, J.; Jarzembski, M. A.; Clarke, A. D.; Cutten, D. R.; Bowdle, D. A.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1999-01-01

    Space-based and airborne coherent Doppler lidars designed for measuring global tropospheric wind profiles in cloud-free air rely on backscatter, beta from aerosols acting as passive wind tracers. Aerosol beta distribution in the vertical can vary over as much as 5-6 orders of magnitude. Thus, the design of a wave length-specific, space-borne or airborne lidar must account for the magnitude of 8 in the region or features of interest. The SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment under development by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and scheduled for launch on the Space Shuttle in 2001, will demonstrate wind measurements from space using a solid-state 2 micrometer coherent Doppler lidar. Consequently, there is a critical need to understand variability of aerosol beta at 2.1 micrometers, to evaluate signal detection under varying aerosol loading conditions. Although few direct measurements of beta at 2.1 micrometers exist, extensive datasets, including climatologies in widely-separated locations, do exist for other wavelengths based on CO2 and Nd:YAG lidars. Datasets also exist for the associated microphysical and chemical properties. An example of a multi-parametric dataset is that of the NASA GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in 1990 in which aerosol chemistry and size distributions were measured concurrently with multi-wavelength lidar backscatter observations. More recently, continuous-wave (CW) lidar backscatter measurements at mid-infrared wavelengths have been made during the Multicenter Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment in 1995. Using Lorenz-Mie theory, these datasets have been used to develop a method to convert lidar backscatter to the 2.1 micrometer wavelength. This paper presents comparison of modeled backscatter at wavelengths for which backscatter measurements exist including converted beta (sub 2.1).

  8. More than 100 channel supercontinuum CW optical source with precise 25GHz spacing for 10Gbit/s DWDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianping; Nan, Yinbo; Zhou, Xianwei

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the generation of supercontinuum (SC) with a 12.5GHz DFB/EAM ultrashort optical pulse broadened in the high nonlinear fiber (HNLF). Through longitudinal mode-carving of the SC spectrum, a novel multiwavelength continuous wave (CW) optical source with precise 25GHz channel spacing is realized. The bit error rate (BER) curve and eye diagram show that the multiwavelength CW optical source is promising for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) systems.

  9. Clear-Sky Closure Studies of Lower Tropospheric Aerosol and Water Vapor During ACE-2 Using Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne In-Situ, Space-Borne, and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Durkee, Philip A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.; Oestroem, Elisabeth; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gordon, Howard R.; Formenti, Paolo; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2000-01-01

    We report on clear-sky column closure experiments (CLEARCOLUMN) performed in the Canary Islands during the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June/July 1997. We present CLEARCOLUMN results obtained by combining airborne sunphotometer and in-situ (optical particle counter, nephelometer, and absorption photometer) measurements taken aboard the Pelican aircraft, space-borne NOAA/AVHRR data and ground-based lidar and sunphotometer measurements. During both days discussed here, vertical profiles flown in cloud-free air masses revealed 3 distinctly different layers: a marine boundary layer (MBL) with varying pollution levels, an elevated dust layer, and a very clean layer between the MBL and the dust layer. A key result of this study is the achievement of closure between extinction or layer aerosol optical depth (AOD) computed from continuous in-situ aerosol size-distributions and composition and those measured with the airborne sunphotometer. In the dust, the agreement in layer AOD (lambda = 380-1060 nm) is 3-8%. In the MBL there is a tendency for the in-situ results to be slightly lower than the sunphotometer measurements (10-17% at lambda = 525 nm), but these differences are within the combined error bars of the measurements and computations.

  10. Cognitive Operations on Space and Their Impact on the Precision of Location Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansdale, Mark; Humphries, Joyce; Flynn, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Learning about object locations in space usually involves the summation of information from different experiences of that space and requires various cognitive operations to make this possible. These processes are poorly understood and, in the extreme, may not occur--leading to mutual exclusivity of memories (Baguley, Lansdale, Lines, & Parkin,…

  11. Precision Laser Development for Interferometric Space Missions NGO, SGO, and GRACE Follow-On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Optical fiber and semiconductor laser technologies have evolved dramatically over the last decade due to the increased demands from optical communications. We are developing a laser (master oscillator) and optical amplifier based on those technologies for interferometric space missions, including the gravitational-wave missions NGO/SGO (formerly LISA) and the climate monitoring mission GRACE Follow-On, by fully utilizing the matured wave-guided optics technologies. In space, where simpler and more reliable system is preferred, the wave-guided components are advantageous over bulk, crystal-based, free-space laser, such as NPRO (Nonplanar Ring Oscillator) and bulk-crystal amplifier.

  12. Precision laser development for interferometric space missions NGO, SGO, and GRACE Follow-On

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, K.; Camp, J.

    2012-06-01

    Optical fiber and semiconductor laser technologies have evolved dramatically over the last decade due to the increased demands from optical communications. We are developing a laser (master oscillator) and optical amplifier based on those technologies for interferometric space missions, including the gravitational-wave missions NGO/SGO (formerly LISA) and the climate monitoring mission GRACE Follow-On, by fully utilizing the matured wave-guided optics technologies. In space, where simpler and more reliable system is preferred, the wave-guided components are advantageous over bulk, crystal-based, free-space laser, such as NPRO (Non-planar Ring Oscillator) and bulk-crystal amplifier.

  13. Real-space electronic structure calculations with full-potential all-electron precision for transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Tomoya; Heide, Marcus; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Baumeister, Paul; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Blügel, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an efficient computational scheme utilizing the real-space finite-difference formalism and the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method to perform precise first-principles electronic-structure simulations based on the density-functional theory for systems containing transition metals with a modest computational effort. By combining the advantages of the time-saving double-grid technique and the Fourier-filtering procedure for the projectors of pseudopotentials, we can overcome the egg box effect in the computations even for first-row elements and transition metals, which is a problem of the real-space finite-difference formalism. In order to demonstrate the potential power in terms of precision and applicability of the present scheme, we have carried out simulations to examine several bulk properties and structural energy differences between different bulk phases of transition metals and have obtained excellent agreement with the results of other precise first-principles methods such as a plane-wave-based PAW method and an all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FLAPW) method.

  14. Development and Validation of High Precision Thermal, Mechanical, and Optical Models for the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindensmith, Chris A.; Briggs, H. Clark; Beregovski, Yuri; Feria, V. Alfonso; Goullioud, Renaud; Gursel, Yekta; Hahn, Inseob; Kinsella, Gary; Orzewalla, Matthew; Phillips, Charles

    2006-01-01

    SIM Planetquest (SIM) is a large optical interferometer for making microarcsecond measurements of the positions of stars, and to detect Earth-sized planets around nearby stars. To achieve this precision, SIM requires stability of optical components to tens of picometers per hour. The combination of SIM s large size (9 meter baseline) and the high stability requirement makes it difficult and costly to measure all aspects of system performance on the ground. To reduce risks, costs and to allow for a design with fewer intermediate testing stages, the SIM project is developing an integrated thermal, mechanical and optical modeling process that will allow predictions of the system performance to be made at the required high precision. This modeling process uses commercial, off-the-shelf tools and has been validated against experimental results at the precision of the SIM performance requirements. This paper presents the description of the model development, some of the models, and their validation in the Thermo-Opto-Mechanical (TOM3) testbed which includes full scale brassboard optical components and the metrology to test them at the SIM performance requirement levels.

  15. Development of precision structure of a large-size space radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astavin, A. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Komaev, R. V.; Moisheev, A. A.; Tsvelev, V. M.; Serebrennikov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents methods for the design and engineering concepts, which made it possible to develop and manufacture the space radio telescope with a large size and high accuracy of the effective reflector area and focal assembly position.

  16. Comparison of Precision of Biomass Estimates in Regional Field Sample Surveys and Airborne LiDAR-Assisted Surveys in Hedmark County, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naesset, Erik; Gobakken, Terje; Bollandsas, Ole Martin; Gregoire, Timothy G.; Nelson, Ross; Stahl, Goeran

    2013-01-01

    Airborne scanning LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) has emerged as a promising tool to provide auxiliary data for sample surveys aiming at estimation of above-ground tree biomass (AGB), with potential applications in REDD forest monitoring. For larger geographical regions such as counties, states or nations, it is not feasible to collect airborne LiDAR data continuously ("wall-to-wall") over the entire area of interest. Two-stage cluster survey designs have therefore been demonstrated by which LiDAR data are collected along selected individual flight-lines treated as clusters and with ground plots sampled along these LiDAR swaths. Recently, analytical AGB estimators and associated variance estimators that quantify the sampling variability have been proposed. Empirical studies employing these estimators have shown a seemingly equal or even larger uncertainty of the AGB estimates obtained with extensive use of LiDAR data to support the estimation as compared to pure field-based estimates employing estimators appropriate under simple random sampling (SRS). However, comparison of uncertainty estimates under SRS and sophisticated two-stage designs is complicated by large differences in the designs and assumptions. In this study, probability-based principles to estimation and inference were followed. We assumed designs of a field sample and a LiDAR-assisted survey of Hedmark County (HC) (27,390 km2), Norway, considered to be more comparable than those assumed in previous studies. The field sample consisted of 659 systematically distributed National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots and the airborne scanning LiDAR data were collected along 53 parallel flight-lines flown over the NFI plots. We compared AGB estimates based on the field survey only assuming SRS against corresponding estimates assuming two-phase (double) sampling with LiDAR and employing model-assisted estimators. We also compared AGB estimates based on the field survey only assuming two-stage sampling (the NFI

  17. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  18. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now. PMID:27250477

  19. An Overview of a Trajectory-Based Solution for En Route and Terminal Area Self-Spacing: Sixth Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the sixth revision to an algorithm specifically designed to support NASA's Airborne Precision Spacing concept. This algorithm is referred to as the Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes version 13 (ASTAR13). This airborne self-spacing concept contains both trajectory-based and state-based mechanisms for calculating the speeds required to achieve or maintain a precise spacing interval. The trajectory-based capability allows for spacing operations prior to the aircraft being on a common path. This algorithm was also designed specifically to support a standalone, non-integrated implementation in the spacing aircraft. This current revision to the algorithm adds the state-based capability in support of evolving industry standards relating to airborne self-spacing.

  20. An Overview of a Trajectory-Based Solution for En Route and Terminal Area Self-Spacing: Seventh Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the seventh revision to an algorithm specifically designed to support NASA's Airborne Precision Spacing concept. This paper supersedes the previous documentation and presents a modification to the algorithm referred to as the Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes version 13 (ASTAR13). This airborne self-spacing concept contains both trajectory-based and state-based mechanisms for calculating the speeds required to achieve or maintain a precise spacing interval. The trajectory-based capability allows for spacing operations prior to the aircraft being on a common path. This algorithm was also designed specifically to support a standalone, non-integrated implementation in the spacing aircraft. This current revision to the algorithm adds the state-based capability in support of evolving industry standards relating to airborne self-spacing.

  1. Development of the APEX experiment, preparatory activities for an airborne system supporting future space-borne imaging spectrometers in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaepman, M.

    2002-06-01

    APEX is an airborne imaging spectrometer built in the framework of ESA PRODEX (Programme développement d'expériences scientifiques) with the support of ESA EO-EP. It is based on a Swiss/Belgian initiative and designed to be an airborne simulator for the support and development of future spaceborne systems for the study of land surface processes. It will be able to contribute to the simulation, calibration, and validation of planned ESA imaging spectrometer missions (e.g., MERIS/ENVISAT, SPECTRA, etc.) in the 400 - 2500 nm region of the spectrum. APEX will foster the use of imaging spectrometer data in Europe and will support the application development for imaging spectroscopy products. The industrial consortium building the instrument is composed out of joint Swiss/Belgian industries with the support of ESA EO-EP (e.g., detectors, calibration, technical management).

  2. An Overview of a Trajectory-Based Solution for En Route and Terminal Area Self-Spacing: Third Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the third major revision to an algorithm specifically designed to support NASA's Airborne Precision Spacing concept. This algorithm is referred to as the Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes version 11 (ASTAR11). This airborne self-spacing concept is trajectory-based, allowing for spacing operations prior to the aircraft being on a common path. Because this algorithm is trajectory-based, it also has the inherent ability to support required time-of-arrival (RTA) operations. This algorithm was also designed specifically to support a standalone, non-integrated implementation in the spacing aircraft.

  3. Precision polymers and 3D DNA nanostructures: emergent assemblies from new parameter space.

    PubMed

    Serpell, Christopher J; Edwardson, Thomas G W; Chidchob, Pongphak; Carneiro, Karina M M; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2014-11-01

    Polymer self-assembly and DNA nanotechnology have both proved to be powerful nanoscale techniques. To date, most attempts to merge the fields have been limited to placing linear DNA segments within a polydisperse block copolymer. Here we show that, by using hydrophobic polymers of a precisely predetermined length conjugated to DNA strands, and addressable 3D DNA prisms, we are able to effect the formation of unprecedented monodisperse quantized superstructures. The structure and properties of larger micelles-of-prisms were probed in depth, revealing their ability to participate in controlled release of their constituent nanostructures, and template light-harvesting energy transfer cascades, mediated through both the addressability of DNA and the controlled aggregation of the polymers. PMID:25325677

  4. Airborne observations of the Eyjafjalla volcano ash cloud over Europe during air space closure in April and May 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.; Weinzierl, B.; Reitebuch, O.; Schlager, H.; Minikin, A.; Forster, C.; Baumann, R.; Sailer, T.; Graf, K.; Mannstein, H.; Voigt, C.; Rahm, S.; Simmet, R.; Scheibe, M.; Lichtenstern, M.; Stock, P.; Rüba, H.; Schäuble, D.; Tafferner, A.; Rautenhaus, M.; Gerz, T.; Ziereis, H.; Krautstrunk, M.; Mallaun, C.; Gayet, J.-F.; Lieke, K.; Kandler, K.; Ebert, M.; Weinbruch, S.; Stohl, A.; Gasteiger, J.; Olafsson, H.; Sturm, K.

    2010-09-01

    Airborne measurements of Lidar backscatter, aerosol concentrations (particle diameters of 4 nm to 50 μm), trace gas mixing ratios (SO2, CO, O3, H2O), single particle properties, and meteorological parameters have been performed in volcanic ash plumes with the Falcon aircraft operated by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR). A series of 17 flights was performed over Europe between Southern Germany and Iceland during the eruption period of the Eyjafjalla1 volcano between 19 April and 18 May 2010. Flight planning and measurement analyses were supported by a refined Meteosat ash product and trajectory model analysis. The volcanic ash plume was observed with Lidar directly over the volcano and up to a distance of 2700 km downwind. Lidar and in-situ measurements covered plume ages of 7 h to 120 h. Aged ash layers were between a few 100 m to 3 km deep, occurred between 1 and 7 km altitude, and were typically 100 to 300 km wide. Particles collected by impactors had diameters up to 20 μm diameter, with size and age dependent composition. Ash mass concentration was evaluated for a material density of 2.6 g cm-3 and for either weakly or moderately absorbing coarse mode particles (refractive index 1.59+0i or 1.59+0.004i). In the absorbing case, the ash concentration is about a factor of four larger than in the non-absorbing limit. Because of sedimentation constraints, the smaller results are the more realistic ones for aged plumes. The Falcon flew in ash clouds up to about 1 mg m-3 for a few minutes and in an ash cloud with more than 0.2 mg m-3 mean-concentration for about one hour without engine damages. In fresh plumes, the SO2 concentration was correlated with the ash mass concentration. Typically, 0.5 mg m-3 ash concentration was related to about 100 nmol mol-31 SO2 mixing ratio and 70 nmol mol-1 CO mixing ratio increases for this volcano period. In aged plumes, layers with enhanced coarse mode particle concentration but without SO2 enhancements occurred. To

  5. Micro-integrated extended cavity diode lasers for precision potassium spectroscopy in space.

    PubMed

    Luvsandamdin, Erdenetsetseg; Kürbis, Christian; Schiemangk, Max; Sahm, Alexander; Wicht, Andreas; Peters, Achim; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2014-04-01

    We present a micro-integrated, extended cavity diode laser module for space-based experiments on potassium Bose-Einstein condensates and atom interferometry. The module emits at the wavelength of the potassium D2-line at 766.7 nm and provides 27.5 GHz of continuous tunability. It features sub-100 kHz short term (100 μs) emission linewidth. To qualify the extended cavity diode laser module for quantum optics experiments in space, vibration tests (8.1 g(RMS) and 21.4 g(RMS)) and mechanical shock tests (1500 g) were carried out. No degradation of the electro-optical performance was observed. PMID:24718155

  6. The PLATO Simulator: modelling of high-precision high-cadence space-based imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos-Arenal, P.; Zima, W.; De Ridder, J.; Aerts, C.; Huygen, R.; Samadi, R.; Green, J.; Piotto, G.; Salmon, S.; Catala, C.; Rauer, H.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Many aspects of the design trade-off of a space-based instrument and its performance can best be tackled through simulations of the expected observations. The complex interplay of various noise sources in the course of the observations make such simulations an indispensable part of the assessment and design study of any space-based mission. Aims: We present a formalism to model and simulate photometric time series of CCD images by including models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the jitter movements of the spacecraft, and all of the important natural noise sources. Methods: This formalism has been implemented in a versatile end-to-end simulation software tool, specifically designed for the PLATO (Planetary Transists and Oscillations of Stars) space mission to be operated from L2, but easily adaptable to similar types of missions. We call this tool Plato Simulator. Results: We provide a detailed description of several noise sources and discuss their properties in connection with the optical design, the allowable level of jitter, the quantum efficiency of the detectors, etc. The expected overall noise budget of generated light curves is computed, as a function of the stellar magnitude, for different sets of input parameters describing the instrument properties. The simulator is offered to the scientific community for future use. Software package available at the Plato Simulator web site (http://https://fys.kuleuven.be/ster/Software/PlatoSimulator/).

  7. Precision modeling of redshift-space distortions from a multipoint propagator expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Bernardeau, Francis

    2013-04-01

    Using a full implementation of resummed perturbation theory (PT) from a multipoint propagator expansion, we put forward new theoretical predictions for the two-point statistics of matter fluctuations in redshift space. The predictions consistently include PT corrections up to the two-loop order and are based on an improved prescription of the redshift-space distortions that properly takes into account their non-Gaussian impact from a systematic low-k expansion. In contrast to the previous studies that partly used standard PT calculations, the present treatment is able to provide a consistent prediction for both power spectra and correlation functions. These results are compared with N-body simulations with which a very good agreement is found up to the quadrupole moment. However, the theoretical predictions for the hexadecapole moment of the power spectra are found to significantly depart from the numerical results at low redshift. We examine this issue and find it to be likely related to an improper modeling of the redshift-space distortions damping effects on which this moment shows large dependence.

  8. Parameter space of experimental chaotic circuits with high-precision control parameters.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Francisco F G; Rubinger, Rero M; Sartorelli, José C; Albuquerque, Holokx A; Baptista, Murilo S

    2016-08-01

    We report high-resolution measurements that experimentally confirm a spiral cascade structure and a scaling relationship of shrimps in the Chua's circuit. Circuits constructed using this component allow for a comprehensive characterization of the circuit behaviors through high resolution parameter spaces. To illustrate the power of our technological development for the creation and the study of chaotic circuits, we constructed a Chua circuit and study its high resolution parameter space. The reliability and stability of the designed component allowed us to obtain data for long periods of time (∼21 weeks), a data set from which an accurate estimation of Lyapunov exponents for the circuit characterization was possible. Moreover, this data, rigorously characterized by the Lyapunov exponents, allows us to reassure experimentally that the shrimps, stable islands embedded in a domain of chaos in the parameter spaces, can be observed in the laboratory. Finally, we confirm that their sizes decay exponentially with the period of the attractor, a result expected to be found in maps of the quadratic family. PMID:27586603

  9. Parameter space of experimental chaotic circuits with high-precision control parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Francisco F. G.; Rubinger, Rero M.; Sartorelli, José C.; Albuquerque, Holokx A.; Baptista, Murilo S.

    2016-08-01

    We report high-resolution measurements that experimentally confirm a spiral cascade structure and a scaling relationship of shrimps in the Chua's circuit. Circuits constructed using this component allow for a comprehensive characterization of the circuit behaviors through high resolution parameter spaces. To illustrate the power of our technological development for the creation and the study of chaotic circuits, we constructed a Chua circuit and study its high resolution parameter space. The reliability and stability of the designed component allowed us to obtain data for long periods of time (˜21 weeks), a data set from which an accurate estimation of Lyapunov exponents for the circuit characterization was possible. Moreover, this data, rigorously characterized by the Lyapunov exponents, allows us to reassure experimentally that the shrimps, stable islands embedded in a domain of chaos in the parameter spaces, can be observed in the laboratory. Finally, we confirm that their sizes decay exponentially with the period of the attractor, a result expected to be found in maps of the quadratic family.

  10. Generation of multiple optical frequencies referenced to a frequency comb for precision free-space frequency transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Byung Jae; Kang, Hyun Jay; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2016-03-01

    Generating multiple optical frequencies referenced to the frequency standard is an important task in optical clock dissemination and optical communication. An apparatus for frequency-comb-referenced generation of multiple optical frequencies is demonstrated for high-precision free-space transfer of multiple optical frequencies. The relative linewidth and frequency instability at each channel corresponds to sub-1 Hz and 1.06×10-15 at 10 s averaging time, respectively. During the free-space transfer, the refractive index change of transmission media caused by atmospheric turbulences induces phase and frequency noise on optical frequencies. These phase and frequency noise causes induced linewidth broadening and frequency shift in optical frequencies which can disturb the accurate frequency transfer. The proposed feedback loop with acousto-optic modulator can monitor and compensate phase/frequency noise on optical frequencies. As a result, a frequency-comb-referenced single optical mode is compensated with a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 80 dB. By sharing the same optical paths, this feedback loop is confirmed to be successfully transferred to the neighboring wavelength channels (a 100 GHz spaced channel). This result confirms our proposed system can transfer optical frequencies to the remote site in free-space without performance degradation.

  11. Simplified Architecture for Precise Aiming of a Deep-Space Communication Laser Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Gerard G.; Farr, William H.; Charles, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    The simplified architecture is a minimal system for a deep-space optical communications transceiver. For a deepspace optical communications link the simplest form of the transceiver requires (1) an efficient modulated optical source, (2) a point-ahead mechanism (PAM) to compensate for two-way light travel, (3) an aperture to reduce the divergence of the transmit laser communication signal and also to collect the uplink communication signal, and (4) a receive detector to sense the uplink communication signal. Additional components are introduced to mitigate for spacecraft microvibrations and to improve the pointing accuracy. The Canonical Transceiver implements this simplified architecture (see figure). A single photon-counting smart focal plane sensor combines acquisition, tracking, and forward link data detection functionality. This improves optical efficiency by eliminating channel splits. A transmit laser blind sensor (e.g. silicon with 1,550-nm beam) provides transmit beam-pointing feedback via the two-photon absorption (TPA) process. This vastly improves the transmit/receive isolation because only the focused transmit beam is detected. A piezoelectric tiptilt actuator implements the required point-ahead angle. This point-ahead mechanism has been demonstrated to have near zero quiescent power and is flight qualified. This architecture also uses an innovative 100-mHz resonant frequency passive isolation platform to filter spacecraft vibrations with voice coil actuators for active tip-tilt correction below the resonant frequency. The canonical deep-space optical communications transceiver makes synergistic use of innovative technologies to reduce size, weight, power, and cost. This optical transceiver can be used to retire risks associated with deep-space optical communications on a planetary pathfinder mission and is complementary to ongoing lunar and access link developments.

  12. High-Precision Narrow Angle Astrometry with a Space-Borne Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Murphy, Dave

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops an observing and processing scheme for narrow angle astrometry using a single baseline interferometer without the aid of "grid" stars to characterize the interferometer baseline vector in inertial space. The basic concept derives from the recognition that over a narrow field the set of fundamental unknown instrument parameters that arise because the interferometer baseline vector has large uncertainties (since there are no grid star measurements) is indistinguishable from a particular set of unobservable errors in the determination of star positions within the field. Reference stars within the narrow field of regard are used to circumvent the unobservable modes. Feasibility of the approach is demonstrated through analysis and example simulations.

  13. Continued Development of a Precision Cryogenic Dilatometer for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlmann, Paul B.; Dudik, Matthew J.; Halverson, Peter G.; Levine, Marie; Marcin, Martin; Peters, Robert D.; Shaklan, Stuart; VanBuren, David

    2004-01-01

    As part of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) materials working group, a novel cryogenic dilatometer was designed and built at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory to help address stringent coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) knowledge requirements. Previously reported results and error analysis have estimated a CTE measurement accuracy for ULE of 1.7 ppb/K with a 20K thermal load and 0.1 ppb/K with a 280K thermal load. Presented here is a further discussion of the cryogenic dilatometer system and a description of recent work including system modifications and investigations.

  14. High-precision early mission narrow angle sciene with the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaklan, S.; Milman, M. H.; Pan, X.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a technique that allows SIM to measure relative stellar positions with an accuracy of 1 micro-arcsecond at any time during its 5-yr mission. Unlike SIM's standard narrow-angle approach, Gridless Narrow Angle Astrometry (GNAA) does not rely on the global reference frame of grid stars that reaches full accuracy after 5 years. GNAA is simply the application of traditional single-telescope narrow angle techniques to SIM's narrow angle optical path delay measurements. In GNAA, a set of reference stars and a target star are observed at several baseline orientations. A linearized model uses delay measurements to solve for star positions and baseline orientations. A conformal transformation maps observations at different epochs to a common reference frame. The technique works on short period signals (P=days to months), allowing it to be applied to many of the known extra-solar planets, intriguing radio/X- ray binaries, and other periodic sources. The technique's accuracy is limited in the long-term by false acceleration due to a combination of reference star and target star proper motion. The science capability 1 micro-arcsecond astrometric precision - is unique to SIM.

  15. a Method for Self-Calibration in Satellite with High Precision of Space Linear Array Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Qian, Fangming; Miao, Yuzhe; Wang, Rongjian

    2016-06-01

    At present, the on-orbit calibration of the geometric parameters of a space surveying camera is usually processed by data from a ground calibration field after capturing the images. The entire process is very complicated and lengthy and cannot monitor and calibrate the geometric parameters in real time. On the basis of a large number of on-orbit calibrations, we found that owing to the influence of many factors, e.g., weather, it is often difficult to capture images of the ground calibration field. Thus, regular calibration using field data cannot be ensured. This article proposes a real time self-calibration method for a space linear array camera on a satellite using the optical auto collimation principle. A collimating light source and small matrix array CCD devices are installed inside the load system of the satellite; these use the same light path as the linear array camera. We can extract the location changes of the cross marks in the matrix array CCD to determine the real-time variations in the focal length and angle parameters of the linear array camera. The on-orbit status of the camera is rapidly obtained using this method. On one hand, the camera's change regulation can be mastered accurately and the camera's attitude can be adjusted in a timely manner to ensure optimal photography; in contrast, self-calibration of the camera aboard the satellite can be realized quickly, which improves the efficiency and reliability of photogrammetric processing.

  16. Use of glass ceramic as a structural material for a high-precision space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juranek, Hans J.; Kleer, G.; Doell, W.

    1994-09-01

    SILEX is the acronym for Satellite InterLink EXperiment. By this experiment ESA (European Space Agency) starts the optical communication technique in space. Similar to the usual RF-communication technique the optical technique requires antennas for transmitting and receiving signals. Such antennas are telescopes. For Silex a two mirror telescope of an aperture of 250 mm was specified. To gain the benefits of optical communication such a telescope must fulfil extreme optical performances, especially concerning the wavefront quality which is strongly governed by the stability of the telescope structure. Thus the structure of SILEX telescope must guarantee a stability of +/- 2 microns over 320 mm in length. This figure must be maintained for 10 years under extreme environmental conditions, this especially concerns temperature, irradiation, ageing and above all launch loads. Looking at this area the glass ceramic ZERODUR was a very promising material to be used as a structural material provided one overcomes the justified concern on its mechanical reliability due to the fact that it is a brittle material similar to glass. This contribution presents solutions of the basic problems in structural design, the means of material and process qualification, and final qualification against launch loads of the critical structural item.

  17. Fault properties, rheology and interseismic deformation in Southern California from high-precision space geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Eric Ostrom

    This dissertation presents the collection and processing of dense high-precision geode- tic data across major faults throughout Southern California. The results are used to inform numerical models of the long-term slip rate and interseismic behavior of these faults, as well as their frictional and rheological properties at shallow depths. The data include campaign surveys of dense networks of GPS monuments crossing the faults, and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations from ENVISAT. Using a Bayesian framework, we first assess to what extent these data constrain relative fault slip rates on the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults, and show that the inferred parameters depend critically on the assumed fault geometry. We next look in detail at near-field observations of strain across the San Jacinto fault, and show that the source of this strain may be either deep anomalous creep or a new form of shallow, distributed yielding in the top few kilometers of the crust. On the San Andreas fault, we show that this type of shallow yielding does occur, and its presence or absence is controlled by variations in the local normal stress that result from subtle bends in the fault. Finally, we investigate shallow creep on the Imperial fault, and show that thanks to observations from all parts of the earthquake cycle it is now possible to obtain a strong constraint on the shallow frictional rheology and depth of the material responsible for creep. The results also suggest activity on a hidden fault to the West, whose existence has been previously suggested but never confirmed.

  18. A Precision Metrology System for the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) will replace the current Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). By providing higher throughput and sensitivity than WFPC2, and operating from the near-IR to the near-UV, WFC3 will once again bring the performance of HST above that from ground-based observatories. Crucial to the integration of the WFC3 optical bench is a pair of 2-axis cathetometers used to view targets which cannot be seen by other means when the bench is loaded into its enclosure. The setup and calibration of these cathetometers is described, along with results from a comparison of the cathetometer system with other metrology techniques.

  19. A Precision Metrology System for the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) will replace the current Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). By providing higher throughput and sensitivity than WFPC2, and operating from the near-IR to the near-UV, WFC3 will once again bring the pefiormance of HST above that from ground-based observatories. Crucial to the integration of the WFC3 optical bench is a pair of 2-axis cathetometers used to view targets which cannot be seen by other means when the bench is loaded into its enclosure. The setup and calibration of these cathetometers is described, along with results from a comparison of the cathetometer system with other metrology techniques. Finally, the use of the cathetometers on the flight optical bench and measurement results are given.

  20. Precise thermal control test demonstration on simulated space telescope main ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettini, R. G.; Wegrich, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    A simulated section of the main ring of the Space Telescope, (ST) the part that holds the primary mirror, was manufactured and tested for thermal stability characteristics in a complex structural assembly. The other telescope subassemblies are also mounted on the main ring, which is constructed of a titanium alloy. The entire ring is wrapped in heater elements around the outside diameter to reduce the external temperature gradient effects by two orders of magnitude. A thermal vacuum test was performed using a stainless steel alloy tailored to represent the titanium ring's thermal characteristics. The tests examined the thermal performance and controllability of the test ring, the effects of a 24-hr slew manuever that produced worst-case environment changes, hot and cold simulation of predicted ST orbital thermal environments, and the effects of heater failure. Pointing and thermal control features were verified, but a heater failure on the 'on' side was found to quickly lead to exceeding the thermal design limits.

  1. Optimization of the concentration optics of the Martian airborne dust sensor for MetNet space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, F.; González, A.; de Castro, A. J.; López, F.

    2012-06-01

    Martian atmosphere contains a significant and rapidly changing load of suspended dust that never drops to zero. The main component of Martian aerosol is micron-sized dust thought to be a product of soil weathering. Although airborne dust plays a key role in Martian climate, the basic physical properties of these aerosols are still poorly known. The scope of Mars MetNet Mission is to deploy several tens of mini atmospheric stations on the Martian surface. MEIGA-MetNet payload is the Spanish contribution in MetNet. Infrared Laboratory of University Carlos III (LIR-UC3M) is in charge of the design and development of a micro-sensor for the characterization of airborne dust. This design must accomplish with a strict budget of mass and power, 45 g and 1 W respectively. The sensor design criteria have been obtained from a physical model specifically developed for optimizing IR local scattering. The model calculates the spectral power density scattered and detected between 1 and 5 μm by a certain particle distribution and sensor configuration. From model calculations a modification based on the insertion of a compound ellipsoidal concentrator (CEC) has appeared as necessary. Its implementation has multiplied up to 100 the scattered optical power detected, significantly enhancing the detection limits of the sensor.

  2. Monitoring and Modeling Crop Health and Water Use via in-situ, Airborne and Space-based Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    The accurate retrieval of plant water use, health and function together with soil state and condition, represent key objectives in the management and monitoring of large-scale agricultural production. In regions of water shortage or stress, understanding the sustainable use of available water supplies is critical. Unfortunately, this need is all too often limited by a lack of reliable observations. Techniques that balance the demand for reliable ground-based data with the rapid retrieval of spatially distributed crop characteristics represent a needed line of research. Data from in-situ monitoring coupled with advances in satellite retrievals of key land surface variables, provide the information necessary to characterize many crop health and water use features, including evaporation, leaf-chlorophyll and other common vegetation indices. With developments in UAV and quadcopter solutions, the opportunity to bridge the spatio-temporal gap between satellite and ground based sensing now exists, along with the capacity for customized retrievals of crop information. While there remain challenges in the routine application of autonomous airborne systems, the state of current technology and sensor developments provide the capacity to explore the operational potential. While this presentation will focus on the multi-scale estimation of crop-water use and crop-health characteristics from satellite-based sensors, the retrieval of high resolution spatially distributed information from near-surface airborne and ground-based systems will also be examined.

  3. POINTS - A global reference frame opportunity. [Precision Optical Interferometer in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. F.; Reasenberg, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    POINTS is a space-based optical astrometric interferometer capable of measuring the angular separation of two stars about 90 degrees apart with 5-microarcsec nominal accuracy . During the intended ten-year mission, a repeated survey of a few hundred targets over the whole sky, including a few bright quasars, establish a 'rigid' reference grid with 0.5 microarcsec position uncertainties. At that level, the grid is free of regional biases and tied to the extra-Galactic frame that is the present best candidate for an inertial frame. POINTS will also determine parallaxes and annual proper motions at about the same level. Further, the planetary ephemeris frame is tied through stellar aberration to the grid at about 300 microarcsec. Additional targets of interest, to a limiting magnitude of greater than 20, are observed relative to the grid, yielding determinations with uncertainties depending on the observing schedule. Measurement at the microarcsec/year level of the apparent relative velocities of quasars that are widely separated on the sky severely test the assumption of cosmological quasar distances and may also constrain models of the early universe.

  4. Precise estimate of correlation length exponents from simple real-space renormalization group analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubica, Aleksander; Yoshida, Beni

    2014-03-01

    We invent a novel real-space renormalization group (RG) scheme which accurately estimates correlation length exponents ν near criticality of quantum Ising and clock models in higher dimensions. The method, based on a recent proposal by Miyazaki et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 051103 (2011), is remarkably simple (often analytical), grouping only a few spins into a block spin so that renormalized Hamiltonian has a closed form. A previous difficulty of spatial anisotropy and unwanted terms arising in higher-dimensional RG schemes is avoided by incorporating rotational invariance and internal Zq symmetries of the Hamiltonian. By applying this scheme to (2+1)-dim Ising model on a triangular lattice, we obtained ν = 0 . 6300 which is within statistical error of the current best Monte-Carlo result and ϕ4 theory estimation with seven-loop corrections. We also apply the scheme to higher-dimensional clock (Potts) models for which ordinary Monte-Carlo methods are not efficient due to suppression of quantum fluctuation in first-order phase transition.

  5. A High-Precision, Fast-Response Airborne CO2 Analyzer for In Situ Sampling From the Surface to the Middle Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daube, B. C., Jr.; Boering, K. A.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    Two in situ CO2 analyzers have been developed for deployment on the NASA ER-2 aircraft and on stratospheric balloons. The ER-2 instrument has had more than 150 flights during 21 deployments from 1992 to 2000, resulting in a dataset with nearly pole-to-pole coverage that includes data from all seasons in both hemispheres except austral summer. In-flight calibrations show that the typical long-term (i.e. flight-to-flight) precision of the instruments is better than plus or minus 0.1 ppmv. The flight standards are traceable to standards held by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory. The balloon instrument has had 8 balloon flights since September 1996, providing the first in situ observations of CO2 above approx. 21 km. In addition, the balloon instrument has been flown onboard a Cessna Citation II aircraft for sampling between the surface and 10 km. In this paper, the instrumentation and calibration procedures for both instruments are described in detail. An intercomparison of the two instruments during the Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region In Summer (POLARIS) project showed that, on average, the instruments agreed to within 0.05 ppmv.

  6. Development and Testing of a High-Precision Position and Attitude Measuring System for a Space Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanenya, Nikolay; Paciotti, Gabriel; Forzani, Eugenio; Blecha, Luc

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a high-precision optical metrology system - a unique ground test equipment which was designed and implemented for simultaneous precise contactless measurements of 6 degrees-of-freedom (3 translational + 3 rotational) of a space mechanism end-effector [1] in a thermally controlled ISO 5 clean environment. The developed contactless method reconstructs both position and attitude of the specimen from three cross-sections measured by 2D distance sensors [2]. The cleanliness is preserved by the hermetic test chamber filled with high purity nitrogen. The specimen's temperature is controlled by the thermostat [7]. The developed method excludes errors caused by the thermal deformations and manufacturing inaccuracies of the test jig. Tests and simulations show that the measurement accuracy of an object absolute position is of 20 micron in in-plane measurement (XY) and about 50 micron out of plane (Z). The typical absolute attitude is determined with an accuracy better than 3 arcmin in rotation around X and Y and better than 10 arcmin in Z. The metrology system is able to determine relative position and movement with an accuracy one order of magnitude lower than the absolute accuracy. Typical relative displacement measurement accuracies are better than 1 micron in X and Y and about 2 micron in Z. Finally, the relative rotation can be measured with accuracy better than 20 arcsec in any direction.

  7. PICASSO: an end-to-end image simulation tool for space and airborne imaging systems II. Extension to the thermal infrared: equations and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, Stephen A.; Lomheim, Terrence S.; Florio, Christopher J.; Harbold, Jeffrey M.; Muto, B. Michael; Schoolar, Richard B.; Wintz, Daniel T.; Keller, Robert A.

    2011-10-01

    In a previous paper in this series, we described how The Aerospace Corporation's Parameterized Image Chain Analysis & Simulation SOftware (PICASSO) tool may be used to model space and airborne imaging systems operating in the visible to near-infrared (VISNIR). PICASSO is a systems-level tool, representative of a class of such tools used throughout the remote sensing community. It is capable of modeling systems over a wide range of fidelity, anywhere from conceptual design level (where it can serve as an integral part of the systems engineering process) to as-built hardware (where it can serve as part of the verification process). In the present paper, we extend the discussion of PICASSO to the modeling of Thermal Infrared (TIR) remote sensing systems, presenting the equations and methods necessary to modeling in that regime.

  8. Future Performance of Ground-Based and Airborne Water-Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar. II. Simulations of the Precision of a Near-Infrared, High-Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulfmeyer, Volker; Walther, Craig

    2001-10-01

    Taking into account Poisson, background, amplifier, and speckle noise, we can simulate the precision of water-vapor measurements by using a 10-W average-power differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. This system is currently under development at Hohenheim University, Germany, and at the American National Center for Atmospheric Research. For operation in the 940-nm region, a large set of measurement situations is described, including configurations that are considered for the first time to the authors knowledge. They include ultrahigh-resolution measurements in the surface layer (resolutions, 1.5 m and 0.1 s) and vertically pointing measurements (resolutions, 30 m and 1 s) from the ground to 2 km in the atmospheric boundary layer. Even during daytime, the DIAL system will have a measurement range from the ground to the upper troposphere (300 m, 10 min) that can be extended from a mountain site to the lower stratosphere. From the ground, for the first time of which the authors are aware, three-dimensional fields of water vapor in the boundary layer can be investigated within a range of the order of 15 km and with an averaging time of 10 min. From an aircraft, measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer (60 m, 1 s) can be performed from a height of 4 km to the ground. At higher altitudes, up to 18 km, water-vapor profiles can still be obtained from aircraft height level to the ground. When it is being flown either in the free troposphere or in the stratosphere, the system will measure horizontal water-vapor profiles up to 12 km. We are not aware of another remote-sensing technique that provides, simultaneously, such high resolution and accuracy.

  9. A study on ultra-precision machining technique for Al6061-T6 to fabricate space infrared optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Geun-man; Lee, Gil-jae; Hyun, Sang-won; Sung, Ha-yeong; Chung, Euisik; Kim, Geon-hee

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, analysis of variance on designed experiments with full factorial design was applied to determine the optimized machining parameters for ultra-precision fabrication of the secondary aspheric mirror, which is one of the key elements of the space cryogenic infrared optics. A single point diamond turning machine (SPDTM, Nanotech 4μpL Moore) was adopted to fabricate the material, AL6061-T6, and the three machining parameters of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut were selected. With several randomly assigned experimental conditions, surface roughness of each condition was measured by a non-contact optical profiler (NT2000; Vecco). As a result of analysis using Minitab, the optimum cutting condition was determined as following; cutting speed: 122 m/min, feed rate: 3 mm/min and depth of cut: 1 μm. Finally, a 120 mm diameter aspheric secondary mirror was attached to a particularly designed jig by using mixture of paraffin and wax and successfully fabricated under the optimum machining parameters. The profile of machined surface was measured by a high-accuracy 3-D profilometer(UA3P; Panasonic) and we obtained the geometrical errors of 30.6 nm(RMS) and 262.4 nm(PV), which satisfy the requirements of the space cryogenic infrared optics.

  10. Navigation for space shuttle approach and landing using an inertial navigation system augmented by data from a precision ranging system or a microwave scan beam landing guidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, L. A.; Smith, G. L.; Hegarty, D. M.; Merrick, R. B.; Carson, T. M.; Schmidt, S. F.

    1970-01-01

    A preliminary study has been made of the navigation performance which might be achieved for the high cross-range space shuttle orbiter during final approach and landing by using an optimally augmented inertial navigation system. Computed navigation accuracies are presented for an on-board inertial navigation system augmented (by means of an optimal filter algorithm) with data from two different ground navigation aids; a precision ranging system and a microwave scanning beam landing guidance system. These results show that augmentation with either type of ground navigation aid is capable of providing a navigation performance at touchdown which should be adequate for the space shuttle. In addition, adequate navigation performance for space shuttle landing is obtainable from the precision ranging system even with a complete dropout of precision range measurements as much as 100 seconds before touchdown.

  11. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  12. EAGLE 2006 - multi-purpose, multi-angle and multi-sensor in-situ, airborne and space borne campaigns over grassland and forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Timmermans, W. J.; van der Tol, C.; Dost, R. J. J.; Bianchi, R.; Gómez, J. A.; House, A.; Hajnsek, I.; Menenti, M.; Magliulo, V.; Esposito, M.; Haarbrink, R.; Bosveld, F. C.; Rothe, R.; Baltink, H. K.; Vekerdy, Z.; Sobrino, J. A.; Timmermans, J.; van Laake, P.; Salama, S.; van der Kwast, H.; Claassen, E.; Stolk, A.; Jia, L.; Moors, E.; Hartogensis, O.; Gillespie, A.

    2009-03-01

    EAGLE2006 - an intensive field campaign for the advances in land surface hydrometeorological processes - was carried out in the Netherlands from 8 to 18 June 2006, involving 16 institutions with in total 67 people from 16 different countries. In addition to the acquisition of multi-angle and multi-sensor satellite data, several airborne instruments - an optical imaging sensor, an imaging microwave radiometer, and a flux airplane - were deployed and extensive ground measurements were conducted over one grassland site at Cabauw and two forest sites at Loobos and Speulderbos in the central part of the Netherlands. The generated data set is both unique and urgently needed for the development and validation of models and inversion algorithms for quantitative land surface parameter estimation and land surface hydrometeorological process studies. EAGLE2006 was led by the Department of Water Resources of the International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC) and originated from the combination of a number of initiatives supported by different funding agencies. The objectives of the EAGLE2006 campaign were closely related to the objectives of other European Space Agency (ESA) campaign activities (SPARC2004, SEN2FLEX2005 and especially AGRISAR2006). However, one important objective of the EAGLE 2006 campaign is to build up a data base for the investigation and validation of the retrieval of bio-geophysical parameters, obtained at different radar frequencies (X-, C- and L-Band) and at hyperspectral optical and thermal bands acquired simultaneously over contrasting vegetated fields (forest and grassland). As such, all activities were related to algorithm development for future satellite missions such as the Sentinels and for validation of retrievals of land surface parameters with optical and thermal and microwave sensors onboard current and future satellite missions. This contribution describes the campaign objectives and provides an overview of

  13. Airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-06-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  14. Monitoring Earthquake Fault Slip from Space: Model Implications for a High Precision, High Resolution Dedicated Gravity Mission (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Sachs, M. K.; Tiampo, K. F.; Fernandez, J.; Turcotte, D. L.; Donnellan, A.; Heien, E. M.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring deformation produced by slip on earthquake faults can be carried out via GPS or InSAR measurements. Both of these types of observations have their advantages and disadvantages, in terms of cost, availability, and technical difficulty. It has been suggested that another method to accomplish many of the same objectives would be via a dedicated gravity mission. The GRACE mission has shown that it is possible to make detailed gravity measurements from space for climate dynamics and other purposes. An important question is what level of accuracy will be needed for precise estimation of fault slip in earthquakes of interest to researchers. To answer this question, we turn to numerical simulations of earthquake fault systems and use these to estimate gravity changes. Rundle (1978) considered the question of gravity changes from dilation sources and thrust faults, and found that gravity changes in these cases were free air anomaly (dilation) and Bouguer anomaly (thrust fault). Walsh and Rice (1978) computed these by a different method and found the same result. Okada (1991) listed gravity and potential Green functions for all possible sources for the general case. Hayes et al (2006) then took the Okada Greens functions and applied them computed from an earlier version of Virtual California earthquake fault system simulations. Those simulations only involved vertical strike slip faults. The current far more advanced generation of Virtual California simulations involves faults of any orientation, dip, and rake. In this talk, we discuss these computations and the implications they have for accuracies needed for a dedicated gravity monitoring mission. Preliminary results are in agreement with previous results from Hayes et al (2006). Computed gravity changes are in the range of tens to hundreds of microgals over distances of few to many tens of kilometers. These values are presumably well within the range of measurement for a modern gravity mission flown either at

  15. Clear-Sky Closure Studies of Tropospheric Aerosol and Water Vapor During ACE-2 Using Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne In-Situ, Space-Borne, and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Collins, Donald R.; Gasso, Santiago; Oestroem, Elisabeth; Powell, Donna M.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Durkee, Philip A.; Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Hegg, Dean A.; Noone, Kevin J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gordon, Howard R.; Reagan, John A.; Spinhirne, James D.

    2000-01-01

    We report on clear-sky column closure experiments (CLEARCOLUMN) performed in the Canary Islands during the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June/July 1997. We present CLEARCOLUMN results obtained by combining airborne sunphotometer and in-situ (a differential mobility analyzer, three optical particle counters, three nephelometers, and one absorption photometer) measurements taken aboard the Pelican aircraft, space-borne NOAA/AVHRR data and ground-based lidars. A wide range of aerosol types was encountered throughout the ACE-2 area, including background Atlantic marine, European pollution-derived, and (although less frequently than expected) African mineral dust. During the two days discussed here, vertical profiles flown in cloud free air masses revealed three distinctly different layers: a marine boundary layer (MBL) with varying pollution levels, an elevated dust layer, and a very clean layer between the MBL and the dust layer. Based on size-resolved composition information we have established an aerosol model that allows us to compute optical properties of the ambient aerosol using the optical particle counter results. In the dust, the agreement in layer AOD (lambda=380-1060 nm) is 3-8%. In the MBL there is a tendency for the in-situ results to be slightly lower than the sunphotometer measurements (10-17% at lambda=525 nm), but these differences are within the combined error bars of the measurements and computations. Aerosol size-distribudon closure based on in-situ size distributions and inverted sunphotometer extinction spectra has been achieved in the MBL (total surface area and volume agree within 0.2, and 7%, respectively) but not in the dust layer. The fact that the three nephelometers operated at three different relative humidities (RH) allowed to parameterize hygroscopic growth and to therefore estimate optical properties at ambient RH. The parameters derived for different aerosol types are themselves useful for the aerosol modeling

  16. Airborne observations of the Eyjafjalla volcano ash cloud over Europe during air space closure in April and May 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.; Weinzierl, B.; Reitebuch, O.; Schlager, H.; Minikin, A.; Forster, C.; Baumann, R.; Sailer, T.; Graf, K.; Mannstein, H.; Voigt, C.; Rahm, S.; Simmet, R.; Scheibe, M.; Lichtenstern, M.; Stock, P.; Rüba, H.; Schäuble, D.; Tafferner, A.; Rautenhaus, M.; Gerz, T.; Ziereis, H.; Krautstrunk, M.; Mallaun, C.; Gayet, J.-F.; Lieke, K.; Kandler, K.; Ebert, M.; Weinbruch, S.; Stohl, A.; Gasteiger, J.; Groß, S.; Freudenthaler, V.; Wiegner, M.; Ansmann, A.; Tesche, M.; Olafsson, H.; Sturm, K.

    2011-03-01

    Airborne lidar and in-situ measurements of aerosols and trace gases were performed in volcanic ash plumes over Europe between Southern Germany and Iceland with the Falcon aircraft during the eruption period of the Eyjafjalla volcano between 19 April and 18 May 2010. Flight planning and measurement analyses were supported by a refined Meteosat ash product and trajectory model analysis. The volcanic ash plume was observed with lidar directly over the volcano and up to a distance of 2700 km downwind, and up to 120 h plume ages. Aged ash layers were between a few 100 m to 3 km deep, occurred between 1 and 7 km altitude, and were typically 100 to 300 km wide. Particles collected by impactors had diameters up to 20 μm diameter, with size and age dependent composition. Ash mass concentrations were derived from optical particle spectrometers for a particle density of 2.6 g cm-3 and various values of the refractive index (RI, real part: 1.59; 3 values for the imaginary part: 0, 0.004 and 0.008). The mass concentrations, effective diameters and related optical properties were compared with ground-based lidar observations. Theoretical considerations of particle sedimentation constrain the particle diameters to those obtained for the lower RI values. The ash mass concentration results have an uncertainty of a factor of two. The maximum ash mass concentration encountered during the 17 flights with 34 ash plume penetrations was below 1 mg m-3. The Falcon flew in ash clouds up to about 0.8 mg m-3 for a few minutes and in an ash cloud with approximately 0.2 mg m-3 mean-concentration for about one hour without engine damage. The ash plumes were rather dry and correlated with considerable CO and SO2 increases and O3 decreases. To first order, ash concentration and SO2 mixing ratio in the plumes decreased by a factor of two within less than a day. In fresh plumes, the SO2 and CO concentration increases were correlated with the ash mass concentration. The ash plumes were often

  17. NASA Airborne Science Program: NASA Stratospheric Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducts a wide variety of remote sensing projects using several unique aircraft platforms. These vehicles have been selected and modified to provide capabilities that are particularly important for geophysical research, in particular, routine access to very high altitudes, long range, long endurance, precise trajectory control, and the payload capacity to operate multiple, diverse instruments concurrently. While the NASA program has been in operation for over 30 years, new aircraft and technological advances that will expand the capabilities for airborne observation are continually being assessed and implemented. This presentation will review the current state of NASA's science platforms, recent improvements and new missions concepts as well as provide a survey of emerging technologies unmanned aerial vehicles for long duration observations (Global Hawk and Predator). Applications of information technology that allow more efficient use of flight time and the ability to rapidly reconfigure systems for different mission objectives are addressed.

  18. CALIOPE and TAISIR airborne experiment platform

    SciTech Connect

    Chocol, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    Between 1950 and 1970, scientific ballooning achieved many new objectives and made a substantial contribution to understanding near-earth and space environments. In 1986, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began development of ballooning technology capable of addressing issues associated with precision tracking of ballistic missiles. In 1993, the Radar Ocean Imaging Project identified the need for a low altitude (1 km) airborne platform for its Radar system. These two technologies and experience base have been merged with the acquisition of government surplus Aerostats by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The CALIOPE and TAISIR Programs can benefit directly from this technology by using the Aerostat as an experiment platform for measurements of the spill facility at NTS.

  19. Development of an open source LIDAR modeling framework for space or airborne multi-wavelength LIDAR in support of the ASCENDS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliutau, D.; Prasad, N. S.

    2011-12-01

    The NRC Decadal Survey has identified the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) as an important atmospheric science mission. An accuracy of 0.5 percent or better is required for the CO2 mixing ratio retrievals. NASA LaRC, working with its partners, is developing lidar technology in the 1.57 μm CO2 and 1.26-1.27 μm O2 bands for ASCENDS measurements. Simultaneous measurement of CO2 and O2 will be used to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios (XCO2). A generalized open-source LIDAR modeling framework is being developed to quantify errors and evaluate the performance of space and airborne lidar in the 1.57-μm and 1.26-1.27-μm bands of CO2 and O2. The general character of the simulation will also allow calculations for alternative 2.05 μm band of CO2 and the A-band of oxygen being investigated by other ASCENDS groups. Such cross-comparison is useful for validation purposes. Lidar simulation package components planned are presented in Table 1 (Ref. 1, 2, 3, 4) describing the main module and auxiliary programs. Our ongoing efforts include implementation of alternative lineshapes for 1.57μm CO2 and 1.26-1.27 μm O2 bands including the effects of speed dependence and line mixing. The accuracy of alternative lineshape models will be validated through comparison of airborne simulations with test-flights data. Figure 2 presents an overview of the lidar simulation framework where geographical location, date/time input are used to derive parameters for subsequent transmission and lidar calculations. The framework will rely upon the use of several databases and satellite datasets such as CALIPSO, MODIS, Google Earth, and GEOS-5 with an option to use radiosonde data. Our lidar framework is anticipated to also become useful for analysis of other missions based on active sensing for a variety of gasses and spectral ranges. (The authors acknowledge the support from ESTO and NPP). 1) L. S. Rothman et al., JQSRT, 110, 533-572, (2009) 2) Clough S. A

  20. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  1. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  2. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  3. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  4. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  5. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  6. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  7. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  8. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  9. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  10. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  11. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  12. 14 CFR 125.223 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Equipment Requirements § 125.223 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate an airplane governed by this part in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne weather...

  13. 14 CFR 121.357 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... § 121.357 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate any transport... December 31, 1964, unless approved airborne weather radar equipment has been installed in the airplane....

  14. 14 CFR 135.175 - Airborne weather radar equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne weather radar equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.175 Airborne weather radar equipment requirements. (a) No person may operate a large, transport category aircraft in passenger-carrying operations unless approved airborne...

  15. Pulsed airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Kawa, S. Randoph; Biraud, Sebastien

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT We report initial measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density using a pulsed airborne lidar operating at 1572 nm. It uses a lidar measurement technique being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a candidate for the CO2 measurement in the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission. The pulsed multiple-wavelength lidar approach offers several new capabilities with respect to passive spectrometer and other lidar techniques for high-precision CO2 column density measurements. We developed an airborne lidar using a fibre laser transmitter and photon counting detector, and conducted initial measurements of the CO2 column absorption during flights over Oklahoma in December 2008. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals. These follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 1.5 to 7.1 km, and are in good agreement with column number density estimates calculated from nearly coincident airborne in-situ measurements.

  16. Simulation Framework to Estimate the Performance of CO2 and O2 Sensing from Space and Airborne Platforms for the ASCENDS Mission Requirements Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plitau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission recommended by the NRC Decadal Survey has a desired accuracy of 0.3% in carbon dioxide mixing ratio (XCO2) retrievals requiring careful selection and optimization of the instrument parameters. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is investigating 1.57 micron carbon dioxide as well as the 1.26-1.27 micron oxygen bands for our proposed ASCENDS mission requirements investigation. Simulation studies are underway for these bands to select optimum instrument parameters. The simulations are based on a multi-wavelength lidar modeling framework being developed at NASA LaRC to predict the performance of CO2 and O2 sensing from space and airborne platforms. The modeling framework consists of a lidar simulation module and a line-by-line calculation component with interchangeable lineshape routines to test the performance of alternative lineshape models in the simulations. As an option the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) program may also be used for line-by-line calculations. The modeling framework is being used to perform error analysis, establish optimum measurement wavelengths as well as to identify the best lineshape models to be used in CO2 and O2 retrievals. Several additional programs for HITRAN database management and related simulations are planned to be included in the framework. The description of the modeling framework with selected results of the simulation studies for CO2 and O2 sensing is presented in this paper.

  17. Research on the Problem of High-Precision Deployment for Large-Aperture Space-Based Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Peterson, Lee D.; Hachkowski, M. Roman; Hinkle, Jason D.; Hardaway, Lisa R.

    1998-01-01

    The present paper summarizes results from an ongoing research program conducted jointly by the University of Colorado and NASA Langley Research Center since 1994. This program has resulted in general guidelines for the design of high-precision deployment mechanisms, and tests of prototype deployable structures incorporating these mechanisms have shown microdynamically stable behavior (i.e., dimensional stability to parts per million). These advancements have resulted from the identification of numerous heretofore unknown microdynamic and micromechanical response phenomena, and the development of new test techniques and instrumentation systems to interrogate these phenomena. In addition, recent tests have begun to interrogate nanomechanical response of materials and joints and have been used to develop an understanding of nonlinear nanodynamic behavior in microdynamically stable structures. The ultimate goal of these efforts is to enable nano-precision active control of micro-precision deployable structures (i.e., active control to a resolution of parts per billion).

  18. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  19. Airborne laser topographic mapping results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Collins, J. G.; Link, L. E.; Swift, R. N.; Butler, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of terrain mapping experiments utilizing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) over forested areas are presented. The flight tests were conducted as part of a joint NASA/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (CE) investigation aimed at evaluating the potential of an airborne laser ranging system to provide cross-sectional topographic data on flood plains that are difficult and expensive to survey using conventional techniques. The data described in this paper were obtained in the Wolf River Basin located near Memphis, TN. Results from surveys conducted under winter 'leaves off' and summer 'leaves on' conditions, aspects of day and night operation, and data obtained from decidous and coniferous tree types are compared. Data processing techniques are reviewed. Conclusions relative to accuracy and present limitations of the AOL, and airborne lidar systems in general, to terrain mapping over forested areas are discussed.

  20. Evapotranspiration from Airborne Simulators as a Proxy Datasets for NASA's ECOSTRESS mission - A new Thermal Infrared Instrument on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillevic, P. C.; Hulley, G. C.; Hook, S. J.; Olioso, A.; Sanchez, J. M.; Drewry, D.; Running, S. W.; Fisher, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Surface evapotranspiration (ET) represents the loss of water from the Earth's surface both by soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration processes. ET is a key climate variable linking the water, carbon, and energy cycles, and is very sensitive to changes in atmospheric forcing and soil water content. The response of ET to water and heat stress directly affects the surface energy balance and temperature which can be measured by thermal infrared remote sensing observations. The NASA ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) will be deployed in 2019 to address critical questions on plant-water dynamics, ecosystem productivity and future ecosystem changes with climate through an optimal combination of thermal infrared measurements in 5 spectral bands between 8-12 µm with pixel sizes of 38×57 m and an average revisit of 5 days over the contiguous United States at varying times of day. Two instruments capable of providing proxy datasets are the MODIS/ASTER (MASTER) airborne simulator and Hyperspectral Thermal Emissions Spectrometer (HyTES). This study is focused on estimating evapotranspiration using shortwave and thermal infrared remote sensing observations from these instruments. The thermal infrared data from MASTER/HyTES is used as a proxy dataset for ECOSTRESS to demonstrate the capability of the future spaceborne system to derive ET and water stress information from thermal based retrievals of land surface temperature. MASTER and HyTES data collected from 2004 to present over the Western United States at different seasons are used to test and evaluate different ET algorithms using ground-based measurements. Selected algorithms are 1) explicitly based on surface energy budget calculation or 2) based on the Penman-Monteith equation and use information on land surface temperature to estimate the surface resistance to convective fluxes. We use ground data from the Fluxnet and Ameriflux networks, and from permanent validation

  1. An Overview of a Trajectory-Based Solution for En Route and Terminal Area Self-Spacing: Fourth Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the fourth major revision to an algorithm specifically designed to support NASA's Airborne Precision Spacing concept. This airborne self-spacing concept is trajectory-based, allowing for spacing operations prior to the aircraft being on a common path. Because this algorithm is trajectory-based, it also has the inherent ability to support required-time-of-arrival (RTA) operations. This algorithm was also designed specifically to support a standalone, non-integrated implementation in the spacing aircraft. Revisions to this algorithm were based on a change to the expected operational environment.

  2. EFFECT OF ELECTROSTATIC SPACE CHARGE ON REDUCTION OF AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION OF SALMONELLA AND OTHER BACTERIA DURING THE LAY CYCLE AND TO THE PROGENY OF BROILER BREEDERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The average broiler breeder laying cycle is 40 weeks and during this period, a large amount of dust becomes airborne. Salmonella and other disease-causing organisms can be transmitted via the air between birds, and the infection merits concern due to the human food-borne illness associated with the...

  3. Modeling Airborne Gravity Data with Local Functions for Regional Geoid Enhancement ---- A Case Study in Puerto Rico Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    Airborne gravimetry has been used as the primary method to quickly and economically obtain updated gravity field information over a region, targeted specifically. Thus, unlike the satellite missions that provide global or near global data coverage, the observables from airborne campaigns are apparently space limited. Moreover, they are also band limited in the frequency domain, considering that various filter banks and/or de-noising techniques have to be applied to overcome the low signal to noise ratio problem that are presented in the airborne systems due to mechanical and mathematical limitations in computing the accelerations, both the kinematic one and the dynamic one. As a result, in this study, a band-limited local function system based on the point mass model is used to process these airborne gravity data that have both a limited frequency domain and a limited space domain in the target area: Puerto Rico Island and its nearby ocean areas. The resulting geoid model show obvious middle to short wavelength geoid changes due to airborne gravity data contribution. In the land area, these changes improved the geoid precision from 3.27cm to 2.09cm at the local GNSS/Leveling bench marks. More importantly, the error trend in the geoid models is largely reduced if not completely removed. Various oceanographic models will be used to validate the geoid changes in the nearby open sea areas.

  4. UAVSAR: An Airborne Window on Earth Surface Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates that UAVSAR's precision autopilot and electronic steering have allowed for the reliable collection of airborne repeat pass radar interferometric data for deformation mapping. Deformation maps from temporal scales ranging from hours to months over a variety of signals of geophysical interest illustrate the utility of UAVSAR airborne repeat pass interferometry to these studies.

  5. Precision of Inhibition: Dendritic Inhibition by Individual GABAergic Synapses on Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells Is Confined in Space and Time.

    PubMed

    Müllner, Fiona E; Wierenga, Corette J; Bonhoeffer, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition plays a fundamental role in controlling neuronal activity in the brain. While perisomatic inhibition has been studied in detail, the majority of inhibitory synapses are found on dendritic shafts and are less well characterized. Here, we combine paired patch-clamp recordings and two-photon Ca(2+) imaging to quantify inhibition exerted by individual GABAergic contacts on hippocampal pyramidal cell dendrites. We observed that Ca(2+) transients from back-propagating action potentials were significantly reduced during simultaneous activation of individual nearby inhibitory contacts. The inhibition of Ca(2+) transients depended on the precise spike-timing (time constant < 5 ms) and declined steeply in the proximal and distal direction (length constants 23-28 μm). Notably, Ca(2+) amplitudes in spines were inhibited to the same degree as in the shaft. Given the known anatomical distribution of inhibitory synapses, our data suggest that the collective inhibitory input to a pyramidal cell is sufficient to control Ca(2+) levels across the entire dendritic arbor with micrometer and millisecond precision. PMID:26247864

  6. Development of precise tuning method of inter-dot spacing and resonant energy transfer between Au clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Mitsuru; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Kawasaki, Hideya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Saitoh, Tadashi; Umezu, Ikurou; Sugimura, Akira

    2011-09-01

    A device to control strength of interactions between adjacent nanostructures, namely Precise Interaction Control System for Nanostructures (PICSN) is developed. The PICSN is operated by combinations of DC motor and capacitancepositioning sensor. In this system, nanostructures are deposited on a flexible substrate and the strength of interactions can be controlled by changing a distance between adjacent nanostructures, stretching or shrinking the flexible substrate. Using the PICSN, we investigate photoluminescence of Au nanoclusters (NCs), which include at least Au5, Au8 and Au13 NCs, deposited on poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrate. We observed a blue shift of PL peak position with increasing interdot distance. Considering the relationship between absorption and emission energies of Au NCs, the blue shift is thought to be a result of fluorescent resonant energy transfer from smaller sized Au NCs to larger ones.

  7. The Circumstellar Imaging Telescope image motion compensation system - Ultra-precise control on the Space Station platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevaston, G. E.; Socha, M. M.; Eisenman, A.

    1989-01-01

    The Circumstellar Imaging Telescope (CIT) is a 1.9 m visible wavelength Cassegrain instrument whose primary mission is to locate extra-solar planets by direct imaging. The current reference concept calls for it to be deployed as a Space Station attached payload some time in the late 1990s. Mission and signal processing demands impose the following attitude control requirements: pointing accuracy - 250 nrad RMS, pointing stability - 50 nrad RMS over 30 minutes, roll accuracy - 1 mrad RMS, roll stability 1 mrad RMS over 30 minutes. This paper reports on the results of a recent design study in which it was determined that these requirements can be met on the Space Station by a three tiered control system consisting of a two degree of freedom mechanical gimbal for course pointing, a magnetically suspended roll bearing for roll accommodation, translational isolation and intermediate pointing control, and articulation of the secondary mirror for fine pointing.

  8. Evaluation of the relative precision of space-geodetic techniques at ITRF co-located sites with the Three Corner Hat approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbondanza, C.; Chin, T. M.; Gross, R. S.; Heflin, M. B.; Wu, X.

    2012-04-01

    The International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) is a linear reference frame consisting of regularized positions and velocities for a set of global stations. It relies on the combination of station positions, velocities and Earth orientation parameters (EOPs) acquired by GPS, VLBI, SLR and DORIS at co-located sites. To properly combine the individual reference frames and suitably scale the variance-covariance information from the 4 space-geodetic solutions, an a-priori knowledge of the relative precisions of the four techniques is mandatory. In this study, focusing on the station position time series derived from GNSS, VLBI, SLR and DORIS at ITRF co-locations, we aim at assessing the relative uncertainty of the co-located space geodetic instruments contributing to ITRF. The investigation relies on the idea of pair-wise differencing station position time series of at least three co-located instruments in order to remove common geophysical signals. By computing the variances of the differenced time series, the relative precision of each time series can be recovered with the Three Corner Hat technique, under the assumption of absence of correlation between the noise processes of the different techniques. Results of the Three Corner Hat analysis of co-located station position time series will be presented.

  9. An Overview of a Trajectory-Based Solution for En Route and Terminal Area Self-Spacing to Include Parallel Runway Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an algorithm specifically designed to support NASA's Airborne Precision Spacing concept. This airborne self-spacing concept is trajectory-based, allowing for spacing operations prior to the aircraft being on a common path. This implementation provides the ability to manage spacing against two traffic aircraft, with one of these aircraft operating to a parallel dependent runway. Because this algorithm is trajectory-based, it also has the inherent ability to support required-time-of-arrival (RTA) operations

  10. Precise, motion-free polarization control in Second Harmonic Generation microscopy using a liquid crystal modulator in the infinity space.

    PubMed

    Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Tilbury, Karissa; Chen, Shean-Jen; Campagnola, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy coupled with polarization analysis has great potential for use in tissue characterization, as molecular and supramolecular structural details can be extracted. Such measurements are difficult to perform quickly and accurately. Here we present a new method that uses a liquid crystal modulator (LCM) located in the infinity space of a SHG laser scanning microscope that allows the generation of any desired linear or circular polarization state. As the device contains no moving parts, polarization can be rotated accurately and faster than by manual or motorized control. The performance in terms of polarization purity was validated using Stokes vector polarimetry, and found to have minimal residual polarization ellipticity. SHG polarization imaging characteristics were validated against well-characterized specimens having cylindrical and/or linear symmetries. The LCM has a small footprint and can be implemented easily in any standard microscope and is cost effective relative to other technologies. PMID:24156059

  11. An Overview of a Trajectory-Based Solution for En Route and Terminal Area Self-Spacing: Fifth Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the fifth revision to an algorithm specifically designed to support NASA's Airborne Precision Spacing concept. This algorithm is referred to as the Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes version 12 (ASTAR12). This airborne self-spacing concept is trajectory-based, allowing for spacing operations prior to the aircraft being on a common path. Because this algorithm is trajectory-based, it also has the inherent ability to support required-time-of- arrival (RTA) operations. This algorithm was also designed specifically to support a standalone, non-integrated implementation in the spacing aircraft. This current revision to the algorithm includes a ground speed feedback term to compensate for slower than expected traffic aircraft speeds based on the accepted air traffic control tendency to slow aircraft below the nominal arrival speeds when they are farther from the airport.

  12. THE MASS OF HD 38529c FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ASTROMETRY AND HIGH-PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Bean, Jacob L.; Barnes, Rory; Harrison, Thomas E.; Hatzes, Artie; Martioli, Eder; Nelan, Edmund P.

    2010-05-15

    Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor astrometric observations of the G4 IV star HD 38529 are combined with the results of the analysis of extensive ground-based radial velocity (RV) data to determine the mass of the outermost of two previously known companions. Our new RVs obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and velocities from the Carnegie-California group now span over 11 yr. With these data we obtain improved RV orbital elements for both the inner companion, HD 38529b, and the outer companion, HD 38529c. We identify a rotational period of HD 38529 (P {sub rot} = 31.65 {+-} 0fd17) with Fine Guidance Sensor photometry. The inferred star spot fraction is consistent with the remaining scatter in velocities being caused by spot-related stellar activity. We then model the combined astrometric and RV measurements to obtain the parallax, proper motion, perturbation period, perturbation inclination, and perturbation size due to HD 38529c. For HD 38529c we find P = 2136.1 {+-} 0.3 d, perturbation semimajor axis {alpha} = 1.05 {+-} 0.06 mas, and inclination i = 48.{sup 0}3 {+-} 3.{sup 0}7. Assuming a primary mass M {sub *} = 1.48 M {sub sun}, we obtain a companion mass M{sub c} = 17.6{sup +1.5} {sub -1.2} M {sub Jup}, 3{sigma} above a 13 M {sub Jup} deuterium burning, brown dwarf lower limit. Dynamical simulations incorporating this accurate mass for HD 38529c indicate that a near-Saturn mass planet could exist between the two known companions. We find weak evidence of an additional low amplitude signal that can be modeled as a planetary-mass ({approx}0.17 M {sub Jup}) companion at P {approx}194 days. Including this component in our modeling lowers the error of the mass determined for HD 38529c. Additional observations (RVs and/or Gaia astrometry) are required to validate an interpretation of HD 38529d as a planetary-mass companion. If confirmed, the resulting HD 38529 planetary system may be an example of a 'Packed Planetary System'.

  13. 14 CFR 135.173 - Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.173 Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements. (a) No person may... the aircraft is equipped with either approved thunderstorm detection equipment or approved...

  14. 14 CFR 135.173 - Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.173 Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements. (a) No person may... the aircraft is equipped with either approved thunderstorm detection equipment or approved...

  15. 14 CFR 135.173 - Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.173 Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements. (a) No person may... the aircraft is equipped with either approved thunderstorm detection equipment or approved...

  16. 14 CFR 135.173 - Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.173 Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements. (a) No person may... the aircraft is equipped with either approved thunderstorm detection equipment or approved...

  17. 14 CFR 135.173 - Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.173 Airborne thunderstorm detection equipment requirements. (a) No person may... the aircraft is equipped with either approved thunderstorm detection equipment or approved...

  18. 54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET (LEFT) AND ASSOCIATED GOULD BRUSH CHART RECORDERS (RIGHT). ELAPSED TIME COUNTER SITS ATOP AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The characteristics of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) are given. The AOL system is described and its potential for various measurement applications including bathymetry and fluorosensing is discussed.

  20. MAPPING GRAIN SORGHUM YEILD VARIABILITY USING AIRBORNE DIGITAL VIDEOGRAPHY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mapping crop yield variability is one important aspect of precision agriculture. This study was designed to assess airborne digital videography as a tool for mapping grain sorghum yields for precision farming. Color-infrared (CIR) imagery was acquired with a three- camera digital video imaging sys...

  1. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiuhong

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, some remote-sensing applications require advanced airborne multi-sensor systems to provide high performance reflective and emissive spectral imaging measurement rapidly over large areas. The key or unique problem of characteristics is associated with a black box back-end system that operates a suite of cutting-edge imaging sensors to collect simultaneously the high throughput reflective and emissive spectral imaging data with precision georeference. This back-end system needs to be portable, easy-to-use, and reliable with advanced onboard processing. The innovation of the black box backend is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS integrates a complex embedded system of systems with dedicated power and signal electronic circuits inside to serve a suite of configurable cutting-edge electro- optical (EO), long-wave infrared (LWIR), and medium-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras, a hyperspectral imaging scanner, and a GPS and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for atmospheric and surface remote sensing. Its compatible sensor packages include NASA s 1,024 1,024 pixel LWIR quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) imager; a 60.5 megapixel BuckEye EO camera; and a fast (e.g. 200+ scanlines/s) and wide swath-width (e.g., 1,920+ pixels) CCD/InGaAs imager-based visible/near infrared reflectance (VNIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometer. MAICSS records continuous precision georeferenced and time-tagged multisensor throughputs to mass storage devices at a high aggregate rate, typically 60 MB/s for its LWIR/EO payload. MAICSS is a complete stand-alone imaging server instrument with an easy-to-use software package for either autonomous data collection or interactive airborne operation. Advanced multisensor data acquisition and onboard processing software features have been implemented for MAICSS. With the onboard processing for real time image development, correction, histogram-equalization, compression, georeference, and

  2. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Methane Using Pulsed Laser Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Wu, Stewart; Gonzalez, Brayler; Rodriguez, Michael; Hasselbrack, William; Fahey, Molly; Yu, Anthony; Stephen, Mark; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with approximately 25 times the radiative forcing of carbon dioxide (CO2) per molecule. At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) we have been developing a laser-based technology needed to remotely measure CH4 from orbit. We report on our development effort for the methane lidar, especially on our laser transmitters and recent airborne demonstration. Our lidar transmitter is based on an optical parametric process to generate near infrared laser radiation at 1651 nanometers, coincident with a CH4 absorption. In an airborne flight campaign in the fall of 2015, we tested two kinds of laser transmitters --- an optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The output wavelength of the lasers was rapidly tuned over the CH4 absorption by tuning the seed laser to sample the CH4 absorption line at several wavelengths. This approach uses the same Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) technique we have used for our CO2 lidar for ASCENDS. The two laser transmitters were successfully operated in the NASAs DC-8 aircraft, measuring methane from 3 to 13 kilometers with high precision.

  3. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  4. Airborne Gravimetry and Downward Continuation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jekeli, C.; Yang, H.; Kwon, J.

    2009-12-01

    Measuring the Earth’s gravity field using airborne instrumentation is fully operational and has been widely practiced for nearly three decades since its official debut in the early 1980s (S. Hammer: “Airborne Gravity is Here!”) coinciding with the precision kinematic positioning capability of GPS. Airborne gravimetry is undertaken for both efficient geophysical exploration purposes, as well as the determination of the regional geoid to aid in the modernization of height systems. Especially for the latter application, downward continuation of the data and combination with existing terrestrial gravimetry pose theoretical as well as practical challenges, which, on the other hand, create multiple processing possibilities. Downward continuation may be approached in various ways from the viewpoint of potential theory and the boundary-value problem to using gradients either estimated locally or computed from existing models. Logistical constraints imposed by the airborne survey, instrumental noise, and the intrinsic numerical instability of downward continuation all conspire to impact the final product in terms of achievable resolution and accuracy. In this paper, we review the theory of airborne gravimetry and the methodology of downward continuation, and provide a numerical comparison of possible schemes and their impact on geoid determination.

  5. Comparison of TOPEX/Poseidon orbit determination solutions obtained by the Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Division and Precision Orbit Determination Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doll, C.; Mistretta, G.; Hart, R.; Oza, D.; Cox, C.; Nemesure, M.; Bolvin, D.; Samii, Mina V.

    1993-01-01

    Orbit determination results are obtained by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) using the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) and a real-time extended Kalman filter estimation system to process Tracking Data and Relay Satellite (TDRS) System (TDRSS) measurements in support of the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon spacecraft navigation and health and safety operations. GTDS is the operational orbit determination system used by the FDD, and the extended Kalman fliter was implemented in an analysis prototype system, the Real-Time Orbit Determination System/Enhanced (RTOD/E). The Precision Orbit Determination (POD) team within the GSFC Space Geodesy Branch generates an independent set of high-accuracy trajectories to support the TOPEX/Poseidon scientific data. These latter solutions use the Geodynamics (GEODYN) orbit determination system with laser ranging tracking data. The TOPEX/Poseidon trajectories were estimated for the October 22 - November 1, 1992, timeframe, for which the latest preliminary POD results were available. Independent assessments were made of the consistencies of solutions produced by the batch and sequential methods. The batch cases were assessed using overlap comparisons, while the sequential cases were assessed with covariances and the first measurement residuals. The batch least-squares and forward-filtered RTOD/E orbit solutions were compared with the definitive POD orbit solutions. The solution differences were generally less than 10 meters (m) for the batch least squares and less than 18 m for the sequential estimation solutions. The differences among the POD, GTDS, and RTOD/E solutions can be traced to differences in modeling and tracking data types, which are being analyzed in detail.

  6. Planar electrostatic gradiometer for airborne geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Lebat, V.; Boulanger, D.

    2011-12-01

    The knowledge of the gravity field of the Earth has been considerably improved for the last decades, thanks to satellites, in particular, both for gravity measurements and positioning. Gravity, and especially gravity gradiometry data are then of great interest to the study of the structure of the continental margins. Space gravity measurements, in particular with the GOCE satellite in orbit since 2009, provide an absolute gravity reference and should contribute to estimate the systematic effects that would affect the surface datasets. But the spatial resolution of those data essentially addresses the large and medium wavelengths of the field (down to a resolution of 90km) and it is therefore essential to complete them at the shorter wavelengths in particular in the littoral area. To this aim, gravity gradiometry systems may be particularly suitable by covering the land/sea transition zone with a uniform precision, and a spatial resolution higher than from gravimetry. The GREMLIT instrument is taking advantage of technologies, formerly developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions, by adapting them to an airborne environment, using a planar configuration for the gradiometer and designing and building a dedicated stabilized platform controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself similarly to the drag free control of the GOCE satellite. The mains interests of the planar configuration are: - its definition, optimized for levitation in the Earth's gravity field ; - its intrinsic linearity, which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth ; - its compactness, ensuring an excellent dimensional stability, a better thermal homogeneity and making the realization of the decoupling platform easier. The performance objective is 0.1 Eötvös. This lowered performance level with respect to a one hundred times better GOCE-type instrument, takes into account the difficulty of measurements

  7. Flight Testing of an Advanced Airborne Natural Gas Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn Lenz; Raymond T. Lines; Darryl Murdock; Jeffrey Owen; Steven Stearns; Michael Stoogenke

    2005-10-01

    ITT Industries Space Systems Division (Space Systems) has developed an airborne natural gas leak detection system designed to detect, image, quantify, and precisely locate leaks from natural gas transmission pipelines. This system is called the Airborne Natural Gas Emission Lidar (ANGEL) system. The ANGEL system uses a highly sensitive differential absorption Lidar technology to remotely detect pipeline leaks. The ANGEL System is operated from a fixed wing aircraft and includes automatic scanning, pointing system, and pilot guidance systems. During a pipeline inspection, the ANGEL system aircraft flies at an elevation of 1000 feet above the ground at speeds of between 100 and 150 mph. Under this contract with DOE/NETL, Space Systems was funded to integrate the ANGEL sensor into a test aircraft and conduct a series of flight tests over a variety of test targets including simulated natural gas pipeline leaks. Following early tests in upstate New York in the summer of 2004, the ANGEL system was deployed to Casper, Wyoming to participate in a set of DOE-sponsored field tests at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). At RMOTC the Space Systems team completed integration of the system and flew an operational system for the first time. The ANGEL system flew 2 missions/day for the duration for the 5-day test. Over the course of the week the ANGEL System detected leaks ranging from 100 to 5,000 scfh.

  8. Precision metal molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townhill, A.

    1967-01-01

    Method provides precise alignment for metal-forming dies while permitting minimal thermal expansion without die warpage or cavity space restriction. The interfacing dowel bars and die side facings are arranged so the dies are restrained in one orthogonal angle and permitted to thermally expand in the opposite orthogonal angle.

  9. Toolsets for Airborne Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-02

    article title:  Toolsets for Airborne Data     View larger image The ... limit of detection values. Prior to accessing the TAD Web Application ( https://tad.larc.nasa.gov ) for the first time, users must ...

  10. The airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven; Schall, Harold; Shattuck, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the current program status.

  11. Development of the second generation Hyperspectral Airborne Terrestrial Imager (HATI): HATI - 2500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor-Leahy, S.; Thordarson, S.; Baldauf, B.; Figueroa, M.; Helmlinger, M.; Miller, H.; Reynolds, T.; Shepanski, J.

    2010-08-01

    Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) has a long legacy developing and fielding hyperspectral sensors, including airborne and space based systems covering the visible through Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) wavelength ranges. Most recently NGAS has developed the Hyperspectral Airborne Terrestrial Instrument (HATI) family of hyperspectral sensors, which are compact airborne hyperspectral imagers designed to fly on a variety of platforms and be integrated with other sensors in NGAS's instrument suite. The current sensor under development is the HATI-2500, a full range Visible Near Infrared (VNIR) through Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) instrument covering the 0.4 - 2.5 micron wavelength range with high spectral resolution (3nm). The system includes a framing camera integrated with a GPS/INS to provide high-resolution multispectral imagery and precision geolocation. Its compact size and flexible acquisition parameters allow HATI-2500 to be integrated on a large variety of aerial platforms. This paper describes the HATI-2500 sensor and subsystems and its expected performance specifications.

  12. Algorithms research of airborne long linear multi-elements whisk broom remote sensing image geometric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Ma, Yan-hua; Li, Sheng-hong

    2015-10-01

    Multi-Element scanning imaging is an imaging method that is conventionally used in space-born spectrometer. By multipixel scanning at the same time, increased exposure time can be achieved and the picture quality can be enhanced. But when this imaging method is applied in airborne remote sensing image systems, corresponding imaging model and correction algorithms must be built, because of the poor posture stability of airborne platform and different characteristics and requirements. This paper builds a geometric correction model of airborne long linear multi-element scanning imaging system by decomposing the process of imaging and also deduced related correction algorithms. The sampling moment of linear CCD can be treated as push broom imaging and a single pixel imaging during the whole whisk broom period can be treated as whisk broom imaging. Based on this kind of decomposition, col-linearity equation correction algorithm and a kind of new tangent correction algorithm are deduced. As shown in the simulation experiment result, combining with position and attitude date collected by the posture position measurement system, these algorithms can map pixel position from image coordinate to WGS84 coordinate with high precision. In addition, some error factors and correction accuracy are roughly analyzed.

  13. Real-time simulation of an airborne radar for overwater approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karmarkar, J.; Clark, D.

    1982-01-01

    Software developed to provide a real time simulation of an airborne radar for overwater approaches to oil rig platforms is documented. The simulation is used to study advanced concepts for enhancement of airborne radar approaches (ARA) in order to reduce crew workload, improve approach tracking precision, and reduce weather minimums. ARA's are currently used for offshore helicopter operations to and from oil rigs.

  14. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  15. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  16. Materiel requirements for airborne minefield detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, Karl A.; Huegle, Helmut

    1997-07-01

    Within the concept study, Material Requirements for an airborne minefield detection systems (AMiDS) the following topics were investigated: (i) concept concerning airborne minefield detection technique sand equipment, (ii) verification analysis of the AMiDS requirements using simulation models and (iii) application concept of AMiDS with regard o tactics and military operations. In a first approach the problems concerning unmanned airborne minefield detection techniques within a well-defined area were considered. The complexity of unmanned airborne minefield detection is a result of the following parameters: mine types, mine deployment methods, tactical requirements, topography, weather conditions, and the size of the area to be searched. In order to perform the analysis, a simulation model was developed to analyze the usability of the proposed remote controlled air carriers. The basic flight patterns for the proposed air carriers, as well as the preparation efforts of military operations and benefits of such a system during combat support missions were investigated. The results of the conceptual study showed that a proposed remote controlled helicopter drone could meet the stated German MOD scanning requirements of mine barriers. Fixed wing air carriers were at a definite disadvantage because of their inherently large turning loops. By implementing a mine detection system like AMiDS minefields can be reconnoitered before an attack. It is therefore possible either to plan, how the minefields can be circumvented or where precisely breaching lanes through the mine barriers are to be cleared for the advancing force.

  17. Optical Communications Link to Airborne Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regehr, Martin W.; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Biswas, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    An optical link from Earth to an aircraft demonstrates the ability to establish a link from a ground platform to a transceiver moving overhead. An airplane has a challenging disturbance environment including airframe vibrations and occasional abrupt changes in attitude during flight. These disturbances make it difficult to maintain pointing lock in an optical transceiver in an airplane. Acquisition can also be challenging. In the case of the aircraft link, the ground station initially has no precise knowledge of the aircraft s location. An airborne pointing system has been designed, built, and demonstrated using direct-drive brushless DC motors for passive isolation of pointing disturbances and for high-bandwidth control feedback. The airborne transceiver uses a GPS-INS system to determine the aircraft s position and attitude, and to then illuminate the ground station initially for acquisition. The ground transceiver participates in link-pointing acquisition by first using a wide-field camera to detect initial illumination from the airborne beacon, and to perform coarse pointing. It then transfers control to a high-precision pointing detector. Using this scheme, live video was successfully streamed from the ground to the aircraft at 270 Mb/s while simultaneously downlinking a 50 kb/s data stream from the aircraft to the ground.

  18. Development of an airborne remote sensing system for crop pest management: System integration and verification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing along with Global Positioning Systems, Geographic Information Systems, and variable rate technology has been developed, which scientists can implement to help farmers maximize the economic and environmental benefits of crop pest management through precision agriculture. Airborne remo...

  19. An examination of the application of space time adaptive processing for the detection of maritime surface targets from high altitude airborne platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael; Cerutti-Maori, Delphine

    2013-09-01

    An examination of the application of Space Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) techniques to real, multi-channel, medium grazing angle, radar sea clutter data is undertaken and the detection performance is quantified against simulated moving maritime surface targets. The application of sub-optimal STAP approaches to the maritime radar detection problem is shown to be complicated by non-stationarity of sea clutter and rapid variations of the sea clutter spectrum due to transient wave activity. Observed performance gains from maritime STAP are much more limited than those observed for Ground Moving Target Indication (GMTI) due to the inherent spectral width of sea clutter and the slow Doppler velocities of maritime targets. Three sub-optimal STAP processing architectures are examined and PRI-Staggered Post-Doppler is shown to provide consistently superior detection performance for the data set in question.

  20. Comparison of Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Calibration Using Earth Surface Targets in Laboratory and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana

    1999-01-01

    Routine backscatter, beta, measurements by an airborne or space-based lidar from designated earth surfaces with known and fairly uniform beta properties can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities. This can in turn be used to obtain accurate atmospheric aerosol and cloud beta measurements on large spatial scales. This is important because achieving a precise calibration factor for large pulsed lidars then need not rest solely on using a standard hard target procedure. Furthermore, calibration from designated earth surfaces would provide an inflight performance evaluation of the lidar. Hence, with active remote sensing using lasers with high resolution data, calibration of a space-based lidar using earth's surfaces will be extremely useful. The calibration methodology using the earth's surface initially requires measuring beta of various earth surfaces simulated in the laboratory using a focused continuous wave (CW) CO2 Doppler lidar and then use these beta measurements as standards for the earth surface signal from airborne or space-based lidars. Since beta from the earth's surface may be retrieved at different angles of incidence, beta would also need to be measured at various angles of incidences of the different surfaces. In general, Earth-surface reflectance measurements have been made in the infrared, but the use of lidars to characterize them and in turn use of the Earth's surface to calibrate lidars has not been made. The feasibility of this calibration methodology is demonstrated through a comparison of these laboratory measurements with actual earth surface beta retrieved from the same lidar during the NASA/Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on NASA's DC8 aircraft from 13 - 26 September, 1995. For the selected earth surface from the airborne lidar data, an average beta for the surface was established and the statistics of lidar efficiency was determined. This was compared with the actual lidar efficiency

  1. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  2. Airborne laser sensors and integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark A.; Gardi, Alessandro; Ramasamy, Subramanian

    2015-11-01

    The underlying principles and technologies enabling the design and operation of airborne laser sensors are introduced and a detailed review of state-of-the-art avionic systems for civil and military applications is presented. Airborne lasers including Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR), Laser Range Finders (LRF), and Laser Weapon Systems (LWS) are extensively used today and new promising technologies are being explored. Most laser systems are active devices that operate in a manner very similar to microwave radars but at much higher frequencies (e.g., LIDAR and LRF). Other devices (e.g., laser target designators and beam-riders) are used to precisely direct Laser Guided Weapons (LGW) against ground targets. The integration of both functions is often encountered in modern military avionics navigation-attack systems. The beneficial effects of airborne lasers including the use of smaller components and remarkable angular resolution have resulted in a host of manned and unmanned aircraft applications. On the other hand, laser sensors performance are much more sensitive to the vagaries of the atmosphere and are thus generally restricted to shorter ranges than microwave systems. Hence it is of paramount importance to analyse the performance of laser sensors and systems in various weather and environmental conditions. Additionally, it is important to define airborne laser safety criteria, since several systems currently in service operate in the near infrared with considerable risk for the naked human eye. Therefore, appropriate methods for predicting and evaluating the performance of infrared laser sensors/systems are presented, taking into account laser safety issues. For aircraft experimental activities with laser systems, it is essential to define test requirements taking into account the specific conditions for operational employment of the systems in the intended scenarios and to verify the performance in realistic environments at the test ranges. To support the

  3. The Airborne Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-09-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  4. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Specifications and preliminary design of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system, which is to be constructed for installation and used on a NASA Wallops Flight Center (WFC) C-54 research aircraft, are reported. The AOL system is to provide an airborne facility for use by various government agencies to demonstrate the utility and practicality of hardware of this type in the wide area collection of oceanographic data on an operational basis. System measurement and performance requirements are presented, followed by a description of the conceptual system approach and the considerations attendant to its development. System performance calculations are addressed, and the system specifications and preliminary design are presented and discussed.

  5. Airborne Microwave Imaging of River Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project was to determine whether airborne microwave remote sensing systems can measure river surface currents with sufficient accuracy to make them prospective instruments with which to monitor river flow from space. The approach was to fly a coherent airborne microwave Doppler radar, developed by APL/UW, on a light airplane along several rivers in western Washington state over an extended period of time. The fundamental quantity obtained by this system to measure river currents is the mean offset of the Doppler spectrum. Since this scatter can be obtained from interferometric synthetic aperture radars (INSARs), which can be flown in space, this project provided a cost effective means for determining the suitability of spaceborne INSAR for measuring river flow.

  6. Airborne Topographic Mapper Calibration Procedures and Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Chreston F.; Krabill, William B.; Manizade, Serdar S.; Russell, Rob L.; Sonntag, John G.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Description of NASA Airborn Topographic Mapper (ATM) lidar calibration procedures including analysis of the accuracy and consistancy of various ATM instrument parameters and the resulting influence on topographic elevation measurements. The ATM elevations measurements from a nominal operating altitude 500 to 750 m above the ice surface was found to be: Horizontal Accuracy 74 cm, Horizontal Precision 14 cm, Vertical Accuracy 6.6 cm, Vertical Precision 3 cm.

  7. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  8. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  9. GLORI: a new airborne GNSS reflectometry instrument for land surface monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, Erwan; Fanise, Pascal; Zribi, Mehrez

    2015-10-01

    From the beginning of the 1990s, the use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) reflected signals have been identified as a as source of opportunity for remote sensing applications. In the last two decades, the potential of the technique have been demonstrated for ocean and continental surfaces studies, and several applications have been proposed in the context of high availability of GNSS signals. The GNSS-R technique is generally based on the use of a passive receiver simultaneously acquiring the direct and reflected signals from various GNSS satellites to estimate geophysical parameters from the scattering surface. In the last years, several ground-based [2], [3], airborne [4] and space-borne [5]-[8] experiments have been proposed. The most considered application foreseen for GNSS-R is ocean altimetry for a precise determination of sea-surface heights as well as roughness and wind direction. For continental surfaces, because of direct relationship between surface permittivity and reflected signal, different approaches [6], [9], [10] have been proposed to estimate surface parameters (soil moisture, vegetation biomass, snow). Different observables have been proposed to analyze GNSS signals: the Delay-Doppler Map, the direct and reflected complex waveforms bistatic signal, the ratio between the direct and reflected waveform's peak time series (Interferometric Complex Field). In this context, the airborne instrument GLORI is proposed to demonstrate contribution of GNSS-R to estimate soil moisture over agricultural soils and biomass of forests or annual cultures. A secondary goal is the feasibility of centimeter-precision altimetry above continental water bodies. The second section describes the characteristics of GLORI instrument. The third section presents airborne campaigns realized over the south West of France and fourth sections discusses the first results. Conclusions are gathered in section 5.

  10. Validation of Airborne CO2 Laser Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Kooi, S.; Fenn, M. A.; Choi, Y.; Vay, S. A.; Harrison, F. W.; Moore, B.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses the flight test validation of a unique, multi-frequency, intensity-modulated, single-beam laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) that operates near 1.57 μm for remote column CO2 measurements. This laser system is under development for a future space-based mission to determine the global distribution of regional-scale CO2 sources and sinks, which is the objective of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions during Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. A prototype of this LAS system, called the Multi-frequency Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), was developed by ITT, and it has been flight tested in nine airborne campaigns since May 2005. This paper focuses on the most recent results obtained over the last two years of flight-testing where the MFLL remote CO2 column measurements were evaluated against airborne in situ CO2 profile measurements traceable to World Meteorological Organization standards. A comprehensive multiple-aircraft flight test program was conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia in July-August 2009. The MFLL obtained surface reflectance and average CO2 column variations along the 50-km flight legs over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility (CF) in Lamont, Oklahoma; over rural Virginia and North Carolina; and over the Chesapeake Bay. For a flight altitude of 4.6 km, the average signal to noise ratio (SNR) for a 1-s CO2 column measurement was found to be 760, which is the equivalent of a CO2 mixing ratio precision of 0.60 ppmv, and for a 10-s average the SNR was found to be 2002 or 0.20 ppmv. Absolute comparisons of MFLL-derived and in situ-derived CO2 column measurements were made for all daytime flights conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia with an average agreement to within 0.32 ppmv. A major ASCENDS flight test campaign was conducted using the NASA DC-8 during 6-18 July 2010. The MFLL system and associated in situ CO2 instrumentation were operated on DC-8 flights over the Central Valley

  11. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Schaffner, P. R.; Mielke, R. R.; Gilreath, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for numerically calculating radiation patterns of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas using the Volumetric Pattern Analysis Program is presented. Special attention is given to aircraft modeling. An actual case study involving a large commercial aircraft is included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

  12. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  13. Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, F. C.; Markle, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator enables prospecting for fluorescent materials, hydrography with fluorescent dyes, and plant studies based on fluorescence of chlorophyll. Optical unit design is the coincidence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum occurring at the characteristic wavelengths of some fluorescent materials.

  14. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  15. Airborne sensor integration for quick reaction programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosian, Gregory; Mason, Kenneth; Servoss, Thomas; Brower, Bernard; Pellechia, Matthew

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present an approach to integrate sensors to meet the demanding requirements of Quick Reaction Capability (QRC) airborne programs. Traditional airborne sensors are generally highly integrated and incorporate custom sensor technologies and interfaces. Custom solutions and new technologies often require significant engineering to achieve a high technology readiness level (TRL) and to meet the overall mission objective. Our approach differs from traditional approaches in that we strive to achieve an integrated solution through regular review, assessment, and identification of relevant industry "best athlete" technologies. Attention is focused on solution providers that adhere to standard interfaces and formats, incorporate non-proprietary techniques, are deemed highly-reliable/repeatable, and enable assembly production. Processes and engineering tools/methods have traditionally been applied to dozens of longer-acquisition space-based ISR programs over 50 years. We have recently leveraged these techniques to solve airborne Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) mission challenges. This presentation describes and illustrates key aspects and examples of these techniques, solving real-world airborne mission needs.

  16. Airborne hyperspectral detection of small changes.

    PubMed

    Eismann, Michael T; Meola, Joseph; Stocker, Alan D; Beaven, Scott G; Schaum, Alan P

    2008-10-01

    Hyperspectral change detection offers a promising approach to detect objects and features of remotely sensed areas that are too difficult to find in single images, such as slight changes in land cover and the insertion, deletion, or movement of small objects, by exploiting subtle differences in the imagery over time. Methods for performing such change detection, however, must effectively maintain invariance to typically larger image-to-image changes in illumination and environmental conditions, as well as misregistration and viewing differences between image observations, while remaining sensitive to small differences in scene content. Previous research has established predictive algorithms to overcome such natural changes between images, and these approaches have recently been extended to deal with space-varying changes. The challenges to effective change detection, however, are often exacerbated in an airborne imaging geometry because of the limitations in control over flight conditions and geometry, and some of the recent change detection algorithms have not been demonstrated in an airborne setting. We describe the airborne implementation and relative performance of such methods. We specifically attempt to characterize the effects of spatial misregistration on change detection performance, the efficacy of class-conditional predictors in an airborne setting, and extensions to the change detection approach, including physically motivated shadow transition classifiers and matched change filtering based on in-scene atmospheric normalization. PMID:18830283

  17. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  18. Precise Truss Assembly using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    We describe an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly of commodity parts with low-precision bonding. We present preliminary experiments in 2D that are motivated by the problem of assembling a space telescope optical bench on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local assembly site in place while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (in this case, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. We report the challenges of designing the IPJR hardware and software, analyze the error in assembly, document the test results over several experiments including a large-scale ring structure, and describe future work to implement the IPJR in 3D and with micron precision.

  19. Precise Truss Assembly Using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, W. R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Hardware and software design and system integration for an intelligent precision jigging robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly using commodity parts and low-precision bonding, is described. Preliminary 2D experiments that are motivated by the problem of assembling space telescope optical benches and very large manipulators on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding are also described. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local structure assembly site in place, while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (for this prototype, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. The analysis of the assembly error and the results of building a square structure and a ring structure are discussed. Options for future work, to extend the IPJR paradigm to building in 3D structures at micron precision are also summarized.

  20. Example of the assessment of data integration accuracy on the base of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warchoł, A.; Hejmanowska, B.

    2011-12-01

    Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology has changed conventional approach to the spatial data acquisition. Unusually amount of the measurements points with extremely high precision are now available from generally two platforms: airborne (Airborne Laser Scanner -ALS) and terrestrial (Terrestrial Laser Scanner -TLS). There are however some gaps in these products, in ALS -on vertical surfaces and in TLS -on horizontal one. The reason is that these laser systems register the same object from different points in space. Integration of the data obtained for airborne and terrestrial platforms can fulfill the gaps. The aim of the research presented in the paper was comparing the matched ALS and TLS data to the in-situ total station (TS) measurements. Different test areas were chosen: placed on horizontal, vertical or inclined surfaces and covered by grass or asphalt pavement. Point's positions obtained from ALS, TLS and TS measurements are analysed together. TS measurements are taken as a reference. ALS and TLS point position accuracy analysis based on these perpendicular distance from the plane defined by the nearest three non-collinear TS points. The discrepancies were further statistically analysed. In conclusion can be stated that some bias was observed in ALS data, they are below TLS and TS points as well. Besides more significant discrepancy between TS points are observed for ALS points in compare to the TLS one, confirming our expectations.

  1. [Air-borne disease].

    PubMed

    Lameiro Vilariño, Carmen; del Campo Pérez, Victor M; Alonso Bürger, Susana; Felpeto Nodar, Irene; Guimarey Pérez, Rosa; Pérez Alvarellos, Alberto

    2003-11-01

    Respiratory protection is a factor which worries nursing professionals who take care of patients susceptible of transmitting microorganisms through the air more as every day passes. This type of protection covers the use of surgical or hygienic masks against the transmission of infection by airborne drops to the use of highly effective masks or respirators against the transmission of airborne diseases such as tuberculosis or SARS, a recently discovered disease. The adequate choice of this protective device and its correct use are fundamental in order to have an effective protection for exposed personnel. The authors summarize the main protective respiratory devices used by health workers, their characteristics and degree of effectiveness, as well as the circumstances under which each device is indicated for use. PMID:14705591

  2. Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and additional resources focuses on space and astronomy. Specifies age levels for resources that include Web sites, CD-ROMS and software, videos, books, audios, and magazines; offers professional resources; and presents a relevant class activity. (LRW)

  3. Precision geo-location at long range with multi-look lidar (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Michael W.; Scheck, Andrew E.; Chiu, Wendy W.; Murphy, Kevin E.

    2005-05-01

    Precision geo-location (absolute accuracy of 20 cm or less) is required of high-resolution lidar data (1 m or less post spacing) for general surveying needs and high-quality visualization. Current open-loop airborne-hardware pointing-technology supports precision geo-location at short range (less than a few km). Precision geo-location at longer range can be achieved with more complex pointing-hardware but at substantial cost. This paper introduces the concept of multi-look lidar that has the potential for achieving long-range precision geo-location but at substantially reduced cost. In this concept, lidar data are collected at multiple look-angles that are consistent with Position-Dilution-Of-Precision (PDOP) requirements. The data are registered, triangulated, and block-adjusted with a dense set of self-generated control points. An analytic model is presented that shows that the error performance is independent of range. A flight test is described that validates the multi-look-lidar concept. Potential system-implementations are also described that can have minimal impact on hardware or conventional flight operations.

  4. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  5. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  6. Precise measurement of the lattice spacing of LaB6 standard powder by the x-ray extended range technique using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.; Tran, C. Q.; Cookson, D. J.

    2004-04-01

    We used the basis of the x-ray extended range technique to measure the lattice spacing of LaB6 standard powder samples relative to silicon 640b standard powder samples with an accuracy of 5× 10-5 Å . Measurements were not constrained to one energy but were carried out over a 5 keV 20 keV energy range. These measurements used powder diffraction to determine the synchrotron beam energy, to diagnose discrepancies in the nominal calibrated beam energies, and to determine beam energy bandwidths as a function of energy. More specifically, this technique is able to yield a result independent of certain energy-dependent systematics and to yield the most accurate determination of the lattice spacing of NIST SRM 660 LaB6 standard powder so far undertaken. This has direct application to beam line energy calibration, structural evaluation, edge energy calibration, and lattice spacing determinations.

  7. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles. PMID:7005667

  8. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  9. BOREAS RSS-12 Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Wrigley, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-12 team collected both ground and airborne sunphotometer measurements for use in characterizing the aerosol optical properties of the atmosphere during the BOREAS data collection activities. These measurements are to be used to: 1) measure the magnitude and variability of the aerosol optical depth in both time and space; 2) determine the optical properties of the boreal aerosols; and 3) atmospherically correct remotely sensed data acquired during BOREAS. This data set contains airborne tracking sunphotometer data that were acquired from the C-130 aircraft during its flights over the BOREAS study areas. The data cover selected days and times from May to September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. Adaptive structures to enable ground test validation of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James F.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Kuo, Chin-Po

    1990-01-01

    The use of analytical models and ground-based experimental validation of precision space structures is addressed. The application of adaptive structures to such validation of precision space structures is addressed, with the focus on adaptive truss structures.

  11. Cryogenic performance of a high precision photogrammetry system for verification of the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module and associated ground support equipment structural alignment requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Maria D.; Cleveland, Paul E.; Cofie, Emmanuel; Crane, J. Allen; Davila, Pamela S.; Eegholm, Bente H.; Hammond, Randolph P.; Heaney, James B.; Hylan, Jason E.; Johnston, John D.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Orndorff, Joseph D.; Osgood, Dean L.; Redman, Kevin W.; Sampler, Henry P.; Smee, Stephen A.; Stock, Joseph M.; Threat, Felix T.; Woodruff, Robert A.; Young, Philip J.

    2010-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a general astrophysics mission which consists of a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy (~35K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SI) including a Guider. The alignment philosophy of ISIM is such that the cryogenic changes in the alignment of the SI interfaces are captured in the ISIM alignment error budget. The SIs are aligned to the structure's coordinate system under ambient, clean room conditions using laser tracker and theodolite metrology. The ISIM structure is thermally cycled and temperature-induced structural changes are concurrently measured with a photogrammetry metrology system to ensure they are within requirements. We compare the ISIM photogrammetry system performance to the ISIM metrology requirements and describe the cryogenic data acquired to verify photogrammetry system level requirements, including measurement uncertainty. The ISIM photogrammetry system is the baseline concept for future tests involving the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Observatory level testing at Johnson Space Flight Center.

  12. Data correction techniques for the airborne large-aperture static image spectrometer based on image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Geng; Shi, Dalian; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Tao; Hu, Bingliang

    2015-01-01

    We propose an approach to correct the data of the airborne large-aperture static image spectrometer (LASIS). LASIS is a kind of stationary interferometer which compromises flux output and device stability. It acquires a series of interferograms to reconstruct the hyperspectral image cube. Reconstruction precision of the airborne LASIS data suffers from the instability of the plane platform. Usually, changes of plane attitudes, such as yaws, pitches, and rolls, can be precisely measured by the inertial measurement unit. However, the along-track and across-track translation errors are difficult to measure precisely. To solve this problem, we propose a co-optimization approach to compute the translation errors between the interferograms using an image registration technique which helps to correct the interferograms with subpixel precision. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, experiments are run on real airborne LASIS data and our results are compared with those of the state-of-the-art approaches.

  13. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  14. Airborne radioactive contamination monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, C.R.; Adams, J.R.; Bounds, J.A.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-03-01

    Current technologies for the detection of airborne radioactive contamination do not provide real-time capability. Most of these techniques are based on the capture of particulate matter in air onto filters which are then processed in the laboratory; thus, the turnaround time for detection of contamination can be many days. To address this shortcoming, an effort is underway to adapt LRAD (Long-Range-Alpha-Detection) technology for real-time monitoring of airborne releases of alpa-emitting radionuclides. Alpha decays in air create ionization that can be subsequently collected on electrodes, producing a current that is proportional to the amount of radioactive material present. Using external fans on a pipe containing LRAD detectors, controlled samples of ambient air can be continuously tested for the presence of radioactive contamination. Current prototypes include a two-chamber model. Sampled air is drawn through a particulate filter and then through the first chamber, which uses an electrostatic filter at its entrance to remove ambient ionization. At its exit, ionization that occurred due to the presence of radon is collected and recorded. The air then passes through a length of pipe to allow some decay of short-lived radon species. A second chamber identical to the first monitors the remaining activity. Further development is necessary on air samples without the use of particulate filtering, both to distinguish ionization that can pass through the initial electrostatic filter on otherwise inert particulate matter from that produced through the decay of radioactive material and to separate both of these from the radon contribution. The end product could provide a sensitive, cost-effective, real-time method of determining the presence of airborne radioactive contamination.

  15. Airborne Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaps, Wm. S.; Burris, J.

    1996-12-01

    We designed and tested an airborne lidar system using Raman scattering to make simultaneous measurements of methane, water vapor, and temperature in a series of flights on a NASA-operated C-130 aircraft. We present the results for methane detection, which show that the instrument has the requisite sensitivity to atmospheric trace gases. Ultimately these measurements can be used to examine the transport of chemically processed air from within the polar vortex to mid-latitudinal regions and the exchange of stratospheric air between tropical and mid-latitudinal regions.

  16. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  17. Development status of the planar electrostatic gradiometer GREMLIT for airborne geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Douch, K.; Panet, I.

    2012-12-01

    The GREMLIT airborne gravity gradiometer is taking advantage of technologies, formerly developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions. Built using a planar configuration with four proof-masses at the corners of a square, the gradiometer is mounted on a dedicated stabilized platform which is controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself to achieve a sufficient rejection ratio of the perturbations/vibrations induced by the airborne environment in the horizontal directions. The levitation of the proof-masses along the normal gravity and the vibration isolation of the platform are designed to allow the instrument to support between +2.5 g and 0 g along the vertical axis. With the help of additional fiber gyro data, the gradiometer differential measurements provide the necessary information to extract the 3 Tyy, Tzz and Tyz independent components of the gravity gradient tensor at the location of the instrument. In addition to be especially well suited to sustain the proof-mass levitation in the Earth's gravity field, such a planar configuration also presents an intrinsic linearity of the horizontal control loops which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth. The compactness of the gradiometer design, with all the electrodes of the 4 accelerometers engrave on the same ULE plate, ensures excellent dimensional stability, good thermal homogeneity and makes the conception of the stabilized platform easier. The detailed error budget of the gradiometer instrument associated with the estimated performance of the platform and the assumed characteristics of the additional attitude, rate and position sensors lead to expect a performance objective between 0.1 and 1 Eötvös taking into account the difficulty of measurements onboard an aircraft by comparison to the particularly conducive satellite measurement environment. The GREMLIT gravity gradiometer systems is more particularly

  18. Airborne multispectral detection of regrowth cotton fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, John K.; Suh, Charles P.-C.; Yang, Chenghai; Lan, Yubin; Eyster, Ritchie S.

    2015-01-01

    Effective methods are needed for timely areawide detection of regrowth cotton plants because boll weevils (a quarantine pest) can feed and reproduce on these plants beyond the cotton production season. Airborne multispectral images of regrowth cotton plots were acquired on several dates after three shredding (i.e., stalk destruction) dates. Linear spectral unmixing (LSU) classification was applied to high-resolution airborne multispectral images of regrowth cotton plots to estimate the minimum detectable size and subsequent growth of plants. We found that regrowth cotton fields can be identified when the mean plant width is ˜0.2 m for an image resolution of 0.1 m. LSU estimates of canopy cover of regrowth cotton plots correlated well (r2=0.81) with the ratio of mean plant width to row spacing, a surrogate measure of plant canopy cover. The height and width of regrowth plants were both well correlated (r2=0.94) with accumulated degree-days after shredding. The results will help boll weevil eradication program managers use airborne multispectral images to detect and monitor the regrowth of cotton plants after stalk destruction, and identify fields that may require further inspection and mitigation of boll weevil infestations.

  19. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown. PMID:23406937

  20. Airborne ballistic camera tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redish, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    An operational airborne ballistic camera tracking system was tested for operational and data reduction feasibility. The acquisition and data processing requirements of the system are discussed. Suggestions for future improvements are also noted. A description of the data reduction mathematics is outlined. Results from a successful reentry test mission are tabulated. The test mission indicated that airborne ballistic camera tracking systems are feasible.

  1. Variation in the mantle sources of the northern Izu arc with time and space — Constraints from high-precision Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Osamu; Taylor, Rex N.; Milton, J. Andy; Nesbitt, Robert W.; Yuasa, Makoto; Sakamoto, Izumi

    2006-09-01

    We present new ages and geochemical data for back-arc lavas from the northern Izu Bonin arc 33 35° N including high-precision double-spike Pb isotope measurements. The northern part of the Izu Bonin arc is distinct from the rest of the arc as it lacks active rifting behind the volcanic front but it does have Quaternary volcanoes (e.g. Niijima). However, in common with the rest of the arc the northern section has back-arc seamount chains and NE SW volcanic ridges. 40Ar/39Ar dating of volcanic rocks has revealed that Quaternary volcanism is limited to within 40 km of the volcanic front. Miocene and Pliocene volcanism extended as far as 120 km west of the current volcanic front along the back-arc seamounts and ridges. The chemical characteristics of back-arc volcanism are significantly different in the Pliocene Quaternary compared to the Miocene. Opx cpx andesite and hornblende andesite are dominant in Miocene volcanic centres, while Pliocene and Quaternary centres are characterized by basalt and rhyolite. Miocene volcanic centres show a marked correlation between Th/Ce and Pb and Nd isotopes. Generally, these lavas have higher Δ7/4 and lower 143Nd/144Nd with increasing Th/Ce. In contrast, the Pliocene and Quaternary lavas show little, if any, Th enrichment relative to potential mantle sources and no correlation with isotopes. These correlations suggest that partial melt of sediment from the subducting slab was an important component in the Miocene, whereas, the Pliocene Quaternary volcanic centres show little evidence of sediment melt and are restricted to a contribution of fluid from altered oceanic crust and fluid from sediment. Quaternary volcanoes at similar distances from the volcanic front are calculated to have similar compositions and amounts of slab-derived fluid in their sources. However, on Pb Pb isotope plots, they lie closer to the NHRL towards south (i.e., Δ8/4 decreases towards south). Almost parallel but distinct trends on Pb Pb plots imply

  2. Airborne transmission of lyssaviruses.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N; Phillpotts, R; Fooks, A R

    2006-06-01

    In 2002, a Scottish bat conservationist developed a rabies-like disease and subsequently died. This was caused by infection with European bat lyssavirus 2 (EBLV-2), a virus closely related to Rabies virus (RABV). The source of this infection and the means of transmission have not yet been confirmed. In this study, the hypothesis that lyssaviruses, particularly RABV and the bat variant EBLV-2, might be transmitted via the airborne route was tested. Mice were challenged via direct introduction of lyssavirus into the nasal passages. Two hours after intranasal challenge with a mouse-adapted strain of RABV (Challenge Virus Standard), viral RNA was detectable in the tongue, lungs and stomach. All of the mice challenged by direct intranasal inoculation developed disease signs by 7 days post-infection. Two out of five mice challenged by direct intranasal inoculation of EBLV-2 developed disease between 16 and 19 days post-infection. In addition, a simple apparatus was evaluated in which mice could be exposed experimentally to infectious doses of lyssavirus from an aerosol. Using this approach, mice challenged with RABV, but not those challenged with EBLV-2, were highly susceptible to infection by inhalation. These data support the hypothesis that lyssaviruses, and RABV in particular, can be spread by airborne transmission in a dose-dependent manner. This could present a particular hazard to personnel exposed to aerosols of infectious RABV following accidental release in a laboratory environment. PMID:16687600

  3. THE MASS OF THE CANDIDATE EXOPLANET COMPANION TO HD 136118 FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ASTROMETRY AND HIGH-PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martioli, Eder; McArthur, Barbara E.; Benedict, G. Fritz; Armstrong, Amber; Bean, Jacob L.; Harrison, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensor astrometry and high-cadence radial velocities for HD 136118 from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with archival data from Lick to determine the complete set of orbital parameters for HD 136118 b. We find an orbital inclination for the candidate exoplanet of i{sub b} = 163.{sup 0}1 +- 3.{sup 0}0. This establishes the actual mass of the object, M{sub b} = 42{sup +11}{sub -18} M{sub J} , in contrast to the minimum mass determined from the radial velocity data only, M{sub b} sin i approx 12 M{sub J} . Therefore, the low-mass companion to HD 136118 is now identified as a likely brown dwarf residing in the 'brown dwarf desert'.

  4. Medicinal smoke reduces airborne bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nene, Yeshwant Laxman

    2007-12-01

    This study represents a comprehensive analysis and scientific validation of our ancient knowledge about the effect of ethnopharmacological aspects of natural products' smoke for therapy and health care on airborne bacterial composition and dynamics, using the Biolog microplate panels and Microlog database. We have observed that 1h treatment of medicinal smoke emanated by burning wood and a mixture of odoriferous and medicinal herbs (havan sámagri=material used in oblation to fire all over India), on aerial bacterial population caused over 94% reduction of bacterial counts by 60 min and the ability of the smoke to purify or disinfect the air and to make the environment cleaner was maintained up to 24h in the closed room. Absence of pathogenic bacteria Corynebacterium urealyticum, Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens, Enterobacter aerogenes (Klebsiella mobilis), Kocuria rosea, Pseudomonas syringae pv. persicae, Staphylococcus lentus, and Xanthomonas campestris pv. tardicrescens in the open room even after 30 days is indicative of the bactericidal potential of the medicinal smoke treatment. We have demonstrated that using medicinal smoke it is possible to completely eliminate diverse plant and human pathogenic bacteria of the air within confined space. PMID:17913417

  5. SOFIA: The Next Generation Airborne Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, E. F.

    1995-10-01

    The United States and German Space Agencies (NASA and DARA) are collaborating in plans for SOFIA — The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy. It is a 2.5 meter telescope to be installed in a Boeing 747 aircraft and operated at altitudes from 41,000 to 45,000 feet. It will permit routine measurement of infrared radiation absorbed by the atmosphere at lower altitudes, and observation of astronomical objects and transient events from anywhere in the world. The concept is based on 20 years of experience with NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), which SOFIA would replace. SOFIA will complement the capabilities of other future space missions, and will enable scientists to make observations which would otherwise be made from space.

  6. Calibration of airborne SAR interferograms using multisquint-processed image pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prats, Pau; Mallorqui, Jordi J.; Reigber, Andreas; Broquetas, Antoni

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents two different approaches to detect and correct phase errors appearing in interferometric airborne SAR sensors due to the lack of precision in the navigation system. The first one is intended for interferometric pairs with high coherence, and the second one for low coherent ones. Both techniques are based on a multisquint processing approach, i.e., by processing the same image pairs with different squint angles we can combine the information of different interferograms to obtain the desired phase correction. Airborne single- and repeat-pass interferometric data from the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) Experimental airborne SAR is used to validate the method.

  7. GREMLIT : an airborne gravity gradiometer inheriting from GOCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, B.; Douch, K.; Christophe, B.; Panet, I.; Boulanger, D.; Lebat, V.

    2012-04-01

    The knowledge of the gravity field of the Earth has been considerably improved thanks to global positioning satellites constellations and to space gravity measurements from recent GRACE and GOCE missions. But the spatial resolution of those gravity data essentially addresses the large and medium wavelengths of the field (down to a resolution of 90km) and it is therefore essential to complete them at the shorter wavelengths in particular in the areas where spatial distribution and quality of ground data remain quite uneven like in high mountain or coastal areas. To this aim, gravity gradiometry systems may be particularly suitable by covering the land/sea transition zone with a uniform precision, and a spatial resolution higher than from gravimetry. The GREMLIT instrument is taking advantage of technologies, formerly developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions. The gradiometer is built using a planar configuration for the gradiometer and is mounted on a dedicated stabilized platform which is controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself to achieve a sufficient rejection ratio of the perturbations/vibrations induced by the airborne environment. Such a planar configuration is especially well suited to sustain the proof-mass levitation in the Earth's gravity field. It also presents intrinsic linearity, which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth. The compactness of the design ensures excellent dimensional stability, good thermal homogeneity and makes the conception of the stabilized platform easier. The performance objective is between 0.1 and 1 Eötvös taking into account the difficulty of measurements onboard an aircraft by comparison to the particularly conducive satellite measurement environment.

  8. Assess program: Interactive data management systems for airborne research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, R. M.; Reller, J. O., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Two data systems were developed for use in airborne research. Both have distributed intelligence and are programmed for interactive support among computers and with human operators. The C-141 system (ADAMS) performs flight planning and telescope control functions in addition to its primary role of data acquisition; the CV-990 system (ADDAS) performs data management functions in support of many research experiments operating concurrently. Each system is arranged for maximum reliability in the first priority function, precision data acquisition.

  9. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric; Schmale, David T.; Oliver, Michael S.

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  10. Co-Registration Airborne LIDAR Point Cloud Data and Synchronous Digital Image Registration Based on Combined Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. H.; Zhang, Y. S.; Zheng, T.; Lai, W. B.; Zou, Z. R.; Zou, B.

    2016-06-01

    Aim at the problem of co-registration airborne laser point cloud data with the synchronous digital image, this paper proposed a registration method based on combined adjustment. By integrating tie point, point cloud data with elevation constraint pseudo observations, using the principle of least-squares adjustment to solve the corrections of exterior orientation elements of each image, high-precision registration results can be obtained. In order to ensure the reliability of the tie point, and the effectiveness of pseudo observations, this paper proposed a point cloud data constrain SIFT matching and optimizing method, can ensure that the tie points are located on flat terrain area. Experiments with the airborne laser point cloud data and its synchronous digital image, there are about 43 pixels error in image space using the original POS data. If only considering the bore-sight of POS system, there are still 1.3 pixels error in image space. The proposed method regards the corrections of the exterior orientation elements of each image as unknowns and the errors are reduced to 0.15 pixels.

  11. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  12. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  13. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼ 250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena. PMID:25166975

  14. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  15. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  16. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  17. Precision measurements in supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.L.

    1995-05-01

    Supersymmetry is a promising framework in which to explore extensions of the standard model. If candidates for supersymmetric particles are found, precision measurements of their properties will then be of paramount importance. The prospects for such measurements and their implications are the subject of this thesis. If charginos are produced at the LEP II collider, they are likely to be one of the few available supersymmetric signals for many years. The author considers the possibility of determining fundamental supersymmetry parameters in such a scenario. The study is complicated by the dependence of observables on a large number of these parameters. He proposes a straightforward procedure for disentangling these dependences and demonstrate its effectiveness by presenting a number of case studies at representative points in parameter space. In addition to determining the properties of supersymmetric particles, precision measurements may also be used to establish that newly-discovered particles are, in fact, supersymmetric. Supersymmetry predicts quantitative relations among the couplings and masses of superparticles. The author discusses tests of such relations at a future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider, using measurements that exploit the availability of polarizable beams. Stringent tests of supersymmetry from chargino production are demonstrated in two representative cases, and fermion and neutralino processes are also discussed.

  18. NASA three-laser airborne differential absorption lidar system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. J.; Copeland, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The system control and signal conditioning electronics of the NASA three laser airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. The multipurpose DIAL system was developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A brief description and photographs of the majority of electronics units developed under this contract are presented. The precision control system; which includes a master control unit, three combined NASA laser control interface/quantel control units, and three noise pulse discriminator/pockels cell pulser units; is described in detail. The need and design considerations for precision timing and control are discussed. Calibration procedures are included.

  19. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  20. Airborne bacteria in the atmosphere: Presence, purpose, and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, Wenke; Moretti, Serena; Denys, Siegfried; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Numerous recent studies have highlighted that the types of bacteria present in the atmosphere often show predictable patterns across space and time. These patterns can be driven by differences in bacterial sources of the atmosphere and a wide range of environmental factors, including UV intensity, precipitation events, and humidity. The abundance of certain bacterial taxa is of interest, not only for their ability to mediate a range of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, such as cloud formation and ice nucleation, but also for their implications -both beneficial and detrimental-for human health. Consequently, the widespread importance of airborne bacteria has stimulated the search for their applicability. Improving air quality, modelling the dispersal of airborne bacteria (e.g. pathogens) and biotechnological purposes are already being explored. Nevertheless, many technological challenges still need to be overcome to fully understand the roles of airborne bacteria in our health and global ecosystems.

  1. Airborne Trace Gas Mapping During the GOSAT-COMEX Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratt, D. M.; Leifer, I.; Buckland, K. N.; Johnson, P. D.; Van Damme, M.; Pierre-Francois, C.; Clarisse, L.

    2015-12-01

    The GOSAT-COMEX-IASI (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite - CO2 and Methane EXperiment - Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) experiment acquired data on 24-27 April 2015 with two aircraft, a mobile ground-based sampling suite, and the GOSAT and IASI platforms. Collections comprised the Kern Front and Kern River oil fields north of Bakersfield, Calif. and the Chino stockyard complex in the eastern Los Angeles Basin. The nested-grid experiment examined the convergence of multiple approaches to total trace gas flux estimation from the experimental area on multiple length-scales, which entailed the integrated analysis of ground-based, airborne, and space-based measurements. Airborne remote sensing was employed to map the spatial distribution of discrete emission sites - crucial information to understanding their relative aggregate contribution to the overall flux estimation. This contribution discusses the methodology in the context of the airborne GHG source mapping component of the GOSAT-COMEX experiment and its application to satellite validation.

  2. COCAP - A compact carbon dioxide analyser for airborne platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Martin; Lavrič, Jošt V.; Jeschag, Wieland; Bryzgalov, Maksym; Hök, Bertil; Heimann, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Airborne platforms are a valuable tool for atmospheric trace gas measurements due to their capability of movement in three dimensions, covering spatial scales from metres to thousands of kilometres. Although crewed research aircraft are flexible in payload and range, their use is limited by high initial and operating costs. Small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have the potential for substantial cost reduction, but require lightweight, miniaturized and energy-efficient scientific equipment. We are developing a COmpact Carbon dioxide analyser for Airborne Platforms (COCAP). It contains a non-dispersive infrared CO2sensor with a nominal full scale of 3000 μmol/mol. Sampled air is dried with magnesium perchlorate before it enters the sensor. This enables measurement of the dry air mole fraction of CO2, as recommended by the World Meteorological Organization. During post-processing, the CO2 measurement is corrected for temperature and pressure variations in the gas line. Allan variance analysis shows that we achieve a precision of better than 0.4 μmol/mol for 10 s averaging time. We plan to monitor the analyser's stability during flight by measuring reference air from a miniature gas tank in regular intervals. Besides CO2, COCAP measures relative humidity, temperature and pressure of ambient air. An on-board GPS receiver delivers accurate timestamps and allows georeferencing. Data is both stored on a microSD card and simultaneously transferred over a wireless serial interface to a ground station for real-time review. The target weight for COCAP is less than 1 kg. We deploy COCAP on a commercially available fixed-wing UAV (Bormatec Explorer) with a wingspan of 2.2 metres. The UAV has high payload capacity (2.5 kg) as well as sufficient space in the fuselage (80x80x600 mm3). It is built from a shock-resistant foam material, which allows quick repair of minor damages in the field. In case of severe damage spare parts are readily available. Calculations suggest that the

  3. Airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1992-01-01

    Proper interpretation of airborne gravimetry and altimetry requires good knowledge of aircraft trajectory. Recent advances in precise navigation with differential GPS have made it possible to measure gravity from the air with accuracies of a few milligals, and to obtain altimeter profiles of terrain or sea surface correct to one decimeter. These developments are opening otherwise inaccessible regions to detailed geophysical mapping. Navigation with GPS presents some problems that grow worse with increasing distance from a fixed receiver: the effect of errors in tropospheric refraction correction, GPS ephemerides, and the coordinates of the fixed receivers. Ionospheric refraction and orbit error complicate ambiguity resolution. Optimal navigation should treat all error sources as unknowns, together with the instantaneous vehicle position. To do so, fast and reliable numerical techniques are needed: efficient and stable Kalman filter-smoother algorithms, together with data compression and, sometimes, the use of simplified dynamics.

  4. Signal to Noise Ratio Analysis of the Data from the Pulsed Airborne CO2 Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.

    2009-12-01

    We are developing a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring the CO2 column concentrations from space for the ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters to simultaneously measure the total column absorption by CO2 in 1570 nm band and O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band by periodically stepping the laser wavelength at predetermined wavelengths across the absorption lines. The reflected laser signals from the surface and clouds are collected by the receiver telescope and detected by a set of single photon counting detectors. We used pulsed lasers and time resolved photon detection to distinguish the surface echoes from cloud and aerosol backscattering and to measure the column height. . The total column absorption at a given wavelength is determined from the ratio of the received laser pulse energy to the transmitted energy. The column gas concentrations and the spectral line shape are determined from curve fitting of the column absorptions as a function of the wavelength. We have built an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 column measurement technique from the NASA Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar scans the laser wavelength across the CO2 absorption line in 20 steps. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse energy is 25 uJ, and laser pulse widths are 1 usec. The backscatter photons are collected by a 20 cm telescope and detected by a near infrared photomultiplier tube. The detected photons are binned according to their arrival times with the use of a multichannel scaler. Several airborne measurements were conducted during October and December 2008, and August 2009 with many hours of CO2 column measurement data at the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm CO2 absorption lines. The measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and some through thin clouds. We also made several improvements to the instrument for the later flights. Measurements from early flights showed the receiver signal and noise levels were

  5. SOFIA: The future of airborne astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.; Davidson, Jacqueline A.

    1995-01-01

    For the past 20 years, the 91 cm telescope in NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) has enabled scientists to observe infrared sources which are obscured by the earth's atmosphere at ground-based sites, and to observe transient astronomical events from anywhere in the world. To augment this capability, the United States and German Space Agencies (NASA and DARA) are collaborating in plans to replace the KAO with a 2.5 meter telescope installed in a Boeing 747 aircraft: SOFIA - The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy. SOFIA's large aperture, wide wavelength coverage, mobility, accessibility, and sophisticated instruments will permit a broad range of scientific studies, some of which are described here. Its unique features complement the capabilities of other future space missions. In addition, SOFIA has important potential as a stimulus for development of new technology and as a national resource for education of K-12 teachers. If started in 1996, SOFIA will be flying in the year 2000.

  6. SOFIA: The future of airborne astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.; Davidson, Jacqueline A.

    For the past 20 years, the 91 cm telescope in NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) has enabled scientists to observe infrared sources which are obscured by the earth's atmosphere at ground-based sites, and to observe transient astronomical events from anywhere in the world. To augment this capability, the United States and German Space Agencies (NASA and DARA) are collaborating in plans to replace the KAO with a 2.5 meter telescope installed in a Boeing 747 aircraft: SOFIA - The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy. SOFIA's large aperture, wide wavelength coverage, mobility, accessibility, and sophisticated instruments will permit a broad range of scientific studies, some of which are described here. Its unique features complement the capabilities of other future space missions. In addition, SOFIA has important potential as a stimulus for development of new technology and as a national resource for education of K-12 teachers. If started in 1996, SOFIA will be flying in the year 2000.

  7. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  8. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  9. Airborne GLM Simulator (FEGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Stewart, M. F.; Podgorny, S.; Corredor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Real time lightning observations have proven to be useful for advanced warning and now-casting of severe weather events. In anticipation of the launch of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard GOES-R that will provide continuous real time observations of total (both cloud and ground) lightning, the Fly's Eye GLM Simulator (FEGS) is in production. FEGS is an airborne instrument designed to provide cal/val measurements for GLM from high altitude aircraft. It consists of a 5 x 5 array of telescopes each with a narrow passband filter to isolate the 777.4 nm neutral oxygen emission triplet radiated by lightning. The telescopes will measure the optical radiance emitted by lightning that is transmitted through the cloud top with a temporal resolution of 10 μs. When integrated on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, the FEGS array with its 90° field-of-view will observe a cloud top area nearly equal to a single GLM pixel. This design will allow FEGS to determine the temporal and spatial variation of light that contributes to a GLM event detection. In addition to the primary telescope array, the instrument includes 5 supplementary optical channels that observe alternate spectral emission features and will enable the use of FEGS for interesting lightning physics applications. Here we present an up-to-date summary of the project and a description of its scientific applications.

  10. Airborne rescue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The airborne rescue system includes a boom with telescoping members for extending a line and collar to a rescue victim. The boom extends beyond the tip of the helicopter rotor so that the victim may avoid the rotor downwash. The rescue line is played out and reeled in by winch. The line is temporarily retained under the boom. When the boom is extended, the rescue line passes through clips. When the victim dons the collar and the tension in the line reaches a predetermined level, the clips open and release the line from the boom. Then the rescue line can form a straight line between the victim and the winch, and the victim can be lifted to the helicopter. A translator is utilized to push out or pull in the telescoping members. The translator comprises a tape and a rope. Inside the telescoping members the tape is curled around the rope and the tape has a tube-like configuration. The tape and rope are provided from supply spools.

  11. Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging of Seagrass and Coral Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, J.; Pan, Z.; Mewes, T.; Herwitz, S.

    2013-12-01

    This talk presents the process of project preparation, airborne data collection, data pre-processing and comparative analysis of a series of airborne hyperspectral projects focused on the mapping of seagrass and coral reef communities in the Florida Keys. As part of a series of large collaborative projects funded by the NASA ROSES program and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and administered by the NASA UAV Collaborative, a series of airborne hyperspectral datasets were collected over six sites in the Florida Keys in May 2012, October 2012 and May 2013 by Galileo Group, Inc. using a manned Cessna 172 and NASA's SIERRA Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. Precise solar and tidal data were used to calculate airborne collection parameters and develop flight plans designed to optimize data quality. Two independent Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging systems covering 400-100nm were used to collect imagery over six Areas of Interest (AOIs). Multiple collections were performed over all sites across strict solar windows in the mornings and afternoons. Independently developed pre-processing algorithms were employed to radiometrically correct, synchronize and georectify individual flight lines which were then combined into color balanced mosaics for each Area of Interest. The use of two different hyperspectral sensor as well as environmental variations between each collection allow for the comparative analysis of data quality as well as the iterative refinement of flight planning and collection parameters.

  12. ISRO's dual frequency airborne SAR pre-cursor to NISAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, V. Manavala; Suneela, T. J. V. D.; Bhan, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have jointly embarked on NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) operating in L-band and S-band, which will map Earth's surface every 12 days. As a pre-cursor to the NISAR mission, ISRO is planning an airborne SAR (L&S band) which will deliver NISAR analogue data products to the science community. ISRO will develop all the hardware with the aim of adhering to system design aspects of NISAR to the maximum extent possible. It is a fully polarimetric stripmap SAR and can be operated in single, dual, compact, quasi-quad and full polarimetry modes. It has wide incidence angle coverage from 24°-77° with swath coverage from 5.5km to 15 km. Apart from simultaneous imaging operations, this system can also operate in standalone L/S SAR modes. This system is planned to operate from an aircraft platform with nominal altitude of 8000meters. Antenna for this SAR will be rigidly mounted to the aircraft, whereas, motion compensation will be implemented in the software processor to generate data products. Data products for this airborne SAR will be generated in slant & ground range azimuth dimension and geocoded in HDF5/Geotiff formats. This airborne SAR will help to prepare the Indian scientific community for optimum utilization of NISAR data. In-order to collect useful science data, airborne campaigns are planned from end of 2016 onwards.

  13. Comparison between laboratory and airborne BRDF measurements for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Butler, James J.; King, Michael D.

    2006-08-01

    Samples from soil and leaf litter were obtained at a site located in the savanna biome of South Africa (Skukuza; 25.0°S, 31.5°E) and their bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDF) were measured using the out-of-plane scatterometer located in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Diffuser Calibration Facility (DCaF). BRDF was measured using P and S incident polarized light over a range of incident and scatter angles. A monochromator-based broadband light source was used in the ultraviolet (uv) and visible (vis) spectral ranges. The diffuse scattered light was collected using an uv-enhanced silicon photodiode detector with output fed to a computer-controlled lock-in amplifier. Typical measurement uncertainties of the reported laboratory BRDF measurements are found to be less than 1% (k=1). These laboratory results were compared with airborne measurements of BRDF from NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) instrument over the same general site where the samples were obtained. This study presents preliminary results of the comparison between these laboratory and airborne BRDF measurements and identifies areas for future laboratory and airborne BRDF measurements. This paper presents initial results in a study to try to understand BRDF measurements from laboratory, airborne, and satellite measurements in an attempt to improve the consistency of remote sensing models.

  14. An Algorithm to Atmospherically Correct Visible and Thermal Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug L.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Schiller, Stephen; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The program Watts implements a system of physically based models developed by the authors, described elsewhere, for the removal of atmospheric effects in multispectral imagery. The band range we treat covers the visible, near IR and the thermal IR. Input to the program begins with atmospheric pal red models specifying transmittance and path radiance. The system also requires the sensor's spectral response curves and knowledge of the scanner's geometric definition. Radiometric characterization of the sensor during data acquisition is also necessary. While the authors contend that active calibration is critical for serious analytical efforts, we recognize that most remote sensing systems, either airborne or space borne, do not as yet attain that minimal level of sophistication. Therefore, Watts will also use semi-active calibration where necessary and available. All of the input is then reduced to common terms, in terms of the physical units. From this it Is then practical to convert raw sensor readings into geophysically meaningful units. There are a large number of intricate details necessary to bring an algorithm or this type to fruition and to even use the program. Further, at this stage of development the authors are uncertain as to the optimal presentation or minimal analytical techniques which users of this type of software must have. Therefore, Watts permits users to break out and analyze the input in various ways. Implemented in REXX under OS/2 the program is designed with attention to the probability that it will be ported to other systems and other languages. Further, as it is in REXX, it is relatively simple for anyone that is literate in any computer language to open the code and modify to meet their needs. The authors have employed Watts in their research addressing precision agriculture and urban heat island.

  15. Development of a portable precision landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. J.; Clary, G. R.; Macdonald, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    A portable, tactical approach guidance (PTAG) system, based on a novel, X-band, precision approach concept, was developed and flight tested as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program. The system is based on state-of-the-art X-band technology and digital processing techniques. The PTAG airborne hardware consists of an X-band receiver and a small microprocessor installed in conjunction with the aircraft instrument landing system (ILS) receiver. The microprocessor analyzes the X-band, PTAG pulses and outputs ILS compatible localizer and glide slope signals. The ground stations are inexpensive, portable units, each weighing less than 85 lb, including battery, that can be quickly deployed at a landing site. Results from the flight test program show that PTAG has a significant potential for providing tactical aircraft with low cost, portable, precision instrument approach capability.

  16. Airborne Laser Polar Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Gerald W.

    1973-01-01

    A polar nephelometer has been developed at NCAR to measure the angular variation of the intensity of light scattered by air molecules and particles. The system has been designed for airborne measurements using outside air ducted through a 5-cm diameter airflow tube; the sample volume is that which is common to the intersection of a collimated source beam and the detector field of view within the airflow tube. The source is a linearly polarized helium-neon laser beam. The optical system defines a collimated field-of-view (0.5deg half-angle) through a series of diaphragms located behind a I72-mm focal length objective lens. A photomultiplier tube is located immediately behind an aperture in the focal plane of the objective lens. The laser beam is mechanically chopped (on-off) at a rate of 5 Hz; a two-channel pulse counter, synchronized to the laser output, measures the photomultiplier pulse rate with the light beam both on and off. The difference in these measured pulse rates is directly proportional to the intensity of the scattered light from the volume common to the intersection of the laser beam and the detector field-of-view. Measurements can be made at scattering angles from 15deg to 165deg with reference to the direction of propagation of the light beam. Intermediate angles are obtained by selecting the angular increments desired between these extreme angles (any multiple of 0.1deg can be selected for the angular increment; 5deg is used in normal operation). Pulses provided by digital circuits control a stepping motor which sequentially rotates the detector by pre-selected angular increments. The synchronous photon-counting system automatically begins measurement of the scattered-light intensity immediately after the rotation to a new angle has been completed. The instrument has been flown on the NASA Convair 990 airborne laboratory to obtain data on the complex index of refraction of atmospheric aerosols. A particle impaction device is operated simultaneously

  17. Precise Countersinking Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Eric S.; Smith, William N.

    1992-01-01

    Tool countersinks holes precisely with only portable drill; does not require costly machine tool. Replaceable pilot stub aligns axis of tool with centerline of hole. Ensures precise cut even with imprecise drill. Designed for relatively low cutting speeds.

  18. A Multi-Use Airborne Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Much of our progress in understanding the Earth system comes from measurements made in the atmosphere. Aircraft are widely used to collect in situ measurements of the troposphere and lower stratosphere, and they also serve as platforms for many remote sensing instruments. Airborne field measurement campaigns require a capable aircraft, a specially trained support team, a suite of basic instrumentation, space and power for new instruments, and data analysis and processing capabilities (e.g. Veal et al., 1977). However, these capabilities are expensive and there is a need to reduce costs while maintaining the capability to perform this type of research. To this end, NASA entered a Cooperative Agreement with the University of North Dakota (UND) to help support the operations of the UND Cessna Citation research aircraft. This Cooperative Agreement followed in form and substance a previous agreement. The Cooperative Agreement has benefited both NASA and UND. In part because of budget reductions, the NASA Airborne Science Office has elected to take advantage of outside operators of science research platforms to off-load some science requirements (Huning, 1996). UND has worked with NASA to identify those requirements that could be met more cost effectively with the UND platform. This has resulted in significant cost savings to NASA while broadening the base of researchers in the NASA science programs. At the same time, the Agreement has provided much needed support to UND to help sustain the Citation research facility. In this report, we describe the work conducted under this Cooperative Agreement.

  19. Advanced Airborne CO2 LAS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, J. T.; Braun, M. G.; McGregor, D. P.; Erxleben, W. H.; Browell, E. V.; Harrison, F. W.

    2009-12-01

    A unique airborne Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (LAS) system has been developed by ITT Space Systems, LLC to address the needs of the National Research Council Decadal Survey Tier 2 mission for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS). This instrument has undergone multiple airborne field tests in cooperation with our partners at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The instrument was built largely with off-the-shelf components and uses high reliability telecom components, including lasers, modulators and fiber amplifiers as the transmitter. Multiple wavelengths are transmitted simultaneously from a single collimator and the return signal is collected by a simple 8” telescope that is fiber coupled to a HgCdTe APD. The analog signal is sampled with a high resolution scope card housed in a National Instruments PXI chassis and the digitized signal is then passed through our custom-built software-based lock-in processing system which allows separation of the signals from the individual wavelengths. The separated signals are then used in the standard Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) relations to determine the integrated column differential optical depth. This presentation will give a detailed overview of this multi-frequency, single-beam, synchronous lock-in LAS instrument including the basic methodology of the measurement. Recent improvements in the lock-in methodology designed to eliminate the effects of multi- path fading and frequency dependence of the electronic components will also be discussed.

  20. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's DC-8 Airborne Science platform shown against a background of a dark blue sky on February 20, 1998. The aircraft is shown from the right rear, slightly above its plane, with the right wing in the foreground and the left wing and horizontal tail in the background. The former airliner is a 'dash-72' model and has a range of 5,400 miles. The craft can stay airborne for 12 hours and has an operational speed range between 300 and 500 knots. The research flights are made at between 500 and 41,000 feet. The aircraft can carry up to 30,000 lbs of research/science payload equipment installed in 15 mission-definable spaces. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  1. Calibration Matters: Advances in Strapdown Airborne Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, D.

    2015-12-01

    Using a commercial navigation-grade strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU) for airborne gravimetry can be advantageous in terms of cost, handling, and space consumption compared to the classical stable-platform spring gravimeters. Up to now, however, large sensor errors made it impossible to reach the mGal-level using such type IMUs as they are not designed or optimized for this kind of application. Apart from a proper error-modeling in the filtering process, specific calibration methods that are tailored to the application of aerogravity may help to bridge this gap and to improve their performance. Based on simulations, a quantitative analysis is presented on how much IMU sensor errors, as biases, scale factors, cross couplings, and thermal drifts distort the determination of gravity and the deflection of the vertical (DOV). Several lab and in-field calibration methods are briefly discussed, and calibration results are shown for an iMAR RQH unit. In particular, a thermal lab calibration of its QA2000 accelerometers greatly improved the long-term drift behavior. Latest results from four recent airborne gravimetry campaigns confirm the effectiveness of the calibrations applied, with cross-over accuracies reaching 1.0 mGal (0.6 mGal after cross-over adjustment) and DOV accuracies reaching 1.1 arc seconds after cross-over adjustment.

  2. Data System for HS3 Airborne Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskey, M.; Mceniry, M.; Berendes, T.; Bugbee, K.; Conover, H.; Ramachandran, R.

    2014-12-01

    Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) is a NASA airborne field campaign aimed at better understanding the physical processes that control hurricane intensity change. HS3 will help answer questions related to the roles of environmental conditions and internal storm structures to storm intensification. Due to the nature of the questions that HS3 mission is addressing, it involves a variety of in-situ, satellite observations, airborne data, meteorological analyses, and simulation data. This variety of datasets presents numerous data management challenges for HS3. The methods used for airborne data management differ greatly from the methods used for space-borne data. In particular, metadata extraction, spatial and temporal indexing, and the large number of instruments and subsequent variables are a few of the data management challenges unique to airborne missions. A robust data system is required to successfully help HS3 scientist achieve their mission goals. Furthermore, the data system also needs to provide for data management that assists in broader use of HS3 data to enable future research activities. The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) is considering all these needs and designing a data system for HS3. Experience with past airborne field campaign puts GHRC in a good position to address HS3 needs. However, the scale of this mission along with science requirements separates HS3 from previous field campaigns. The HS3 data system will include automated services for geo-location, metadata extraction, discovery, and distribution for all HS3 data. To answer the science questions, the data system will include a visual data exploration tool that is fully integrated into the data catalog. The tool will allow visually augmenting airborne data with analyses and simulations. Satellite data will provide contextual information during such data explorations. All HS3 tools will be supported by an enterprise service architecture that will allow scaling, easy integration

  3. Up-dated configuration of the planar electrostatic gradiometer GREMLIT for airborne geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, Bernard; Douch, Karim; Christophe, Bruno; Panet, Isabelle; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    The knowledge of the gravity field of the Earth has been considerably improved thanks to global positioning satellites constellations and to space gravity measurements from recent GRACE and GOCE missions. But the spatial resolution of those gravity data essentially addresses the large and medium wavelengths of the field (down to a resolution of 90km) and it is therefore essential to complete them at the shorter wavelengths in particular in the areas where spatial distribution and quality of ground data remain quite uneven like in high mountain or coastal areas. Taking advantage of technologies, formerly developed by ONERA for the GRACE and GOCE space missions, the GREMLIT airborne gravity gradiometer is more particularly developed to cover the land/sea transition zone with a uniform precision, and a spatial resolution expected higher than from classical airborne gravimetry. Built using a configuration with eight planar proof-masses at the corners of a cube, the gradiometer is mounted on a dedicated stabilized platform which is controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself to achieve a sufficient rejection ratio of the perturbations/vibrations induced by the airborne environment in the horizontal directions. The levitation of the proof-masses along the normal gravity and the vibration isolation of the platform are designed to allow the instrument to support between +2.5 g and 0 g along the vertical axis. The gradiometer differential measurements along the two horizontal axes provide the necessary information to extract the six components of the gravity gradient tensor at the location of the instrument. Well suited to sustain the proof-mass levitation in the Earth's gravity field, the planar configuration of each accelerometer also presents an intrinsic linearity of the horizontal control loops which minimizes the aliasing due to high frequency vibrations or motions generated outside the measurement bandwidth. The compactness of the gradiometer

  4. "Precision" drug development?

    PubMed

    Woodcock, J

    2016-02-01

    The concept of precision medicine has entered broad public consciousness, spurred by a string of targeted drug approvals, highlighted by the availability of personal gene sequences, and accompanied by some remarkable claims about the future of medicine. It is likely that precision medicines will require precision drug development programs. What might such programs look like? PMID:26331240

  5. Precision agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture is a new farming practice that has been developing since late 1980s. It has been variously referred to as precision farming, prescription farming, site-specific crop management, to name but a few. There are numerous definitions for precision agriculture, but the central concept...

  6. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  7. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  8. Airborne GPS kinematic positioning and its application to oceanographic mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shaowei; Rizos, Chris

    2000-10-01

    Precise, long-range, airborne GPS kinematic positioning requires the use of carrier phase measurements, the data processing of which suffers from the technical challenges of "on-the-fly" ambiguity resolution and cycle slip repair. In this paper the authors describe how the combination of an `ambiguity recovery' technique and a `linear bias correction' method has been used to support oceanographic mapping in Australian waters, together with the augmentation from the Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) system. Two experiments, carried out on the 4th December 1997 in the Torres Strait between Papua New Guinea and Australia, and on the 20 May 1998 at Lake Argyle in Australia, were analysed. The results indicate that the topography of the water surface can be obtained with sub-decimetre accuracy, with a spatial resolution of a few metres. The main errors are attributable to multipath interference of the GPS signals at the antennas from the aircraft surface.

  9. MARA (Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter) system documentation. Volume 1: MARA system requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter (MARA), a flexible airborne radar remote sensing facility developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is discussed. This volume describes the scientific justification for the development of the instrument and the translation of these scientific requirements into instrument design goals. Values for key instrument parameters are derived to accommodate these goals, and simulations and analytical models are used to estimate the developed system's performance.

  10. Prompt and Precise Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For Sanders Design International, Inc., of Wilton, New Hampshire, every passing second between the concept and realization of a product is essential to succeed in the rapid prototyping industry where amongst heavy competition, faster time-to-market means more business. To separate itself from its rivals, Sanders Design aligned with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop what it considers to be the most accurate rapid prototyping machine for fabrication of extremely precise tooling prototypes. The company's Rapid ToolMaker System has revolutionized production of high quality, small-to-medium sized prototype patterns and tooling molds with an exactness that surpasses that of computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machining devices. Created with funding and support from Marshall under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Rapid ToolMaker is a dual-use technology with applications in both commercial and military aerospace fields. The advanced technology provides cost savings in the design and manufacturing of automotive, electronic, and medical parts, as well as in other areas of consumer interest, such as jewelry and toys. For aerospace applications, the Rapid ToolMaker enables fabrication of high-quality turbine and compressor blades for jet engines on unmanned air vehicles, aircraft, and missiles.

  11. Identification of human motion signature using airborne radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael; Damini, Anthony

    2013-09-01

    Data containing the radar signature of amoving person on the groundwere collected at ranges of up to 30 kmfroma moving airborne platform using the DRDC Ottawa X-bandWideband Experimental Airborne Radar (XWEAR). The human target radar echo returns were found to possess a characteristic amplitude modulated (AM) and frequency modulated (FM) signature which could be usefully characterized in terms of conventional AM and FM modulation parameters. Human detection performance after space time adaptive processing is frequently limited by false alarms arising from incomplete cancellation of large radar cross-section discretes during the whitening step. However, the clutter discretes possess different modulation characteristics from the human targets discussed above. The ability of pattern classification techniques to use this parameter measurement space to distinguish between human targets and clutter discretes is explored and preliminary results presented.

  12. NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights Data from the 1982 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of El Chichon ... continuing to January 1984. Transcribed from the following NASA Tech Reports: McCormick, M. P., and M. T. Osborn, Airborne lidar ...

  13. Husbandry Trace Gas Emissions from a Dairy Complex By Mobile in Situ and Airborne and Spaceborne Remote Sensing: A Comex Campaign Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, I.; Tratt, D. M.; Bovensmann, H.; Buckland, K. N.; Burrows, J. P.; Frash, J.; Gerilowski, K.; Iraci, L. T.; Johnson, P. D.; Kolyer, R.; Krautwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Leen, J. B.; Hu, C.; Melton, C.; Vigil, S. A.; Yates, E. L.; Zhang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field study reviews on the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) found significant underestimation from fossil fuel industry and husbandry. The 2014 COMEX campaign seeks to develop methods to derive CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) from remote sensing data by combining hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages synergies between high spatial resolution HSI column abundance maps and moderate spectral/spatial resolution NIS. Airborne husbandry data were collected for the Chino dairy complex (East Los Angeles Basin) by NIS-MAMAP, HSI-Mako thermal-infrared (TIR); AVIRIS NG shortwave IR (SWIR), with in situ surface mobile-AMOG Surveyor (AutoMObile greenhouse Gas)-and airborne in situ from a Twin Otter and the AlphaJet. AMOG Surveyor uses in situ Integrated Cavity Off Axis Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, H2O, H2S and NH3 at 5-10 Hz, 2D winds, and thermal anomaly in an adapted commuter car. OA-ICOS provides high precision and accuracy with excellent stability. NH3 and CH4 emissions were correlated at dairy size-scales but not sub-dairy scales in surface and Mako data, showing fine-scale structure and large variations between the numerous dairies in the complex (herd ~200,000-250,000) embedded in an urban setting. Emissions hotspots were consistent between surface and airborne surveys. In June, surface and MAMAP data showed a weak overall plume, while surface and Mako data showed a stronger plume in late (hotter) July. Multiple surface plume transects using NH3 fingerprinting showed East and then NE advection out of the LA Basin consistent with airborne data. Long-term trends were investigated in satellite data. This study shows the value of synergistically combined NH3 and CH4 remote sensing data to the task of CH4 source attribution using airborne and space-based remote sensing (IASI for NH3) and top of atmosphere sensitivity calculations for Sentinel V and Carbon Sat (CH4).

  14. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2016-06-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new instrument has been flown in spring of 2014 for a total of ten flights with 27 flight hours. This IPDA lidar provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the results.

  15. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2015-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new 2-miron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of 2014 for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  16. Hybrid optical radio frequency airborne communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagley, Zachary C.; Hughes, David H.; Juarez, Juan C.; Kolodzy, Paul; Martin, Todd; Northcott, Malcolm; Pike, H. Alan; Plasson, Ned D.; Stadler, Brian; Stotts, Larry B.; Young, David W.

    2012-05-01

    Optical RF Communications Adjunct Program flight test results provide validation of the theoretical models and hybrid optical radio frequency (RF) airborne system concepts developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory. Theoretical models of the free-space optical communications (FSOC), RF, and network components accurately predict the flight test results under a wide range of day and night operating conditions. The FSOC system, including the adaptive optics and optical modem, can operate under high turbulence conditions. The RF and network mechanisms of Layer 2 retransmission and failover provide increased reliability, reducing end-to-end packet error rates. Overall the test results show that stable, long-range FSOC is possible and practical for near-term operations.

  17. Possibility of growth of airborne microbes in outer planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmick, R. L.; Chatigny, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The state of the art of laboratory aerobiological research is briefly reviewed. Experiments are described in which the biological behavior of microbes in or on aerosol particles is investigated in a stirred settling chamber and a rotating drum. Experimental findings are summarized which indicate that airborne bacteria can maintain metabolic functions in a suitable atmosphere. These studies have been undertaken in consideration of the possibility that Jupiter's atmosphere might be contaminated if a space probe enters a biological stratum.

  18. Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) on left rear fuselage of DC-8 Airborne Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A view of the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) antenna on the left rear fuselage of the DC-8. The AIRSAR captures images of the ground from the side of the aircraft and can provide precision digital elevation mapping capabilities for a variety of studies. The AIRSAR is one of a number of research systems that have been added to the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  19. Precision performance lamp technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Dean A.; Kiesa, James E.; Dean, Raymond A.

    1997-09-01

    A principal function of a lamp is to produce light output with designated spectra, intensity, and/or geometric radiation patterns. The function of a precision performance lamp is to go beyond these parameters and into the precision repeatability of performance. All lamps are not equal. There are a variety of incandescent lamps, from the vacuum incandescent indictor lamp to the precision lamp of a blood analyzer. In the past the definition of a precision lamp was described in terms of wattage, light center length (LCL), filament position, and/or spot alignment. This paper presents a new view of precision lamps through the discussion of a new segment of lamp design, which we term precision performance lamps. The definition of precision performance lamps will include (must include) the factors of a precision lamp. But what makes a precision lamp a precision performance lamp is the manner in which the design factors of amperage, mscp (mean spherical candlepower), efficacy (lumens/watt), life, not considered individually but rather considered collectively. There is a statistical bias in a precision performance lamp for each of these factors; taken individually and as a whole. When properly considered the results can be dramatic to the system design engineer, system production manage and the system end-user. It can be shown that for the lamp user, the use of precision performance lamps can translate to: (1) ease of system design, (2) simplification of electronics, (3) superior signal to noise ratios, (4) higher manufacturing yields, (5) lower system costs, (6) better product performance. The factors mentioned above are described along with their interdependent relationships. It is statistically shown how the benefits listed above are achievable. Examples are provided to illustrate how proper attention to precision performance lamp characteristics actually aid in system product design and manufacturing to build and market more, market acceptable product products in the

  20. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  1. Airborne fungi--a resurvey

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.H.; Prince, H.E.; Raymer, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    A 15-month survey of airborne fungi at 14 geographical stations was conducted to determine the incidence of different fungal genera. Five of these stations were surveyed 25 years earlier. A comparison between previous studies and present surveys revealed similar organisms at each station with slight shifts in frequency of dominant genera.

  2. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  3. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  4. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  5. Airborne Remote Sensing of River Flow and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, S.; Anderson, S. P.; McLean, J.; Redford, R.

    2014-12-01

    River morphology, surface slope and flow are some of the fundamental measurements required for surface water monitoring and hydrodynamic research. This paper describes a method of combining bathymetric lidar with space-time processing of mid-wave infrared (MWIR) imagery to simultaneously measure bathymetry, currents and surface slope from an airborne platform. In May 2014, Areté installed a Pushbroom Imaging Lidar for Littoral Surveillance (PILLS) and a FLIR SC8000 MWIR imaging system sampling at 2 Hz in a small twin-engine aircraft. Data was collected over the lower Colorado River between Picacho Park and Parker. PILLS is a compact bathymetric lidar based on streak-tube sensor technology. It provides channel and bank topography and water surface elevation at 1 meter horizontal scales and 25 cm vertical accuracy. Surface currents are derived from the MWIR imagery by tracking surface features using a cross correlation algorithm. This approach enables the retrieval of currents along extended reaches at the forward speed of the aircraft with spatial resolutions down to 5 m with accuracy better than 10 cm/s. The fused airborne data captures current and depth variability on scales of meters over 10's of kilometers collected in just a few minutes. The airborne MWIR current retrievals are combined with the bathymetric lidar data to calculate river discharge which is then compared with real-time streamflow stations. The results highlight the potential for improving our understanding of complex river environments with simultaneous collections from multiple airborne sensors.

  6. Advanced irrigation engineering: Precision and Precise

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation advances in precision irrigation (PI) or site-specific irrigation (SSI) have been considerable in research; however commercialization lags. A primary necessity for it is variability in soil texture that affects soil water holding capacity and crop yield. Basically, SSI/PI uses variable ra...

  7. Advanced irrigation engineering: Precision and Precise

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation advances in precision irrigation (PI) or site specific irrigation (SSI) have been considerable in research; however commercialization lags. A primary necessity for PI/SSI is variability in soil texture that affects soil water holding capacity and crop yield. Basically, SSI/PI uses variabl...

  8. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Column CO2 Concentration to Cloud Tops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Globally distributed atmospheric CO2 measurements with high precision, low bias and full seasonal sampling are crucial to advance carbon cycle sciences. However, two thirds of the Earth's surface is typically covered by clouds, and passive remote sensing approaches from space, e.g., OCO-2 and GOSAT, are limited to cloud-free scenes. They are unable to provide useful retrievals in cloudy areas where the photon path-length can't be well characterized. Thus, passive approaches have limited global coverage and poor sampling in cloudy regions, even though some cloudy regions have active carbon surface fluxes. NASA Goddard is developing a pulsed integrated-path, differential absorption (IPDA) lidar approach to measure atmospheric column CO2 concentrations from space as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Measurements of time-resolved laser backscatter profiles from the atmosphere also allow this technique to estimate column CO2 and range to cloud tops in addition to those to the ground with precise knowledge of the photon path-length. This allows retrievals of column CO2 concentrations to cloud tops, providing much higher spatial coverage and some information about vertical structure of CO2. This is expected to benefit atmospheric transport process studies, carbon data assimilation in models, and global and regional carbon flux estimation. We show some preliminary results of the all-sky retrieval capability using airborne lidar measurements from the 2011, 2013 and 2014 ASCENDS airborne campaigns on the NASA DC-8. These show retrievals of atmospheric CO2 over low-level marine stratus clouds, cumulus clouds at the top of planetary boundary layer, some mid-level clouds and visually thin high-level cirrus clouds. The CO2 retrievals from the lidar are validated against in-situ measurements and compared to Goddard PCTM model simulations. Lidar cloud slicing to derive CO2 abundance in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere also has been demonstrated. The

  9. Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackler, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    ITT Space Systems Division s new Precision Cleaning facility provides critical cleaning and packaging of aerospace flight hardware and optical payloads to meet customer performance requirements. The Precision Cleaning Path to Premier Project was a 2007 capital project and is a key element in the approved Premier Resource Management - Integrated Supply Chain Footprint Optimization Project. Formerly precision cleaning was located offsite in a leased building. A new facility equipped with modern precision cleaning equipment including advanced process analytical technology and improved capabilities was designed and built after outsourcing solutions were investigated and found lacking in ability to meet quality specifications and schedule needs. SSD cleans parts that can range in size from a single threaded fastener all the way up to large composite structures. Materials that can be processed include optics, composites, metals and various high performance coatings. We are required to provide verification to our customers that we have met their particulate and molecular cleanliness requirements and we have that analytical capability in this new facility. The new facility footprint is approximately half the size of the former leased operation and provides double the amount of throughput. Process improvements and new cleaning equipment are projected to increase 1st pass yield from 78% to 98% avoiding $300K+/yr in rework costs. Cost avoidance of $350K/yr will result from elimination of rent, IT services, transportation, and decreased utility costs. Savings due to reduced staff expected to net $4-500K/yr.

  10. AIRBORNE RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Cartmell, T.R.; Gifford, J.F.

    1959-08-01

    An ionization chamber used for measuring the radioactivity of dust present in atmospheric air is described. More particularly. the patent describes a device comprising two concentric open ended, electrically connected cylinders between which is disposed a wire electrcde. A heating source is disposed inside of the cylinder to circulate air through the space between the two cylinders by convective flow. A high voltage electric field between the wire electrcde of the electrically connected cylinder will cause ionization of the air as it passes therethrough.

  11. Airborne cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Santesson, S; Andersson, M; Degerman, E; Johansson, T; Nilsson, J; Nilsson, S

    2000-08-01

    A miniaturized analysis system for the study of living cells and biochemical reactions in microdroplets was developed. The technique utilizes an in-house-developed piezoelectric flow-through droplet dispenser for precise reagent supply and an ultrasonic levitator for contactless sample handling. A few-cell study was performed with living primary adipocytes. Droplets (500 nL) containing 3-15 individual cells were acoustically levitated. The addition of beta-adrenergic agonists into the levitated droplet using the droplet dispenser stimulated adipocyte lipolysis, leading to free fatty acid release and a consequent pH decrease of the surrounding buffer. The addition of insulin antagonized lipolysis and hence also the decrease in pH. The changes in pH, i.e., the cell response in the droplet, were followed using a pH-dependent fluorophore continuously monitored by fluorescence imaging detection. An image analysis computer program was employed to calculate the droplet intensities. To counteract droplet evaporation, found to affect the fluorescence intensities, a separate dispenser was used to continually add water, thus keeping the droplet volume constant. PMID:10952520

  12. Combined Global Navigation Satellite Systems in the Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Force, Dale A.; Miller, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Besides providing position, navigation, and timing (PNT) services to traditional terrestrial and airborne users, GPS is also being increasingly used as a tool to enable precision orbit determination, precise time synchronization, real-time spacecraft navigation, and three-axis attitude control of Earth orbiting satellites. With additional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) constellations being replenished and coming into service (GLONASS, Beidou, and Galileo), it will become possible to benefit from greater signal availability and robustness by using evolving multi-constellation receivers. The paper, "GPS in the Space Service Volume," presented at the ION GNSS 19th International Technical Meeting in 2006 (Ref. 1), defined the Space Service Volume, and analyzed the performance of GPS out to seventy thousand kilometers. This paper will report a similar analysis of the signal coverage of GPS in the space domain; however, the analyses will also consider signal coverage from each of the additional GNSS constellations noted earlier to specifically demonstrate the expected benefits to be derived from using GPS in conjunction with other foreign systems. The Space Service Volume is formally defined as the volume of space between three thousand kilometers altitude and geosynchronous altitude circa 36,000 km, as compared with the Terrestrial Service Volume between 3,000 km and the surface of the Earth. In the Terrestrial Service Volume, GNSS performance is the same as on or near the Earth's surface due to satellite vehicle availability and geometry similarities. The core GPS system has thereby established signal requirements for the Space Service Volume as part of technical Capability Development Documentation (CDD) that specifies system performance. Besides the technical discussion, we also present diplomatic efforts to extend the GPS Space Service Volume concept to other PNT service providers in an effort to assure that all space users will benefit from the enhanced

  13. Satellite and airborne IR sensor validation by an airborne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gumley, L.E.; Delst, P.F. van; Moeller, C.C.

    1996-11-01

    The validation of in-orbit longwave IR radiances from the GOES-8 Sounder and inflight longwave IR radiances from the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) is described. The reference used is the airborne University of Wisconsin High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS). The calibration of each sensor is described. Data collected during the Ocean Temperature Interferometric Survey (OTIS) experiment in January 1995 is used in the comparison between sensors. Detailed forward calculations of at-sensor radiance are used to account for the difference in GOES-8 and HIS altitude and viewing geometry. MAS radiances and spectrally averaged HIS radiances are compared directly. Differences between GOES-8 and HIS brightness temperatures, and GOES-8 and MAS brightness temperatures, are found to be with 1.0 K for the majority of longwave channels examined. The same validation approach will be used for future sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). 11 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Improving the precision matrix for precision cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Dante J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.

    2015-12-01

    The estimation of cosmological constraints from observations of the large-scale structure of the Universe, such as the power spectrum or the correlation function, requires the knowledge of the inverse of the associated covariance matrix, namely the precision matrix, Ψ . In most analyses, Ψ is estimated from a limited set of mock catalogues. Depending on how many mocks are used, this estimation has an associated error which must be propagated into the final cosmological constraints. For future surveys such as Euclid and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, the control of this additional uncertainty requires a prohibitively large number of mock catalogues. In this work, we test a novel technique for the estimation of the precision matrix, the covariance tapering method, in the context of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Even though this technique was originally devised as a way to speed up maximum likelihood estimations, our results show that it also reduces the impact of noisy precision matrix estimates on the derived confidence intervals, without introducing biases on the target parameters. The application of this technique can help future surveys to reach their true constraining power using a significantly smaller number of mock catalogues.

  15. Precision Optics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert L.; And Others

    This guide outlines the competency-based, two-year precision optics curriculum that the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association has proposed to fill the void that it suggests will soon exist as many of the master opticians currently employed retire. The model, which closely resembles the old European apprenticeship model, calls for 300…

  16. Terrestrial Method for Airborne Lidar Quality Control and Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsubaie, N. M.; Badawy, H. M.; Elhabiby, M. M.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2014-11-01

    Most of LiDAR systems do not provide the end user with the calibration and acquisition procedures that can use to validate the quality of the data acquired by the airborne system. Therefore, this system needs data Quality Control (QC) and assessment procedures to verify the accuracy of the laser footprints and mainly at building edges. This research paper introduces an efficient method for validating the quality of the airborne LiDAR point clouds data using terrestrial laser scanning data integrated with edge detection techniques. This method will be based on detecting the edge of buildings from these two independent systems. Hence, the building edges are extracted from the airborne data using an algorithm that is based on the standard deviation of neighbour point's height from certain threshold with respect to centre points using radius threshold. The algorithm is adaptive to different point densities. The approach is combined with another innovative edge detection technique from terrestrial laser scanning point clouds that is based on the height and point density constraints. Finally, statistical analysis and assessment will be applied to compare these two systems in term of edge detection extraction precision, which will be a priori step for 3D city modelling generated from heterogeneous LiDAR systems

  17. Dual channel airborne hygrometer for climate research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatrai, David; Gulyas, Gabor; Bozoki, Zoltan; Szabo, Gabor

    2015-04-01

    Airborne hygrometry has an increasing role in climate research and nowadays the determination of cloud content especially of cirrus clouds is gaining high interest. The greatest challenges for such measurements are being used from ground level up to the lower stratosphere with appropriate precision and accuracy the low concentration and varying environment pressure. Such purpose instrument was probably presented first by our research group [1-2]. The development of the system called WaSUL-Hygro and some measurement results will be introduced. The measurement system is based on photoacoustic spectroscopy and contains two measuring cells, one is used to measure water vapor concentration which is typically sampled by a sideward or backward inlet, while the second one measures total water content (water vapor plus ice crystals) after evaporation in a forward facing sampler. The two measuring cells are simultaneously illuminated through with one distributed feedback diode laser (1371 or 1392 nm). Two early versions have been used within the CARIBIC project. During the recent years, efforts were made to turn the system into a more reliable and robust one [3]. The first important development was the improvement of the wavelength stabilization method of the applied laser. As a result the uncertainty of the wavelength is less than 40fm, which corresponds to less than 0.05% of PA signal uncertainty. This PA signal uncertainty is lower than the noise level of the system itself. The other main development was the improvement of the concentration determination algorithm. For this purpose several calibration and data evaluation methods were developed, the combination of the latest ones have made the system traceable to the humidity generator applied during the calibration within 1.5% relative deviation or within noise level, whichever is greater. The improved system was several times blind tested at the Environmental Simulation Facility (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany) in

  18. Mapping Slumgullion Landslide in Colorado, USA Using Airborne Repeat-Pass InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Wang, G.; Lu, Z.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.; Cao, N.; Zaugg, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) uses two or more SAR images over the same area to determine landscape topography or ground deformation. An interferogram, generated by the phase components of two coherent SAR images, depicts range changes between the radar and the ground resolution elements, and can be used to derive both landscape topography and subtle changes in surface elevation. However, spaceborne repeat-pass interferometry has two main drawbacks: effects due to differences in atmospheric temperature, pressure, and water vapour at two observation times, and loss of coherence due to long spatial and temporal baselines between observations. Airborne repeat-pass interferometry does not suffer from these drawbacks. The atmospheric effect in case of airborne DInSAR becomes negligible due to smaller swath coverage, and the coherence can be maintained by using smaller spatial and temporal baselines. However, the main technical limitation concerning airborne DInSAR is the need of precise motion compensation with an accurate navigation system to correct for the significant phase errors due to typical flight instability from air turbulence. Here, we present results from a pilot study conducted on July 2015 using both X-band and L-band SlimSAR airborne system over the Slumgullion landslide in Colorado in order to (1) acquire the differential interferograms from the airborne platform, (2) understand their source of errors, and (3) pave a way to improve the precision of the derived surface deformation. The landslide movement estimated from airborne DInSAR is also compared with coincident GPS, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), airborne LiDAR, and spaceborne DInSAR measurements using COSMO-SkyMed images. The airborne DInSAR system has a potential to provide time-transient variability in land surface topography with high-precision and high-resolution, and provide researchers with greater flexibility in selecting the temporal and spatial baselines of the data

  19. Axion Bounds from Precision Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, G. G.; Hamann, J.; Hannestad, S.; Mirizzi, A.; Wong, Y. Y. Y.

    2010-08-30

    Depending on their mass, axions produced in the early universe can leave different imprints in cosmic structures. If axions have masses in the eV-range, they contribute a hot dark matter fraction, allowing one to constrain m{sub a} in analogy to neutrinos. In the more favored scenario where axions play the role of cold dark matter and if reheating after inflation does not restore the Peccei-Quinn symmetry, the axion field provides isocurvature fluctuations that are severely constrained by precision cosmology. There remains a small sliver in parameter space where isocurvature fluctuations could still show up in future probes.

  20. Constraining supersymmetry with precision data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Damien M.; Erler, Jens

    1997-06-15

    We discuss the results of a global fit to precision data in supersymmetric models. We consider both gravity- and gauge-mediated models. As the superpartner spectrum becomes light, the global fit to the data typically results in larger values of {chi}{sup 2}. We indicate the regions of parameter space which are excluded by the data. We discuss the additional effect of the B(B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma}) measurement. Our analysis excludes chargino masses below M{sub Z} in the simplest gauge-mediated model with {mu}>0, with stronger constraints for larger values of tan {beta}.

  1. SOFIA'S Challenge: Scheduling Airborne Astronomy Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    generate flights enables humans to assess and analyze complex tradeoffs between fuel consumption, estimated science quality and the percentage of scheduled observations. Due to the changing nature of SOFIA scheduling problems, this functionality will play a crucial role in optimizing science and minimizing costs during operations. In the full paper, we will summarize the technical challenges that have been met in order to build this system. These include: design of the search algorithm, design of appropriate heuristics and approximations, and reduction in the size of the search space. We will also describe technical challenges that are currently being addressed, including the extension of the existing approach to handle new solution criteria. Finally, we will describe a variety of cultural challenges that the astronomical community must address in order to successfully use SOFIA, and describe how the AFT can be used to address some of these challenges. Specifically, many of the intended science users are accustomed to using ground-based or space-based observatories; we will identify some differences that arise due to the nature of airborne observatories, and how the AFT can be extended to provide useful services to ease these cultural differences.

  2. Procedure for rapid determination of nickel, cobalt, and chromium in airborne particulate samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. F.; Graab, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A rapid, selective procedure for the determination of 1 to 20 micrograms of nickel, chromium, and cobalt in airborne particulates is described. The method utilizes the combined techniques of low temperature ashing and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The airborne particulates are collected on analytical filter paper. The filter papers are ashed, and the residues are dissolved in hydrochloric acid. Nickel, chromium, and cobalt are determined directly with good precision and accuracy by means of atomic absorption. The effects of flame type, burner height, slit width, and lamp current on the atomic absorption measurements are reported.

  3. Measurement of Raman spectra of single airborne absorbing particles trapped by a single laser beam.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lin; Li, Yong-qing

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate a method for optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of micron-sized, airborne absorbing particles using a single focused laser beam. A single Gaussian beam at 532 nm is used to trap and precisely manipulate absorbing airborne particles. The fluctuation of the position of the trapped particles is substantially reduced by controlling the power of the laser beam with a position-sensitive detector and a locking circuit. Raman spectra of the position-stabilized particles or clusters are then measured with an objective and CCD spectrograph. PMID:23455087

  4. Large aperture scanning airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Bindschadler, R.; Boers, R.; Bufton, J. L.; Clem, D.; Garvin, J.; Melfi, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    A large aperture scanning airborne lidar facility is being developed to provide important new capabilities for airborne lidar sensor systems. The proposed scanning mechanism allows for a large aperture telescope (25 in. diameter) in front of an elliptical flat (25 x 36 in.) turning mirror positioned at a 45 degree angle with respect to the telescope optical axis. The lidar scanning capability will provide opportunities for acquiring new data sets for atmospheric, earth resources, and oceans communities. This completed facility will also make available the opportunity to acquire simulated EOS lidar data on a near global basis. The design and construction of this unique scanning mechanism presents exciting technological challenges of maintaining the turning mirror optical flatness during scanning while exposed to extreme temperatures, ambient pressures, aircraft vibrations, etc.

  5. Magnetic airborne survey - geophysical flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros Camara, Erick; Nei Pereira Guimarães, Suze

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a technical review process in the area of airborne acquisition of geophysical data, with emphasis for magnetometry. In summary, it addresses the calibration processes of geophysical equipment as well as the aircraft to minimize possible errors in measurements. The corrections used in data processing and filtering are demonstrated with the same results as well as the evolution of these techniques in Brazil and worldwide.

  6. Airborne microorganisms from waste containers.

    PubMed

    Jedlicka, Sabrina S; Stravitz, David M; Lyman, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    In physician's offices and biomedical labs, biological waste is handled every day. This waste is disposed of in waste containers designed for holding red autoclave bags. The containers used in these environments are closed hands-free containers, often with a step pedal. While these containers protect the user from surface-borne microorganisms, the containers may allow airborne microorganisms to escape via the open/close mechanism because of the air current produced upon open/close cycles. In this study, the air current was shown to be sufficient to allow airborne escape of microorganisms held in the container, including Aspergillus niger. However, bacterial cultures, such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis did not escape. This may be due to the choice of bacterial cultures and the absence of solid waste, such as dust or other particulate matter in the waste containers, that such strains of bacteria could travel on during aerosolization. We compared these results to those obtained using a re-designed receptacle, which mimimizes air currents, and detected no escaping microorganisms. This study highlights one potential source of airborne contamination in labs, hospitals, and other environments that dispose of biological waste. PMID:23047084

  7. Airborne lidar global positioning investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) network of satellites shows high promise of revolutionizing methods for conducting surveying, navigation, and positioning. This is especially true in the case of airborne or satellite positioning. A single GPS receiver (suitably adapted for aircraft deployment) can yield positioning accuracies (world-wide) in the order of 30 to 50 m vertically, as well as horizontally. This accuracy is dramatically improved when a second GPS receiver is positioned at a known horizontal and vertical reference. Absolute horizontal and vertical positioning of 1 to 2 m are easily achieved over areas of separation of tens of km. If four common satellites remain in lock in both receivers, then differential phase pseudo-ranges on the GPS L-band carrier can be utilized to achieve accuracies of + or - 10 cm and perhaps as good as + or - 2 cm. The initial proof of concept investigation for airborne positioning using the phase difference between the airborne and stationary GPS receivers was conducted and is examined.

  8. NASA Student Airborne Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, E. L.; Shetter, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) is a unique summer internship program for advanced undergraduates and early graduate students majoring in the STEM disciplines. SARP participants acquire hands-on research experience in all aspects of an airborne research campaign, including flying onboard an major NASA resource used for studying Earth system processes. In summer 2012, thirty-two participants worked in four interdisciplinary teams to study surface, atmospheric, and oceanographic processes. Participants assisted in the operation of instruments onboard the NASA P-3B aircraft where they sampled and measured atmospheric gases and imaged land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Along with airborne data collection, students participated in taking measurements at field sites. Mission faculty and research mentors helped to guide participants through instrument operation, sample analysis, and data reduction. Over the eight-week program, each student developed an individual research project from the data collected and delivered a conference-style final presentation on his/her results. We will discuss the results and effectiveness of the program from the first four summers and discuss plans for the future.

  9. ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements

    DOE Data Explorer

    Biraud, Sebastien

    2013-03-26

    The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

  10. Detecting inertial effects with airborne matter-wave interferometry.

    PubMed

    Geiger, R; Ménoret, V; Stern, G; Zahzam, N; Cheinet, P; Battelier, B; Villing, A; Moron, F; Lours, M; Bidel, Y; Bresson, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2011-01-01

    Inertial sensors relying on atom interferometry offer a breakthrough advance in a variety of applications, such as inertial navigation, gravimetry or ground- and space-based tests of fundamental physics. These instruments require a quiet environment to reach their performance and using them outside the laboratory remains a challenge. Here we report the first operation of an airborne matter-wave accelerometer set up aboard a 0g plane and operating during the standard gravity (1g) and microgravity (0g) phases of the flight. At 1g, the sensor can detect inertial effects more than 300 times weaker than the typical acceleration fluctuations of the aircraft. We describe the improvement of the interferometer sensitivity in 0g, which reaches 2 x 10-4 ms-2 / √Hz with our current setup. We finally discuss the extension of our method to airborne and spaceborne tests of the Universality of free fall with matter waves. PMID:21934658

  11. Detecting inertial effects with airborne matter-wave interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, R.; Ménoret, V.; Stern, G.; Zahzam, N.; Cheinet, P.; Battelier, B.; Villing, A.; Moron, F.; Lours, M.; Bidel, Y.; Bresson, A.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2011-01-01

    Inertial sensors relying on atom interferometry offer a breakthrough advance in a variety of applications, such as inertial navigation, gravimetry or ground- and space-based tests of fundamental physics. These instruments require a quiet environment to reach their performance and using them outside the laboratory remains a challenge. Here we report the first operation of an airborne matter-wave accelerometer set up aboard a 0g plane and operating during the standard gravity (1g) and microgravity (0g) phases of the flight. At 1g, the sensor can detect inertial effects more than 300 times weaker than the typical acceleration fluctuations of the aircraft. We describe the improvement of the interferometer sensitivity in 0g, which reaches 2 x 10-4 ms-2 / √Hz with our current setup. We finally discuss the extension of our method to airborne and spaceborne tests of the Universality of free fall with matter waves. PMID:21934658

  12. An airborne system for detection of volcanic surface deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is proposed for measuring volcanic deformation on the order of centimeters per day to centimeters per year. An airborne multifrequency pulsed radar, tracking passive ground reflectors spaced at 1 kilometer intervals over a 50 square kilometer area is employed. Identification of targets is accomplished by Doppler and range resolution techniques, with final relative position measurements accomplished by phase comparison of multifrequency signals. Atmospheric path length errors are corrected by an airborne refractometer, meteorological instruments, or other refractive index measuring devices. Anticipated system accuracy is 1-2 cm, with measuring times on the order of minutes. Potential problems exist in the high intrinsic data assimilation rate required of the system to overcome ground backscatter noise.

  13. Geoscience Applications of Airborne and Spaceborne Lidar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding David J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in lidar altimetry technology have enabled new methods to describe the vertical structure of the Earth's surface with great accuracy. Application of these methods in several geoscience disciplines will be described. Airborne characterization of vegetation canopy structure will be illustrated, including a validation of lidar-derived Canopy Height Profiles for closed-canopy, broadleaf forests. Airborne detection of tectonic landforms beneath dense canopy will also be illustrated, with an application mapping active fault traces in the Puget Lowland of Washington state for earthquake hazard assessment purposes. Application of data from the first and second flights of the Shuttle Laser Altimeter will also be discussed in an assessment of global digital elevation model accuracy and error characteristics. Two upcoming space flight missions will be described, the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) and the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Mission (ICESat), which will provide comprehensive lidar altimeter observations of the Earth's topography and vegetation cover.

  14. Survival rate of airborne Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Gannon, B W; Hayes, C M; Roe, J M

    2007-04-01

    Despite years of study the principle transmission route of bovine tuberculosis to cattle remains unresolved. The distribution of pathological lesions, which are concentrated in the respiratory system, and the very low dose of Mycobacterium bovis needed to initiate infection from a respiratory tract challenge suggest that the disease is spread by airborne transmission. Critical to the airborne transmission of a pathogenic microorganism is its ability to survive the stresses incurred whilst airborne. This study demonstrates that M. bovis is resistant to the stresses imposed immediately after becoming airborne, 94% surviving the first 10 min after aerosolisation. Once airborne the organism is robust, its viability decreasing with a half-life of approximately 1.5 hours. These findings support the hypothesis that airborne transmission is the principle route of infection for bovine tuberculosis. PMID:17045316

  15. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  16. Precision digital control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskub, V. G.; Rozov, B. S.; Savelev, V. I.

    This book is concerned with the characteristics of digital control systems of great accuracy. A classification of such systems is considered along with aspects of stabilization, programmable control applications, digital tracking systems and servomechanisms, and precision systems for the control of a scanning laser beam. Other topics explored are related to systems of proportional control, linear devices and methods for increasing precision, approaches for further decreasing the response time in the case of high-speed operation, possibilities for the implementation of a logical control law, and methods for the study of precision digital control systems. A description is presented of precision automatic control systems which make use of electronic computers, taking into account the existing possibilities for an employment of computers in automatic control systems, approaches and studies required for including a computer in such control systems, and an analysis of the structure of automatic control systems with computers. Attention is also given to functional blocks in the considered systems.

  17. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  18. Real-time atmospheric absorption spectra for in-flight tuning of an airborne dial system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dombrowski, M.; Walden, H.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Milrod, J.; Korb, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    Real-time measurements of atmospheric absorption spectra are displayed and used to precisely calibrate and fix the frequency of an Alexandrite laser to specific oxygen absorption features for airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric pressure and temperature. The DIAL system used contains two narrowband tunable Alexandrite lasers: one is electronically scanned to tune to oxygen absorption features for on-line signals while the second is used to obtain off-line (nonabsorbed) atmospheric return signals. The lidar operator may select the number of shots to be averaged, the altitude, and altitude interval over which the signals are averaged using single key stroke commands. The operator also determines exactly which oxygen absorption lines are scanned by comparing the line spacings and relative strengths with known line parameters, thus calibrating the laser wavelength readout. The system was used successfully to measure the atmospheric pressure profile on the first flights of this lidar, November 20, and December 9, 1985, aboard the NASA Wallops Electra aircraft.

  19. Wind barriers suppress fugitive dust and soil-derived airborne particles in arid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Grantz, D.A.; Vaughn, D.L.; Farber, R.J.; Kim, B.; Ashbaugh, L.; Van Curen, T.; Campbell, R.

    1998-07-01

    Areas of abandoned agricultural land in the Antelope Valley, western Mojave (high) desert of California have proven in the previous studies to be recalcitrant to conventional tillage and revegetation strategies designed to suppress wind erosion of soil and transport of sediment and fugitive dust. These areas represented a continuing source of drifting sand and of coarse and respirable suspended particulate matter. The traditional techniques failed because furrows collapsed and the water holding capacity of the overburden was too low to support seed germination and transplant survival. In this study a variety of wind barriers were evaluated for suppression of sediment transport. Airborne particles were measured with an array of coarse particle samplers at heights of 0.2, 1.0, and 2.0 m above the soil surface. Discrete artificial wind barriers, consisting of widely spaced roughness elements were effective in suppressing fugitive emissions. Wind fences established along the leeward edge of an area of blowing sand, perpendicular to the prevailing wind, significantly decreased fugitive emissions. Control was greatest and precision of the measurements was highest under high wind conditions. These techniques provide rapid and effective suppression of fugitive emissions of soil-derived particles under conditions that resist conventional tillage and revegetation techniques. A simple, indirect procedure for determining local wind velocity erosion thresholds requiring only sampling of wind run and suspended particulate mass compared favorably with direct measurement of saltation as a function of wind velocity.

  20. Full-waveform Airborne and Spaceborne Laser Altimetry for Mapping and Sampling the Earth's Forests, Cryosphere, and Land surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, J. B.; Dubayah, R.; Hofton, M. A.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rabine, D.; Wake, S.; Coyle, B.; Stysley, P.; Salerno, C.

    2014-12-01

    Laser altimetry is an established technique for providing precise and accurate measurements of topography, vegetation, ice sheets, glaciers and sea ice. The Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) is a wide swath, full-waveform laser altimeter that has been operational since the late 1990's and has mapped 100,000's of square kilometers around the globe. NASA is developing a Facility version of the LVIS sensor to make it more cost-effective and more easily available to the broader science community. Based heavily on the existing LVIS sensor, the Facility LVIS instrument includes numerous improvements for reliability, resolution, real-time performance monitoring, lower cost for integration and ops, and data consistency. Building upon the foundation provided by LVIS, the Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) Lidar was recently selected for funding as a part of NASA's Earth Venture Program and will use multiple laser beams to measure high-resolution forest structure and surface topography from the International Space Station (ISS). Dependent on the funding profile and availability of launch options to ISS, GEDI could launch as early as 2018. Within a single year of operations GEDI will provide billions of vegetation height and structure measurements for the precise estimation of biomass within the orbital coverage provided by ISS (+/- 51.6 degrees latitude). GEDI uses the same high-SNR waveform measurement technique as the airborne LVIS sensor. LVIS will provide calibration and validation of GEDI's on-orbit performance.

  1. Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) Data Processing Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C. Wayne; Brock, John C.; Nagle, David

    2009-01-01

    . Each pulse is focused into an illumination area that has a radius of about 20 centimeters on the ground. The pulse-repetition frequency of the EAARL transmitter varies along each across-track scan to produce equal cross-track sample spacing and near uniform density (Nayegandhi and others, 2006). Targets can have varying physical and optical characteristics that cause extreme fluctuations in laser backscatter complexity and signal strength. To accommodate this dynamic range, EAARL has the real-time ability to detect, capture, and automatically adapt to each laser return backscatter. The backscattered energy is collected by an array of four high-speed waveform digitizers connected to an array of four sub-nanosecond photodetectors. Each of the four photodetectors receives a finite range of the returning laser backscatter photons. The most sensitive channel receives 90% of the photons, the least sensitive receives 0.9%, and the middle channel receives 9% (Wright and Brock, 2002). The fourth channel is available for detection but is not currently being utilized. All four channels are digitized simultaneously into 65,536 samples for every laser pulse. Receiver optics consists of a 15-centimeter-diameter dielectric-coated Newtonian telescope, a computer-driven raster scanning mirror oscillating at 12.5 hertz (25 rasters per second), and an array of sub-nanosecond photodetectors. The signal emitted by the pulsed laser transmitter is amplified as backscatter by the optical telescope receiver. The photomultiplier tube (PMT) then converts the optical energy into electrical impulses (Nayegandhi and others, 2006). In addition to the full-waveform resolving laser, the EAARL sensor suite includes a down-looking 70-centimeter-resolution Red-Green-Blue (RGB) digital network camera, a high-resolution color infrared (CIR) multispectral camera (14-centimeter-resolution), two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase global positioning system (GPS) receivers, and an

  2. Hyperspectral mapping of crop and soils for precision agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Michael L.; Ustin, Susan L.; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo; Palacios-Orueta, Alicia; Vanderbilt, Vern C.

    2006-08-01

    Precision agriculture requires high spectral and spatial resolution imagery for advanced analyses of crop and soil conditions to increase environmental protection and producers' sustainability. GIS models that anticipate crop responses to nutrients, water, and pesticides require high spatial detail to generate application prescription maps. While the added precision of geo-spatial interpolation to field scouting generates improved zone maps and are an improvement over field-wide applications, it is limited in detail due to expense, and lacks the high precision required for pixel level applications. Multi-spectral imagery gives the spatial detail required, but broad band indexes are not sensitive to many variables in the crop and soil environment. Hyperspectral imagery provides both the spatial detail of airborne imagery and spectral resolution for spectroscopic and narrow band analysis techniques developed over recent decades in the laboratory that will advance precise determination of water and bio-physical properties of crops and soils. For several years, we have conducted remote sensing investigations to improve cotton production through field spectrometer measurements, and plant and soil samples in commercial fields and crop trials. We have developed spectral analyses techniques for plant and soil conditions through determination of crop water status, effectiveness of pre-harvest defoliant applications, and soil characterizations. We present the most promising of these spectroscopic absorption and narrow band index techniques, and their application to airborne hyperspectral imagery in mapping the variability in crops and soils.

  3. A method to quantify infectious airborne pathogens at concentrations below the threshold of quantification by culture

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Timothy D.; Wang, Chong; Hoff, Steven J.; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    In aerobiology, dose-response studies are used to estimate the risk of infection to a susceptible host presented by exposure to a specific dose of an airborne pathogen. In the research setting, host- and pathogen-specific factors that affect the dose-response continuum can be accounted for by experimental design, but the requirement to precisely determine the dose of infectious pathogen to which the host was exposed is often challenging. By definition, quantification of viable airborne pathogens is based on the culture of micro-organisms, but some airborne pathogens are transmissible at concentrations below the threshold of quantification by culture. In this paper we present an approach to the calculation of exposure dose at microbiologically unquantifiable levels using an application of the “continuous-stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model” and the validation of this approach using rhodamine B dye as a surrogate for aerosolized microbial pathogens in a dynamic aerosol toroid (DAT). PMID:24082399

  4. Fabry-Perot Based Radiometers for Precise Measurement of Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Differential radiometers based upon the Fabry-Perot interferometer have been developed and demonstrated that exhibit very great sensitivity to changes in the atmospheric column of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and water vapor. These instruments employ a solid Fabry-Perot etalon that is tuned to the proper wavelength by changing the temperature. By choosing the thickness of the etalon its multiple pass bands can be made to align with regularly space absorption features of the molecule under investigation. Use of multiple absorption features improves the optical throughput of the instrument and improves the stability of the instrument response with respect to environmental changes. Efforts are underway at Goddard to extend this technique to the carbon 13 isotope of carbon dioxide and to methane. These instruments are intrinsically rugged and can be made rather small and inexpensively. They therefore hold promise for widespread use in ground based networks for calibration of satellite instruments such as OCO and GOSAT. Results will be presented for ground based and airborne operations for these systems. The effects of atmospheric scattering, pointing errors, pressure broadening and temperature effects will be discussed with regard to achieving precision better than .5% required for validation of carbon dioxide column measured from space. Designs permitting the extension of the technique to an even larger number of atmospheric species will be discussed along with theoretical analysis of potential system performance.

  5. An integrated airborne gravity survey of an offshore area near the northern Noto Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komazawa, Masao; Okuma, Shigeo; Segawa, Jiro

    2010-02-01

    An airborne gravity survey using a helicopter was carried out in October 2008, offshore along the northern Noto Peninsula, to understand the shallow and regional underground structure. Eleven flight lines, including three tie lines, were arranged at 2km spacing within 20km of the coast. The total length of the flight lines was ~700km. The Bouguer anomalies computed from the airborne gravimetry are consistent with those computed from land and shipborne gravimetry, which gradually decrease in the offshore direction. So, the accuracy of the airborne system is considered to be adequate. A local gravity low in Wajima Bay, which was already known from seafloor gravimetry, was also observed. This suggests that the airborne system has a structural resolution of ~2km. Reduction of gravity data to a common datum was conducted by compiling the three kinds of gravity data, from airborne, shipborne, and land surveys. In the present study, we have used a solid angle numerical integration method and an iteration method. We finally calculated the gravity anomalies at 300m above sea level. We needed to add corrections of 2-5mGals in order to compile the airborne and shipborne gravity data smoothly, so the accuracy of the Bouguer anomaly map is considered to be nearly 2mGal on the whole, and 5mGals at worst in limited or local areas.

  6. Application of vector analysis on study of illuminated area and Doppler characteristics of airborne pulse radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijiang; Yang, Ling

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the application of vector analysis tool in the illuminated area and the Doppler frequency distribution research for the airborne pulse radar is studied. An important feature of vector analysis is that it can closely combine the geometric ideas with algebraic calculations. Through coordinate transform, the relationship between the frame of radar antenna and the ground, under aircraft motion attitude, is derived. Under the time-space analysis, the overlap area between the footprint of radar beam and the pulse-illuminated zone is obtained. Furthermore, the Doppler frequency expression is successfully deduced. In addition, the Doppler frequency distribution is plotted finally. Using the time-space analysis results, some important parameters of a specified airborne radar system are obtained. Simultaneously, the results are applied to correct the phase error brought by attitude change in airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging.

  7. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-08-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/sqrt{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/sqrt{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example, we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  8. Precision Higgs Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughezal, Radja

    2015-04-01

    The future of the high energy physics program will increasingly rely upon precision studies looking for deviations from the Standard Model. Run I of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) triumphantly discovered the long-awaited Higgs boson, and there is great hope in the particle physics community that this new state will open a portal onto a new theory of Nature at the smallest scales. A precision study of Higgs boson properties is needed in order to test whether this belief is true. New theoretical ideas and high-precision QCD tools are crucial to fulfill this goal. They become even more important as larger data sets from LHC Run II further reduce the experimental errors and theoretical uncertainties begin to dominate. In this talk, I will review recent progress in understanding Higgs properties,including the calculation of precision predictions needed to identify possible physics beyond the Standard Model in the Higgs sector. New ideas for measuring the Higgs couplings to light quarks as well as bounding the Higgs width in a model-independent way will be discussed. Precision predictions for Higgs production in association with jets and ongoing efforts to calculate the inclusive N3LO cross section will be reviewed.

  9. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-05-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/√{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/√{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  10. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-08-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/√{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/√{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example, we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  11. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

  12. Airborne wavemeter validation and calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, Joseph H., Jr.; Rinsland, Pamela L.; Kist, Edward H., Jr.; Geier, Erika B.; Banziger, Curtis G.

    1992-01-01

    This manuscript outlines a continuing effort to validate and verify the performance of an airborne autonomous wavemeter for tuning solid state lasers to a desired wavelength. The application is measuring the vertical profiles of atmospheric water vapor using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. Improved wavemeter performance data for varying ambient temperatures are presented. This resulted when the electronic grounding and shielding were improved. The results with short pulse duration lasers are also included. These lasers show that similar performance could be obtained with lasers operating in the continuous and the pulsed domains.

  13. High sensitive airborne radioiodine monitor.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshimune; Yamasaki, Tadashi; Hanafusa, Ryuji

    2013-11-01

    Airborne radioiodine monitoring includes a problem in that commercial radioactive gas monitors have inadequate sensitivity. To solve this problem, we designed a highly sensitive monitoring system. The higher counting efficiency and lower background made it possible to perform the low-level monitoring. The characteristics of the system were investigated using gaseous (125)I. The minimum detectable activity concentration was 1 × 10(-4)Bq cm(-3) for 1 min counting, which is one tenth of the legal limit for the radiation controlled areas in Japan. PMID:23602709

  14. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  15. Cyberinfrastructure for Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004 the NASA Airborne Science Program has been prototyping and using infrastructure that enables researchers to interact with each other and with their instruments via network communications. This infrastructure uses satellite links and an evolving suite of applications and services that leverage open-source software. The use of these tools has increased near-real-time situational awareness during field operations, resulting in productivity improvements and the collection of better data. This paper describes the high-level system architecture and major components, with example highlights from the use of the infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of ongoing efforts to transition to operational status.

  16. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  17. Airborne Gravity Gradiometry Resolves a Full Range of Gravity Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataragio, J.; Brewster, J.; Mims, J.

    2007-12-01

    Airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (Air\\-FTGR) was flown at high altitude coincident with Airborne Gravity (AG) flown in 2003 in West Arnhem Land, Australia. A preliminary analysis of two data sets indicates that the Air\\-FTGR system has the capability of resolving intermediate to long wavelengths features that may be associated with relatively deeper geological structures. A comparison of frequency filtered slices and power spectral density (PSD) for both data sets using the short (> 5 km), intermediate (10 km) and long (20 km) wavelengths reveals that high altitude Air\\-FTGR data show greater response in high frequency anomalies than a conventional Airborne Gravity and matches well with the AG even at the longest wavelengths anomalies. The effect of line spacing and target resolution was examined between the two data sets. Reprocessed gradient and AG data at 2, 4 and 6 km line spacing suggest that Air\\-FTGR could be effectively flown at a comparatively wider line spacing to resolve similar targets the AG would resolve with tighter line spacing. Introduction Airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (Air\\-FTGR) data have been available to the mining industry since 2002 and their use for geologic applications is well established. However, Air\\-FTGR data has been mostly considered and used in mapping and delineation of near surface geological targets. This is due to the fact that gravity gradiometer measurements are well suited to capture the high frequency signal associated with near\\-surface targets ( Li, 2001). This is possible because the gradiometer signal strength falls off with the cube of the distance to the target. Nonetheless, in recent years there has been an increasing demand from the mining, oil, and gas industry in utilizing Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometer as a mapping tool for both regional and prospect level surveys. Air\\-FTGR as a Regional Mapping Tool Several, relatively low altitude surveys have been successfully flown in Brazil, Canada and Australia

  18. The alpine Swiss-French airborne gravity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdun, Jérôme; Klingelé, Emile E.; Bayer, Roger; Cocard, Marc; Geiger, Alain; Kahle, Hans-Gert

    2003-01-01

    In February 1998, a regional-scale, airborne gravity survey was carried out over the French Occidental Alps within the framework of the GéoFrance 3-D research program.The survey consisted of 18 NS and 16 EW oriented lines with a spacing of 10 and 20 km respectively, covering the whole of the Western French Alps (total area: 50 000 km2; total distance of lines flown: 10 000 km). The equipment was mounted in a medium-size aircraft (DeHavilland Twin Otter) flowing at a constant altitude of 5100 m a.s.l, and at a mean ground speed of about 280 km h-1. Gravity was measured using a LaCoste & Romberg relative, air/sea gravimeter (type SA) mounted on a laser gyro stabilized platform. Data from 5 GPS antennae located on fuselage and wings and 7 ground-based GPS reference stations were used to determine position and aircraft induced accelerations.The gravimeter passband was derived by comparing the vertical accelerations provided by the gravimeter with those estimated from the GPS positions. This comparison showed that the gravimeter is not sensitive to very short wavelength aircraft accelerations, and therefore a simplified formulation for computing airborne gravity measurements was developed. The intermediate and short wavelength, non-gravitational accelerations were eliminated by means of digital, exponential low-pass filters (cut-off wavelength: 16 km). An important issue in airborne gravimetry is the reliability of the airborne gravity surveys when compared to ground surveys. In our studied area, the differences between the airborne-acquired Bouguer anomaly and the ground upward-continued Bouguer anomaly of the Alps shows a good agreement: the rms of these differences is equal to 7.68 mGal for a spatial resolution of 8 km. However, in some areas with rugged topography, the amplitudes of those differences have a striking correlation with the topography. We then argue that the choice of an appropriate density (reduction by a factor of 10 per cent) for computing the

  19. Effect of land uses and wind direction on the contribution of local sources to airborne pollen.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Jesús; Rapp, Ana; Lara, Beatriz; Fernández-González, Federico; Pérez-Badia, Rosa

    2015-12-15

    The interpretation of airborne pollen levels in cities based on the contribution of the surrounding flora and vegetation is a useful tool to estimate airborne allergen concentrations and, consequently, to determine the allergy risk for local residents. This study examined the pollen spectrum in a city in central Spain (Guadalajara) and analysed the vegetation landscape and land uses within a radius of 20km in an attempt to identify and locate the origin of airborne pollen and to determine the effect of meteorological variables on pollen emission and dispersal. The results showed that local wind direction was largely responsible for changes in the concentrations of different airborne pollen types. The land uses contributing most to airborne pollen counts were urban green spaces, though only 0.1% of the total surface area studied, and broadleaved forest which covered 5% of the study area. These two types of land use together accounted for 70% of the airborne pollen. Crops, scrubland and pastureland, though covering 80% of the total surface area, contributed only 18.6% to the total pollen count, and this contribution mainly consisted of pollen from Olea and herbaceous plants, including Poaceae, Urticaceae and Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae. Pollen from ornamental species were mainly associated with easterly (Platanus), southerly (Cupressaceae) and westerly (Cupressaceae and Platanus) winds from the areas where the city's largest parks and gardens are located. Quercus pollen was mostly transported by winds blowing in from holm-oak stands on the eastern edge of the city. The highest Populus pollen counts were associated with easterly and westerly winds blowing in from areas containing rivers and streams. The airborne pollen counts generally rose with increasing temperature, solar radiation and hours of sunlight, all of which favour pollen release. In contrast, pollen counts declined with increased relative humidity and rainfall, which hinder airborne pollen transport

  20. How Physics Got Precise

    SciTech Connect

    Kleppner, Daniel

    2005-01-19

    Although the ancients knew the length of the year to about ten parts per million, it was not until the end of the 19th century that precision measurements came to play a defining role in physics. Eventually such measurements made it possible to replace human-made artifacts for the standards of length and time with natural standards. For a new generation of atomic clocks, time keeping could be so precise that the effects of the local gravitational potentials on the clock rates would be important. This would force us to re-introduce an artifact into the definition of the second - the location of the primary clock. I will describe some of the events in the history of precision measurements that have led us to this pleasing conundrum, and some of the unexpected uses of atomic clocks today.

  1. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  2. Precision Muonium Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2016-09-01

    The muonium atom is the purely leptonic bound state of a positive muon and an electron. It has a lifetime of 2.2 µs. The absence of any known internal structure provides for precision experiments to test fundamental physics theories and to determine accurate values of fundamental constants. In particular ground state hyperfine structure transitions can be measured by microwave spectroscopy to deliver the muon magnetic moment. The frequency of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen-like atom can be determined with laser spectroscopy to obtain the muon mass. With such measurements fundamental physical interactions, in particular quantum electrodynamics, can also be tested at highest precision. The results are important input parameters for experiments on the muon magnetic anomaly. The simplicity of the atom enables further precise experiments, such as a search for muonium-antimuonium conversion for testing charged lepton number conservation and searches for possible antigravity of muons and dark matter.

  3. Stability of airborne microbes in the Louvre Museum over time.

    PubMed

    Gaüzère, C; Moletta-Denat, M; Blanquart, H; Ferreira, S; Moularat, S; Godon, J-J; Robine, E

    2014-02-01

    The microbial content of air has as yet been little described, despite its public health implications, and there remains a lack of environmental microbial data on airborne microflora in enclosed spaces. In this context, the aim of this study was to characterize the diversity and dynamics of airborne microorganisms in the Louvre Museum using high-throughput molecular tools and to underline the microbial signature of indoor air in this human-occupied environment. This microbial community was monitored for 6 month during occupied time. The quantitative results revealed variations in the concentrations of less than one logarithm, with average values of 10(3) and 10(4) Escherichia coli/Aspergillus fumigatus genome equivalent per m(3) for bacteria and fungi, respectively. Our observations highlight the stability of the indoor airborne bacterial diversity over time, while the corresponding eukaryote community was less stable. Bacterial diversity characterized by pyrosequencing 454 showed high diversity dominated by the Proteobacteria which represented 51.1%, 46.9%, and 38.4% of sequences, for each of the three air samples sequenced. A common bacterial diversity was underlined, corresponding to 58.4% of the sequences. The core species were belonging mostly to the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, and to the genus Paracoccus spp., Acinetobacter sp., Pseudomonas sp., Enhydrobacter sp., Sphingomonas sp., Staphylococcus sp., and Streptococcus sp. PMID:23710880

  4. Field of view selection for optimal airborne imaging sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Tristan M.; Barnard, P. Werner; Fildis, Halidun; Erbudak, Mustafa; Senger, Tolga; Alpman, Mehmet E.

    2014-05-01

    The choice of the Field of View (FOV) of imaging sensors used in airborne targeting applications has major impact on the overall performance of the system. Conducting a market survey from published data on sensors used in stabilized airborne targeting systems shows a trend of ever narrowing FOVs housed in smaller and lighter volumes. This approach promotes the ever increasing geometric resolution provided by narrower FOVs, while it seemingly ignores the influences the FOV selection has on the sensor's sensitivity, the effects of diffraction, the influences of sight line jitter and collectively the overall system performance. This paper presents a trade-off methodology to select the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor that is limited in aperture diameter by mechanical constraints (such as space/volume available and window size) by balancing the influences FOV has on sensitivity and resolution and thereby optimizing the system's performance. The methodology may be applied to staring array based imaging sensors across all wavebands from visible/day cameras through to long wave infrared thermal imagers. Some examples of sensor analysis applying the trade-off methodology are given that highlights the performance advantages that can be gained by maximizing the aperture diameters and choosing the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor used in airborne targeting applications.

  5. Airborne trace contaminants of possible interest in CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garavelli, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    One design goal of Closed Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) for long duration space missions is to maintain an atmosphere which is healthy for all the desirable biological species and not deleterious to any of the mechanical components in that atmosphere. CELESS design must take into account the interactions of at least six major components; (1) humans and animals, (2) higher plants, (3) microalgae, (4) bacteria and fungi, (5) the waste processing system, and (6) other mechanical systems. Each of these major components can be both a source and a target of airborne trace contaminants in a CELSS. A range of possible airborne trace contaminants is discussed within a chemical classification scheme. These contaminants are analyzed with respect to their probable sources among the six major components and their potential effects on those components. Data on airborne chemical contaminants detected in shuttle missions is presented along with this analysis. The observed concentrations of several classes of compounds, including hydrocarbons, halocarbons, halosilanes, amines and nitrogen oxides, are considered with respect to the problems which they present to CELSS.

  6. Three years of practical use of airborne gravity gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, E.

    2003-04-01

    BHP Billiton has successfully built and deployed three airborne gravity gradiometer (AGG) systems, (Newton, Einstein and Galileo) based upon the Bell Airspace (now Lockheed Martin) Gravity Gradient Instruments developed for the United States Department of Defense. A second-generation gradiometer (Feynman) is presently nearing completion. The GGI technology is based on groups of four (4) accelerometers where the accelerometers are equi-spaced on a circle. The configuration successfully rejects both common mode accelerations and rotations about the axis perpendicular to the plane of the complement. The GGI is mounted within an aircraft in a specially designed, inertially stabilized platform, which significantly reduces sensitivity to noise and turbulence. The BHP Billiton AGG Technology provides high quality gravity maps with a resolution and sensitivity to map gravity anomalies associated with both minerals and hydrocarbon deposits. To date the purpose built and designed hardware and data processing algorithms, in conjunction with several other geophysical survey instruments, have been deployed against a broad range of mineral and hydrocarbon targets, a total of over 300,000km of operational flights having been made. Data will also be presented on the in-flight sensitivity of a gravity gradiometer to the airborne environment. It will also outline some of the many unexpected problems that were encountered in the 18-month flight trials required to achieve satisfactory airborne operation.

  7. Simulation and analysis of airborne antenna radiation patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. J.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1984-01-01

    The objective is to develop an accurate and efficient analytic solution for predicting high frequency radiation patterns of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas. This is an analytic study of airborne antenna patterns using the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD). The aircraft is modeled in its most basic form so that the solution is applicable to general-type aircraft. The fuselage is modeled as a perfectly conducting composite ellipsoid; whereas, the wings, stabilizers, nose, fuel tanks, and engines, are simulated as perfectly conducting flat plates that can be attached to the fuselage and/or to each other. The composite-ellipsoid fuselage model is necessary to successfully simulate the wide variety of real world fuselage shapes. Since the antenna is mounted on the fuselage, it has a dominant effect on the resulting radiation pattern so it must be simulated accurately, especially near the antenna. Various radiation patterns are calculated for commercial, private, and military aircraft, and the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The application of this solution to numerous practical airborne antenna problems illustrates its versatility and design capability. In most cases, the solution accuracy is verified by the comparisons between the calculated and measured data.

  8. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  9. Global Test Range: Toward Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Freudinger, Larry; DelFrate John H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planned global sensor network that will monitor the Earth's climate, and resources using airborne sensor systems. The vision is an intelligent, affordable Earth Observation System. Global Test Range is a lab developing trustworthy services for airborne instruments - a specialized Internet Service Provider. There is discussion of several current and planned missions.

  10. Airborne Relay-Based Regional Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuman; Noh, Hongjun; Lim, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based pseudolite systems have some limitations, such as low vertical accuracy, multipath effects and near-far problems. These problems are not significant in airborne-based pseudolite systems. However, the monitoring of pseudolite positions is required because of the mobility of the platforms on which the pseudolites are mounted, and this causes performance degradation. To address these pseudolite system limitations, we propose an airborne relay-based regional positioning system that consists of a master station, reference stations, airborne relays and a user. In the proposed system, navigation signals are generated from the reference stations located on the ground and are relayed via the airborne relays. Unlike in conventional airborne-based systems, the user in the proposed system sequentially estimates both the locations of airborne relays and his/her own position. Therefore, a delay due to monitoring does not occur, and the accuracy is not affected by the movement of airborne relays. We conducted several simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. Based on the simulation results, we demonstrated that the proposed system guarantees a higher accuracy than airborne-based pseudolite systems, and it is feasible despite the existence of clock offsets among reference stations. PMID:26029953

  11. The Continuous wavelet in airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Liu, L.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne gravimetry is an efficient method to recover medium and high frequency band of earth gravity over any region, especially inaccessible areas, which can measure gravity data with high accuracy,high resolution and broad range in a rapidly and economical way, and It will play an important role for geoid and geophysical exploration. Filtering methods for reducing high-frequency errors is critical to the success of airborne gravimetry due to Aircraft acceleration determination based on GPS.Tradiontal filters used in airborne gravimetry are FIR,IIR filer and so on. This study recommends an improved continuous wavelet to process airborne gravity data. Here we focus on how to construct the continuous wavelet filters and show their working principle. Particularly the technical parameters (window width parameter and scale parameter) of the filters are tested. Then the raw airborne gravity data from the first Chinese airborne gravimetry campaign are filtered using FIR-low pass filter and continuous wavelet filters to remove the noise. The comparison to reference data is performed to determinate external accuracy, which shows that continuous wavelet filters applied to airborne gravity in this thesis have good performances. The advantages of the continuous wavelet filters over digital filters are also introduced. The effectiveness of the continuous wavelet filters for airborne gravimetry is demonstrated through real data computation.

  12. A Simple Method for Collecting Airborne Pollen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Peter G.; DiGiovanni, Franco; Ho, Rong H.; Taki, Hisatomo; Ferguson, Kristyn A.; Pawlowski, Agata K.

    2006-01-01

    Pollination is a broad area of study within biology. For many plants, pollen carried by wind is required for successful seed set. Airborne pollen also affects human health. To foster studies of airborne pollen, we introduce a simple device--the "megastigma"--for collecting pollen from the air. This device is flexible, yielding easily obtained data…

  13. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  14. Meeting Review: Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Huebert, Barry; Wilson, Chuck

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings from the Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop are presented. The two central topics of discussion were the role of aerosols in atmospheric processes and the difficulties in characterizing aerosols. The following topics were discussed during the working sessions: airborne observations to date; identification of inlet design issues; inlet modeling needs and directions; objectives for aircraft experiments; and future laboratory and wind tunnel studies.

  15. Precision Nova operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Robert B.; Miller, John L.; Saunders, Rodney L.; Thompson, Calvin E.; Weiland, Timothy L.; Laumann, Curt W.

    1995-12-01

    To improve the symmetry of x-ray drive on indirectly driven ICF capsules, we have increased the accuracy of operating procedures and diagnostics on the Nova laser. Precision Nova operations include routine precision power balance to within 10% rms in the 'foot' and 5% rms in the peak of shaped pulses, beam synchronization to within 10 ps rms, and pointing of the beams onto targets to within 35 micrometer rms. We have also added a 'fail-safe chirp' system to avoid stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in optical components during high energy shots.

  16. Precision Nova operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.B.; Miller, J.L.; Saunders, R.L.; Thompson, C.E.; Weiland, T.L.; Laumann, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    To improve the symmetry of x-ray drive on indirectly driven ICF capsules, we have increased the accuracy of operating procedures and diagnostics on the Nova laser. Precision Nova operations includes routine precision power balance to within 10% rms in the ``foot`` and 5% nns in the peak of shaped pulses, beam synchronization to within 10 ps rms, and pointing of the beams onto targets to within 35 {mu}m rms. We have also added a ``fail-safe chirp`` system to avoid Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in optical components during high energy shots.

  17. Precision electron polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chudakov, Eugene A.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. M{\\o}ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at ~300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100\\%-polarized electron target for M{\\o}ller polarimetry.

  18. Precision electron polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chudakov, E.

    2013-11-07

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. Mo/ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at 300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100%-polarized electron target for Mo/ller polarimetry.

  19. Precision Heating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A heat sealing process was developed by SEBRA based on technology that originated in work with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The project involved connecting and transferring blood and fluids between sterile plastic containers while maintaining a closed system. SEBRA markets the PIRF Process to manufacturers of medical catheters. It is a precisely controlled method of heating thermoplastic materials in a mold to form or weld catheters and other products. The process offers advantages in fast, precise welding or shape forming of catheters as well as applications in a variety of other industries.

  20. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, M.J.; Bellman, R.A.

    1982-09-27

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  1. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Malcolm J.; Bellman, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  2. A theoretical model for airborne radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubert, D.

    1989-11-01

    This work describes a general theory for the simulation of airborne (or spaceborne) radars. It can simulate many types of systems including Airborne Intercept and Airborne Early Warning radars, airborne missile approach warning systems etc. It computes the average Signal-to-Noise ratio at the output of the signal processor. In this manner, one obtains the average performance of the radar without having to use Monte Carlo techniques. The model has provision for a waveform without frequency modulation and one with linear frequency modulation. The waveform may also have frequency hopping for Electronic Counter Measures or for clutter suppression. The model can accommodate any type of encounter including air-to-air, air-to-ground (look-down) and rear attacks. It can simulate systems with multiple phase centers on receive for studying advanced clutter or jamming interference suppression techniques. An Airborne Intercept radar is investigated to demonstrate the validity and the capability of the model.

  3. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  4. Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhothermel, Jeffry; Jones, W. D.; Dunkin, J. A.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This effort involves development of a calibrated, pulsed coherent CO2 Doppler lidar, followed by a carefully-planned and -executed program of multi-dimensional wind velocity and aerosol backscatter measurements from the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The lidar, designated as the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS), will be applicable to two research areas. First, MACAWS will enable specialized measurements of atmospheric dynamical processes in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere in geographic locations and over scales of motion not routinely or easily accessible to conventional sensors. The proposed observations will contribute fundamentally to a greater understanding of the role of the mesoscale, helping to improve predictive capabilities for mesoscale phenomena and to provide insights into improving model parameterizations of sub-grid scale processes within large-scale circulation models. As such, it has the potential to contribute uniquely to major, multi-institutional field programs planned for the mid 1990's. Second, MACAWS measurements can be used to reduce the degree of uncertainty in performance assessments and algorithm development for NASA's prospective Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), which has no space-based instrument heritage. Ground-based lidar measurements alone are insufficient to address all of the key issues. To minimize costs, MACAWS is being developed cooperatively by the lidar remote sensing groups of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, and MSFC using existing lidar hardware and manpower resources. Several lidar components have already been exercised in previous airborne lidar programs (for example, MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) used in 1981,4 Severe Storms Wind Measurement Program; JPL Airborne Backscatter Lidar Experiment (ABLE) used in 1989,90 Global Backscatter Experiment Survey Missions). MSFC has been given responsibility for directing the overall

  5. Challenges and Successes Managing Airborne Science Data for CARVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardman, S. H.; Dinardo, S. J.; Lee, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) mission collects detailed measurements of important greenhouse gases on local to regional scales in the Alaskan Arctic and demonstrates new remote sensing and improved modeling capabilities to quantify Arctic carbon fluxes and carbon cycle-climate processes. Airborne missions offer a number of challenges when it comes to collecting and processing the science data and CARVE is no different. The biggest challenge relates to the flexibility of the instrument payload. Within the life of the mission, instruments may be removed from or added to the payload, or even reconfigured on a yearly, monthly or daily basis. Although modification of the instrument payload provides a distinct advantage for airborne missions compared to spaceborne missions, it does tend to wreak havoc on the underlying data system when introducing changes to existing data inputs or new data inputs that require modifications to the pipeline for processing the data. In addition to payload flexibility, it is not uncommon to find unsupported files in the field data submission. In the case of CARVE, these include video files, photographs taken during the flight and screen shots from terminal displays. These need to captured, saved and somehow integrated into the data system. The CARVE data system was built on a multi-mission data system infrastructure for airborne instruments called the Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE). ACCE encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation. This well-tested and proven infrastructure allows the CARVE data system to be easily adapted in order to handle the challenges posed by the CARVE mission and to successfully process, manage and distribute the mission's science data. This

  6. Applying linear spectral unmixing to airborne hyperspectral imagery for mapping yield variability in grain sorghum and cotton fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined linear spectral unmixing techniques for mapping the variation in crop yield for precision agriculture. Both unconstrained and constrained linear spectral unmixing models were applied to airborne hyperspectral imagery collected from a grain sorghum field and a cotton field. A pair...

  7. Precision bolometer bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. R.

    1968-01-01

    Prototype precision bolometer calibration bridge is manually balanced device for indicating dc bias and balance with either dc or ac power. An external galvanometer is used with the bridge for null indication, and the circuitry monitors voltage and current simultaneously without adapters in testing 100 and 200 ohm thin film bolometers.

  8. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  9. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, Michael E.; Sullivan, William H.

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  10. Precision in Stereochemical Terminology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Leroy G., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of relatively new terminology that has given multiple definitions often resulting in students learning principles that are actually false is presented with an example of the new term stereogenic atom introduced by Mislow and Siegel. The Mislow terminology would be useful in some cases if it were used precisely and correctly, but it is…

  11. Precision physics at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1997-05-01

    In this talk the author gives a brief survey of some physics topics that will be addressed by the Large Hadron Collider currently under construction at CERN. Instead of discussing the reach of this machine for new physics, the author gives examples of the types of precision measurements that might be made if new physics is discovered.

  12. Airborne particulate matter and spacecraft internal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Benjamin Y. H.; Rubow, Kenneth L.; Mcmurry, Peter H.; Kotz, Thomas J.; Russo, Dane

    1991-01-01

    Instrumentation, consisting of a Shuttle Particle Sampler (SPS) and a Shuttle Particle Monitor (SPM), has been developed to characterize the airborne particulate matter in the Space Shuttle cabin during orbital flight. The SPS size selectively collects particles in four size fractions (0-2.5, 2.5-10, 10-100, and greater than 100 microns) which are analyzed postflight for mass concentration and size distribution, elemental composition, and morphology. The SPM provides a continuous record of particle concentration through photometric light scattering. Measurements were performed onboard Columbia, OV-102, during the flight of STS-32 in January 1990. No significant changes were observed in the particle mass concentration, size distribution, or chemical composition in samples collected during flight-day 2 and flight-day 7. The total mass concentration was 56 microg/cu cm with approximately half of the particles larger than 100 microns. Elemental analysis showed that roughly 70 percent of the particles larger than 2.5 microns were carbonaceous with small amounts of other elements present. The SPM showed no temporal or spatial variation in particle mass concentration during the mission.

  13. Airborne intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Torres, Arnold L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during missions flown in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system and two chemiluminescence instruments (CL). NO mixing ratios from below 5 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) to greater than 100 pptv were reported, with the majority less than 20 pptv. Good correlation was observed between the measurements reported by the CL and LIF techniques. The general level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements obtained during the two missions provides the basis from which one can conclude that equally 'valid' measurements of background levels of NO can be expected from either CL or LIF instruments. At the same time the periods of disagreement that were observed between the CL and LIF instruments as well as between the two CL instruments highlight the difficulty of obtaining reliable measurements with NO mixing ratios in the 5-20 pptv range and emphasize the vigilance that should be maintained in future NO measurements.

  14. Airborne measured analytic signal for UXO detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gamey, T.J.; Holladay, J.S.; Mahler, R.

    1997-10-01

    The Altmark Tank Training Range north of Haldensleben, Germany has been in operation since WWI. Weapons training and testing has included cavalry, cannon, small arms, rail guns, and tank battalions. Current plans are to convert the area to a fully digital combat training facility. Instead of using blank or dummy ordnance, hits will be registered with lasers and computers. Before this can happen, the 25,000 ha must be cleared of old debris. In support of this cleanup operation, Aerodat Inc., in conjunction with IABG of Germany, demonstrated a new high resolution magnetic survey technique involving the measurement of 3-component magnetic gradient data. The survey was conducted in May 1996, and covered 500 ha in two blocks. The nominal line spacing was 10 m, and the average sensor altitude was 7 m. The geologic column consisted of sands over a sedimentary basin. Topographic relief was generally flat with approximately 3 m rolling dunes and occasional man-made features such as fox holes, bunkers, tank traps and reviewing stands. Trees were sparse and short (2-3 metres) due to frequent burn off and tank activity. As such, this site was nearly ideal for low altitude airborne surveying.

  15. DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The NASA DC-8 in a right bank over the rugged Sierra Nevada Mountains. The former airliner is a 'dash-72' model and has a range of 5,500 miles. The craft can stay airborne for 12 hours and has an operational speed range between 300 and 500 knots. The research flights are made at between 500 and 41,000 feet. The aircraft can carry up to 30,000 lbs of research/science payload equipment installed in 15 mission-definable spaces. In this photo, the aircraft is shown in flight from below, with the DC-8 silhouetted against a blue sky. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  16. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2002-01-01

    In response to recommendations from the National Aviation Weather Program Council, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working with industry to develop an electronic pilot reporting capability for small aircraft. This paper describes the Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) sensor development effort. NASA is working with industry to develop a sensor capable of measuring temperature, relative humidity, magnetic heading, pressure, icing, and average turbulence energy dissipation. Users of the data include National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) forecast modelers, air traffic controllers, flight service stations, airline operation centers, and pilots. Preliminary results from flight tests are presented.

  17. Airborne Instrumentation Needs for Climate and Atmospheric Research

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg; Schmid, Beat; Korolev, Alexei; Ogren, John A.; Russell, P. B.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Turner, David D.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2011-10-06

    Observational data are of fundamental importance for advances in climate and atmospheric research. Advances in atmospheric science are being made not only through the use of ground-based and space-based observations, but also through the use of in-situ and remote sensing observations acquired on instrumented aircraft. In order for us to enhance our knowledge of atmospheric processes, it is imperative that efforts be made to improve our understanding of the operating characteristics of current instrumentation and of the caveats and uncertainties in data acquired by current probes, as well as to develop improved observing methodologies for acquisition of airborne data.

  18. The Multi-Center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor: Recent Measurements and Future Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Howell, Burgess F.; Hardesty, Robert M.; Tratt, David M.; Darby, Lisa S.

    1999-01-01

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center jointly developed an airborne scanning coherent Doppler Lidar. We describe the system, present recent measurement (including the first wind fields measured within a hurricane using Doppler lidar), and describe prospective instrument improvements and research applications.

  19. 3D time-domain airborne EM modeling for an arbitrarily anisotropic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Changchun; Qi, Yanfu; Liu, Yunhe

    2016-08-01

    Time-domain airborne EM data is currently interpreted based on an isotropic model. Sometimes, it can be problematic when working in the region with distinct dipping stratifications. In this paper, we simulate the 3D time-domain airborne EM responses over an arbitrarily anisotropic earth with topography by edge-based finite-element method. Tetrahedral meshes are used to describe the abnormal bodies with complicated shapes. We further adopt the Backward Euler scheme to discretize the time-domain diffusion equation for electric field, obtaining an unconditionally stable linear equations system. We verify the accuracy of our 3D algorithm by comparing with 1D solutions for an anisotropic half-space. Then, we switch attentions to effects of anisotropic media on the strengths and the diffusion patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses. For numerical experiments, we adopt three typical anisotropic models: 1) an anisotropic anomalous body embedded in an isotropic half-space; 2) an isotropic anomalous body embedded in an anisotropic half-space; 3) an anisotropic half-space with topography. The modeling results show that the electric anisotropy of the subsurface media has big effects on both the strengths and the distribution patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses; this effect needs to be taken into account when interpreting ATEM data in areas with distinct anisotropy.

  20. Final Report on the Airborne Field Mill Project (ABFM) 2000-2001 Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Lewis, Sharon; Bateman, Monte, G.; Mach, Douglas M.; Merceret, Francis J.; Ward, Jennifer G.; Grainger, Cedric A.

    2004-01-01

    The Airborne Field Mill (ABFM) research program conducted under the direction of the John F. Kennedy Space Center during 2000 and 2001 is described. The purpose, methodology and initial results from the program are presented. Extensive appendices detailing the instrumentation used to collect the data are provided.

  1. Single Scattering Albedo Monitor for Airborne Particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onasch, Timothy; Massoli, Paola; Kebabian, Paul; Hills, Frank; Bacon, Fred; Freedman, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    We describe a robust, compact, field deployable instrument (the CAPS PMssa) that simultaneously measures airborne particle light extinction and scattering coefficients and thus the single scattering albedo (SSA) on the same sample volume. With an appropriate change in mirrors and light source, measurements have been made at wavelengths ranging from 450 to 780 nm. The extinction measurement is based on cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) techniques as employed in the CAPS PMex particle extinction monitor; scattering is measured using a integrating nephelometry by incorporating a Lambertian integrating sphere within the sample cell. The scattering measurement is calibrated using the extinction measurement. Measurements using ammonium sulfate particles of various sizes indicate that the response of the scattering channel with respect to measured extinction is linear to within 1% up to 1000 Mm-1 and can be extended further (4000 Mm-1) with additional corrections. The precision in both measurement channels is less than 1 Mm-1 (1s, 1σ). The truncation effect in the scattering channel, caused by light lost at extreme forward/backward scattering angles, was measured as a function of particle size using monodisperse polystyrene latex particles (n=1.59). The results were successfully fit using a simple geometric model allowing for reasonable extrapolation to a given wavelength, particle index of refraction and particle size distribution, assuming spherical particles. For sub-micron sized particles, the truncation corrections are comparable to those reported for commercial nephelometers. Measurements of the optical properties of ambient aerosol indicate that the values of the SSA of these particles measured with this instrument (0.91±0.03) using scattering and extinction agreed within experimental uncertainty with those determined using extinction measured by this instrument and absorption measured using a Multi-Angle Absorption Spectrometer (0.89±0.03) where the

  2. Airborne EM for geothermal and hydrogeological mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menghini, A.; Manzella, A.; Viezzoli, A.; Montanari, D.; Maggi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Within the "VIGOR" project, aimed at assessing the geothermal potential of four regions in southern Italy, Airborne EM data have been acquired, modeled and interpreted. The system deployed was SkyTEM, a time-domain helicopter electromagnetic system designed for hydrogeophysical, environmental and mineral investigations. The AEM data provide, after data acquisition, analysis, processing, and modeling, a distribution volume of electrical resistivity, spanning an investigation depth from ground surface of few hundred meters, depending on resistivity condition. Resistivity is an important physical parameter for geothermal investigation, since it proved to be very effective in mapping anomalies due to hydrothermal fluid circulation, which usually has high salt content and produces clayey alteration minerals. Since the project required, among other issues, to define geothermal resources at shallow level, it was decided to perform a test with an airborne electromagnetic geophysical survey, to verify the advantages offered by the system in covering large areas in a short time. The geophysical survey was carried out in Sicily, Italy, in late 2011, over two test sites named "Termini" and "Western Sicily". The two areas were chosen on different basis. "Termini" area is covered by extensive geological surveys, and was going to be investigated also by means of electrical tomography in its northern part. Since geological condition of Sicily, even at shallow depth, is very complex, this area provided a good place for defining the resistivity values of the main geological units outcropping in the region. "Termini" survey has been also an occasion to define relations between resistivity distribution, lithological units and thermal conductivity. The "Western Sicily" area cover the main thermal manifestations of western Sicily, and the research target was to establish whether they are characterized by common hydrogeological or tectonic features that could be mapped by resistivity

  3. An Astronomical Test of CCD Photometric Precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David G.; Dunham, Edward W.; Borucki, William J.; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2001-01-01

    Ground-based differential photometry is limited to a precision of order 10(exp -3) because of atmospheric effects. A space-based photometer should be limited only by the inherent instrument precision and shot noise. Laboratory tests have shown that a precision of order 10-5 is achievable with commercially available charged coupled devices (CCDs). We have proposed to take this one step further by performing measurements at a telescope using a Wollaston prism as a beam splitter First-order atmospheric effects (e.g., extinction) will appear to be identical in the two images of each star formed by the prism and will be removed in the data analysis. This arrangement can determine the precision that is achievable under the influence of second-order atmospheric effects (e.g., variable point-spread function (PSF) from seeing). These telescopic observations will thus provide a lower limit to the precision that can be realized by a space-based differential photometer.

  4. An intercomparison of airborne nitric acid measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Hoell, J. M.; Huebert, B. J.; van Bramer, S. E.; Lebel, P. J.; Vay, S. A.; Marinaro, R. M.; Schiff, H. I.; Hastie, D. R.; Mackay, G. I.; Karecki, D. R.

    1990-06-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric acid are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during the summer of 1986. Instruments intercompared included a denuder tube collection system (DENUDER) with chemiluminescent detection, a niylon filter collection system (FILTER) with ion chromatography detection, and a tunable diode laser (TDLAS) multipath absorption system. Intercomparison of investigators' calibration standards were also performed as part of the test protocol. While results were somewhat "soft" and data sparse, these tests suggested that the TDLAS measurements might be high compared to the other techniques. Airborne intercomparisons were conducted predominately in the free troposphere and included encounters with marine and continental air masses. While the intercomparisons included mixing ratios to 1000 parts per trillion by volume (pptv), the majority of the results were for mixing ratios of <300 pptv. The TDLAS participated in an intercomparison of NO2 instruments (major focus) that was also conducted during the same flights. As a result the TDLAS data set is limited. Further, a significant fraction of the nitric acid measurements were below the TDLAS detection limit (75 pptv as configured for these tests). While the lack of simultaneous measurements from the three instruments limits the conclusions that can be drawn, it is clear that there can be substantial disagreement among the three techniques, even at mixing ratios above their respective detection limits. Equally clear is that at mixing ratios below 150 pptv there is very little correlation between their results. Based on these observations, an overall conclusion from the intercomparison is that none of the HNO3 techniques can be identified to unambiguously (e.g., 20% accuracy) provide measurements of HNO3 at levels often encountered in the

  5. Potential of Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy at Czechglobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuš, J.; Fabiánek, T.; Fajmon, L.

    2016-06-01

    Ecosystems, their services, structures and functions are affected by complex environmental processes, which are both natural and human-induced and globally changing. In order to understand how ecosystems behave in globally changing environment, it is important to monitor the current status of ecosystems and their structural and functional changes in time and space. An essential tool allowing monitoring of ecosystems is remote sensing (RS). Many ecosystems variables are being translated into a spectral response recorded by RS instruments. It is however important to understand the complexity and synergies of the key ecosystem variables influencing the reflected signal. This can be achieved by analysing high resolution RS data from multiple sources acquired simultaneously from the same platform. Such a system has been recently built at CzechGlobe - Global Change Research Institute (The Czech Academy of Sciences). CzechGlobe has been significantly extending its research infrastructure in the last years, which allows advanced monitoring of ecosystem changes at hierarchical levels spanning from molecules to entire ecosystems. One of the CzechGlobe components is a laboratory of imaging spectroscopy. The laboratory is now operating a new platform for advanced remote sensing observations called FLIS (Flying Laboratory of Imaging Spectroscopy). FLIS consists of an airborne carrier equipped with passive RS systems. The core instrument of FLIS is a hyperspectral imaging system provided by Itres Ltd. The hyperspectral system consists of three spectroradiometers (CASI 1500, SASI 600 and TASI 600) that cover the reflective spectral range from 380 to 2450 nm, as well as the thermal range from 8 to 11.5 μm. The airborne platform is prepared for mounting of full-waveform laser scanner Riegl-Q780 as well, however a laser scanner is not a permanent part of FLIS. In 2014 the installation of the hyperspectral scanners was completed and the first flights were carried out with all

  6. High Energy 2-Micron Solid-State Laser Transmitter for NASA's Airborne CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  7. Precision Measurement of the Helium Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays of Rigidities 1.9 GV to 3 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cerreta, D.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Gil, E. Cortina; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Haas, D.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Korkmaz, M. A.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, Hu; Lolli, M.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Willenbrock, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of the precise rigidity dependence of the helium flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. A precise measurement of the helium flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1.9 GV to 3 TV based on 50 million events is presented and compared to the proton flux. The detailed variation with rigidity of the helium flux spectral index is presented for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at rigidities larger than 100 GV. The rigidity dependence of the helium flux spectral index is similar to that of the proton spectral index though the magnitudes are different. Remarkably, the spectral index of the proton to helium flux ratio increases with rigidity up to 45 GV and then becomes constant; the flux ratio above 45 GV is well described by a single power law.

  8. Precision Measurement of the Helium Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays of Rigidities 1.9 GV to 3 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Gil, E Cortina; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Korkmaz, M A; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Liu, Hu; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; von Dratzig, A Schulz; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2015-11-20

    Knowledge of the precise rigidity dependence of the helium flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. A precise measurement of the helium flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1.9 GV to 3 TV based on 50 million events is presented and compared to the proton flux. The detailed variation with rigidity of the helium flux spectral index is presented for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at rigidities larger than 100 GV. The rigidity dependence of the helium flux spectral index is similar to that of the proton spectral index though the magnitudes are different. Remarkably, the spectral index of the proton to helium flux ratio increases with rigidity up to 45 GV and then becomes constant; the flux ratio above 45 GV is well described by a single power law. PMID:26636836

  9. Potential Use of CW High Energy Laser on an Airborne Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joung R.; Cusumano, Salvatore J.; Whiteley, Mathew R.

    2006-05-01

    Beamed energy propulsion (BEP) offers advanced and intellectually satisfying options to a class of space applications by using a high energy laser (HEL) as the prime power that is external to the system being propelled. Included in this class of applications are: launching satellites into orbit, space debris clearing, and orbital maneuvering, among others. Realistic applications or demonstrations of such BEP applications have been limited by the availability of HEL devices ever since the concept was first suggested by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972. Development of the devices needed for BEP has been slow due to technology challenges and the significant non-recurring engineering costs. In general HEL systems of viable power levels have been exclusively the domain of military research and development. With the recent investment in the airborne platform laser systems, it may now be possible to capitalize on the military successes of such a system. The next decade may hold the possibility of transitioning defense HEL technology into BEP. The transitioning of military technology into civilian applications has occurred many times in the past, so speculation on available sources for BEP is not completely without merit. The concept of an airborne platform for BEP offers mobility and mitigates the coherence, reducing atmospheric turbulence. Operating at 12 kilometers (km), an airborne platform significantly reduces the beam path issues associated with ground to space. The trade-off is that the airborne platform disturbances are much greater and require more creative stabilization solutions than one sitting on "Terra Firma." The use of jitter reduction techniques may provide a profitable compromise for an airborne versus a ground-based system for BEP. This paper concentrates on the potential benefits from the use of an airborne platform for the BEP community.

  10. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  11. Precision Measurement of the Proton Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from Rigidity 1 GV to 1.8 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Cortina Gil, E; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2015-05-01

    A precise measurement of the proton flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1 GV to 1.8 TV is presented based on 300 million events. Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the proton flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. We present the detailed variation with rigidity of the flux spectral index for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at high rigidities. PMID:25978222

  12. Precision Measurement of the Proton Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from Rigidity 1 GV to 1.8 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cerreta, D.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Gil, E. Cortina; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Haas, D.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Levi, G.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lolli, M.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    A precise measurement of the proton flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1 GV to 1.8 TV is presented based on 300 million events. Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the proton flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. We present the detailed variation with rigidity of the flux spectral index for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at high rigidities.

  13. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A passion for precision

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-19

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  15. Towards precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Euan A

    2016-08-16

    There is great potential for genome sequencing to enhance patient care through improved diagnostic sensitivity and more precise therapeutic targeting. To maximize this potential, genomics strategies that have been developed for genetic discovery - including DNA-sequencing technologies and analysis algorithms - need to be adapted to fit clinical needs. This will require the optimization of alignment algorithms, attention to quality-coverage metrics, tailored solutions for paralogous or low-complexity areas of the genome, and the adoption of consensus standards for variant calling and interpretation. Global sharing of this more accurate genotypic and phenotypic data will accelerate the determination of causality for novel genes or variants. Thus, a deeper understanding of disease will be realized that will allow its targeting with much greater therapeutic precision. PMID:27528417

  16. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.

  17. A passion for precision

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  18. Precision disablement aiming system

    DOEpatents

    Monda, Mark J.; Hobart, Clinton G.; Gladwell, Thomas Scott

    2016-02-16

    A disrupter to a target may be precisely aimed by positioning a radiation source to direct radiation towards the target, and a detector is positioned to detect radiation that passes through the target. An aiming device is positioned between the radiation source and the target, wherein a mechanical feature of the aiming device is superimposed on the target in a captured radiographic image. The location of the aiming device in the radiographic image is used to aim a disrupter towards the target.

  19. Precise linear sun sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation of the precise linear sun sensor relating to future mission applications was performed. The test procedures, data, and results of the dual-axis, solid-state system are included. Brief descriptions of the sensing head and of the system's operational characteristics are presented. A unique feature of the system is that multiple sensor heads with various fields of view may be used with the same electronics.

  20. Precision laser aiming system

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, Brandon R.; Todd, Steven N.

    2009-04-28

    A precision laser aiming system comprises a disrupter tool, a reflector, and a laser fixture. The disrupter tool, the reflector and the laser fixture are configurable for iterative alignment and aiming toward an explosive device threat. The invention enables a disrupter to be quickly and accurately set up, aligned, and aimed in order to render safe or to disrupt a target from a standoff position.

  1. Modis-N airborne simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cech, Steven D.

    1992-01-01

    All required work associated with the above referenced contract has been successfully completed at this time. The Modis-N Airborne Simulator has been developed from existing AB184 Wildfire spectrometer parts as well as new detector arrays, optical components, and associated mechanical and electrical hardware. The various instrument components have been integrated into an operational system which has undergone extensive laboratory calibration and testing. The instrument has been delivered to NASA Ames where it will be installed on the NASA ER-2. The following paragraphs detail the specific tasks performed during the contract effort, the results obtained during the integration and testing of the instrument, and the conclusions which can be drawn from this effort.

  2. Airborne imaging spectrometer development tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolten, John

    The tasks that must be completed to design and build an airborne imaging spectrometer are listed. The manpower and resources required to do these tasks must be estimated by the people responsible for that work. The tasks are broken down by instrument subsystem or discipline. The instrument performance can be assessed at various stages during the development. The initial assessment should be done with the preliminary computer model. The instrument calibration facilities should be designed, but no calibration facilities are needed. The intermediate assessment can be done when the front end has been assembled. The preliminary instrument calibration facility should be available at this stage. The final assessment can only be done when the instrument is complete and ready for flight. For this, the final instrument calibration facility and the flight qualification facilities must be ready. The final assessment is discussed in each discipline under the section on integration and test.

  3. Research on MLS airborne antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical solutions for the radiation patterns of antennas mounted on aircraft are developed. The airborne antenna problems associated with the Microwave Landing System (MLS) are emphasized. Based on the requirements of the MLS, volumetric pattern solutions are essential. Previous attempts at solving for the volumetric patterns were found to be far too complex and very inefficient. However as a result of previous efforts, it is possible to combine the elevation and roll plane pattern solutions to give the complete volumetric pattern. This combination is described as well as the aircraft simulation models used in the analysis. A numerical technique is presented to aid in the simulation of the aircraft studied. Finally, a description of the input data used in the computer code is given.

  4. Global deposition of airborne dioxin.

    PubMed

    Booth, Shawn; Hui, Joe; Alojado, Zoraida; Lam, Vicky; Cheung, William; Zeller, Dirk; Steyn, Douw; Pauly, Daniel

    2013-10-15

    We present a global dioxin model that simulates one year of atmospheric emissions, transport processes, and depositions to the earth's terrestrial and marine habitats. We map starting emission levels for each land area, and we also map the resulting deposits to terrestrial and marine environments. This model confirms that 'hot spots' of deposition are likely to be in northern Europe, eastern North America, and in parts of Asia with the highest marine dioxin depositions being the northeast and northwest Atlantic, western Pacific, northern Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean. It also reveals that approximately 40% of airborne dioxin emissions are deposited to marine environments and that many countries in Africa receive more dioxin than they produce, which results in these countries being disproportionately impacted. Since human exposure to dioxin is largely through diet, this work highlights food producing areas that receive higher atmospheric deposits of dioxin than others. PMID:23962732

  5. Detection of fault structures with airborne LiDAR point-cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Du, Lei

    2015-08-01

    The airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) technology is a new type of aerial earth observation method which can be used to produce high-precision DEM (Digital Elevation Model) quickly and reflect ground surface information directly. Fault structure is one of the key forms of crustal movement, and its quantitative description is the key to the research of crustal movement. The airborne LiDAR point-cloud data is used to detect and extract fault structures automatically based on linear extension, elevation mutation and slope abnormal characteristics. Firstly, the LiDAR point-cloud data is processed to filter out buildings, vegetation and other non-surface information with the TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network) filtering method and Burman model calibration method. TIN and DEM are made from the processed data sequentially. Secondly, linear fault structures are extracted based on dual-threshold method. Finally, high-precision DOM (Digital Orthophoto Map) and other geological knowledge are used to check the accuracy of fault structure extraction. An experiment is carried out in Beiya Village of Yunnan Province, China. With LiDAR technology, results reveal that: the airborne LiDAR point-cloud data can be utilized to extract linear fault structures accurately and automatically, measure information such as height, width and slope of fault structures with high precision, and detect faults in areas with vegetation coverage effectively.

  6. A method for computing the damage level due to the exposure to an airborne chemical with a time-varying concentration.

    PubMed

    Acquesta, Alejandro D; Sánchez, Erica Yanina; Porta, Andres; Jacovkis, Pablo M

    2011-09-01

    The calculation of damage level due to the exposure to a toxic cloud is usually not included in most popular software, or it is included using techniques that do not take into account the variation in concentration over a period of time. In this work, a method is introduced for calculating the temporal evolution of the potential damage level and to obtain a more precise and descriptive estimation of this level. The proposed goal is: to estimate the maximum and minimum damage level experienced by a population due to the exposure to an airborne chemical with a time-varying concentration; to be able to assess the damage level experienced in a progressive way, as the exposure to the airborne chemical occurs. The method relies on transformations of time-concentration pairs on a continuum of damage level curves based on the available guideline levels, obtaining maximum and minimum approximations of the expected damage level for any exposure duration. Consequently, applying this method to transport model output data and demographic information, damage evolution in relation to time and space can be predicted, as well as its effect on the local population, which enables the determination of threat zones. The comparison between the proposed method and the current (Spanish and ALOHA) ones showed that the former can offer a more precise estimation and a more descriptive approach of the potential damage level. This method can be used by atmospheric dispersion models to compute damage level and graphically display the regions exposed to each guideline level on area maps. PMID:21395635

  7. Airborne remote sensing of forest biomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne sensor data of forest biomes obtained using an SAR, a laser profiler, an IR MSS, and a TM simulator are presented and examined. The SAR was utilized to investigate forest canopy structures in Mississippi and Costa Rica; the IR MSS measured forest canopy temperatures in Oregon and Puerto Rico; the TM simulator was employed in a tropical forest in Puerto Rico; and the laser profiler studied forest canopy characteristics in Costa Rica. The advantages and disadvantages of airborne systems are discussed. It is noted that the airborne sensors provide measurements applicable to forest monitoring programs.

  8. Precision adjustable stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A stage center block is mounted on each of two opposite sides by a pair of spaced ball bearing tracks which provide stability as well as simplicity. The use of the spaced ball bearing pairs in conjunction with an adjustment screw which also provides support eliminates extraneous stabilization components and permits maximization of the area of the center block laser transmission hole.

  9. New Methods for Personal Exposure Monitoring for Airborne Particles.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Kirsten A; Peters, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Airborne particles have been associated with a range of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes, which has driven its monitoring at stationary central sites throughout the world. Individual exposures, however, can differ substantially from concentrations measured at central sites due to spatial variability across a region and sources unique to the individual, such as cooking or cleaning in homes, traffic emissions during commutes, and widely varying sources encountered at work. Personal monitoring with small, battery-powered instruments enables the measurement of an individual's exposure as they go about their daily activities. Personal monitoring can substantially reduce exposure misclassification and improve the power to detect relationships between particulate pollution and adverse health outcomes. By partitioning exposures to known locations and sources, it may be possible to account for variable toxicity of different sources. This review outlines recent advances in the field of personal exposure assessment for particulate pollution. Advances in battery technology have improved the feasibility of 24-h monitoring, providing the ability to more completely attribute exposures to microenvironment (e.g., work, home, commute). New metrics to evaluate the relationship between particulate matter and health are also being considered, including particle number concentration, particle composition measures, and particle oxidative load. Such metrics provide opportunities to develop more precise associations between airborne particles and health and may provide opportunities for more effective regulations. PMID:26385477

  10. New Methods for Personal Exposure Monitoring for Airborne Particles

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kirsten A.; Peters, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Airborne particles have been associated with a range of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes, which has driven its monitoring at stationary, central sites throughout the world. Individual exposures, however, can differ substantially from concentrations measured at central sites due to spatial variability across a region and sources unique to the individual, such as cooking or cleaning in homes, traffic emissions during commutes, and widely varying sources encountered at work. Personal monitoring with small, battery-powered instruments enables the measurement of an individual’s exposure as they go about their daily activities. Personal monitoring can substantially reduce exposure misclassification and improve the power to detect relationships between particulate pollution and adverse health outcomes. By partitioning exposures to known locations and sources, it may be possible to account for variable toxicity of different sources. This review outlines recent advances in the field of personal exposure assessment for particulate pollution. Advances in battery technology have improved the feasibility of 24-hour monitoring, providing the ability to more completely attribute exposures to microenvironment (e.g., work, home, commute). New metrics to evaluate the relationship between particulate matter and health are also being considered, including particle number concentration, particle composition measures, and particle oxidative load. Such metrics provide opportunities to develop more precise associations between airborne particles and health and may provide opportunities for more effective regulations. PMID:26385477

  11. Precision Measurement of the (e^{+}+e^{-}) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-11-28

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e^{+}+e^{-}) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e^{+}+e^{-}) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=-3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale). PMID:25494065

  12. Precision Measurement of the(e++e-)Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; et al

    2014-11-26

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e++e-) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e++e-) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ= -3.170 ± 0.008(stat+syst) ± 0.008(energy scale).

  13. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-jin; Jung, Jungkyo; Kang, Ki-mook; Kim, Seung Hee; Xu, Zhen; Hensley, Scott; Swan, Aaron; Duersch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge. PMID:26437413

  14. Measurements of Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence at 685 nm by Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, F.; Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Corp, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or solar Fraunhofer lines in the reflected spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is a triple etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer designed and optimized specifically for the ChlF sensing from an airborne platform using this line fill-in technique. In this paper, we will present the results of APFS ChlF measurements obtained from a NASA Langley King Air during two airborne campaigns (12/12 in 2014 and 5/20 in 2015) over various land, river, and vegetated targets in Virginia during stressed and growth seasons.

  15. Remote Sensing of Chlorophyll Fluorescence by the Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Morgan, F., II; Demajistre, R.; Cook, B. D.; Corp, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the amount of fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or Fraunhofer lines in the reflected solar spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is designed and constructed specifically for airborne and groundbased ChlF measurements using the line fill-in ChlF measurement technique. In this paper, we will present the design of this triple etalon Fabry-Perot imaging instrument and the results of its vegetation fluorescence measurements obtained from the ground in the laboratory and from a NASA Langley King Air during our 2014 airborne campaign over vegetated targets in North Carolina and Virginia.

  16. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-jin; Jung, Jungkyo; Kang, Ki-mook; Kim, Seung Hee; Xu, Zhen; Hensley, Scott; Swan, Aaron; Duersch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge. PMID:26437413

  17. Airborne Radar Sounding and Ice Thickness Measurements over Lake Vostok, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, M. E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Morse, D. L.; Holt, J. W.; Kempf, S. D.; Richter, T. G.; Falola, B.; Oliason, S.

    2002-05-01

    Lake Vostok was discovered using airborne ice-sounding radar in East Antarctica during the mid 1970's, but interest in this largest known subglacial lake has increased in recent years. Frozen microbial discoveries from ice cores taken just above Lake Vostok suggest its potential for being an isolated biological ecosystem. Also, the lake's unique combination of glaciologic, hydrologic and geological processes make it a possible terrestrial analogue for sub-ice water on other planetary bodies. Satellite radar has mapped the spatial extent of the lake from surface topography, and Russian ground traverses have gathered radar and seismic data along select profiles, but the full subglacial environment has remained uncharted. In response to a proposal by R.E. Bell and M. Studinger at Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) conducted an airborne geophysical survey over Lake Vostok and its surroundings during the 2000/01 field season. The survey included 21,000 line-km of geophysical observations with a line spacing of 7.5 km and a tie-line spacing of 11.25 or 22.5 km. The instrument suite included incoherent ice-sounding radar, laser altimetry, and precise GPS positioning and navigation, as well as airborne gravity and magnetics measurements. The radar system consisted of a 60 MHz, 8000 watt peak power transmitter operating in pulsed continuous-wave mode at 12.5 kHz (with 250 ns pulse width), a log-detection incoherent receiver (with 80 dB dynamic range), and a signal digitizer with a unique capability to average signals rapidly. Incoherent radar observations constructed from 2048 averaged transmissions occurred roughly every 12 m along-track. Ice thicknesses in excess of 4000 m were routinely sounded over Lake Vostok using this system. In addition to the incoherent radar, a new acquisition system was developed on an experimental basis to coherently integrate radar signals utilizing synthetic aperture radar techniques

  18. Pluto's Atmosphere from the 29 June 2015 Occultation: SOFIA Airborne Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, Michael J.; MIT-Williams Occulation Group (MIT/Williams College/Lowell Observatory/SAAO), HIPO Instrument Group (Lowell Observatory/MIT), FLITECAM Instrument Group (UCLA), FPI+ Instrument Group (DSI/U. Stuttgart), SOFIA Operations Group (NASA/USRA/DSI)

    2016-01-01

    After an extensive prediction effort, the 29 June 2015 occultation by Pluto was observed from both airborne (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy - SOFIA) and numerous ground-based telescopes (Bosh et al. 2015, in prep.). Real-time prediction updates allowed placement of the SOFIA telescope with its four detectors deep within the central-flash region of the atmospheric occultation. Fortuitously, the Mount John University Observatory (Lake Tekapo, New Zealand) was also within the central-flash region. This happenstance allowed for direct mutual calibration of the SOFIA data with the ground-based data in multiple central-flash detections in several colors from each facility resulting in a full maping of the central-flash evolute.Combining all of the data allows for a precise measurement of the SOFIA flight path through the shadow, and direct measurement of Pluto's atmospheric shadow size.We will examine and discuss the central-flash signatures from the deepest pass yet recorded through a Pluto central flash. The relative orientations and asymmetries in the various central flash data allow us to use them to tightly constrain the lower atmospheric ellipticity and orientation of likely winds with respect to Pluto's figure. The ratio of the two separate central flashes (airborne and ground-based) is also a strong constraint on the geometric solution for the full occultation data set, and the absolute height of the central flashes with respect to those expected for a clear isothermal atmosphere places constraints on haze densities and thermal gradients in Pluto's lower atmosphere. We can also compare the central-flash signatures in several colors to establish bounds on haze-particle sizes in the lower atmosphere.SOFIA is jointly operated by the Universities Space Research Association, Inc. (USRA), under NASA contract NAS2-97001, and the Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) under DLR contract 50 OK 0901 to the University of Stuttgart. Support for this work was

  19. Aspects regarding vertical distribution of greenhouse gases resulted from in situ airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscornea, Andreea; Sorin Vajaiac, Nicolae; Ardelean, Magdalena; Benciu, Silviu Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades the air quality, as well as other components of the environment, has been severely affected by uncontrolled emissions of gases - most known as greenhouse gases (GHG). The main role of GHG is given by the direct influence on the Earth's radiative budget, through Sun light scattering and indirectly by participating in cloud formation. Aldo, many efforts were made for reducing the high levels of these pollutants, e.g., International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) initiatives, Montreal Protocol, etc., this issue is still open. In this context, this study aims to present several aspects regarding the vertical distribution in the lower atmosphere of some greenhouse gases: water vapours, CO, CO2 and methane. Bucharest and its metropolitan area is one of the most polluted regions of Romania due to high traffic. For assessing the air quality of this area, in situ measurements of water vapours, CO, CO2 and CH4 were performed using a Britten Norman Islander BN2 aircraft equipped with a Picarro gas analyser, model G2401-mc, able to provide precised, continuous and accurate data in real time. This configuration consisting in aircraft and airborne instruments was tested for the first time in Romania. For accomplishing the objectives of the measurement campaign, there were proposed several flight strategies which included vertical and horizontal soundings from 105 m to 3300 m and vice-versa around Clinceni area (20 km West of Bucharest). During 5 days (25.08.2015 - 31.08.2015) were performed 7 flights comprising 10h 18min research flight hours. The measured concentrations of GHS ranged between 0.18 - 2.2 ppm for water vapours with an average maximum value of 1.7 ppm, 0.04 - 0.53 ppm for CO with an average maximum value of 0.21 ppm, 377 - 437.5 ppm for CO2 with an average maximum value of 397 ppm and 1.7 - 6.1 ppm for CH4 with an average maximum value of 2.195 ppm. It was noticed that measured concentrations of GHG are decreasing for high values of sounding

  20. The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar: an Advanced Technology Airborne Laser Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabney, P.; Harding, D. J.; Huss, T.; Valett, S.; Yu, A. W.; Zheng, Y.

    2009-12-01

    photon ranging precision of 8 cm. The high speed, high throughput data system is capable of recording 22 million time-tagged photon detection events per second. At typical aircraft flight speeds, each of the 16 channels acquires a single photon range every 5 to 15 cm along the four profiles providing a highly sampled measure of surface roughness. The nominal flight altitude is 5 km yielding 10 m spacing between the four beam profiles, providing a measure of surface slope at 10 m length scales. The altitude is currently constrained by the low signal level of the NIR cross-polarized channels. SIMPL’s measurement capabilities provide information about surface elevation, roughness, slope and type of value in characterizing ice sheet surfaces and sea ice, including their melt state. Capabilities will be illustrated using data acquired over Lake Erie ice cover in February, 2009.