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Sample records for airborne pulsed doppler

  1. Radiometric Calibration of an Airborne CO2 Pulsed Doppler Lidar Using a Natural Earth Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, Dean R.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Tratt, David M.; Srivastava, Vandana; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of an airborne CO2 pulsed Doppler lidar has been accomplished using surface retro-reflection signals from the White Sands National Monument, New Mexico, USA. Two circular passes were made at altitudes of 6.26 and 9.26 km. The computed calibration factors for both altitudes are in excellent agreement with the value derived from standard ground-based measurements involving a fixed sandpaper target of known reflectance. This finding corroborates a previous study that successfully calibrated an airborne continuous-wave Doppler lidar using a variety of natural Earth surfaces. The present results indicate that relatively uniform Earth-surface targets can be used for in-flight calibration of pulsed airborne, and, in principal, spaceborne lidars.

  2. Designing clutter rejection filters with complex coefficients for airborne pulsed Doppler weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamora, Dennis A.

    1993-01-01

    Ground clutter interference is a major problem for airborne pulse Doppler radar operating at low altitudes in a look-down mode. With Doppler zero set at the aircraft ground speed, ground clutter rejection filtering is typically accomplished using a high-pass filter with real valued coefficients and a stopband notch centered at zero Doppler. Clutter spectra from the NASA Wind Shear Flight Experiments of l991-1992 show that the dominant clutter mode can be located away from zero Doppler, particularly at short ranges dominated by sidelobe returns. Use of digital notch filters with complex valued coefficients so that the stopband notch can be located at any Doppler frequency is investigated. Several clutter mode tracking algorithms are considered to estimate the Doppler frequency location of the dominant clutter mode. From the examination of night data, when a dominant clutter mode away from zero Doppler is present, complex filtering is able to significantly increase clutter rejection over use of a notch filter centered at zero Doppler.

  3. The pulse-pair algorithm as a robust estimator of turbulent weather spectral parameters using airborne pulse Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Lee, Jonggil

    1991-01-01

    The pulse pair method for spectrum parameter estimation is commonly used in pulse Doppler weather radar signal processing since it is economical to implement and can be shown to be a maximum likelihood estimator. With the use of airborne weather radar for windshear detection, the turbulent weather and strong ground clutter return spectrum differs from that assumed in its derivation, so the performance robustness of the pulse pair technique must be understood. Here, the effect of radar system pulse to pulse phase jitter and signal spectrum skew on the pulse pair algorithm performance is discussed. Phase jitter effect may be significant when the weather return signal to clutter ratio is very low and clutter rejection filtering is attempted. The analysis can be used to develop design specifications for airborne radar system phase stability. It is also shown that the weather return spectrum skew can cause a significant bias in the pulse pair mean windspeed estimates, and that the poly pulse pair algorithm can reduce this bias. It is suggested that use of a spectrum mode estimator may be more appropriate in characterizing the windspeed within a radar range resolution cell for detection of hazardous windspeed gradients.

  4. Localized Optimization and Effectiveness Analysis of Medium PRF Airborne Pulse Doppler Radars in the Turkish Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISAR Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ITU International Telecommunications Union LOS Line of...Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) • Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) • Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ( ISAR ) • Weapon control radar 18...can be detected and tracked. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ( ISAR ) pulse Doppler designs are capable of

  5. Analysis and improved design considerations for airborne pulse Doppler radar signal processing in the detection of hazardous windshear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonggil

    1990-01-01

    High resolution windspeed profile measurements are needed to provide reliable detection of hazardous low altitude windshear with an airborne pulse Doppler radar. The system phase noise in a Doppler weather radar may degrade the spectrum moment estimation quality and the clutter cancellation capability which are important in windshear detection. Also the bias due to weather return Doppler spectrum skewness may cause large errors in pulse pair spectral parameter estimates. These effects are analyzed for the improvement of an airborne Doppler weather radar signal processing design. A method is presented for the direct measurement of windspeed gradient using low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) radar. This spatial gradient is essential in obtaining the windshear hazard index. As an alternative, the modified Prony method is suggested as a spectrum mode estimator for both the clutter and weather signal. Estimation of Doppler spectrum modes may provide the desired windshear hazard information without the need of any preliminary processing requirement such as clutter filtering. The results obtained by processing a NASA simulation model output support consideration of mode identification as one component of a windshear detection algorithm.

  6. Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithms for the Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Ray, Taylor J.

    2013-01-01

    Two versions of airborne wind profiling algorithms for the pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. Each algorithm utilizes different number of line-of-sight (LOS) lidar returns while compensating the adverse effects of different coordinate systems between the aircraft and the Earth. One of the two algorithms APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) estimates wind products using two LOSs. The other algorithm utilizes five LOSs. The airborne lidar data were acquired during the NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010. The wind profile products from the two algorithms are compared with the dropsonde data to validate their results.

  7. Airborne Wind Profiling With the Data Acquisition and Processing System for a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia flew on the NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) during the summer of 2010. The participation was part of the project Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) Air. Selected results of airborne wind profiling are presented and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes. Panoramic presentations of different wind parameters over a nominal observation time span are also presented for selected GRIP data sets. The realtime data acquisition and analysis software that was employed during the GRIP campaign is introduced with its unique features.

  8. Noise Whitening in Airborne Wind Profiling With a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Arthur, Grant E.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Two different noise whitening methods in airborne wind profiling with a pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. In order to provide accurate wind parameter estimates from the airborne lidar data acquired during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010, the adverse effects of background instrument noise must be compensated properly in the early stage of data processing. The results of the two methods are presented using selected GRIP data and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes.

  9. Data Acquisition and Processing System for Airborne Wind Profiling with a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, J. Y.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A data acquisition and signal processing system is being developed for a 2-micron airborne wind profiling coherent Doppler lidar system. This lidar, called the Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN), is based on a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser transmitter and 15-cm diameter telescope. It is being packaged for flights onboard the NASA DC-8, with the first flights in the summer of 2010 in support of the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign for the study of hurricanes. The data acquisition and processing system is housed in a compact PCI chassis and consists of four components such as a digitizer, a digital signal processing (DSP) module, a video controller, and a serial port controller. The data acquisition and processing software (DAPS) is also being developed to control the system including real-time data analysis and display. The system detects an external 10 Hz trigger pulse and initiates the data acquisition and processing process, and displays selected wind profile parameters such as Doppler shift, power distribution, wind directions and velocities. Doppler shift created by aircraft motion is measured by an inertial navigation/GPS sensor and fed to the signal processing system for real-time removal of aircraft effects from wind measurements. A general overview of the system and the DAPS as well as the coherent Doppler lidar system is presented in this paper.

  10. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  11. Pulse subtraction Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahue, Veronique; Mari, Jean Martial; Eckersley, Robert J.; Caro, Colin G.; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances have demonstrated the feasibility of molecular imaging using targeted microbubbles and ultrasound. One technical challenge is to selectively detect attached bubbles from those freely flowing bubbles and surrounding tissue. Pulse Inversion Doppler is an imaging technique enabling the selective detection of both static and moving ultrasound contrast agents: linear scatterers generate a single band Doppler spectrum, while non-linear scatterers generate a double band spectrum, one being uniquely correlated with the presence of contrast agents and non-linear tissue signals. We demonstrate that similar spectrums, and thus the same discrimination, can be obtained through a Doppler implementation of Pulse Subtraction. This is achieved by reconstructing a virtual echo using the echo generated from a short pulse transmission. Moreover by subtracting from this virtual echo the one generated from a longer pulse transmission, it is possible to fully suppress the echo from linear scatterers, while for non-linear scatterers, a signal will remain, allowing classical agent detection. Simulations of a single moving microbubble and a moving linear scatterer subject to these pulses show that when the virtual echo and the long pulse echo are used to perform pulsed Doppler, the power Doppler spectrum allows separation of linear and non-linear moving scattering. Similar results are obtained on experimental data acquired on a flow containing either microbubble contrast agents or linear blood mimicking fluid. This new Doppler method constitutes an alternative to Pulse Inversion Doppler and preliminary results suggest that similar dual band spectrums could be obtained by the combination of any non-linear detection technique with Doppler demodulation.

  12. Airborne Differential Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.; Bidwell, S.; Liao, L.; Rincon, R.; Heymsfield, G.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Precipitation Radar aboard the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite has shown the potential for spaceborne sensing of snow and rain by means of an incoherent pulsed radar operating at 13.8 GHz. The primary advantage of radar relative to passive instruments arises from the fact that the radar can image the 3-dimensional structure of storms. As a consequence, the radar data can be used to determine the vertical rain structure, rain type (convective/stratiform) effective storm height, and location of the melting layer. The radar, moreover, can be used to detect snow and improve the estimation of rain rate over land. To move toward spaceborne weather radars that can be deployed routinely as part of an instrument set consisting of passive and active sensors will require the development of less expensive, lighter-weight radars that consume less power. At the same time, the addition of a second frequency and an upgrade to Doppler capability are features that are needed to retrieve information on the characteristics of the drop size distribution, vertical air motion and storm dynamics. One approach to the problem is to use a single broad-band transmitter-receiver and antenna where two narrow-band frequencies are spaced apart by 5% to 10% of the center frequency. Use of Ka-band frequencies (26.5 GHz - 40 GHz) affords two advantages: adequate spatial resolution can be attained with a relatively small antenna and the differential reflectivity and mean Doppler signals are directly related to the median mass diameter of the snow and raindrop size distributions. The differential mean Doppler signal has the additional property that this quantity depends only on that part of the radial speed of the hydrometeors that is drop-size dependent. In principle, the mean and differential mean Doppler from a near-nadir viewing radar can be used to retrieve vertical air motion as well as the total mean radial velocity. In the paper, we present theoretical calculations for the

  13. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  14. The Next Generation Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Salazar, Jorge; Chandrasekar, V.

    2013-04-01

    NCAR's Electra Doppler radar (ELDORA) with a dual-beam slotted waveguide array using dual-transmitter, dual-beam, rapid scan and step-chirped waveform significantly improved the spatial scale to 300m (Hildebrand et al. 1996). However, ELDORA X-band radar's penetration into precipitation is limited by attenuation and is not designed to collect polarimetric measurements to remotely estimate microphysics. ELDORA has been placed on dormancy because its airborne platform (P3 587) was retired in January 2013. The US research community has strongly voiced the need to continue measurement capability similar to the ELDORA. A critical weather research area is quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting (QPE/QPF). In recent years, hurricane intensity change involving eye-eyewall interactions has drawn research attention (Montgomery et al., 2006; Bell and Montgomery, 2006). In the case of convective precipitation, two issues, namely, (1) when and where convection will be initiated, and (2) determining the organization and structure of ensuing convection, are key for QPF. Therefore collocated measurements of 3-D winds and precipitation microphysics are required for achieving significant skills in QPF and QPE. Multiple radars in dual-Doppler configuration with polarization capability estimate dynamical and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation are mostly available over land. However, storms over complex terrain, the ocean and in forest regions are not observable by ground-based radars (Bluestein and Wakimoto, 2003). NCAR/EOL is investigating potential configurations for the next generation airborne radar that is capable of retrieving dynamic and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. ELDORA's slotted waveguide array radar is not compatible for dual-polarization measurements. Therefore, the new design has to address both dual-polarization capability and platform requirements to replace the ELDORA system. NCAR maintains a C-130

  15. Exploratory Meeting on Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, G. H. (Editor); Kaufman, J. W. (Editor); Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific interests and applications of the Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement System to severe storms and local weather are discussed. The main areas include convective phenomena, local circulation, atmospheric boundary layer, atmospheric dispersion, and industrial aerodynamics.

  16. Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind LIDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y. (Inventor); Koch, Grady J. (Inventor); Kavaya, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems, methods, and devices of the present invention enable airborne Doppler Wind LIDAR system measurements and INS/GPS measurements to be combined to estimate wind parameters and compensate for instrument misalignment. In a further embodiment, the wind speed and wind direction may be computed based on two orthogonal line-of-sight LIDAR returns.

  17. Users guide for an Airborne Windshear Doppler Radar Simulation (AWDRS) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.

    1990-01-01

    A description is provided of the Airborne Windshear Doppler Radar Simulation (AWDRS) program developed for NASA-Langley by the Research Triangle Institute. The radar simulation program is a comprehensive calculation of the signal characteristics and expected outputs of an airborne coherent pulsed Doppler radar system viewing a low level microburst along or near the approach path of the aircraft. The detailed nature of the simulation permits the quick evaluation of proposed trade-offs in radar system parameters and the evaluation of the performance of proposed configurations in various microburst/clutter environments. The simulation also provides a test bed for various proposed signal processing techniques for minimizing the effects of noise, phase jitter, and ground clutter and maximizing the useful information derived for avoidance of microburst windshear by aircraft.

  18. Inline Ultrasonic Rheometry by Pulsed Doppler

    SciTech Connect

    Pfund, David M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Pappas, Richard A.

    2006-12-22

    This will be a discussion of the non-invasive determination of the viscosity of a non-Newtonian fluid in laminar pipe flow over the range of shear rates present in the pipe. The procedure used requires knowledge of the flow profile in and the pressure drop along a long straight run of pipe. The profile is determined by using a pulsed ultrasonic Doppler velocimeter. This approach is ideal for making non-invasive, real-time measurements for monitoring and control. Rheograms of a shear thinning, thixotropic gel will be presented. The operating parameters and limitations of the Doppler-based instrument will be discussed. The most significant limitation is velocity gradient broadening of the Doppler spectra near the walls of the pipe. This limitation can be significant for strongly shear thinning fluids (depending also on the ratio of beam to pipe diameter and the transducer's insertion angle).

  19. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distribution with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Jazembski, Maurice; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler laser radar (lidar), when operated from an airborne platform, is a unique tool for the study of atmospheric and surface processes and features. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are typically at a disadvantage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of an eye-safe approx. 1 Joule/pulse lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and flight computer system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically-resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is approx. 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (of order 1 micron diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and composition. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be approx. 1 meter per second. A variety of applications have been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of. flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the first measurements of eyewall and boundary layer winds within a

  20. NASA airborne Doppler lidar program: Data characteristics of 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    The first flights of the NASA/Marshall airborne CO2 Doppler lidar wind measuring system were made during the summer of 1981. Successful measurements of two-dimensional flow fields were made to ranges of 15 km from the aircraft track. The characteristics of the data obtained are examined. A study of various artifacts introduced into the data set by incomplete compensation for aircraft dynamics is summarized. Most of these artifacts can be corrected by post processing, which reduces velocity errors in the reconstructed flow field to remarkably low levels.

  1. Flight Testing of the TWiLiTE Airborne Molecular Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Machan, Roman; Reed, Daniel; Cargo, Ryan; Wilkens, David J.; Hart, William; Yorks, John; Scott, Stan; Wake, Shane; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan

    2010-01-01

    In September, 2009 the TWiLiTE (Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment) direct detection Doppler lidar was integrated for engineering flight testing on the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft. The TWiI,iTE Doppler lidar measures vertical profiles of wind by transmitting a short ultraviolet (355 nm) laser pulse into the atmosphere, collecting the laser light scattered back to the lidar by air molecules and measuring the Doppler shifted frequency of that light. The magnitude of the Doppler shift is proportional to the wind speed of the air in the parcel scattering the laser light. TWiLiTE was developed with funding from the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (11P). The primary objectives of the TWiLiTE program are twofold: 1) to advance the development of key technologies and subsystems critical for a future space based Global 3-1) Wind Mission, as recommended by the National Research Council in the recent Decadal Survey for Earth Science [1] and 2) to develop, for the first time, a fully autonomous airborne Doppler lidar and to demonstrate tropospheric wind profile measurements from a high altitude downward looking, moving platform to simulate spaceborne measurements. In this paper we will briefly describe the instrument followed by a discussion of the results from the 2009 engineering test flights

  2. Hurricane Wind Field Measurements with Scanning Airborne Doppler Lidar During CAMEX-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, D. R.; Howell, J. N.; Darby, L. S.; Hardesty, R. M.; Traff, D. M.; Menzies, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3), the first hurricane wind field measurements with Doppler lidar were achieved. Wind fields were mapped within the eye, along the eyewall, in the central dense overcast, and in the marine boundary layer encompassing the inflow region. Spatial coverage was determined primarily by cloud distribution and opacity. Within optically-thin cirrus slant range of 20- 25 km was achieved, whereas no propagation was obtained during penetration of dense cloud. Measurements were obtained with the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. MACAWS was developed and operated cooperatively by the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A pseudo-dual Doppler technique ("co-planar scanning") is used to map the horizontal component of the wind at several vertical levels. Pulses from the laser are directed out the left side of the aircraft in the desired directions using computer-controlled rotating prisms. Upon exiting the aircraft, the beam is completely eyesafe. Aircraft attitude and speed are taken into account during real-time signal processing, resulting in determination of the ground-relative wind to an accuracy of about 1 m/s magnitude and about 10 deg direction. Beam pointing angle errors are about 0.1 deg, equivalent to about 17 m at 10 km. Horizontal resolution is about 1 km (along-track) for typical signal processor and scanner settings; vertical resolution varies with range. Results from CAMEX-3 suggest that scanning Doppler wind lidar can complement airborne Doppler radar by providing wind field measurements in regions that are devoid of hydrometeors. At present MACAWS observations are being assimilated into experimental forecast models and satellite Doppler wind lidar simulations to evaluate the relative impact.

  3. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550 Section 892.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... features of continuous wave doppler-effect technology with pulsed-echo effect technology and is intended...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550 Section 892.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... features of continuous wave doppler-effect technology with pulsed-echo effect technology and is intended...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550 Section 892.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... features of continuous wave doppler-effect technology with pulsed-echo effect technology and is intended...

  6. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550 Section 892.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... features of continuous wave doppler-effect technology with pulsed-echo effect technology and is intended...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550 Section 892.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1550 Ultrasonic pulsed doppler...

  8. Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar Post Data Processing Software DAPS-LV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y. (Inventor); Koch, Grady J. (Inventor); Kavaya, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems, methods, and devices of the present invention enable post processing of airborne Doppler wind LIDAR data. In an embodiment, airborne Doppler wind LIDAR data software written in LabVIEW may be provided and may run two versions of different airborne wind profiling algorithms. A first algorithm may be the Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind LIDAR ("APOLO") using airborne wind LIDAR data from two orthogonal directions to estimate wind parameters, and a second algorithm may be a five direction based method using pseudo inverse functions to estimate wind parameters. The various embodiments may enable wind profiles to be compared using different algorithms, may enable wind profile data for long haul color displays to be generated, may display long haul color displays, and/or may enable archiving of data at user-selectable altitudes over a long observation period for data distribution and population.

  9. Analysis of airborne Doppler lidar, Doppler radar and tall tower measurements of atmospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluestein, H. B.; Doviak, R. J.; Eilts, M. D.; Mccaul, E. W.; Rabin, R.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Zrnic, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The first experiment to combine airborne Doppler Lidar and ground-based dual Doppler Radar measurements of wind to detail the lower tropospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather was conducted in central Oklahoma during four days in June-July 1981. Data from these unique remote sensing instruments, coupled with data from conventional in-situ facilities, i.e., 500-m meteorological tower, rawinsonde, and surface based sensors, were analyzed to enhance understanding of wind, waves and turbulence. The purposes of the study were to: (1) compare winds mapped by ground-based dual Doppler radars, airborne Doppler lidar, and anemometers on a tower; (2) compare measured atmospheric boundary layer flow with flows predicted by theoretical models; (3) investigate the kinematic structure of air mass boundaries that precede the development of severe storms; and (4) study the kinematic structure of thunderstorm phenomena (downdrafts, gust fronts, etc.) that produce wind shear and turbulence hazardous to aircraft operations. The report consists of three parts: Part 1, Intercomparison of Wind Data from Airborne Lidar, Ground-Based Radars and Instrumented 444 m Tower; Part 2, The Structure of the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer as Revealed by Lidar and Doppler Radars; and Part 3, Doppler Lidar Observations in Thunderstorm Environments.

  10. Spectrum Modal Analysis for the Detection of Low-Altitude Windshear with Airborne Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunkel, Matthew W.

    1992-01-01

    A major obstacle in the estimation of windspeed patterns associated with low-altitude windshear with an airborne pulsed Doppler radar system is the presence of strong levels of ground clutter which can strongly bias a windspeed estimate. Typical solutions attempt to remove the clutter energy from the return through clutter rejection filtering. Proposed is a method whereby both the weather and clutter modes present in a return spectrum can be identified to yield an unbiased estimate of the weather mode without the need for clutter rejection filtering. An attempt will be made to show that modeling through a second order extended Prony approach is sufficient for the identification of the weather mode. A pattern recognition approach to windspeed estimation from the identified modes is derived and applied to both simulated and actual flight data. Comparisons between windspeed estimates derived from modal analysis and the pulse-pair estimator are included as well as associated hazard factors. Also included is a computationally attractive method for estimating windspeeds directly from the coefficients of a second-order autoregressive model. Extensions and recommendations for further study are included.

  11. Pulsed Doppler echocardiographic analysis of mitral regurgitation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Loperfido, F; Biasucci, L M; Pennestri, F; Laurenzi, F; Gimigliano, F; Vigna, C; Rossi, E; Favuzzi, A; Santarelli, P; Manzoli, U

    1986-10-01

    In 72 patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI), mitral regurgitation (MR) was assessed by pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography and compared with physical and 2-dimensional echocardiographic findings. MR was found by Doppler in 29 of 42 patients (62%) with anterior MI, 11 of 30 (37%) with inferior MI (p less than 0.01) and in none of 20 normal control subjects. MR was more frequent in patients who underwent Doppler study 3 months after MI than in those who underwent Doppler at discharge (anterior MI = 83% vs 50%, p less than 0.01; inferior MI = 47% vs 27%, p = not significant). Of 15 patients who underwent Doppler studies both times, 3 (all with anterior MI) had MR only on the second study. Of the patients with Doppler MR, 12 of 27 (44%) with a left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) greater than 30% and 1 of 13 (8%) with an EF of 30% or less (p less than 0.01) had an MR systolic murmur. Mitral prolapse or eversion and papillary muscle fibrosis were infrequent in MI patients, whether or not Doppler MR was present. The degree of Doppler MR correlated with EF (r = -0.61), LV systolic volume (r = 0.47), and systolic and diastolic mitral anulus circumference (r = 0.52 and 0.51, respectively). Doppler MR was present in 24 of 28 patients (86%) with an EF of 40% or less and in 16 of 44 (36%) with EF more than 40% (p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Airborne bathymetric charting using pulsed blue-green lasers.

    PubMed

    Kim, H H

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory and airborne experiments have proven the feasibility and demonstrated the techniques of an airborne pulsed laser system for rapidly mapping coastal water bathymetry. Water depths of 10 +/- 0.25 m were recorded in waters having an effective attenuation coefficient of 0.175 m(-1). A2-MW peak power Nd:YAG pulsed laser was flown at an altitude of 600 m. An advanced system, incorporating a mirror scanner, a high pulsed rate laser, and a good signal processor, could survey coastal zones at the rate of several square miles per hour.

  13. Airborne bathymetric charting using pulsed blue-green lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory and airborne experiments have proven the feasibility and demonstrated the techniques of an airborne pulsed laser system for rapidly mapping coastal water bathymetry. Water depths of 10 plus or minus 0.25 m were recorded in waters having an effective attenuation coefficient of 0.175 m. A 2-MW peak power Nd:YAG pulsed laser was flown at an altitude of 600 m. An advanced system, incorporating a mirror scanner, a high pulsed rate laser, and a good signal processor, could survey coastal zones at the rate of several square miles per hour.

  14. Design and Development of a Scanning Airborne Direct Detection Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Schwemmer, Geary; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan; Wilkerson, Thomas; Atlas, Robert; Sirota, Marcos; Lindemann, Scott

    2006-01-01

    In the fall of 2005 we began developing an airborne scanning direct detection molecular Doppler lidar. The instrument is being built as part of the Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE), a three year project selected by the NASA Earth Sun Technology Office under the Instrument Incubator Program. The TWiLiTE project is a collaboration involving scientists and engineers from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NOAA ESRL, Utah State University Space Dynamics Lab, Michigan Aerospace Corporation and Sigma Space Corporation. The TWiLiTE instrument will leverage significant research and development investments made by NASA Goddard and it's partners in the past several years in key lidar technologies and sub-systems (lasers, telescopes, scanning systems, detectors and receivers) required to enable spaceborne global wind lidar measurement. These sub-systems will be integrated into a complete molecular direct detection Doppler wind lidar system designed for autonomous operation on a high altitude aircraft, such as the NASA WB57. The WB57 flies at an altitude of 18 km and from this vantage point the nadir viewing Doppler lidar will be able to profile winds through the full troposphere. The TWiLiTE integrated airborne Doppler lidar instrument will be the first demonstration of a airborne scanning direct detection Doppler lidar and will serve as a critical milestone on the path to a future spaceborne tropospheric wind system. In addition to being a technology testbed for space based tropospheric wind lidar, when completed the TWiLiTE high altitude airborne lidar will be used for studying mesoscale dynamics and storm research (e.g. winter storms, hurricanes) and could be used for calibration and validation of satellite based wind systems such as ESA's Aeolus Atmospheric Dynamics Mission. The TWiLiTE Doppler lidar will have the capability to profile winds in clear air from the aircraft altitude of 18 km to the surface with 250 m vertical resolution and < 2mls

  15. Airborne/Space-Based Doppler Lidar Wind Sounders Sampling the PBL and Other Regions of Significant Beta and U Inhomogeneities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, Dave

    1998-01-01

    This final report covers the period from April 1994 through March 1998. The proposed research was organized under four main tasks. Those tasks were: (1) Investigate the vertical and horizontal velocity structures within and adjacent to thin and subvisual cirrus; (2) Investigate the lowest 1 km of the PBL and develop algorithms for processing pulsed Doppler lidar data obtained from single shots into regions of significant inhomogeneities in Beta and U; (3) Participate in OSSEs including those designed to establish shot density requirements for meso-gamma scale phenomena with quasi-persistent locations (e.g., jets, leewaves, tropical storms); and (4) Participate in the planning and execution of an airborne mission to measure winds with a pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar. Over the four year period of this research contract, work on all four tasks has yielded significant results which have led to 38 professional presentations (conferences and publications) and have been folded into the science justification for an approved NASA space mission, SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment), in 2001. Also this research has, through Task 4, led to a funded proposal to work directly on a NASA field campaign, CAMEX III, in which an airborne Doppler wind lidar will be used to investigate the cloud-free circulations near tropical storms. Monthly progress reports required under this contract are on file. This final report will highlight major accomplishments, including some that were not foreseen in the original proposal. The presentation of this final report includes this written document as well as material that is better presented via the internet (web pages). There is heavy reference to appended papers and documents. Thus, the main body of the report will serve to summarize the key efforts and findings.

  16. 77 FR 37470 - Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground Speed and/or Drift Angle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground Speed... Doppler radar ground speed and/or drift angle measuring equipment (for air carrier aircraft). SUMMARY: This notice announces the FAA's intent to cancel TSO-C65a, Airborne Doppler radar ground speed...

  17. Pulsed photoacoustic Doppler flow measurements in blood-mimicking phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2011-03-01

    The feasibility of making spatially resolved measurements of blood flow using pulsed photoacoustic Doppler techniques has been explored. Doppler time shifts were quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated within a blood-simulating phantom using pairs of laser light pulses. The photoacoustic waves were detected using a focussed or planar PZT ultrasound transducer. For each flow measurement, a series of 100 waveform pairs was collected. Previous data processing methods involved rejection of poorly correlated waveform pairs; the modal velocity value and standard deviation were then extracted from the selected distribution of velocity measurements. However, the data selection criteria used in this approach is to some extent arbitrary. A new data analysis protocol, which involves averaging the 100 cross-correlation functions and thus uses all of the measured data, has been designed in order to prevent exclusion of outliers. This more rigorous approach has proved effective for quantifying the linear motion of micron-scale absorbers imprinted on an acetate sheet moving with velocities in the range 0.14 to 1.25 ms-1. Experimental parameters, such as the time separation between the laser pulses and the transducer frequency response, were evaluated in terms of their effect on the accuracy, resolution and range of measurable velocities. The technique was subsequently applied to fluid phantoms flowing at rates less than 5 mms-1 along an optically transparent tube. Preliminary results are described for three different suspensions of phenolic resin microspheres, and also for whole blood. Velocity information was obtained even under non-optimal conditions using a low frequency transducer and a low pulse repetition frequency. The distinguishing advantage of pulsed rather than continuous-wave excitation is that spatially resolved velocity measurements can be made. This offers the prospect of mapping flow within the microcirculation and thus

  18. Adaptive clutter rejection filters for airborne Doppler weather radar applied to the detection of low altitude windshear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, Byron M.

    1989-01-01

    An optimum adaptive clutter rejection filter for use with airborne Doppler weather radar is presented. The radar system is being designed to operate at low-altitudes for the detection of windshear in an airport terminal area where ground clutter returns may mask the weather return. The coefficients of the adaptive clutter rejection filter are obtained using a complex form of a square root normalized recursive least squares lattice estimation algorithm which models the clutter return data as an autoregressive process. The normalized lattice structure implementation of the adaptive modeling process for determining the filter coefficients assures that the resulting coefficients will yield a stable filter and offers possible fixed point implementation. A 10th order FIR clutter rejection filter indexed by geographical location is designed through autoregressive modeling of simulated clutter data. Filtered data, containing simulated dry microburst and clutter return, are analyzed using pulse-pair estimation techniques. To measure the ability of the clutter rejection filters to remove the clutter, results are compared to pulse-pair estimates of windspeed within a simulated dry microburst without clutter. In the filter evaluation process, post-filtered pulse-pair width estimates and power levels are also used to measure the effectiveness of the filters. The results support the use of an adaptive clutter rejection filter for reducing the clutter induced bias in pulse-pair estimates of windspeed.

  19. Comparison of Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Calibration Using Earth Surface Targets in Laboratory and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana

    1999-01-01

    Routine backscatter, beta, measurements by an airborne or space-based lidar from designated earth surfaces with known and fairly uniform beta properties can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities. This can in turn be used to obtain accurate atmospheric aerosol and cloud beta measurements on large spatial scales. This is important because achieving a precise calibration factor for large pulsed lidars then need not rest solely on using a standard hard target procedure. Furthermore, calibration from designated earth surfaces would provide an inflight performance evaluation of the lidar. Hence, with active remote sensing using lasers with high resolution data, calibration of a space-based lidar using earth's surfaces will be extremely useful. The calibration methodology using the earth's surface initially requires measuring beta of various earth surfaces simulated in the laboratory using a focused continuous wave (CW) CO2 Doppler lidar and then use these beta measurements as standards for the earth surface signal from airborne or space-based lidars. Since beta from the earth's surface may be retrieved at different angles of incidence, beta would also need to be measured at various angles of incidences of the different surfaces. In general, Earth-surface reflectance measurements have been made in the infrared, but the use of lidars to characterize them and in turn use of the Earth's surface to calibrate lidars has not been made. The feasibility of this calibration methodology is demonstrated through a comparison of these laboratory measurements with actual earth surface beta retrieved from the same lidar during the NASA/Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on NASA's DC8 aircraft from 13 - 26 September, 1995. For the selected earth surface from the airborne lidar data, an average beta for the surface was established and the statistics of lidar efficiency was determined. This was compared with the actual lidar efficiency

  20. Range ambiguity resolution for high PRF pulse-Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postema, G. B.

    The range ambiguity resolution for high 'PRF pulse-Doppler radars can be resolved using a simple algorithm based on residue arithmetic. The unambiguous range is found from R = T + R(a), where T is the output of a look-up table and R(a) is one of the measured ambiguous ranges. This formula is easily extended to multiple PRF ranging systems, where three or more measurements are required for the ambiguity resolution. Target obscuration in clutter reduces the visibility and leads, especially in dense target environments, to ghost ranges. It is shown that long range coverage requires a small resolved pulse length and PRFs as low as practical in the intended clutter and target environment. Special attention is given to the generation of sparsely populated look-up tables that reduce the ghosting problem. A practical example for an S-band surveillance radar is presented.

  1. Waveform design and Doppler sensitivity analysis for nonlinear FM chirp pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, J. A.; Fairhead, A. C.

    1986-04-01

    The use of pulse compression to obtain simultaneous long-range detection and good range resolution is described. The types of modulation that can be used to obtain pulse compression are outlined with particular emphasis on their performance under Doppler shift. It is shown that nonlinear frequency-modulated (FM) signals are capable of providing low range-sidelobes while being compressed using a matched filter. A design method for nonlinear FM signals based on window functions is outlined. Simulation results for pulse compression of nonlinear FM signals based on four different window functions with Doppler shift are presented. The results are used to define the effects of Doppler shift on the pulse compression. An analysis is presented, and interpreted pictorially, that explains the effects of Doppler shift on the pulse compression. The analysis is also extended to explain the better Doppler performance of hybrid FM pulse compression systems.

  2. A New Active Cavitation Mapping Technique for Pulsed HIFU Applications – Bubble Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new active cavitation mapping technique for pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) applications termed bubble Doppler is proposed and its feasibility tested in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. pHIFU therapy uses short pulses, delivered at low pulse repetition frequency, to cause transient bubble activity that has been shown to enhance drug and gene delivery to tissues. The current gold standard for detecting and monitoring cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments is passive cavitation detection (PCD), which provides minimal information on the spatial distribution of the bubbles. B-mode imaging can detect hyperecho formation, but has very limited sensitivity, especially to small, transient microbubbles. The bubble Doppler method proposed here is based on a fusion of the adaptations of three Doppler techniques that had been previously developed for imaging of ultrasound contrast agents – color Doppler, pulse inversion Doppler, and decorrelation Doppler. Doppler ensemble pulses were interleaved with therapeutic pHIFU pulses using three different pulse sequences and standard Doppler processing was applied to the received echoes. The information yielded by each of the techniques on the distribution and characteristics of pHIFU-induced cavitation bubbles was evaluated separately, and found to be complementary. The unified approach - bubble Doppler – was then proposed to both spatially map the presence of transient bubbles and to estimate their sizes and the degree of nonlinearity. PMID:25265178

  3. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  4. Design and Implementation of High Frequency Ultrasound Pulsed-Wave Doppler Using FPGA

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chang-hong; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    The development of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based pulsed-wave Doppler processing approach in pure digital domain is reported in this paper. After the ultrasound signals are digitized, directional Doppler frequency shifts are obtained with a digital-down converter followed by a low-pass filter. A Doppler spectrum is then calculated using the complex fast Fourier transform core inside the FPGA. In this approach, a pulsed-wave Doppler implementation core with reconfigurable and real-time processing capability is achieved. PMID:18986909

  5. Wake Vortex Tracking Using a 35 GHz Pulsed Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neece, Robert T.; Britt, Charles L.; White, Joseph H.; Mudukutore, Ashok; Nguyen, Chi; Hooper, Bill

    2005-01-01

    A 35 GHz, pulsed-Doppler radar system has been designed and assembled for wake vortex detection and tracking in low visibility conditions. Aircraft wake vortices continue to be an important factor in determining safe following distances or spacings for aircraft in the terminal area. Currently, under instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), aircraft adhere to conservative, fixed following-distance guidelines based primarily on aircraft weight classifications. When ambient conditions are such that vortices will either drift or dissipate, leaving the flight corridor clear, the prescribed spacings are unnecessarily long and result in decreased airport throughput. There is a potential for significant airport efficiency improvement, if a system can be employed to aid regulators and pilots in setting safe and efficient following distances based on airport conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Agency, and Volpe National Transportation Systems Center have promoted and worked to develop systems that would increase airport capacity and provide for safe reductions in aircraft separation. The NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS), a wake vortex spacing system that can provide dynamic adjustment of spacings based on real-time airport weather conditions, has demonstrated that Lidar systems can be successfully used to detect and track vortices in clear air conditions. To fill the need for detection capability in low-visibility conditions, a 35 GHz, pulsed-Doppler radar system is being investigated for use as a complimentary, low-visibility sensor for wake vortices. The radar sensor provides spatial and temporal information similar to that provided by Lidar, but under weather conditions that a Lidar cannot penetrate. Currently, we are analyzing the radar design based upon the data and experience gained during the wake vortex Lidar deployment with AVOSS at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. As part of this study

  6. Airborne Double Pulsed 2-Micron IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Singh, Upendra

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an airborne 2-micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurements. The double pulsed, high pulse energy lidar instrument can provide high-precision CO2 column density measurements.

  7. Arterial pulse wave propagation velocity in healthy dogs by pulse wave Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Rodrigo B; Pereira, Lucas A; Basso, Alice F; da Fonseca, Ingrid S; Alves, Lorena A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) values in healthy dogs using pulse wave Doppler ultrasound. A secondary aim was to determine the feasibility of this method and to report the intra- and interobserver reproducibilities of the PWV in conscious dogs. The data were studied in 30 healthy, adult, male (n = 15) and female (n = 15) dogs. The time interval marked between the R wave peak of the electrocardiogram and the intersection of the blood flow wave upstroke of the Doppler spectrum with the baseline of zero frequency was determined for the carotid (T1) and for the femoral (T2) arteries. The distance covered by the pulse wave (L) was determined. The PWV was then calculated using the following formula: L/T2 - T1. The mean values of PWV calculated from the total sample (n = 30) evaluated were 13.41 ± 2.20 m/s. No significant statistical difference was observed for the PWV measurements between males (14.82 ± 3.18 m/s) and females (12.64 ± 2.45 m/s). The analysis revealed no intra nor interobserver differences. A reasonable reproducibility of the PWV measurements was showed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), and the coefficients of variation (CV). These data demonstrate that noninvasive vascular Doppler analysis is a feasible and reproducible method to determine the carotid-femoral PWV in dogs.

  8. Direct Measurement of Basilar Membrane Motion Using Pulsed-Wave Doppler High-Frequency Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbatian, Z.; Garland, P.; Adamson, R. B. A.; Bance, M.; Brown, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    We present a preliminary report on the use of a new technique for measuring the motion of the basilar membrane, high-frequency ultrasound Doppler vibrometry. Using a custom-built, 1 mm diameter probe, we collected ultrasonic reflections from intracochlear structures and applied pulsed-wave Doppler vibrometry to measure the basilar membrane response to pressure applied in the ear canal.

  9. Ventricular septal defect after myocardial infarction: assessment by cross sectional echocardiography with pulsed wave Doppler scanning.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, D; Fananapazir, L; de Bono, D; Bloomfield, P

    1987-01-01

    Eight patients who developed a ventricular septal defect after myocardial infarction were assessed by cross sectional echocardiography and pulsed wave Doppler scanning. Cross sectional echocardiography visualised the defect in four patients and gave an accurate assessment of global and regional left ventricular function in all eight. In all patients pulsed wave Doppler scanning detected turbulent flow at the apex of the right ventricle or adjacent to a wall motion abnormality affecting the interventricular septum. Pulsed wave Doppler detected coexisting mitral regurgitation in one patient and tricuspid regurgitation in another two. In all patients a left to right shunt was confirmed by oximetry and the location of the defect was identified by angiography or at operation or necropsy. Cross sectional echocardiography in combination with pulsed wave Doppler scanning is useful in the rapid bedside evaluation of patients with ventricular septal defect after myocardial infarction. Images Fig PMID:3663420

  10. Analysis of the NASA/MSFC airborne Doppler lidar results from San Gorgonio Pass, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Skarda, J. R.; Renne, D. S.; Sandusky, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar System was flown in July 1981 aboard the NASA/Ames Convair 990 on the east side of San Gorgonio Pass California, near Palm Springs, to measure and investigate the accelerated atmospheric wind field discharging from the pass. At this region, the maritime layer from the west coast accelerates through the pass and spreads out over the valley floor on the east side of the pass. The experiment was selected in order to study accelerated flow in and at the exit of the canyon. Ground truth wind data taken concurrently with the flight data were available from approximately 12 meteorological towers and 3 tala kites for limited comparison purposes. The experiment provided the first spatial data for ensemble averaging of spatial correlations to compute lateral and longitudinal length scales in the lateral and longitudinal directions for both components, and information on atmospheric flow in this region of interest from wind energy resource considerations.

  11. Wind-Driven Angular Dependence of Sea-Surface Reflectance Measured with an Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Cutten, Dean R.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of wind-stress on the optical properties of the ocean surface have been studied for several decades. In particular, the classic study by Cox and Munk (1954) linking sea-surface wind field to wave slope statistics provides a phenomenology by which the sea-surface wind velocity can be estimated from direct measurement of the wave-modulated surface reflectance. A limited number of studies along these lines have been conducted using airborne or spaceborne lidar systems. In these instances, truthing was provided by in situ ship reports or satellite microwave remote sensing instruments (e.g., ERS scatterometer, SSM/I). During the second deployment of the MACAWS Doppler wind lidar in the summer of 1996 measurements of sea-surface reflectance as a function of azimuth- and nadir-viewing angles were acquired off the California coast. MACAWS data products include directly measured winds, as well as calibrated backscatter/reflectance profiles, thus enabling comparison of the winds inferred from sea-surface reflectance measurements with those deriving from the Doppler-processed direct line-of-sight (LOS) estimates. Additional validation data was extracted from the ERS and SSM/I satellite microwave sensor archives maintained by the JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO- DAAC).

  12. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10.6 microns with airborne and ground-based CO2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado High Plains. I - Lidar intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Vaughan, J. Michael; Brown, Derek W.; Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    An airborne continuous-wave (CW) focused CO2 Doppler lidar and a ground-based pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar were to obtain seven pairs of comparative measurements of tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles at 10.6-micron wavelength, near Denver, Colorado, during a 20-day period in July 1982. In regions of uniform backscatter, the two lidars show good agreement, with differences usually less than about 50 percent near 8-km altitude and less than a factor of 2 or 3 elsewhere but with the pulsed lidar often lower than the CW lidar. Near sharp backscatter gradients, the two lidars show poorer agreement, with the pulsed lidar usually higher than the CW lidar. Most discrepancies arise from a combination of atmospheric factors and instrument factors, particularly small-scale areal and temporal backscatter heterogeneity above the planetary boundary layer, unusual large-scale vertical backscatter structure in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and differences in the spatial resolution, detection threshold, and noise estimation for the two lidars.

  13. The leicester Doppler phantom--a digital electronic phantom for ultrasound pulsed Doppler system testing.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John; Martin, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Doppler flow and string phantoms have been used to assess the performance of ultrasound Doppler systems in terms of parameters such as sensitivity, velocity accuracy and sample volume registration. However, because of the nature of their construction, they cannot challenge the accuracy and repeatability of modern digital ultrasound systems or give objective measures of system performance. Electronic Doppler phantoms are able to make use of electronically generated test signals, which may be controlled precisely in terms of frequency, amplitude and timing. The Leicester Electronic Doppler Phantom uses modern digital signal processing methods and field programmable gate array technology to overcome some of the limitations of previously described electronic phantoms. In its present form, it is able to give quantitative graphical assessments of frequency response and range gate characteristics, as well as measures of dynamic range and velocity measurement accuracy. The use of direct acoustic coupling eliminates uncertainties caused by Doppler beam effects, such as intrinsic spectral broadening, but prevents their evaluation.

  14. Airborne derivation of microburst alerts from ground-based Terminal Doppler Weather Radar information: A flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.

    1993-01-01

    An element of the NASA/FAA windshear program is the integration of ground-based microburst information on the flight deck, to support airborne windshear alerting and microburst avoidance. NASA conducted a windshear flight test program in the summer of 1991 during which airborne processing of Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) data was used to derive microburst alerts. Microburst information was extracted from TDWR, transmitted to a NASA Boeing 737 in flight via data link, and processed to estimate the windshear hazard level (F-factor) that would be experienced by the aircraft in each microburst. The microburst location and F-factor were used to derive a situation display and alerts. The situation display was successfully used to maneuver the aircraft for microburst penetrations, during which atmospheric 'truth' measurements were made. A total of 19 penetrations were made of TDWR-reported microburst locations, resulting in 18 airborne microburst alerts from the TDWR data and two microburst alerts from the airborne reactive windshear detection system. The primary factors affecting alerting performance were spatial offset of the flight path from the region of strongest shear, differences in TDWR measurement altitude and airplane penetration altitude, and variations in microburst outflow profiles. Predicted and measured F-factors agreed well in penetrations near microburst cores. Although improvements in airborne and ground processing of the TDWR measurements would be required to support an airborne executive-level alerting protocol, the practicality of airborne utilization of TDWR data link data has been demonstrated.

  15. Conceptual design of an airborne laser Doppler velocimeter system for studying wind fields associated with severe local storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, J. A. L.; Davies, A. R.; Sulzmann, K. G. P.

    1976-01-01

    An airborne laser Doppler velocimeter was evaluated for diagnostics of the wind field associated with an isolated severe thunderstorm. Two scanning configurations were identified, one a long-range (out to 10-20 km) roughly horizontal plane mode intended to allow probing of the velocity field around the storm at the higher altitudes (4-10 km). The other is a shorter range (out to 1-3 km) mode in which a vertical or horizontal plane is scanned for velocity (and possibly turbulence), and is intended for diagnostics of the lower altitude region below the storm and in the out-flow region. It was concluded that aircraft flight velocities are high enough and severe storm lifetimes are long enough that a single airborne Doppler system, operating at a range of less than about 20 km, can view the storm area from two or more different aspects before the storm characteristics change appreciably.

  16. Wind Retrieval Algorithms for the IWRAP and HIWRAP Airborne Doppler Radars with Applications to Hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimond, Stephen Richard; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Frasier, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Algorithms for the retrieval of atmospheric winds in precipitating systems from downward-pointing, conically-scanning airborne Doppler radars are presented. The focus in the paper is on two radars: the Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler(IWRAP) and the High-altitude IWRAP (HIWRAP). The IWRAP is a dual-frequency (Cand Ku band), multi-beam (incidence angles of 30 50) system that flies on the NOAAWP-3D aircraft at altitudes of 2-4 km. The HIWRAP is a dual-frequency (Ku and Kaband), dual-beam (incidence angles of 30 and 40) system that flies on the NASA Global Hawk aircraft at altitudes of 18-20 km. Retrievals of the three Cartesian wind components over the entire radar sampling volume are described, which can be determined using either a traditional least squares or variational solution procedure. The random errors in the retrievals are evaluated using both an error propagation analysis and a numerical simulation of a hurricane. These analyses show that the vertical and along-track wind errors have strong across-track dependence with values of 0.25 m s-1 at nadir to 2.0 m s-1 and 1.0 m s-1 at the swath edges, respectively. The across-track wind errors also have across-track structure and are on average, 3.0 3.5 m s-1 or 10 of the hurricane wind speed. For typical rotated figure four flight patterns through hurricanes, the zonal and meridional wind speed errors are 2 3 m s-1.Examples of measured data retrievals from IWRAP during an eyewall replacement cycle in Hurricane Isabel (2003) and from HIWRAP during the development of Tropical Storm Matthew (2010) are shown.

  17. Barker code pulse compression with a large Doppler tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xuefeng; Zhu, Zhaoda

    1991-03-01

    This paper discusses the application of least square approximate inverse filtering techniques to radar range sidelobe suppression. The method is illustrated by application to the design of a compensated noncoherent sidelobe suppression filter (SSF). The compensated noncoherent SSF of the 13-element Barker code has been found. The -40 kHz to 40 kHz Doppler tolerance of the filter is obtained under the conditions that the subpulse duration is equal to 0.7 microsec and the peak sidelobe level is less than -30 dB. Theoretical computations and experimental results indicate that the SSF implemented has much wider Doppler tolerance than the Rihaczek-Golden (1971) SSF.

  18. 77 FR 53962 - Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground Speed and/or Drift Angle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground... Doppler Radar Ground Speed and/or Drift Angle Measuring Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft). SUMMARY: This notice announces the FAA's cancellation of TSO-C65a. The effect of the cancelled TSO will...

  19. Investigation of the Air-Wave-Sea Interaction Modes Using an Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar: Analyses of the HRDL Data Taken during DYNAMO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-06

    2011-August 16, 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Investigation of the Air-Wave- Sea Interaction Modes Using an Airborne NOOO 1411...area code) u 434-979-3571 STANDARD FORM 298 Back (Rev. 8/98) Investigation of the Air-Wave- Sea Interaction Modes Using an Airborne Doppler Wind

  20. Evaluating the accuracy and representativeness of Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar winds in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, K.; Emmitt, G. D.; Greco, S.; De Wekker, S.

    2013-12-01

    An Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar (ADWL) was flown during the MATERHORN experiment in October 2012. The ADWL was used to obtain profiles of u,v,w,σlos and aerosol structure between the surface and flight level (~2500m AGL). The lidar returns were processed to obtain a vertical resolution of 50m and a complete profile every 1.5km. The aircraft (Navy Twin Otter) was flown in a 'lawnmower' pattern near and over Granite Mountain located at the Dugway Proving Grounds, Utah. Combining multiple Lines of Sight (LOS) measurements to construct a vertical profile in complex terrain presents several challenges that must be met before using these data in numerical models. In addition to the wind profiles obtained with a nadir conical scan, we pointed the beam straight down to obtain a direct measure of the vertical velocity of the air. With a precision of < 10 cm/s, mountain waves, katabatic flows and other complex terrain induced flow features are resolved and provide validation of model resolved flow features. Examples of ADWL profile grids will be presented along with a discussion of the methodology(s) used to evaluate the accuracy and representativeness of the ADWL winds. We will also illustrate how we are making comparisons with numerical model wind fields (WRF) by using a forward operator with lidar LOS observations. Particular attention will be paid to interpreting the non-conventional ADWL's estimate(s) of turbulent kinetic energy.

  1. Analysis of the NASA/MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar results from San Gorgonio Pass, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Skarda, J. R.; Renne, D. S.; Sandusky, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    Two days during July of 1981 the NASA/MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) was flown aboard the NASA/AMES Convair 990 on the east side of San Gorgonio Pass California, near Palm Springs, to measure and investigate the accelerated atmospheric wind field discharging from the pass. The vertical and horizontal extent of the fast moving atmospheric flow discharging from the San Gorgonio Pass were examined. Conventional ground measurements were also taken during the tests to assist in validating the ADLS results. This particular region is recognized as a high wind resource region and, as such, a knowledge of the horizontal and vertical extent of this flow was of interest for wind energy applications. The statistics of the atmospheric flow field itself as it discharges from the pass and then spreads out over the desert were also of scientific interests. This data provided the first spatial data for ensemble averaging of spatial correlations to compute longitudinal and lateral integral length scales in the longitudinal and lateral directions for both components.

  2. Coupling airborne laser scanning and acoustic Doppler current profiler data to model stream rating curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N.; Lyon, S. W.; Kean, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The rating curve enables the translation of water depth into discharge through a reference cross section. Errors in estimating stream channel geometry can therefore result in increased discharge uncertainty. This study investigates coupling national-scale airborne laser scanning (ALS) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) bathymetric survey data for generating stream rating curves. Specifically, stream channel geometries were generated from coupled ALS and ADCP scanning data collected for a well-monitored site located in northern Sweden. These data were used to define the hydraulic geometry required by a physically-based 1-D hydraulic model. The results of our study demonstrate that the effects of potential scanning data errors on the model generated rating curve were less than the uncertainties due to stream gauging measurements and empirical rating curve fitting. Further analysis of the ALS data showed that an overestimation of the streambank elevation (the main scanning data error) was primarily due to vegetation that could be adjusted for through a root-mean-square-error bias correction. We consider these findings encouraging as hydrometric agencies can potentially leverage national-scale ALS and ADCP instrumentation to reduce the cost and effort required for maintaining and establish rating curves at gauging stations.

  3. The Coplane Analysis Technique for Three-Dimensional Wind Retrieval Using the HIWRAP Airborne Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didlake, Anthony C., Jr.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Guimond, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The coplane analysis technique for mapping the three-dimensional wind field of precipitating systems is applied to the NASA High Altitude Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP). HIWRAP is a dual-frequency Doppler radar system with two downward pointing and conically scanning beams. The coplane technique interpolates radar measurements to a natural coordinate frame, directly solves for two wind components, and integrates the mass continuity equation to retrieve the unobserved third wind component. This technique is tested using a model simulation of a hurricane and compared to a global optimization retrieval. The coplane method produced lower errors for the cross-track and vertical wind components, while the global optimization method produced lower errors for the along-track wind component. Cross-track and vertical wind errors were dependent upon the accuracy of the estimated boundary condition winds near the surface and at nadir, which were derived by making certain assumptions about the vertical velocity field. The coplane technique was then applied successfully to HIWRAP observations of Hurricane Ingrid (2013). Unlike the global optimization method, the coplane analysis allows for a transparent connection between the radar observations and specific analysis results. With this ability, small-scale features can be analyzed more adequately and erroneous radar measurements can be identified more easily.

  4. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2015-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new 2-miron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of 2014 for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  5. A Methodology for Determining Statistical Performance Compliance for Airborne Doppler Radar with Forward-Looking Turbulence Detection Capability. Second Corrected Copy Issued May 23, 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Roland L.; Buck, Bill K.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the research developed and presented in this document was to statistically assess turbulence hazard detection performance employing airborne pulse Doppler radar systems. The FAA certification methodology for forward looking airborne turbulence radars will require estimating the probabilities of missed and false hazard indications under operational conditions. Analytical approaches must be used due to the near impossibility of obtaining sufficient statistics experimentally. This report describes an end-to-end analytical technique for estimating these probabilities for Enhanced Turbulence (E-Turb) Radar systems under noise-limited conditions, for a variety of aircraft types, as defined in FAA TSO-C134. This technique provides for one means, but not the only means, by which an applicant can demonstrate compliance to the FAA directed ATDS Working Group performance requirements. Turbulence hazard algorithms were developed that derived predictive estimates of aircraft hazards from basic radar observables. These algorithms were designed to prevent false turbulence indications while accurately predicting areas of elevated turbulence risks to aircraft, passengers, and crew; and were successfully flight tested on a NASA B757-200 and a Delta Air Lines B737-800. Application of this defined methodology for calculating the probability of missed and false hazard indications taking into account the effect of the various algorithms used, is demonstrated for representative transport aircraft and radar performance characteristics.

  6. Remote Sensing of Multi-Level Wind Fields with High-Energy Airborne Scanning Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Olivier, Lisa D.; Banta, Robert M.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States.

  7. Remote sensing of multi-level wind fields with high-energy airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, J; Olivier, L; Banta, R; Hardesty, R M; Howell, J; Cutten, D; Johnson, S; Menzies, R; Tratt, D M

    1998-01-19

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the planetary boundary layer, free troposphere, and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States.

  8. The Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE): An Airborne Direct Detection Doppler Lidar Instrument Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Schwemmer, Geary; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan; Wilkerson, Thomas; Atlas, Robert; Sirota, Marcos; Lindemann, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Global measurement of tropospheric winds is a key measurement for understanding atmospheric dynamics and improving numerical weather prediction. Global wind profiles remain a high priority for the operational weather community and also for a variety of research applications including studies of the global hydrologic cycle and transport studies of aerosols and trace species. In addition to space based winds, a high altitude airborne system flown on UAV or other advanced platforms would be of great interest for studying mesoscale dynamics and hurricanes. The Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE) project was selected in 2005 by the NASA Earth Sun Technology Office as part of the Instrument Incubator Program. TWiLiTE will leverage significant research and development investments in key technologies made in the past several years. The primary focus will be on integrating these sub-systems into a complete molecular direct detection Doppler wind lidar system designed for autonomous operation on a high altitude aircraft, such as the NASA WB57, so that the nadir viewing lidar will be able to profile winds through the full troposphere. TWiLiTE is a collaboration involving scientists and technologists from NASA Goddard, NOAA ESRL, Utah State University Space Dynamics Lab and industry partners Michigan Aerospace Corporation and Sigma Space Corporation. NASA Goddard and it's partners have been at the forefront in the development of key lidar technologies (lasers, telescopes, scanning systems, detectors and receivers) required to enable spaceborne global wind lidar measurement. The TWiLiTE integrated airborne Doppler lidar instrument will be the first demonstration of a airborne scanning direct detection Doppler lidar and will serve as a critical milestone on the path to a fixture spaceborne tropospheric wind system. The completed system will have the capability to profile winds in clear air from the aircraft altitude of 18 h to the surface with 250 m vertical

  9. Doppler cooling with coherent trains of laser pulses and a tunable velocity comb

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinova, Ekaterina; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Derevianko, Andrei

    2011-09-15

    We explore the possibility of decelerating and Doppler cooling an ensemble of two-level atoms by a coherent train of short, nonoverlapping laser pulses. We derive analytical expressions for mechanical force exerted by the train. In frequency space the force pattern reflects the underlying frequency comb structure. The pattern depends strongly on the ratio of the atomic lifetime to the repetition time between the pulses and pulse area. For example, in the limit of short lifetimes, the frequency-space peaks of the optical force wash out. We propose to tune the carrier-envelope offset frequency to follow the Doppler-shifted detuning as atoms decelerate; this leads to compression of atomic velocity distribution about comb teeth and results in a ''velocity comb''--a series of narrow equidistant peaks in the velocity space.

  10. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO2 Doppler lidar measurements. I - Algorithm description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Bowdle, David A.; Vaughan, Michael; Brown, Derek W.; Woodfield, Alan A.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1981 the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment and the Royal Aircraft Establishment, United Kindom, have made vertical and horizontal sounding measurements of aerosol backscatter coefficients at 10.6 microns, using an airborne continuous-wave-focused CO2 Doppler lidar, the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS). In this paper, the heterodyne signal from the LATAS detector is spectrally analyzed. Then, in conjunction with aircraft flight parameters, the data are processed in a six-stage computer algorithm: set search window, search for peak signal, test peak signal, measure total signal, calculate signal-to-noise ratio, and calculate backscatter coefficient.

  11. Dust Transport Across the Atlantic Studied by Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar During the Saltrace Experiment in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Rahm, Stephan; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-06-01

    During the SALTRACE field experiment, conducted during June/July 2013, the Saharan dust transport across the Atlantic was analyzed by a set of ground based, in-situ and airborne instruments, including a 2-μm coherent DWL (Doppler wind lidar) mounted onboard the DLR Falcon 20 research aircraft. An overview of the measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction, horizontal and vertical winds retrieved from the DWL are presented together with a brief description of the applied methods. The retrieved measurements provide direct observation of Saharan dust transport mechanisms across the Atlantic as well as island induced lee waves in the Barbados region.

  12. Diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta by pulsed Doppler cross sectional echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Wendel, C H; Cornman, C R; Dianzumba, S B

    1985-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta are relatively uncommon compared with those evolving from the left ventricle. In a young man with endocarditis of the aortic valve who developed a pseudoaneurysm arising from the ascending aorta, the diagnosis was established with the pulsed Doppler technique and cross sectional echocardiography by passing the Doppler sample from the aorta through the neck of the false aneurysm into the large pseudoaneurysm. Aortic root angiography showed this connexion to be a small fistula between the aorta and right atrium. Necropsy findings confirmed the diagnosis. Images PMID:3994873

  13. Compact, Engineered 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype for Field and Airborne Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent Doppler wind lidar system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid Doppler wind lidar solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  14. Doppler ultrasound in the measurement of pulse wave velocity: agreement with the Complior method

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aortic stiffness is an independent predictor factor for cardiovascular risk. Different methods for determining pulse wave velocity (PWV) are used, among which the most common are mechanical methods such as SphygmoCor or Complior, which require specific devices and are limited by technical difficulty in obtaining measurements. Doppler guided by 2D ultrasound is a good alternative to these methods. We studied 40 patients (29 male, aged 21 to 82 years) comparing the Complior method with Doppler. Agreement of both devices was high (R = 0.91, 0.84-0.95, 95% CI). The reproducibility analysis revealed no intra-nor interobserver differences. Based on these results, we conclude that Doppler ultrasound is a reliable and reproducible alternative to other established methods for the measurement of aortic PWV. PMID:21496271

  15. Investigation of the Air-Wave-Sea Interaction Modes Using an Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar: Analyses of the HRDL Data Taken using DYNAMO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-07

    07-10-2013 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 08/17/2012-08/16/2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigation of the Air-Wave- Sea ...of our initially proposed work. The move to examining the ABL using data taken from the CIRPAS TODWL (Twin Otter Doppler Wind Lidar) remains...Investigation of the Air-Wave- Sea Interaction Modes Using an Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar: Analyses of the HRDL data taken during DYNAMO George

  16. Pulsed Compression for Aerosol Ranging with Coherent Pulse-Doppler Lidar Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    as well as conventional Doppler radar hard-target applications. Accord- ing to Menzies and Hardesty , the accuracy of Doppler lidar velocity...density expressed in Equation (80). As Hardesty and Menzies explain, if a lidar of a single carrier frequency f illuminates a volume of dense, randomly...ham, WA: SPIE, 1988. 14. Hardesty , Michael R. Measurement of Range-Resolved Water Vapor Concentra- tion by Coherent C0 2 Differential Absorption Lidar

  17. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2016-06-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new instrument has been flown in spring of 2014 for a total of ten flights with 27 flight hours. This IPDA lidar provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the results.

  18. Pulse compression with very low sidelobes in an airborne rain mapping radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, A.; Durden, S. L.; Denning, R.; Im, E.; Li, F. K.; Ricketts, W.; Wilson, W.

    1994-01-01

    Pulse compression allows a substantial reduction in the peak transmitted power of a radar and is attractive for spaceborne remote sensing applications. In the case of a downward looking rain measuring radar, however, the range sidelobes associated with surface return can mask return from rain and must be kept to a minimum. Here, we describe the pulse compression system for the NASA/JPL Airborne Rain Mapping Radar. This system uses time-domain weighting of the transmitted pulse and is able to achieve a range sidelobe level of -55 dB or better in flight tests. This is significantly lower than other values reported in the open literature.

  19. [Doppler effect on width of characteristic line in plasma induced by pulsed laser ablating Al].

    PubMed

    Song, Yi-Zhong; He, An-Zhi

    2005-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) plasma was induced with a pulsed Nd: YAG laser beam ablating Al target in Ar. Time-resolved information of the plasma radiation was taken with time-resolved technique, and the spectra of the radiation were recorded with an optical multi-path analyzer (OMA III ), whereupon, time-resolved spectra of the plasma radiation induced by pulsed laser were acquired. Based on the experiment data, Al resonant double lines, Al I 396.15 nm, Al I 394.40 nm, were respectively fitted with Lorentz, Gauss and their linear integrated function (abbr. Integrated function), whereupon, Lorentz and Gauss elements were separated from the experiment data profile curve. By contrasting Lorentz with Gauss curve separated, it was found that the experiment curve mainly consisted of Lorentz element, a with little Gauss. By contrasting Lorentz with Integrated fitting curve for experiment data, a visual picture of the characteristic lines broadened by Doppler effect was exhibited. According to the visual picture, the increase of full half-high width of the characteristic line broadened by Doppler effect was estimated. It was about 2 x 10(-)3 -8 x 10(-3) nm, approximating the theoretical value 6.7 x 10(-)3 nm. As a result, Doppler effect on the width of characteristic lines in the plasma could be reasonably explained by curve fitting analysis and theoretical calculation.

  20. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Methane Using Pulsed Laser Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Wu, Stewart; Gonzalez, Brayler; Rodriguez, Michael; Hasselbrack, William; Fahey, Molly; Yu, Anthony; Stephen, Mark; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with approximately 25 times the radiative forcing of carbon dioxide (CO2) per molecule. At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) we have been developing a laser-based technology needed to remotely measure CH4 from orbit. We report on our development effort for the methane lidar, especially on our laser transmitters and recent airborne demonstration. Our lidar transmitter is based on an optical parametric process to generate near infrared laser radiation at 1651 nanometers, coincident with a CH4 absorption. In an airborne flight campaign in the fall of 2015, we tested two kinds of laser transmitters --- an optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The output wavelength of the lasers was rapidly tuned over the CH4 absorption by tuning the seed laser to sample the CH4 absorption line at several wavelengths. This approach uses the same Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) technique we have used for our CO2 lidar for ASCENDS. The two laser transmitters were successfully operated in the NASAs DC-8 aircraft, measuring methane from 3 to 13 kilometers with high precision.

  1. Conductivity depth imaging of Airborne Electromagnetic data with double pulse transmitting current based on model fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Dou, Mei; Lu, Yiming; Peng, Cong; Yu, Zining; Zhu, Kaiguang

    2017-01-01

    The airborne electromagnetic (AEM) systems have been used traditionally in mineral exploration. Typically the system transmits a single pulse waveform to detect conductive anomaly. Conductivity-depth imaging (CDI) of data is generally applied in identifying conductive targets. A CDI algorithm with double-pulse transmitting current based on model fusion is developed. The double-pulse is made up of a half-sine pulse of high power and a trapezoid pulse of low power. This CDI algorithm presents more shallow information than traditional CDI with a single pulse. The electromagnetic response with double-pulse transmitting current is calculated by linear convolution based on forward modeling. The CDI results with half-sine and trapezoid pulse are obtained by look-up table method, and the two results are fused to form a double-pulse conductivity-depth imaging result. This makes it possible to obtain accurate conductivity and depth. Tests on synthetic data demonstrate that CDI algorithm with double-pulse transmitting current based on model fusion maps a wider range of conductivities and does a better job compared with CDI with a single pulse transmitting current in reflecting the whole geological conductivity changes.

  2. Comparing Pulsed Doppler LIDAR with SODAR and Direct Measurements for Wind Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.; Pichugina, Y. L.

    2007-07-01

    There is a pressing need for good wind-speed measurements at greater and greater heights to assess the availability of the resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring atmospheric structural characteristics that may create turbulence that impacts the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components. In this paper, we summarize the results of a short study that compares the relative accuracies of wind speeds derived from a high-resolution pulsed Doppler LIDAR operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and a midrange Doppler SODAR with wind speeds measured by four levels of tower-based sonic anemometry up to a height of 116 m.

  3. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  4. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  5. Airborne 2-micron double-pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar for column CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 mJ and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 µs and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-µm direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-μm IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  6. MSFC Doppler Lidar Science experiments and operations plans for 1981 airborne test flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Bilbro, J. W.; Kaufman, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The flight experiment and operations plans for the Doppler Lidar System (DLS) are provided. Application of DLS to the study of severe storms and local weather penomena is addressed. Test plans involve 66 hours of flight time. Plans also include ground based severe storm and local weather data acquisition.

  7. Assessment of the orifice diameter by a multigated pulsed Doppler system in children with congenital semilunar valve stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    de Knecht, S; Hopman, J C; Daniëls, O; Stoelinga, G B; Reneman, R S; Hoeks, A P

    1989-01-01

    This study investigated whether the jet diameter measured by a multigated pulsed Doppler system could be used to assess the severity of valve disease in children with pulmonary (n = 11) or aortic (n = 4) valve stenosis. The results obtained were compared with those obtained at cineangiography and at operation. Multigated pulsed Doppler examination of a stenosed valve showed a region of relatively high velocities in the velocity profile (jet flow). There was good agreement between the diameter of the disturbed region on the Doppler echocardiogram and the diameter of the jet on the lateral angiocardiogram. In severe valve stenosis the agreement between the valve diameters measured by multigated pulsed Doppler and at operation was also good. In less severe valve stenosis Doppler measurements systematically underestimated the valve diameter at operation. It is likely that the functional opening of a semilunar valve is a more relevant estimate of the degree of stenosis than the anatomical measurement of the orifice. The findings of this study indicate that multigated pulsed Doppler systems are useful in the noninvasive diagnosis of stenotic valve disease. Images Fig 1 PMID:2757874

  8. Fpga based L-band pulse doppler radar design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savci, Kubilay

    As its name implies RADAR (Radio Detection and Ranging) is an electromagnetic sensor used for detection and locating targets from their return signals. Radar systems propagate electromagnetic energy, from the antenna which is in part intercepted by an object. Objects reradiate a portion of energy which is captured by the radar receiver. The received signal is then processed for information extraction. Radar systems are widely used for surveillance, air security, navigation, weather hazard detection, as well as remote sensing applications. In this work, an FPGA based L-band Pulse Doppler radar prototype, which is used for target detection, localization and velocity calculation has been built and a general-purpose Pulse Doppler radar processor has been developed. This radar is a ground based stationary monopulse radar, which transmits a short pulse with a certain pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Return signals from the target are processed and information about their location and velocity is extracted. Discrete components are used for the transmitter and receiver chain. The hardware solution is based on Xilinx Virtex-6 ML605 FPGA board, responsible for the control of the radar system and the digital signal processing of the received signal, which involves Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detection and Pulse Doppler processing. The algorithm is implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK using the Xilinx System Generator for DSP tool. The field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) implementation of the radar system provides the flexibility of changing parameters such as the PRF and pulse length therefore it can be used with different radar configurations as well. A VHDL design has been developed for 1Gbit Ethernet connection to transfer digitized return signal and detection results to PC. An A-Scope software has been developed with C# programming language to display time domain radar signals and detection results on PC. Data are processed both in FPGA chip and on PC. FPGA uses fixed

  9. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  10. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-Micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael J.; Remus, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2-micron lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250 millijoules in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2-micron Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hours of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meters to 8000 meters. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a

  11. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael; Remus, Ruben

    2015-04-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2 µm lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2 µm lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250-mJ in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2 μm Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hrs of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meter to 8000 meter. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and NOAA airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a triple-pulsed 2 μm Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA

  12. Pulsed ultra-cold neutron production using a Doppler shifter at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imajo, S.; Mishima, K.; Kitaguchi, M.; Iwashia, Y.; Yamada, N. L.; Hino, M.; Oda, T.; Ino, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Yamashita, S.; Katayama, R.

    2016-01-01

    We have constructed a Doppler-shifter-type pulsed ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source at the Materials and Life Science Experiment Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. Very cold neutrons (VCNs) with 136 m s^{-1} velocity in a neutron beam supplied by a pulsed neutron source are decelerated by reflection on an m=10 wide-band multilayer mirror, yielding pulsed UCNs. The mirror is fixed to the tip of a 2000 rpm rotating arm moving with 68 m s^{-1} velocity in the same direction as the VCNs. The repetition frequency of the pulsed UCNs is 8.33 Hz and the time width of the pulse at production is 4.4 ms. In order to increase the UCN flux, a supermirror guide, wide-band monochromatic mirrors, focus guides, and a UCN extraction guide have been newly installed or improved. The 1 MW-equivalent count rate of the output neutrons with longitudinal wavelengths longer than 58 nm is 1.6 × 102 cps, while that of the true UCNs is 80 cps. The spatial density at production is 1.4 UCN cm^{-3}. This new UCN source enables us to research and develop apparatuses necessary for the investigation of the neutron electric dipole moment.

  13. Modern spectral analysis techniques for blood flow velocity and spectral measurements with pulsed Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    David, J Y; Jones, S A; Giddens, D P

    1991-06-01

    Four spectral analysis techniques were applied to pulsed Doppler ultrasonic quadrature signals to compare the relative merits of each technique for estimation of flow velocity and Doppler spectra. The four techniques were 1) the fast Fourier transform method, 2) the maximum likelihood method, 3) the Burg autoregressive algorithm, and 4) the modified covariance approach to autoregressive modeling. Both simulated signals and signals obtained from an in vitro flow system were studied. Optimal parameter values (e.g., model orders) were determined for each method, and the effects of signal-to-noise ratio and signal bandwidth were investigated. The modern spectral analysis techniques were shown to be superior to Fourier techniques in most circumstances, provided the model order was chosen appropriately. Robustness considerations tended to recommend the maximum likelihood method for both velocity and spectral estimation. Despite the restrictions of steady laminar flow, the results provide important basic information concerning the applicability of modern spectral analysis techniques to Doppler ultrasonic evaluation of arterial disease.

  14. First Scientific Working Group Meeting of Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the first scientific working group meeting was fourfold: (1) to identify flight test options for engineering verification of the MSFC Doppler Lidar; (2) to identify flight test options for gathering data for scientific/technology applications; (3) to identify additional support equipment needed on the CV 990 aircraft for the flight tests; and (4) to identify postflight data processing and data sets requirements. The working group identified approximately ten flight options for gathering data on atmospheric dynamics processes, including turbulence, valley breezes, and thunderstorm cloud anvil and cold air outflow dynamics. These test options will be used as a basis for planning the fiscal year 1981 tests of the Doppler Lidar system.

  15. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  16. Doppler Compensation for Airborne Non-Side-Looking Phased-Array Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    looking airborne arrays. The depression angle is a function of the ratio of platform height h to range r , resulting in, )cos(1 2 max aaa r...is operated in the forward-looking mode, is, 2 0 1 2cos2      −== r hvvf aaa λ θ λ (8) Equation (8) clearly shows the range-dependency of

  17. Recent advances in the applications of pulsed lasers in the hydrosphere. [considering airborne bathymetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory and field measurements have been performed on the transmission/scattering characteristics of a pulsed neon laser as a function of water turbidity. These results have been used to establish the criteria for an airborne laser bathymetry system. Extensive measurements have been made of laser induced fluorescence using a pulsed tunable dye laser. Feasibility has been demonstrated for remote detection and possible identification of various types of algae and oils. Similar measurements made on a wide variety of organic dyes have shown this technique to have applications in remote measurements of subsurface currents, temperature and salinity.

  18. Development of ultrasonic pulse-train Doppler method for velocity profile and flowrate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Sanehiro; Furuichi, Noriyuki; Shimada, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel technique for measuring the velocity profile and flowrate in a pipe. This method, named the ultrasonic pulse-train Doppler method (UPTD), has the advantages of expanding the velocity range and setting the smaller measurement volume with low calculation and instrument costs in comparison with the conventional ultrasonic pulse Doppler method. The conventional method has limited measurement of the velocity range due to the Nyquist sampling theorem. In addition, previous reports indicate that a smaller measurement volume increases the accuracy of the measurement. In consideration of the application of the conventional method to actual flow fields, such as industrial facilities and power plants, the issues of velocity range and measurement volume are important. The UPTD algorithm, which exploits two pulses of ultrasound with a short interval and envelope detection, is proposed. Velocity profiles calculated by this algorithm were examined through simulations and excellent agreement was found in all cases. The influence of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on the algorithm was also estimated. The result indicates that UPTD can measure velocity profiles with high accuracy, even under a small SNR. Experimental measurements were conducted and the results were evaluated at the national standard calibration facility of water flowrate in Japan. Every detected signal forms a set of two pulses and the enveloped line can be observed clearly. The results show that UPTD can measure the velocity profiles over the pipe diameter, even if the velocities exceed the measurable velocity range. The measured flowrates were under 0.6% and the standard deviations for all flowrate conditions were within  ±0.38%, which is the uncertainty of the flowrate measurement estimated in the previous report. In conclusion, UPTD provides superior accuracy and expansion of the velocity range.

  19. Influence of Pulse Repetition Frequency on 3-D Power Doppler Quantification.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos A M; Pavan, Theo Z; Miyague, Andre H; Kudla, Marek; Martins, Wellington P

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional power Doppler quantification has limited application because of its high dependency on attenuation. The purpose of the study described here was to assess if different degrees of attenuation, depending on pulse repetition frequency (PRF) adjustment, alter 3-D power Doppler quantification in a region of 100% moving blood when using vascularization index, flow index and vascularization flow index (VFI). A cubic-shaped gelatin phantom with a 1.8-mm-internal-diameter silicon tube was used. The tube, placed at 45° to the phantom's surface, was filled with blood-mimicking fluid with as constant maximum velocity of 30 cm/s. Two different attenuation blocks (low and high attenuation) were alternatively placed between the phantom and the transvaginal transducer. One single observer acquired 10 data sets for each PRF level from 0.3 to 7.5 kHz, using the high- and low-attenuation blocks, for a total of 200 3-D power Doppler data sets. We assessed VFI from 1.5-mm-diameter spherical samples, virtually placed inside the tube, always at the same position. No difference was noted between high- and low-attenuation VFI values when using a PRF of 0.3 kHz. As PRF increased, it was observed that VFI quantification progressively differed between low and high attenuation. Also, a slope on VFI values for both high- and low-attenuation models could be observed when increasing PRF, particularly above 4.0 kHz. We concluded that PRF adjustment is very relevant when using VFI to quantify 3-D power Doppler signal.

  20. Left ventricular radial colour and longitudinal pulsed-wave tissue Doppler echocardiography in 39 healthy domestic pet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Casamian-Sorrosal, Domingo; Saunders, Richard; Browne, William; Elliot, Sarah; Fonfara, Sonja

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports radial colour and longitudinal mitral annulus pulsed-wave tissue Doppler findings in a large cohort of healthy, adult pet rabbits. Thirty-nine rabbits (22 Dwarf Lops, 14 French Lops and three Alaskans) underwent conscious echocardiography. The median age of the rabbits was 22 months and the median weight was 2.8 kg (Dwarf Lop 2.4 kg/French Lop 6.0 kg). Adequate radial colour and longitudinal pulsed-wave tissue Doppler traces were obtained in 100% and 85% of cases, respectively. Most systolic tissue Doppler parameters were significantly higher in French Lops than in Dwarf Lops. Separation of mitral inflow diastolic waves was present in 40% of cases using conventional spectral Doppler and in >60% of cases using pulsed-wave tissue Doppler which could be beneficial when evaluating diastolic function in rabbits. This study can be used as a reference for normal echocardiographic tissue Doppler values for adult rabbits undergoing conscious echocardiography in clinical practice.

  1. Phase noise in pulsed Doppler lidar and limitations on achievable single-shot velocity accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholl, P.; Alejandro, S.

    1992-01-01

    The smaller sampling volumes afforded by Doppler lidars compared to radars allows for spatial resolutions at and below some sheer and turbulence wind structure scale sizes. This has brought new emphasis on achieving the optimum product of wind velocity and range resolutions. Several recent studies have considered the effects of amplitude noise, reduction algorithms, and possible hardware related signal artifacts on obtainable velocity accuracy. We discuss here the limitation on this accuracy resulting from the incoherent nature and finite temporal extent of backscatter from aerosols. For a lidar return from a hard (or slab) target, the phase of the intermediate frequency (IF) signal is random and the total return energy fluctuates from shot to shot due to speckle; however, the offset from the transmitted frequency is determinable with an accuracy subject only to instrumental effects and the signal to noise ratio (SNR), the noise being determined by the LO power in the shot noise limited regime. This is not the case for a return from a media extending over a range on the order of or greater than the spatial extent of the transmitted pulse, such as from atmospheric aerosols. In this case, the phase of the IF signal will exhibit a temporal random walk like behavior. It will be uncorrelated over times greater than the pulse duration as the transmitted pulse samples non-overlapping volumes of scattering centers. Frequency analysis of the IF signal in a window similar to the transmitted pulse envelope will therefore show shot-to-shot frequency deviations on the order of the inverse pulse duration reflecting the random phase rate variations. Like speckle, these deviations arise from the incoherent nature of the scattering process and diminish if the IF signal is averaged over times greater than a single range resolution cell (here the pulse duration). Apart from limiting the high SNR performance of a Doppler lidar, this shot-to-shot variance in velocity estimates has a

  2. Pulse transit times to the capillary bed evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry.

    PubMed

    Bernjak, Alan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2009-03-01

    The pulse transit time (PTT) of a wave over a specified distance along a blood vessel provides a simple non-invasive index that can be used for the evaluation of arterial distensibility. Current methods of measuring the PTT determine the propagation times of pulses only in the larger arteries. We have evaluated the pulse arrival time (PAT) to the capillary bed, through the microcirculation, and have investigated its relationship to the arterial PAT to a fingertip. To do so, we detected cardiac-induced pulse waves in skin microcirculation using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Using the ECG as a reference, PATs to the microcirculation were measured on the four extremities of 108 healthy subjects. Simultaneously, PATs to the radial artery of the left index finger were obtained from blood pressure recordings using a piezoelectric sensor. Both PATs correlate in similar ways with heart rate and age. That to the microcirculation is shown to be sensitive to local changes in skin perfusion induced by cooling. We introduce a measure for the PTT through the microcirculation. We conclude that a combination of LDF and pressure measurements enables simultaneous characterization of the states of the macro and microvasculature. Information about the microcirculation, including an assessment of endothelial function, may be obtained from the responses to perturbations in skin perfusion, such as temperature stress or vasoactive substances.

  3. Three-Dimensional Wind Profiling of Offshore Wind Energy Areas With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Cowen, Larry J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Grant, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    A technique has been developed for imaging the wind field over offshore areas being considered for wind farming. This is accomplished with an eye-safe 2-micrometer wavelength coherent Doppler lidar installed in an aircraft. By raster scanning the aircraft over the wind energy area (WEA), a three-dimensional map of the wind vector can be made. This technique was evaluated in 11 flights over the Virginia and Maryland offshore WEAs. Heights above the ocean surface planned for wind turbines are shown to be within the marine boundary layer, and the wind vector is seen to show variation across the geographical area of interest at turbine heights.

  4. Three-dimensional wind profiling of offshore wind energy areas with airborne Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Cowen, Larry J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Grant, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    A technique has been developed for imaging the wind field over offshore areas being considered for wind farming. This is accomplished with an eye-safe 2-μm wavelength coherent Doppler lidar installed in an aircraft. By raster scanning the aircraft over the wind energy area (WEA), a three-dimensional map of the wind vector can be made. This technique was evaluated in 11 flights over the Virginia and Maryland offshore WEAs. Heights above the ocean surface planned for wind turbines are shown to be within the marine boundary layer, and the wind vector is seen to show variation across the geographical area of interest at turbine heights.

  5. Turbulence in breaking mountain waves and atmospheric rotors estimated from airborne in situ and Doppler radar measurements.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Lukas; Serafin, Stefano; Haimov, Samuel; Grubišić, Vanda

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence generated in flow over mountainous terrain is studied using airborne in situ and cloud radar measurements over the Medicine Bow Mountains in southeast Wyoming, USA. During the NASA Orographic Clouds Experiment (NASA06) in 2006, two complex mountain flow cases were documented by the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft carrying the Wyoming Cloud Radar. The structure of turbulence and its intensity across the mountain range are described using the variance of vertical velocity σw2 and the cube root of the energy dissipation rate ɛ(1/3) (EDR). For a quantitative analysis of turbulence from the cloud radar, the uncertainties in the Doppler wind retrieval have to be taken into account, such as the variance of hydrometeor fall speed and the contamination of vertical Doppler velocity by the horizontal wind. A thorough analysis of the uncertainties shows that 25% accuracy or better can be achieved in regions of moderate to severe turbulence in the lee of the mountains, while only qualitative estimates of turbulence intensity can be obtained outside the most turbulent regions. Two NASA06 events exhibiting large-amplitude mountain waves, mid-tropospheric wave breaking, and rotor circulations are examined. Moderate turbulence is found in a wave-breaking region with σw2 and EDR reaching 4.8 m(2) s(-2) and 0.25 m(2/3) s(-1), respectively. Severe turbulence is measured within the rotor circulations with σw2 and EDR respectively in the ranges of 7.8-16.4 m(2) s(-2) and 0.50-0.77 m(2/3) s(-1). A unique result of this study is the quantitative estimation of the intensity of turbulence and its spatial distribution in the interior of atmospheric rotors, provided by the radar-derived turbulence fields.

  6. Characteristics of Deep Tropical and Subtropical Convection from Nadir-Viewing High-Altitude Airborne Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Li, Lihua; Guimond, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents observations of deep convection characteristics in the tropics and subtropics that have been classified into four categories: tropical cyclone, oceanic, land, and sea breeze. Vertical velocities in the convection were derived from Doppler radar measurements collected during several NASA field experiments from the nadir-viewing high-altitude ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP). Emphasis is placed on the vertical structure of the convection from the surface to cloud top (sometimes reaching 18-km altitude). This unique look at convection is not possible from other approaches such as ground-based or lower-altitude airborne scanning radars. The vertical motions from the radar measurements are derived using new relationships between radar reflectivity and hydrometeor fall speed. Various convective properties, such as the peak updraft and downdraft velocities and their corresponding altitude, heights of reflectivity levels, and widths of reflectivity cores, are estimated. The most significant findings are the following: 1) strong updrafts that mostly exceed 15 m/s, with a few exceeding 30 m/s, are found in all the deep convection cases, whether over land or ocean; 2) peak updrafts were almost always above the 10-km level and, in the case of tropical cyclones, were closer to the 12-km level; and 3) land-based and sea-breeze convection had higher reflectivities and wider convective cores than oceanic and tropical cyclone convection. In addition, the high-resolution EDOP data were used to examine the connection between reflectivity and vertical velocity, for which only weak linear relationships were found. The results are discussed in terms of dynamical and microphysical implications for numerical models and future remote sensors.

  7. An observation of sea-spray microphysics by airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairall, C. W.; Pezoa, S.; Moran, K.; Wolfe, D.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes observations and analysis of Doppler radar data from a down-looking 94 GHz (W-Band) system operated from a NOAA WP-3 Orion research aircraft in Tropical Storm (TS) Karen. The flight took place on 5 October 2013; Karen had weakened with maximum winds around 20 m s-1. Doppler spectral moments from the radar were processed to retrieve sea-spray microphysical properties (drop size and liquid water mass concentration) profiles in the height range 75-300 m above the sea surface. In the high wind speed regions of TS Karen (U10 > 15 m s-1), sea spray was observed with a nominal mass-mode radius of about 40 µm, a radar-weighted gravitational fall velocity of about 1 m s-1, and a mass concentration of about 10-3 gm-3 at 75 m. Spray-drop mass concentration declined with height to values of about 10-4 gm-3 at 300 m. Drop mass decreased slightly more slowly with increasing height than predicted by surface-layer similarity theory for a balance of turbulent diffusion vs fall velocity.

  8. Pulse pressure monitoring through non-contact cardiac motion detection using 2.45 GHz microwave Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    The use of a Continuous Wave (CW) quadrature Doppler radar is proposed here for continuous non-invasive Pulse Pressure monitoring. A correspondence between the variation in systemic pulse and variation in the displacement of the chest due to heart is demonstrated, establishing feasibility for the approach. Arctangent demodulation technique was used to process baseband data from radar measurements on two test subjects, in order to determine the absolute cardiac motion. An Omron digital Blood pressure cuff was used to measure the systolic and diastolic blood pressures from which the pulse pressure was calculated. Correlation between pulse pressure and cardiac motion was observed through changes induced due to different postures of the body.

  9. Investigating the impacts of LLJs and OLEs on ABL exchanges and transports using an airborne Doppler wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmitt, G. D.; Foster, R. C.; Godwin, K.; Greco, S.

    2013-12-01

    An airborne Doppler wind lidar (ADWL) has been used for more than a decade to investigate the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in the coastal region of central California. The frequent detection of Low Level Jets (LLJs) and Organized Large Eddies (OLEs) has made a strong case for a focused study on the role these structures play in modulating the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the atmosphere and the underlying land/water. As the ADWL provides high resolution wind and aerosol observations, aircraft in situ instrumentation measures state variables (10Hz) to enable flux computations within the ABL. This combination is ideally suited to relating both Eddy Diffusivity and Mass Fluxes to the presence and degree of organized structures such as LLJs, OLEs scaled to the depth of the Boundary Layer, OLEs scaled by the LLJ and convective 'plumes'. The recent addition of a modified 'cruise missile' towed below the aircraft, within 10 meters of the surface, promises to provide an additional and unique set of observations. Results from several field experiments using an ADWL installed on a Twin Otter (TODWL) will be presented with a focus upon the visualization of ABL structures and the interpretation of direct measurements of wind velocity, turbulence and aerosol distributions. Observations and fluxes derived from the Twin Otter's gust probe will be examined in terms of the DWL resolved ABL features.

  10. Airborne Doppler lidar at 532nm based on a tunable dual-channel Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-mei; Xing, Ting-wen; Lin, Wi-mei

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore a high-precision, a wide range of a frequency discrimination technique, and to study the application of this technique in the optical air data system (MOADS). To overcome the traditional equipment's shortcomings of short velocity detecting range such as pilot static tubes and wind wane, this technique can provide precision aviation data for various aerocrafts , without influencing pneumatic shape and performance of aerocraft. A tunable dual channel Fabry-Perot interferometer is used as a frequency discriminator in an airborne wind lidar system. This new frequency discriminator has been proposed to overcome the exiting frequency discriminator shortcoming. By adjusting the cavity length of interferometer, the speed of aerocraft can be detected and cut into several dynamic range. By this way, the Doppler wind lidar system can detect atmospheric parameters at the meantime, such as speed of aerocraft and temperature of atmosphere around the aerocraft, by analyzing the information of Rayleigh backscattering light. There are three main contribution in this paper: the first is discussing the basic theory of MOADS, calculational method and mathematic model of relative wind velocity between aircraft and wind are put forward.; the second is the parameter optimization of the dual-channel Fabry-Perot interferometer and the structure design of the interferometer; the third is the simulation of the performance and the accuracy of this system. Theory analysis and simulation results show this method is reasonable and practical.

  11. The design and development of signal-processing algorithms for an airborne x-band Doppler weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Shaun R.

    1994-01-01

    Improved measurements of precipitation will aid our understanding of the role of latent heating on global circulations. Spaceborne meteorological sensors such as the planned precipitation radar and microwave radiometers on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) provide for the first time a comprehensive means of making these global measurements. Pre-TRMM activities include development of precipitation algorithms using existing satellite data, computer simulations, and measurements from limited aircraft campaigns. Since the TRMM radar will be the first spaceborne precipitation radar, there is limited experience with such measurements, and only recently have airborne radars become available that can attempt to address the issue of the limitations of a spaceborne radar. There are many questions regarding how much attenuation occurs in various cloud types and the effect of cloud vertical motions on the estimation of precipitation rates. The EDOP program being developed by NASA GSFC will provide data useful for testing both rain-retrieval algorithms and the importance of vertical motions on the rain measurements. The purpose of this report is to describe the design and development of real-time embedded parallel algorithms used by EDOP to extract reflectivity and Doppler products (velocity, spectrum width, and signal-to-noise ratio) as the first step in the aforementioned goals.

  12. MULTI-CHANNEL PULSED DOPPLER SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR VASCULAR MEASUREMENTS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Madala, Sridhar; Jones, Alan D.; Caro, Walter A.; Eberth, John F.; Pham, Thuy T.; Taffet, George E.; Hartley, Craig J.

    2009-01-01

    The small size, high heart rate, and small tissue displacement of a mouse require small sensors that are capable of high spatial and temporal tissue displacement resolutions and multichannel data acquisition systems with high sampling rates for simultaneous measurement of high fidelity signals. We developed and evaluated an ultrasound-based mouse vascular research system (MVRS) that can be used to characterize vascular physiology in normal, transgenic, surgically altered, and disease models of mice. The system consists of multiple 10/20MHz ultrasound transducers, analog electronics for Doppler displacement and velocity measurement, signal acquisition and processing electronics, and personal computer based software for real-time and offline analysis. In-vitro testing of the system showed that it is capable of measuring tissue displacement as low as 0.1 µm and tissue velocity (µm/s) starting from 0. The system can measure blood velocities up to 9 m/s (with 10 MHz Doppler at a PRF of 125 kHz) and has a temporal resolution of 0.1 milliseconds. Ex-vivo tracking of an excised mouse carotid artery wall using our Doppler technique and a video pixel tracking technique showed high correlation (R2=0.99). The system can be used to measure diameter changes, augmentation index, impedance spectra, pulse wave velocity, characteristic impedance, forward and backward waves, reflection coefficients, coronary flow reserve, and cardiac motion in murine models. The system will facilitate the study of mouse vascular mechanics and arterial abnormalities resulting in significant impact on the evaluation and screening of vascular disease in mice. PMID:19854566

  13. Quantitative Gait Measurement With Pulse-Doppler Radar for Passive In-Home Gait Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%–18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment. PMID:24771566

  14. Quantitative gait measurement with pulse-Doppler radar for passive in-home gait assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%-18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment.

  15. Pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonographic evaluation of hepatic vein in dogs with tricuspid regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehwan; Kim, Soyoung

    2017-01-01

    This study was performed to identify the relationships between hepatic vein (HV) measurements, including flow velocity and waveform, using pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler ultrasonography, and the severity of tricuspid regurgitation (TR) in dogs. The study included 22 dogs with TR and 7 healthy dogs. The TR group was subdivided into 3 groups according to TR jet profile obtained by echocardiography. The hepatic venous waveform was obtained and classified into 3 types. A variety of HV measurements, including the maximal velocities of the atrial systolic, systolic (S), end ventricular systolic, and diastolic (D) waves and the ratio of the S- and D- wave velocities (S/D ratio), were acquired. TR severity was significantly correlated with the S- (r = −0.380, p = 0.042) and D- (r = 0.468, p = 0.011) wave velocities and the S/D ratio (r = −0.747, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed the highest sensitivity and specificity for the S/D ratio (89% and 75%, respectively) at a threshold of 0.97 with excellent accuracy (AUC = 0.911, p < 0.001). In conclusion, PW Doppler ultrasonography of the HV can be used to identify the presence of significant TR and to classify TR severity in dogs. PMID:27515264

  16. [Experimental use of intraoperative pulse wave Doppler in the study of vascular microanastomosis].

    PubMed

    La Rosa, A; Bonoldi, A P; Bagliani, A; Pagella, C; Rossi, D; Digiacomo, A; Zonta, A

    1990-02-01

    Personal experience with pulse wave Doppler (PWD) at 20 MHz with real time signal spectral analysis in FFT (Fast Fourier Transform), for the valuation of the vascular microanastomosis patency degree is reported. Fifty-nine Sprague-Dawley rats have been studied after abdominal aorta dissection: in 19 (group A) an organic stenosis has been simulated varying from 5% to 95% by a 8/0 silk suture; in 40 rats (group B and C) we the abdominal aorta was stitched with interrupted suture after transversal section. In the group C (20 rats) a longitudinal arteriotomy on abdominal aorta within 10-15 min from anastomosis was performed to value under microscopic control the suture line. The PWD technique is able to recognize stenoses more than 10% of intraluminal diameter, showing a higher sensibility than traditional techniques.

  17. Measurement of Ultracold Neutrons Produced by Using Doppler-shifted Bragg Reflection at a Pulsed-neutron Source

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brun, T. O.; Carpenter, J. M.; Krohn, V. E.; Ringo, G. R.; Cronin, J. W.; Dombeck, T. W.; Lynn, J. W.; Werner, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) have been produced at the Argonne pulsed-neutron source by the Doppler shift of 400-m/s neutrons Bragg reflected from a moving crystal. The peak density of UCN produced at the crystal exceeds 0.1 n/cm{sup 3}.

  18. Double-Pulse Two-Micron IPDA Lidar Simulation for Airborne Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    An advanced double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide. The instrument utilizes a state-of-the-art 2-micron laser transmitter with tunable on-line wavelength and advanced receiver. Instrument modeling and airborne simulations are presented in this paper. Focusing on random errors, results demonstrate instrument capabilities of performing precise carbon dioxide differential optical depth measurement with less than 3% random error for single-shot operation from up to 11 km altitude. This study is useful for defining CO2 measurement weighting, instrument setting, validation and sensitivity trade-offs.

  19. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Methane Column Abundance Made Using a Pulsed IPDA Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Ramanathan, Anamd; Dawsey, Martha; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Randolph; Abshire, James B.

    2012-01-01

    We report airborne measurements of the column abundance of atmospheric methane made over an altitude range of 3-11 km using a direct detection IPDA lidar with a pulsed laser emitting at 1651 nm. The laser transmitter was a tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier (OPA) pumped by a Nd:YAG laser and the receiver used a photomultiplier detector and photon counting electronics. The results follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude and the measured line shapes and optical depths show good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  20. Impact of arterial load on the agreement between pulse pressure analysis and esophageal Doppler

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The reliability of pulse pressure analysis to estimate cardiac output is known to be affected by arterial load changes. However, the contribution of each aspect of arterial load could be substantially different. In this study, we evaluated the agreement of eight non-commercial algorithms of pulse pressure analysis for estimating cardiac output (PPCO) with esophageal Doppler cardiac output (EDCO) during acute changes of arterial load. In addition, we aimed to determine the optimal arterial load parameter that could detect a clinically significant difference between PPCO and the EDCO. Methods We included mechanically ventilated patients monitored with a prototype esophageal Doppler (CardioQ-Combi™, Deltex Medical, Chichester, UK) and an indwelling arterial catheter who received a fluid challenge or in whom the vasoactive medication was introduced or modified. Initial calibration of PPCO was made with the baseline value of EDCO. We evaluated several aspects of arterial load: total systemic vascular resistance (TSVR = mean arterial pressure [MAP]/EDCO * 80), net arterial compliance (C = EDCO-derived stroke volume/pulse pressure), and effective arterial elastance (Ea = 0.9 * systolic blood pressure/EDCO-derived stroke volume). We compared CO values with Bland-Altman analysis, four-quadrant plot and a modified polar plot (with least significant change analysis). Results A total of 16,964-paired measurements in 53 patients were performed (median 271; interquartile range: 180-415). Agreement of all PPCO algorithms with EDCO was significantly affected by changes in arterial load, although the impact was more pronounced during changes in vasopressor therapy. When looking at different parameters of arterial load, the predictive abilities of Ea and C were superior to TSVR and MAP changes to detect a PPCO-EDCO discrepancy ≥ 10% in all PPCO algorithms. An absolute Ea change > 8.9 ± 1.7% was associated with a PPCO-EDCO discrepancy ≥ 10% in most algorithms

  1. The Effectiveness of Real-Time Feedback with an Audible Pulse: A Preliminary Study in Renal Doppler Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Hae Kyung; Choi, Seo-Youn; Yi, Boem Ha

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The effectiveness of real-time feedback using an audible pulse in renal Doppler ultrasonography was evaluated. Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board of our hospital. Written informed consent was provided by all volunteers at enrollment. The 26 healthy volunteers enrolled in this study underwent Doppler ultrasound of both kidneys using audible and inaudible pulses in randomized order and at 1-week intervals. Doppler waveforms were obtained at the interlobar or arcuate arteries using a 2-mm Doppler gate. Each session was considered complete when reproducible waveforms were obtained for 5 s in three predefined regions of the kidney. The scan times needed to obtain waveforms of the right and left kidneys were recorded separately. Measurements were compared using a paired t-test and a two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results The total recorded Doppler sonography scan time for each kidney ranged from 33 to 146 s. The mean scan time was 56.83 s (right, 58.19 s; left, 55.46 s) in the audible session and 72.58 s (right, 72.08 s; left, 73.08 s) in the inaudible session. The scan times were significantly shorter in the audible than inaudible session (p<0.001), whereas the difference in the scan times between the right and left kidneys was not significant. The order of the sessions had no effect on the total scan time. Conclusion Real-time feedback using an audible pulse may encourage patient cooperation during breath-holding and can shorten the time needed to perform Doppler ultrasonography. PMID:27685667

  2. Wind Profiling from a New Compact, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar Transceiver during Wind Measurement Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Demoz, B.; Veneable, D.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other lidars and other sensors will be presented.

  3. Saharan dust long-range transport across the Atlantic studied by an airborne Doppler wind lidar and the MACC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Benedetti, Angela; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-09-01

    A huge amount of dust is transported every year from north Africa into the Caribbean region. This paper presents an investigation of this long-range transport process based on airborne Doppler wind lidar (DWL) measurements conducted during the SALTRACE campaign (June-July 2013), as well as an evaluation of the ability of the MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) global aerosol model to reproduce it and its associated features. Although both the modeled winds from MACC and the measurements from the DWL show a generally good agreement, some differences, particularly in the African easterly jet (AEJ) intensity, were noted. The observed differences between modeled and measured wind jet speeds are between 5 and 10 m s-1. The vertical aerosol distribution within the Saharan dust plume and the marine boundary layer is investigated during the June-July 2013 period based on the MACC aerosol model results and the CALIOP satellite lidar measurements. While the modeled Saharan dust plume extent shows a good agreement with the measurements, a systematic underestimation of the marine boundary layer extinction is observed. Additionally, three selected case studies covering different aspects of the Saharan dust long-range transport along the west African coast, over the North Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean are presented. For the first time, DWL measurements are used to investigate the Saharan dust long-range transport. Simultaneous wind and backscatter measurements from the DWL are used, in combination with the MACC model, to analyze different features associated with the long-range transport, including an African easterly wave trough, the AEJ and the intertropical convergence zone.

  4. Accuracy of a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler in a wave-dominated flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of velocities measured by a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP) in the bottom boundary layer of a wave-dominated inner-shelf environment is evaluated. The downward-looking PCADP measured velocities in eight 10-cm cells at 1 Hz. Velocities measured by the PCADP are compared to those measured by an acoustic Doppler velocimeter for wave orbital velocities up to 95 cm s-1 and currents up to 40 cm s-1. An algorithm for correcting ambiguity errors using the resolution velocities was developed. Instrument bias, measured as the average error in burst mean speed, is -0.4 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 0.8). The accuracy (root-mean-square error) of instantaneous velocities has a mean of 8.6 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 6.5) for eastward velocities (the predominant direction of waves), 6.5 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 4.4) for northward velocities, and 2.4 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 1.6) for vertical velocities. Both burst mean and root-mean-square errors are greater for bursts with ub ??? 50 cm s-1. Profiles of burst mean speeds from the bottom five cells were fit to logarithmic curves: 92% of bursts with mean speed ??? 5 cm s-1 have a correlation coefficient R2 > 0.96. In cells close to the transducer, instantaneous velocities are noisy, burst mean velocities are biased low, and bottom orbital velocities are biased high. With adequate blanking distances for both the profile and resolution velocities, the PCADP provides sufficient accuracy to measure velocities in the bottom boundary layer under moderately energetic inner-shelf conditions.

  5. Quantification of Shear-Relative Asymmetries in Eyewall Slope Using Airborne Doppler Radar Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, A.; Rogers, R.; Hart, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it has become apparent that typical methods for analyzing tropical cyclones (TCs), such as track and intensity, are insufficient for evaluating TC structural evolution and numerical model forecasts of that evolution. Many studies have analyzed different metrics related to TC inner-core structure in an attempt to better understand the processes that drive changes in core structure. One important metric related to vertical TC structure is the slope of the eyewall. Hazelton and Hart (2013) discussed azimuthal mean eyewall slope based on radar reflectivity data, and its relationship with TC intensity and core structure. That study also noted significant azimuthal variation in slopes, but did not significantly explore reasons for this variation. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to quantify the role of vertical wind shear in causing azimuthal variance of slope, using research quality Doppler radar composites from the NOAA Hurricane Research Division (HRD). We analyze the slope of the 20 dBZ surface as in Hazelton and Hart (2013), and also look at azimuthal variation in other measures of eyewall slope, such as the slope of the radius of maximum winds (RMW), which has been analyzed in an azimuthal mean sense by Stern and Nolan (2009), and an angular momentum surface. The shear-relative slopes are quantified by separating the radar data into four quadrants relative to the vertical shear vector: Downshear Left (DSL), Upshear Left (USL), Upshear Right (USR), and Downshear Right (DSR). This follows the method employed in shear-relative analyses of other aspects of TC core structure, such as Rogers et al. (2013) and Reasor et al. (2013). The data suitable for use in this study consist of 36 flights into 15 different TCs (14 Atlantic, 1 Eastern Pacific) between 1997 and 2010. Preliminary results show apparent shear-induced asymmetries in eyewall slope. The slope of the RMW shows an asymmetry due to the tilt of the vortex approximately along the shear vector, with

  6. Beat-by-beat stroke volume assessment by pulsed Doppler in upright and supine exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Greene, E. R.; Hoekenga, D. E.; Caprihan, A.; Luft, U. C.

    1981-01-01

    The instantaneous stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (Q) in eight male subjects during steady-state supine (S) and upright (U) exercises at 300 kpm/min is assessed by a 3.0-MHz pulsed Doppler echocardiograph. The mean transients in heart rate (HR), SV, and Q for each posture were determined and the center-line blood velocities obtained in the ascending aorta. Results show that the mean supine values for SV and Q at rest and exercise were 111 ml and 6.4 l/min and 112 ml and 9.7 l/min, respectively. The corresponding results for U were 76 ml and 5.6 l/min and 92 ml and 8.4 l/min, respectively. The values compare favorably with previous studies utilizing invasive procedures. The transient response of Q following the onset of exercise in U was about twice as fast as in S because of the rapid and almost immediate upsurge in SV. The faster rise in aortic flow in U with exercise represented and additional volume (184 ml) of blood passing through the aorta compared with S in the first 20 exercises. It is suggested that the rapid mobilization of pooled venous blood from the leg veins during U was responsible for the increased blood flow.

  7. Noninvasive Method for Measuring Local Pulse Wave Velocity by Dual Pulse Wave Doppler: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Yang, Yong; Yuan, Li-jun; Liu, Jie; Duan, Yun-you; Cao, Tie-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a noninvasive dual pulse wave Doppler (DPWD) method, which involves simultaneous recording of flow velocity of two independent sample volumes with a measurable distance, for measuring the local arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) through in vitro and in vivo studies. Methods The DPWD mode of Hitachi HI Vision Preirus ultrasound system with a 5–13MHz transducer was used. An in vitro model was designed to compare the PWV of a homogeneous rubber tubing with the local PWV of its middle part measured by DPWD method. In the in vivo study, local PWV of 45 hypertensive patients (25 male, 49.8±3.1 years) and 45 matched healthy subjects (25 male, 49.3±3.0 years) were investigated at the left common carotid artery (LCCA) by DPWD method. Results In the in vitro study, the local PWV measured by DPWP method and the PWV of the homogeneous rubber tubing did not show statistical difference (5.16 ± 0.28 m/s vs 5.03 ± 0.15 m/s, p = 0.075). The coefficient of variation (CV) of the intra- and inter- measurements for local PWV were 3.46% and 4.96%, for the PWV of the homogeneous rubber tubing were 0.99% and 1.98%. In the in vivo study, a significantly higher local PWV of LCCA was found in the hypertensive patients as compared to that in healthy subjects (6.29±1.04m/s vs. 5.31±0.72m/s, P = 0.019). The CV of the intra- and inter- measurements in hypertensive patients were 2.22% and 3.94%, in healthy subjects were 2.07% and 4.14%. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility of the noninvasive DPWD method to determine the local PWV, which was accurate and reproducible not only in vitro but also in vivo studies. This noninvasive echocardiographic method may be illuminating to clinical use. PMID:25786124

  8. Double-Pulse Two-micron LPDA Lidar Simulation for Airborne Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2016-06-01

    An advanced double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide. The instrument utilizes a state-of-the-art 2-μm laser transmitter with tunable on-line wavelength and advanced receiver. Instrument modeling and airborne simulations are presented in this paper. Focusing on random errors, results demonstrate instrument capabilities of performing precise carbon dioxide differential optical depth measurement with less than 3% random error for single-shot operation up to 11 km altitude. This study is useful for defining CO2 measurement weighting function for adaptive targeting, instrument setting, validation and sensitivity trade-offs.

  9. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic doppler velocimetry using speed of sound and reflection mode pulsed wideband doppler

    DOEpatents

    Shekarriz, Alireza; Sheen, David M.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a method and apparatus rely upon tomographic measurement of the speed of sound and fluid velocity in a pipe. The invention provides a more accurate profile of velocity within flow fields where the speed of sound varies within the cross-section of the pipe. This profile is obtained by reconstruction of the velocity profile from the local speed of sound measurement simultaneously with the flow velocity. The method of the present invention is real-time tomographic ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry utilizing a to plurality of ultrasonic transmission and reflection measurements along two orthogonal sets of parallel acoustic lines-of-sight. The fluid velocity profile and the acoustic velocity profile are determined by iteration between determining a fluid velocity profile and measuring local acoustic velocity until convergence is reached.

  10. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Ramanathan, Anand; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Weaver, Clark; Browell, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to greater than 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the Iidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected -linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes greater than 6 km the random errors were approximately 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as wen as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly

  11. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Ramanathan, A.; Hasselbrack, W.; Mao, J.; Weaver, C. J.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to > 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected ~linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes > 6 km the random errors were ~ 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as well as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity

  12. Development of the Data Acquisition and Processing System for a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A general overview of the development of a data acquisition and processing system is presented for a pulsed, 2-micron coherent Doppler Lidar system located in NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, USA. It is a comprehensive system that performs high-speed data acquisition, analysis, and data display both in real time and offline. The first flight missions are scheduled for the summer of 2010 as part of the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign for the study of hurricanes. The system as well as the control software is reviewed and its requirements and unique features are discussed.

  13. Equipment review: New techniques for cardiac output measurement – oesophageal Doppler, Fick principle using carbon dioxide, and pulse contour analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berton, Christine; Cholley, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Measuring cardiac output is of paramount importance in the management of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit and of 'high risk' surgical patients in the operating room. Alternatives to thermodilution are now available and are gaining acceptance among practitioners who have been trained almost exclusively in the use of the pulmonary artery catheter. The present review focuses on the principles, advantages and limitations of oesophageal Doppler, Fick principle applied to carbon dioxide, and pulse contour analysis. No single method stands out or renders the others obsolete. By making cardiac output easily measurable, however, these techniques should all contribute to improvement in haemodynamic management. PMID:12133181

  14. Laser Doppler technology applied to atmospheric environmental operating problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E. A.; Bilbro, J. W.; Dunkin, J. A.; Jeffreys, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon dioxide laser Doppler ground wind data were very favorably compared with data from standard anemometers. As a result of these measurements, two breadboard systems were developed for taking research data: a continuous wave velocimeter and a pulsed Doppler system. The scanning continuous wave laser Doppler velocimeter developed for detecting, tracking and measuring aircraft wake vortices was successfully tested at an airport where it located vortices to an accuracy of 3 meters at a range of 150 meters. The airborne pulsed laser Doppler system was developed to detect and measure clear air turbulence (CAT). This system was tested aboard an aircraft, but jet stream CAT was not encountered. However, low altitude turbulence in cumulus clouds near a mountain range was detected by the system and encountered by the aircraft at the predicted time.

  15. Compact, Engineered, 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype for Field and Airborne Validation: Doppler Aerosol WiNd Lidar (DAWN). Interim Review #1 (6 months)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2006-01-01

    A new project, selected in 2005 by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), will be described. The 3-year effort is intended to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a packaged, rugged, compact, space-qualifiable coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) transceiver capable of future validation in an aircraft and/or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent DWL breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent DWL system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid DWL solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  16. The Windvan pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar wide-area wind sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Rhidian

    1990-01-01

    Wind sensing using a Doppler lidar is achieved by sensing the Doppler content of narrow frequency laser light backscattered by the ambient atmospheric aerosols. The derived radial wind components along several directions are used to generate wind vectors, typically using the Velocity Azimuth Display (VAD) method described below. Range resolved information is obtained by range gating the continuous scattered return. For a CO2 laser (10.6 mu) the Doppler velocity scaling factor is 188 kHz/ms(exp -1). In the VAD scan method the zenith angle of the pointing direction is fixed and its azimuth is continuously varied through 2 pi. A spatially uniform wind field at a particular altitude yields a sinusoidal variation of the radial component vs. azimuth. The amplitude, phase and dc component of this sinusoid yield the horizontal wind speed, direction and vertical component of the wind respectively. In a nonuniform wind field the Fourier components of the variation yields the required information.

  17. [The usefulness of range-gated pulsed Doppler echocardiography. A review (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lange, L; Allen, H D; Goldberg, S J; Sahn, D J

    1979-03-01

    Single-crystal RGPD Echocardiography has clearly become a useful noninvasive ultrasonic method which enlarges the capabilities of investigating the heart. Recording of flow direction and showing disturbed flow allows additional clarification and confirmation of various diagnoses. This single-crystal technique does not allow flow quantification at the present time. The TIH and auditory signal displays of Doppler shift as presently utilized in commercial devices allow qualitative observation but require much experience in test performance and evaluation. The future here is probably in the area of spectral analysis. Present instrumentation employs M-mode echo for Doppler sample localization. Drawbacks include inprecise sample beam localization and non-variable sample volume size. Further, standardization of the Doppler signal is necessary. Combination with 2-D echo in the future will allow more precise sample beam localization and accuracy in flow quantification. The latter area has particular promise and is under investigation but is not yet commercially available.

  18. Wind Profiling from a High Energy, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar during Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. N.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Yu, J.; Beyon, J. Y.; Demoz, B.

    2009-12-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. The LaRC mobile lidar was deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland as part of NASA HQ funded (ROSES-2007, Wind Lidar Science Proposal entitled “Intercomparison of Multiple Lidars for Wind Measurements). During the campaign, testing of the lidar was combined with a field campaign to operate a 2-μm coherent lidar alongside a 355-nm direct detection lidar to demonstrate the hybrid wind lidar concept. Besides lidar, many other meteorological sensors were located at the campaign site, including wind measuring balloon sondes, sonic and propeller anemometers mounted on a tower, and a 915-MHz radio acoustic sounding system. Comparisons among these wind measurement sensors are currently being analyzed and should be available for presentation at the Conference.

  19. Testing of a Two-Micron Double-Pulse IPDA Lidar Instrument for Airborne Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Singh, U. N.

    2015-12-01

    Utilizing a tunable two-micron double-pulse laser transmitter, an airborne IPDA lidar system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for atmospheric carbon dioxide column measurements. The instrument comprises a receiver with 0.4 m telescope and InGaAs pin detectors coupled to 12-bit, 200 MS/s waveform digitizers. For on-site ground testing, the 2-μm CO2 IPDA lidar was installed inside a trailer located where meteorological data and CO2 mixing ratio profiles were obtained from CAPABLE and LiCoR in-suite sampling, respectively. IPDA horizontal ground testing with 860 m target distance indicated CO2 sensitivity of 2.24 ppm with -0.43 ppm offset, while operating at 3 GHz on-line position from the R30 line center. Then, the IPDA lidar was integrated inside the NASA B-200 aircraft, with supporting instrumentation, for airborne testing and validation. Supporting instruments included in-situ LiCoR sensor, GPS and video recorder for target identification. Besides, aircraft built-in sensors provided altitude, pressure, temperature and relative humidity sampling during flights. The 2-mm CO2 IPDA lidar airborne testing was conducted through ten daytime flights (27 hours flight time). Airborne testing included different operating and environmental conditions for flight altitude up to 7 km, different ground target conditions such as vegetation, soil, ocean, snow and sand and different cloud conditions. Some flights targeted power plant incinerators for investigating IPDA sensitivity to CO2 plums. Relying on independent CO2 in-situ sampling, conducted through NOAA, airborne IPDA CO2 sensitivity of 4.15 ppm with 1.14 ppm offset were observed at 6 km altitude and 4 GHz on-line offset frequency. This validates the 2-μm double-pulse IPDA lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurement.

  20. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Backscatter and Earth Surface Targets By Use of An Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Over Western North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Airborne lidar systems are used to determine wind velocity and to measure aerosol or cloud backscatter variability. Atmospheric aerosols, being affected by local and regional sources, show tremendous variability. Continuous wave (cw) lidar can obtain detailed aerosol loading with unprecedented high resolution (3 sec) and sensitivity (1 mg/cubic meter) as was done during the 1995 NASA Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission over western North America and the Pacific Ocean. Backscatter variability was measured at a 9.1 micron wavelength cw focused CO2 Doppler lidar for approximately 52 flight hours, covering an equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 30,000 km in the troposphere. Some quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents at altitudes that ranged from approximately 0.1 to 12 km. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and ocean were observed. Mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was approximately 6 x 10(exp -11)/ms/r, consistent with previous lidar datasets. While these atmospheric measurements were made, the lidar also retrieved a distinct backscatter signal from the Earth's surface from the unfocused part of the focused cw lidar beam during aircraft rolls. Atmospheric backscatter can be highly variable both spatially and temporally, whereas, Earth-surface backscatter is relatively much less variant and can be quite predictable. Therefore, routine atmospheric backscatter measurements by an airborne lidar also give Earth surface backscatter which can allow for investigating the Earth terrain. In the case where the Earth's surface backscatter is coming from a well-known and fairly uniform region, then it can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities during flight. These Earth surface measurements over varying Californian terrain during the mission were compared with laboratory backscatter measurements using the same lidar of various

  1. A remote and non-contact method for obtaining the blood-pulse waveform with a laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Candida L.; Antonelli, Lynn T.; Soares, Edward

    2007-02-01

    The use of lasers to remotely and non-invasively detect the blood pressure waveform of humans and animals would provide a powerful diagnostic tool. Current blood pressure measurement tools, such as a cuff, are not useful for burn and trauma victims, and animals require catheterization to acquire accurate blood pressure information. The purpose of our sensor method and apparatus invention is to remotely and non-invasively detect the blood pulse waveform of both animals and humans. This device is used to monitor an animal or human's skin in proximity to an artery using radiation from a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). This system measures the velocity (or displacement) of the pulsatile motion of the skin, indicative of physiological parameters of the arterial motion in relation to the cardiac cycle. Tests have been conducted that measures surface velocity with an LDV and a signal-processing unit, with enhanced detection obtained with optional hardware including a retro-reflector dot. The blood pulse waveform is obtained by integrating the velocity signal to get surface displacement using standard signal processing techniques. Continuous recording of the blood pulse waveform yields data containing information on cardiac health and can be analyzed to identify important events in the cardiac cycle, such as heart rate, the timing of peak systole, left ventricular ejection time and aortic valve closure. Experimental results are provided that demonstrates the current capabilities of the optical, non-contact sensor for the continuous, non-contact recording of the blood pulse waveform without causing patient distress.

  2. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Concentration in the ASCENDS 2014 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Chen, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We report progress in demonstrating a pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. The CO2 lidar flies on NASA's DC-8 aircraft and measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line by using 30 wavelength samples distributed across the lube. Our post-flight analysis estimates the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength 10 times per second. The retrievals solve for the optimum CO2 absorption line shape and the column average CO2 concentrations using radiative transfer calculations based on HITRAN, the aircraft altitude, range to the scattering surface, and the atmospheric conditions. We compare these to CO2 concentrations sampled by in-situ sensors on the aircraft. The number of wavelength samples can be reduced in the retrievals. During the ASCENDS airborne campaign in 2013 two flights were made in February over snow in the Rocky Mountains and the Central Plains allowing measurement of snow-covered surface reflectivity. Several improvements were made to the lidar for the 2014 campaign. These included using a new step-locked laser diode source, and incorporating a new HgCdTe APD detector and analog digitizer into the lidar receiver. Testing showed this detector had higher sensitivity, analog response, and a more linear dynamic range than the PMT detector used previously. In 2014 flights were made in late August and early September over the California Central Valley, the redwood forests along the California coast, two desert areas in Nevada and California, and two flights above growing agriculture in Iowa. Two flights were also made under OCO-2 satellite ground tracks. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, and mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, and through thin clouds and aerosol scattering. The lidar measurements clearly

  3. Boundary Layer CO2 mixing ratio measurements by an airborne pulsed IPDA lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Since the primary signature of CO2 fluxes at the surface occurs in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), remote sensing measurements of CO2 that can resolve the CO2 absorption in the PBL separate from the total column are more sensitive to fluxes than those that can only measure a total column. The NASA Goddard CO2 sounder is a pulsed, range-resolved lidar that samples multiple (presently 30) wavelengths across the 1572.335 nm CO2 absorption line. The range resolution and line shape measurement enable CO2 mixing ratio measurements to be made in two or more altitude layers including the PBL via lidar cloud-slicing and multi-layer retrievals techniques. The pulsed lidar approach allows range-resolved backscatter of scattering from ground and cloud tops. Post flight data analysis can be used split the vertical CO2 column into layers (lidar cloud-slicing) and solve for the CO2 mixing ratio in each layer. We have demonstrated lidar cloud slicing with lidar measurements from a flight over Iowa, USA in August 2011 during the corn-growing season, remotely measuring a ≈15 ppm drawdown in the PBL CO2. We will present results using an improved lidar cloud slicing retrieval algorithm as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming ASCENDS 2014 flight campaign. The CO2 absorption line is also more pressure broadened at lower altitudes. Analyzing the line shape also allows solving for some vertical resolution in the CO2 distribution. By allowing the retrieval process to independently vary the column concentrations in two or more altitude layers, one can perform a best-fit retrieval to obtain the CO2 mixing ratios in each of the layers. Analysis of airborne lidar measurements (in 2011) over Iowa, USA and Four Corners, New Mexico, USA show that for altitudes above 8 km, the CO2 sounder can detect and measure enhanced or diminished CO2 mixing ratios in the PBL even in the absence of clouds. We will present these results as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming

  4. Sizing of Emboli in Flowing Blood Using Pulse Doppler Ultrasound and the Embolus-To Power Ratio.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehring, Mark Alan

    The embolus to blood ratio (EBR) theoretical model describing pulse Doppler ultrasound observations of emboli in flowing blood is summarized. The EBR model uses the backscattered signal power from blood in the Doppler sample volume as a reference from which to assess embolus size and composition. This EBR is independent of attenuation and reflection loss in intervening tissues between probe and bloodflow. An in vitro investigation is presented that tests the validity of the EBR model. The experimental apparatus includes a novel phantom for Doppler observation of circulating emboli and a Doppler system which uses 1.6 and 2.4 MHz concurrently for interrogation of an embolus. The phantom contains a tubeless flow conduit inside a polyacrylamide gel and a blood-mimicking fluid flowing in the conduit. Time series Doppler shift data which are gathered while polystyrene microsphere "emboli" transit the sample volume are post -processed to calculate the EBR on each embolic signature. EBR measurements from microspheres of three different diameters are summarized and shown to contain pronounced and systematic variability. The hypothesis is presented that this variability is due to a small speed of sound mismatch between the gel and the blood-mimicking fluid, a phenomenon anticipated in vivo. This speed of sound mismatch results in beam refraction and a non-uniformly insonated sample volume (thereby causing variability in embolus signatures). A three dimensional theoretical study is presented that models beam refraction resulting from speed of sound mismatch between the blood mimicking fluid and the surrounding gel. A Monte Carlo study of the EBR behavior in the presence of beam refraction is performed and yields similar results to the data obtained in vitro. This study is evidence that the experimental signal variability is due to speed of sound mismatch between blood-mimicking fluid and gel. A method of extracting embolus size from the dual frequency EBR data based on the

  5. Wave Field Characterization Using Dual-Polarized Pulse-Doppler X-Band Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    height spectra for runs 265, 267, 268, 269, and 272 (dataset denoted in each subfigure title) 22 Figure 17. Time histories of (a) peak period, (b) mean... history of significant wave height as measured by the buoy, array, Doppler, and RCS. (b) Difference between buoy measured significant wave height and...speed and direction from an anemometer at the end of the SIO pier. The wind speed and direction data was provided hourly, while the tidal data was in 6

  6. Nonstationarity broadening reduction in pulsed Doppler spectrum measurements using time-frequency estimators.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, J C; Ruano, M G; Fish, P J

    1996-12-01

    The spectral width of Doppler signals is used as measure of lesion-induced flow disturbance. Its estimation accuracy is compromised using the conventional short-term Fourier transform (STFT) since this method implicitly assumes signal stationarity during the signal window while the Doppler signals from arteries are markedly nonstationary. The Wigner-Ville (WVD), Choi-Williams (CWD) and Bessel distributions (BD), specifically designed for nonstationary signals, have been optimized for spectral width estimation accuracy and compared to the STFT under different signal to noise ratios using simulated Doppler signals of known time-frequency characteristics. The optimum parameter values for each method were determined as a Hanning window duration of 10 ms for the STFT, 40 ms for the WVD and CWD and 20 ms for the BD and dimensionless time-frequency smoothing constant values of five in the CWD and two in the BD. Thresholding was used to reduce the effect of cross terms and side lobes in the WVD and BD. With no added noise the WVD gave the lowest estimation error followed by the CWD. At signal-to-noise ratios (SNR's) of 10 dB and 20 dB the CWD and BD had similar errors and were markedly better than the other estimators. Overall the CWD gave the best performance.

  7. Accuracy of velocity and shear rate measurements using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a comparison of signal analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Markou, C P; Ku, D N

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was instituted to evaluate the performance of Doppler ultrasound signal processing techniques for measuring fluid velocity under well-defined flow conditions using a 10-MHz multigated pulsed ultrasound instrument. Conditions of fully developed flow in a rigid, circular tube were varied over a Reynolds number range between 500 and 8000. The velocity across the tube was determined using analog and digital zero crossing detectors and three digital spectrum estimators. Determination of the Doppler frequency from analog or digital zero crossing detectors gave accurate velocity values for laminar and moderately turbulent flow away from the wall (0.969 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.986). Three digital spectrum estimators, Fast Fourier Transform, Burg autoregressive method, and minimum variance method, were slightly more accurate than the zero crossing detector (0.984 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.994), especially at points close to the walls and with higher levels of turbulence. Steep velocity gradients and transit-time-effects from high velocities produced significantly larger errors in velocity measurement. Wall shear rate estimates were most precise when calculated using the position of the wall and two velocity points. The calculated wall shears were within 20%-30% of theoretically predicted values.

  8. Noninvasive aortic bloodflow by Pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) compared to cardiac output by the direct Fick procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Left ventricular stroke volume was estimated from the systolic velocity integral in the ascending aorta by pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) and the cross sectional area of the aorta estimated by M mode echocardiography on 15 patients with coronary disease undergoing right catheterization for diagnostic purposes. Cardiac output was calculated from stroke volume and heart volume using the PDE method as well as the Fick procedure for comparison. The mean value for the cardiac output via the PDE method (4.42 L/min) was only 6% lower than for the cardiac output obtained from the Fick procedure (4.69 L/min) and the correlation between the two methods was excellent (r=0.967, p less than .01). The good agreement between the two methods demonstrates that the PDE technique offers a reliable noninvasive alternative for estimating cardiac output, requiring no active cooperation by the subject. It was concluded that the Doppler method is superior to the Fick method in that it provides beat by beat information on cardiac performance.

  9. Range-gated pulsed Doppler ultrasonographic evaluation of carotid arterial blood flow in small preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, W D; Carrigan, T A; Dooley, K J; Giddens, D P; Dykes, F D; Lazzara, A; Ray, J L; Ahmann, P A

    1983-02-01

    Range-gated pulsed Doppler (RGPD) ultrasonography was utilized to study the effect of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) on carotid arterial blood flow in small preterm infants. Carotid arterial flow velocity studies were performed on 23 preterm infants, sampling right and left carotid arteries. Studies on seven infants after PDA ligation and on seven who developed no evidence of PDA were used as controls. A strong relationship was demonstrated between diastolic reversal in the carotid arteries and PDA. The results of this study indicate that the RGPD flow velocity curve from the carotid artery is more sensitive than M-mode echocardiography or clinical examination in detecting PDA, and that PDA in small preterm infants is associated with a distinct abnormality in the carotid arterial flow pattern.

  10. Fetal Echocardiography and Pulsed-wave Doppler Ultrasound in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Ryan; Endo, Masayuki; La Gerche, Andre; Eixarch, Elisenda; DeKoninck, Philip; Ferferieva, Vessilina; D'hooge, Jan; Wallace, Euan M.; Deprest, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) results in abnormal cardiac function that is apparent antenatally due to advances in fetoplacental Doppler ultrasound and fetal echocardiography. Increasingly, these imaging modalities are being employed clinically to examine cardiac function and assess wellbeing in utero, thereby guiding timing of birth decisions. Here, we used a rabbit model of IUGR that allows analysis of cardiac function in a clinically relevant way. Using isoflurane induced anesthesia, IUGR is surgically created at gestational age day 25 by performing a laparotomy, exposing the bicornuate uterus and then ligating 40-50% of uteroplacental vessels supplying each gestational sac in a single uterine horn. The other horn in the rabbit bicornuate uterus serves as internal control fetuses. Then, after recovery at gestational age day 30 (full term), the same rabbit undergoes examination of fetal cardiac function. Anesthesia is induced with ketamine and xylazine intramuscularly, then maintained by a continuous intravenous infusion of ketamine and xylazine to minimize iatrogenic effects on fetal cardiac function. A repeat laparotomy is performed to expose each gestational sac and a microultrasound examination (VisualSonics VEVO 2100) of fetal cardiac function is performed. Placental insufficiency is evident by a raised pulsatility index or an absent or reversed end diastolic flow of the umbilical artery Doppler waveform. The ductus venosus and middle cerebral artery Doppler is then examined. Fetal echocardiography is performed by recording B mode, M mode and flow velocity waveforms in lateral and apical views. Offline calculations determine standard M-mode cardiac variables, tricuspid and mitral annular plane systolic excursion, speckle tracking and strain analysis, modified myocardial performance index and vascular flow velocity waveforms of interest. This small animal model of IUGR therefore affords examination of in utero cardiac function that is

  11. Impacts of 4D-VAR Assimilation of Airborne Doppler Radar Observations on Numerical Simulations of the Genesis of Typhoon Nuri (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Z.; Li, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model and its four-dimensional variational data assimilation system are employed to examine the impact of airborne Doppler radar observations on predicting the genesis of Typhoon Nuri (2008). The ELDORA airborne radar data, collected during the Office of Naval Research-sponsored Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 field experiment, are used for data assimilation experiments. Two assimilation methods are evaluated and compared, namely, the direct assimilation of radar-measured radial velocity and the assimilation of three-dimensional wind analysis derived from the radar radial velocity. Results show that direct assimilation of radar radial velocity leads to better intensity forecasts, as it enhances the development of convective systems and improves the inner core structure of Nuri, whereas assimilation of the radar-retrieved wind analysis is more beneficial for tracking forecasts, as it results in improved environmental flows. The assimilation of both the radar-retrieved wind and the radial velocity can lead to better forecasts in both intensity and tracking, if the radial velocity observations are assimilated first and the retrieved winds are then assimilated in the same data assimilation window. In addition, experiments with and without radar data assimilation lead to developing and nondeveloping disturbances for Nuri's genesis in the numerical simulations. The improved initial conditions and forecasts from the data assimilation imply that the enhanced midlevel vortex and moisture conditions are favorable for the development of deep convection in the center of the pouch and eventually contribute to Nuri's genesis. The improved simulations of the convection and associated environmental conditions produce enhanced upper-level warming in the core region and lead to the drop in sea-level pressure.

  12. Maximum-likelihood spectral estimation and adaptive filtering techniques with application to airborne Doppler weather radar. Thesis Technical Report No. 20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Jonathan Y.

    1994-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the signal processing problems associated with the detection of hazardous windshears using airborne Doppler radar when weak weather returns are in the presence of strong clutter returns. In light of the frequent inadequacy of spectral-processing oriented clutter suppression methods, we model a clutter signal as multiple sinusoids plus Gaussian noise, and propose adaptive filtering approaches that better capture the temporal characteristics of the signal process. This idea leads to two research topics in signal processing: (1) signal modeling and parameter estimation, and (2) adaptive filtering in this particular signal environment. A high-resolution, low SNR threshold maximum likelihood (ML) frequency estimation and signal modeling algorithm is devised and proves capable of delineating both the spectral and temporal nature of the clutter return. Furthermore, the Least Mean Square (LMS) -based adaptive filter's performance for the proposed signal model is investigated, and promising simulation results have testified to its potential for clutter rejection leading to more accurate estimation of windspeed thus obtaining a better assessment of the windshear hazard.

  13. The comparison of a novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time and echo Doppler during exercise.

    PubMed

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Tomoyuki; Terao, Mami; Ukawa, Teiji; Ochiai, Ryoichi

    2012-01-01

    A new technology called estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) uses pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram and pulse oximeter to measure cardiac output (CO) non-invasively and continuously. This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of esCCO during exercise testing. We compared esCCO with CO measured by the echo Doppler aortic velocity-time integral (VTIao_CO). The correlation coefficient between esCCO and VTIao_CO was r= 0.87 (n= 72). Bias and precision were 0.33 ± 0.95 L/min and percentage error was 31%. The esCCO could detect change in VTIao_CO larger than 1 L/min with a concordance rate of 88%. In polar plot, 83% of data are within 0.5 L/min, and 100% of data are within 1 L/min. Those results show the acceptable accuracy and trend ability of esCCO. Change in pre-ejection period (PEP) measured by using M-mode of Diagnostic Ultrasound System accounted for approximately half of change in PWTT. This indicates that PEP included in PWTT has an impact on the accuracy of esCCO measurement. In this study, the validity of esCCO during exercise testing was assessed and shown to be acceptable. The result of this study suggests that we can expand its application.

  14. Why Current Doppler Ultrasound Methodology Is Inaccurate in Assessing Cerebral Venous Return: The Alternative of the Ultrasonic Jugular Venous Pulse

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of cerebral venous return is growing interest for potential application in clinical practice. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was used as a screening tool. However, three meta-analyses of qualitative DUS protocol demonstrate a big heterogeneity among studies. In an attempt to improve accuracy, several authors alternatively measured the flow rate, based on the product of the time average velocity with the cross-sectional area (CSA). However, also the quantification protocols lacked of the necessary accuracy. The reasons are as follows: (a) automatic measurement of the CSA assimilates the jugular to a circle, while it is elliptical; (b) the use of just a single CSA value in a pulsatile vessel is inaccurate; (c) time average velocity assessment can be applied only in laminar flow. Finally, the tutorial describes alternative ultrasound calculation of flow based on the Womersley method, which takes into account the variation of the jugular CSA overtime. In the near future, it will be possible to synchronize the electrocardiogram with the brain inflow (carotid distension wave) and with the outflow (jugular venous pulse) in order to nicely have a noninvasive ultrasound picture of the brain-heart axis. US jugular venous pulse may have potential use in neurovascular, neurocognitive, neurosensorial, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27006525

  15. Analysis of Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Weaver, Clark J.; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS space mission [1]. It uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1575 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with the range profile of scattering in the path. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off-line signals via the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. The time of flight of the laser pulses is used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate an early version of the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar stepped the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 wavelength steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a NIR photomultiplier and is recorded on every other reading by a photon counting system [2]. During August 2009 we made a series of 2.5 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over locations in the US, including the SGP ARM site in Oklahoma, central Illinois, north-eastern North Carolina, and over the Chesapeake Bay and the eastern shore of Virginia. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made

  16. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  17. Time dependent Doppler shifts in high-order harmonic generation in intense laser interactions with solid density plasma and frequency chirped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, E. C.; Zhang, P.; He, Z.-H.; Dollar, F.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2015-05-15

    High order harmonic generation from solid targets is a compelling route to generating intense attosecond or even zeptosecond pulses. However, the effects of ion motion on the generation of harmonics have only recently started to be considered. Here, we study the effects of ion motion in harmonics production at ultrahigh laser intensities interacting with solid density plasma. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we find that there is an optimum density for harmonic production that depends on laser intensity, which scales linearly with a{sub 0} with no ion motion but with a reduced scaling if ion motion is included. We derive a scaling for this optimum density with ion motion and also find that the background ion motion induces Doppler red-shifts in the harmonic structures of the reflected pulse. The temporal structure of the Doppler shifts is correlated to the envelope of the incident laser pulse. We demonstrate that by introducing a frequency chirp in the incident pulse we are able to eliminate these Doppler shifts almost completely.

  18. Micro-pulse upconversion Doppler lidar for wind and visibility detection in the atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haiyun; Shangguan, Mingjia; Wang, Chong; Shentu, Guoliang; Qiu, Jiawei; Zhang, Qiang; Dou, Xiankang; Pan, Jianwei

    2016-11-15

    For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a compact, eye-safe, and versatile direct detection Doppler lidar is developed using an upconversion single-photon detection method at 1.5 μm. An all-fiber and polarization maintaining architecture is realized to guarantee the high optical coupling efficiency and the robust stability. Using integrated-optic components, the conservation of etendue of the optical receiver is achieved by manufacturing a fiber-coupled periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide and an all-fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The double-edge technique is implemented by using a convert single-channel FPI and a single upconversion detector, incorporating a time-division multiplexing method. The backscatter photons at 1548.1 nm are converted into 863 nm via mixing with a pump laser at 1950 nm. The relative error of the system is less than 0.1% over nine weeks. In experiments, atmospheric wind and visibility over 48 h are detected in the boundary layer. The lidar shows good agreement with the ultrasonic wind sensor, with a standard deviation of 1.04 m/s in speed and 12.3° in direction.

  19. Subendocardial motion in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: assessment from long- and short-axis views by pulsed tissue Doppler imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabata, T.; Oki, T.; Yamada, H.; Abe, M.; Onose, Y.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a recently developed technique that allows the instantaneous measurement of intrinsic regional myocardial motion velocity. Pulsed TDI is capable of separately assessing left ventricular (LV) regional motion velocity caused by circumferential and longitudinal fiber contraction. This particular feature of function is still controversial in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). METHODS: To better characterize intrinsic circumferential and longitudinal LV systolic myocardial function in HC, we used pulsed TDI to measure short- and long-axis LV motion velocities, respectively. The subendocardial motion velocity patterns at the middle of the LV posterior wall (PW) and ventricular septum (IVS) in LV parasternal and apical long-axis views were recorded by pulsed TDI in 19 patients with nonobstructive HC and in 21 normal controls (NC). RESULTS: Peak short- and long-axis systolic subendocardial velocities in both the LV PW and IVS were significantly smaller in the HC group than in the NC group, and the time to peak velocity was significantly delayed. Furthermore, peak PW systolic velocity was significantly greater along the long axis than along the short axis in the NC group (8.8 +/- 1.5 cm/s vs 8.2 +/- 1.4 cm/s, P <.05), whereas the opposite was observed in the HC group (6.1 +/- 1.2 cm/s vs 7.5 +/- 1.0 cm/s, P <.0001). No significant differences were found in either group between the long- and short-axis IVS velocities (HC: 5.9 +/- 1.4 cm/s vs 5.5 +/- 1.3 cm/s; NC: 7.8 +/- 1.3 cm/s vs 7.9 +/- 1.6 cm/s). CONCLUSIONS: By using the capability of pulsed TDI for the evaluation of intrinsic myocardial velocity instantaneously in a specific region and direction, we found impairment of LV myocardial systolic function in patients with HC not only in the hypertrophied IVS but also in the nonhypertrophied LV PW. We also found a greater decrease in LV PW velocities along the long axis than the short axis, suggesting greater

  20. Sub-Doppler spectra of infrared hyperfine transitions of nitric oxide using a pulse modulated quantum cascade laser: rapid passage, free induction decay, and the ac Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Kelly, James F; Blake, Thomas A; Langford, Nigel

    2012-05-07

    Using a low power, rapid (nsec) pulse-modulated quantum cascade (QC) laser, collective coherent effects in the 5 μm spectrum of nitric oxide have been demonstrated by the observation of sub-Doppler hyperfine splitting and also Autler-Townes splitting of Doppler broadened lines. For nitrous oxide, experiments and model calculations have demonstrated that two main effects occur with pulse-modulated (chirped) quantum cascade lasers: free induction decay signals, and signals induced by rapid passage during the laser chirp. In the open shell molecule, NO, in which both Λ-doubling splitting and hyperfine structure occur, laser field-induced coupling between the hyperfine levels of the two Λ-doublet components can induce a large ac Stark effect. This may be observed as sub-Doppler structure, field-induced splittings, or Autler-Townes splitting of a Doppler broadened line. These represent an extension of the types of behaviour observed in the closed shell molecule nitrous oxide, using the same apparatus, when probed with an 8 μm QC laser.

  1. Prediction and uncertainty of Hurricane Sandy (2012) explored through a real-time cloud-permitting ensemble analysis and forecast system assimilating airborne Doppler radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsell, Erin B.; Zhang, Fuqing

    2014-03-01

    the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) real-time convection-permitting hurricane analysis and forecasting system (WRF-EnKF) that assimilates airborne Doppler radar observations, the sensitivity and uncertainty of forecasts initialized several days prior to landfall of Hurricane Sandy (2012) are assessed. The performance of the track and intensity forecasts of both the deterministic and ensemble forecasts by the PSU WRF-EnKF system show significant skill and are comparable to or better than forecasts produced by operational dynamical models, even at lead times of 4-5 days prior to landfall. Many of the ensemble members correctly capture the interaction of Sandy with an approaching midlatitude trough, which precedes Sandy's forecasted landfall in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. However, the ensemble reveals considerable forecast uncertainties in the prediction of Sandy. For example, in the ensemble forecast initialized at 0000 UTC 26 October 2012, 10 of the 60 members do not predict a United States landfall. Using ensemble composite and sensitivity analyses, the essential dynamics and initial condition uncertainties that lead to forecast divergence among the members in tracks and precipitation are examined. It is observed that uncertainties in the environmental steering flow are the most impactful factor on the divergence of Sandy's track forecasts, and its subsequent interaction with the approaching midlatitude trough. Though the midlatitude system does not strongly influence the final position of Sandy, differences in the timing and location of its interactions with Sandy lead to considerable differences in rainfall forecasts, especially with respect to heavy precipitation over land.

  2. PMN-PT single crystal, high-frequency ultrasonic needle transducers for pulsed-wave Doppler application.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qifa; Xu, Xiaochen; Gottlieb, Emanuel J; Sun, Lei; Cannata, Jonathan M; Ameri, Hossein; Humayun, Mark S; Han, Pengdi; Shung, K Kirk

    2007-03-01

    High-frequency needle ultrasound transducers with an aperture size of 0.4 mm were fabricated using lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-33% PT) as the active piezoelectric material. The active element was bonded to a conductive silver particle matching layer and a conductive epoxy backing through direct contact curing. An outer matching layer of parylene was formed by vapor deposition. The active element was housed within a polyimide tube and a 20-gauge needle housing. The magnitude and phase of the electrical impedance of the transducer were 47 omega and -38 degrees, respectively. The measured center frequency and -6 dB fractional bandwidth of the PMN-PT needle transducer were 44 MHz and 45%, respectively. The two-way insertion loss was approximately 15 dB. In vivo high-frequency, pulsed-wave Doppler patterns of blood flow in the posterior portion and in vitro ultrasonic backscatter microscope (UBM) images of the rabbit eye were obtained with the 44-MHz needle transducer.

  3. Wind turbines and bat mortality: Doppler shift profiles and ultrasonic bat-like pulse reflection from moving turbine blades.

    PubMed

    Long, Chloe V; Flint, James A; Lepper, Paul A

    2010-10-01

    Bat mortality resulting from actual or near-collision with operational wind turbine rotors is a phenomenon that is widespread but not well understood. Because bats rely on information contained in high-frequency echoes to determine the nature and movement of a target, it is important to consider how ultrasonic pulses similar to those used by bats for echolocation may be interacting with operational turbine rotor blades. By assessing the characteristics of reflected ultrasonic echoes, moving turbine blades operating under low wind speed conditions (<6 m s(-1)) were found to produce distinct Doppler shift profiles at different angles to the rotor. Frequency shifts of up to ±700-800 Hz were produced, which may not be perceptible by some bat species. Monte Carlo simulation of bat-like sampling by echolocation revealed that over 50 rotor echoes could be required by species such as Pipistrellus pipistrellus for accurate interpretation of blade movement, which may not be achieved in the bat's approach time-window. In summary, it was found that echoes returned from moving blades had features which could render them attractive to bats or which might make it difficult for the bat to accurately detect and locate blades in sufficient time to avoid a collision.

  4. Analysis of Doppler Effect on the Pulse Compression of Different Codes Emitted by an Ultrasonic LPS

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, José A.; Aguilera, Teodoro; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Lozano, Jesús; Morera, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This work analyses the effect of the receiver movement on the detection by pulse compression of different families of codes characterizing the emissions of an Ultrasonic Local Positioning System. Three families of codes have been compared: Kasami, Complementary Sets of Sequences and Loosely Synchronous, considering in all cases three different lengths close to 64, 256 and 1,024 bits. This comparison is first carried out by using a system model in order to obtain a set of results that are then experimentally validated with the help of an electric slider that provides radial speeds up to 2 m/s. The performance of the codes under analysis has been characterized by means of the auto-correlation and cross-correlation bounds. The results derived from this study should be of interest to anyone performing matched filtering of ultrasonic signals with a moving emitter/receiver. PMID:22346670

  5. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS space mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are rapidly and precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The time of flight of the laser pulses are also used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to identify cases of mixed cloud and ground scattering. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during fall 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin clouds. The atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the

  6. Signal processing for airborne doppler radar detection of hazardous wind shear as applied to NASA 1991 radar flight experiment data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Radar data collected during the 1991 NASA flight tests have been selectively analyzed to support research directed at developing both improved as well as new algorithms for detecting hazardous low-altitude windshear. Analysis of aircraft attitude data from several flights indicated that platform stability bandwidths were small compared to the data rate bandwidths which should support an assumption that radar returns can be treated as short time stationary. Various approaches at detection of weather returns in the presence of ground clutter are being investigated. Non-coventional clutter rejection through spectrum mode tracking and classification algorithms is a subject of continuing research. Based upon autoregressive modeling of the radar return time sequence, this approach may offer an alternative to overcome errors in conventional pulse-pair estimates. Adaptive filtering is being evaluated as a means of rejecting clutter with emphasis on low signal-to-clutter ratio situations, particularly in the presence of discrete clutter interference. An analysis of out-of-range clutter returns is included to illustrate effects of ground clutter interference due to range aliasing for aircraft on final approach. Data are presented to indicate how aircraft groundspeed might be corrected from the radar data as well as point to an observed problem of groundspeed estimate bias variation with radar antenna scan angle. A description of how recorded clutter return data are mixed with simulated weather returns is included. This enables the researcher to run controlled experiments to test signal processing algorithms. In the summary research efforts involving improved modelling of radar ground clutter returns and a Bayesian approach at hazard factor estimation are mentioned.

  7. Pulsed Airborne Lidar measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C. J.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Sun, X.

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA’s planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser’s wavelength across a selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, laser pulse energy is 25 uJ and laser pulse widths are 1 usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during October and December 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin and broken clouds. Atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the DOE SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These flights were coordinated with DOE investigators who flew an in-situ CO2 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The

  8. Sub-Doppler Spectra of Infrared Hyperfine Transitions of Nitric Oxide Using a Pulse Modulated Quantum Cascade Laser: Rapid Passage, Free Induction Decay and the AC Stark Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Kelly, James F.; Blake, Thomas A.; Langford, Nigel

    2012-05-07

    Using a low power, rapid (nsec) pulse-modulated quantum cascade (QC) laser, collective coherent effects in the 5 {micro}m spectrum of nitric oxide have been demonstrated by the observation of sub-Doppler hyperfine splitting and also Autler-Townes splitting of Doppler broadened lines. For nitrous oxide, experiments and model calculations have demonstrated that two main effects occur with ulsemodulated (chirped) quantum cascade lasers: free induction decay signals, and signals induced by rapid passage during the laser chirp. In the open shell molecule, NO, in which both {Lambda}-doubling splitting and hyperfine structure occur, laser field-induced coupling between the hyperfine levels of the two {Lambda}-doublet components can induce a large AC Stark effect. This may be observed as sub-Doppler structure, field-induced splittings, or Autler-Townes splitting of a Doppler broadened line. These represent an extension of the types of behaviour observed in the closed shell molecule nitrous oxide, using the same apparatus, when probed with an 8 {micro}m QC laser.

  9. The Detection and Exclusion of the Prostate Neuro-Vascular Bundle (NVB) in Automated HIFU Treatment Planning Using a Pulsed-Wave Doppler Ultrasound System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wohsing; Carlson, Roy F.; Fedewa, Russell; Seip, Ralf; Sanghvi, Narendra T.; Dines, Kris A.; Pfile, Richard; Penna, Michael A.; Gardner, Thomas A.

    2005-03-01

    Men with prostate cancer are likely to develop impotence after prostate cancer therapy if the treatment damages the neuro-vascular bundles (NVB). The NVB are generally located at the periphery of the prostate gland. To preserve the NVB, a Doppler system is used to detect and localize the associated blood vessels. This information is used during the therapy planning procedure to avoid treatment surrounding the blood vessel areas. The Sonablate®500 (Focus Surgery, Inc.) image-guided HIFU device is enhanced with a pulse-wave multi-gate Doppler system that uses the current imaging transducer and mechanical scanner to acquire Doppler data. Doppler detection is executed after the regular B-mode images are acquired from the base to the apex of the prostate using parallel sector scans. The results are stored and rendered in 3-D display, registered with additional models generated for the capsule, urethra, and rectal wall, and the B-mode data and treatment plan itself. The display of the blood flow can be in 2-D color overlaid on the B-mode image or in 3-D color structure. Based on this 3-D model, the HIFU treatment planning can be executed in automated or manual mode by the physician to remove originally defined treatment zones that overlap with the NVB (for preservation of NVB). The results of the NVB detection in animal experiments, and the 3-D modeling and data registration of the prostate will be presented.

  10. Measurements of ion temperature and flow of pulsed plasmas produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device using an ion Doppler spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is important to know surface damage characteristics of plasma-facing component materials during transient heat and particle loads such as type I ELMs. A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device has been used as transient heat and particle source in ELM simulation experiments. Characteristics of pulsed plasmas produced by the MCPG device play an important role for the plasma material interaction. In this study, ion temperature and flow velocity of pulsed He plasmas were measured by an ion Doppler spectrometer (IDS). The IDS system consists of a light collection system including optical fibers, 1m-spectrometer and a 16 channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. The IDS system measures the width and Doppler shift of HeII (468.58 nm) emission line with the time resolution of 1 μs. The Doppler broadened and shifted spectra were measured with 45 and 135 degree angles with respect to the plasmoid traveling direction. The observed emission line profile was represented by sum of two Gaussian components to determine the temperature and flow velocity. The minor component at around the wavelength of zero-velocity was produced by the stationary plasma. As the results, the ion velocity and temperature were 68 km/s and 19 eV, respectively. Thus, the He ion flow energy is 97 eV. The observed flow velocity agrees with that measured by a time of flight technique.

  11. The Multi-Center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor: Recent Measurements and Future Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Darby, Lisa S.; Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    The coherent Doppler lidar, when operated from an airborne platform, offers a unique measurement capability for study of atmospheric dynamical and physical properties. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are at a disadvantage in terms of spatial resolution and coverage. Recent experience suggests airborne coherent Doppler lidar can yield unique wind measurements of--and during operation within--extreme weather phenomena. This paper presents the first airborne coherent Doppler lidar measurements of hurricane wind fields. The lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory jointly developed an airborne lidar system, the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS). The centerpiece of MACAWS is the lidar transmitter from the highly successful NOAA Windvan. Other field-tested lidar components have also been used, when feasible, to reduce costs and development time. The methodology for remotely sensing atmospheric wind fields with scanning coherent Doppler lidar was demonstrated in 1981; enhancements were made and the system was reflown in 1984. MACAWS has potentially greater scientific utility, compared to the original airborne scanning lidar system, owing to a factor of approx. 60 greater energy-per-pulse from the NOAA transmitter. MACAWS development was completed and the system was first flown in 1995. Following enhancements to improve performance, the system was re-flown in 1996 and 1998. The scientific motivation for MACAWS is three-fold: obtain fundamental measurements of subgrid scale (i.e., approx. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in hydrological, climate, and general

  12. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C.; Hasselbrack, W.; Sun, X.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric C02 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a C02 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, 02 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the C02 line and an 02 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the C02 and 02 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the C02 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear 25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across a selected C02 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz and laser pulse widths are I usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during October and December 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin and broken clouds. Atmospheric C02 column measurements using the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm C02 lines. Two flights were made above the DOE SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These nights were coordinated with DOE investigators who Hew an in-situ C02 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing C02 line absorptions with

  13. Operation Sun Beam, Shots Little Feller II and Small Boy. Project Officer's report - Project 7. 16. Airborne E-field radiation measurements of electromagnetic-pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, K.L.

    1985-09-01

    Airborne measurements of the absolute vertical electric field (E-field) of the radiated electromagnetic pulse were attempted for Shots Little Feller II and Small Boy. Instrumentation included calibrated vertical whip antennas, wideband magnetic tape recorders, and photographs of oscilloscope traces. One instrumented aircraft participated in Little Feller II (C-131F); two aircraft participated in Small Boy (a C-131F and an A-3A). No detectable signals were recorded for either event. It is concluded that the vertical E-field intensities encountered were below the calibrated levels of the instrumentation or the method of instrumentation and calibration was inadequate for nonrepetitive pulse signals.

  14. Feasibility Study of an Airborne 1.6-μm Pulsed IPDA Lidar for Measuring Atmospheric Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaat, T. F.; Ismail, S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Hair, J. W.; Crawford, J. H.; Leifer, I.; Shuman, T.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) has the second largest radiative forcing of the long-lived greenhouse gasses after carbon dioxide (CO2). However, methane's much shorter atmospheric lifetime and much stronger warming potential make its radiative forcing equivalent to that for CO2 over a 20-year time horizon as compared to the more commonly cited 100-year period. This makes CH4 a particularly attractive target for mitigation strategies. Development of CH4 active remote sensing capability employing the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique enables scientific assessments of both natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks of the gas and its impacts on the climate. A feasibility study of a pulsed DIAL system for monitoring atmospheric methane is presented. This system leverages a high power and high pulse repetition frequency injection-seeded Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator laser operating in the 1.645 μm spectral band. The system also leverages an efficient low noise, commercially available, InGaAs avalanche photodiode. Lidar signals and error budget were analyzed for this system while operating on ground in the range-resolved DIAL mode and from airborne platforms in the integrated path DIAL (IPDA) mode over varying surface albedos. The analysis is based on optical depth calculations assuming US standard atmospheric model and molecular absorption line parameters from the HITRAN 2008 database. Error budget included systematic and random errors. Systematic errors comprise uncertainties in the knowledge of environmental and transmitter spectral properties. Environmental error sources included the uncertainty in the knowledge of molecular interference, temperature, pressure and relative humidity. Transmitter errors included the uncertainty in the laser line width and jitter for the on-line and off-line wavelengths. Random errors included all noise sources associated with the detection system electronics beside signals shot noises. Results from this study

  15. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  16. Recent Pulsed Airborne Lidar measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption to 13 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C. J.; Mao, J.; Hasselbrack, W.; Sun, X.; Rodriguez, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA’s ASCENDS mission. It uses pulsed laser transmitters to simultaneously measure a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers step in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line pair during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the time resolved backscatter of the laser echoes. Signal processing is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, estimate their range, and reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated via the IPDA technique. We developed a lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from aricraft. The lidar steps the pulsed laser’s wavelength across a selected CO2 line with 20 or 30 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz and laser pulse widths are 1 usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. During July and August 2009 we made 5 two hour long flights while installed on the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. We measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over a variety of surfaces in Nebraska, Illinois, the SGP ARM site, and near and over the Chesapeake Bay. Strong laser signals and clear line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made through thin clouds. The Oklahoma and east coast flights were coordinated with the NASA LaRC/ITT CO2 lidar on their UC-12 aircraft, a LaRC in-situ CO2 sensor, and the Oklahoma flights also included a JPL CO2 lidar on a Twin Otter aircraft. Ed Browell

  17. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and

  18. Doppler flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1983-01-01

    A Doppler flowmeter impulses an ultrasonic fixed-frequency signal obliquely into a slurry flowing in a pipe and a reflected signal is detected after having been scattered off of the slurry particles, whereby the shift in frequencies between the signals is proportional to the slurry velocity and hence slurry flow rate. This flowmeter filters the Doppler frequency-shift signal, compares the filtered and unfiltered shift signals in a divider to obtain a ratio, and then further compares this ratio against a preset fractional ratio. The flowmeter utilizes a voltage-to-frequency convertor to generate a pulsed signal having a determinable rate of repetition precisely proportional to the divergence of the ratios. The pulsed signal serves as the input control for a frequency-controlled low-pass filter, which provides thereby that the cutoff frequency of the filtered signal is known. The flowmeter provides a feedback control by minimizing the divergence. With the cutoff frequency and preset fractional ratio known, the slurry velocity and hence flow will also be determinable.

  19. Doppler flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.; Raptis, A.C.

    1981-11-13

    A Doppler flowmeter impulses an ultrasonic fixed-frequency signal obliquely into a slurry flowing in a pipe and a reflected signal is detected after having been scattered off of the slurry particles, whereby the shift in frequencies between the signals is proportional to the slurry velocity and hence slurry flow rate. This flowmeter filters the Doppler frequency-shift signal, compares the filtered and unfiltered shift signals in a divider to obtain a ratio, and then further compares this ratio against a preset fractional ratio. The flowmeter utilizes a voltage-to-frequency convertor to generate a pulsed signal having a determinable rate of repetition precisely proportional to the divergence of the ratios. The pulsed signal serves as the input control for a frequency-controlled low-pass filter, which provides thereby that the cutoff frequency of the filtered signal is known. The flowmeter provides a feedback control by minimizing the divergence. With the cutoff frequency and preset fractional ratio known, the slurry velocity and hence flow will also be determinable.

  20. 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption lidar development for simultaneous airborne column measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-05-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  1. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  2. Analysis of nozzle effect on pulsed detonation engine performance based on laser absorption spectroscopy with Doppler frequency shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-long; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-sheng; Lv, Xiao-jing

    2016-10-01

    An optical experiment system of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is designed for valveless gas-liquid PDE to reveal the mechanism of nozzle improved the thrust performance. The velocity of detonation exhaust with non-nozzle, convergent nozzle, divergent nozzle and convergent-divergent nozzle is tested by laser Doppler velocimetry. The results indicate that laser Doppler method can accurately infer the instantaneous flow velocity, especially the velocity platform where contributes more to the engine impulse. The maximum value is 1222.66 m/s, 1128.52 m/s, 1338.64 m/s and 1296.93 m/s, the time of duration which the velocity is greater than 400m/s is 8.51ms, 7.58ms, 5.83ms and 17.62ms of the velocity under the condition of non-nozzle, convergent nozzle, divergent nozzle and convergent-divergent nozzle respectively.

  3. Evaluation of an airborne triple-pulsed 2 μm IPDA lidar for simultaneous and independent atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide measurements.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Ismail, Syed; Kavaya, Michael J; Davis, Kenneth J

    2015-02-20

    Water vapor and carbon dioxide are the most dominant greenhouse gases directly contributing to the Earth's radiation budget and global warming. A performance evaluation of an airborne triple-pulsed integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar system for simultaneous and independent monitoring of atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide column amounts is presented. This system leverages a state-of-the-art Ho:Tm:YLF triple-pulse laser transmitter operating at 2.05 μm wavelength. The transmitter provides wavelength tuning and locking capabilities for each pulse. The IPDA lidar system leverages a low risk and technologically mature receiver system based on InGaAs pin detectors. Measurement methodology and wavelength setting are discussed. The IPDA lidar return signals and error budget are analyzed for airborne operation on-board the NASA B-200. Results indicate that the IPDA lidar system is capable of measuring water vapor and carbon dioxide differential optical depth with 0.5% and 0.2% accuracy, respectively, from an altitude of 8 km to the surface and with 10 s averaging. Provided availability of meteorological data, in terms of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity vertical profiles, the differential optical depth conversion into weighted-average column dry-air volume-mixing ratio is also presented.

  4. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  5. Analysis of Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption During the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs altitude. The

  6. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Range During the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar only on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear C02 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs

  7. Color Doppler Sonographic Evaluation of Peak Systolic Velocity and Pulsatility Index in Artery after Pulsed HIFU Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Chiu, Wei-Hsiu; Yeh, Chi-Fang

    2011-09-01

    The objective of current study was to investigate the functional changes in arteries induced by pulsed-HIFU with or without microbubbles. Sonication was applied at an ultrasound frequency of 1 MHz with a burst length of 50 ms and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The duration of the whole sonication was 6s. The abdominal aortas of Sprague-Dawley rats were surgically exposed and sonicated with pulsed HIFU; the pulsed HIFU beam was aimed using color images of the blood flow. There was no obvious normalized peak systolic velocity (PSV) change at various acoustic powers of pulsed-HIFU exposure in the absence of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA). However, the normalized PSV change induced by pulsed-HIFU decreased with the injected dose of UCA at acoustic powers. At this time, the normalized pulsatility index (PI) change in the vessel subjected to pulsed-HIFU increased in proportion to UCA dose. Additional research is needed to investigate the detailed mechanical effects of pulsed-HIFU exposure on blood flow and the structure of vessel walls.

  8. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  9. Real-time parallel implementation of Pulse-Doppler radar signal processing chain on a massively parallel machine based on multi-core DSP and Serial RapidIO interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klilou, Abdessamad; Belkouch, Said; Elleaume, Philippe; Le Gall, Philippe; Bourzeix, François; Hassani, Moha M'Rabet

    2014-12-01

    Pulse-Doppler radars require high-computing power. A massively parallel machine has been developed in this paper to implement a Pulse-Doppler radar signal processing chain in real-time fashion. The proposed machine consists of two C6678 digital signal processors (DSPs), each with eight DSP cores, interconnected with Serial RapidIO (SRIO) bus. In this study, each individual core is considered as the basic processing element; hence, the proposed parallel machine contains 16 processing elements. A straightforward model has been adopted to distribute the Pulse-Doppler radar signal processing chain. This model provides low latency, but communication inefficiency limits system performance. This paper proposes several optimizations that greatly reduce the inter-processor communication in a straightforward model and improves the parallel efficiency of the system. A use case of the Pulse-Doppler radar signal processing chain has been used to illustrate and validate the concept of the proposed mapping model. Experimental results show that the parallel efficiency of the proposed parallel machine is about 90%.

  10. Investigation of the Representation of OLEs and Terrain Effects within the Coastal Zone in the EDMF Parameterization Scheme: An Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-21

    EDMF) parameterization of turbulence and convective mixing in numerical models. The main focus was in using previously obtained Twin Otter Doppler...Mass Flux (EDMF) parameterization of turbulence and convective mixing in numerical models. As during the previous years, we have focused on using...expression that better represents the contributions of shear generated rolls as opposed to convective organization? In addition to the analysis of real TODWL

  11. Effects of first myocardial infarction on left ventricular systolic and diastolic function with the use of mitral annular velocity determined by pulsed wave doppler tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Alam, M; Wardell, J; Andersson, E; Samad, B A; Nordlander, R

    2000-05-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effect of a first myocardial infarction (MI) on the systolic and diastolic velocity profiles of the mitral annulus determined by pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging and thereby evaluate left ventricular (LV) function after MI. Seventy-eight patients with a first MI were examined before discharge. Peak systolic, peak early diastolic, and peak late diastolic velocities were recorded at 4 different sites on the mitral annulus corresponding to the septum, anterior, lateral, and inferior sites of the left ventricle. In addition, the amplitude of mitral annular motion at the 4 above LV sites, the ejection fraction, and conventional Doppler diastolic parameters were recorded. Nineteen age-matched healthy subjects served as controls. Compared with healthy subjects, the MI patients had a significantly reduced peak systolic velocity at the mitral annulus, especially at the infarction sites. A relatively good linear correlation was found between the ejection fraction and the mean systolic velocity from the 4 LV sites (r = 0.74, P <.001). The correlation was also good when the mean peak systolic mitral annular velocity was tested against the magnitude of the mean mitral annular motion (r = 0.77, P <.001). When the patients were divided into 2 different groups with respect to an ejection fraction > or =0.50 or <0.50, a cutoff point of mean systolic mitral annular velocity of > or =7.5 cm/s had a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 88% in predicting a preserved global LV systolic function. Similar to systolic velocities, the early diastolic velocity was also reduced, especially at the infarction sites. The peak mitral annular early diastolic velocity correlated well with both LV ejection fraction (r =.66, P <.001) and mean systolic mitral annular motion (r = 0.68, P <.001). However, no correlation existed between the early diastolic velocity and conventional diastolic Doppler parameters. The reduced peak systolic mitral annular velocity

  12. Simultaneous and Independent Measurement of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide using a Triple-Pulsed, 2-micron Airborne IPDA Lidar - A Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.

    2013-12-01

    Water vapor (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are dominant greenhouse gases that are critical for Earth's radiation budget and global warming through the eco-system and the carbon cycle. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has a strong heritage in atmospheric remote sensing of both gases using several instruments adopting various DIAL techniques. This communication presents a feasibility study for measuring both H2O and CO2 simultaneously and independently using a single instrument. This instrument utilizes the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar technique to measure the weighted-average column dry-air mixing ratios of CO2 (XCO2) and H2O (XH2O) independently and simultaneously from an airborne platform. The key component of this instrument is a tunable triple-pulse 2-micron laser. The three laser pulses are transmitted sequentially within a short time interval of 200 microsec. The wavelength of each of the laser pulses can be tuned separately. The IPDA receiver design is based on low-risk, commercially available components, including 300-micron diameter InGaAs 2-micron pin detector, a low-noise, high speed trans-impedance amplifier (TIA) and 12-bit 400 MHz digitizer.

  13. An airborne system for detection of volcanic surface deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is proposed for measuring volcanic deformation on the order of centimeters per day to centimeters per year. An airborne multifrequency pulsed radar, tracking passive ground reflectors spaced at 1 kilometer intervals over a 50 square kilometer area is employed. Identification of targets is accomplished by Doppler and range resolution techniques, with final relative position measurements accomplished by phase comparison of multifrequency signals. Atmospheric path length errors are corrected by an airborne refractometer, meteorological instruments, or other refractive index measuring devices. Anticipated system accuracy is 1-2 cm, with measuring times on the order of minutes. Potential problems exist in the high intrinsic data assimilation rate required of the system to overcome ground backscatter noise.

  14. A classifying method analysis on the number of returns for given pulse of post-earthquake airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinxia; Dou, Aixia; Wang, Xiaoqing; Huang, Shusong; Yuan, Xiaoxiang

    2016-11-01

    Compared to remote sensing image, post-earthquake airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data contains a high-precision three-dimensional information on earthquake disaster which can improve the accuracy of the identification of destroy buildings. However after the earthquake, the damaged buildings showed so many different characteristics that we can't distinguish currently between trees and damaged buildings points by the most commonly used method of pre-processing. In this study, we analyse the number of returns for given pulse of trees and damaged buildings point cloud and explore methods to distinguish currently between trees and damaged buildings points. We propose a new method by searching for a certain number of neighbourhood space and calculate the ratio(R) of points whose number of returns for given pulse greater than 1 of the neighbourhood points to separate trees from buildings. In this study, we select some point clouds of typical undamaged building, collapsed building and tree as samples from airborne LiDAR point cloud data which got after 2010 earthquake in Haiti MW7.0 by the way of human-computer interaction. Testing to get the Rvalue to distinguish between trees and buildings and apply the R-value to test testing areas. The experiment results show that the proposed method in this study can distinguish between building (undamaged and damaged building) points and tree points effectively but be limited in area where buildings various, damaged complex and trees dense, so this method will be improved necessarily.

  15. Relationship between the rheological properties of thickener solutions and their velocity through the pharynx as measured by the ultrasonic pulse Doppler method.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Akiko; Hasegawa, Atsuko; Kohyama, Kaoru; Kumagai, Hitomi; Kumagai, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    The dependence of the dynamic viscoelastic parameters of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), xanthan gum, and guar gum solutions on the angular frequency (omega) was compared with that of their viscosity (mu) on the shear rate (gamma). In addition, the effect of these rheological properties on the maximum velocity through the pharynx, V(max), as measured by the ultrasonic pulse Doppler method, was investigated. The CMC and guar gum solutions examined were taken as a dilute solution and a true polymer solution, respectively. The xanthan gum solution was taken as a weak gel above 0.5% and a true polymer solution below 0.2%. The maximum velocity, V(max), of the thickener solutions correlated well with mu, the dynamic viscosity eta', and the complex viscosity eta(*), especially those measured at gamma or omega of 20-30 s(-1) (or rad/s) and above, suggesting that mu, eta', and eta(*) are suitable indexes for care foods of the liquid type for dysphagic patients.

  16. Effect of acute pericardial tamponade on the relative contributions of systolic and diastolic pulmonary venous return: a transesophageal pulsed Doppler study.

    PubMed

    Louie, E K; Hariman, R J; Wang, Y; Hwang, M H; Loeb, H S; Scanlon, P J

    1995-01-01

    The effect of acute pericardial tamponade on pulmonary venous return was assessed by transesophageal pulsed Doppler echocardiography. In 14 open-chest anesthetized dogs peak pulmonary venous flow velocities in systole (VJ) and in diastole (VK) were measured during apnea and atrial pacing while acute tamponade was induced by intrapericardial instillation of 0.9% sodium chloride solution. Before intravascular volume expansion, induction of acute tamponade resulted in a significant decline in VK (43 +/- 17 to 19 +/- 8 cm/sec; p < 0.05) but no change in VJ or the ratio VJ/VK. After intravascular volume expansion, induction of acute tamponade resulted in significant reductions in VJ (43 +/- 9 to 29 +/- 10 cm/sec; p < 0.001) and VK (37 +/- 19 to 15 +/- 11 cm/sec; p < 0.001). The effect was disproportionately greater on VK, however, resulting in a significant increase in VJ/VK (1.51 +/- 0.84 to 2.58 +/- 1.41; p < 0.001). The disproportionate effect of acute tamponade on VK suggests that increased pericardial pressure directly constrains diastolic filling of the left atrium as a conduit to the left ventricle and that it does not decrease the systolic and diastolic phases of pulmonary venous return uniformly. Intravascular volume expansion increases cardiac output before acute tamponade, but during acute tamponade it amplifies the disproportionate impact of increased pericardial pressure on left ventricular diastolic filling as the left ventricle is constrained within the fluid-filled pericardial sac.

  17. Five years use of Pulse Doppler RADAR-utechnology in debris-flows monitoring - experience at three test sites so far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koschuch, Richard; Brauner, Michael; Hu, Kaiheng; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Automatic monitoring of alpine mass movement is a major challenge in dealing with natural hazards. The presented research project shows a new approach in measurment and alarming technology for water level changes an debris flow by using a high-frequency Pulse Doppler RADAR. The detection system was implemented on 3 places (2 in Tirol/Austria within the monitoring systems of the IAN/BOKU; 1 in Dongchuan/China within the monitoring systems of the IMHE/Chinese Academy of Science) in order to prove the applicability of the RADAR in monitoring torrential activities (e.g. debris-flows, mudflows, flash floods, etc.). The main objective is to illustrate the principles and the potential of an innovative RADAR system and its versatility as an automatic detection system for fast (> 1 km/h - 300 km/h) alpine mass movements of any kind. The high frequency RADAR device was already successfully tested for snow avalanches in Sedrun/Switzerland (Lussi et al., 2012), in Ischgl/Austria (Kogelnig et al., 2012). The experience and the data of the five year showed the enormous potential of the presented RADAR technology in use as an independent warning and monitoring system in the field of natural hazard. We have been able to measure water level changes, surface velocities and several debris flows and can compare this data with the other installed systems.

  18. An evaluation of range gated pulsed Doppler echocardiography for detecting pulmonary outflow tract obstruction in d-transposition of the great vessels.

    PubMed

    Areias, J C; Goldberg, S J; Spitaels, S E; de Villeneuve, V H

    1978-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of range gated pulsed Doppler (RGPD) echocardiography for detecting obstruction to the pulmonary outflow tract in children with d-transposition of the great vessels (d-TGV). Twenty-one children were randomly selected for those available with d-TGV and were studied by precordial and suprasternal RGPD echocardiography. Three were excluded, leaving a population of 18 subjects. The exclusive criterion used to judge the RGPD results was the output of the time interval histogram (TIH). Coherence of the TIH was considered to represent laminar flow. Dispersion of the TIH was considered evidence of flow disturbance and obstruction to the outflow tract. With the range gating feature, the first site of disturbance could be localized. Information was handled by a technique that decreased bias. RGPD results were then compared to diagnoses of the outflow tract established at cardiac catheterization or operation. Comparison of these results indicated that all seven children with obstruction were correctly identified by RGPD study, and the level of the first obstruction was correctly identified. With one exception, all children without pulmonary obstruction were correctly identified by the examination.

  19. Pulsed airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric optical depth using the Oxygen A-band at 765 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riris, H.; Rodriguez, M.; Allan, G. R.; Mao, J.; Hasselbrack, W.; Abshire, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    We report on an airborne demonstration of atmospheric oxygen (O2) optical depth measurements with an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar using a fiber-based laser system and a photon counting detector. Accurate atmospheric temperature and pressure measurements are required for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission. Since O2 in uniformly mixed in the atmosphere, its absorption spectra can be used to estimate atmospheric pressure. In its airborne configuration, the IPDA lidar uses a doubled Erbium Doped Fiber amplifier and single photon counting detector to measure oxygen absorption at multiple discrete wavelengths in the oxygen A-band near 765 nm. This instrument has been deployed three times aboard NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory as part of campaigns to measure CO2 mixing ratios over a wide range of topography and weather conditions from altitudes between 3 km and 13 km. The O2 IPDA lidar flew seven flights in 2011 and six flights in 2013 in the continental United States and British Columbia, Canada. Our results from 2011 showed good agreement between the experimentally derived differential optical depth measurements with the theoretical predictions for aircraft altitudes from 3 to 13 km after a systematic bias correction of approximately 8% was applied. The random noise component was 2.5-3.0 %. The most recent data recorded in 2013 show better agreement between experimental optical depth measurements and theoretical predictions and much smaller systematic errors. The random error remained comparable with 2011 at 2-3%. The main source of random error is primarily the low energy (power) of the laser transmitter and the high solar background. We are in the process of addressing this issue with a new, higher energy amplifier that we anticipate will reduce the random noise component by a factor of 3-5 to less than 0.5%. The results from these flights show that the IPDA technique is a viable method

  20. Pulsed airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric optical depth using the Oxygen A-band at 765 nm.

    PubMed

    Riris, Haris; Rodriguez, Michael; Allan, Graham R; Hasselbrack, William; Mao, Jianping; Stephen, Mark; Abshire, James

    2013-09-01

    We report on an airborne demonstration of atmospheric oxygen optical depth measurements with an IPDA lidar using a fiber-based laser system and a photon counting detector. Accurate knowledge of atmospheric temperature and pressure is required for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission, and climate modeling studies. The lidar uses a doubled erbium-doped fiber amplifier and single photon-counting detector to measure oxygen absorption at 765 nm. Our results show good agreement between the experimentally derived differential optical depth measurements with the theoretical predictions for aircraft altitudes from 3 to 13 km.

  1. The use of data turning in airborne radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightstone, L.; Faubert, D.

    Data turning is a digital signal processing method that achieves good signal-to-noise ratio and target/interference resolution while reducing the number of pulses processed in the discrete Fourier transform/fast Fourier transform operation. A mathematical description is provided of data turning, along with a mathematical example of the impact of data turning on a bank of discrete Fourier transform filters. Data turning is discussed from the frequency domain and time domain perspectives, and a simulated performance example is taken from an airborne pulse doppler radar system. It is shown that data turning can, with a proper choice of signal processing parameters, approximate the integration improvement of non-coherent integration. Data turning can be significantly faster than either full coherent processing or non-coherent processing.

  2. Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhothermel, Jeffry; Jones, W. D.; Dunkin, J. A.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This effort involves development of a calibrated, pulsed coherent CO2 Doppler lidar, followed by a carefully-planned and -executed program of multi-dimensional wind velocity and aerosol backscatter measurements from the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The lidar, designated as the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS), will be applicable to two research areas. First, MACAWS will enable specialized measurements of atmospheric dynamical processes in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere in geographic locations and over scales of motion not routinely or easily accessible to conventional sensors. The proposed observations will contribute fundamentally to a greater understanding of the role of the mesoscale, helping to improve predictive capabilities for mesoscale phenomena and to provide insights into improving model parameterizations of sub-grid scale processes within large-scale circulation models. As such, it has the potential to contribute uniquely to major, multi-institutional field programs planned for the mid 1990's. Second, MACAWS measurements can be used to reduce the degree of uncertainty in performance assessments and algorithm development for NASA's prospective Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), which has no space-based instrument heritage. Ground-based lidar measurements alone are insufficient to address all of the key issues. To minimize costs, MACAWS is being developed cooperatively by the lidar remote sensing groups of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, and MSFC using existing lidar hardware and manpower resources. Several lidar components have already been exercised in previous airborne lidar programs (for example, MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) used in 1981,4 Severe Storms Wind Measurement Program; JPL Airborne Backscatter Lidar Experiment (ABLE) used in 1989,90 Global Backscatter Experiment Survey Missions). MSFC has been given responsibility for directing the overall

  3. Laser Doppler velocimeter aerial spray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Eberle, W. R.; Howle, R. E.; Shrider, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental research program for measuring the location, spatial extent, and relative concentration of airborne spray clouds generated by agricultural aircraft is described. The measurements were conducted with a ground-based laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote sensing instrumentation, experimental tests, and the results of the flight tests are discussed. The cross section of the aerial spray cloud and the observed location, extent, and relative concentration of the airborne particulates are presented. It is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to track and monitor the transport and dispersion of aerial spray generated by an agricultural aircraft.

  4. Doppler echocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Labovitz, A.J.; Williams, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors are successful in presenting a basic book on clinical quantitative Doppler echocardiography. It is not intended to be a comprehensive text, but it does cover clinical applications in a succinct fashion. Only the more common diseases in the adult are considered. The subjects are presented logically and are easy to comprehend. The illustrations are good, and the book is paperbound. The basic principles of Doppler echocardiography are presented briefly. The book ends with chapters on left ventricular function (stroke volume and cardiac output), congenital heart disease, and color Doppler echo-cardiography. There are numerous references and a good glossary and index.

  5. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base of the thumb. Press with flat fingers until ... determine if the patient's heart is pumping. Pulse measurement has other uses as well. During or immediately ...

  6. Correction of Doppler Rada Data for Aircraft Motion Using Surface Measurements and Recursive Least-Squares Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, S.; Haddad, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Observations of Doppler velocity of hydrometeors form airborne Doppler weather radars normally contains a component due to the aircraft motion. Accurate hydrometeor velocity measurements thus require correction by subtracting this velocity from the observed velocity.

  7. 94 GHz doppler wind radar satellite mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chung-Chi; Rommen, Björn; Buck, Christopher; Schüttemeyer, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Extreme weather such as storms, hurricanes and typhoons, also called `high impact weather', is a high priority area of research for the atmospheric dynamics and meteorological science communities. 94 GHz Doppler wind radar satellite mission concepts have been elaborated, which use cloud and precipitation droplets/particles as tracers to measure 3-D wind fields. The so-called polarisation-diversity pulse-pair (PDPP) technique enables to derive line-of-sight wind speed with good accuracy (< 2-3 m/s) and large unambiguous dynamic range (e.g. 75 m/s). Two distinct system concepts have been elaborated: (1) a conically scanning radar concept with large coverage (> 800 km) and ˜50 km along-track sampling, and; (2) a stereo viewing concept with high sampling resolution (< 4 km) within an inclined cut through the atmosphere. The former concept is adequate for studying large-scale severe/extreme weather systems, whereas the latter would be more suitable for understanding of small-scale convective phenomena. For demonstrating the potential of the FDPP technique for deriving accurate Doppler observations, ground-based and airborne Doppler radar campaigns are in preparation. The Galileo 94 GHz radar, upgraded recently to include a FDPP capability, at Chilbolton in the UK, will be used for an extended ground-based campaign (6 months). For the airborne campaign, the dual-frequency (9.4 + 94 GHz) NAWX radar on board a Convair-580 aircraft of the National Science Council of Canada will be upgraded and flown. This paper describes the observation requirements, preliminary satellite mission concepts, associated wind retrieval aspects and the planned demonstration campaigns.

  8. Airborne Turbulence Detection and Warning ACLAIM Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannon, Stephen M.; Bagley, Hal R.; Soreide, Dave C.; Bowdle, David A.; Bogue, Rodney K.; Ehernberger, L. Jack

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced Inflight Measurements (ACLAIM) is a NASA/Dryden-lead program to develop and demonstrate a 2 micrometers pulsed Doppler lidar for airborne look-ahead turbulence detection and warning. Advanced warning of approaching turbulence can significantly reduce injuries to passengers and crew aboard commercial airliners. The ACLAIM instrument is a key asset to the ongoing Turbulence component of NASA's Aviation Safety Program, aimed at reducing the accident rate aboard commercial airliners by a factor of five over the next ten years and by a factor of ten over the next twenty years. As well, the advanced turbulence warning capability can prevent "unstarts" in the inlet of supersonic aircraft engines by alerting the flight control computer which then adjusts the engine to operate in a less fuel efficient, and more turbulence tolerant, mode. Initial flight tests of the ACLAIM were completed in March and April of 1998. This paper and presentation gives results from these initial flights, with validated demonstration of Doppler lidar wind turbulence detection several kilometers ahead of the aircraft.

  9. Measurement of the Doppler power of flowing blood using ultrasound Doppler devices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Pay-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of the Doppler power of signals backscattered from flowing blood (henceforth referred to as the Doppler power of flowing blood) and the echogenicity of flowing blood have been used widely to assess the degree of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation for more than 20 y. Many studies have used Doppler flowmeters based on an analogue circuit design to obtain the Doppler shifts in the signals backscattered from flowing blood; however, some recent studies have mentioned that the analogue Doppler flowmeter exhibits a frequency-response problem whereby the backscattered energy is lost at higher Doppler shift frequencies. Therefore, the measured Doppler power of flowing blood and evaluations of RBC aggregation obtained using an analogue Doppler device may be inaccurate. To overcome this problem, the present study implemented a field-programmable gate array-based digital pulsed-wave Doppler flowmeter to measure the Doppler power of flowing blood, in the aim of providing more accurate assessments of RBC aggregation. A clinical duplex ultrasound imaging system that can acquire pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms is now available, but its usefulness for estimating the ultrasound scattering properties of blood is still in doubt. Therefore, the echogenicity and Doppler power of flowing blood under the same flow conditions were measured using a laboratory pulser-receiver system and a clinical ultrasound system, respectively, for comparisons. The experiments were carried out using porcine blood under steady laminar flow with both RBC suspensions and whole blood. The experimental results indicated that a clinical ultrasound system used to measure the Doppler spectrograms is not suitable for quantifying Doppler power. However, the Doppler power measured using a digital Doppler flowmeter can reveal the relationship between backscattering signals and the properties of blood cells because the effects of frequency response are eliminated. The measurements of the Doppler power and

  10. Analysis of Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 and 2013 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A.; Mao, J.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W.; Weaver, C. J.; Browell, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. The CO2 lidar flies on NASA's DC-8 aircraft and measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan with 300 scans per second. Our post-flight analysis estimates the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solve for the optimum CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak and the column average CO2 concentrations. We compared these to radiative transfer calculations based on the HITRAN 2008 database, the atmospheric conditions, and the CO2 concentrations sampled by in-situ sensors on the aircraft. Our team participated in the ASCENDS science flights during July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to > 12 km, and clear CO2 absorption line shapes were recorded. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as well as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds and to stratus cloud tops. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption profile (averaged for 50 sec) matched the predicted profile to better than 1% RMS error for all flight altitudes. For 10 second averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by signal shot noise (i.e. the signal photon count). For flight

  11. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were <1.4 ppm for flight measurement altitudes >6 km.

  12. Vertically-resolved retrievals of the atmospheric CO2 concentration using multi-wavelength pulsed lidar measurements from the ASCENDS airborne campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C. J.; Kawa, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Vertically resolved remote sensing measurements of CO2 can greatly aid the understanding of terrestrial processes compared to column-averaged measurements since the effects of such processes occur mainly in planetary boundary layer of the atmosphere. Using the NASA GSFC CO2 sounder, a multi-wavelength pulsed lidar system for CO2 remote sensing, we demonstrate vertically resolved CO2 concentration measurements from the ASCENDS (Active Sensing of Co2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons) airborne campaigns of July-August 2011 and February-March 2013. Our instrument uses an IPDA (Integrated Path Differential Absorption) approach probing 30 wavelengths across a 1572.335 nm CO2 absorption line. Our pulsed approach gives us height-resolved (from time-of-flight) atmospheric backscatter information, allowing us to resolve lidar reflections from clouds and the ground. When flying over thin or broken clouds, the instrument simultaneously measures the absorption to each individual cloud layer and ground. This allows us to split the vertical CO2 column into layers (cloud-slicing of the atmosphere) and solve for the CO2 concentration of each column layer. Data from a flight over Iowa, USA in August 2011 making measurements through broken cumulus clouds showed not only a 15-20 ppm reduction in the column averaged CO2 measurements due to the summer biosphere, but also a further 10 ppm decrease in the CO2 concentration in the air below the cloud tops (in the planetary boundary layer) compared to the column average. Line shape information can also be used to resolve several vertical layers from measurements in clear air. Lower atmospheric CO2 has a broader absorption feature compared to that of upper atmospheric CO2 and so changes in lower atmospheric or boundary layer CO2 affect the total column absorption line shape differently compared to those of the upper atmosphere. The CO2 sounder instrument samples the entire absorption line, potentially allowing for resolving several

  13. Juneau Airport Doppler Lidar Deployment: Extraction of Accurate Turbulent Wind Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannon, Stephen M.; Frehlich, Rod; Cornman, Larry; Goodrich, Robert; Norris, Douglas; Williams, John

    1999-01-01

    A 2 micrometer pulsed Doppler lidar was deployed to the Juneau Airport in 1998 to measure turbulence and wind shear in and around the departure and arrival corridors. The primary objective of the measurement program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of a pulsed coherent lidar to remotely and unambiguously measure wind turbulence. Lidar measurements were coordinated with flights of an instrumented research aircraft operated by representatives of the University of North Dakota (UND) under the direction of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The data collected is expected to aid both turbulence characterization as well as airborne turbulence detection algorithm development activities within NASA and the FAA. This paper presents a summary of the deployment and results of analysis and simulation which address important issues regarding the measurement requirements for accurate turbulent wind statistics extraction.

  14. WIND MEASUREMENTS WITH HIGH-ENERGY DOPPLER LIDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Petros, Mulugeta; Jirong, Yu; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Slingh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    Coherent lidars at 2-micron wavelengths from holmium or thulium solid-state lasers have been in use to measure wind for applications in meteorology, aircraft wake vortex tracking, and turbulence detection [1,2,3] These field-deployed lidars, however, have generally been of a pulse energy of a few millijoules, limiting their range capability or restricting operation to regions of high aerosol concentration such as the atmospheric boundary layer. Technology improvements in the form of high-energy pulsed lasers, low noise detectors, and high optical quality telescopes are being evaluated to make wind measurements to long ranges or low aerosol concentrations. This research is aimed at developing lidar technology for satellite-based observation of wind on a global scale. The VALIDAR project was initiated to demonstrate a high pulse energy coherent Doppler lidar. VALIDAR gets its name from the concept of validation lidar, in that it can serve as a calibration and validation source for future airborne and spaceborne lidar missions. VALIDAR is housed within a mobile trailer for field measurements.

  15. Development of a Compact, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Doppler Wind Lidar Transceiver; and Plans for Flights on NASA's DC-8 and WB-57 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a recently completed effort to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a compact lidar transceiver for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to permit study of the laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for global coherent Doppler lidar measurement of winds in the future. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz compact transceiver was also designed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 and WB-57 aircraft. The WB-57 flights will present a more severe environment and will require autonomous operation of the lidar system. The DC-8 lidar system is a likely component of future NASA hurricane research. It will include real-time data processing and display, as well as full data archiving. We will attempt to co-fly on both aircraft with a direct-detection Doppler wind lidar system being prepared by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  16. Processing of High Resolution, Multiparametric Radar Data for the Airborne Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar APR-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Meagher, Jonathan P.; Durden, Stephen L.; Im, Eastwood

    2004-01-01

    Following the successful Precipitation Radar (PR) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, a new airborne, 14/35 GHz rain profiling radar, known as Airborne Precipitation Radar - 2 (APR-2), has been developed as a prototype for an advanced, dual-frequency spaceborne radar for a future spaceborne precipitation measurement mission. . This airborne instrument is capable of making simultaneous measurements of rainfall parameters, including co-pol and cross-pol rain reflectivities and vertical Doppler velocities, at 14 and 35 GHz. furthermore, it also features several advanced technologies for performance improvement, including real-time data processing, low-sidelobe dual-frequency pulse compression, and dual-frequency scanning antenna. Since August 2001, APR-2 has been deployed on the NASA P3 and DC8 aircrafts in four experiments including CAMEX-4 and the Wakasa Bay Experiment. Raw radar data are first processed to obtain reflectivity, LDR (linear depolarization ratio), and Doppler velocity measurements. The dataset is then processed iteratively to accurately estimate the true aircraft navigation parameters and to classify the surface return. These intermediate products are then used to refine reflectivity and LDR calibrations (by analyzing clear air ocean surface returns), and to correct Doppler measurements for the aircraft motion. Finally, the the melting layer of precipitation is detected and its boundaries and characteristics are identifIed at the APR-2 range resolution of 30m. The resulting 3D dataset will be used for validation of other airborne and spaceborne instruments, development of multiparametric rain/snow retrieval algorithms and melting layer characterization and statistics.

  17. A wing pod-based millimeter wavelength airborne cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Ellis, S.; Tsai, P.; Loew, E.; Lee, W. C.; Emmett, J.; Dixon, M.; Burghart, C.; Rauenbuehler, S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter wavelength radar. Its frequency of operation is 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength). The radar has been designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft; however, it could be deployed on other similarly equipped aircraft. The pod-based configuration occupies minimum cabin space and maximizes scan coverage. The radar system is capable of collecting observations in a staring mode between zenith and nadir or in a scanning mode. Standard pulse-pair estimates of moments and raw time series of backscattered signals are recorded. The radar system design and characteristics, as well as techniques for calibrating reflectivity and correcting Doppler velocity for aircraft attitude and motion are described. The radar can alternatively be deployed in a ground-based configuration, housed in the 20 ft shipping container it shares with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The radar was tested both on the ground and in flight. Preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected and examples are presented.

  18. A wing pod-based millimeter wavelength airborne cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Ellis, S.; Tsai, P.; Loew, E.; Lee, W.-C.; Emmett, J.; Dixon, M.; Burghart, C.; Rauenbuehler, S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter (mm) wavelength radar. Its frequency of operation is 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength). The radar has been designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft; however, it could be deployed on other similarly equipped aircraft. The pod-based configuration occupies minimum cabin space and maximizes scan coverage. The radar system is capable of collecting observations in a staring mode between zenith and nadir or in a scanning mode. Standard pulse-pair estimates of moments and raw time series of backscattered signals are recorded. The radar system design and characteristics as well as techniques for calibrating reflectivity and correcting Doppler velocity for aircraft attitude and motion are described. The radar can alternatively be deployed in a ground-based configuration, housed in the 20 ft shipping container it shares with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The radar was tested both on the ground and in flight. Preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected and examples are presented.

  19. Laser Doppler spectrometer method of particle sizing. [for air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, F. N.

    1976-01-01

    A spectrometer for the detection of airborne particulate pollution in the submicron size range is described. In this device, airborne particles are accelerated through a supersonic nozzle, with different sizes achieving different velocities in the gas flow. Information about the velocities of the accelerated particles is obtained with a laser-heterodyne optical system through the Doppler shift of light scattered from the particles. Detection is accomplished by means of a photomultiplier. Nozzle design and signal processing techniques are also discussed.

  20. Doppler estimation accuracy of linear FM waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, F. E.

    The single-pulse Doppler estimation accuracy of an unweighted linear FM waveform is analyzed in detail. Simple formulas are derived that predict that one-sigma Doppler estimation error for realistic radar applications. The effects of multiple target interference and nonlinearlities in the radar measurements are considered. In addition, a practical method to estimate Doppler frequency is presented. This technique uses the phase data after pulse compression, and it limits the effect of multiple target interference. In contrast, the available literature is based on the Cramer-Rao bound for Doppler accuracy, which ignores the effects of nonlinearities, multiple target interference and the question of practical implementation. A simple formula is derived that predicts the region of validity for the Cramer-Rao bound. This formula provides a criterion for minimum signal-to-noise ratio in terms of time-bandwidth product. Finally, an important concept that is demonstrated in this paper is that: the bulk of the Doppler information in a linear FM pulse is encoded in the range sidelobes after pulse compression.

  1. A combined sea clutter and noise model appropriate to the operation of high-frequency pulsed Doppler radar in regions constrained by external noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Eric W.; Walsh, John

    2008-08-01

    In recent years, bistatic pulsed high-frequency ground wave radar models of the ocean clutter have been developed. Several new features, distinct from earlier monostatic developments, appear as products of those analyses. One question that needs to be addressed is, "What characteristics of the theoretical clutter models are likely to be visible in experimental data collected from the ocean surface?" A major consideration in answering this question is the development of an appropriate noise model. Such a model along with an analogous clutter model is derived. This allows a simulation of time series data for both clutter and noise which may be treated using standard Fourier transform techniques to provide a periodogram for the typical combined noise/clutter spectrum of scattering from the ocean surface. The analysis proceeds on the assumption of an externally noise-limited system, with the noise being characterized as a white Gaussian zero-mean process. The aliasing due to noise undersampling is seen to be an integral part of the model. Statistical stationarity is assumed throughout. Both infinite and finite pulse trains are considered.

  2. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  3. Aerosol Backscatter from Airborne Continuous Wave CO2 Lidars Over Western North America and the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter, beta, variability gives a direct indication of aerosol loading. Since aerosol variability is governed by regional sources and sinks as well as affected by its transport due to meteorological conditions, it is important to characterize this loading at different locations and times. Lidars are sensitive instruments that can effectively provide high-resolution, large-scale sampling of the atmosphere remotely by measuring aerosol beta, thereby capturing detailed temporal and spatial variability of aerosol loading, Although vertical beta profiles are usually obtained by pulsed lidars, airborne-focused CW lidars, with high sensitivity and short time integration, can provide higher resolution sampling in the vertical, thereby revealing detailed structure of aerosol layers. During the 1995 NASA Multicenter Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission, NASA MSFC airborne-focused CW CO2 Doppler lidars, operating at 9.1 and 10.6-micrometers wavelength, obtained high resolution in situ aerosol beta measurements to characterize aerosol variability. The observed variability in beta at 9.1-micrometers wavelength with altitude is presented as well as comparison with some pulsed lidar profiles.

  4. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  5. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  6. Tissue Doppler characterization of cardiac phenotype in mouse.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah

    2009-10-01

    Mice allow biologists to study various genes playing a role in cardiac function and pathophysiological situations. Echocardiography is a non-invasive tool for assessing cardiac phenotype. Because of load dependence of conventional parameters (left ventricular shortening fraction, left ventricular ejection fraction and mitral pulsed Doppler), we have to perform Doppler tissular velocity imaging and strain imaging for the characterization of cardiomyopathies mice models.

  7. Ambiguity Of Doppler Centroid In Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chi-Yung; Curlander, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Paper discusses performances of two algorithms for resolution of ambiguity in estimated Doppler centroid frequency of echoes in synthetic-aperture radar. One based on range-cross-correlation technique, other based on multiple-pulse-repetition-frequency technique.

  8. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W; Jordan, Jay D; Kim, Theodore J

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  9. Airborne Microwave Imaging of River Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project was to determine whether airborne microwave remote sensing systems can measure river surface currents with sufficient accuracy to make them prospective instruments with which to monitor river flow from space. The approach was to fly a coherent airborne microwave Doppler radar, developed by APL/UW, on a light airplane along several rivers in western Washington state over an extended period of time. The fundamental quantity obtained by this system to measure river currents is the mean offset of the Doppler spectrum. Since this scatter can be obtained from interferometric synthetic aperture radars (INSARs), which can be flown in space, this project provided a cost effective means for determining the suitability of spaceborne INSAR for measuring river flow.

  10. DOPPLER WEATHER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Gary J.

    2002-08-05

    The SRS Doppler Weather System consists of a Doppler Server, A Master Server (also known as the Weather Server), several Doppler Slave Servers, and client-side software program called the Doppler Radar Client. This system is used to display near rel-time images taken from the SRS Weather Center's Doppler Radar computer. The Doppler Server is software that resides on the SRS Doppler Computer. It gathers raw data, 24-bit color weather images via screen scraping ever five minutes as requested by the Master Server. The Doppler Server then reduces the 24-bit color images to 8-bit color using a fixed color table for analysis and compression. This preserves the fidelity of the image color and arranges the colors in specific order for display. At the time of color reduction, the white color used for the city names on the background images are remapped to a different index (color) of white that the white on the weather scale. The Weather Server places a time stamp on the image, then compresses the image and passes it to all Doppler Slave servers. Each of the Doppler Slave servers mainitain a circular buffer of the eight most current images representing the last 40 minutes of weather data. As a new image is added, the oldest drops off. The Doppler Radar Client is an optional install program for any site-wide workstation. When a Client session is started, the Client requests Doppler Slave server assignment from the Master Server. Upon its initial request to the Slave Server, the Client obtains all eight current images and maintains its own circular buffer, updating its images every five minutes as the Doppler Slave is updated. Three background reference images are stored as part of the Client. The Client brings up the appropriate background image, decompresses the doppler data, and displays the doppler data on the background image.

  11. Christian Doppler and the Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Kurt

    1984-04-01

    A summary is given of Doppler's life and career. He was born 180 years ago on November 29, 1803, in Salzburg, Austria. He died on March 17, 1853 in Venice. The effect bearing his name was first announced in a presentation before the Royal Bohemian Society of the Sciences in Prague on May 25, 1842. Doppler considered his work a generalization of the aberration theorem as discovered by Bradley. With it came the inference that the perception of physical phenomena can change with the state of motion of the observer. Acceptance of the principle was not without controversy. In 1852, the mathematician Petzval claimed that no useful scientific deductions can be made from Doppler's elementary equations. In 1860, Ernst Mach resolved the misunderstanding that clouded this controversy. The Doppler effect is alive and well. Its role in radio science and related disciplines is enumerated.

  12. [Cerebral Doppler ultrasonography in newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Luciano, R; Velardi, F

    1995-01-01

    Following the first study of Bada et al. (1979), Doppler assessment of cerebral blood flow has increasingly been used in newborn infants, matching the technical progress in the available equipment. The experience gathered in recent years has confirmed that Doppler US is a reliable and reproducible examination while precising the limitations and the methodology to be followed in order to prevent gross errors of assessment and interpretation. The interest this procedure has arisen, among other things, stems from being noninvasive and feasible at the patient's bed. These features enable its repeated use in newborn infants in poor clinical condition. The diagnostic and prognostic role of Doppler velocimetry has been shown in a number of neonatal diseases and the cerebral hemodynamics has been assessed in physiologic conditions as well as after drug administration. The most common equipment used in newborn infants is at present Duplex Doppler consisting of a pulsed Doppler combined with bidimensional scanner, which, with visualization of study arteries, enables precise positioning of sample volume and correction of the ultrasonic angle of incidence with respect to the direction of blood flow in the examined vessel. In this report, after a survey of the techniques and modalities of cerebral Doppler examination in newborns, a review of the present state of the art, in neonatal cerebral as well as extracranial disease, is presented.

  13. Analysis of Doppler measurements of people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Robert; Bender, Robert

    2006-05-01

    With the changing nature of international security it is of interest to the military to use remote sensors to detect and classify people as potential threats. We chose a millimeter wave (MMW) radar as our sensor to collect data on single and small groups of people that were either walking or running to determine how easily they could be detected. This work was done to support the concept of using Ka-band radar to detect people from an airborne platform. Fully-polarimetric Ka-Band radar data was collected of people walking and running at various orientations with respect to the radar. Micro-Doppler analysis reveals Doppler oscillations with time that are characteristic of people at all orientations measured.

  14. Effects of transducer, velocity, Doppler angle, and instrument settings on the accuracy of color Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S F

    2001-04-01

    The accuracy of a commercial color Doppler ultrasound (US) system was assessed in vitro using a rotating torus phantom. The phantom consisted of a thin rubber tube filled with a blood-mimicking fluid, joined at the ends to form a torus. The torus was mounted on a disk suspended in water, and rotated at constant speeds by a motor. The torus fluid was shown in a previous study to rotate as a solid body, so that the actual fluid velocity was dependent only on the motor speed and sample volume radius. The fluid velocity could, thus, be easily compared to the color Doppler-derived velocity. The effects of instrument settings, velocity and the Doppler angle was assessed in four transducers: a 2.0-MHz phased-array transducer designed for cardiac use, a 4.0-MHz curved-array transducer designed for general thoracic use, and two linear transducers designed for vascular use (one 4.0 MHz and one 6.0 MHz). The color Doppler accuracy was found to be significantly dependent on the transducer used, the pulse-repetition frequency and wall-filter frequency, the actual fluid velocity and the Doppler angle (p < 0.001 by analysis of variance). In particular, the phased array and curved array were observed to be significantly more accurate than the two linear arrays. The torus phantom was found to provide a sensitive measure of color Doppler accuracy. Clinicians need to be aware of these effects when performing color Doppler US exams.

  15. Overview of mesocale research Doppler lidar activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjarrald, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    In evaluating the performance of the airborne Doppler lidar system, a large number of deficiencies or mistakes were identified in the original system and experiment plans. All of the known problems were addressed and corrected in the planning and engineering for the fall 1984/spring 1985 ADLS flight series. Thus, the most significant result of the data analysis was the input it has provided to the preparations for the new experiment. Attitude measurements are taken together with the streamlined operating procedures, color graphics real time displays of data, and better experiment design, the result is a second-generation system that is considerably better than the one used in 1981.

  16. Solid-State 2-Micron Laser Transmitter Advancement for Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements From Ground, Airborne, and Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Ismail, Syed

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing 2-micron lidar technologies over a decade for wind measurements, utilizing coherent Doppler wind lidar technique and carbon dioxide measurements, utilizing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. Significant advancements have been made towards developing state-of-the-art technologies towards laser transmitters, detectors, and receiver systems. These efforts have led to the development of solid-state lasers with high pulse energy, tunablility, wavelength-stability, and double-pulsed operation. This paper will present a review of these technological developments along with examples of high resolution wind and high precision CO2 DIAL measurements in the atmosphere. Plans for the development of compact high power lasers for applications in airborne and future space platforms for wind and regional to global scale measurement of atmospheric CO2 will also be discussed.

  17. Advances in Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    We review the principle and some recent applications of Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT). The advances of the phase-resolved Doppler OCT method are described. Functional OCT algorithms which are based on an extension of the phase-resolved scheme are also introduced. Recent applications of Doppler OCT for quantification of flow, imaging of microvasculature and vocal fold vibration, and optical coherence elastography are briefly discussed. PMID:24443649

  18. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  19. Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, George D.; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Mary-land, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other sensors will be presented. A simulation and data product for wind measurement at Venus will be presented.

  20. Short pulse radar used to measure sea surface wind speed and SWH. [Significant Wave Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, D. L.; Mennella, R. A.; Walsh, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    A joint airborne measurement program is being pursued by NRL and NASA Wallops Flight Center to determine the extent to which wind speed and sea surface significant wave height (SWH) can be measured quantitatively and remotely with a short pulse (2 ns), wide-beam (60 deg), nadir-looking 3-cm radar. The concept involves relative power measurements only and does not need a scanning antenna, Doppler filters, or absolute power calibration. The slopes of the leading and trailing edges of the averaged received power for the pulse limited altimeter are used to infer SWH and surface wind speed. The interpretation is based on theoretical models of the effects of SWH on the leading edge shape and rms sea-surface slope on the trailing-edge shape. The models include the radar system parameters of antenna beam width and pulsewidth.

  1. Pulsed-wave Doppler tissue imaging velocities in normal geriatric cats and geriatric cats with primary or systemic diseases linked to specific cardiomyopathies in humans, and the influence of age and heart rate upon these velocities.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kerry E; Gunn-Moore, Danièlle A; Shaw, Darren J; French, Anne T; Dukes-McEwan, Joanna; Moran, Carmel M; Corcoran, Brendan M

    2009-04-01

    Pulsed-wave Doppler tissue imaging (pw-DTI) techniques allow the non-invasive assessment of myocardial dynamics. pw-DTI has demonstrated regional and global diastolic impairment in various forms of human and feline cardiomyopathy. We hypothesise that in geriatric cats with systemic diseases that have been linked to specific cardiomyopathies in human beings, the myocardial velocity profile will be altered when compared to either normal or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) cats; and that both age and heart rate have a significant affect upon pw-DTI velocities. The aims of this study were to determine whether the feline M-mode or myocardial velocity profile is altered in geriatric cats with disease states that have been linked to specific cardiomyopathies in humans when compared to normal geriatric cats or geriatric cats with HCM and to determine whether age or heart rate has a significant effect upon pw-DTI velocities within these groups of cats. Sixty-six cats aged 8 years or above were included in the study, and were divided as follows: Unaffected (n=8), basilar septal bulge (BSB) (17), HCM (14), hyperthyroid (HiT(4)) (12) and chronic renal failure (CRF) (15). Systolic blood pressure was normal in all the cats. pw-DTI systolic (S'), early (E') and late diastolic (A') velocities were assessed from standardised sites within the myocardium, and the relationships between these and disease group, age and heart rate were then assessed. In cats with HCM, the E' velocity was decreased at various sites. Conversely, the HiT(4) cats demonstrated increased S' velocities. The only site at which the age of the cat was significantly related to myocardial velocities was the S' velocity from the apical mid-septum. There were also significant positive relationships between heart rate and the magnitude of myocardial S', E' and A' velocities of radial motion and S' and A' velocities of longitudinal motion. pw-DTI detected diastolic dysfunction in untreated cats with HCM and increased

  2. Compression of polyphase codes with Doppler shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, W. D.

    It is shown that pulse compression with sufficient Doppler tolerance may be achieved with polyphase codes derived from linear frequency modulation (LFM) and nonlinear frequency modulation (NLFM). Low sidelobes in range and Doppler are required especially for the radar search function. These may be achieved by an LFM derived phase coder together with Hamming weighting or by applying a PNL polyphase code derived from NLFM. For a discrete and known Doppler frequency with an expanded and mismatched reference vector a sidelobe reduction is possible. The compression is then achieved without a loss in resolution. A set up for the expanded reference gives zero sidelobes only in an interval around the signal peak or a least square minimization for all range elements. This version may be useful for target tracking.

  3. Shear-layer detection in poststenotic flow by spectrum analysis of Doppler signals.

    PubMed

    Tamura, T; Fronek, A

    1988-11-01

    Spectrum analysis of the Doppler signals was performed 0.5 tube diameters downstream from an axisymmetric constriction with an area reduction of 80 percent in steady flow at a jet Reynolds number of 2840. Both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) Doppler spectra showed significant reverse flow components in the separated flow. The pulsed Doppler spectra exhibited sudden changes when the sample volume crossed the shear layer between the center jet and the separated flow. A power spectrum equation was theoretically derived from continuity of flow to define the Doppler shift frequency for the shear layer velocity. The CW Doppler spectrum showed a minimum spectrum density at a frequency which equalled the shear layer Doppler shift frequency derived from the equation. The pulsed spectra exhibited the sudden changes at the same frequency as well.

  4. Doppler-guided retrograde catheterization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazin, Leon J.; Vonesh, Michael J.; Chandran, Krishnan B.; Khasho, Fouad; Lanza, George M.; Talano, James V.; McPherson, David D.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a Doppler guided catheterization system as an adjunctive or alternative methodology to overcome the disadvantages of left heart catheterization and angiography. These disadvantages include the biological effects of radiation and the toxic and volume effects of iodine contrast. Doppler retrograde guidance uses a 20 MHz circular pulsed Doppler crystal incorporated into the tip of a triple lumen multipurpose catheter and is advanced retrogradely using the directional flow information provided by the Doppler waveform. The velocity detection limits are either 1 m/second or 4 m/second depending upon the instrumentation. In a physiologic flow model of the human aortic arch, multiple data points revealed a positive wave form when flow was traveling toward the catheter tip indicating proper alignment for retrograde advancement. There was a negative wave form when flow was traveling away from the catheter tip if the catheter was in a branch or bent upon itself indicating improper catheter tip position for retrograde advancement. In a series of six dogs, the catheter was able to be accurately advanced from the femoral artery to the left ventricular chamber under Doppler signal guidance without the use of x-ray. The potential applications of a Doppler guided retrograde catheterization system include decreasing time requirements and allowing safer catheter guidance in patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease and suspected aortic dissection. The Doppler system may allow left ventricular pressure monitoring in the intensive care unit without the need for x-ray and it may allow left sided contrast echocardiography. With pulse velocity detection limits of 4 m/second, this system may allow catheter direction and passage into the aortic root and left ventricle in patients with aortic stenosis. A modification of the Doppler catheter may include transponder technology which would allow precise catheter tip localization once the

  5. An application of space-time adaptive processing to airborne and spaceborne monostatic and bistatic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Richard James

    A challenging problem faced by Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radars on both airborne and spaceborne platforms is the ability to detect slow moving targets due the presence of non-stationary and heterogeneous ground clutter returns. Space-Time Adaptive Processing techniques process both the spatial signals from an antenna array as well as radar pulses simultaneously to aid in mitigating this clutter which has an inherent Doppler shift due to radar platform motion, as well as spreading across Angle-Doppler space attributable to a variety of factors. Additional problems such as clutter aliasing, widening of the clutter notch, and range dependency add additional complexity when the radar is bistatic in nature, and vary significantly as the bistatic radar geometry changes with respect to the targeted location. The most difficult situation is that of a spaceborne radar system due to its high velocity and altitude with respect to the earth. A spaceborne system does however offer several advantages over an airborne system, such as the ability to cover wide areas and to provide access to areas denied to airborne platforms. This dissertation examines both monostatic and bistatic radar performance based upon a computer simulation developed by the author, and explores the use of both optimal STAP and reduced dimension STAP architectures to mitigate the modeled clutter returns. Factors such as broadband jamming, wind, and earth rotation are considered, along with their impact on the interference covariance matrix, constructed from sample training data. Calculation of the covariance matrix in near real time based upon extracted training data is computer processor intensive and reduced dimension STAP architectures relieve some of the computation burden. The problems resulting from extending both monostatic and bistatic radar systems to space are also simulated and studied.

  6. The Cognitive Doppler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozoil, Micah E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the learning needs of students in the concrete operational stage in mathematics. Identifies the phenomenon of reduced cognitive performance in an out-of-class environment as the "Cognitive Doppler." Suggests methods of reducing the pronounced effects of the Cognitive Doppler by capitalizing on the students' ability to memorize…

  7. Doppler ultrasound monitoring technology.

    PubMed

    Docker, M F

    1993-03-01

    Developments in the signal processing of Doppler ultrasound used for the detection of fetal heart rate (FHR) have improved the operation of cardiotocographs. These developments are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the various Doppler and signal processing methods are compared.

  8. Raytheon low temperature RSP2 cryocooler airborne testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Raytheon Cryocooler Product Line tested the Low Temperature Stirling / Pulse Tube Hybrid 2-Stage (LTRSP2) cryocooler for an airborne application during 2012. Several tests were carried out to verify the ability of the machine to operate in an airborne environment. The vacuum level and heat rejection surface temperatures were varied to determine the performance over the excursions. Vibration testing was performed to prove that the LT-RSP2 cryocooler can operate on an airborne platform. This paper will present the results of the airborne characterization testing.

  9. Raytheon low temperature RSP2 cryocooler airborne testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. J.

    2013-09-01

    The Raytheon Cryocooler Product Line tested the Low Temperature Stirling / Pulse Tube Hybrid 2-Stage (LTRSP2) cryocooler for an airborne application during 2012. Several tests were carried out to verify the ability of the machine to operate in an airborne environment. The vacuum level and heat rejection surface temperatures were varied to determine the performance over the excursions. Vibration testing was performed to prove that the LT-RSP2 cryocooler can operate on an airborne platform. This paper will present the results of the airborne characterization testing.

  10. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  11. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104-5  ×  107 microbubbles ml-1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s-1, prior to the onset of

  12. A resonance-free nano-film airborne ultrasound emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daschewski, Maxim; Harrer, Andrea; Prager, Jens; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Beck, Uwe; Lange, Thorid; Weise, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a novel thermo-acoustic approach for the generation of broad band airborne ultrasound and investigate the applicability of resonance-free thermo-acoustic emitters for very short high pressure airborne ultrasound pulses. We report on measurements of thermo-acoustic emitter consisting of a 30 nm thin metallic film on a usual soda-lime glass substrate, generating sound pressure values of more than 140 dB at 60 mm distance from the transducer and compare the results with conventional piezoelectric airborne ultrasound transducers. Our experimental investigations show that such thermo-acoustic devices can be used as broad band emitters using pulse excitation.

  13. Development of the NASA High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Gerald; Carswell, James; Schaubert, Dan; McLinden, Matthew; Vega, Manuel; Perrine, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the development and recent field deployments of the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), which was funded under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) [1]. HIWRAP is a dual-frequency (Ka- and Ku-band), dual-beam (300 and 400 incidence angles), conical scanning, Doppler radar system designed for operation on the NASA high-altitude (65,000 ft) Global Hawk Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). It utilizes solid state transmitters along with a novel pulse compression scheme that results in a system with compact size, light weight, less power consumption, and low cost compared to radars currently in use for precipitation and Doppler wind measurements. By combining measurements at Ku- and Ka-band, HIWRAP is able to image winds through measuring volume backscattering from clouds and precipitation. In addition, HIWRAP is also capable of measuring surface winds in an approach similar to SeaWinds on QuikScat. To this end, HIWRAP hardware and software development has been completed. It was installed on the NASA WB57 for instrument test flights in March, 2010 and then deployed on the NASA Global Hawk for supporting the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field campaign in August-September, 2010. This paper describes the scientific motivations of the development of HIWRAP as well as system hardware, aircraft integration and flight missions. Preliminary data from GRIP science flights is also presented.

  14. Compact, Engineered, 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype: A New NASA Instrument Incubator Program Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Wang, Jinxue; Petros, Mulugeta

    2005-01-01

    A new project, selected in 2005 by NASA s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), will be described. The 3-year effort is intended to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a packaged, rugged, compact, space-qualifiable coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) transceiver capable of future validation in an aircraft and/or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The packaged DWL will utilize the numerous advances in pulsed, solid-state, 2-micron laser technology at NASA s Langley Research Center (LaRC) in such areas as crystal composition, architecture, efficiency, cooling techniques, pulse energy, and beam quality. The extensive experience of Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (RSAS) in coherent lidar systems, in spacebased sensors, and in packaging rugged lidar systems will be applied to this project. The packaged transceiver will be as close to an envisioned space-based DWL system as the resources and technology readiness allow. We will attempt to facilitate a future upgrade to a coherent lidar system capable of simultaneous wind and CO2 concentration profile measurements. Since aerosol and dust concentration is also available from the lidar signal, the potential for a triple measurement lidar system is attractive for both Earth and Mars remote sensing. A key follow on step after the IIP will be to add a telescope, scanner, and software for aircraft validation. This IIP should also put us in a position to begin a parallel formulation study in the 2006-2007 timeframe for a space-based DWL demonstration mission early next decade.

  15. Suppression of Doppler Ambiguities for Linear Sparse Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    06, Verona NY. Government Purpose Rights 14. ABSTRACT A key trade-off in airborne or spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) design involves the...trade-off in airborne or spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) design involves the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the number and location of...optimal weight application and without (i.e., using uniform weights). Also, MC-type results are shown for two key synthetic aperture radar (SAR

  16. Modular high accuracy tracker for dual channel laser Doppler velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridman, J. D.; Young, R. M.; Seavey, R. E.; Orloff, K. L.

    1976-01-01

    In the study described, a scanning dual-channel cross-beam laser Doppler velocimeter (developed for measuring simultaneously the two orthogonal components of flow velocity and turbulence intensity) was used to measure the instantaneous velocity characteristics of a model helicopter rotor and in a vortex wake survey experiment on a Boeing 747 aircraft model. Particular attention is given to a special purpose dual-loop frequency tracker developed to track and demodulate 10 microsecond wide pulse burst Doppler signals with a study cycle of 25% (or narrower signals at a higher duty cycle) generated by the laser Doppler velocimeter.

  17. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, W. R.; Beaver, W. L.; Meindl, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were made of (1) blood flow redistribution during lower body negative pressure (LBNP), (2) the profile of blood flow across the mitral annulus of the heart (both perpendicular and parallel to the commissures), (3) testing and evaluation of a number of pulsed Doppler systems, (4) acute calibration of perivascular Doppler transducers, (5) redesign of the mitral flow transducers to improve reliability and ease of construction, and (6) a frequency offset generator designed for use in distinguishing forward and reverse components of blood flow by producing frequencies above and below the offset frequency. Finally methodology was developed and initial results were obtained from a computer analysis of time-varying Doppler spectra.

  18. Doppler radar flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Petlevich, Walter J.; Sverdrup, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    A Doppler radar flowmeter comprises a transceiver which produces an audio frequency output related to the Doppler shift in frequency between radio waves backscattered from particulate matter carried in a fluid and the radiated radio waves. A variable gain amplifier and low pass filter are provided for amplifying and filtering the transceiver output. A frequency counter having a variable triggering level is also provided to determine the magnitude of the Doppler shift. A calibration method is disclosed wherein the amplifier gain and frequency counter trigger level are adjusted to achieve plateaus in the output of the frequency counter and thereby allow calibration without the necessity of being able to visually observe the flow.

  19. Efficient pulse compression for LPI waveforms based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengzheng; Nepal, Ramesh; Zhang, Yan; Blake, WIlliam

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve low probability-of-intercept (LPI), radar waveforms are usually long and randomly generated. Due to the randomized nature, Matched filter responses (autocorrelation) of those waveforms can have high sidelobes which would mask weaker targets near a strong target, limiting radar's ability to distinguish close-by targets. To improve resolution and reduced sidelobe contaminations, a waveform independent pulse compression filter is desired. Furthermore, the pulse compression filter needs to be able to adapt to received signal to achieve optimized performance. As many existing pulse techniques require intensive computation, real-time implementation is infeasible. This paper introduces a new adaptive pulse compression technique for LPI waveforms that is based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach (IAA). Due to the nonparametric nature, no parameter tuning is required for different waveforms. IAA can achieve super-resolution and sidelobe suppression in both range and Doppler domains. Also it can be extended to directly handle the matched filter (MF) output (called MF-IAA), which further reduces the computational load. The practical impact of LPI waveform operations on IAA and MF-IAA has not been carefully studied in previous work. Herein the typical LPI waveforms such as random phase coding and other non- PI waveforms are tested with both single-pulse and multi-pulse IAA processing. A realistic airborne radar simulator as well as actual measured radar data are used for the validations. It is validated that in spite of noticeable difference with different test waveforms, the IAA algorithms and its improvement can effectively achieve range-Doppler super-resolution in realistic data.

  20. [Noise and speckle reduction in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms by using MP-PCNN].

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Ma, Yue; Zhang, Yufeng; Shu, Xinling

    2011-10-01

    To reduce background noise and Dopplar speckle in the spectrogram of ultrasound Doppler blood flow signals, a novel method, called Matching Pursuit with threshold decaying pulse coupled neural network (MP-PCNN), has been proposed. The proposed method used an iterative algorithm, which decomposed the ultrasound Doppler signals into linear expansion of atoms in a time-frequency dictionary by using the Matching Pursuit (MP) for de-noising the ultrasound Doppler signal. Subsequently, a simplified unidirectional pulse coupled neural network was applied to calculate the firing matrix of the denoised spectrogram. The Doppler speckles were located and removed through analyzing and processing the PCNN firing matrix. Experiments were conducted on simulation signals which SNRs were 0dB, 5dB and 10dB. The result showed that the MP-PCNN performed effectively in reducing noise, eliminating Doppler speckles, and achieved better performance than exiting noise and speckle suppression algorithm for Doppler ultrasound blood flow spectrogram.

  1. An inertial velocity reference for the NASA airborne Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keck, Thomas S.; Telford, James W.

    1988-01-01

    The following four tasks were studied: (1) modification of the calibration routines to calibrate the Inertial Measurement Unit gyroscope drifts with fixed platform heading; (2) modification of the calibration routines to calibrate the Inertial Measurement Unit accelerometers; (3) checking overall software again for errors; and (4) providing documentation on the above work describing changes to the present software, results of these changes and future operating procedures.

  2. Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, Mario; Molek, Christopher; Vesely, Annamaria

    2015-06-01

    We report the successful proof-of-concept demonstration of the Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler velocimetry technique. RALF is a high-velocity and high-acceleration adaptation of the Global Doppler Velocimetry (GDV) method developed in the 1990s by aerodynamics researchers. Laser velocimetry techniques in common use within the shock physics community (e . g . VISAR, Fabry-Perot, PDV) decode the Doppler shift of light reflected from a moving surface via interference phenomena. In contrast, RALF employs a completely different physical principle: the frequency-dependent near-resonant optical transmission of a Rb/N2 gas cell, to convert the Doppler shift of reflected λ0 ~ 780.24 nm light directly into transmitted light intensity. The single-point RALF apparatus used in these experiments is fiber optic based, and incorporates a simultaneous PDV measurement channel as an ``internal standard'' for validation of the RALF results. Future plans include ``line-RALF'' experiments with streak camera detection, and two-dimensional surface velocity mapping using pulsed laser illumination and gated intensified CCD camera detection. [RW PA#4931

  3. Tissue Doppler imaging reproducibility during exercise.

    PubMed

    Bougault, V; Nottin, S; Noltin, S; Doucende, G; Obert, P

    2008-05-01

    Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is an echocardiographic technique used during exercising to improve the accuracy of a cardiovascular diagnostic. The validity of TDI requires its reproducibility, which has never been challenged during moderate to maximal intensity exercising. The present study was specifically designed to assess the transmitral Doppler and pulsed TDI reproducibility in 19 healthy men, who had undergone two identical semi-supine maximal exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. Systolic (S') and diastolic (E') tissue velocities at the septal and lateral walls as well as early transmitral velocities (E) were assessed during exercise up to maximal effort. The data were compared between the two tests at 40 %, 60 %, 80 % and 100 % of maximal aerobic power. Despite upper body movements and hyperventilation, good quality echocardiographic images were obtained in each case. Regardless of exercise intensity, no differences were noticed between the two tests for all measurements. The variation coefficients for Doppler variables ranged from 3 % to 9 % over the transition from rest to maximal exercise. The random measurement error was, on average, 5.8 cm/s for E' and 4.4 cm/s for S'. Overall, the reproducibility of TDI was acceptable. Tissue Doppler imaging can be used to accurately evaluate LV diastolic and/or systolic function for this range of exercise intensity.

  4. Airborne/Spaceborne Pulsed Power Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    along the surfaces of such insulators or interfaces (referred to as surface flashover ) no matter what medium the 0 39 0 DIELECTRIC CONSTANT 90 W 80 70...0 45 S insulator may be in. For the gas side of the insulators of the PFN, the gas pressure can be increased to prevent surface flashover (Refs. 19...Power Conf., Arlington, VA, p. 339, 1985. 19. Laghari, J. R., and A. H. Qureshi, " Surface Flashover of Spacers in Compressed Gas Insulated Systems," IEEE

  5. Radar/sonar signal design for bounded Doppler shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altes, R. A.

    1982-07-01

    In many detection and estimation problems, Doppler frequency shifts are bounded. For clutter or multipath that is uniformly distributed in range and symmetrically distributed in Doppler shift relative to the signal, detectability of a point target or a communication signal is improved by minimizing the weighted volume of the magnitude-squared autoambiguity function. When clutter Doppler shifts are bounded, this volume is in a strip containing the range axis on the range-Doppler plane. For scattering function estimation, e.g., for weather radar, Doppler flow meters, and distributed target classifiers, it is again relevant to minimize ambiguity volume in a strip. Strip volume is minimized by using a pulse train, but such a signal has unacceptably large range sidelobe for most applications. Other waveforms that have relatively small sidelobe level within a strip on the range-Doppler plane, as well as small ambiguity volume in the strip, are obtained. The waveforms are composed of pulse pairs that are phase modulated with Golay complementary codes.

  6. Slow-light-induced Doppler shift in photonic-crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Baba, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this Rapid Communication, we theoretically discuss a large Doppler shift in a signal slow-light pulse in a photonic-crystal waveguide by considering its reflection at a quasilight speed mirror. The mirror is formed by the photonic band-gap shift induced by the high nonlinearity of a control slow-light pulse, which could be possible in a realistic device. In the simulation, the Doppler shift appears at multiple frequencies due to the Bloch nature of the photonic lattice. Larger but inefficient Doppler shifts occur through nonadiabatic processes, whereas the smallest but more efficient shift (i.e., the intraband Doppler shift) occurs through an adiabatic process. The occurrence of the intraband shift depends on whether the adiabatic process produces a complete reflection of the incident pulse, despite the fact that the pulse penetrates the mirror. A large band-gap shift and a moderately slow mirror satisfy this condition; otherwise, the shift ends at the halfway point.

  7. Development of CO2 laser Doppler instrumentation for detection of clear air turbulence, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Jelalian, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    Modification, construction, test and operation of an advanced airborne carbon dioxide laser Doppler system for detecting clear air turbulence are described. The second generation CAT program and those auxiliary activities required to support and verify such a first-of-a-kind system are detailed: aircraft interface; ground and flight verification tests; data analysis; and laboratory examinations.

  8. Intracoronary Doppler: Clinical Application And Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Patrick L.; Raymond, Russell E.; Tuzcu, E. Murat

    1989-08-01

    Because coronary arteriography may underestimate the severity of coronary artery disease, other methods to assess the physiologic significance of a coronary lesion have been sought. Experimental data have confirmed that the ratio of peak flow to resting flow, coronary vasodilator reserve (CVDR), is a quantitative measure of the functional significance of a coronary a stenosis. A 20 MHz pulsed Doppler catheter with a 1 mm outer diameter and an innerlumen for guidewire placement was developed in 1985 and has been used for clinical measurement of CVDR. The technique appears safe, and reliable signals can be obtained in the vast majority of patients studied. Limitations of the technique include possible changes in vessel diameter with delivery of a vasodilator stimulus, possible elevation of baseline flow above normal resting values which would diminish the CVDR, and inability to measure absolute coronary flow. These limitations could be overcome by the development of an intravascular Echo-Doppler device in the future.

  9. [Color-Doppler semiology in transplanted kidney].

    PubMed

    Rivolta, R; Castagnone, D; Burdick, L; Mandelli, C; Mangiarotti, R

    1993-05-01

    Color-encoded duplex ultrasonography (CEDU) makes a more accurate technique in kidney graft monitoring by combining real-time US with pulsed Doppler studies of renal vasculature. It is a non-invasive and easy technique. Suitable to study the whole renal artery and vein, CEDU also allows the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the intrarenal vasculature and therefore the easy diagnosis of such vessel dysfunctions as arteriovenous fistulas following biopsy. Moreover, Doppler spectral analysis can be used to distinguish among different causes of renal allograft dysfunction--i.e. rejection, cyclosporine nephrotoxicity or acute tubular necrosis. The value of the resistive index for the differential diagnosis is discussed. CEDU allows a more reliable measurement of renal blood flow thanks to the more precise evaluation of renal artery diameter and mean flow velocity.

  10. Multicenter airborne coherent atmospheric wind sensor (MACAWS) instrument: recent upgrades and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, James N.; Rothermel, Jeffrey; Tratt, David M.; Cutten, Dean; Darby, Lisa S.; Hardesty, R. Michael

    1999-10-01

    The Multicenter Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor instrument is an airborne coherent Doppler laser radar (Lidar) capable of measuring atmospheric wind fields and aerosol structure. Since the first demonstration flights onboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft in September 1995, two additional science flights have been completed. Several system upgrades have also bee implemented. In this paper we discuss the system upgrades and present several case studies which demonstrate the various capabilities of the system.

  11. Compressed Sensing Doppler Ultrasound Reconstruction Using Block Sparse Bayesian Learning.

    PubMed

    Lorintiu, Oana; Liebgott, Herve; Friboulet, Denis

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we propose a framework for using duplex Doppler ultrasound systems. These type of systems need to interleave the acquisition and display of a B-mode image and of the pulsed Doppler spectrogram. In a recent study (Richy , 2013), we have shown that compressed sensing-based reconstruction of Doppler signal allowed reducing the number of Doppler emissions and yielded better results than traditional interpolation and at least equivalent or even better depending on the configuration than the study estimating the signal from sparse data sets given in Jensen, 2006. We propose here to improve over this study by using a novel framework for randomly interleaving Doppler and US emissions. The proposed method reconstructs the Doppler signal segment by segment using a block sparse Bayesian learning (BSBL) algorithm based CS reconstruction. The interest of using such framework in the context of duplex Doppler is linked to the unique ability of BSBL to exploit block-correlated signals and to recover non-sparse signals. The performance of the technique is evaluated from simulated data as well as experimental in vivo data and compared to the recent results in Richy , 2013.

  12. Doppler ion program description

    SciTech Connect

    Henline, P.

    1980-12-01

    The Doppler spectrometer is a conventional Czerny-Turner grating spectrometer with a 1024 channel multiple detector. Light is dispersed across the detector, and its output yields a spectrum covering approximately 200 A. The width of the spectral peak is directly proportional to the temperature of the emitting ions, and determination of the impurity ion temperature allows one to infer the plasma ion temperature. The Doppler ion software system developed at General Atomic uses a TRACOR Northern 1710-31 and an LSI-11/2. The exact configuration of Doublet III is different from TRACOR Northern systems at other facilities.

  13. Study on analysis from sources of error for Airborne LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H. C.; Yan, Q.; Liu, Z. J.; Zuo, Z. Q.; Xu, Q. Q.; Li, F. F.; Song, C.

    2016-11-01

    With the advancement of Aerial Photogrammetry, it appears that to obtain geo-spatial information of high spatial and temporal resolution provides a new technical means for Airborne LIDAR measurement techniques, with unique advantages and broad application prospects. Airborne LIDAR is increasingly becoming a new kind of space for earth observation technology, which is mounted by launching platform for aviation, accepting laser pulses to get high-precision, high-density three-dimensional coordinate point cloud data and intensity information. In this paper, we briefly demonstrates Airborne laser radar systems, and that some errors about Airborne LIDAR data sources are analyzed in detail, so the corresponding methods is put forwarded to avoid or eliminate it. Taking into account the practical application of engineering, some recommendations were developed for these designs, which has crucial theoretical and practical significance in Airborne LIDAR data processing fields.

  14. Wind Measurements with High Energy 2 Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Bruce W.; Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Ji-Rong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2004-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar based on an injection seeded Ho:Tm:YLF pulsed laser was developed for wind measurements. A transmitted pulse energy over 75 mJ at 5 Hz repetition rate has been demonstrated. Designs are presented on the laser, injection seeding, receiver, and signal processing subsystems. Sample data of atmospheric measurements are presented including a wind profile extending from the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to the free troposphere.

  15. Applications of airborne remote sensing in atmospheric sciences research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafin, R. J.; Szejwach, G.; Phillips, B. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper explores the potential for airborne remote sensing for atmospheric sciences research. Passive and active techniques from the microwave to visible bands are discussed. It is concluded that technology has progressed sufficiently in several areas that the time is right to develop and operate new remote sensing instruments for use by the community of atmospheric scientists as general purpose tools. Promising candidates include Doppler radar and lidar, infrared short range radiometry, and microwave radiometry.

  16. Finnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Ewan OConnor

    2015-03-27

    This doppler lidar system provides co-polar and cross polar attenuated backscatter coefficients,signal strength, and doppler velocities in the cloud and in the boundary level, including uncertainties for all parameters. Using the doppler beam swinging DBS technique, and Vertical Azimuthal Display (VAD) this system also provides vertical profiles of horizontal winds.

  17. The Doppler Pendulum Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, C. K.; Wong, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment to verify the Doppler effect of sound waves is described. An ultrasonic source is mounted at the end of a simple pendulum. As the pendulum swings, the rapid change of frequency can be recorded by a stationary receiver using a simple frequency-to-voltage converter. The experimental results are in close agreement with the Doppler…

  18. Doppler wind profile experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The data collection phase of a Doppler wind measurement experiment supported by high-resolution Jimsphere/FPS-16 wind data and Windsonde data was carried out at the Kennedy Space Center in February, March and early April of 1985. The Doppler wind measurements were made using a hybrid doppler profiler put in place by the Johnson Space Center and a SOUSY profiler operated by Radian Corporation. Both systems operated at 50 Mhz. Although the doppler profiler systems were located 10 km apart to enable concurrent operation of the systems for data comparison, little concurrent data were obtained due to set-up delays with the SOUSY system, and system problems with the WPL system during the last month of the test. During the test period, special serial Jimsphere soundings were taken at two-hour intervals on six days in March and April in addition to balloon soundings taken in support of the Shuttle launch operations. In addition, there is temperature, moisture and wind information available from the daily morning Radiosonde sounding taken at the Kennedy site. The balloon release point was at the same location as the SOUSY profiler. Vertical resolution of the SOUSY profiler was 150 M to approximately 20 km. The vertical resolution of the WPL profiler was 290 M to 10 km and 870 M to 17 km. Winds determined form the Jimsphere balloon have a vertical resolution of 30 M.

  19. Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries: anatomy and scanning guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries is a valuable technique, although it is less frequently indicated for peripheral arterial disease than for deep vein thrombosis or varicose veins. Ultrasonography can diagnose stenosis through the direct visualization of plaques and through the analysis of the Doppler waveforms in stenotic and poststenotic arteries. To perform Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries, the operator should be familiar with the arterial anatomy of the lower extremities, basic scanning techniques, and the parameters used in color and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography. PMID:28219004

  20. Reducing Spaceborne-Doppler-Radar Rainfall-Velocity Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    A combined frequency-time (CFT) spectral moment estimation technique has been devised for calculating rainfall velocity from measurement data acquired by a nadir-looking spaceborne Doppler weather radar system. Prior spectral moment estimation techniques used for this purpose are based partly on the assumption that the radar resolution volume is uniformly filled with rainfall. The assumption is unrealistic in general but introduces negligible error in application to airborne radar systems. However, for spaceborne systems, the combination of this assumption and inhomogeneities in rainfall [denoted non-uniform beam filling (NUBF)] can result in velocity measurement errors of several meters per second. The present CFT spectral moment estimation technique includes coherent processing of a series of Doppler spectra generated in a standard manner from data over measurement volumes that are partially overlapping in the along-track direction. Performance simulation of this technique using high-resolution data from an airborne rain-mapping radar shows that a spaceborne Ku-band Doppler radar operating at signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 dB can achieve root-mean-square accuracy between 0.5 and 0.6 m/s in vertical-velocity estimates.

  1. Doppler effect in optical velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkevichius, Bronius S.

    1996-02-01

    The current state of the optical metrology based on the Doppler effect has been reviewed. Some historical and scientific information is given, in addition the contemporary optical methods of the velocity measurement using the Doppler effect are analyzed. The Doppler effect applications in astrophysics, plasma physics, investigations of gas and liquid flows, acoustics, mechanics of the deforming solid body and of the rotational motion are considered. The description is presented for the following techniques of the velocity measurement: laser Doppler anemometry, laser Doppler vibrometry, laser gyroscopy.

  2. Sampling for Airborne Radioactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    compared to betas, gammas and neutrons. For an airborne radioactivity detection system, it is most important to be able to detect alpha particles and... Airborne radioactive particles may emit alpha, beta, gamma or neutron radiation, depending on which radioisotope is present. From a health perspective...

  3. From Mars to Greenland: Charting gravity with space and airborne instruments - Fields, tides, methods, results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This symposium on space and airborne techniques for measuring gravity fields, and related theory, contains papers on gravity modeling of Mars and Venus at NASA/GSFC, an integrated laser Doppler method for measuring planetary gravity fields, observed temporal variations in the earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis, high-resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data, the effect of water vapor corrections for satellite altimeter measurements of the geoid, and laboratory demonstrations of superconducting gravity and inertial sensors for space and airborne gravity measurements. Other papers are on airborne gravity measurements over the Kelvin Seamount; the accuracy of GPS-derived acceleration from moving platform tests; airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors; controlling common mode stabilization errors in airborne gravity gradiometry, GPS/INS gravity measurements in space and on a balloon, and Walsh-Fourier series expansion of the earth's gravitational potential.

  4. Laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dennis A.

    1988-01-01

    The material in this NASA TM is to appear as a chapter on Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) in the AGARDograph entitled, A Survey of Measurements and Measuring Techniques in Rapidly Distorted Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers. The application of LDA (specifically, the dual-beam, burst-counter approach) to compressible flows is discussed. Subjects treated include signal processing, particle light scattering and tracking, data reduction and sampling bias, and three-dimensional measurements.

  5. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Werkmeister, René M.; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  6. Laser double Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poffo, L.; Goujon, J.-M.; Le Page, R.; Lemaitre, J.; Guendouz, M.; Lorrain, N.; Bosc, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive method for estimating the tissular blood flow and speed at a microscopic scale (microcirculation). It is used for medical research as well as for the diagnosis of diseases related to circulatory system tissues and organs including the issues of microvascular flow (perfusion). It is based on the Doppler effect, created by the interaction between the laser light and tissues. LDF measures the mean blood flow in a volume formed by the single laser beam, that penetrate into the skin. The size of this measurement volume is crucial and depends on skin absorption, and is not directly reachable. Therefore, current developments of the LDF are focused on the use of always more complex and sophisticated signal processing methods. On the other hand, laser Double Doppler Flowmeter (FL2D) proposes to use two laser beams to generate the measurement volume. This volume would be perfectly stable and localized at the intersection of the two laser beams. With FL2D we will be able to determine the absolute blood flow of a specific artery. One aimed application would be to help clinical physicians in health care units.

  7. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: Third Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference on airborne wind shear detection and warning systems are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: terms of reference; case study; flight management; sensor fusion and flight evaluation; Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data link/display; heavy rain aerodynamics; and second generation reactive systems.

  8. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  9. Clinical applications of doppler ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.J.W.; Burns, P.N.; Well, P.N.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book introduces a guide to the physical principles and instrumentation of duplex Doppler ultrasound and its applications in obstetrics, gynecology, neonatology, gastroentology, and evaluation of peripheral vascular disease. The book provides information needed to perform Doppler ultrasound examinations and interpret the results. An introduction to Doppler physics and instrumentation is followed by a thorough review of hemodynamics, which explains the principles underlying interpretation of Doppler signals. Of special note is the state-of-the-art coverage of new applications of Doppler in recognition of high-risk pregnancy, diagnosis of intrauterine growth retardation, investigation of neonatal blood flow, evaluation of first-trimester pregnancy, and diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease. The book also offers guidelines on the use of Doppler ultrasound in diagnosing carotid disease, deep venous thrombosis, and aorta/femoral disease.

  10. Laser Doppler diagnostics for orthodontia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkova, Anastasia V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Kharish, Natalia A.

    2004-06-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of intensity fluctuations of light, scattered from mucous membrane of oral cavity of healthy volunteers and patients, abused by the orthodontic diseases, are presented. Analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, is carried out. New approach to monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of Doppler measuring system on formation of the output signal is studied.

  11. Laser Doppler velocimetry primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced research in experimental fluid dynamics required a familiarity with sophisticated measurement techniques. In some cases, the development and application of new techniques is required for difficult measurements. Optical methods and in particular, the laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) are now recognized as the most reliable means for performing measurements in complex turbulent flows. And such, the experimental fluid dynamicist should be familiar with the principles of operation of the method and the details associated with its application. Thus, the goals of this primer are to efficiently transmit the basic concepts of the LDV method to potential users and to provide references that describe the specific areas in greater detail.

  12. Galaxy: a new state of the art airborne lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartsell, Daryl; LaRocque, Paul E.; Tripp, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    Recent advancements in lidar technologies have led to significant improvements in Teledyne Optech's airborne lidar systems. This paper will present the performance enhancements that have led to the creation of the Galaxy, a compact scanning lidar system. Unlike the previous generation of conventional airborne lidar, the Galaxy offers fundamentally improved specifications for long-range airborne lidar systems. The Galaxy system is capable of acquiring high-density, multiple-return data with unique pulse separation characteristics and exceptional precision. Utilizing discrete time-of-flight measurement electronics, this new system is capable of seamlessly operating at very high laser repetition rates through blind zones and with multiple pulses in the air. By utilizing even higher scan products , the system outperforms previous generations of systems and optimizes point density during collection.

  13. Digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Li, Chen; Tan, Cheng-Jun; Ge, Liang-Quan; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-07-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. After energy calibration, the spectrometer can clearly distinguish photopeaks at 239, 352, 583 and 609 keV in the low-energy spectral sections. The photopeak energy resolution of 137Cs improves to 6.75% from the original 7.8%. Furthermore, the energy resolution of three photopeaks, namely, K, U, and Th, is maintained, and the overall stability of the energy spectrum is increased through potassium peak spectrum stabilization. Thus, it is possible to effectively measure energy from 20 keV to 10 MeV.

  14. [Tissue Doppler: the physical principles, representational and analytical modalities and clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Trambaiolo, P; Salustri, A; Tonti, G; Fedele, F; Palamara, A

    2000-01-01

    Tissue Doppler imaging or myocardial velocity imaging is a variation of conventional Doppler. This modality allows the quantification of the Doppler shift within the range of myocardial tissue motion. The velocity of motion at a variety of myocardial sites can be determined and distinguished very rapidly using Doppler techniques. The velocity of moving tissue can be studied with pulsed wave tissue Doppler sampling, which displays the velocity of a selected myocardial region against time, with high temporal resolution. In addition, the velocities can be calculated with time velocity maps and displayed as color coded velocity maps in either M-mode or two-dimensional format. This review will focus on the technical aspects and the different methods of tissue Doppler for regional systolic and diastolic left ventricular function analysis. While pulsed wave tissue Doppler allows us to measure the velocities of a selected myocardial region, color tissue Doppler gives the best overall view of cardiac dynamics because the whole scanned color data are displayed simultaneously. However, there is an increasing need for objective evaluation of tissue Doppler information. Digital images and data post-processing allow for quantitative off-line analysis, and the different approaches and parameters proposed from different centers are discussed. In recent years, tissue Doppler imaging has been applied for accurate evaluation of diastolic function, quantifying regional function particularly during stress, pre-excitation syndrome, and left ventricular hypertrophy. The results of these experiences indicate that tissue Doppler imaging is a promising technique for quantifying the response of the myocardium and endocardium during both normal and abnormal function. Again, there is a significant learning curve concerning its application, but with experience it will be a useful and reproducible technique.

  15. ANL Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karplus, H. B.; Raptis, A. C.; Lee, S.; Simpson, T.

    1985-10-01

    A flowmeter has been developed for measuring flow velocity in hot slurries. The flowmeter works on an ultrasonic Doppler principle in which ultrasound is injected into the flowing fluid through the solid pipe wall. Isolating waveguides separate the hot pipe from conventional ultrasonic transducers. Special clamp-on high-temperature transducers also can be adapted to work well in this application. Typical flows in pilot plants were found to be laminar, giving rise to broad-band Doppler spectra. A special circuit based on a servomechanism sensor was devised to determine the frequency average of such a broad spectrum. The device was tested at different pilot plants. Slurries with particulates greater than 70 microns (0.003 in.) yielded good signals, but slurries with extremely fine particulates were unpredictable. Small bubbles can replace the coarse particles to provide a good signal if there are not too many. Successful operation with very fine particulate slurries may have been enhanced by the presence of microbubbles.

  16. Doppler Beats or Interference Fringes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Paul S.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the following: another version of Doppler beats; alternate proof of spin-1 sin-1/2 problems; some mechanisms related to Dirac's strings; Doppler redshift in oblique approach of source and observer; undergraduate experiment on noise thermometry; use of the time evolution operator; resolution of an entropy maximization controversy;…

  17. Multi-center airborne coherent atmospheric wind sensor (MACAWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.; Tratt, D.M.

    1996-11-01

    The Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) is an airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar designed to acquire remote multi-dimensional measurements of winds and absolute aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. These measurements enable study of atmospheric dynamic processes and features at scales of motion that may be undersampled by, or may be beyond the capability of, existing or planned sensors. MACAWS capabilities enable more realistic assessments of concepts in global tropospheric wind measurement with satellite Doppler lidar, as well as a unique capability to validate the NASA Scatterometer currently scheduled for launch in late 1996. MACAWS consists of a Joule-class CO{sub 2} coherent Doppler lidar on a ruggedized optical table, a programmable scanner to direct the lidar beam in the desired direction, and a dedicated inertial navigation system to account for variable aircraft attitude and speed. MACAWS was flown for the first time in September 1995, over the eastern Pacific Ocean and western US. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Doppler Feature Based Classification of Wind Profiler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Swati; Chandrasekhar Sarma, T. V.; Lourde. R, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Wind Profilers (WP) are coherent pulsed Doppler radars in UHF and VHF bands. They are used for vertical profiling of wind velocity and direction. This information is very useful for weather modeling, study of climatic patterns and weather prediction. Observations at different height and different wind velocities are possible by changing the operating parameters of WP. A set of Doppler power spectra is the standard form of WP data. Wind velocity, direction and wind velocity turbulence at different heights can be derived from it. Modern wind profilers operate for long duration and generate approximately 4 megabytes of data per hour. The radar data stream contains Doppler power spectra from different radar configurations with echoes from different atmospheric targets. In order to facilitate systematic study, this data needs to be segregated according the type of target. A reliable automated target classification technique is required to do this job. Classical techniques of radar target identification use pattern matching and minimization of mean squared error, Euclidean distance etc. These techniques are not effective for the classification of WP echoes, as these targets do not have well-defined signature in Doppler power spectra. This paper presents an effective target classification technique based on range-Doppler features.

  19. Airborne Next: Rethinking Airborne Organization and Applying New Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    structures since its employment on a large scale during World War II. It is puzzling to consider how little airborne organizational structures and employment...future potential of airborne concepts by rethinking traditional airborne organizational structures and employment concepts. Using a holistic approach in... structures of airborne forces to model a “small and many” approach over a “large and few” approach, while incorporating a “swarming” concept. Utilizing

  20. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Implantable pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter development has resulted in designs for application to the aortas of dogs and humans, and to human renal and coronary arteries. A figure of merit was derived for each design, indicating the degree of its precision. An H-array design for transcutaneous observation of blood flow was developed and tested in vitro. Two other simplified designs for the same purpose obviate the need to determine vessel orientation. One of these will be developed in the next time period. Techniques for intraoperative use and for implantation have had mixed success. While satisfactory on large vessels, higher ultrasonic frequencies and alteration of transducer design are required for satisfactory operation of pulsed Doppler flowmeters with small vessels.

  1. Optimization of radar pulse compression processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Samuel M.; Kim, Woonkyung M.; Lee, Myung-Su

    1997-06-01

    We propose an optimal radar pulse compression technique and evaluate its performance in the presence of Doppler shift. The traditional pulse compression using Barker code increases the signal strength by transmitting a Barker coded long pulse. The received signal is then processed by an appropriate correlation processing. This Barker code radar pulse compression enhances the detection sensitivity while maintaining the range resolution of a single chip of the Barker coded long pulse. But unfortunately, the technique suffers from the addition of range sidelobes which sometimes will mask weak targets in the vicinity of larger targets. Our proposed optimal algorithm completely eliminates the sidelobes at the cost of additional processing.

  2. Comparison between digital Doppler filtering processes applied to radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desodt, G.

    1983-10-01

    Two families of Doppler processes based on FFT and FIR filters, respectively, are compared in terms of hardware complexity and performance. It is shown that FIR filter banks are characterized by better performance than FFT filter banks. For the same number of pulses, the FIR processor permits a better clutter rejection and greater bandwidth than the FFT one. Also, an FIR-based bank has a much simpler and more adaptable architecture than an FFT-based bank.

  3. Observations of Wind Profile of Marine Atmosphere Boundary Layer by Shipborne Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Yin, Jiaping; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Hongwei; Song, Xiaoquan; Zhang, Kailin

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) system is so good as to prove the feasibility of the marine atmosphere boundary layer detection. A ship-mounted Coherent Doppler lidar was used to measure the wind profile and vertical velocity in the boundary layer over the Yellow sea in 2014. Furthermore, for the purpose of reducing the impact of vibration during movement and correcting the LOS velocity, the paper introduces the attitude correction algorithm and comparison results.

  4. Offshore wind measurements using Doppler aerosol wind lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    The latest flight demonstration of Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is presented. The goal of the campaign was to demonstrate the improvement of DAWN system since the previous flight campaign in 2012 and the capabilities of DAWN and the latest airborne wind profiling algorithm APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) developed at LaRC. The comparisons of APOLO and another algorithm are discussed utilizing two and five line-of-sights (LOSs), respectively. Wind parameters from DAWN were compared with ground-based radar measurements for validation purposes. The campaign period was June - July in 2013 and the flight altitude was 8 km in inland toward Charlotte, NC, and offshores in Virginia Beach, VA and Ocean City, MD. The DAWN system was integrated into a UC12B with two operators onboard during the campaign.

  5. Offshore Wind Measurements Using Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The latest flight demonstration of Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is presented. The goal of the campaign was to demonstrate the improvement of DAWN system since the previous flight campaign in 2012 and the capabilities of DAWN and the latest airborne wind profiling algorithm APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) developed at LaRC. The comparisons of APOLO and another algorithm are discussed utilizing two and five line-of-sights (LOSs), respectively. Wind parameters from DAWN were compared with ground-based radar measurements for validation purposes. The campaign period was June - July in 2013 and the flight altitude was 8 km in inland toward Charlotte, NC, and offshores in Virginia Beach, VA and Ocean City, MD. The DAWN system was integrated into a UC12B with two operators onboard during the campaign.

  6. Christian Doppler is 200 years young.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Alfred; Partsch, Hugo

    2003-11-01

    Christian Doppler was born 200 years ago in Salzburg, Austria, on November 29, 1803, worked in Prague and Vienna and died 150 years ago in Venice. In an article of eight pages he described the principle, which made him famous. It appeared in 1842 with the exotic title: "On the Coloured Light of the Double Stars and Certain Other Stars of the Heaven". The validity of his principle for velocity measurement was confirmed by trumpet sounds produced on a train moving towards and away from the observer. Around 1960 Japanese scientists suggested that flow velocity in blood vessels could be determined by analysing the difference of frequency between emitted and backscattered ultrasound. Rushmer and coworkers built machines suitable for medicine in Seattle, where Eugene Strandness recognized their potential and applied them in first studies. In 1967 the technique jumped to Europe and started to be used worldwide. Already by using continuous wave ultrasound it was possible to diagnose occlusive disease of neck and limb arteries, venous thrombosis and valvular insufficiency with accuracy. Measurements of postestenotic ankle blood pressure were facilitated by Doppler sensing. Over the years more sophisticated instruments were developed. Pulsed emission of ultrasound waves opened a way to study flow velocity profiles across large vessels. By combining the method with A or B mode ultrasound blood flow could be quantified and finally perfused segments of blood vessels visualized. Duplex scanning in its simple and then in its colour coded version is nowadays the standard non-invasive technique that nobody would like to miss. Vascular territories like intracranial, renal and intestinal arteries can also be explored. For the assessment of microvascular flow in skin and mucosae laser Doppler instruments were introduced.

  7. 3-D ultrafast Doppler imaging applied to the noninvasive mapping of blood vessels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Demene, Charlie; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast Doppler imaging was introduced as a technique to quantify blood flow in an entire 2-D field of view, expanding the field of application of ultrasound imaging to the highly sensitive anatomical and functional mapping of blood vessels. We have recently developed 3-D ultrafast ultrasound imaging, a technique that can produce thousands of ultrasound volumes per second, based on a 3-D plane and diverging wave emissions, and demonstrated its clinical feasibility in human subjects in vivo. In this study, we show that noninvasive 3-D ultrafast power Doppler, pulsed Doppler, and color Doppler imaging can be used to perform imaging of blood vessels in humans when using coherent compounding of 3-D tilted plane waves. A customized, programmable, 1024-channel ultrasound system was designed to perform 3-D ultrafast imaging. Using a 32 × 32, 3-MHz matrix phased array (Vermon, Tours, France), volumes were beamformed by coherently compounding successive tilted plane wave emissions. Doppler processing was then applied in a voxel-wise fashion. The proof of principle of 3-D ultrafast power Doppler imaging was first performed by imaging Tygon tubes of various diameters, and in vivo feasibility was demonstrated by imaging small vessels in the human thyroid. Simultaneous 3-D color and pulsed Doppler imaging using compounded emissions were also applied in the carotid artery and the jugular vein in one healthy volunteer.

  8. Evaluation of factors influencing arterial Doppler waveforms in an in vitro flow phantom

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate factors that influence arterial Doppler waveforms in an in vitro phantom to provide a more accurate and comprehensive explanation of the Doppler signal. Methods A flow model was created using a pulsatile artificial heart, rubber or polyethylene tubes, a water tank, and a glass tube. Spectral Doppler tracings were obtained in multiple combinations of compliance, resistance, and pulse rate. Peak systolic velocity, minimum diastolic velocity, resistive index (RI), pulsatility index, early systolic acceleration time, and acceleration index were measured. On the basis of these measurements, the influences of the variables on the Doppler waveforms were analyzed. Results With increasing distal resistance, the RI increased in a relatively linear relationship. With increasing proximal resistance, the RI decreased. The pulsus tardus and parvus phenomenon was observed with a small acceleration index in the model with a higher grade of stenosis. An increase in the distal resistance masked the pulsus tardus and parvus phenomenon by increasing the acceleration index. Although this phenomenon occurred independently of compliance, changes in the compliance of proximal or distal tubes caused significant changes in the Doppler waveform. There was a reverse relationship between the RI and the pulse rate. Conclusion Resistance and compliance can alter the Doppler waveforms independently. The pulse rate is an extrinsic factor that also influences the RI. The compliance and distal resistance, as well as proximal resistance, influence the pulsus tardus and parvus phenomenon. PMID:27784154

  9. Characterizing Subglacial Interfaces With Airborne Radar Sounding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, M. E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Morse, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Ice sheets are sensitive indicators of global change including sea-level rise. An ice sheet's subglacial interface is an important factor controlling its dynamic behavior. In particular, the grounding zones of ice streams and subglacial lakes are complex systems involving the interaction of the moving ice mass with underlying materials such as liquid water, saturated lubricating tills, and rough or frozen bedrock sticky spots. Imaging and characterizing the subglacial environment of ice sheets is fundamental to understanding these complex systems. Airborne radar sounding is a powerful and well-known technique for studying ice sheets and glaciers and their contiguous underlying environments. We present results from data acquired in 2001 over the ice stream C grounding zone in West Antarctica, as well as over a hypothesized subglacial lake near the South Pole. These data were acquired using a uniquely configured coherent airborne radar system. Our focus has been to characterize the subglacial interface through radar echo analysis based on reflection and scattering theory. The radar system uses a programmable signal source linked to a 10 kW transmitter and a dual-channel coherent down-conversion receiver. The radar operates in chirped pulse mode at 60 MHz with 15 MHz bandwidth. High and low-gain channels allow for recording a wide dynamic range of echoes simultaneously and without range-dependent gain control. Data acquisition includes integrations of 16 returned radar signals about every 15 cm along-track. Pulse compression and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing were components of data analysis. Subglacial echoes are influenced by the physical properties of the interface such as the composition and roughness of the materials at the interface. Other important factors include dielectric losses and volumetric scattering losses from propagation through the ice as well as transmission and refraction at the air-ice interface. Unfocussed SAR narrows the along

  10. GEOS-3 Doppler difference tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, B.

    1977-01-01

    The Doppler difference method as applied to track the GEOS 3 spacecraft is discussed. In this method a pair of 2 GHz ground tracking stations simultaneously track a spacecraft beacon to generate an observable signal in which bias and instability of the carrier frequency cancel. The baselines are formed by the tracking sites at Bermuda, Rosman, and Merritt Island. Measurements were made to evaluate the effectiveness of the Doppler differencing procedure in tracking a beacon target with the high dynamic rate of the GEOS 3 orbit. Results indicate the precision of the differenced data to be at a level comparable to the conventional precise two way Doppler tracking.

  11. Digital Doppler measurement with spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Hinedi, Sami M.; Labelle, Remi C.; Bevan, Roland P.; Del Castillo, Hector M.; Chong, Dwayne C.

    1991-01-01

    Digital and analog phase-locked loop (PLL) receivers were operated in parallel, each tracking the residual carrier from a spacecraft. The PLL tracked the downlink carrier and measured its instantaneous phase. This information, combined with a knowledge of the uplink carrier and the transponder ratio, permitted the computation of a Doppler observable. In this way, two separate Doppler measurements were obtained for one observation window. The two receivers agreed on the magnitude of the Doppler effect to within 1 mHz. There was less jitter on the data from the digital receiver. This was due to its smaller noise bandwidth. The demonstration and its results are described.

  12. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  13. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  14. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  15. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  16. Pulsed Lidar Performance/Technical Maturity Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimmestad, Gary G.; West, Leanne L.; Wood, Jack W.; Frehlich, Rod

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of investigations performed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) under a task entitled 'Pulsed Lidar Performance/Technical Maturity Assessment' funded by the Crew Systems Branch of the Airborne Systems Competency at the NASA Langley Research Center. The investigations included two tasks, 1.1(a) and 1.1(b). The Tasks discussed in this report are in support of the NASA Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) program and are designed to evaluate a pulsed lidar that will be required for active wake vortex avoidance solutions. The Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) WindTracer LIDAR is an eye-safe, 2-micron, coherent, pulsed Doppler lidar with wake tracking capability. The actual performance of the WindTracer system was to be quantified. In addition, the sensor performance has been assessed and modeled, and the models have been included in simulation efforts. The WindTracer LIDAR was purchased by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for use in near-term field data collection efforts as part of a joint NASA/FAA wake vortex research program. In the joint research program, a minimum common wake and weather data collection platform will be defined. NASA Langley will use the field data to support wake model development and operational concept investigation in support of the VAMS project, where the ultimate goal is to improve airport capacity and safety. Task 1.1(a), performed by NCAR in Boulder, Colorado to analyze the lidar system to determine its performance and capabilities based on results from simulated lidar data with analytic wake vortex models provided by NASA, which were then compared to the vendor's claims for the operational specifications of the lidar. Task 1.1(a) is described in Section 3, including the vortex model, lidar parameters and simulations, and results for both detection and tracking of wake vortices generated by Boeing 737s and 747s. Task 1

  17. Dual-Doppler Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    When two or more Doppler weather radar systems are monitoring the same region, the Doppler velocities can be combined to form a three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector field thus providing for a more intuitive analysis of the wind field. A real-time display of the 3-D winds can assist forecasters in predicting the onset of convection and severe weather. The data can also be used to initialize local numerical weather prediction models. Two operational Doppler Radar systems are in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS); these systems are operated by the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) and the National Weather Service Melbourne, Fla. (NWS MLB). Dual-Doppler applications were considered by the 45 SW in choosing the site for the new radar. Accordingly, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), NWS MLB and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to investigate the feasibility of establishing dual-Doppler capability using the two existing systems. This study investigated technical, hardware, and software requirements necessary to enable the establishment of a dual-Doppler capability. Review of the available literature pertaining to the dual-Doppler technique and consultation with experts revealed that the physical locations and resulting beam crossing angles of the 45 SW and NWS MLB radars make them ideally suited for a dual-Doppler capability. The dual-Doppler equations were derived to facilitate complete understanding of dual-Doppler synthesis; to determine the technical information requirements; and to determine the components of wind velocity from the equation of continuity and radial velocity data collected by the two Doppler radars. Analysis confirmed the suitability of the existing systems to provide the desired capability. In addition, it is possible that both 45 SW radar data and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data from Orlando International Airport could be used to alleviate any

  18. Doppler characteristics of sea clutter.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-06-01

    Doppler radars can distinguish targets from clutter if the target's velocity along the radar line of sight is beyond that of the clutter. Some targets of interest may have a Doppler shift similar to that of clutter. The nature of sea clutter is different in the clutter and exo-clutter regions. This behavior requires special consideration regarding where a radar can expect to find sea-clutter returns in Doppler space and what detection algorithms are most appropriate to help mitigate false alarms and increase probability of detection of a target. This paper studies the existing state-of-the-art in the understanding of Doppler characteristics of sea clutter and scattering from the ocean to better understand the design and performance choices of a radar in differentiating targets from clutter under prevailing sea conditions.

  19. Doppler tracking of planetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    This article concerns the measurement of Doppler shift on microwave links that connect planetary spacecraft with the Deep Space Network. Such measurements are made by tracking the Doppler effect with phase-locked loop receivers. A description of equipment and techniques as well as a summary of the appropriate mathematical models are given. The two-way Doppler shift is measured by transmitting a highly-stable microwave (uplink) carrier from a ground station, having the spacecraft coherently transpond this carrier, and using a phase-locked loop receiver at the ground station to track the returned (downlink) carrier. The largest sources of measurement error are usually plasma noise and thermal noise. The plasma noise, which may originate in the ionosphere or the solar corona, is discussed; and a technique to partially calibrate its effect, involving the use of two simultaneous downlink carriers that are coherently related, is described. Range measurements employing Doppler rate-aiding are also described.

  20. ICESat-2 Simulated Data from Airborne Altimetery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Neumann, T. A.; Markus, T.; Brenner, A. C.; Barbieri, K. A.; Field, C. T.; Sirota, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is scheduled to launch in 2015 and will carry onboard the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which represents a new approach to spaceborne determination of surface elevations. Specifically, the current ATLAS design is for a micropulse, multibeam, photon-counting laser altimeter with lower energy, a shorter pulse width, and a higher repetition rate relative to the Geoscience Laser Altimeter (GLAS), the instrument that was onboard ICESat. Given the new and untested technology associated with ATLAS, airborne altimetry data is necessary (1) to test the proposed ATLAS instrument geometry, (2) to validate instrument models, and (3) to assess the atmospheric effects on multibeam altimeters. We present an overview of the airborne instruments and datasets intended to address the ATLAS instrument concept, including data collected over Greenland (July 2009) using an airborne SBIR prototype 100 channel, photon-counting, terrain mapping altimeter, which addresses the first of these 3 scientific concerns. Additionally, we present the plan for further simulator data collection over vegetated and ice covered regions using Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), intended to address the latter two scientific concerns. As the ICESAT-2 project is in the design phase, the particular configuration of the ATLAS instrument may change. However, we expect this work to be relevant as long as ATLAS pursues a photon-counting approach.

  1. Mathematical Models for Doppler Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, William M.

    1987-01-01

    Error analysis increases precision of navigation. Report presents improved mathematical models of analysis of Doppler measurements and measurement errors of spacecraft navigation. To take advantage of potential navigational accuracy of Doppler measurements, precise equations relate measured cycle count to position and velocity. Drifts and random variations in transmitter and receiver oscillator frequencies taken into account. Mathematical models also adapted to aircraft navigation, radar, sonar, lidar, and interferometry.

  2. Novel instantaneous laser Doppler velocimeter.

    PubMed

    Avidor, J M

    1974-02-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter capable of directly measuring instantaneous velocities is described. The new LDV uses a novel detection technique based on the utilization of a static slightly defocused spherical Fabry-Perot interferometer used in conjunction with a special mask for the detection of instantaneous Doppler frequency shifts. The essential characteristics of this LDV are discussed, and such a system recently developed is described. Results of turbulent flow measurements show good agreement with data obtained using hot wire anemometry.

  3. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  4. Adaptive spectral doppler estimation.

    PubMed

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence. The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch's method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out. Simulations in Field II for pulsating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior performance for short observation windows compared with the averaged periodogram. Computational costs and implementation details are also discussed.

  5. High Resolution Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Grant supported the development of an incoherent lidar system to measure winds and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. During this period the following activities occurred: (1) an active feedback system was developed to improve the laser frequency stability; (2) a detailed forward model of the instrument was developed to take into account many subtle effects, such as detector non-linearity; (3) a non-linear least squares inversion method was developed to recover the Doppler shift and aerosol backscatter without requiring assumptions about the molecular component of the signal; (4) a study was done of the effects of systematic errors due to multiple etalon misalignment. It was discovered that even for small offsets and high aerosol loadings, the wind determination can be biased by as much as 1 m/s. The forward model and inversion process were modified to account for this effect; and (5) the lidar measurements were validated using rawinsonde balloon measurements. The measurements were found to be in agreement within 1-2 m/s.

  6. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  7. Modeling the Performance of Direct-Detection Doppler Lidar Systems in Real Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew J.; Hart, William D.; McKay, Jack A.; Spinhirne, James D.

    1999-01-01

    Previous modeling of the performance of spaceborne direct-detection Doppler lidar systems has assumed extremely idealized atmospheric models. Here we develop a technique for modeling the performance of these systems in a more realistic atmosphere, based on actual airborne lidar observations. The resulting atmospheric model contains cloud and aerosol variability that is absent in other simulations of spaceborne Doppler lidar instruments. To produce a realistic simulation of daytime performance, we include solar radiance values that are based on actual measurements and are allowed to vary as the viewing scene changes. Simulations are performed for two types of direct-detection Doppler lidar systems: the double-edge and the multi-channel techniques. Both systems were optimized to measure winds from Rayleigh backscatter at 355 nm. Simulations show that the measurement uncertainty during daytime is degraded by only about 10-20% compared to nighttime performance, provided a proper solar filter is included in the instrument design.

  8. Analytical model of range-Doppler image of rough rotating cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Long-gang; Wu, Zhen-sen; Liao, Run-gui

    2013-09-01

    The technique of laser range-Doppler image has get growing attentions from aerospace and national defense experts. Recently, in laser range-Doppler image system, laser scatter feature has been used for target ranging and orientation. Laser range-Doppler image can identify the moving components of the aeroplane, and detect the moving disk and sphere. Meanwhile, it is also widely used in detection of the moving gesture of the aerospace, discover of the target micro-motion and the measurement of the local fluid velocity. The laser range-Doppler image of target is the pulse laser scatter feature of the rotating target, which can reflect the shape, attitude and surface material of the target. For instance, detection of the flight gesture of target, identification of the warhead, the rotation of structures in a target, and the target torsional state. An analytical model of laser range-Doppler image of cones rotating around their axes is proposed in this paper. The analytical model can provide the effects of geometric parameters, the roughness of the surface, attitude and pulse duration on laser range-Doppler image. This analytical model can degenerate into the analytical model of Doppler spectra for plane waves. The influences of geometry parameters and attitude are analyzed numerically by using the analytical model. The results indicate that the laser range-Doppler image of cone can show the information about geometrical shape and attitude of target. Combining the theory and measurements, the analytical model can be used for identifying physical parameters and geometrical parameters of cone. This analytical solution may contribute to the laser Doppler velocimetry and ladar applications.

  9. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  10. Summary of flight tests of an airborne lighting locator system and comparison with ground-based measurements of precipitation and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, B. D.; Crabill, N. L.

    1981-01-01

    Data from an airborne lightning locator system and data relating to storm intensity obtained by ground-based Doppler radars and the S-band research radar are presented. When comparing lightning locations from the airborne lightning locator system with ground-based Doppler radar measurements of reflectivity and spectrum width, the lightning locations tended to be further from the aircraft position than the Doppler radar contours, but at the same relative bearing from the aircraft as the Doppler contours. The results also show that convective storms generate little or no lightning for a significant part of their life cycle, but can produce at least moderate turbulence. Therefore, it is concluded that a lack of lightning activity cannot be accepted as an inference of a corresponding lack of other hazards to the flight of aircraft through convective storms.

  11. Pulse Oximeter Derived Blood Pressure Measurement in Patients With a Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lane, Kathleen A; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Munson, Sarah D; Pickrell, Jeanette; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2016-10-26

    Currently, blood pressure (BP) measurement is obtained noninvasively in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) by placing a Doppler probe over the brachial or radial artery with inflation and deflation of a manual BP cuff. We hypothesized that replacing the Doppler probe with a finger-based pulse oximeter can yield BP measurements similar to the Doppler derived mean arterial pressure (MAP). We conducted a prospective study consisting of patients with contemporary continuous flow LVADs. In a small pilot phase I inpatient study, we compared direct arterial line measurements with an automated blood pressure (ABP) cuff, Doppler and pulse oximeter derived MAP. Our main phase II study included LVAD outpatients with a comparison between Doppler, ABP, and pulse oximeter derived MAP. A total of five phase I and 36 phase II patients were recruited during February-June 2014. In phase I, the average MAP measured by pulse oximeter was closer to arterial line MAP rather than Doppler (P = 0.06) or ABP (P < 0.01). In phase II, pulse oximeter MAP (96.6 mm Hg) was significantly closer to Doppler MAP (96.5 mm Hg) when compared to ABP (82.1 mm Hg) (P = 0.0001). Pulse oximeter derived blood pressure measurement may be as reliable as Doppler in patients with continuous flow LVADs.

  12. Airborne lidar detection of subsurface oceanic scattering layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Krabill, William B.; Buntzen, Rodney R.; Gilbert, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    The airborne lidar detection and cross-sectional mapping of submerged oceanic scattering layers are reported. The field experiment was conducted in the Atlantic Ocean southeast of Assateague Island, VA. NASA's Airborne Oceanographic Lidar was operated in the bathymetric mode to acquire on-wavelength 532-nm depth-resolved backscatter signals from shelf/slope waters. Unwanted laser pulse reflection from the air-water interface was minimized by spatial filtering and off-nadir operation. The presence of thermal stratification over the shelf was verified by the deployment of airborne expendable bathythermographs. Optical beam transmission measurements acquired from a surface truthing vessel indicated the presence of a layer of turbid water near the sea floor over the inner portion of the shelf.

  13. Overview of the first Multicenter Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment: conversion of a ground-based lidar for airborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, James N.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Rothermel, Jeffrey; Menzies, Robert T.

    1996-11-01

    The first Multi center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) field experiment demonstrated an airborne high energy TEA CO2 Doppler lidar system for measurement of atmospheric wind fields and aerosol structure. The system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 during September 1995 in a series of checkout flights to observe several important atmospheric phenomena, including upper level winds in a Pacific hurricane, marine boundary layer winds, cirrus cloud properties, and land-sea breeze structure. The instrument, with its capability to measure 3D winds and backscatter fields, promises to be a valuable tool for climate and global change, severe weather, and air quality research. In this paper, we describe the airborne instrument, assess its performance, discuss future improvements, and show some preliminary results from the September experiments.

  14. Overview of the first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment: Conversion of a ground-based lidar for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.N.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    The first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) field experiment demonstrated an airborne high energy TEA CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar system for measurement of atmospheric wind fields and aerosol structure. The system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 during September 1995 in a series of checkout flights to observe several important atmospheric phenomena, including upper level winds in a Pacific hurricane, marine boundary layer winds, cirrus cloud properties, and land-sea breeze structure. The instrument, with its capability to measure three-dimensional winds and backscatter fields, promises to be a valuable tool for climate and global change, severe weather, and air quality research. In this paper, the authors describe the airborne instrument, assess its performance, discuss future improvements, and show some preliminary results from September experiments.

  15. Airborne Intercept Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Primary mirror of Zerodur with Pilkington 747 coating • FOV = 0.104 degrees Airborne Intercept Monitoring RTO-MP-SET-105 16 - 3 UNCLASSIFIED...Pointing System (SPS). The STS is a 0.75 meter aperture Mersenne Cassegrain telescope and the SAT is a 0.34 meter aperture 3- mirror anastigmat telescope...UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED • Air Flow to Mitigate Thermal “Seeing” Effects • Light weighted primary mirror to reduce mass The SAT

  16. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  17. Airborne Infrared Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.

    2017-01-01

    A unique program of infrared astronomical observations from aircraft evolved at NASA’s Ames Research Center, beginning in the 1960s. Telescopes were flown on a Convair 990, a Lear Jet, and a Lockheed C-141 - the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) - leading to the planning and development of SOFIA: a 2.7 m telescope now flying on a Boeing 747SP. The poster describes these telescopes and highlights of some of the scientific results obtained from them.

  18. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D [Menan, ID; Schmitt, Michael J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Warren F [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  19. Robust population transfer in atomic beams induced by Doppler shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unanyan, R. G.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of photon momentum recoil on adiabatic population transfer in an atomic three-level lambda system is studied. It is shown that the Doppler frequency shifts, due to atomic motion, can play an important role in adiabatic population transfer processes of atomic internal states by a pair of laser fields. For the limiting case of slow atoms (Doppler shift much smaller than the photon recoil energy), the atoms occupy the same target state regardless of the order of switching of laser fields, while for the case of fast atoms interacting with the intuitive sequence of pulses, the target state is the intermediate atomic state. Furthermore, it is shown that this novel technique for adiabatic population transfer is related to a level crossing in the bright-intermediate state basis (rather than in the original atomic basis). It is shown that these processes are robust with respect to parameter fluctuations, such as the laser pulse area and the relative spatial offset (delay) of the laser beams. The obtained results can be used for the control of temporal evolution of atomic populations in cold atomic beams by externally adjustable Doppler shifts.

  20. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  1. [Echocardiographic and Doppler echocardiographic characterization of left ventricular diastolic function].

    PubMed

    Muscholl, M; Dennig, K; Kraus, F; Rudolph, W

    1990-12-01

    For noninvasive assessment of diastolic ventricular function, in addition to echocardiography, more recently, in particular, Doppler echocardiography has been employed. M-mode echocardiogram velocity curves for diameter changes as well as Doppler-echocardiographically registered velocity curves of mitral flow characterize the temporal changes of diastolic flow into the left ventricle. They represent the overall result of factors which influence diastolic filling and are functions of the temporal course of the pressure difference between left atrium and left ventricle. Registration of M-mode and Doppler echocardiograms: For determination of M-mode parameters which should describe left ventricular diastolic function, in addition to the motion of the mitral valve, the left ventricular contours of septum and posterior wall between mitral leaflets and papillary muscles are recorded together with the ECG. For evaluation of the index of atrial emptying, an M-mode registration is obtained from the region of the aortic root. Determination of the Doppler echocardiographic parameters is based on analysis of the blood flow velocity in the region of the mitral valve in the apical four-chamber view with the pulsed Doppler method. Additionally, simultaneous to the Doppler curve, a phonocardiogram is registered or, alternatively, a continuous-wave Doppler registration is obtained which delineates the left ventricular outflow signal and the artefact of mitral valve opening. Parameters for characterization of left ventricular diastolic filling: The first peak of the velocity curve of the diameter change in the M-mode echocardiogram corresponds with the maximal diameter change resulting from early-diastolic filling and the second peak with the maximal diameter change of the left ventricle associated with atrial filling. From this curve as well as the diameter curve relative to time and the mitral valve motion, the times for isovolumetric relaxation as well as the rapid, slow and

  2. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  3. The Multi-Center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor, MACAWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Menzies, Robert T.; Howell, James; Johnson, Steven C.; Tratt, David M.; Olivier, Lisa D.; Banta, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    In 1992 the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory began a joint collaboration to develop an airborne high-energy Doppler laser radar (lidar) system for atmospheric research and satellite validation and simulation studies. The result is the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor, MACAWS, which has the capability to remotely sense the distribution of wind and absolute aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A factor critical to the programmatic feasibility and technical success of this collaboration has been the utilization of existing components and expertise which were developed for previous atmospheric research by the respective institutions. The motivation for the MACAWS program Is three-fold: to obtain fundamental measurements of sub-synoptic scale processes and features which may be used as a basis to improve sub-grid scale parameterizations in large-scale models; to obtain similar datasets in order to improve the understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to validate (simulate) the performance of existing (planned) satellite-borne sensors. Examples of the latter include participation in the validation of the NASA Scatterometer and the assessment of prospective satellite Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurement. Initial flight tests were made in September 1995; subsequent flights were made in June 1996 following improvements. This paper describes the MACAWS instrument, principles of operation, examples of measurements over the eastern Pacific Ocean and western United States, and future applications.

  4. Estimation of physiological sub-millimeter displacement with CW Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Jia Xu; Xiaomeng Gao; Padasdao, Bryson E; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Doppler radar physiological sensing has been studied for non-contact detection of vital signs including respiratory and heartbeat rates. This paper presents the first micrometer resolution Wi-Fi band Doppler radar for sub-millimeter physiological displacement measurement. A continuous-wave Doppler radar working at 2.4GHz is used for the measurement. It is intended for estimating small displacements on the body surface resulting from physiological activity. A mechanical mover was used as target, and programmed to conduct sinusoidal motions to simulate pulse motions. Measured displacements were compared with a reference system, which indicates a superior performance in accuracy for having absolute errors less than 10μm, and relative errors below 4%. It indicates the feasibility of highly accurate non-contact monitoring of physiological movements using Doppler radar.

  5. Doppler centroid estimation ambiguity for synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Y.; Curlander, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    A technique for estimation of the Doppler centroid of an SAR in the presence of large uncertainty in antenna boresight pointing is described. Also investigated is the image degradation resulting from data processing that uses an ambiguous centroid. Two approaches for resolving ambiguities in Doppler centroid estimation (DCE) are presented: the range cross-correlation technique and the multiple-PRF (pulse repetition frequency) technique. Because other design factors control the PRF selection for SAR, a generalized algorithm is derived for PRFs not containing a common divisor. An example using the SIR-C parameters illustrates that this algorithm is capable of resolving the C-band DCE ambiguities for antenna pointing uncertainties of about 2-3 deg.

  6. Investigations of spectral resolution and angle dependency in a 2-D tracking Doppler method.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, Tonje D; Avdal, Jorgen; Ekroll, Ingvild K; Dahl, Torbjorn; Lovstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans

    2014-07-01

    An important source of error in velocity measurements from conventional pulsed wave (PW) Doppler is the angle used for velocity calibration. Because there are great uncertainties and interobserver variability in the methods used for Doppler angle correction in the clinic today, it is desirable to develop new and more robust methods. In this work, we have investigated how a previously presented method, 2-D tracking Doppler, depends on the tracking angle. A signal model was further developed to include tracking along any angle, providing velocity spectra which showed good agreement with both experimental data and simulations. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) bandwidth and the peak value of predicted power spectra were calculated for varying tracking angles. It was shown that the spectra have lowest bandwidth and maximum power when the tracking angle is equal to the beam-to-flow angle. This may facilitate new techniques for velocity calibration, e.g., by manually adjusting the tracking angle, while observing the effect on the spectral display. An in vitro study was performed in which the Doppler angles were predicted by the minimum FWHM and the maximum power of the 2-D tracking Doppler spectra for 3 different flow angles. The estimated Doppler angles had an overall error of 0.24° ± 0.75° when using the minimum FWHM. With an in vivo example, it was demonstrated that the 2-D tracking Doppler method is suited for measurements in a patient with carotid stenosis.

  7. The application of coded excitation technology in medical ultrasonic Doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng; Chen, Xiaodong; Bao, Jing; Yu, Daoyin

    2008-03-01

    Medical ultrasonic Doppler imaging is one of the most important domains of modern medical imaging technology. The application of coded excitation technology in medical ultrasonic Doppler imaging system has the potential of higher SNR and deeper penetration depth than conventional pulse-echo imaging system, it also improves the image quality, and enhances the sensitivity of feeble signal, furthermore, proper coded excitation is beneficial to received spectrum of Doppler signal. Firstly, this paper analyzes the application of coded excitation technology in medical ultrasonic Doppler imaging system abstractly, showing the advantage and bright future of coded excitation technology, then introduces the principle and the theory of coded excitation. Secondly, we compare some coded serials (including Chirp and fake Chirp signal, Barker codes, Golay's complementary serial, M-sequence, etc). Considering Mainlobe Width, Range Sidelobe Level, Signal-to-Noise Ratio and sensitivity of Doppler signal, we choose Barker codes as coded serial. At last, we design the coded excitation circuit. The result in B-mode imaging and Doppler flow measurement coincided with our expectation, which incarnated the advantage of application of coded excitation technology in Digital Medical Ultrasonic Doppler Endoscope Imaging System.

  8. Ground and Airborne Methane Measurements with an Optical Parametric Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    We report on ground and airborne atmospheric methane measurements with a differential absorption lidar using an optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Methane is a strong greenhouse gas on Earth and its accurate global mapping is urgently needed to understand climate change. We are developing a nanosecond-pulsed OPA for remote measurements of methane from an Earth-orbiting satellite. We have successfully demonstrated the detection of methane on the ground and from an airplane at approximately 11-km altitude.

  9. The Retrieval of Vertical Air Motion from an Airborne W-Band using Mie Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, E.; Albrecht, B. A.; Kollias, P.

    2010-12-01

    Raindrops have diameters comparable to the wavelength (3.2 mm) of a 95-GHz radar. As a result, the Rayleigh scattering approximation is not valid and the full Mie scattering theory is required to explain the oscillations of the backscattering cross section between successive peaks and valleys as a function of the raindrop diameter. At radar wavelengths of 3 mm, the first minimum in the backscattering cross section occurs at a raindrop diameter equals to 1.7 mm. Since raindrop diameters often exceed this size, these oscillations are captured in the radar Doppler spectrum and thus can be used as reference for the retrieval of the vertical air motion. This technique, which has been successfully developed for surface-based radars, is applied to radar Doppler spectra from an airborne, upward pointing W-band radar operated during the Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment (BACEX) from precipitating cumulus. Before the technique is applied to the airborne W-band radar data, the observed Doppler velocities are corrected for aircraft motions and attitude as recorded by the aircraft navigation system. The first order corrections to the vertical component of the Doppler velocity involve the pitch and speed of the aircraft and the vertical motion of aircraft itself for the radar operating in an upward pointing configuration. The vertical air velocity can then be deduced form the difference between the terminal velocity of a raindrop with a diameter of 1.7mm and the value of observed first minimum in the Doppler spectrum. An air density correction for the terminal velocity is made using the mean profile of density. The vertical air velocity retrieved from the technique is extrapolated to the level of aircraft (the radar has a dead zone of approximately ~50m) for comparison with the vertical air motion obtained from the aircraft sensors. Possible applications of this technique for airborne observations of the vertical profiles of air vertical velocities and the relative drop

  10. Compact and Rugged Transceiver for Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Applications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Trieu, Bo C.; Modlin, Ed A.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Reithmaier, Karl; Petzar, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    High-accuracy, vertical profiles of the horizontal vector wind in earth s atmosphere, with the global coverage of an orbiting sensor, are a highly desired measurement of NASA, NOAA, and many other agencies and countries. It is the consensus of NASA and NOAA that the most cost effective, lowest risk measurement method with the earliest achievable mission date is the hybrid Doppler lidar method which utilizes both coherent- and direct-detection Doppler lidars to obtain the desired profiles. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has advanced the 2-micron pulsed solid-state laser greatly over the past 15 years and has recently demonstrated 1.2 J of pulse energy whereas the requirement for a 400-km hybrid Doppler lidar mission is only 0.25 J. The IIP project reported here is an effort to increase the ruggedness and to compactly package the LaRC state-of-the-art laser technology.

  11. Arterial pulse shape measurement using self-mixing effect in a diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, J; Myllylae, Risto; Sorvoja, H; Miettinen, J

    2002-11-30

    The self-mixing effect in a diode laser and the Doppler technique are used for quantitative measurements of the cardiovascular pulses from radial arteries of human individuals. 738 cardiovascular pulses from 10 healthy volunteers were studied. The Doppler spectrograms reconstructed from the Doppler signal, which is measured from the radial displacement of the radial artery, are compared to the first derivative of the blood pressure signals measured from the middle finger by the Penaz technique. The mean correlation coefficient between the Doppler spectrograms and the first derivative of the blood pressure signals was 0.84, with a standard deviation of 0.05. Pulses with the correlation coefficient less than 0.7 were neglected in the study. Percentage of successfully detected pulses was 95.7%. It is shown that cardiovascular pulse shape from the radial artery can be measured noninvasively by using the self-mixing interferometry. (laser biology and medicine)

  12. Doppler Ultrasound: What Is It Used for?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your neck (carotid artery stenosis) A Doppler ultrasound can estimate how fast blood flows by measuring the rate of change in its pitch (frequency). During a Doppler ultrasound, a technician trained in ultrasound imaging (sonographer) presses ...

  13. Right Ventricular Tissue Doppler in Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ebert, Douglas; Martin, David S.; Barratt, Michael R.; Martin, David S.; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The presentation slides review normal physiology of the right ventricle in space, general physiology of the right ventricle; difficulties in imaging the heart in space, imaging methods, tissue Doppler spectrum, right ventricle tissue Doppler, and Rt Tei Index.

  14. Coherent Laser Spectroscopy and Doppler Lidar Sensing in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, J. M.

    The principles of coherent laser spectroscopy are briefly reviewed in which a signal beam is heterodyned with an optical local oscillator beam. The frequency and single mode selectivity this provides is shown to be very advantageous. This is illustrated by recent work on the properties of different classes of light field, including the fractal character of Gaussian-Lorentzian light, and by several aspects of laser physics. In equivalent practical applications to remote sensing in the atmosphere, coherent Doppler lidar provides a powerful technique. This is illustrated by measurements of wind fields and aircraft wake vortices. Airborne equipments have been used for measurements of true airspeed, wind shear warning and atmospheric backscatter levels. Future space-borne lidars could potentially measure the global wind field - of great benefit for numerical weather forecasting and climate studies.

  15. Understanding Doppler Broadening of Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Sullivan, John P.

    2014-07-03

    Doppler-broadened gamma ray peaks are observed routinely in the collection and analysis of gamma-ray spectra. If not recognized and understood, the appearance of Doppler broadening can complicate the interpretation of a spectrum and the correct identification of the gamma ray-emitting material. We have conducted a study using a simulation code to demonstrate how Doppler broadening arises and provide a real-world example in which Doppler broadening is found. This report describes that study and its results.

  16. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  17. The Doppler Effect--A New Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the Doppler effect as it applies to different situations, such as a stationary source of sound with the observer moving, a stationary observer, and the sound source and observer both moving. Police radar, satellite surveillance radar, radar astronomy, and the Doppler navigator, are discussed as applications of Doppler shift. (JR)

  18. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  19. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  20. Doppler Imaging of EI Eridani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washuettl, Albert; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Collier-Cameron, Andrew

    We present Doppler images of the rapidly rotating active close binary star EI Eridani. Several Doppler images have been produced since 1984 making use of different versions of the Doppler imaging technique. They all show high-latitude spots surrounding or covering the rotational pole as well as some smaller spots on lower latitudes. The high-latitude/polar spot seems to be long-lived (at least a decade) but changes its shape on comparatively short timescales (of the order of one month). From time to time spots along the stellar equator also occur, but their lifetimes tend to be relatively short (weeks). Furthermore, long-term photometric observations revealed the existence of a magnetic cycle which has been estimated to be around 11 years. We also present time-resolved Doppler images from EI Eri obtained at McMath/NSO in fall 1996 during 70 consecutive nights. The final aim of this program is to investigate the spot evolution over the whole activity cycle.

  1. Study on characteristics of chirp about Doppler wind lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Li-fang; Yang, Guo-tao; Wang, Ji-hong; Yue, Chuan; Chen, Lin-xiang

    2016-11-01

    In the doppler wind lidar, usually every 4MHz frequency error will produce wind error of 1m/s of 532nm laser. In the Doppler lidar system, frequency stabilization was achieved through absorption of iodine molecules. Commands that control the instrumental system were based on the PID algorithm and coded using VB language. The frequency of the seed laser was locked to iodine molecular absorption line 1109 which is close to the upper edge of the absorption range, with long-time (>4h) frequency-locking accuracy being≤0.5MHz and long-time frequency stability being 10-9 . The experimental result indicated that the seed frequency and the pulse laser frequency have a deviation, which effect is called the laser chirp characteristics. Finally chirp test system was constructed and tested the frequency offset in time. And such frequency deviation is known as Chirp of the laser pulse. The real-time measured frequency difference of the continuous and pulsed lights was about 10MHz, long-time stability deviation was around 5MHz. After experimental testing technology mature, which can monitoring the signal at long-term with corrected the wind speed.

  2. Modeling of Doppler frequency shift in multipath radiochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzin, Maksim; Iyin, Nikolay

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the modeling of propagation of a quasi-monochromatic radio signal, represented by a coherent pulse sequence, in a non-stationary multipath radio channel. In such a channel, signal propagation results in the observed frequency shift for each ray (Doppler effect). The modeling is based on the assumption that during propagation of a single pulse a channel can be considered stationary. A phase change in the channel transfer function is shown to cause the observed frequency shift in the received signal. Thus, instead of measuring the Doppler frequency shift, we can measure the rate of change in the mean phase of one pulse relative to another. The modeling is carried out within the framework of the method of normal waves. The method enables us to model the dynamics of the electromagnetic field at a given point with the required accuracy. The modeling reveals that a local change in ionospheric conditions more severely affects the rays whose reflection region is in the area where the changes occur.

  3. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  4. 315mJ, 2-micrometers Double-Pulsed Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Transmitter for Atmospheric CO2 Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Koch, Grady; Chen, Songsheng; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The design of a double pulsed, injection seeded, 2-micrometer compact coherent Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) transmitter for CO2 sensing is presented. This system is hardened for ground and airborne applications. The design architecture includes three continuous wave lasers which provide controlled on and off line seeding, injection seeded power oscillator and a single amplifier operating in double pass configuration. As the derivative a coherent Doppler wind lidar, this instrument has the added benefit of providing wind information. The active laser material used for this application is a Ho: Tm:YLF crystal operates at the eye-safe wavelength. The 3-meter long folded ring resonator produces energy of 130-mJ (90/40) with a temporal pulse length around 220 nanoseconds and 530 nanosecond pulses for on and off lines respectively. The separation between the two pulses is on the order of 200 microseconds. The line width is in the order of 2.5MHz and the beam quality has an M(sup 2) of 1.1 times diffraction limited beam. A final output energy for a pair of both on and off pulses as high as 315 mJ (190/125) at a repetition rate of 10 Hz is achieved. The operating temperature is set around 20 C for the pump diode lasers and 10 C for the rod. Since the laser design has to meet high-energy as well as high beam quality requirements, close attention is paid to the laser head design to avoid thermal distortion in the rod. A side-pumped configuration is used and heat is removed uniformly by passing coolant through a tube slightly larger than the rod to reduce thermal gradient. This paper also discusses the advantage of using a long upper laser level life time laser crystal for DIAL application. In addition issues related to injection seeding with two different frequencies to achieve a transform limited line width will be presented.

  5. Airborne Interferometry using GNSS Reflections for Surface Level Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmling, Maximilian; Beyerle, Georg; Schön, Steffen; Stosius, Ralf; Gerber, Thomas; Beckheinrich, Jamila; Markgraf, Markus; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The interferometric use of GNSS reflections for ocean altimetry can fill the gap in coverage of ocean observations. Today radar altimeters are used for large scale ocean observations to monitor e.g. global sea level change or circulation processes like El Niño. Spacial and temporal resolution of a single radar altimeter, however, is insufficient to observe mesoscale ocean phenomena like large oceanic eddies that are important indicators of climate change. The high coverage expected for a spaceborne altimeter based on GNSS reflections stimulated investigations on according interferometric methods. Several airborne experiments have been conducted using code observations. Carrier observations have a better precision but are severely affected by noise and have mostly been used in ground-based experiments. A new interferometric approach is presented using carrier observations for airborne application. Implementing a spectral retrieval noise reduction is achieved. A flight experiment was conducted with a Zeppelin airship on 2010/10/12 over Lake Constance at the border between Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The lake surface with an area of 536km2 is suitable for altimetric study as its decimeter range Geoid undulations are well-known. Three GNSS receiver were installed on the airship. A Javad Delta receiver recording direct signals for navigation. The DLR G-REX receiver recording reflected signals for scatterometry and the GORS (GNSS Occultation Reflectometry Scatterometry) receiver recording direct and reflected signals for interferometry. The airship's trajectory is determined from navigation data with a precision better than 10cm using regional augmentation. This presentation focuses on the interferometric analysis of GORS observations. Ray tracing calculations are used to model the difference of direct and reflected signals' path. Spectral retrieval is applied to determine Doppler residuals of modelled path difference and interferometric observations. Lake level

  6. Alternative analysis of airborne laser data collected within conventional multi-parameter airborne geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl, Andreas; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.; Schattauer, I.

    2010-05-01

    For the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry as well as airborne electromagnetics it is of great importance to determine the distance between the geophysical sensor and the ground surface. Since radar altimeters do not penetrate vegetation, laser altimeters became popular in airborne geophysics over the past years. Currently the airborne geophysical platform of the Geological Survey of Austria (GBA) is equipped with a Riegl LD90-3800VHS-FLP high resolution laser altimeter, measuring the distances according to the first and the last reflected pulse. The goal of the presented study was to explore the possibilities of deriving additional information about the survey area from the laser data and to determine the accuracy of such results. On one hand the difference between the arrival time of the first and the last reflected pulse can be used to determine the height of the vegetation. This parameter is for example important for the correction of damping effects on airborne gamma-ray measurements caused by vegetation. Moreover especially for groundwater studies at catchment scale, this parameter can also be applied to support the spatial assessment of evapotranspiration. In combination with the altitude above geoid, determined by a GPS receiver, a rough digital elevation model of the survey area can be derived from the laser altimetry. Based on a data set from a survey area in the northern part of Austria, close to the border with the Czech Republic, the reliability of such a digital elevation model and the calculated vegetation height was tested. In this study a mean deviation of -1.4m, with a standard deviation of ±3.4m, between the digital elevation model from Upper Austria (25m spatial resolution) and the determined elevation model was determined. We also found an obvious correlation between the calculated vegetation heights greater 15m and the mapped forest published by the ‘Department of Forest Inventory' of the ‘Federal Forest Office' of Austria

  7. Hybrid space-airborne bistatic SAR geometric resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moccia, Antonio; Renga, Alfredo

    2009-09-01

    Performance analysis of Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) characterized by arbitrary geometric configurations is usually complex and time-consuming since system impulse response has to be evaluated by bistatic SAR processing. This approach does not allow derivation of general equations regulating the behaviour of image resolutions with varying the observation geometry. It is well known that for an arbitrary configuration of bistatic SAR there are not perpendicular range and azimuth directions, but the capability to produce an image is not prevented as it depends only on the possibility to generate image pixels from time delay and Doppler measurements. However, even if separately range and Doppler resolutions are good, bistatic SAR geometries can exist in which imaging capabilities are very poor when range and Doppler directions become locally parallel. The present paper aims to derive analytical tools for calculating the geometric resolutions of arbitrary configuration of bistatic SAR. The method has been applied to a hybrid bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar formed by a spaceborne illuminator and a receiving-only airborne forward-looking Synthetic Aperture Radar (F-SAR). It can take advantage of the spaceborne illuminator to dodge the limitations of monostatic FSAR. Basic modeling and best illumination conditions have been detailed in the paper.

  8. Qualification Testing of Laser Diode Pump Arrays for a Space-Based 2-micron Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers being considered as the transmitter source for space-based coherent Doppler lidar require high power laser diode pump arrays operating in a long pulse regime of about 1 msec. Operating laser diode arrays over such long pulses drastically impact their useful lifetime due to the excessive localized heating and substantial pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling of their active regions. This paper describes the long pulse performance of laser diode arrays and their critical thermal characteristics. A viable approach is then offered that allows for determining the optimum operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  9. Spread-Spectrum Beamforming and Clutter Filtering for Plane-Wave Color Doppler Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Omar; Poepping, Tamie L; Lacefield, James C

    2016-07-21

    Plane-wave imaging is desirable for its ability to achieve high frame rates, allowing the capture of fast dynamic events and continuous Doppler data. In most implementations of plane-wave imaging, multiple low-resolution images from different plane wave tilt angles are compounded to form a single high-resolution image, thereby reducing the frame rate. Compounding improves the lateral beam profile in the high-resolution image, but it also acts as a low-pass filter in slow time that causes attenuation and aliasing of signals with high Doppler shifts. This paper introduces a spread-spectrum color Doppler imaging method that produces high-resolution images without the use of compounding, thereby eliminating the tradeoff between beam quality, maximum unaliased Doppler frequency, and frame rate. The method uses a long, random sequence of transmit angles rather than a linear sweep of plane wave directions. The random angle sequence randomizes the phase of off-focus (clutter) signals, thereby spreading the clutter power in the Doppler spectrum, while keeping the spectrum of the in-focus signal intact. The ensemble of randomly tilted low-resolution frames also acts as the Doppler ensemble, so it can be much longer than a conventional linear sweep, thereby improving beam formation while also making the slow-time Doppler sampling frequency equal to the pulse repetition frequency. Experiments performed using a carotid artery phantom with constant flow demonstrate that the spread-spectrum method more accurately measures the parabolic flow profile of the vessel and outperforms conventional plane-wave Doppler in both contrast resolution and estimation of high flow velocities. The spread-spectrum method is expected to be valuable for Doppler applications that require measurement of high velocities at high frame rates.

  10. The New Airborne Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Community air pollution is the new airborne disease of our generation's communities. It is caused by the increasing use of fuel, associated with both affluence and careless waste. Photochemical air pollution of the California type involves newly defined atmospheric reactions, is due mostly to motor vehicle exhaust, is oxidizing, and produces ozone, plant damage, impairment of visibility and eye and respiratory symptoms. Aggravation of asthma, impairment of lung function among persons with chronic respiratory disease and a possible causal role, along with cigarette smoking in emphysema and chronic bronchitis, are some of the effects of photochemical pollution. More subtle effects of pollution include impairment of oxygen transport by the blood due to carbon monoxide and interference with porphyrin metabolism due to lead. Carbon monoxide exposures may affect survival of patients who are in hospitals because of myocardial infarction. While many uncertainties in pollution-health reactions need to be resolved, a large number of people in California have health impairment due to airborne disease of this new type. PMID:5485227

  11. Even Shallower Exploration with Airborne Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Kirkegaard, C.; Nyboe, N. S.; Sørensen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne electromagnetics (EM) is in many ways undergoing the same type rapid technological development as seen in the telecommunication industry. These developments are driven by a steadily increasing demand for exploration of minerals, groundwater and geotechnical targets. The latter two areas demand shallow and accurate resolution of the near surface geology in terms of both resistivity and spatial delineation of the sedimentary layers. Airborne EM systems measure the grounds electromagnetic response when subject to either a continuous discrete sinusoidal transmitter signal (frequency domain) or by measuring the decay of currents induced in the ground by rapid transmission of transient pulses (time domain). In the last decade almost all new developments of both instrument hardware and data processing techniques has focused around time domain systems. Here we present a concept for measuring the time domain response even before the transient transmitter current has been turned off. Our approach relies on a combination of new instrument hardware and novel modeling algorithms. The newly developed hardware allows for measuring the instruments complete transfer function which is convolved with the synthetic earth response in the inversion algorithm. The effect is that earth response data measured while the transmitter current is turned off can be included in the inversion, significantly increasing the amount of available information. We demonstrate the technique using both synthetic and field data. The synthetic examples provide insight on the physics during the turn off process and the field examples document the robustness of the method. Geological near surface structures can now be resolved to a degree that is unprecedented to the best of our knowledge, making airborne EM even more attractive and cost-effective for exploration of water and minerals that are crucial for the function of our societies.

  12. Retrieval of Snow and Rain From Combined X- and W-B and Airborne Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Gerald M.

    2008-01-01

    Two independent airborne dual-wavelength techniques, based on nadir measurements of radar reflectivity factors and Doppler velocities, respectively, are investigated with respect to their capability of estimating microphysical properties of hydrometeors. The data used to investigate the methods are taken from the ER-2 Doppler radar (X-band) and Cloud Radar System (W-band) airborne Doppler radars during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment campaign in 2002. Validity is assessed by the degree to which the methods produce consistent retrievals of the microphysics. For deriving snow parameters, the reflectivity-based technique has a clear advantage over the Doppler-velocity-based approach because of the large dynamic range in the dual-frequency ratio (DFR) with respect to the median diameter Do and the fact that the difference in mean Doppler velocity at the two frequencies, i.e., the differential Doppler velocity (DDV), in snow is small relative to the measurement errors and is often not uniquely related to Do. The DFR and DDV can also be used to independently derive Do in rain. At W-band, the DFR-based algorithms are highly sensitive to attenuation from rain, cloud water, and water vapor. Thus, the retrieval algorithms depend on various assumptions regarding these components, whereas the DDV-based approach is unaffected by attenuation. In view of the difficulties and ambiguities associated with the attenuation correction at W-band, the DDV approach in rain is more straightforward and potentially more accurate than the DFR method.

  13. Mechanism of relativistic Doppler reflection from a photoinduced moving plasma front studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Nanase; Itakura, Ryuji; Tsubouchi, Masaaki

    2016-10-01

    We applied terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy to reveal the mechanism of the relativistic Doppler reflection of THz light from a photoinduced plasma front in a silicon wafer. The frequency upshift caused by the Doppler reflection was identified by measurement of the reflected THz waveforms and compared to the calculated results obtained using the one-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. The relation between the energy density of the pump light and the frequency upshift was also explored. We found that the interaction time of the moving plasma front and the reflected THz pulse is a key factor in understanding the mechanism of the relativistic Doppler reflection.

  14. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging Applied to the Noninvasive and Quantitative Imaging of Blood Vessels in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, J.; Papadacci, C.; Demene, C.; Gennisson, J-L.; Tanter, M.; Pernot, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast Doppler Imaging was introduced as a technique to quantify blood flow in an entire 2-D field of view, expanding the field of application of ultrasound imaging to the highly sensitive anatomical and functional mapping of blood vessels. We have recently developed 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging, a technique that can produce thousands of ultrasound volumes per second, based on three-dimensional plane and diverging wave emissions, and demonstrated its clinical feasibility in human subjects in vivo. In this study, we show that non-invasive 3-D Ultrafast Power Doppler, Pulsed Doppler, and Color Doppler Imaging can be used to perform quantitative imaging of blood vessels in humans when using coherent compounding of three-dimensional tilted plane waves. A customized, programmable, 1024-channel ultrasound system was designed to perform 3-D Ultrafast Imaging. Using a 32X32, 3-MHz matrix phased array (Vermon, France), volumes were beamformed by coherently compounding successive tilted plane wave emissions. Doppler processing was then applied in a voxel-wise fashion. 3-D Ultrafast Power Doppler Imaging was first validated by imaging Tygon tubes of varying diameter and its in vivo feasibility was demonstrated by imaging small vessels in the human thyroid. Simultaneous 3-D Color and Pulsed Doppler Imaging using compounded emissions were also applied in the carotid artery and the jugular vein in one healthy volunteer. PMID:26276956

  15. Doppler Velocity Estimation Based on Spectral Characteristics of M-Sequence-Modulated Signals in Ultrasonic Measurement for Moving Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Pulse compression using maximum-length sequence (M-sequence) can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflected echo and distance resolution in the pulse-echo method. In the case of a moving object, however, the echo is modulated due to the Doppler effect. The Doppler-shifted M-sequence-modulated signal cannot be correlated with the reference signal, which corresponds to the transmitted M-sequence-modulated signal. Therefore, Doppler velocity estimation before the correlation and cross correlation of the received signal with Doppler-shifted reference signals has been proposed. In this paper, the proposed Doppler velocity estimation based on spectral characteristics of cyclic M-sequence-modulated signals is described. Then, the Doppler velocity estimation is evaluated based on computer simulations. The Doppler velocity can be estimated from the Fourier-transformed spectral density of cycles of the M-sequence-modulated signal with high resolution even in noisy environments. According to the evaluation, furthermore, the cycle number and the number of carrier waves in 1 digit of the M-sequence-modulated signal should be decreased to improve the resolution and accuracy when the length of the transmitted signal is determined.

  16. Mean velocities measured with the double pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.

    2004-10-01

    It was recently observed that double-pulse measurements of the mean velocities of a wide asymmetric spectrum are a function of the time lag between the pulses (Uspensky et al., 2004). Here we demonstrate that the observed relationship probably is influenced by the measurement technique in a way that is consistent with theoretical prediction. It is further shown that for small time lags the double pulse velocity is a good approximation to the mean Doppler velo-city.

  17. Dynamic spectrum of airborne gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Minato, S

    1990-04-01

    This note describes a method of direct measurement of airborne gamma-rays primarily from 222Rn daughters using a NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer with lead shields. This method has the advantage of being able to maintain the system easily compared to other usual systems including a pump. The pulse-height distributions are successively fed to a floppy disk in a personal computer every unit time. The gain shifts can be corrected automatically by a computer program. This technique would be applicable to the estimation of 222Rn daughters concentration and to examination of disequilibrium between 214Pb(RaB) and 214Bi(RaC) and of those height distribution up to about 200 m. The accuracy for estimating the concentration is as good as that of the filter method.

  18. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  19. Pulse transit time differential measurement by fiber Bragg grating pulse recorder.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Sharath; Padma, Srivani; Ambastha, Shikha; Kalegowda, Anand; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2015-05-01

    The present study reports a noninvasive technique for the measurement of the pulse transit time differential (PTTD) from the pulse pressure waveforms obtained at the carotid artery and radial artery using fiber Bragg grating pulse recorders (FBGPR). PTTD is defined as the time difference between the arrivals of a pulse pressure waveform at the carotid and radial arterial sites. The PTTD is investigated as an indicator of variation in the systolic blood pressure. The results are validated against blood pressure variation obtained from a Mindray Patient Monitor. Furthermore, the pulse wave velocity computed from the obtained PTTD is compared with the pulse wave velocity obtained from the color Doppler ultrasound system and is found to be in good agreement. The major advantage of the PTTD measurement via FBGPRs is that the data acquisition system employed can simultaneously acquire pulse pressure waveforms from both FBGPRs placed at carotid and radial arterial sites with a single time scale, which eliminates time synchronization complexity.

  20. Concepts and trade-offs in velocity estimation with plane-wave contrast-enhanced Doppler.

    PubMed

    Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Williams, Ross; Sheeran, Paul; Milot, Laurent; Bruce, Matthew; Burns, Peter

    2016-07-29

    While long Doppler ensembles are, in principle, beneficial for velocity estimates, short acoustic pulses must be used in microbubble contrast-enhanced Doppler to mitigate microbubble destruction. This introduces inherent trade-offs in velocity estimates with autocorrelators, which are studied here. A model of the autocorrelation function adapted to the microbubble Doppler signal, accounting for transit time, the echo frequency uncertainty and contrast-agent destruction is derived and validated in vitro. It is further demonstrated that a local measurement of the center frequency of the microbubble echo is essential in order to avoid significant bias in velocity estimates arising from the linear and nonlinear frequency-dependent scattering of microbubbles, and compensate the inherent speckle nature of the received echo frequency. For these reasons, broadband Doppler estimators (2D autocorrelator, Radon projection) are better suited than simpler narrowband estimators (1D autocorrelator, 1D Fourier transform) for contrast-enhanced flow assessment. A case study of perfusion in a VX-2 carcinoma using contrast-enhanced planewave Doppler is also shown. We demonstrate that even when considering all uncertainties associated with microbubble-related decorrelation (destruction, pulse bandwidth, transit time, flow gradient) and the need for real-time imaging, a coefficient of variation of 4% on the an axial velocity is achievable with planewave imaging.

  1. Concepts and Tradeoffs in Velocity Estimation With Plane-Wave Contrast-Enhanced Doppler.

    PubMed

    Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Williams, Ross; Sheeran, Paul S; Milot, Laurent; Bruce, Matthew; Burns, Peter N

    2016-11-01

    While long Doppler ensembles are, in principle, beneficial for velocity estimates, short acoustic pulses must be used in microbubble contrast-enhanced (CE) Doppler to mitigate microbubble destruction. This introduces inherent tradeoffs in velocity estimates with autocorrelators, which are studied here. A model of the autocorrelation function adapted to the microbubble Doppler signal accounting for transit time, the echo frequency uncertainty, and contrast-agent destruction is derived and validated in vitro. It is further demonstrated that a local measurement of the center frequency of the microbubble echo is essential in order to avoid significant bias in velocity estimates arising from the linear and nonlinear frequency-dependent scattering of microbubbles and compensate for the inherent speckle nature of the received echo frequency. For these reasons, broadband Doppler estimators (2-D autocorrelator and Radon projection) are better suited than simpler narrow-band estimators (1-D autocorrelator and 1-D Fourier transform) for CE flow assessment. A case study of perfusion in a VX-2 carcinoma using CE plane-wave Doppler is also shown. We demonstrate that even when considering all uncertainties associated with microbubble-related decorrelation (destruction, pulse bandwidth, transit time, and flow gradient) and the need for real-time imaging, a coefficient of variation of 4% on the axial velocity is achievable with plane-wave imaging.

  2. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  3. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  4. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  5. High-energy, efficient, 30-Hz ultraviolet laser sources for airborne ozone-lidar systems.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Khaled A; Chen, Songsheng; Petway, Larry B; Meadows, Byron L; Marsh, Waverly D; Edwards, William C; Barnes, James C; DeYoung, Russell J

    2002-05-20

    Two compact, high-pulse-energy, injection-seeded, 30-Hz frequency-doubled Nd:YAG-laser-pumped Ti: sapphire lasers were developed and operated at infrared wavelengths of 867 and 900 nm. Beams with laser pulse energy >30 mJ at ultraviolet wavelengths of 289 and 300 nm were generated through a tripling of the frequencies of these Ti:sapphire lasers. This work is directed at the replacement of dye lasers for use in an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar system. The ultraviolet pulse energy at 289 and 300 nm had 27% and 31% absolute optical energy conversion efficiencies from input pulse energies at 867 and 900 nm, respectively.

  6. A 10 cm dual frequency Doppler weather radar. Part 1: The radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, A. W.; Armstrong, G. M.

    1982-10-01

    Design concepts and test results are summarized for a Doppler weather radar system suitable for precipitation measurements over a wide span of radial velocities and slant ranges, even in the presence of ground clutter. The radar transmits two uniform pulse trains at 2.710 and 2.760 GHz. Uniformly spaced pulses permit ground clutter cancellation of up to 50 dB to be achieved with a three-pole elliptic filter. Pulse spacing at one frequency is consistent with long-range coverage in reflectivity, while spacing of the second is consistent with a wide unambiguous velocity measurement span.

  7. [Doppler echocardiographic diagnosis and evaluation of tricuspid regurgitation].

    PubMed

    Blanchard, D; Diébold, B; Guermonprez, J L; Chitour, Z; Née, M; Péronneau, P; Forman, J; Maurice, P

    1982-12-01

    The reliability of pulsed Doppler echocardiography in the diagnosis and quantification of tricuspid regurgitation was assessed by analysis of blood flow in the inferior vena cava in 28 patients. The inferior vena caval flow was sampled in the retrohepatic portion of the vessel from the subxiphoid region. Recordings from 10 normal patients were used to define criteria of normality. This was characterised by two anterograde components (one systolic and one diastolic); atrial contraction gave rise to an end diastolic retrograde component. In tricuspid incompetence, retrograde systolic blood flow was recorded. A Doppler index was calculated from the ratio of the maximal amplitude of systolic reflux to the maximal amplitude of anterograde diastolic flow. In the absence of tricuspid regurgitation, this index approximated 0. The average of this ratio over 10 consecutive beats was compared with the semi quantitative assessment of tricuspid regurgitation from selective right ventricular angiography. There were no false positive results, specificity was, therefore, 100 p. 100. Six minimal regurgitations were not detected: sensitivity was therefore 74 p. 100. All moderate and severe regurgitations were detected, and the sensitivity for these cases was 100 p. 100. There was a close correlation (R = 0,89, p less than 0,01) between the Doppler index and the degree of regurgitation assessed by selective right ventricular angiography.

  8. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Total recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.

  9. Atmospheric aerosol and Doppler lidar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeff; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Jarzembski, M.; Cutten, D.; Mccaul, E. W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies were performed of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and atmospheric dynamics with Doppler lidar as a primary tool. Activities include field and laboratory measurement and analysis efforts. The primary focus of activities related to understanding aerosol backscatter is the GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program. GLOBE is a multi-element effort designed toward developing a global aerosol model to describe tropospheric clean background backscatter conditions that Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) is likely to encounter. Two survey missions were designed and flown in the NASA DC-8 in November 1989 and May to June 1990 over the remote Pacific Ocean, a region where backscatter values are low and where LAWS wind measurements could make a major contribution. The instrument complement consisted of pulsed and continuous-wave (CW) CO2 gas and solid state lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, optical particle counters measuring aerosol concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition, a filter/impactor system collecting aerosol samples for subsequent analysis, and integrating nephelometers measuring visible scattering coefficients. The GLOBE instrument package and survey missions were carefully planned to achieve complementary measurements under clean background backscatter conditions.

  10. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    DOE PAGES

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; ...

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Totalmore » recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.« less

  11. Vector Doppler: spatial sampling analysis and presentation techniques for real-time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capineri, Lorenzo; Scabia, Marco; Masotti, Leonardo F.

    2001-05-01

    The aim of the vector Doppler (VD) technique is the quantitative reconstruction of a velocity field independently of the ultrasonic probe axis to flow angle. In particular vector Doppler is interesting for studying vascular pathologies related to complex blood flow conditions. Clinical applications require a real-time operating mode and the capability to perform Doppler measurements over a defined volume. The combination of these two characteristics produces a real-time vector velocity map. In previous works the authors investigated the theory of pulsed wave (PW) vector Doppler and developed an experimental system capable of producing off-line 3D vector velocity maps. Afterwards, for producing dynamic velocity vector maps, we realized a new 2D vector Doppler system based on a modified commercial echograph. The measurement and presentation of a vector velocity field requires a correct spatial sampling that must satisfy the Shannon criterion. In this work we tackled this problem, establishing a relationship between sampling steps and scanning system characteristics. Another problem posed by the vector Doppler technique is the data representation in real-time that should be easy to interpret for the physician. With this in mine we attempted a multimedia solution that uses both interpolated images and sound to represent the information of the measured vector velocity map. These presentation techniques were experimented for real-time scanning on flow phantoms and preliminary measurements in vivo on a human carotid artery.

  12. UWB micro-doppler radar for human gait analysis using joint range-time-frequency representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yazhou; Fathy, Aly E.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel, standalone ultra wideband (UWB) micro-Doppler radar sensor that goes beyond simple range or micro-Doppler detection to combined range-time-Doppler frequency analysis. Moreover, it can monitor more than one human object in both line-of-sight (LOS) and through wall scenarios, thus have full human objects tracking capabilities. The unique radar design is based on narrow pulse transceiver, high speed data acquisition module, and wideband antenna array. For advanced radar post-data processing, joint range-time-frequency representation has been performed. Characteristics of human walking activity have been analyzed using the radar sensor by precisely tracking the radar object and acquiring range-time-Doppler information simultaneously. The UWB micro-Doppler radar prototype is capable of detecting Doppler frequency range from -180 Hz to +180 Hz, which allows a maximum target velocity of 9 m/s. The developed radar sensor can also be extended for many other applications, such as respiration and heartbeat detection of trapped survivors under building debris.

  13. Development of quantitative Doppler indices for uteroplacental and fetal blood flow during the third trimester.

    PubMed

    Joern, H; Funk, A; Goetz, M; Kuehlwein, H; Klein, A; Fendel, H

    1996-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe the development of uteroplacental and fetal blood flow during the third trimester. Doppler examination was carried out on 393 uncomplicated pregnancies with uncomplicated term delivery. Using a pulsed color Doppler, we calculated the maximum systolic, mean and maximum end-diastolic velocity after correcting the angle of insonation. Patients under tocolysis or other medication influencing blood flow parameters were excluded from this cross-sectional study. Summarizing the results gained by Doppler ultrasound investigation of the uteroplacental and fetal blood vessels, we created quantiles as quantitative Doppler indices for the maximum systolic, mean (TAMX = time averaged maximum velocity) and maximum end-diastolic velocity. The following conclusions could be drawn: (1) resistance to the blood flow in the maternal portion of the placenta does not change during the third trimester; (2) resistance to the blood flow on the fetal side of the placenta decreases up to week 42 of gestation; (3) cerebral vascular resistance decreases constantly up to gestational week 42; and (4) vascular resistance to the blood flow of the kidney decreases only slightly during the third trimester. This study offers clinically important values for quantitative Doppler flow velocimetry for the first time. We hope that our findings improve the usefulness of Doppler ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in obstetrical management.

  14. Ultrasound imaging for the rheumatologist. XVII. Role of colour Doppler and power Doppler.

    PubMed

    Iagnocco, A; Epis, O; Delle Sedie, A; Meenagh, G; Filippucci, E; Riente, L; Scirè, C A; Montecucco, C; Bombardieri, S; Grassi, W; Valesini, G

    2008-01-01

    The use of Doppler ultrasound in rheumatology has grown in recent years. This is partly due to the increasing number of rheumatologists who perform US in their daily clinical practise and also to the technological advances of US systems. Both colour Doppler and power Doppler are used to evaluate the degree of intra- and peri-articular soft tissue inflammation. Moreover, Doppler US has been found to be of help in the assessment of vascular pathologies such as the vasculitides. In this review we provide an update of the data regarding the use of colour Doppler and power Doppler in rheumatology.

  15. Pulse Oximetry

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.thoracic.org amount of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) that are in your blood. To get ... Also, a pulse oximeter does not measure your carbon dioxide level. How accurate is the pulse oximeter? ...

  16. Digital signal processor-based real-time optical Doppler tomography system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shikui; Piao, Daqing; Chen, Yueli; Zhu, Quing

    2004-01-01

    We present a real-time data-processing and display unit based on a custom-designed digital signal processor (DSP) module for imaging tissue structure and Doppler blood flow. The DSP module is incorporated into a conventional optical coherence tomography system. We also demonstrate the flexibility of embedding advanced Doppler processing algorithms in the DSP module. Two advanced velocity estimation algorithms previously introduced by us are incorporated in this DSP module. Experiments on Intralipid flow demonstrate that a pulsatile flow of several hundred pulses per minute can be faithfully captured in M-scan mode by this DSP system. In vivo imaging of a rat's abdominal blood flow is also presented.

  17. Noninvasive and nonocclusive determination of blood pressure using laser Doppler flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elter, Peter; Stork, Wilhelm; Mueller-Glaser, Klaus-Dieter; Lutter, Norbert O.

    1999-04-01

    This report describes an approach determining blood pressure noninvasively without cuff. Regarding an elastic, fluid-filled tube as a model of an arterial segment, the solution of the Navier Stokes differential equations delivers a relation between the pressure and velocity pulse. There, simulations prove a minimal sensitivity of blood pressure concerning blood density, blood viscosity and damping. Hence, these parameters can be regarded interindividually as constants. Blood pressure is essentially sensitive on the pulse wave velocity, the velocity pulse, the arterial diameter and the reflection coefficient. To perform measurements, a system was built up comprising at least one laser Doppler blood flow sensor, a high performance DSP hardware and a PC. After individual initial Riva Rocci calibration, arterial diameter and reflection coefficient can be determined. Flow and pulse wave velocity and thus blood pressure can be calculated measuring continuously at least one velocity pulse with the laser Doppler flow sensor at a superficial artery like the a. radialis and simultaneously another cardiovascular signal like an ECG or another flow pulse at a different site of the artery. As a first result, high linear correlations between systolic blood pressure and pulse transit time were obtained.

  18. High Energy 2-Micron Solid-State Laser Transmitter for NASA's Airborne CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  19. Method for ambiguity resolution in range-Doppler measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M. (Inventor); Miller, Lee S. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method for resolving range and Doppler target ambiguities when the target has substantial range or has a high relative velocity in which a first signal is generated and a second signal is also generated which is coherent with the first signal but at a slightly different frequency such that there exists a difference in frequency between these two signals of Delta f(sub t). The first and second signals are converted into a dual-frequency pulsed signal, amplified, and the dual-frequency pulsed signal is transmitted towards a target. A reflected dual-frequency signal is received from the target, amplified, and changed to an intermediate dual-frequency signal. The intermediate dual-frequency signal is amplified, with extracting of a shifted difference frequency Delta f(sub r) from the amplified intermediate dual-frequency signal done by a nonlinear detector. The final step is generating two quadrature signals from the difference frequency Delta f(sub t) and the shifted difference frequency Delta f(sub r) and processing the two quadrature signals to determine range and Doppler information of the target.

  20. Effect of wind turbine micro-Doppler on SAR and GMTI signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Ling, Hao

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a modeling study to examine the interference effect of microDopplers caused by offshore wind farms on airborne sensors operating in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and ground moving target indicator (GMTI) modes. The modeling is carried out by generating CAD instantiations of the dynamic wind turbine and using the high-frequency electromagnetic code Xpatch to perform the scattering calculations. Artifacts in the resulting SAR and GMTI signatures are evaluated for interference with tracking of boats in coastal waters. Results of signal filtering algorithms to reduce the dynamic turbine clutter in both SAR images and GMTI displays are presented.

  1. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Arterial pulse shape measurement using self-mixing effect in a diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hast, J.; Myllylä, Risto; Sorvoja, H.; Miettinen, J.

    2002-11-01

    The self-mixing effect in a diode laser and the Doppler technique are used for quantitative measurements of the cardiovascular pulses from radial arteries of human individuals. 738 cardiovascular pulses from 10 healthy volunteers were studied. The Doppler spectrograms reconstructed from the Doppler signal, which is measured from the radial displacement of the radial artery, are compared to the first derivative of the blood pressure signals measured from the middle finger by the Penaz technique. The mean correlation coefficient between the Doppler spectrograms and the first derivative of the blood pressure signals was 0.84, with a standard deviation of 0.05. Pulses with the correlation coefficient less than 0.7 were neglected in the study. Percentage of successfully detected pulses was 95.7%. It is shown that cardiovascular pulse shape from the radial artery can be measured noninvasively by using the self-mixing interferometry.

  2. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  3. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  4. Performance Of A Doppler-Corrected MDPSK Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.; Jedrey, Thomas C.; Hinedi, Sami; Agan, Martin J.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents theoretical analysis of effect of rate of change of Doppler shift of received multiple-differential-phase-shift-keyed (MDPSK) radio signal on performance of Doppler-corrected differential detector. In particular detector, phase of received signal corrected for Doppler shift by use of Doppler estimator designed to operate in presence of negligibly small Doppler rate.

  5. Equations for Bistatic Doppler Shift and Rate of Change of Doppler Shift of Dark Satellite Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Equations are given for the doppler shift and rate of change of doppler shift for the bistatic case where an orbiting, nontransmitting earth... of change of doppler shift, satellite height, earth-center angle between the receiver and the satellite, and zenith angle from receiver to satellite are shown for a typical satellite, 1958 Alpha, Explorer I....have been computed, using transmitting and receiving sites of the Space Surveillance System. Plots of various relationships between doppler shift, rate

  6. Helicopter Airborne Laser Positioning System (HALPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppel, Joseph C.; Christiansen, Howard; Cross, Jeffrey; Totah, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The theory of operation, configuration, laboratory, and ground test results obtained with a helicopter airborne laser positioning system developed by Princeton University is presented. Unfortunately, due to time constraints, flight data could not be completed for presentation at this time. The system measures the relative position between two aircraft in three dimensions using two orthogonal fan-shaped laser beams sweeping across an array of four detectors. Specifically, the system calculates the relative range, elevation, and azimuth between an observation aircraft and a test helicopter with a high degree of accuracy. The detector array provides a wide field of view in the presence of solar interference due to compound parabolic concentrators and spectral filtering of the detector pulses. The detected pulses and their associated time delays are processed by the electronics and are sent as position errors to the helicopter pilot who repositions the aircraft as part of the closed loop system. Accuracies obtained in the laboratory at a range of 80 ft in the absence of sunlight were + or - 1 deg in elevation; +0.5 to -1.5 deg in azimuth; +0.5 to -1.0 ft in range; while elevation varied from 0 to +28 deg and the azimuth varied from 0 to + or - 45 deg. Accuracies in sunlight were approximately 40 deg (+ or - 20 deg) in direct sunlight.

  7. Airborne rescue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The airborne rescue system includes a boom with telescoping members for extending a line and collar to a rescue victim. The boom extends beyond the tip of the helicopter rotor so that the victim may avoid the rotor downwash. The rescue line is played out and reeled in by winch. The line is temporarily retained under the boom. When the boom is extended, the rescue line passes through clips. When the victim dons the collar and the tension in the line reaches a predetermined level, the clips open and release the line from the boom. Then the rescue line can form a straight line between the victim and the winch, and the victim can be lifted to the helicopter. A translator is utilized to push out or pull in the telescoping members. The translator comprises a tape and a rope. Inside the telescoping members the tape is curled around the rope and the tape has a tube-like configuration. The tape and rope are provided from supply spools.

  8. Airborne Astronomy with a 150 micron - 400 micron Heterodyne Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under NASA Grant NAG2-753 awarded to the University of Colorado. The project goal was to build a far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer for NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory, and to use this instrument to observe atomic and molecular spectral lines from the interstellar medium. This goal was successfully achieved. Detections of particular note have been the 370 micron line of neutral atomic carbon, the 158 micron transition of ionized carbon, many of the high-J rotational lines of CO-12 and CO-13 between J=9-8 and J=22-21, the 119 micron and 163 micron rotational lines of OH, the 219 micron ground-state rotational line of H2D(+), and the 63 microns fine structure line of neutral atomic oxygen. All of these lines were observed at spectral resolutions exceeding 1 part in 10(exp 6), thereby allowing accurate line shapes and Doppler velocities to be measured.

  9. Airborne Astronomy with a 150 microns - 400 microns Heterodyne Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under NASA Grant NAG2-753 awarded to the University of Colorado. The project goal was to build a far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer for NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory, and to use this instrument to observe atomic and molecular spectral lines from the interstellar medium. This goal was successfully achieved. Detections of particular note have been the 370 micron line of neutral atomic carbon, the 158 micron transition of ionized carbon, many of the high-J rotational lines of CO-12 and CO-13 between J=9-8 and J=22-21, the 119 micron and 163 micron rotational lines of OH, the 219 micron ground-state rotational line of H2D(+), and the 63 micron fine structure line of neutral atomic oxygen. All of these lines were observed at spectral resolutions exceeding 1 part in 10(exp 6) thereby allowing accurate line shapes and Doppler velocities to be measured.

  10. Airborne astronomy with a 150 micrometer - 500 micrometer heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under NASA Grant NAG2-254 awarded to the University of California. The project goal was to build a far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer for NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and to use this instrument to observe atomic and molecular spectral lines from the interstellar medium. This goal was successfully achieved; the spectrometer is now in routine use aboard the KAO. Detections of particular note have been the 370 micrometers line of neutral atomic carbon, the 158 micrometers transition of ionized carbon, many of the high-J rotational lines of 12CO and 13CO between J=9-8 and J=22-21, the 119 micron ground-state rotational line of OH, and the 219 micron ground-state rotational line of H2D(+). All of these lines were observed at spectral resolutions exceeding 1 part in 10(exp 6), thereby allowing accurate line shapes and Doppler velocities to be measured.

  11. Simultaneous spatial and spectral mapping of flow using photoacoustic Doppler measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinfeld, Adi; Gilead, Sharon; Eyal, Avishay

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of tone-burst excitation and time-gated spectral analysis for photoacoustic Doppler mapping of flow in an unperturbed vessel phantom and in a vessel with a spatially varying lumen. The method, which mimics pulsed Doppler ultrasound, enables simultaneous measurement of axial position and flow as well as complete characterization of the Doppler spectrum over a wide range of mean velocities (3.5 to 200 mm/s). To generate the required optical excitation, a continuous cw laser source followed by an external electro-optic modulator is used. Stenoses at various levels are emulated in a C-flex tube with a flowing suspension of micrometer-scale carbon particles. Two-dimensional maps of spectral content versus axial position at different points along the vessel and for various levels of perturbations demonstrate the potential use of the method for characterization of flow irregularities.

  12. Doppler laser radar for range and speed measurement of road targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yanfang; Mao, Xuesong; Fang, Jianchao; Zhang, Tao

    2016-11-01

    A pulsed coherent vehicle laser radar system basing on the measurement of light flight time and Doppler frequency shift is demonstrated for the first time, which features a simple design that uses one photodiode (PD) as its optical detector. Pseudo random noise (PN) code is used for modulating the amplitude of transmitting light. Correlation function of the received echoes and the local modulating codes is calculated for measuring the light flight time. Due to PN code modulation, beat signal output from PD is piecewise continuous, which causes equidistant sampling of Doppler sine wave not feasible. In order that Doppler frequency be correctly measured by using fast Fourier transform (FFT), a simple signal amplitude modification method is derived from the definition of Fourier transform.

  13. Stimulated brillouin backscatter of a short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D.E.; Williams, E.A.; Berger, R.L.

    1994-11-03

    Stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) from a short-pulse laser, where the pulse length is short compared to the plasma length, is found to be qualitatively different than in the long pulse regime, where the pulse length is long compared to the plasma length. We find that after an initial transient of order the laser pulse length transit time, the instability reaches a steady state in the variables x{prime} = x {minus} V{sub g}t, t{prime} = t, where V{sub g} is the pulse group velocity. In contrast, SBBS in a long pulse can be absolutely unstable and grows indefinitely, or until nonlinearities intervene. We find that the motion of the laser pulse induces Doppler related effects that substantially modify the backscattered spectrum at higher intensities, where the instability is strongly coupled (i.e. , has a growth rate large compared to the ion acoustic frequency).

  14. Theoretical simulation of a 2 micron airborne solid state laser anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbert, Beatrice; Cariou, Jean-Pierre

    1992-01-01

    In the near future, military aircraft will need to know precisely their true airspeed in order to optimize flight conditions. In comparison with classical anemometer probes, an airborne Doppler lidar allows measurement of the air velocity without influence from aircraft aerodynamic disturbance. While several demonstration systems of heterodyne detection using a CO2 laser have been reported, improvements in the technology of solid state lasers have recently opened up the possibility that these devices can be used as an alternative to CO2 laser systems. In particular, a diode pumped Tm:Ho:YAG laser allows a reliable compact airborne system with an eye safe wavelength (lambda = 2.09 microns) to be achieved. The theoretical study of performances of a coherent lidar using a solid state diode pumped Tm:Ho:YAG laser, caled SALSA, for measuring aircraft airspeed relative to atmospheric aerosols is described. A computer simulation was developed in order to modelize the Doppler anemometer in the function of atmospheric propagation and optical design. A clever analysis of the power budget on the detector area allows optical characteristic parameters of the system to be calculated, and then it can be used to predict performances of the Doppler system. Estimating signal to noise ratios (SNR) and heterodyne efficiency provides the available energy of speed measurement as well as a useful measurement of the alignment of the backscattered and reference fields on the detector.

  15. The Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Menzies, Robert T.; Howell, James N.; Johnson, Steven C.; Tratt, David M.; Olivier, Lisa D.; Banta, Robert M.

    1998-04-01

    In 1992 the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory began a joint collaboration to develop an airborne high-energy Doppler laser radar (lidar) system for atmospheric research and satellite validation and simulation studies. The result is the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS), which has the capability to remotely sense the distribution of wind and absolute aerosol backscatter in three-dimensional volumes in the troposphere and lower stratosphere.A factor critical to the programmatic feasibility and technical success of this collaboration has been the utilization of existing components and expertise that were developed for previous atmospheric research by the respective institutions. For example, the laser transmitter is that of the mobile ground-based Doppler lidar system developed and used in atmospheric research for more than a decade at NOAA/ETL.The motivation for MACAWS is threefold: 1) to obtain fundamental measurements of subsynoptic-scale processes and features to improve subgrid-scale parameterizations in large-scale models, 2) to obtain datasets in order to improve the understanding of and predictive capabilities for meteorological systems on subsynoptic scales, and 3) to validate (simulate) the performance of existing (planned) satellite-borne sensors.Initial flight tests were made in September 1995; subsequent flights were made in June 1996 following system improvements. This paper describes the MACAWS instrument, principles of operation, examples of measurements over the eastern Pacific Ocean and western United States, and future applications.

  16. NASA/LMSC coherent LIDAR airborne shear sensor: System capabilities and flight test plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the NASA/LMSC Coherent Lidar Airborne Shear Sensor (CLASS) system flight tests is to evaluate the capability of an airborne coherent lidar system to detect, measure, and predict hazardous wind shear ahead of the aircraft with a view to warning flight crew of any impending dangers. On NASA's Boeing 737 Transport Systems Research Vehicle, the CLASS system will be used to measure wind velocity fields and, by incorporating such measurements with real-time aircraft state parameters, identify regions of wind shear that may be detrimental to the aircraft's performance. Assessment is to be made through actual wind shear encounters in flight. Wind shear measurements made by the class system will be compared to those made by the aircraft's in situ wind shear detection system as well as by ground-based Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and airborne Doppler radar. By examining the aircraft performance loss (or gain) due to wind shear that the lidar predicts with that actually experienced by the aircraft, the performance of the CLASS system as a predictive wind shear detector will be assessed.

  17. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  18. Pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, David H.

    Pulsed power systems are critical elements for such prospective weapons technologies as high-power microwaves, electrothermal and electromagnetic projectile launchers, neutral particle beams, space-based FELs, ground-based lasers, and charged particle beams. Pulsed power will also be essential for the development of nonweapon military systems such as lidars and ultrawideband radars, and could serve as the bases for nuclear weapon effect simulators. The pulsed power generation requirements for each of these systems is considered.

  19. Change in amplitude distributions of Doppler spectrograms recorded below the aortic valve in patients with a valvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, G; Lemire, F; Durand, L G; Latour, Y; Jarry, M; Solignac, A; Langlois, Y E

    1991-01-01

    Amplitude distributions of Doppler spectrograms were characterized in a group of 22 patients having no aortic pressure gradient and another group of 26 patients having a stenotic aortic valve. Specifically, for each patient, the ratios of the mean amplitude in three normalized frequency bands (low, middle and high) to the mean amplitude of the Doppler spectrogram computed in selected portions of the systolic period were considered. Pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms were recorded by positioning the sample volume in the left ventricular outflow tract, approximately 1 cm below the aortic valve. Statistically significant differences were found between the middle (p = 0.041) and high (p = 0.028) frequency bands of Doppler signals recorded from the two groups of patients. The differences observed are believed to be attributed to blood flow eddies generated below the stenotic aortic heart valve and to changes in blood flow orientation.

  20. Short Pulse Switches for Airborne High Power Supplies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-10-01

    high voltage direct current interrupter tube is patterned after interrupters built by Hughes for HVDC circuit breaker service. These tubes have been...tested at the 100 kV, 2 kA, 2 kV/fisec level. This tube is the only known component inherently capable of HVDC interruption (i. e. , without...GE No. ZR 7512). The pulser circuit is shown in Fig. 11-26. The battery represents the (3 kV) HVDC supply. The total stored energy is

  1. Short Pulse Switches for Airborne High Power Supplies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-10-01

    must be small and lightweight and must operate reliably for 50.000 cycles. All of these design goals can be met utilizing the vacuum interrupter... reliability and to significantly reduce development and future manufacturing costs. Where necessary, modifications have been made to these components in...Westlnghouse proprietary material utilized In our current vacuum Interrupter product line. In order to Insure highly reliable lightweight actuation of

  2. Curved PVDF airborne transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Toda, M

    1999-01-01

    In the application of airborne ultrasonic ranging measurement, a partially cylindrical (curved) PVDF transducer can effectively couple ultrasound into the air and generate strong sound pressure. Because of its geometrical features, the ultrasound beam angles of a curved PVDF transducer can be unsymmetrical (i.e., broad horizontally and narrow vertically). This feature is desired in some applications. In this work, a curved PVDF air transducer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Two resonances were observed in this transducer. They are length extensional mode and flexural bending mode. Surface vibration profiles of these two modes were measured by a laser vibrometer. It was found from the experiment that the surface vibration was not uniform along the curvature direction for both vibration modes. Theoretical calculations based on a model developed in this work confirmed the experimental results. Two displacement peaks were found in the piezoelectric active direction of PVDF film for the length extensional mode; three peaks were found for the flexural bending mode. The observed peak positions were in good agreement with the calculation results. Transient surface displacement measurements revealed that vibration peaks were in phase for the length extensional mode and out of phase for the flexural bending mode. Therefore, the length extensional mode can generate a stronger ultrasound wave than the flexural bending mode. The resonance frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the two modes strongly depend on the structure parameters as well as the material properties. For the transducer design, the theoretical model developed in this work can be used to optimize the ultrasound performance.

  3. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  4. Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojek, Zbigniew

    The idea of imposing potential pulses and measuring the currents at the end of each pulse was proposed by Barker in a little-known journal as early as in 1958 [1]. However, the first reliable trouble-free and affordable polarographs offering voltammetric pulse techniques appeared on the market only in the 1970s. This delay was due to some limitations on the electronic side. In the 1990s, again substantial progress in electrochemical pulse instrumentation took place. This was related to the introduction of microprocessors, computers, and advanced software.

  5. Bubble-induced Color Doppler Feedback for Histotripsy Tissue Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ryan M.; Zhang, Xi; Maxwell, Adam; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy therapy produces cavitating bubble clouds to increasingly fractionate and eventually liquefy tissue using high intensity ultrasound pulses. Following cavitation generated by each pulse, coherent motion of the cavitation residual nuclei can be detected using metrics formed from ultrasound color Doppler acquisitions. In this paper, three experiments were performed to investigate the characteristics of this motion as real-time feedback on histotripsy tissue fractionation. In the first experiment, bubble-induced color Doppler (BCD) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis monitored the residual cavitation nuclei in the treatment region in an agarose tissue phantom treated with 2-cycle histotripsy pulses at > 30 MPa using a 500 kHz transducer. Both BCD and PIV results showed brief chaotic motion of the residual nuclei followed by coherent motion first moving away from the transducer and then rebounding back. Velocity measurements from both PIV and BCD agreed well, showing a monotonic increase in rebound time up to a saturation point for increased therapy dose. In a second experiment, a thin layer of red blood cells (RBC) was added to the phantom to allow quantification of the fractionation of the RBC layer to compare with BCD metrics. A strong linear correlation was observed between the fractionation level and the time to BCD peak rebound velocity over histotripsy treatment. Finally, the correlation between BCD feedback and histotripsy tissue fractionation was validated in ex vivo porcine liver evaluated histologically. BCD metrics showed strong linear correlation with fractionation progression, suggesting that BCD provides useful quantitative real-time feedback on histotripsy treatment progression. PMID:26863659

  6. Blood flow velocity in monocular retinoblastoma assessed by color doppler

    PubMed Central

    Bonanomi, Maria Teresa B C; Saito, Osmar C; de Lima, Patricia Picciarelli; Bonanomi, Roberta Chizzotti; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the flow of retrobulbar vessels in retinoblastoma by color Doppler imaging. METHODS: A prospective study of monocular retinoblastoma treated by enucleation between 2010 and 2014. The examination comprised fundoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and color Doppler imaging. The peak blood velocities in the central retinal artery and central retinal vein of tumor-containing eyes (tuCRAv and tuCRVv, respectively) were assessed. The velocities were compared with those for normal eyes (nlCRAv and nlCRVv) and correlated with clinical and pathological findings. Tumor dimensions in the pathological sections were compared with those in magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography and were correlated with tuCRAv and tuCRVv. In tumor-containing eyes, the resistivity index in the central retinal artery and the pulse index in the central retinal vein were studied in relation to all variables. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were included. Comparisons between tuCRAv and nlCRAv and between tuCRVv and nlCRVv revealed higher velocities in tumor-containing eyes (p<0.001 for both), with a greater effect in the central retinal artery than in the central retinal vein (p=0.024). Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography measurements were as reliable as pathology assessments (p=0.675 and p=0.375, respectively). A positive relationship was found between tuCRAv and the tumor volume (p=0.027). The pulse index in the central retinal vein was lower in male patients (p=0.017) and in eyes with optic nerve invasion (p=0.0088). CONCLUSIONS: TuCRAv and tuCRVv are higher in tumor-containing eyes than in normal eyes. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography measurements are reliable. The tumor volume is correlated with a higher tuCRAv and a reduced pulse in the central retinal vein is correlated with male sex and optic nerve invasion. PMID:26735219

  7. Airborne atmospheric electricity experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    During the 1984 U2 spring flight program, lightning spectra were measured in the wavelengths from 380 nm to 900 nm with a temporal resolution of 5 ms. With this capability, researchers simultaneously acquired both visible near-infrared lightning spectra on a pulse to pulse basis, so that the spectral variability within a flash, as well as flash to flash variations, can be studied. Preliminary results suggest that important variations do occur, particularly in the strengths of the hydrogen and singly ionized nitrogen emission lines. Also, the results have revealed significant differences in the integrated energy distributions between the lightning spectra measured above clouds and the spectral measurements of cloud-to-ground lightning made at the ground. In particular, the ratio of the energy in the near-IR to that in the visible is around 1 to 2 for cloud top spectra versus about 1/3 for surface observations. Detailed analyses of the 1984 lightning spectral data is being conducted. This data should provide improved understanding about the optical transmission properties of thunderclouds and the physics of the lightning discharge process. Efforts continue on developing and testing background signal removal algorithms using U2 spectometer and optical array sensor day-flight data sets. The goal of this research is to develop an algorithm satisfying Lightning Mapper Sensor requirements.

  8. Normal Doppler velocimetry of renal vasculature in Persian cats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cibele F; Chammas, Maria C

    2011-06-01

    Renal diseases are common in older cats. Decreased renal blood flow may be the first sign of dysfunction and can be evaluated by Doppler ultrasound. But previous studies suggest that the resistive index (RI) has a low sensitivity for detecting renal disease. Doppler waveforms of renal and intrarenal arteries demonstrate decreased blood flow before there are any changes in the RI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the normal Doppler flowmetrics parameters of renal arteries (RAs), interlobar arteries (IAs) and abdominal aorta (AO) in adult healthy, Persian cats. Twenty-five Persian cats (13 females and 12 males with mean age of 30 months and an age range 12-60 months) with normal clinical examinations and biochemical tests and normal systemic blood pressure were given B-mode ultrasonographies in order to exclude all nephropathies, including polycystic kidney disease. All measurements were performed on both kidneys. Both kidneys (n=50) were examined by color mapping of the renal vasculature. Pulsed Doppler was used to examine both RAs, the IAs at cranial, middle and caudal sites, and the AO. The RI was calculated for all of the vessels. Early systolic acceleration (ESA) of RA and IA was obtained with Doppler spectral analysis. Furthermore, the ratio indices between RA/AO, and IA/RA velocities were calculated. The mean values of peak systolic velocity (PSV) and the diameter for AO were 53.17±13.46 cm/s and 0.38±0.08 cm, respectively. The mean RA diameter for all 50 kidneys was 0.15±0.02 cm. Considering the velocimetric values in both RAs, the mean PSV and RI that were obtained were 41.17±9.40 cm/s and 0.54±0.07. The RA had a mean ESA of 1.12±1.14 m/s(2) and the calculated upper limit of the reference value was 3.40 m/s(2). The mean renal-aortic ratio was 0.828±0.296. The IA showed PSV and RI values of 32.16±9.33 cm/s and 0.52±0.06, respectively. The mean ESA of all IAs was 0.73±0.61 m/s(2). The calculated upper limit of the reference value was 2.0m

  9. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  10. CHARM-F: the Airborne MERLIN Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Büdenbender, C.; Fix, A.; Quatrevalet, M.; Wirth, M.

    2013-12-01

    A common and efficient method for demonstration of the usefulness of new remote sensing instruments in space science is to test them on airborne platforms prior to fly them on space-borne platform. CHARM-F comprises a new IPDA lidar sensor for the simultaneous measurement of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). This instrument is regarded to serve as an MERLIN demonstrator when operated on an airborne platform measuring the differential atmospheric optical depth (DAOD) of CH4 beneath the aircraft. The data products of the French-German climate mission MERLIN are DAOD and XCH4 that will be measured by a small OPO-based IPDA lidar at 1.64 μm. Similar to the MERLIN transmitter, the transmitter of CHARM-F emits two frequency-controlled, spectrally narrow-band OPO pulses into the atmosphere serving for the on- and off-line measurements. The ground echoes are measured by means of fast IR sensors in the direct detection mode. A special feature of CHARM-F comprises its weighting function which is quite similar to the one considered for MERLIN since the on- and off-line frequencies can be selected to be identically. Moreover, CHARM-F is designed for operation on the German HALO aircraft that can cruise at an altitude as high as 15 km. Thus a large portion of the MERLIN DAOD will be measured by CHARM-F offering the unique possibility to validate DAOD of MERLIN which is not possible by any other means. In our presentation we will introduce the CHARM-F instrument as a demonstrator for MERLIN. Further we report on results of the qualification tests of the subsystems which are required prior to fly the instrument on the HALO aircraft. Finally, we present first results from ground-based long-path absorption measurements of CH4 employing topographic targets.

  11. Observation of the Zero Doppler Effect.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jia; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Xiaodong; Fang, Kai; Zhao, Junfei; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-05

    The normal Doppler effect has well-established applications in many areas of science and technology. Recently, a few experimental demonstrations of the inverse Doppler effect have begun to appear in negative-index metamaterials. Here we report an experimental observation of the zero Doppler effect, that is, no frequency shift irrespective of the relative motion between the wave signal source and the detector in a zero-index metamaterial. This unique phenomenon, accompanied by the normal and inverse Doppler effects, is generated by reflecting a wave from a moving discontinuity in a composite right/left-handed transmission line loaded with varactors when operating in the near zero-index passband, or the right/left-handed passband. This work has revealed a complete picture of the Doppler effect in metamaterials and may lead to potential applications in electromagnetic wave related metrology.

  12. Development of the doppler electron velocimeter: theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2007-03-01

    Measurement of dynamic events at the nano-scale is currently impossible. This paper presents the theoretical underpinnings of a method for making these measurements using electron microscopes. Building on the work of Moellenstedt and Lichte who demonstrated Doppler shifting of an electron beam with a moving electron mirror, further work is proposed to perfect and utilize this concept in dynamic measurements. Specifically, using the concept of ''fringe-counting'' with the current principles of transmission electron holography, an extension of these methods to dynamic measurements is proposed. A presentation of the theory of Doppler electron wave shifting is given, starting from the development of the de Broglie wave, up through the equations describing interference effects and Doppler shifting in electron waves. A mathematical demonstration that Doppler shifting is identical to the conceptually easier to understand idea of counting moving fringes is given by analogy to optical interferometry. Finally, potential developmental experiments and uses of a Doppler electron microscope are discussed.

  13. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  14. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-08-31

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  15. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  16. Oxygen consumption estimation with combined color doppler ultrasound and photoacoustic microscopy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Harrison, Tyler; Forbrich, Alex; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (MRO2) quantifies tissue metabolism, which is important for diagnosis of many diseases. For a single vessel model, the MRO2 can be estimated in terms of the mean flow velocity, vessel crosssectional area, total concentration of hemoglobin (CHB), and the difference between the oxygen saturation (sO2) of blood flowing into and out of the tissue region. In this work, we would like to show the feasibility to estimate MRO2 with our combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound imaging system. This system uses a swept-scan 25-MHz ultrasound transducer with confocal dark-field laser illumination optics. A pulse-sequencer enables ultrasonic and laser pulses to be interlaced so that photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound images are co-registered. Since the mean flow velocity can be measured by color Doppler ultrasound, the vessel cross-sectional area can be measured by power Doppler or photoacoustic imaging, and multi-wavelength photoacoustic methods can be used to estimate sO2 and CHB, all of these parameters necessary for MRO2 estimation can be provided by our system. Experiments have been performed on flow phantoms to generate co-registered color Doppler and photoacoustic images. To verify the sO2 estimation, two ink samples (red and blue) were mixed in various concentration ratios to mimic different levels of sO2, and the result shows a good match between the calculated concentration ratios and actual values.

  17. PATH TO NEXRAD: Doppler Radar Development at the National Severe Storms Laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Rodger A.; Lewis, John M.

    2005-10-01

    In this historical paper, we trace the scientific- and engineering-based steps at the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) and in the larger weather radar community that led to the development of NSSL's first 10-cm-wavelength pulsed Doppler radar. This radar was the prototype for the current Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD), or Weather Surveillance Radar-1998 Doppler (WSR-88D) network.We track events, both political and scientific, that led to the establishment of NSSL in 1964. The vision of NSSL's first director, Edwin Kessler, is reconstructed through access to historical documents and oral histories. This vision included the development of Doppler radar, where research was to be meshed with the operational needs of the U.S. Weather Bureau and its successor—the National Weather Service.Realization of the vision came through steps that were often fit-ful, where complications arose due to personnel concerns, and where there were always financial concerns. The historical research indicates that 1) the engineering prowess and mentorship of Roger Lhermitte was at the heart of Doppler radar development at NSSL; 2) key decisions by Kessler in the wake of Lhermitte's sudden departure in 1967 proved crucial to the ultimate success of the project; 3) research results indicated that Doppler velocity signatures of mesocyclones are a precursor of damaging thunderstorms and tornadoes; and 4) results from field testing of the Doppler-derived products during the 1977 79 Joint Doppler Operational Project—especially the noticeable increase in the verification of tornado warnings and an associated marked decrease in false alarms—led to the government decision to establish the NEXRAD network.

  18. Comparison of new Doppler echocardiographic methods to differentiate constrictive pericardial heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, N; Garcia, M J; Rodriguez, L; Murray, R D; Apperson-Hansen, C; Stugaard, M; Thomas, J D; Klein, A L

    2001-01-01

    This study assesses how the newer modalities of tissue Doppler echocardiography and color M-mode flow propagation compare with respiratory variation of Doppler flow in distinguishing between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy. We studied 30 patients referred for further evaluation of diastolic function who had a diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis or restrictive cardiomyopathy established by diagnostic tests, including clinical assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, cardiac catheterization, endomyocardial biopsy, and surgical findings. Nineteen patients had constrictive pericarditis and 11 had restrictive cardiomyopathy. We performed 2-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography combined with pulsed-wave Doppler of the pulmonary veins and mitral inflow with respiratory monitoring, tissue Doppler echocardiography of the lateral mitral annulus, and color M-mode flow propagation of left ventricular filling. Respiratory variation of the mitral inflow peak early (peak E) velocity of > or =10% predicted constrictive pericarditis with 84% sensitivity and 91% specificity and variation in the pulmonary venous peak diastolic (peak D) flow velocity of > or =18% distinguished constriction with 79% sensitivity and 91% specificity. Using tissue Doppler echocardiography, a peak early velocity of longitudinal expansion (peak Ea) of > or =8.0 cm/s differentiated patients with constriction from restriction with 89% sensitivity and 100% specificity. A slope of > or =100 cm/s for the first aliasing contour in color M-mode flow propagation predicted patients with constriction with 74% sensitivity and 91% specificity. Thus, the newer methods of tissue Doppler echocardiography and color M-mode flow propagation are equivalent and complimentary with Doppler respiratory variation in distinguishing between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy. The additive role of the new methods needs to be established in difficult cases of constrictive

  19. Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development at NASA Langley Research Center for NASA Space-Based 3-D Winds Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.

    2012-01-01

    We review the 20-plus years of pulsed transmit laser development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to enable a coherent Doppler wind lidar to measure global winds from earth orbit. We briefly also discuss the many other ingredients needed to prepare for this space mission.

  20. Estimation of aircraft wake vortex parameters from data measured with a 1.5-μm coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Smalikho, I N; Banakh, V A

    2015-07-15

    A strategy of measurement by a 1.5-μm pulsed coherent Doppler lidar "Stream Line" has been developed, and a method for estimation of aircraft wake vortices from the lidar data has been proposed. The principal possibility of obtaining the information about the vortex situation over an airport airfield with the Stream-Line lidar has been demonstrated.

  1. Expected Characteristics of Global Wind Profile Measurements with a Scanning, Hybrid, Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 20 years of investigation by NASA and NOAA scientists and Doppler lidar technologists into a global wind profiling mission from earth orbit have led to the current favored concept of an instrument with both coherent- and direct-detection pulsed Doppler lidars (i.e., a hybrid Doppler lidar) and a stepstare beam scanning approach covering several azimuth angles with a fixed nadir angle. The nominal lidar wavelengths are 2 microns for coherent detection, and 0.355 microns for direct detection. The two agencies have also generated two sets of sophisticated wind measurement requirements for a space mission: science demonstration requirements and operational requirements. The requirements contain the necessary details to permit mission design and optimization by lidar technologists. Simulations have been developed that connect the science requirements to the wind measurement requirements, and that connect the wind measurement requirements to the Doppler lidar parameters. The simulations also permit trade studies within the multi-parameter space. These tools, combined with knowledge of the state of the Doppler lidar technology, have been used to conduct space instrument and mission design activities to validate the feasibility of the chosen mission and lidar parameters. Recently, the NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey recommended the wind mission to NASA as one of 15 recommended missions. A full description of the wind measurement product from these notional missions and the possible trades available are presented in this paper.

  2. Instantaneous transmitral flow using Doppler and M-mode echocardiography: comparison with radionuclide ventriculography.

    PubMed

    Hoit, B D; Rashwan, M; Verba, J; Pretorius, T; Sahn, D J; Bhargava, V

    1989-08-01

    To improve the accuracy of Doppler echocardiographic indices of left ventricular filling, we derived two indices of instantaneous transmitral flow with the use of Doppler velocities and M-mode echocardiography. These indices were calculated from the product of pulsed Doppler mitral velocities and either the excursion of the anterior mitral leaflet or the separation of both mitral leaflets as measures of the changing mitral orifice area. The derived flow indices and the mitral velocities alone were compared to left ventricular filling as determined by radionuclide ventriculography in 24 patients. When compared as areas under the matched decile divisions of the derived filling sequences by linear regression analysis, the relationship for combined Doppler and M-mode versus radionuclide left ventricular filling was closer to the line of identity (slope = 0.98 and 0.94 using the anterior mitral leaflet and both mitral leaflets, respectively, both p = NS versus the line of identity) than was the relationship for mitral velocities alone versus radionuclide left ventricular filling (slope = 0.74, p less than 0.05 versus the line of identity). The instantaneous mitral volume flow indices more closely resemble the time course and shape of radionuclide left ventricular filling curves than do mitral velocities alone, and the application of these indices should assist the quantitative description by Doppler echocardiography of left ventricular filling.

  3. Experimental characterization of a vector Doppler system based on a clinical ultrasound scanner.

    PubMed

    Eranki, Avinash; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a vector Doppler system using a clinical ultrasound scanner with a research interface. In this system, vector Doppler estimation is performed by electronically dividing a linear array transducer into a transmit sub-aperture and two receive sub-apertures. The receive beams are electronically steered, and two velocity components are estimated from echoes received from the beam overlap region. The velocity vector is reconstructed from these two estimates. The goal of this study was to characterize this vector Doppler system in vitro using a string phantom with a pulsatile velocity waveform. We studied the effect of four parameters on the estimation error: beam steering angle, angle of the velocity vector, depth of the scatterer relative to the beam overlap region and the transmit focus depth. Our results show that changing these parameters have minimal effect on the velocity and angle estimates, and robust velocity vector estimates can be obtained under a variety of conditions. The mean velocity error was less than 0.06 x pulse repetition frequency. The velocity estimates are sensitive to the Doppler estimation method. Our results indicate that vector Doppler using a linear array transducer is feasible for a wide range of imaging parameters. Such a system would facilitate the investigation of complex blood flow and tissue motion in human subjects.

  4. [Color-coded M-mode Doppler echocardiography in the diagnosis of fetal arrhythmia].

    PubMed

    Gembruch, U; Bald, R; Hansmann, M

    1990-04-01

    Colour-coded M-mode Doppler echocardiography is a simultaneous registration of the conventional M-mode echocardiogram and of the pulsed wave colour-coded Doppler echocardiogram with simultaneous analysis of several sample volumes along the ultrasound cursor with a high timely resolution, guided by the two-dimensional imaging. Within 9 months, 36 foetuses with arrhythmias were prospectively examined (24 foetuses with atrial premature beats, 9 foetuses with supraventricular tachycardia, and 3 foetuses with complete heart block). The classification of arrhythmia by the colour-coded M-mode Doppler echocardiography was always possible at first examination. The most important advantage of this method is the simultaneous registration of the information of conventional M-mode and Doppler echocardiography. Therefore, the intervals between atrial and ventricular contractions can also be analysed even when the angle of insonation to the foetal heart is unfavourable, since contractions cannot only be identified by wall movements but also by the flow velocities. Furthermore, the duration of regurgitation of atrioventricular valves can be exactly measured by colour-coded M-mode Doppler echocardiography. In foetal supraventricular tachycardia, it appears that severity of congestive heart failure is correlated with the duration of atrioventricular valve regurgitation up to a holosystolic insufficiency. Thus, it seems possible, that the duration of insufficiency of atrioventricular valves is a good parameter for evaluation of cardiac function and for modifying antiarrhythmic treatment in cases of supraventricular tachycardia.

  5. NASA three-laser airborne differential absorption lidar system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. J.; Copeland, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The system control and signal conditioning electronics of the NASA three laser airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. The multipurpose DIAL system was developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A brief description and photographs of the majority of electronics units developed under this contract are presented. The precision control system; which includes a master control unit, three combined NASA laser control interface/quantel control units, and three noise pulse discriminator/pockels cell pulser units; is described in detail. The need and design considerations for precision timing and control are discussed. Calibration procedures are included.

  6. Airborne transmission of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Jason M; Beren, Joel; Merkel, Tod J

    2012-09-15

    Pertussis is a contagious, acute respiratory illness caused by the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Although it is widely believed that transmission of B. pertussis occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets, no controlled study has ever documented airborne transmission of pertussis. We set out to determine if airborne transmission occurs between infected and naive animals, utilizing the baboon model of pertussis. Our results showed that 100% of exposed naive animals became infected even when physical contact was prevented, demonstrating that pertussis transmission occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets.

  7. Micro-Doppler lidar signals and noise mechanisms: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatt, Philip; Henderson, Sammy W.; Thomson, J. Alex L.; Bruns, Dale L.

    2000-09-01

    Lidar remote sensing of micro-Doppler signals is important for a large number of civilian and military applications. The single most important performance metric of these sensors is their velocity measurement precision. The velocity precision of a micro-Doppler lidar is limited by any one of various noise sources, which include shot-noise, local-oscillator frequency noise, speckle decorrelation noise, refractive turbulence advection noise and pointing jitter. In this paper, we present a theory, which describes these noise sources and their wavelength dependence. For example, it will be shown that the turbulence advection noise is wavelength independent while speckle decorrelation noise is proportional to the illumination wavelength and that the noise sources are, to a first-order, independent of the interrogation waveform classification (i.e., pulsed or CW). The results from recent field measurements using a doublet-pulse lidar will be compared with theory.

  8. Pulse oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Jubran, Amal

    1999-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is one of the most commonly employed monitoringmodalities in the critical care setting. This review describes the latesttechnological advances in the field of pulse oximetry. Accuracy of pulseoximeters and their limitations are critically examined. Finally, the existingdata regarding the clinical applications and cost-effectiveness of pulseoximeters are discussed. PMID:11094477

  9. Doppler sensors and harnesses for cardiac and peripheral arterial flow monitoring.

    PubMed

    Arbeille, P

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to design Doppler sensors and harnesses for monitoring in real time the cardiac stroke volume and output, the cerebral flow volume and resistance and the lower limb arterial flow and resistance changes. For the middle cerebral artery investigation we used a 2-MHz transcranial pulsed wave (PW) Doppler probe (commercial probe) mounted on a rotula, fixed on the horizontal branch of a headset designed like an audio headset. The arch of the headset passed over the top of the skull. For the common carotid investigation, a 4-MHz continuous-wave (CW) or PW flat Doppler probe was inserted in a circular silicone support of 5-cm diameter and 0.6-cm thickness. This soft support could adapt to the irregular surface of the neck, and the silicone material, which is fairly adhesive to the skin, made the system stable. The transducers were preoriented at 45 degrees from the support, which provided an acceptable orientation of the Doppler beam. The aortic Doppler harness consisted of a 2-MHz PW Doppler probe, mounted on a rotula fixed on a plastic rigid support 7 x 1.5 cm2 in area (parallel to the sternum) whose length could be changed (4-7 cm) to localize the rotula and its sensor on the suprasternal area. This flat segment was fixed on a rotating platform, part of a solid square plastic support (10 x 10 cm2) placed on the upper part of the sternum. This system was maintained by elastic bands passing around the shoulder and the chest. The femoral Doppler harness consisted of a 4-MHz CW or PW flat Doppler probe, inserted in a flat and rectangular rigid plastic support 10 x 3 cm2 in area. This rigid support was well adapted to the flat surface of the internal part of the thigh, which made the system stable. Two elastic bands passed around the thigh and the abdomen, which avoided any translation of the support and kept the sensor in contact with the skin. The transducers were preoriented at 45 degrees from the support, which provided an acceptable

  10. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  11. Laser Doppler dust devil measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, J. W.; Jeffreys, H. B.; Kaufman, J. W.; Weaver, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning laser doppler velocimeter (SLDV) system was used to detect, track, and measure the velocity flow field of naturally occurring tornado-like flows (dust devils) in the atmosphere. A general description of the dust devil phenomenon is given along with a description of the test program, measurement system, and data processing techniques used to collect information on the dust devil flow field. The general meteorological conditions occurring during the test program are also described, and the information collected on two selected dust devils are discussed in detail to show the type of information which can be obtained with a SLDV system. The results from these measurements agree well with those of other investigators and illustrate the potential for the SLDV in future endeavors.

  12. Rotational Doppler effect in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guixin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-08-01

    The translational Doppler effect of electromagnetic and sound waves has been successfully applied in measurements of the speed and direction of vehicles, astronomical objects and blood flow in human bodies, and for the Global Positioning System. The Doppler effect plays a key role for some important quantum phenomena such as the broadened emission spectra of atoms and has benefited cooling and trapping of atoms with laser light. Despite numerous successful applications of the translational Doppler effect, it fails to measure the rotation frequency of a spinning object when the probing wave propagates along its rotation axis. This constraint was circumvented by deploying the angular momentum of electromagnetic waves--the so-called rotational Doppler effect. Here, we report on the demonstration of rotational Doppler shift in nonlinear optics. The Doppler frequency shift is determined for the second harmonic generation of a circularly polarized beam passing through a spinning nonlinear optical crystal with three-fold rotational symmetry. We find that the second harmonic generation signal with circular polarization opposite to that of the fundamental beam experiences a Doppler shift of three times the rotation frequency of the optical crystal. This demonstration is of fundamental significance in nonlinear optics, as it provides us with insight into the interaction of light with moving media in the nonlinear optical regime.

  13. Development of a 0.5 micrometer incoherent Doppler lidar for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, A.; Sroga, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of a prototype 0.53 micrometer Doppler lidar system under development at RCA. This system consists of a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser constrained to yield a narrow bandwidth, single frequency pulse, a Fabry-Perot Inteferometer (FPI) using an Image Plane Detector (IPD) to measure the backscatter spectrum for each pulse and a Data Acquisition System (DAS) to sample, store, and analyze the backscattered signal. These individual subsystem components have been assembled and preliminary atmospheric testing has recently begun. Atmospheric backscatter spectra are presented which demonstrate the capabilities of this system to distinguish between return signals from aerosols, molecules, and clouds.

  14. Vertical Aerosol Backscatter Variability from an Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements using a continuous wave focused Doppler lidar at 9.1 micron wavelength were obtained over western North America and the Pacific Ocean during 13 - 26 September, 1995 as part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on board the NASA DC8 aircraft. Backscatter variability was measured for approximately 52 flight hours, covering equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 25,000 km in the troposphere. Quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents which ranged between approximately 0.1 to 12.0 km altitude. Aerosol haze layers were encountered at different altitudes. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and over ocean were observed. A mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was found with modal value approximately 1O(exp -10)/m/sr, consistent with previous airborne and ground-based datasets.

  15. CO2 laser technology for spaceborne doppler wind LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenberger, Paul M.; Wallace, Steven; Robinson, R. J.; Willetts, David V.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of activities carried out in support of both NASA and European Space Agency programs for the development of a laser for space-based wind measurement. For the NASA Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) program, a Phase One Laser Transmitter Study was undertaken, leading to the recommendation of an e-beam sustained CO(subscript 2) laser. For the European Space Agency (ESA) program for Development of a CO(subscript 2) Laser for Spaceborne Doppler Wind Lidar, some of the most significant results obtained to date are: (1) Demonstration of sealed lifetests using an e-beam sustained test laser to 10(superscript 7) pulses using a gas phase catalysis technique, (2) Optimization of multimode laser head efficiency to 17% has been accomplished, with a corresponding 10% single transverse mode efficiency, (3) Demonstration of foil lifetimes consistently in excess of 10(superscript 9) pulses at higher temperature and pressure pulse levels than expected in the breadboard laser, (4) Design, procurement, assembly, and initial testing of a compact breadboard laser. As well as laser performance, particular attention has been paid to the sever vibration requirements, thermal and gas flow aspects.

  16. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  17. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  18. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  19. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  20. Detection of trees using airborne lidar data based on ArcGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Feifei; Liu, Jingnan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2006-10-01

    In this article, we use the height difference between the first pulse and last pulse recorded by the airborne laser scanning system to implement a strategy for detection of trees, especially for relatively tall trees. The airborne lidar data we use include 3D coordinates and intensity information of first pulse and last pulse respectively, and the image file of the test area are also available. ArcGIS version 9.0, has been used as the implementation platform as which as effective data processing function and outstanding performance of data analysis such as TIN interpolation and 3D display. To extract trees from the raw data, the data is loaded into ArcGIS to create shapefile recognized by ArcGIS at first, and the corresponding attributes, coordinates, intensity and height difference computed by programming are stored. Then we select the data accord with the filtering condition, a threshold for height difference is given. All the comparisons of 3D coordinates and intensity occur between point data in the same row, in other words, between the first pulse and last pulse. We accept the first pulse which satisfies the height difference threshold as vegetation points. At last, a considerable result of detection of trees has been achieved.

  1. Topography and Vegetation Characterization using Dual-Wavelength Airborne Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, A. L.; Bradford, B.; Magruder, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring Earth surface dynamics at an ever increasing resolution has helped to support the characterization of local topography, including vegetated and urban environments. Airborne remote sensing using light detection and ranging (LIDAR) is naturally suited to characterize vegetation and landscapes as it provides detailed three-dimensional spatial data with multiple elevation recordings for each laser pulse. The full waveform LIDAR receiver is unique in this aspect as it can capture and record the complete temporal history of the reflected signal, which contains detailed information about the structure of the objects and ground surfaces illuminated by the beam. This study examines the utility of co-collected, dual-wavelength, full waveform LIDAR data to characterize vegetation and landscapes through the extraction of waveform features, including total waveform energy, canopy energy distribution, and foliage penetration metrics. Assessments are performed using data collected in May 2014 over Monterey, CA, including the Naval Postgraduate School campus area as well as the Point Lobos State Natural Reserve situated on the Monterey coast. The surveys were performed with the Chiroptera dual-laser LIDAR mapping system from Airborne Hydrography AB (AHAB), which can collect both green (515nm) and near infrared (1064nm) waveforms simultaneously. Making use of the dual waveforms allows for detailed characterization of the vegetation and landscape not previously possible with airborne LIDAR.

  2. Routing architecture and security for airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei; Xie, Peng; Li, Jason; Xu, Roger; Levy, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Airborne networks are envisioned to provide interconnectivity for terrestial and space networks by interconnecting highly mobile airborne platforms. A number of military applications are expected to be used by the operator, and all these applications require proper routing security support to establish correct route between communicating platforms in a timely manner. As airborne networks somewhat different from traditional wired and wireless networks (e.g., Internet, LAN, WLAN, MANET, etc), security aspects valid in these networks are not fully applicable to airborne networks. Designing an efficient security scheme to protect airborne networks is confronted with new requirements. In this paper, we first identify a candidate routing architecture, which works as an underlying structure for our proposed security scheme. And then we investigate the vulnerabilities and attack models against routing protocols in airborne networks. Based on these studies, we propose an integrated security solution to address routing security issues in airborne networks.

  3. Velocity magnitude estimation with linear arrays using Doppler bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Tortoli, P; Guidi, G; Mantovani, L; Newhouse, V L

    2001-04-01

    The dependence of pulsed wave Doppler bandwidth on parameters typical of linear transducer arrays used in commercial Duplex and color flow mapping systems is investigated experimentally. For a single flow line it is observed that this bandwidth generally depends not only on the scatterer velocity and the beam-to-flow angle, but also on the flow line range and orientation. This is due to the fact that in Duplex and color flow systems the transducer is differently focused in the scan and elevation planes and its aperture and focal lengths are often made to vary, depending on the distance of the flow line from the transducer. It is however experimentally demonstrated that, at points where the ultrasound beamwidths in the scan and elevation planes are both comparable to the sample volume length, the Doppler bandwidth is independent of the beam-to-flow angle. It is also shown that this invariance can be extended to other ranges by appropriately modifying the array aperture. Finally, as an application of this independence, the flow-line velocity magnitude in these beam regions is estimated with better than 5% uncertainty through a simple bandwidth measurement.

  4. [Placental 3D Doppler angiography: current and upcoming applications].

    PubMed

    Duan, J; Perdriolle-Galet, E; Chabot-Lecoanet, A-C; Callec, R; Beaumont, M; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Tsatsaris, V; Morel, O

    2015-02-01

    The placental dysfunction, which seems to be caused by a defect of trophoblastic invasion and impaired uterine vascular remodeling since the first trimester, is responsible in a non-exclusive way for the chronic placental hypoxia, resulting secondarily in the intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) and/or pre-eclampsia (PE). The quality of utero-placental vasculature is essential for a proper fetal development and a successful progress of pregnancy. However, the in vivo assessment of placental vascularization with non-invasive methods is complicated by the small size of placental terminal vessel and its complex architecture. Moreover, imaging with contrast agent is not recommended to pregnant women. Until recently, the fetal and maternal vascularization could only be evaluated through pulse Doppler of uterine arteries during pregnancy, which has little clinical value for utero-placental vascularization defects assessment. Recently, a non-invasive study, without use of contrast agent for vasculature evaluation of an organ of interest has become possible by the development of 3D Doppler angiography technique. The objective of this review was to make an inventory of its current and future applications for utero-placental vasculature quantification. The main findings of the literature on the assessment of utero-placental vascularization in physiological situation and major placental vascular dysfunction pathologies such as PE and IUGR were widely discussed.

  5. Doppler backscatter properties of a blood-mimicking fluid for Doppler performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Ramnarine, K V; Hoskins, P R; Routh, H F; Davidson, F

    1999-01-01

    The Doppler backscatter properties of a blood-mimickig fluid (BMF) were studied to evaluate its suitability for use in a Doppler flow test object. Measurements were performed using a flow rig with C-flex tubing and BMF flow produced by a roller pump or a gear pump. A SciMed Doppler system was used to measure the backscattered Doppler power with a root-mean-square power meter connected to the audio output. Studies investigated the dependence of the backscattered Doppler power of the BMF with: circulation time; batch and operator preparations; storage; sieve size; flow speed; and pump type. A comparison was made with human red blood cells resuspended in saline. The backscatter properties are stable and within International Electrotechnical Commission requirements. The BMF is suitable for use in a test object for Doppler performance assessment.

  6. Development of a pulsed 9.5 micron lidar for regional scale O3 measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A pulsed infrared lidar system designed for application to the remote sensing of atmospheric trace gases from an airborne platform is described. The system is also capable of measuring the infrared backscatter characteristics of the ocean surface, terrain, cloud, and aerosol targets. The lidar employed is based on dual wavelength pulse energy measurements in the 9-11 micrometer wavelength region.

  7. Non-contact displacement estimation using Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaomeng; Singh, Aditya; Yavari, Ehsan; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Non-contact Doppler radar has been used extensively for detection of physiological motion. Most of the results published to date have been focused on estimation of the physiological rates, such as respiratory rate and heart rate, with CW and modulated waveforms in various settings. Accurate assessment of chest displacement may take this type of monitoring to the new level, by enabling the estimation of associated cardiopulmonary volumes, and possibly pulse pressure. To obtain absolute chest displacement with highest precision, full nonlinear phase demodulation of the quadrature radar outputs must be performed. The accuracy of this type of demodulation is limited by the drifting received RF power, varying dc offset, and channel quadrature imbalance. In this paper we demonstrate that if relatively large motion is used to calibrate the system, smaller motion displacement may be acquired with the accuracy on the order of 30 µm.

  8. Planar Particle Imaging and Doppler Velocimetry System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A planar velocity measurement system (100) is operative to measure all three velocity components of a flowing fluid (106) across an illuminated plane (108) using only a single line of sight. The fluid flow is seeded with small particles which accurately follow the flow field fluctuations. The seeded flow field is illuminated with pulsed laser light source (102) and the positions of the particles in the flow are recorded on CCD cameras (122,124). The in-plane velocities are measured by determining the in-plane particle displacements. The out-of-plane velocity component is determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the light scattered by the particles. Both gas and liquid velocities can be measured, as well as two-phase flows.

  9. Coherent Doppler lidars: Current US 9-11 micrometer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Freeman F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    To gain a proper perspective of the potential of coherent Doppler lidars for global wind sensing sometime in the future, we need to examine where we are, how we got here, and the expectations for future lidar system development. First we give a brief review of lidar developments leading to our present technology. Next we survey present U.S. infrared systems with particular attention to the pulsed systems since they are the ones that will have sufficient range to operate from satellites. Finally we comment on trends and probable future developments. Only unclassified lidars are considered. The considerable DoD support for classified applications certainly enhances future developments in components and subsystems.

  10. Pulse Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osteryoung, Janet

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the nature of pulse voltammetry, indicating that its widespread use arises from good sensitivity and detection limits and from ease of application and low cost. Provides analytical and mechanistic applications of the procedure. (JN)

  11. Range and Velocity Estimation of Moving Targets Using Multiple Stepped-frequency Pulse Trains

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Meng, Huadong; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Peng, Ying-Ning

    2008-01-01

    Range and velocity estimation of moving targets using conventional stepped-frequency pulse radar may suffer from the range-Doppler coupling and the phase wrapping. To overcome these problems, this paper presents a new radar waveform named multiple stepped-frequency pulse trains and proposes a new algorithm. It is shown that by using multiple stepped-frequency pulse trains and the robust phase unwrapping theorem (RPUT), both of the range-Doppler coupling and the phase wrapping can be robustly resolved, and accordingly, the range and the velocity of a moving target can be accurately estimated. PMID:27879769

  12. IIP Update: A Packaged Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Transceiver. Doppler Aerosol WiNd Lidar (DAWN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent Doppler wind lidar system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid Doppler wind lidar solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  13. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus (20) for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse. The apparatus (20) uses a White cell (10) having a plurality of optical delay paths (18a-18d) of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror (13) and the objective mirrors (11 and 12). A pulse (26) from a laser (27) travels through a multi-leg reflective path (28) between a beam splitter (21) and a totally reflective mirror (24) to the laser output (37). The laser pulse (26) is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter (21) to the input mirrors (14a-14d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d). The pulses from the output mirrors (16a-16d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d) go simultaneously to the laser output (37) and to the input mirrors ( 14b-14d) of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter (21) is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output (37).

  14. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression

  15. Teaching the Doppler effect in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen W.; Cowley, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The Doppler effect is a shift in the frequency of waves emitted from an object moving relative to the observer. By observing and analysing the Doppler shift in electromagnetic waves from astronomical objects, astronomers gain greater insight into the structure and operation of our Universe. In this paper, a simple technique is described for teaching the basics of the Doppler effect to undergraduate astrophysics students using acoustic waves. An advantage of the technique is that it produces a visual representation of the acoustic Doppler shift. The equipment comprises a 40 kHz acoustic transmitter and a microphone. The sound is bounced off a computer fan and the signal collected by a DrDAQ ADC and processed by a spectrum analyser. Widening of the spectrum is observed as the fan power supply potential is increased from 4 to 12 V.

  16. Generalized Doppler Formula in a Nonstatic Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Peter G.

    1977-01-01

    Derives the general Doppler formula in a nonstatic universe using assumptions of special relativity, homogeneity and isotropy of the universe. Examples of applications to physical cosmology are given. (SL)

  17. Student Microwave Experiments Involving the Doppler Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, F. Neff; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Described is the use of the Doppler Effect with microwaves in the measurement of the acceleration due to gravity of falling objects. The experiments described add to the repertoire of quantitative student microwave experiments. (Author/DS)

  18. Comparison of Continuous-Wave CO2 Lidar Calibration by use of Earth-Surface Targets in Laboratory and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana

    1998-01-01

    Backscatter of several Earth surfaces was characterized in the laboratory as a function of incidence angle with a focused continuous-wave 9.1 micro meter CO2 Doppler lidar for use as possible calibration targets. Some targets showed negligible angular dependence, while others showed a slight increase with decreasing angle. The Earth-surface signal measured over the complex Californian terrain during a 1995 NASA airborne mission compared well with laboratory data. Distributions of the Earth's surface signal shows that the lidar efficiency can be estimated with a fair degree of accuracy, preferably with uniform Earth-surface targets during flight for airborne or space-based lidar.

  19. An airborne intensive care facility (fixed wing).

    PubMed

    Gilligan, J E; Goon, P; Maughan, G; Griggs, W; Haslam, R; Scholten, A

    1996-04-01

    A fixed-wing aircraft (Beechcraft KingAir B200 C) fitted as an airborne intensive care facility is described. It completed 2000 missions from 1987-1992 for distances up to 1300 km. Features include: 1. Space for carriage of two stretchers, medical cabin crew of up to five persons and equipment and two-pilot operation if necessary. A third stretcher may be carried in emergencies. 2. Two CARDIOCAP (TM) fixed monitors for ECG, invasive and noninvasive pressures pulse oximetry and end-tidal C02 plus SIEMENS 630(TM)/PROPAQ(TM) compact monitors for the ground transport phase of missions, or the total duration. 3. A medical oxygen reservoir of 4650 litres sufficient for two patients on IPPV with FiO2 = 1.0 for a four-hour trip. The medical suction system is powered from the engine or a vacuum pump. 4. Other medical equipment and drugs in portable packs, for ground transport and resuscitation needs and for replenishment by nursing staff at the parent hospitals. 5. Stretchers compatible with helicopter and road ambulance vehicles used. 6. A stretcher loading device energized from the aircraft, operating through a wide (cargo) door. 7. Provision of 24Ov AC (alternating current) and 28v DC (direct current) electrical energy. 8. Pressurization and climate control. 9. Satisfactory aviation performance for conditions encountered, with single-pilot operation.

  20. An airborne icing characterization probe: nephelometer prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, S.

    2007-10-01

    The aeronautical industry uses airborne probes to characterize icing conditions for flight certification purposes by counting and sizing cloud droplets. Existing probes have been developed for meteorologists in order to study cloud microphysics. They are used on specific aircraft, instrumented for this type of study, but are not adapted for an industrial flight test environment. The development by Airbus of a new probe giving a real time response for particle sizes between 10 and 500 µm, adapted to operational requirements, is in progress. An optical principle by coherent shadowgraphy with a low coherency point source is used for the application. The size of the droplets is measured from their shadows on a CCD. A pulsed laser coupled to a fast camera freezes the movement. Usually, image processing rejects out-of-focus objects. Here, particles far from the focal plane can be sized because of the large depth of field due to the point source. The technique used increases the depth of field and the sampled volume is enough to build a histogram even for low droplet concentrations. Image processing is done in real time and results are provided to the flight test engineer. All data and images are recorded in order to allow on-ground complementary analysis if necessary. A non-telescopic prototype has been tested in a wind tunnel and in flight. The definitive probe being retractable is designed to be easily installed through a dummy window. Retracted, it will allow the aircraft to fly at VMO (maximum operating limit speed).

  1. Time-Height Variations of Ion-Line Doppler Spectra at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, B. J.; Fallen, C. T.

    2012-12-01

    O-mode HF heating results in enhanced electron temperatures in the lower ionosphere that in turn result in enhanced electron densities due to temperature-dependent molecular ion chemistry. As a result, for a fixed HF heating frequency, the altitude of the HF interaction region decreases with time after the onset of HF heating. Corresponding altitudes of the HF-enhanced ion-line signals detected with the MUIR UHF-frequency diagnostic radar also decrease with time. For the data presented here, the radar range resolution was 600 meters, and time-height Doppler spectra were obtained for every pulse (10ms inter-pulse period) of the UHF-radar. We have therefore been able to examine the height-dependent spectral characteristics of ion-line signals every 10ms. The UHF radar signals show a brief initial period after HF turn-on (about 120ms) when signals are scattered around zero Doppler over about 2km height range. The UHF signals then rapidly convert to a stable configuration with two ion-line signatures (approximately +/- 5kHz Doppler values); above a fixed height there is only positive Doppler data (downward ion-acoustic waves), and below that height there is only negative Doppler data (upward ion-acoustic waves). The power associated with the downward ion-acoustic waves is typically stronger than the upward waves. For the example shown, this spectral type persists for the entire duration of the HF heating time, at progressively lower heights. We suggest that the spectral characteristics are associated with HF frequencies near the 3rd gyro harmonic.

  2. Compact, High Energy 2-micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development for NASA's Future 3-D Winds Measurement from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Demoz, Belay B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2-micron laser transmitter development at NASA Langley Research Center for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to study laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for future global coherent Doppler lidar winds measurement. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz laser was designed as an integral part of a compact lidar transceiver developed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 aircraft in autonomous operation. Recently, LaRC 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar system was selected to contribute to the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Earth Science Division (ESD) hurricane field experiment in 2010 titled Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The Doppler lidar system will measure vertical profiles of horizontal vector winds from the DC-8 aircraft using NASA Langley s existing 2-micron, pulsed, coherent detection, Doppler wind lidar system that is ready for DC-8 integration. The measurements will typically extend from the DC-8 to the earth s surface. They will be highly accurate in both wind magnitude and direction. Displays of the data will be provided in real time on the DC-8. The pulsed Doppler wind lidar of NASA Langley Research Center is much more powerful than past Doppler lidars. The operating range, accuracy, range resolution, and time resolution will be unprecedented. We expect the data to play a key role, combined with the other sensors, in improving understanding and predictive algorithms for hurricane strength and track. 1

  3. Doppler micro sense and avoid radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for small Sense and Avoid (SAA) systems for small and micro Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to avoid collisions with obstacles and other aircraft. The proposed SAA systems will give drones the ability to "see" close up and give them the agility to maneuver through tight areas. Doppler radar is proposed for use in this sense and avoid system because in contrast to optical or infrared (IR) systems Doppler can work in more harsh conditions such as at dusk, and in rain and snow. And in contrast to ultrasound based systems, Doppler can better sense small sized obstacles such as wires and it can provide a sensing range from a few inches to several miles. An SAA systems comprised of Doppler radar modules and an array of directional antennas that are distributed around the perimeter of the drone can cover the entire sky. These modules are designed so that they can provide the direction to the obstacle and simultaneously generate an alarm signal if the obstacle enters within the SAA system's adjustable "Protection Border". The alarm signal alerts the drone's autopilot to automatically initiate an avoidance maneuver. A series of Doppler radar modules with different ranges, angles of view and transmitting power have been designed for drones of different sizes and applications. The proposed Doppler radar micro SAA system has simple circuitry, works from a 5 volt source and has low power consumption. It is light weight, inexpensive and it can be used for a variety of small unmanned aircraft.

  4. Doppler-corrected differential detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Doppler in a communication system operating with a multiple differential phase-shift-keyed format (MDPSK) creates an adverse phase shift in an incoming signal. An open loop frequency estimation is derived from a Doppler-contaminated incoming signal. Based upon the recognition that, whereas the change in phase of the received signal over a full symbol contains both the differentially encoded data and the Doppler induced phase shift, the same change in phase over half a symbol (within a given symbol interval) contains only the Doppler induced phase shift, and the Doppler effect can be estimated and removed from the incoming signal. Doppler correction occurs prior to the receiver's final output of decoded data. A multiphase system can operate with two samplings per symbol interval at no penalty in signal-to-noise ratio provided that an ideal low pass pre-detection filter is employed, and two samples, at 1/4 and 3/4 of the symbol interval T sub s, are taken and summed together prior to incoming signal data detection.

  5. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Spuler, S. M.; Spowart, M.; Lenschow, D. H.; Friesen, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s-1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents) that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  6. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Spuler, S. M.; Spowart, M.; Lenschow, D. H.; Friesen, R. B.

    2014-03-01

    A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with an uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s-1 (standard error) and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard-error uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the Global Positioning System, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents) that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that the new laser air-motion sensor, combined with parametrized fits to correction factors for the measured dynamic and ambient pressure, provides a measurement of temperature that is independent of any other temperature sensor.

  7. Study for hardware application of airborne laser doppler system for severe storms measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Specifications are discussed for the overall system configuration, the processor, the scanner, the CO2 laser, and data analysis methods required to measure velocity flow fields associated with severe storms. Modifications to the clear air turbulence (CAT) system and its capability for two dimensional measuring are examined.

  8. Tropospheric Wind Profile Measurements with a Direct Detection Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin; Mathur, Savyasachee

    1998-01-01

    Research has established the importance of global tropospheric wind measurements for large scale improvements in numerical weather prediction. In addition, global wind measurements provide data that are fundamental to the understanding and prediction of global climate change. These tasks are closely linked with the goals of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise and Global Climate Change programs. NASA Goddard has been actively involved in the development of direct detection Doppler lidar methods and technologies to meet the wind observing needs of the atmospheric science community. In this paper we describe a recently developed prototype wind lidar system using a direct detection Doppler technique for measuring wind profiles from the surface through the troposphere. This system uses a pulsed ND:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm as the transmitter. The laser pulse is directed to the atmosphere using a 40 cm diameter scan mirror. The portion of the laser energy backscattered from aerosols and molecules is collected by a 40 cm diameter telescope and coupled via fiber optics into the Doppler receiver. Single photon counting APD's are used to detect the atmospheric backscattered signal. The principle element of the receiver is a dual bandpass tunable Fabry Perot etalon which analyzes the Doppler shift of the incoming laser signal using the double edge technique. The double edge technique uses two high resolution optical filters having bandpasses offset relative to one another such that the 'edge' of the first filter's transmission function crosses that of the second at the half power point. The outgoing laser frequency is located approximately at the crossover point. Due to the opposite going slopes of the edges, a Doppler shift in the atmospheric backscattered laser frequency produces a positive change in signal for one filter and a negative change in the second filter. Taking the ratio of the two edge channel signals yields a result which is directly proportional to the

  9. Detection of airborne polyoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGarrity, G. J.; Dion, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Polyoma virus was recovered from the air of an animal laboratory housing mice infected with the virus. Air samples were obtained by means of a high volume air sampler and further concentrated by high speed centrifugation. Total concentration of the air samples was 7.5 x 10(7). Assay for polyoma virus was by mouse antibody production tests. Airborne polyoma virus was detected in four of six samples. PMID:211163

  10. The Future of Airborne Reconnaissance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    biplanes to the worldwide Cold War missions of the U - 2 and SR-71, airborne reconnaissance has become an indispensable tool to the intelligence community...Reconnaissance Operations (SRO) procedures, such as the U - 2 , RC- 135, and the EP-3, and traditional theater/fleet tactical reconnaissance systems like...upgraded sensor package on the U -2.14 The Army Staffs argument centers around command and control of the asset. The Army agreed that the U - 2 ’s

  11. A feasibility study for the detection of upper atmospheric winds using a ground based laser Doppler velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, J. A. L.; Meng, J. C. S.

    1975-01-01

    A possible measurement program designed to obtain the information requisite to determining the feasibility of airborne and/or satellite-borne LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimeter) systems is discussed. Measurements made from the ground are favored over an airborne measurement as far as for the purpose of determining feasibility is concerned. The expected signal strengths for scattering at various altitude and elevation angles are examined; it appears that both molecular absorption and ambient turbulence degrade the signal at low elevation angles and effectively constrain the ground based measurement of elevation angles exceeding a critical value. The nature of the wind shear and turbulence to be expected are treated from a linear hydrodynamic model - a mountain lee wave model. The spatial and temporal correlation distances establish requirements on the range resolution, the maximum detectable range and the allowable integration time.

  12. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  13. Photon Counting Airborne Laser Swath Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Slatton, K. C.

    2004-05-01

    During the past decade airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) has brought topographic mapping to the forefront of geodesy. ALSM has made it possible, for the first time, to study natural geo-surficial processes on spatial scales extending from meters to hundreds of kilometers, all in a consistent geodetic frame of reference. The conventional approach to ALSM has been to use lasers with enough energy per pulse, and optics with large enough collecting areas, to obtain returns of thousands of photons per shot. This approach minimizes the impact of spurious range values caused by noise, such as background solar radiation and sensor thermal noise, but also constrains the minimum size, weight and power consumption of the hardware. Current systems typically operate at rates approaching 100,000 pulses per second, and another order of magnitude increase would be needed to provide contiguous coverage with a spatial resolution of 30 cm or better. This high signal-to-noise ratio approach affords little scalability for significantly downsizing the hardware, or reducing the costs. University of Florida (UF) researchers are developing an ALSM unit based on a different paradigm, which we refer to as photon counting ALSM, or simply PC-ALSM. The approach is to transmit relatively low energy laser pulses, and to illuminate a surface `patch' about an order of magnitude larger than the typical footprint of a conventional ALSM system. The returning signal will have far fewer photons per unit area of the receive optics, making it more difficult to discriminate between return signal and noise. If a single channel detector were used, the spatial resolution would also be degraded. However, by using a multi-channel photomultiplier tube to detect the returns, the surface patch can be divided into an array of groundals, and by using a multi-stop timing system false ranges can be filtered out of the data during post flight processing. Researchers at NASA GSFC have already tested a first generation

  14. Retroreflector for photonic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoski, Thomas J.; Coutu, Ronald A., Jr.; Starman, LaVern A.

    2009-08-01

    In order to meet the goals of the Department of Defense (DoD) for smaller and more accurate weapons, numerous projects are currently investigating the miniaturization of weapons and munition fuze components. One of these efforts is to characterize the performance of small detonators. The velocity of the flyer, the key component needed to initiate a detonation sequence, can be measured using a photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV). The purpose of this research was to develop a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device that would act as an optimal retroreflective surface for the PDV. Two MEMS solutions were explored: one using the PolyMUMPsTM fabrication process and one in-house fabrication design using silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers. The in-house design consisted of an array of corner reflectors created using an SOI wafer. Each corner reflector consisted of three separate mirror plates which were self-assembled by photoresist pad hinges. When heated to a critical temperature (typically 140-160 °C), the photoresist pads melted and the resulting surface tension caused each mirror to rotate into place. The resulting array of corner reflectors was then coated with a thin layer of gold to increase reflectivity. Despite the successful assembly of a PolyMUMPsTM corner reflector, assembling an array of these reflectors was found to be unfeasible. Although the SOI corner reflector design was completed, these devices were not fabricated in time for testing during this research. However, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) and optical cross section (OCS) of commercially available retroreflective tapes were measured. These results can be used as a baseline comparison for future testing of a fabricated SOI corner reflector array.

  15. Simulation of a Doppler lidar system for autonomous navigation and hazard avoidance during planetary landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budge, Scott E.; Chester, David B.

    2016-05-01

    The latest mission proposals for exploration of solar system bodies require accurate position and velocity data during the descent phase in order to ensure safe, soft landing at the pre-designated sites. During landing maneuvers, the accuracy of the on-board inertial measurement unit (IMU) may not be reliable due to drift over extended travel times to destinations. NASA has proposed an advanced Doppler lidar system with multiple beams that can be used to accurately determine attitude and position of the landing vehicle during descent, and to detect hazards that might exist in the landing area. In order to assess the effectiveness of such a Doppler lidar landing system, it is valuable to simulate the system with different beam numbers and configurations. In addition, the effectiveness of the system to detect and map potential landing hazards must be understood. This paper reports the simulated system performance for a proposed multi-beam Doppler lidar using the LadarSIM system simulation software. Details of the simulation methods are given, as well as lidar performance parameters such as range and velocity accuracy, detection and false alarm rates, and examples of the Doppler lidars ability to detect and characterize simulated hazards in the landing site. The simulation includes modulated pulse generation and coherent detection methods, beam footprint simulation, beam scanning, and interaction with terrain.

  16. Tropospheric and stratospheric wind profiling with a direct detection Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abreu, Vincent J.; Barnes, John E.; Fischer, Ken W.; Skinner, Wilbert R.; Mcgill, Matt J.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Physics Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan has been operating a direct detection, high resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) to measure winds in the boundary layer, free troposphere and lower stratosphere. A direct detection Doppler lidar measures the Doppler shift of the aerosol or Rayleigh backscattered signal, from which the wind velocity vector can be retrieved (Benedetti-Michelangeli et al, 1972, 1974; Chanin et al., 1989; Abreu et al., 1992). The system components are shown. The transmitting system is a Continuum NY-60 Nd:YAG laser frequency doubled to a wavelength of 532 nm. The laser is injection seeded for single line mode operation yielding a linewidth of 0.0045 cm(exp -1) (135 MHz) with excellent shot-to-shot frequency stability. The laser produces 60 mJ pulses and operates at a 50 Hz repetition rate for an effective output power of 3.0 W. A description of the University of Michigan's Doppler lidar is given with examples of wind profiles for the boundary layer, free troposphere, and for the lower stratosphere. The system provides a reliable method of remotely measuring the wind. The wind error is smallest in regions of high aerosols. The system also produces aerosol extinction profiles versus altitude which can be determined by the shape of the spectra. The system has been installed in a trailor so that measurements can be made for field campaigns. Winds and aerosol data are available immediately at the site for use in forecasting.

  17. Transcranial power M-mode Doppler ultrasound for diagnosis of patent foramen ovale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehring, Mark; Spencer, Merrill

    2005-04-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a right-to-left shunt (RLS) which communicates blood from the right to left atrium of the heart. PFO has been associated with stroke and, more recently, with migraine headache. Diagnosis of RLS can be accomplished effectively with transcranial power M-mode Doppler ultrasound (PMD). PMD is a modality which can be performed without the sedation required by the more invasive diagnostic technique using transesophageal echocardiography. PMD for this application consists of 2 MHz pulse Doppler ultrasound with placement of sample gates at 2 mm intervals along the single-transducer beam axis, and 8 kHz pulse repetition rate (PMD100M, Spencer Technologies). Doppler power versus depth is constructed every 4ms, using 33 sample gates. Bubble microemboli injected in the venous system and moving across a PFO present as high intensity tracks on a PMD image, as emboli transit from the heart to the brain and through the observed cerebral vasculature. Use of PMD in this context has been reported in the clinical literature [M. P. Spencer, M. A. Moehring, J. Jesurum et al, J. Neuroimaging 14, 342-349 (2004)]. This talk surveys the basic technical features of PMD for sensing PFO-related showers of bubble microemboli, and how these features provide clues to the severity of PFO.

  18. PULSE COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Trumbo, D.E.

    1959-02-10

    A transistorized pulse-counting circuit adapted for use with nuclear radiation detecting detecting devices to provide a small, light weight portable counter is reported. The small size and low power requirements of the transistor are of particular value in this instance. The circuit provides an adjustable count scale with a single transistor which is triggered by the accumulated charge on a storage capacitor.

  19. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  20. Spacecraft Doppler Tracking as a Xylophone Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo

    1996-01-01

    We discuss spacecraft Doppler tracking in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. By using the four-link radio system first proposed by Vessot and Levine, we derive a new method for removing from the combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. Our method provides also for reducing by several orders of magnitude, at selected Fourier components, the frequency fluctuations due to other noise sources, such as the clock on board the spacecraft or the antenna and buffeting of the probe by non-gravitational forces. In this respect spacecraft Doppler tracking can be regarded as a xylophone detector. Estimates of the sensitivities achievable by this xylophone are presented for two tests of Einstein's theory of relativity: searches for gravitational waves and measurements of the gravitational red shift. This experimental technique could be extended to other tests of the theory of relativity, and to radio science experiments that rely on high-precision Doppler measurements.