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Sample records for airborne raman ozone

  1. Validation of Temperature Measurements from the Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature and Aerosol Lidar During SOLVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas; Hoegy, Walter; Lait, Leslie; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Heaps, William; Hostetler, Chris; Bui, T. Paul; Neuber, Roland; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Airborne Raman Ozone, Temperature and Aerosol Lidar (AROTEL) participated in the recent Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) by providing profiles of aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), ozone and temperature with high vertical and horizontal resolution. Temperatures were derived from just above the aircraft to approximately 60 kilometers geometric altitude with a reported vertical resolution of between 0.5 and 1.5 km. The horizontal footprint varied from 4 to 70 km. This paper explores the measurement uncertainties associated with the temperature retrievals and makes comparisons with independent, coincident, measurements of temperature. Measurement uncertainties range from 0.1 K to approximately 4 K depending on altitude and integration time. Comparisons between AROTEL and balloon sonde temperatures retrieved under clear sky conditions using both Rayleigh and Raman scattered data showed AROTEL approximately 1 K colder than sonde values. Comparisons between AROTEL and the Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) on NASA's ER-2 show AROTEL being from 2-3 K colder for altitudes ranging from 14 to 18 km. Temperature comparisons between AROTEL and the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's model showed differences of approximately 1 K below approximately 25 km and a very strong cold bias of approximately 12 K at altitudes between 30 and 35 km.

  2. Flight results for the airborne Raman lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Burris, John F.

    1995-01-01

    The airborne Raman lidar recently completed a series of flight tests aboard a C-130 aircraft operated by the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. The Raman lidar is intended to make simultaneous remote measurements of methane, water vapor, temperature, and pressure. The principal purpose of the measurements is to aid in the investigation of polar phenomena related to the formation of ozone 'holes' by permitting the identification of the origin of air parcels using methane as a tracer.

  3. Airborne chemistry coupled to Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Johansson, Jonas; Taylor, Lynne S; Levander, Ia; Fox, Shannon; Sepaniak, Michael; Nilsson, Staffan

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, the use of airborne chemistry (acoustically levitated drops) in combination with Raman spectroscopy is explored. We report herein the first Raman studies of crystallization processes in levitated drops and the first demonstration of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection in this medium. Crystallization studies on the model compounds benzamide and indomethacin resulted in the formation of two crystal modifications for each compound, suggesting that this methodology may be useful for investigation of polymorphs. SERS detection resulted in a signal enhancement of 27 000 for benzoic acid and 11 000 for rhodamine 6-G. The preliminary results presented here clearly indicate that several important applications of the combination between Raman spectroscopy and acoustic drop levitation can be expected in the future. PMID:12720359

  4. Tropospheric ozone in the vicinity of the ozone hole - 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Warren, Linda S.; Hypes, Warren D.; Tuck, Adrian F.; Kelly, Kenneth K.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on ozone measurements in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere over Antarctica, obtained by NASA DC-8 aircraft during the August/September 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The ozone mixing ratios as high as several hundred ppbv were measured, but in all cases these ratios were observed in pockets of upper atmospheric air, both in the vicinity of and away from the location of the ozone hole. The background ozone values in the surrounding troposphere were typically in the range of 20-50 ppbv. Correlation of tropospheric ozone observations with the boundaries of the ozone hole differed in the course of the experiment. During the August 28 - September 2 flights, encounters with ozone-rich air were limited, and the background tropospheric ozone appeared to decrease beneath the hole. For the later flights, and as the ozone hole deepened, the ozone-rich air was frequently observed in the vicinity of the hole, and the average ozone values at the flight altitude were frequently higher than the background values.

  5. Airborne Dial Remote Sensing of the Arctic Ozone Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, Martin; Renger, Wolfgang; Ehret, Gerhard

    1992-01-01

    A combined ozone and aerosol LIDAR was developed at the Institute of Physics of the Atmosphere at the DLR in Oberpfaffenhofen. It is an airborne version, that, based on the DIAL-principle, permits the recording of two-dimensional ozone profiles. This presentation will focus on the ozone-part; the aerosol subsection will be treated later.

  6. Tropospheric ozone in the vicinity of the ozone hole: 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, G.L.; Warren, L.S. ); Hypes, W.D. ); Tuck, A.F.; Kelly, K.K. ); Krueger, A.J. )

    1989-11-30

    Tropospheric ozone measurements over Antarctica aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft are summarized. As part of the August/September 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment, the aircraft flew 13 missions covering a latitude of 53{degree}-90{degree}S, at altitudes to 13 km. Ozone mixing ratios as high as several hundred parts per billion by volume (ppbv) were measured, but in all cases these ratios were observed in pockets or patches of upper atmospheric air. These pockets were observed both in the vicinity of and away from the location of the ozone hole. At times, and as a result of these pockets, the ozone levels at the flight altitude of the aircraft, as averaged beneath the boundaries of the stratospheric ozone hole, were 2-3 times higher than background tropospheric values. The data suggest that the ozone-rich air seldom penetrated below about 9-km altitude. Background ozone values in the surrounding troposphere were typically in the range of 20-50 ppbv. Correlation of tropospheric ozone observations with the boundaries of the ozone hole differed during the experiment. During the early flights (August 28 through September 2), encounters with ozone-rich air were limited and background tropospheric ozone (at the flight altitude) appeared to decrease beneath the hole. For many of the later flights, and as the hole deepened, the reverse was noted, in that ozone-rich air was frequently observed in the vicinity of the hole and, as noted earlier, average ozone at the flight altitude was frequently higher than background values.

  7. Ozone Hole Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (Pre-Flight)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The first segment of this video gives an overview of the Ozone Hole Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, an international effort using balloon payloads, ground based instruments, and airborne instruments to study ozone depletion and the hole in the ozone over Antarctica which occurs every spring. False color imagery taken from NASA's Nimbus 7 satellite which documents daily changes in ozone is also shown. The second segment of this video shows actual take-off and flight footage of the two aircraft used in the experiment: the DC-8 Flying Laboratory and the high flying ER-2.

  8. Performance Modeling of an Airborne Raman Water Vapor Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Schwemmer, G.; Berkoff, T.; Plotkin, H.; Ramos-Izquierdo, L.; Pappalardo, G.

    2000-01-01

    A sophisticated Raman lidar numerical model had been developed. The model has been used to simulate the performance of two ground-based Raman water vapor lidar systems. After tuning the model using these ground-based measurements, the model is used to simulate the water vapor measurement capability of an airborne Raman lidar under both day-and night-time conditions for a wide range of water vapor conditions. The results indicate that, under many circumstances, the daytime measurements possess comparable resolution to an existing airborne differential absorption water vapor lidar while the nighttime measurement have higher resolution. In addition, a Raman lidar is capable of measurements not possible using a differential absorption system.

  9. Raman shifting of KrF laser radiation for tropospheric ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Ismail, Syed

    1991-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurement of tropospheric ozone requires use of high average power UV lasers operating at two appropriate DIAL wavelengths. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that a KrF excimer laser can be used to generate several wavelengths with good energy conversion efficiencies by stimulated Raman shifting using hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2). Computer simulations for an airborne lidar have shown that these laser emissions can be used for the less than 5 percent random error, high resolution measuremment of ozone across the troposphere using the DIAL technique. In the region of strong ozone absorption, laser wavelengths of 277.0 and 291.7 nm were generated using H2 and D2, respectively. In addition, a laser wavelength at 302.0 nm was generated using two cells in series, with the first containing D2 and the second containing H2. The energy conversion efficiency for each wavelength was between 14 and 27 percent.

  10. Contribution of ozone to airborne aldehyde formation in Paris homes.

    PubMed

    Rancière, Fanny; Dassonville, Claire; Roda, Célina; Laurent, Anne-Marie; Le Moullec, Yvon; Momas, Isabelle

    2011-09-15

    Indoor aldehydes may result from ozone-initiated chemistry, mainly documented by experimental studies. As part of an environmental investigation included in the PARIS birth cohort, the aim of this study was to examine ozone contribution to airborne aldehyde formation in Paris homes. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and hexaldehyde levels, as well as styrene, nitrogen dioxide and nicotine concentrations, comfort parameters and carbon dioxide levels, were measured twice during the first year of life of the babies. Ambient ozone concentrations were collected from the closest background station of the regional air monitoring network. Traffic-related nitrogen oxide concentrations in front of the dwellings were estimated by an air pollution dispersion model. Home characteristics and families' way of life were described by questionnaires. Stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to link aldehyde levels with ambient ozone concentrations and a few aldehyde precursors involved in oxidation reactions, adjusting for other indoor aldehyde sources, comfort parameters and traffic-related nitrogen oxides. A 4 and 11% increase in formaldehyde and hexaldehyde levels was pointed out when 8-hour ozone concentrations increased by 20 μg/m(3). The influence of potential precursors such as indoor styrene level and frequent use of air fresheners, containing unsaturated volatile organic compounds as terpenes, was also found. Thus, our results suggest that ambient ozone can significantly impact indoor air quality, especially with regard to formaldehyde and hexaldehyde levels.

  11. Theoretical support for the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, D.L.

    1992-03-01

    This investigation was to provide theoretical support during and after the deployment of NASA research aircraft to Punta Arenas, Chile during August and September of 1987 to conduct the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The experiment was very successful in demonstrating the role of anthropogenic chlorine in producing the ozone hole over Antarctica during September and October of 1987. The PI worked primarily on using tracer data from the ER-2 aircraft to show that transport could not have caused the ozone hole in 1987, and that transport of chemical species into the polar vortex was very weak during the period of the experiment. The presence of gravity waves was also very apparent in the ER-2 data, and papers were published on this analysis and on the use of meteorological analyses to position the aircraft within the vortex.

  12. Airborne lidar measurements of ozone and aerosols during the pacific exploratory mission-tropics A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenn, Marta A.; Browell, Edward V.; Grant, William B.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Gregory, Gerald L.

    1998-01-01

    Airborne lidar measurements of aerosol and ozone distributions from the surface to above the tropopause over the South Pacific Ocean are presented. The measurements illustrate large-scale features of the region, and are used to quantify the relative contributions of different ozone sources to the tropospheric ozone budget in this remote region.

  13. AROTEL - An Airborne Ozone, Aerosol and Temperature Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Thomas J.; Burris, John F.; Hoegy, Walter; Heaps, William; Silbert, Donald; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Nueber, Roland; Schmidt, Thomas; Hostetler, Chris

    2000-01-01

    The AROTEL instrument is a collaboration between scientists at NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center and NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument was designed and constructed to be flown on the NASA DC-8, and to measure vertical profiles of ozone, temperature and aerosol. The instrument transmits radiation at 308, 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Depolarization is measured at 532 nm. In addition to the transmitted wavelengths, Raman scattered signals at 332 nm and 387 nm are also collected. The instrument was installed aboard the DC-8 for the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) which deployed from Kiruna, Sweden, during the winter of 1999-2000 to study the polar stratosphere. During this time, profile measurements of polar stratospheric clouds, ozone and temperature were made. This paper provides an instrumental overview as an introduction to several data papers to be presented in the poster sessions. In addition to samples of the measurements, examples will be given to establish the quality of the various data products.

  14. Airborne compact rotational Raman lidar for temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Decheng; Wang, Zhien; Wechsler, Perry; Mahon, Nick; Deng, Min; Glover, Brent; Burkhart, Matthew; Kuestner, William; Heesen, Ben

    2016-09-01

    We developed an airborne compact rotational Raman lidar (CRL) for use on the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) aircraft to obtain two-dimensional (2D) temperature disman tributions. It obtained fine-scale 2D temperature distributions within 3 km below the aircraft for the first time during the PECAN (Plains Elevated Convection At Night) campaign in 2015. The CRL provided nighttime temperature measurements with a random error of <0.5 K within 800 m below aircraft at 45 m vertical and 1000 m horizontal resolution. The temperatures obtained by the CRL and a radiosonde agreed. Along with water vapor and aerosol measurements, the CRL provides critical parameters on the state of the lower atmosphere for a wide range of atmospheric research. PMID:27607724

  15. An evaluation of PBL parameterizations utilizing compact airborne raman Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauly, Rebecca

    The water vapor structure within and above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) plays an essential role in many weather and climate phenomena including the water vapor feedback, thunderstorm formation and maintenance, and precipitation amounts. As a result, the accurate modeling of the PBL and its water vapor structure is critical for accurate climate and weather predictions. The University of Wyoming Compact Airborne Raman Lidar (CARL) is an ideal instrument with which to conduct model evaluation studies because of its ability to measure the fine scale water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) on a mobile platform. A PBL scheme comparison and sensitivity study was conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and CARL data from two days in June 2010. The three PBL schemes used were the Mellor, Yamada, Janjic (MYJ) scheme, Yonsei University (YSU) scheme, and the Asymmetric Convective Model Version 2 (ACM2) scheme. The analysis revealed that the MYJ scheme performed best on modeling the magnitude of WVMR in the PBL but that the ACM2 and YSU schemes modeled the vertical structure better. Sensitivity studies modifying the assumptions made to determine the PBL top, k-diffusivity profiles, and surface heat fluxes were conducted. The magnitude of WVMR was improved within the YSU and ACM2 schemes by modifying the vertical diffusivity as well as in the YSU scheme by decreasing the surface sensible heat flux. The convective storms, which formed in each case, were also studied, and results show that runs with higher magnitudes of WVMR modeled these storms more accurately.

  16. Compact airborne Raman lidar for profiling aerosol, water vapor and clouds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Zhien; Cai, Yong; Wechsler, Perry; Kuestner, William; Burkhart, Matthew; Welch, Wayne

    2014-08-25

    A compact airborne Raman lidar system, which can perform water vapor and aerosol measurements both during nighttime and daytime is described. The system design, setup and the data processing methods are described in the paper. The Raman lidar was tested on University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft (UWKA) during the Wyoming King Air PBL Exploratory Experiment (KAPEE) in 2010. An observation showing clouds, aerosols and a dry line is presented to illustrate the lidar detection capabilities. Comparisons of the water vapor and aerosol measurements using the Raman lidar and other in situ airborne instruments show good agreement. PMID:25321266

  17. Compact airborne Raman lidar for profiling aerosol, water vapor and clouds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Zhien; Cai, Yong; Wechsler, Perry; Kuestner, William; Burkhart, Matthew; Welch, Wayne

    2014-08-25

    A compact airborne Raman lidar system, which can perform water vapor and aerosol measurements both during nighttime and daytime is described. The system design, setup and the data processing methods are described in the paper. The Raman lidar was tested on University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft (UWKA) during the Wyoming King Air PBL Exploratory Experiment (KAPEE) in 2010. An observation showing clouds, aerosols and a dry line is presented to illustrate the lidar detection capabilities. Comparisons of the water vapor and aerosol measurements using the Raman lidar and other in situ airborne instruments show good agreement.

  18. Correlative Stratospheric Ozone Measurements with the Airborne UV DIAL System during TOTE/VOTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Fenn, Marta A.; Browell, Edward V.; McGee, Thomas J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Gross, Michael R.; McDermid, I. Stuart; Froidevaux, Lucien; Wang, Pi-Huang

    1998-01-01

    The airborne UV differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system participated in the Tropical Ozone Transport Experiment/Vortex Ozone Transport Experiment (TOTE/VOTE) in late 1995/early 1996. This mission afforded the opportunity to compare the DIAL system's stratospheric ozone measuring capability with other remote-sensing instruments through correlative measurements over a latitude range from the tropics to the Arctic. These instruments included ground-based DIAL and space-based stratospheric instruments: HALOE; MLS; and SAGE II. The ozone profiles generally agreed within random error estimates for the various instruments in the middle of the profiles in the tropics, but regions of significant systematic differences, especially near or below the tropopause or at the higher altitudes were also found. The comparisons strongly suggest that the airborne UV DIAL system can play a valuable role as a mobile lower-stratospheric ozone validation instrument.

  19. Barium Nitrate Raman Laser Development for Remote Sensing of Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Christopher L.; Chyba, Thomas H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand the impact of anthropogenic emissions upon the earth's environment, scientists require remote sensing techniques which are capable of providing range-resolved measurements of clouds, aerosols, and the concentrations of several chemical constituents of the atmosphere. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is a very promising method to measure concentration profiles of chemical species such as ozone and water vapor as well as detect the presence of aerosols and clouds. If a suitable DIAL system could be deployed in space, it would provide a global data set of tremendous value. Such systems, however, need to be compact, reliable, and very efficient. In order to measure atmospheric gases with the DIAL technique, the laser transmitter must generate suitable on-line and off-line wavelength pulse pairs. The on-line pulse is resonant with an absorption feature of the species of interest. The off-line pulse is tuned so that it encounters significantly less absorption. The relative backscattered power for the two pulses enables the range-resolved concentration to be computed. Preliminary experiments at NASA LaRC suggested that the solid state Raman shifting material, Ba(NO3)2, could be utilized to produce these pulse pairs. A Raman oscillator pumped at 532 nm by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser can create first Stokes laser output at 563 nm and second Stokes output at 599 nm. With frequency doublers, UV output at 281 nm and 299 nm can be subsequently obtained. This all-solid state system has the potential to be very efficient, compact, and reliable. Raman shifting in Ba(NO3)2, has previously been performed in both the visible and the infrared. The first Raman oscillator in the visible region was investigated in 1986 with the configurations of plane-plane and unstable telescopic resonators. However, most of the recent research has focused on the development of infrared sources for eye-safe lidar applications.

  20. Airborne lidar mapping of vertical ozone distributions in support of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uthe, Edward E.; Nielsen, Norman B.; Livingston, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandated attainment of the ozone standard established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Improved photochemical models validated by experimental data are needed to develop strategies for reducing near surface ozone concentrations downwind of urban and industrial centers. For more than 10 years, lidar has been used on large aircraft to provide unique information on ozone distributions in the atmosphere. However, compact airborne lidar systems are needed for operation on small aircraft of the type typically used on regional air quality investigations to collect data with which to develop and validate air quality models. Data presented in this paper will consist of a comparison between airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and airborne in-situ ozone measurements. Also discussed are future plans to improve the airborne ultraviolet-DIAL for ozone and other gas observations and addition of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) emission spectrometer to investigate the effects of other gas species on vertical ozone distribution.

  1. Absolute tracer dye concentration using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The use of simultaneous airborne-laser-induced dye fluorescence and water Raman backscatter to measure the absolute concentration of an ocean-dispersed tracer dye is discussed. Theoretical considerations of the calculation of dye concentration by the numerical comparison of airborne laser-induced fluorescence spectra with laboratory spectra for known dye concentrations using the 3400/cm OH-stretch water Raman scatter as a calibration signal are presented which show that minimum errors are obtained and no data concerning water mass transmission properties are required when the laser wavelength is chosen to yield a Raman signal near the dye emission band. Results of field experiments conducted with an airborne conical scan lidar over a site in New York Bight into which rhodamine dye had been injected in a study of oil spill dispersion are then indicated which resulted in a contour map of dye concentrations, with a minimum detectable dye concentration of approximately 2 ppb by weight.

  2. Observation of atmospheric ozone by dial with Raman lasers pumped by a KrF laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, M.; Shibata, T.

    1986-01-01

    Since the XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) was first used in Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for stratospheric ozone detection, the XeCl ozone lidar became a useful tool for the monitoring of the stratospheric ozone concentration. Shorter wavelength lasers are needed for the observation of ozone in the troposphere where the ozone concentration is about one order of magnitude smaller than in the stratosphere. In 1983, tropospheric ozone was observed with the combination of the second Stokes line (290.4 nm) of stimulated Raman scattering from methane pumped by a KrF laser and the XeCl laser line. The measurement of the ozone distribution from ground to 30 km was reported, using three Stokes lines of Raman lasers pumped by a KrF laser. At wavelengths shorter than 295 nm, the background solar radiation is effectively suppressed by atmospheric ozone. Such a solar-blind effect can be expected when two wavelengths 277 and 290.4 nm are used for DIAL ozone detection. A preliminary measurement of the day time ozone distribution in the troposphere is presented using these wavelengths generated by a KrF laser with a Raman shifter. Analysis using the lidar equation predicts the maximum detectable range is 7 km.

  3. Bimodal distribution of free tropospheric ozone over the tropical western Pacific revealed by airborne observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L. L.; Honomichl, S. B.; Randel, W. J.; Apel, E. C.; Atlas, E. L.; Beaton, S. P.; Bresch, J. F.; Hornbrook, R.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2015-09-01

    A recent airborne field campaign over the remote western Pacific obtained the first intensive in situ ozone sampling over the warm pool region from oceanic surface to 15 km altitude (near 360 K potential temperature level). The new data set quantifies ozone in the tropical tropopause layer under significant influence of convective outflow. The analysis further reveals a bimodal distribution of free tropospheric ozone mixing ratio. A primary mode, narrowly distributed around 20 ppbv, dominates the troposphere from the surface to 15 km. A secondary mode, broadly distributed with a 60 ppbv modal value, is prominent between 3 and 8 km (320 K to 340 K potential temperature levels). The latter mode occurs as persistent layers of ozone-rich drier air and is characterized by relative humidity under 45%. Possible controlling mechanisms are discussed. These findings provide new insight into the physical interpretation of the "S"-shaped mean ozone profiles in the tropics.

  4. Rotational vibrational-rotational Raman differential absorption lidar for atmospheric ozone measurements: methodology and experiment.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, J; Bisson, S E; Reichardt, S; Weitkamp, C; Neidhart, B

    2000-11-20

    A single-laser Raman differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for ozone measurements in clouds is proposed. An injection-locked XeCl excimer laser serves as the radiation source. The ozone molecule number density is calculated from the differential absorption of the anti-Stokes rotational Raman return signals from molecular nitrogen and oxygen as the on-resonance wavelength and the vibrational-rotational Raman backscattering from molecular nitrogen or oxygen as the off-resonance wavelength. Model calculations show that the main advantage of the new rotational vibrational-rotational (RVR) Raman DIAL over conventional Raman DIAL is a 70-85% reduction in the wavelength-dependent effects of cloud-particle scattering on the measured ozone concentration; furthermore the complexity of the apparatus is reduced substantially. We describe a RVR Raman DIAL setup that uses a narrow-band interference-filter polychromator as the lidar receiver. Single-laser ozone measurements in the troposphere and lower stratosphere are presented, and it is shown that on further improvement of the receiver performance, ozone measurements in clouds are attainable with the filter-polychromator approach.

  5. Tropospheric ozone distributions measured with an airborne laser absorption spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of tropospheric ozone have been made in the southern and middle California regions and over the Pacific Ocean during two series of flights in February and May 1977. The data were obtained by using a laser absorption spectrometer, a nadir-viewing instrument which remotely measures the ozone column abundance between ground level and aircraft altitude by interacting with ozone at specific wavelengths near 9.5 microns. The measurements indicate significantly lower ozone abundances above the Mojave Desert region as compared with farm, forest, and urban areas. The average tropospheric column density was found to be 0.0027 atm cm/km over the California region and 0.0035 atm cm/km over the Pacific Ocean region 1000-2000 km west of the coast of Mexico.

  6. Boundary layer ozone - An airborne survey above the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Browell, Edward V.; Warren, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    Ozone data obtained over the forest canopy of the Amazon Basin during July and August 1985 in the course of NASA's Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A are discussed, and ozone profiles obtained during flights from Belem to Tabatinga, Brazil, are analyzed to determine any cross-basin effects. The analyses of ozone data indicate that the mixed layer of the Amazon Basin, for the conditions of undisturbed meteorology and in the absence of biomass burning, is a significant sink for tropospheric ozone. As the coast is approached, marine influences are noted at about 300 km inland, and a transition from a forest-controlled mixed layer to a marine-controlled mixed layer is noted.

  7. Near-real-time TOMS, telecommunications and meteorological support for the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardanuy, P.; Victorine, J.; Sechrist, F.; Feiner, A.; Penn, L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole. Total ozone data taken by the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) played a central role in the successful outcome of the experiment. During the experiment, the near-real-time TOMS total ozone observations were supplied within hours of real time to the operations center in Punta Arenas, Chile. The final report summarizes the role which Research and Data Systems (RDS) Corporation played in the support of the experiment. The RDS provided telecommunications to support the science and operations efforts for the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment, and supplied near real-time weather information to ensure flight and crew safety; designed and installed the telecommunications network to link NASA-GSFC, the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO), Palmer Station, the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to the operation at Punta Arenas; engineered and installed stations and other stand-alone systems to collect data from designated low-orbiting polar satellites and beacons; provided analyses of Nimbus-7 TOMS data and backup data products to Punta Arenas; and provided synoptic meteorological data analysis and reduction.

  8. Continental Outflow from the Northeastern United States as Observed by Airborne Ozone Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, R. M.; Senff, C. J.; Darby, L. S.; White, A. B.; Trainer, M.; Alvarez, R. J.; Hardesty, R. M.

    2005-12-01

    A continental outflow of pollutants, which represents an accumulation plume of pollutants from major cities and other sources from Washington DC to New York and Boston is often produced by summertime southwesterly synoptic flow along the East Coast of the United States, according to numerical weather prediction (NWP) modeling studies. Observational evidence of these effects is provided using measurements from NOAA's airborne ozone-profiling lidar, which measures a vertical curtain of height-resolved ozone concentrations from the surface to ~3 km above sea level (ASL) along the aircraft flight track. The daytime plume of a major source, the New York City urban-complex, was shown to be carried eastward over Long Island by late afternoon, while maintaining ozone concentrations exceeding 120 ppb. Flights several hundred kilometers offshore characterized the continental outflow, which consisted of a 75-ppb outflow with embedded plumes, which maintained concentrations of > 90 ppb and widths of ~100 km. Airborne ozone lidar data were combined with trajectory data from profiler networks, dropsonde data from the lidar aircraft (a DC-3), and air chemistry data from the NOAA P-3, to characterize the plume and the atmospheric transport. This combined analysis showed that the origins of the offshore plumes were the Philadelphia and Washington DC-Baltimore areas. Comparison of plume location and peak ozone concentrations with NWP model output will also be performed and presented.

  9. The 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment: the Nimbus-7 TOMS Data Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Ardanuy, Philip E.; Sechrist, Frank S.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Galimore, Reginald N.

    1988-01-01

    Total ozone data taken by the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) played a central role in the successful outcome of the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The near-real-time TOMS total ozone observations were suppled within hours of real time to the operations center in Punta Arenas, Chile, over a telecommunications network designed specifically for this purpose. The TOMS data preparation and method of transfer over the telecommunications links are reviewed. This atlas includes a complete set of the near-real-time TOMS orbital overpass data over regions around the Palmer Peninsula of Antarctica for the period of August 8 through September 29, 1987. Also provided are daily polar orthographic projections of TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere from August through November 1987. In addition, a chronology of the salient points of the experiment, along with some latitudinal cross sections and time series at locations of interest of the TOMS total ozone observations are presented. The TOMS total ozone measurements are evaluated along the flight tracks of each of the ER-2 and DC-8 missions during the experiment. The ozone hole is shown here to develop in a monotonic progression throughout late August and September. The minimum total ozone amount was found on 5 October, when its all-time lowest value of 109 DU is recorded. The hole remains well defined, but fills gradually from mid-October through mid-November. The hole's dissolution is observed here to begin in mid-November, when it elongates and begins to rotate. By the end of November, the south pole is no longer located within the ozone hole.

  10. Ozone and aerosol changes during the 1991-1992 airborne arctic stratospheric expedition.

    PubMed

    Browell, E V; Butler, C F; Fenn, M A; Grant, W B; Ismail, S; Schoeberl, M R; Toon, O B; Loewenstein, M; Podolske, J R

    1993-08-27

    Stratospheric ozone and aerosol distributions were measured across the wintertime Arctic vortex from January to March 1992 with an airborne lidar system as part of the 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE II). Aerosols from the Mount Pinatubo eruption were found outside and inside the vortex with distinctly different distributions that clearly identified the dynamics of the vortex. Changes in aerosols inside the vortex indicated advection of air from outside to inside the vortex below 16 kilometers. No polar stratospheric clouds were observed and no evidence was found for frozen volcanic aerosols inside the vortex. Between January and March, ozone depletion was observed inside the vortex from 14 to 20 kilometers with a maximum average loss of about 23 percent near 18 kilometers.

  11. Raman DIAL measurements of stratospheric ozone in the presence of volcanic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Thomas J.; Gross, Michael; Ferrare, Richard; Heaps, William; Singh, Upendra

    1993-01-01

    Since the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June, 1991, measurements of atmospheric species which depend on Rayleigh scattering of radiation, have been severely compromised where the volcanic aerosol cloud exists. For the GSFC stratospheric ozone lidar, this has meant that ozone determination has been impossible below approximately 30 km. The GSFC lidar has been modified to detect Raman scattering from nitrogen molecules from transmitted laser wavelengths. The instrument transmits two laser wavelengths at 308 nm and 351 nm, and detects returns at four wavelengths; 308 nm, 332 nm, 351 nm, and 382 nm. Using this technique in conjunction with the Rayleigh DIAL measurement, ozone profiles have been measured between 15 and 50 km.

  12. Estimating total aqueous and airborne chemical emissions from ozonated and chemically treated cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, A.

    1996-10-01

    Cooling tower operations result in aqueous and airborne emissions into the environment in the form of blowdown and drift, respectively. Increased regulatory and licensing requirements often obligate end users to quantify the nature and amount of any added chemicals in such emissions. This paper presents a methodology whereby cooling tower operators can perform such calculations for conventionally chemically treated cooling towers as well as ozonated cooling towers. Emissions from cooling towers depend on the operating characteristics of the tower (recirculation rate, drift rate), makeup and cooling water quality (makeup water mineral concentration, cooling water cycles of concentration), the amount of chemicals added to the cooling water, and/or the amount of ozone injected into the cooling water and the mass transfer efficiency of the ozone injection process.

  13. Oil film thickness measurement using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The use of laser-induced water Raman backscatter for remote thin oil film detection and thickness measurement is reported here for the first time. A 337.1-nm nitrogen laser was used to excite the 3400-cm-1 OH stretch band of natural ocean water beneath the oil slick from an altitude of 150 m. The signal strength of the 381-nm water Raman backscatter was always observed to depress when the oil was encountered and then return to its original undepressed value after complete aircraft traversal of the floating slick. After removal of background and oil fluorescence contributions, the ratio of the depressed-to-undepressed airborne water Raman signal intensities, together with laboratory measured oil extinction coefficients, is used to calculate the oil film thickness.

  14. Error analysis of Raman differential absorption lidar ozone measurements in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, J

    2000-11-20

    A formalism for the error treatment of lidar ozone measurements with the Raman differential absorption lidar technique is presented. In the presence of clouds wavelength-dependent multiple scattering and cloud-particle extinction are the main sources of systematic errors in ozone measurements and necessitate a correction of the measured ozone profiles. Model calculations are performed to describe the influence of cirrus and polar stratospheric clouds on the ozone. It is found that it is sufficient to account for cloud-particle scattering and Rayleigh scattering in and above the cloud; boundary-layer aerosols and the atmospheric column below the cloud can be neglected for the ozone correction. Furthermore, if the extinction coefficient of the cloud is ?0.1 km(-1), the effect in the cloud is proportional to the effective particle extinction and to a particle correction function determined in the limit of negligible molecular scattering. The particle correction function depends on the scattering behavior of the cloud particles, the cloud geometric structure, and the lidar system parameters. Because of the differential extinction of light that has undergone one or more small-angle scattering processes within the cloud, the cloud effect on ozone extends to altitudes above the cloud. The various influencing parameters imply that the particle-related ozone correction has to be calculated for each individual measurement. Examples of ozone measurements in cirrus clouds are discussed.

  15. Radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in which daily 3D Type I nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and Type II water ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were generated in the polar regions during AAOE and the AASE aircraft missions. Mission data on particular composition and size, together with NMC-analyzed temperatures, are used. For AAOE, both Type I and Type II clouds were formed for the time period August 23 to September 17, after which only Type I clouds formed. During AASE, while Type I clouds were formed for each day between January 3 and February 10, Type II clouds formed on only two days, January 24 and 31. Mie theory and a radiative transfer model are used to compute the radiative heating rates during the mission periods, for clear and cloudy lower sky cases. Only the Type II water ice clouds have a significant radiative effect, with the Type I NATO PSCs generating a net heating or cooling of 0.1 K/d or less.

  16. Identification and characterization of individual airborne volcanic ash particles by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Huckele, Susanne; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph; Baumann, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We present for the first time the Raman microspectroscopic identification and characterization of individual airborne volcanic ash (VA) particles. The particles were collected in April/May 2010 during research aircraft flights, which were performed by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt in the airspace near the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption and over Europe (between Iceland and Southern Germany). In addition, aerosol particles were sampled by an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor in Munich, Germany. As references for the Raman analysis, we used the spectra of VA collected at the ground near the place of eruption, of mineral basaltic rock, and of different minerals from a database. We found significant differences in the spectra of VA and other aerosol particles (e.g., soot, nitrates, sulfates, and clay minerals), which allowed us to identify VA among other atmospheric particulate matter. Furthermore, while the airborne VA shows a characteristic Raman pattern (with broad band from ca. 200 to ca. 700 cm(-1) typical for SiO₂ glasses and additional bands of ferric minerals), the differences between the spectra of aged and fresh particles were observed, suggesting differences in their chemical composition and/or structure. We also analyzed similarities between Eyjafjallajökull VA particles collected at different sampling sites and compared the particles with a large variety of glassy and crystalline minerals. This was done by applying cluster analysis, in order to get information on the composition and structure of volcanic ash. PMID:24121468

  17. Airborne and Ground-Based Measurements Using a High-Performance Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Rush, Kurt; Rabenhorst, Scott; Welch, Wayne; Cadirola, Martin; McIntire, Gerry; Russo, Felicita; Adam, Mariana; Venable, Demetrius; Connell, Rasheen; Veselovskii, Igor; Forno, Ricardo; Mielke, Bernd; Stein, Bernhard; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Stuart; Voemel, Holger

    2010-01-01

    A high-performance Raman lidar operating in the UV portion of the spectrum has been used to acquire, for the first time using a single lidar, simultaneous airborne profiles of the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscatter, aerosol extinction, aerosol depolarization and research mode measurements of cloud liquid water, cloud droplet radius, and number density. The Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL) system was installed in a Beechcraft King Air B200 aircraft and was flown over the mid-Atlantic United States during July August 2007 at altitudes ranging between 5 and 8 km. During these flights, despite suboptimal laser performance and subaperture use of the telescope, all RASL measurement expectations were met, except that of aerosol extinction. Following the Water Vapor Validation Experiment Satellite/Sondes (WAVES_2007) field campaign in the summer of 2007, RASL was installed in a mobile trailer for groundbased use during the Measurements of Humidity and Validation Experiment (MOHAVE-II) field campaign held during October 2007 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory s Table Mountain Facility in southern California. This ground-based configuration of the lidar hardware is called Atmospheric Lidar for Validation, Interagency Collaboration and Education (ALVICE). During theMOHAVE-II field campaign, during which only nighttime measurements were made, ALVICE demonstrated significant sensitivity to lower-stratospheric water vapor. Numerical simulation and comparisons with a cryogenic frost-point hygrometer are used to demonstrate that a system with the performance characteristics of RASL ALVICE should indeed be able to quantify water vapor well into the lower stratosphere with extended averaging from an elevated location like Table Mountain. The same design considerations that optimize Raman lidar for airborne use on a small research aircraft are, therefore, shown to yield significant dividends in the quantification of lower-stratospheric water vapor. The MOHAVE

  18. Water Raman normalization of airborne laser fluorosensor measurements - A computer model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Esaias, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    The technique for normalizing airborne lidar measurements of chlorophyll fluoresence by the water Raman scattering signal is investigated for laser-excitation wavelengths of 480 and 532 nm using a semianalytic Monte Carlo methodology (SALMON). The signal-integration depth for chlorophyll fluorescence Z(90,F), is found to be insensitive to excitation wavelength and ranges from a maximum of 4.5 m in clearest waters to less than 1 m at a chlorophyll concentration of 20 microgram/liter. For excitation at 532 nm, the signal-integration depth for Raman scattering, Z(90,R), is comparable to Z(90,F). For excitation at 480 nm, Z(90,R) is four times as large as Z(90,F) in clearest waters but nearly equivalent at chlorophyll concentrations greater than 2-3 microgram/liter. Absolute signal levels are stronger with excitation at 480 nm than with excitation at 532 nm, but this advantage must be weighed against potential ambiguities resulting from different integration depths for the fluorescence and Raman scattering signals in clearer waters. To the precision of the simulations, Raman normalization produces effectively linear response to chlorophyll concentration for both excitation wavelengths.

  19. Southern Hemispheric nitrous oxide measurements obtained during 1987 airborne Antarctic ozone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolske, J. R.; Loewenstein, M.; Strahan, S. E.; Chan, K. Roland

    1988-01-01

    The chemical lifetime of N2O is about 150 years, which makes it an excellent dynamical tracer of air motion on the time scale of the ozone depletion event. For these reasons it was chosen to help test whether dynamical theories of ozone loss over Antarctica were plausible, particularly the theory that upwelling ozone-poor air from the troposphere was replacing ozone-rich stratospheric air. The N2O measurements were made with the Airborne Tunable Laser Absorption Spectrometer (ATLAS) aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The detection technique involves measuring the diffential absorption of the IR laser radiation as it is rapidly scanned over an N2O absorption feature. For the AAOE mission, the instrument was capable of making measurements with a 1 ppb sensitivity, 1 second response time, over an altitude range of 10 to 20 kilometers. The AAOE mission consisted of a series of 12 flights from Punta Arenas (53S) into the polar vortex (approximately 72S) at which time a vertical profile from 65 to 45 km and back was performed. Comparison of the observed profiles inside the vortex with N2O profiles obtained by balloon flights during the austral summer showed that an overall subsidence had occurred during the winter of about 5 to 6 km. Also, over the course of the mission (mid-August to late September), no trend in the N2O vertical profile, either upward or downward, was discernible, eliminating the possibility that upwelling was the cause of the observed ozone decrease.

  20. Airborne Observations of Ozone and Other Trace Gases Upwind of National Parks in California and Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.

    2016-01-01

    The Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) is a research project based at Moffett Field, CA, which collects airborne measurements of ozone, carbon dioxide, methane, water vapor, and formaldehyde, as well as 3-D winds, temperature, pressure, and location. Since its first science flight in 2011, AJAX has developed a wide a variety of mission types, combining vertical profiles (from approximately 8 km to near surface), boundary layer legs, and plume sampling as needed. With an ongoing five-year data set, the team has sampled over 160 vertical profiles, a dozen wildfires, and numerous stratospheric ozone intrusions. Our largest data collection includes 55 vertical profiles at Railroad Valley, NV, approximately 100 miles southwest of Great Basin National Park, and many of those flights include comparisons to surface monitors in the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative network. We have also collected a smaller set of measurements northwest of Joshua Tree National Park, and are looking to develop partnerships that can put this data to use to assess or improve air quality in nearby Parks. AJAX also studies the plumes emitted by wildfires in California, as most emissions inventories are based on prescribed fires. We have sampled a dozen fires, and results will be presented from several, including the Rim (2013), Soberanes and Cedar (2016) Fires.

  1. Ozone and water-vapor measurements by Raman lidar in the planetary boundary layer: error sources and field measurements.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto, B; Frioud, M; Larchevêque, G; Mitev, V; Quaglia, P; Simeonov, V; Thompson, A; van den Bergh, H; Calpini, B

    2001-06-20

    A new lidar instrument has been developed to measure tropospheric ozone and water vapor at low altitude. The lidar uses Raman scattering of an UV beam from atmospheric nitrogen, oxygen, and water vapor to retrieve ozone and water-vapor vertical profiles. By numerical simulation we investigate the sensitivity of the method to both atmospheric and device perturbations. The aerosol optical effect in the planetary boundary layer, ozone interference in water-vapor retrieval, statistical error, optical cross talk between Raman-shifted channels, and optical cross talk between an elastically backscattered signal in Raman-shifted signals and an afterpulse effect are studied in detail. In support of the main conclusions of this model study, time series of ozone and water vapor obtained at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne and during a field campaign in Crete are presented. They are compared with point monitor and balloon sounding measurements for daytime and nighttime conditions.

  2. A New Raman DIAL Technique for Measuring Stratospheric Ozone in the Presence of Volcanic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Mcgee, Thomas J.; Gross, Michael; Heaps, William S.; Ferrare, Richard

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a new lidar scheme to measure stratospheric ozone in the presence of heavy volcanic aerosol loading. The eruptions of the Philippine volcano Pinatubo during June 1991 ejected large amounts of sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere to altitudes of at least 30 km. The resulting aerosols have severely affected the measurements of stratospheric ozone when using traditional Rayleigh differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique, in which the scattering mechanism is almost entirely Rayleigh and which assumes a small amount or no aerosols. In order to extract an ozone profile in the regions below about 30 km where the Rayleigh lidar returns are contaminated by aerosol scattering from Mt. Pinatubo cloud, we have used a Raman lidar technique, where the scattering mechanism depends solely on molecular nitrogen. In this scheme there is no aerosol scattering component to the backscattered lidar return. Using this technique in conjunction with the Rayleigh DIAL measurement, the GSFC stratospheric ozone lidar has measured ozone profiles between 15 and 50 km during the recently held UARS correlative measurement campaign (February-March 1992) at JPL's Table Mountain Facility in California.

  3. Photochemical modeling of the Antarctic stratosphere: Observational constraints from the airborne Antarctic ozone experiment and implications for ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Jose M.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    1988-01-01

    The rapid decrease in O3 column densities observed during Antarctic spring has been attributed to several chemical mechanisms involving nitrogen, bromine, or chlorine species, to dynamical mechanisms, or to a combination of the above. Chlorine-related theories, in particular, predict greatly elevated concentrations of ClO and OClO and suppressed abundances of NO2 below 22 km. The heterogeneous reactions and phase transitions proposed by these theories could also impact the concentrations of HCl, ClNO3 and HNO3 in this region. Observations of the above species have been carried out from the ground by the National Ozone Expedition (NOZE-I, 1986, and NOZE-II, 1987), and from aircrafts by the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) during the austral spring of 1987. Observations of aerosol concentrations, size distribution and backscattering ratio from AAOE, and of aerosol extinction coefficients from the SAM-II satellite can also be used to deduce the altitude and temporal behavior of surfaces which catalyze heterogeneous mechanisms. All these observations provide important constraints on the photochemical processes suggested for the spring Antarctic stratosphere. Results are presented for the concentrations and time development of key trace gases in the Antarctic stratosphere, utilizing the AER photochemical model. This model includes complete gas-phase photochemistry, as well as heterogeneous reactions. Heterogeneous chemistry is parameterized in terms of surface concentrations of aerosols, collision frequencies between gas molecules and aerosol surfaces, concentrations of HCl/H2O in the frozen particles, and probability of reaction per collision (gamma). Values of gamma are taken from the latest laboratory measurements. The heterogeneous chemistry and phase transitions are assumed to occur between 12 and 22 km. The behavior of trace species at higher altitudes is calculated by the AER 2-D model without heterogeneous chemistry. Calculations are performed for

  4. Observations of condensation nuclei in the 1987 airborne Antarctic ozone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Smith, S. D.; Ferry, G. V.; Loewenstein, M.

    1988-01-01

    The condensation nucleus counter (CNC) flown of the NASA ER-2 in the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment provides a measurement of the number mixing ratio of particles which can be grown by exposure to supersaturated n-butyl alcohol vapor to diameters of a few microns. Such particles are referred to as condensation nuclei (CN). The ER-2 CNC was calibrated with aerosols of known size and concentration and was found to provide an accurate measure of the number concentration of particles larger than about 0.02 micron. Since the number distribution of stratospheric aerosols is usually dominated by particles less than a few tenths of micron in diameter, the upper cutoff of the ER-2 CNC has not been determined experimentally. However, theory suggests that the sampling and counting efficiency should remain near one for particles as large as 1 micron in diameter. Thus, the CN mixing ratio is usually a good measure of the mixing ratio of submicron particles.

  5. Investigation of Ozone Sources in California Using AJAX Airborne Measurements and Models: Implications for Stratospheric Intrusion and Long Range Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Johnson, Matthew S.; Iraci, Laura T.; Yates, Emma L.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Gore, Warren

    2015-01-01

    High ozone concentrations at low altitudes near the surface were detected from airborne Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) measurements on May 30, 2012. We investigate the causes of the elevated ozone concentrations using the airborne measurements and various models. GEOS-chem and WRF-STILT model simulations show that the contribution from local sources is small. From MERRA reanalysis, it is found that high potential vorticity (PV) is observed at low altitudes. This high PV appears to be only partially coming through the stratospheric intrusions because the air inside the high PV region is moist, which shows that mixing appears to be enhanced in the low altitudes. Considering that diabatic heating can also produce high PV in the lower troposphere, high ozone is partially coming through stratospheric intrusion, but this cannot explain the whole ozone concentration in the target areas of the western U.S. A back-trajectory model is utilized to see where the air masses originated. The air masses of the target areas came from the lower stratosphere (LS), upper (UT), mid- (MT), and lower troposphere (LT). The relative number of trajectories coming from LS and UT is low (7.7 and 7.6, respectively) compared to that from LT (64.1), but the relative ozone concentration coming from LS and UT is high (38.4 and 20.95, respectively) compared to that from LT (17.7). The air mass coming from LT appears to be mostly coming from Asia. Q diagnostics show that there is sufficient mixing along the trajectory to indicate that ozone from the different origins is mixed and transported to the western U.S. This study shows that high ozone concentrations can be detected by airborne measurements, which can be analyzed by integrated platforms such as models, reanalysis, and satellite data.

  6. Investigating Ozone Sources in California Using AJAX Airborne Measurements and Models: Implications for Stratospheric Intrusion and Long Range Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Johnson, Matthew S.; Iraci, Laura T.; Yates, Emma L.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Gore, Warren

    2016-01-01

    High ozone concentrations at low altitudes near the surface were detected from airborne Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) measurements on May 30, 2012. We investigate the causes of the elevated ozone concentrations using the airborne measurements and various models. GEOSchem and WRF-STILT model simulations show that the contribution from local sources is small. From MERRA reanalysis, it is found that high potential vorticity (PV) is observed at low altitudes. This high PV appears to be only partially coming through the stratospheric intrusions because the air inside the high PV region is moist, which shows that mixing appears to be enhanced in the low altitudes. Considering that diabatic heating can also produce high PV in the lower troposphere, high ozone is partially coming through stratospheric intrusion, but this cannot explain the whole ozone concentration in the target areas of the western U.S. A back-trajectory model is utilized to see where the air masses originated. The air masses of the target areas came from the lower stratosphere (LS), upper (UT), mid- (MT), and lower troposphere (LT). The relative number of trajectories coming from LS and UT is low (7.7% and 7.6%, respectively) compared to that from LT (64.1%), but the relative ozone concentration coming from LS and UT is high (38.4% and 20.95%, respectively) compared to that from LT (17.7%). The air mass coming from LT appears to be mostly coming from Asia. Q diagnostics show that there is sufficient mixing along the trajectory to indicate that ozone from the different origins is mixed and transported to the western U.S. This study shows that high ozone concentrations can be detected by airborne measurements, which can be analyzed by integrated platforms such as models, reanalysis, and satellite data.

  7. Nitrous oxide as a dynamical tracer in the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Chan, K. R.; Strahan, S. E.

    1989-01-01

    In situ N2O measurements were made using an airborne tunable laser absorption spectrometer (ATLAS) on 12 flights into the Antarctic vortex, as well as on five transit flights outside the vortex region in August and September 1987, as part of the Airborne Antartic Ozone Experiment. Vertical profiles of N2O were obtained within the vortex on most of these flights and were obtained outside the vortex on several occasions. Flights into the vortex region show N2O decreasing southward between 53 and 72 S latitude on constant potential temperature surfaces in the lower stratosphere. The data lead to two important conclusions about the vortex region: (1) the lower stratosphere in August/September 1987 was occupied by 'old' air, which had subsided several kilometers during polar winter; (2) the N2O profile in the vortex was in an approximately steady state in August/September 1987, which indicates that the spring upwelling, suggested by several theories, did not occur.

  8. A Composite View of Lower Stratospheric Ozone Developed Using a Chemistry Transport Model and Observations from Airborne Lidar and Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Browell, E. V.

    1999-01-01

    An ozone simulation from the Goddard three-dimensional chemistry and transport model for the 1995-96 northern hemisphere winter is compared with ozone observations from airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL), from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM), from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), and from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE). The 3D model uses winds from the Goddard Data Assimilation System. The 3D model reproduces the latitude dependence of the horizontal and vertical ozone gradients of the subtropical DIAL observations. Comparisons with subtropical satellite observations, which lack the spatial resolution of DIAL but provide near continuous coverage throughout the subtropics, show that the model also reproduces longitude and temporal dependence in the tropical-midlatitude boundary. At polar latitudes, observations from DIAL flights on December 9 and January 30, and POAM and MLS between late December and late January are compared with the 3D model. Data from the three platforms consistently show that the observed ozone has a negative trend relative to the modeled ozone, and that the trend is uniform in time between early and mid winter, with no obvious dependence on proximity to the vortex edge.

  9. Stratospheric ozone isotopes observed by air-borne and space-borne submillimeter-wave heterodyne radiometry: A sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y.; Urban, J.; Takahashi, C.; Smiles Mission Team

    2003-04-01

    The variation of the isotopic composition of a species in the Earth atmosphere provides us the information on the history of the air masses, because the isotope enrichment or depletion reflects the chemical and physical processes. Since the discovery of the heavy isotope enrichment of ozone in the stratosphere in 1981 considerable progress has been made in understanding the processes that control the isotope enrichment based on atmospheric observations, laboratory experiments, and so on. However, the exact mechanism for the effect remains uncertain and accurate sequentially observations of ozone isotopomer at global scale are still very sparse. Further improvements of measurement precision can be obtained by making use of the new technological development of high-precision submillimeter-wave heterodyne radiometry based on sensitive SIS detector technology. The airborne ASUR instrument (Airborne SUb-millimeter SIS Radiometer) observed lines of asymmetric-18 ozone in the frequency region of 645 GHz with this technology since ~1994. The JEM/SMILES instrument (Japaneses Experiment Module / Superconducting sub-MIllimeter Limb Emission Sounder), to be installed on the International Space Station in 2007, will measure several ozone isotopomer in the stratosphere at global scale from space using very similar frequency bands. An error analysis including the most typical systematic errors is performed.

  10. Airborne detection of oceanic turbidity cell structure using depth-resolved laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne laser-induced, depth-resolved water Raman backscatter is useful in the detection and mapping of water optical transmission variations. This test, together with other field experiments, has identified the need for additional field experiments to resolve the degree of the contribution to the depth-resolved, Raman-backscattered signal waveform that is due to (1) sea surface height or elevation probability density; (2) off-nadir laser beam angle relative to the mean sea surface; and (3) the Gelbstoff fluorescence background, and the analytical techniques required to remove it. When converted to along-track profiles, the waveforms obtained reveal cells of a decreased Raman backscatter superimposed on an overall trend of monotonically decreasing water column optical transmission.

  11. Ozone precursors and ozone photochemistry over eastern North Pacific during the spring of 1984 based on the NASA GTE/CITE 1 airborne observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, W. L.; Davis, D. D.; Gregory, G. L.; Sachse, G.; Torres, A. L.

    1989-01-01

    Simultaneous high-resolution measurements of O3, NO, CO, dew point temperature, and UV flux obtained during the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (GTE/CITE 1) spring 1984 airborne field exercise over the eastern North Pacific Ocean are analyzed. Mid-tropospheric CO, O3, and NO mixing ratios averaged about 120 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), 50 ppbv, and 10 parts per trillion by volume (pptv), respectively. Statistical analysis of the high-resolution data indicates the existence of two ozone sources, one related to the downward transport of ozone-rich air from the upper troposphere and stratosphere, and the other to the transport of ozone-rich air from the continents. Modeling calculations based on these average levels imply that, from the surface to about 8 km, photochemical reactions probably supplied a net sink of ozone to the region overlying the eastern North Pacific Ocean during the sampling period. However, because the NO levels measured during the flights were frequently at or near the detection limit of the instruments and because the results are very sensitive to the absolute NO levels and their temporal variability, the conclusion must be considered provisional.

  12. Filter measurements of chemical composition during the airborne Antarctic ozone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandrud, B. W.; Sperry, P. D.; Sanford, L.

    1988-01-01

    During the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment campaign, a filter sampler was flown to measure the bulk composition of aerosol and gas phases. The background sulfate aerosol was measured in regions inside and outside of the chemically perturbed region (CPR) of the polar vortex. The mass ratio of sulfate outside to inside was 2.8. This is indicative of a cleansing mechanism effecting the CPR or of a different air mass inside versus outside. The absolute value of the sulfate mixing ratio shows that the background aerosol has not been influenced by recent volcanic eruptions. The sulfate measured on the ferry flight returning to NASA Ames shows a decrease towards the equator with increasing concentrations in the northern hemisphere. Nitrate in the aerosol phase was observed on two flights. The largest amount of nitrate measured in the aerosol was 44 percent of the total amount of nitrate observed. Other samples on the same flights show no nitrate in the aerosol phase. The presence of nitrate in the aerosol is correlated with the coldest temperatures observed on a given flight. Total nitrate (aerosol plus acidic vapor nitrate) concentrations were observed to increase at flight altitude with increasing latitude north and south of the equator. Total nitrate was lower inside the CPR than outside. Chloride and flouride were not detected in the aerosol phase. From the concentrations of acidic chloride vapor, the ratio of acidic vapor Cl to acidic vapor F and a summing of the individual chloride containing species to yield a total chloride concentration, there is a suggestion that some of the air sampled was dechlorinated. Acidic vapor phase fluoride was observed to increase at flight altitude with increasing latitude both north and south of the equator. The acidic vapor phase fluoride was the only compound measured with the filter technique that exhibited larger concentrations inside the CPR than outside.

  13. Tropospheric ozone and aerosols measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic boundary layer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Ozone (O3) and aerosol distributions were measured from an aircraft using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system as part of the 1988 NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment - Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE-3A) to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during the summer. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere. Several cases of continental polar air masses were examined during the experiment. The aerosol scattering associated with these air masses was very low, and the atmospheric distribution of aerosols was quite homogeneous for those air masses that had been transported over the ice for greater than or = 3 days. The transition in O3 and aerosol distributions from tundra to marine conditions was examined several times. The aerosol data clearly show an abrupt change in aerosol scattering properties within the mixed layer from lower values over the tundra to generally higher values over the water. The distinct differences in the heights of the mixed layers in the two regions was also readily apparent. Several cases of enhanced O3 were observed during ABLE-3 in conjunction with enhanced aerosol scattering in layers in the free atmosphere. Examples are presented of the large scale variations of O3 and aerosols observed with the airborne lidar system from near the surface to above the tropopause over the Arctic during ABLE-3.

  14. Using Cloud Top Pressures Derived from Raman Scattering in the UV for the OMI Total Column Ozone Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Yang, K.

    2003-01-01

    The OMI cloud pressure product is necessary for accounting for cloud effects on the mission- critical total ozone product. One of the OM1 cloud pressure algorithms uses UV measurements to derive cloud pressures from the high frequency structure of top- of-atmosphere reflectance caused by rotational Raman scattering (RRS) in the atmosphere. RRS results in filling-in of Fraunhofer lines in the backscatter UV spectra (also known as the Ring effect). The magnitude of filling-in of the Fraunhofer lines is roughly proportional to the average number of solar photon scatterings in the atmosphere above the clouds. This property of RRS is used to deduce an effective cloud pressure. The cloud pressure algorithm retrieves the cloud pressure and cloud fraction using a concept of the Mixed Lambert Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) also used for the TOMS-V8 OM1 total column ozone algorithm. Currently, this OMI total column ozone algorithm utilizes information about cloud top pressures from a climatology based on IR measurements. The IR-derived cloud top pressure is known to be lower than UV-derived cloud top pressure because UV radiation penetrates clouds deeper than IR radiation. That is why the UV-derived cloud pressure may be more consistent withthe total ozone algorithm. We estimate total column ozone differences caused by replacing the cloud pressure climatology with cloud pressures retrieved from GOME data same as used for retrieval of ozone.

  15. A Transport Analysis of In Situ Airborne Ozone Measurements from the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkinson, H. L.; Brent, L. C.; He, H.; Loughner, C.; Stehr, J. W.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Baltimore and Washington are currently designated as nonattainment areas with respect to the 2008 EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for 8-hour Ozone (O3). Tropospheric O3 is the dominant component of summertime photochemical smog, and at high levels, has deleterious effects on human health, ecosystems, and materials. The University of Maryland (UMD) Regional Atmospheric Measurement Modeling and Prediction Program (RAMMPP) strives to improve understanding of air quality in the Mid-Atlantic States and to elucidate contributions of pollutants such as O3 from regional transport versus local sources through a combination of modeling and in situ measurements. The NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) project investigates the connection between column measurements and surface conditions to explore the potential of remote sensing observations in diagnosing air quality at ground level where pollutants can affect human health. During the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ field campaign, in situ airborne measurements of trace gases and aerosols were performed along the Interstate 95 corridor between Baltimore and Washington from the NASA P3B aircraft. To augment this data and provide regional context, measurements of trace gases and aerosols were also performed by the RAMMPP Cessna 402B aircraft over nearby airports in Maryland and Virginia. This work presents an analysis of O3 measurements made by the Ultraviolet (UV) Photometric Ambient O3 Analyzer on the RAMMPP Cessna 402B and by the NCAR 4-Channel Chemiluminescence instrument on the NASA P3B. In this analysis, spatial and temporal patterns of O3 data are examined within the context of forward and backward trajectories calculated from 12-km North American Mesoscale (NAM) meteorological data using the NOAA Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) Model and from a high resolution Weather Research and

  16. Airborne DIAL Ozone and Aerosol Trends Observed at High Latitudes Over North America from February to May 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, Jonathan W.; Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grant, William B.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Fenn, Marta A.; Brackett, Vince G.; Clayton, Marian B.; Brasseur, Lorraine

    2002-01-01

    Ozone (O3) and aerosol scattering ratio profiles were obtained from airborne lidar measurements on thirty-eight aircraft flights over seven aircraft deployments covering the latitudes of 40 deg.-85 deg.N between 4 February and 23 May 2000 as part of the TOPSE (Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox) field experiment. The remote and in situ O3 measurements were used together to produce a vertically-continuous O3 profile from near the surface to above the tropopause. Ozone, aerosol, and potential vorticity (PV) distributions were used together to identify the presence of pollution plumes and stratospheric intrusions. The number of observed pollution plumes was found to increase into the spring along with a significant increase in aerosol loading. Ozone was found to increase in the middle free troposphere (4-6 km) at high latitudes (60 deg.-85 deg. N) by an average of 4.3 ppbv/mo from about 55 ppbv in early February to over 72 ppbv in mid-May. The average aerosol scattering ratios in the same region increased at an average rate of 0.37/mo from about 0.35 to over 1.7. Ozone and aerosol scattering were highly correlated over entire field experiment. Based on the above results and the observed aircraft in-situ measurements, it was estimated that stratospherically-derived O3 accounted for less than 20% of the observed increase in mid tropospheric O3 at high latitudes. The primary cause of the observed O3 increase was found to be the photochemical production of O3 in pollution plumes.

  17. Influence of atmospheric ozone, PM 10 and meteorological factors on the concentration of airborne pollen and fungal spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, S. I. V.; Martins, F. G.; Pereira, M. C.; Alvim-Ferraz, M. C. M.; Ribeiro, H.; Oliveira, M.; Abreu, I.

    The increase of allergenic symptoms has been associated with air contaminants such as ozone, particulate matter, pollen and fungal spores. Considering the potential relevance of crossed effects of non-biological pollutants and airborne pollens and fungal spores on allergy worsening, the aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of non-biological pollutants and meteorological parameters on the concentrations of pollen and fungal spores using linear correlations and multiple linear regressions. For that, the seasonal variation of ozone, particulate matter with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm, pollen and fungal spores were assessed and statistical correlations were analysed between those parameters. The data were collected through 2003-2005 in Porto, Portugal. The linear correlations showed that ozone and particulate matter had no significant influence on the concentration of pollen and fungal spores. On the contrary, when using multiple linear regressions those parameters showed to have some influence on the biological pollutants, although results were different depending on the year analysed. Among the meteorological parameters analysed, temperature was the one that most influenced the pollen and fungal spores airborne concentrations, both when using linear and multiple linear correlations. Relative humidity also showed to have some influence on the fungal spore dispersion when multiple linear regressions were used. Nevertheless, the conclusions for each pollen and fungal spore were different depending on the analysed period, which means that the correlations identified as statistically significant may not be, even so, consistent enough. Furthermore, the comparison of the results here presented with those obtained by other authors for only one period should be made carefully.

  18. Airborne and ground-based observations of a weekend effect in ozone, precursors, and oxidation products in the California South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Andrews, A. E.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Brown, S. S.; Commane, R.; Daube, B. C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Dubé, W. P.; Flynn, J.; Frost, G. J.; Gilman, J. B.; Grossberg, N.; Holloway, J. S.; Kofler, J.; Kort, E. A.; Kuster, W. C.; Lang, P. M.; Lefer, B.; Lueb, R. A.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Novelli, P. C.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Roberts, J. M.; Santoni, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Wagner, N. L.; Warneke, C.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Xiang, B.

    2012-02-01

    Airborne and ground-based measurements during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field study in May/June 2010 show a weekend effect in ozone in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) consistent with previous observations. The well-known and much-studied weekend ozone effect has been attributed to weekend reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOx = NO + NO2) emissions, which affect ozone levels via two processes: (1) reduced ozone loss by titration and (2) enhanced photochemical production of ozone due to an increased ratio of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to NOx. In accord with previous assessments, the 2010 airborne and ground-based data show an average decrease in NOx of 46 ± 11% and 34 ± 4%, respectively, and an average increase in VOC/NOx ratio of 48 ± 8% and 43 ± 22%, respectively, on weekends. This work extends current understanding of the weekend ozone effect in the SoCAB by identifying its major causes and quantifying their relative importance from the available CalNex data. Increased weekend production of a VOC-NOx oxidation product, peroxyacetyl nitrate, compared to a radical termination product, nitric acid, indicates a significant contribution from increased photochemical production on weekends. Weekday-to-weekend differences in the products of NOx oxidation show 45 ± 13% and 42 ± 12% more extensive photochemical processing and, when compared with odd oxygen (Ox = O3 + NO2), 51 ± 14% and 22 ± 17% greater ozone production efficiency on weekends in the airborne and ground-based data, respectively, indicating that both contribute to higher weekend ozone levels in the SoCAB.

  19. Airborne LIDAR Measurements of Aerosol and Ozone Above the Alberta Oil Sands Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, M.; Whiteway, J. A.; Seabrook, J.; Gray, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    Lidar measurements of ozone and aerosol were conducted from a Twin Otter aircraft above the oil sands region of northern Alberta. The field campaign was carried out with a total of five flights out of Fort McMurray, Alberta during the period between August 22 and August 26, 2013. Significant amounts of aerosol were observed within the boundary layer, up to a height of 1.6 km, but the ozone concentration remained at or below background levels. On August 24th the lidar observed a separated layer of aerosol above the boundary layer, at a height of 1.8 km, in which the ozone mixing ratio increased to 70 ppbv. Backward trajectory calculations revealed that the air containing this separated aerosol layer had passed over an area of forest fires. Directly below the layer of forest fire smoke, in the pollution from the oil sands industry, the measured ozone mixing ratio was lower than the background levels (≤35 ppbv).

  20. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactive form of oxygen. In the upper atmosphere, ozone forms a protective layer that shields us from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. At ground level, ozone is a harmful air pollutant and a primary ...

  1. Calibration of the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe used on the ER-2 during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Dye, James E.; Gandrud, Bruce W.

    1989-01-01

    The Particle Measuring Systems (PMS) Forwared Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP-100) which was flown on the ER-2 during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment for the measurement of particles in polar stratospheric clouds has been evaluated and calibrated. The sample volume of the probe per 10-s sampling period increases from 257 cu cm for 1-micron particles to 412 for 15-micron particles, but there is substantial uncertainty in this value. Limitations in the measurements from this instrument and possible corrections are discussed. The uncertainty in the total particle mass measured by the probe may be as large as + or - 100 percent. Recommendations are given for the processing of data from the FSSP used in this project.

  2. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Ozone is a gas. It can be good or bad, depending on where it is. "Good" ozone occurs naturally about 10 to 30 miles above ... the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is gone. Man-made chemicals have destroyed ...

  3. Techniques for Estimating Emissions Factors from Forest Burning: ARCTAS and SEAC4RS Airborne Measurements Indicate which Fires Produce Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of emission factors from biomass burning are prone to large errors since they ignore the interplay of mixing and varying pre-fire background CO2 levels. Such complications severely affected our studies of 446 forest fire plume samples measured in the Western US by the science teams of NASA's SEAC4RS and ARCTAS airborne missions. Consequently we propose a Mixed Effects Regression Emission Technique (MERET) to check techniques like the Normalized Emission Ratio Method (NERM), where use of sequential observations cannot disentangle emissions and mixing. We also evaluate a simpler "consensus" technique. All techniques relate emissions to fuel burned using C(burn) = delta C(tot) added to the fire plume, where C(tot) approximately equals (CO2 = CO). Mixed-effects regression can estimate pre-fire background values of C(tot) (indexed by observation j) simultaneously with emissions factors indexed by individual species i, delta, epsilon lambda tau alpha-x(sub I)/C(sub burn))I,j. MERET and "consensus" require more than emissions indicators. Our studies excluded samples where exogenous CO or CH4 might have been fed into a fire plume, mimicking emission. We sought to let the data on 13 gases and particulate properties suggest clusters of variables and plume types, using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). While samples were mixtures, the NMF unmixing suggested purer burn types. Particulate properties (b scant, b abs, SSA, AAE) and gas-phase emissions were interrelated. Finally, we sought a simple categorization useful for modeling ozone production in plumes. Two kinds of fires produced high ozone: those with large fuel nitrogen as evidenced by remnant CH3CN in the plumes, and also those from very intense large burns. Fire types with optimal ratios of delta-NOy/delta- HCHO associate with the highest additional ozone per unit Cburn, Perhaps these plumes exhibit limited NOx binding to reactive organics. Perhaps these plumes exhibit limited NOx binding to

  4. Techniques for Estimating Emissions Factors from Forest Burning: ARCTAS and SEAC4RS Airborne Measurements Indicate Which Fires Produce Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of emission factors from biomass burning are prone to large errors since they ignore the interplay of mixing and varying pre-fire background CO2 levels. Such complications severely affected our studies of 446 forest fire plume samples measured in the Western US by the science teams of NASA's SEAC4RS and ARCTAS airborne missions. Consequently we propose a Mixed Effects Regression Emission Technique (MERET) to check techniques like the Normalized Emission Ratio Method (NERM), where use of sequential observations cannot disentangle emissions and mixing. We also evaluate a simpler "consensus" technique. All techniques relate emissions to fuel burned using C(sub burn) = delta C(sub tot) added to the fire plume, where C(sub tot) approximately equals (CO2 + CO). Mixed-effects regression can estimate pre-fire background values of Ctot (indexed by observation j) simultaneously with emissions factors indexed by individual species i, delta epsilon lambda tau alpha-x(sub i)/(C(sub burn))i,j., MERET and "consensus" require more than two emissions indicators. Our studies excluded samples where exogenous CO or CH4 might have been fed into a fire plume, mimicking emission. We sought to let the data on 13 gases and particulate properties suggest clusters of variables and plume types, using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). While samples were mixtures, the NMF unmixing suggested purer burn types. Particulate properties (bscat, babs, SSA, AAE) and gas-phase emissions were interrelated. Finally, we sought a simple categorization useful for modeling ozone production in plumes. Two kinds of fires produced high ozone: those with large fuel nitrogen as evidenced by remnant CH3CN in the plumes, and also those from very intense large burns. Fire types with optimal ratios of delta-NOy/delta- HCHO associate with the highest additional ozone per unit Cburn, Perhaps these plumes exhibit limited NOx binding to reactive organics. Perhaps these plumes exhibit limited NOx

  5. Ozone and Aitken nuclei over equatorial Africa - Airborne observations during DECAFE 88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Chapuis, A.; Cros, B.; Fontan, J.; Helas, G.; Justice, C.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Minga, A.; Nganga, D.

    1992-01-01

    Results of ozone and Aitken condensation nuclei measurements made over the rain forest in equatorial Africa during February 12-25, 1988 are presented. The results indicate the presence of a layer between 1 and 4 km altitude where these species are strongly enriched. Based on information derived from simultaneous measurements of other chemical and meteorological parameters, satellite imagery, and trajectory calculations, this enrichment is attributed to emissions from biomass burning in sub-Saharan Africa, from which ozone is formed by photochemical reactions.

  6. Large-scale variations in ozone and polar stratospheric clouds measured with airborne lidar during formation of the 1987 ozone hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Poole, Lamont R.; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Ismail, Syed; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.; Szedlmayer, Margaret M.; Jones, Rod; Krueger, Arlin J.; Tuck, Adrian

    1988-01-01

    A joint field experiment between NASA and NOAA was conducted during August to September 1987 to obtain in situ and remote measurements of key gases and aerosols from aircraft platforms during the formation of the ozone (O3) hole over Antarctica. The ER-2 (advanced U-2) and DC-8 aircraft from the NASA Ames Research Center were used in this field experiment. The NASA Langley Research Center's airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system was operated from the DC-8 to obtain profiles of O3 and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere during long-range flights over Antarctica from August 28 to September 29, 1987. The airborne DIAL system was configured to transmit simultaneously four laser wavelengths (301, 311, 622, and 1064 nm) above the DC-8 for DIAL measurements of O3 profiles between 11 to 20 km ASL (geometric altitude above sea level) and multiple wavelength aerosol backscatter measurements between 11 to 24 km ASL. A total of 13 DC-8 flights were made over Antarctica with 2 flights reaching the South Pole. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) were detected in multiple thin layers in the 11 to 21 km ASL altitude range with each layer having a typical thickness of less than 1 km. Two types of PSC's were found based on aerosol backscattering ratios: predominantly water ice clouds (type 2) and clouds with scattering characteristics consistent with binary solid nitric acid/water clouds (type 1). Large-scale cross sections of O3 distributions were obtained. The data provides additional information about a potentially important transport mechanism that may influence the O3 budget inside the vortex. There is also some evidence that strong low pressure systems in the troposphere are associated with regions of lower stratospheric O3. This paper discusses the spatial and temporal variations of O3 inside and outside the polar vortex region during the development of the O3 hole and relates these data to other measurements obtained during this field experiment.

  7. Summertime ozone and airborne particle concentrations measured on the Juneau Icefield (58°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J.; Katz, J. D.; Redell, K.; Dittrich, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Juneau Icefield Research Program has facilitated long-term research on the remote subarctic and mountain environment since 1946. In summer 2010, a pilot air quality study was conducted at Camp 18 on the Juneau Icefield (58°36'N 134°30'W). Ozone mixing ratio and aerosol particle size distribution were measured on a remote glacier plateau, with coincident monitoring of wind speed and direction from August 4-11, 2010. Correlations between these air pollution indicators and airmass source direction are explored to address the broader question of long-range transport of pollution.

  8. Laboratory evaluation of an airborne ozone instrument that compensates for altitude/sensitivity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Hudgins, C. H.; Edahl, R. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    One problem encountered in the use of air-quality instrumentation on aircraft is the variation of instrument sensitivity with pressure as the result of altitude changes of the aircraft. Many instruments experience sensitivity changes of as much as a factor of 2 at altitudes of 6 km. Discussed are recent modifications to a chemiluminescent (ethylene) ozone detector that allow the instrument to automatically compensate for pressure/sensitivity effects. The modification provides automated mass flow rate control for both the sample and ethylene gas flows. The flow control systems maintain flow rate to within 15 percent for a 100-torr instantaneous pressure change, and flow rates are returned to the desired set points within 10 s after the pressure change. During simulated altitude changes (300 m/min from mean sea level to 3-km altitude), flow rates were controlled to within 3 percent of the set point. Laboratory data are summarized verifying the operation of the instrument for a pressure range of 760 torr (sea level) to 350 torr (approximately 20,000 ft) and an ozone concentration range from 20 to approximately 700 ppb.

  9. Free-surface microfluidic control of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the optimized detection of airborne molecules

    PubMed Central

    Piorek, Brian D.; Lee, Seung Joon; Santiago, Juan G.; Moskovits, Martin; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Meinhart, Carl D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a microfluidic technique for sensitive, real-time, optimized detection of airborne water-soluble molecules by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The method is based on a free-surface fluidic device in which a pressure-driven liquid microchannel flow is constrained by surface tension. A colloidal suspension of silver nanoparticles flowing through the microchannel that is open to the atmosphere absorbs gas-phase 4-aminobenzenethiol (4-ABT) from the surrounding environment. As surface ions adsorbed on the colloid nanoparticles are substituted by 4-ABT, the colloid aggregates, forming SERS “hot spots” whose concentrations vary predictably along the microchannel flow. 4-ABT confined in these hot spots produces SERS spectra of very great intensity. An aggregation model is used to account quantitatively for the extent of colloid aggregation as determined from the variation of the SERS intensity measured as a function of the streamwise position along the microchannel, which also corresponds to nanoparticle exposure time. This allows us to monitor simultaneously the nanoparticle aggregation process and to determine the location at which the SERS signal is optimized. PMID:18025462

  10. Upper tropospheric water vapor: A field campaign of two Raman lidars, Airborne hygrometers, and Radiosondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, S. Harvey; Turner, Dave; Evans, Keith; Whiteman, Dave; Schwemmer, Geary; Ferrare, Richard

    1998-01-01

    from: two Raman Lidars, the NASA Goddard Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) and the CART Raman Lidar (CARL), a number of Vaisala radiosondes launched during the IOP campaign, and a dew point hygrometer flown on the University of North Dakota Cessna Citation Aircraft.

  11. Airborne simultaneous spectroscopic detection of laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence from chlorophyll a and other naturally occurring pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The airborne laser-induced spectral emission bands obtained simultaneously from water Raman backscatter and the fluorescence of chlorophyll and other naturally occurring waterborne pigments are reported here for the first time. The importance of this type data lies not only in its single-shot multispectral character but also in the application of the Raman line for correction or calibration of the spatial variation of the laser penetration depth without the need for in situ water attenuation measurements. The entire laser-induced fluorescence and Raman scatter emissions resulting from each separate 532-nm 10-nsec laser pulse are collected and spectrally dispersed in a diffraction grating spectrometer having forty photomultiplier tube detectors. Results from field experiments conducted in the North Sea and the Chesapeake Bay/Potomac River are presented. Difficulties involving the multispectral resolution of the induced emissions are addressed, and feasible solutions are suggested together with new instrument configurations and future research directions.

  12. A Compact Ti:Sapphire Laser With its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) for an Airborne Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Storm, Mark E.; Marsh, Waverly D.; Petway, Larry B.; Edwards, William C.; Barnes, James C.

    2000-01-01

    A compact and high-pulse-energy Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) has been developed for an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to study the distributions and concentrations of the ozone throughout the troposphere. The Ti:Sapphire laser, pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and seeded by a single mode diode laser, is operated either at 867 nm or at 900 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 20 Hz. High energy laser pulses (more than 110 mJ/pulse) at 867 nm or 900 nm with a desired beam quality have been achieved and utilized to generate its third harmonic at 289nm or 300nm, which are on-line and off-line wavelengths of an airborne ozone DIAL. After being experimentally compared with Beta-Barium Borate (beta - BaB2O4 or BBO) nonlinear crystals, two Lithium Triborate (LBO) crystals (5 x 5 x 20 cu mm) are selected for the Third Harmonic Generation (THG). In this paper, we report the Ti:Sapphire laser at 900 nm and its third harmonic at 300 nm. The desired high ultraviolet (UV) output pulse energy is more than 30 mJ at 300 nm and the energy conversion efficiency from 900 nm to 300 nm is 30%.

  13. AROTAL Ozone and Temperature Vertical Profile Measurements from the NASA DC-8 during the SOLVE II Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Thomas J.; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Hoegy, Walter; Burris, John; Silbert, Donald; Heaps, William; Neuber, R.; Trepte, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    The AROTAL instrument (Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature and Aerosol Lidar) - a collaboration between scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and Langley Research Center - was flown on the NASA DC-8 during the SOLVE II Campaign during January and February, 2003. The flights were flown from the Arena Arctica in Kiruna, Sweden. We report measurements of temperature and ozone profiles showing approximately a 600 ppbv loss in ozone near 17.5 km, over the time frame of the aircraft campaign. Comparisons of ozone profiles from AROTAL are made with the SAGE III instrument.

  14. Delineation of estuarine fronts in the German Bight using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence of water column constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The acquisition and application of airborne laser induced emission spectra from German Bight water during the 1979 MARSEN experiment is detailed for the synoptic location of estuarine fronts. The NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) was operated in the fluorosensing mode. A nitrogen laser transmitter at 337.1 nm was used to stimulate the water column to obtain Gelbstoff or organic material fluorescence spectra together with water Raman backscatter. Maps showing the location and relative strength of estuarine fronts are presented. The distribution of the fronts indicates that mixing within the German Bight takes place across a relatively large area. Reasonable agreement between the patterns observed by the AOL and published results are obtained. The limitations and constraints of this technique are indicated and improvements to the AOL fluorosensor are discussed with respect to future ocean mapping applications.

  15. Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The author discusses the debate over whether concern about a hole in the ozone layer in Antarctic is real or science fiction. There is a growing consensus that efforts must be taken to protect the ozone layer. The issue now is not whether chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) should be controlled and regulated but how much and how soon. The United States has urged that the production of dangerous CFCs, and any other chemicals that affect the ozone layer, be restricted immediately to current levels and that their use be reduced 95 percent over the next decade. The American position was too strong for many European nations and the Japanese. Negotiations at an international conference on the matter broke down. The breakdown is due in part to a more acute concern for environmental matters in the United States than exists in many countries. Meanwhile CFCs are linked to another environmental problem that equally threatens the world - the Greenhouse Effect. The earth is in a natural warming period, but man could be causing it to become even warmer. The Greenhouse Effect could have a catastrophic impact on mankind, although nothing has been proven yet.

  16. Retrieval of Ozone Column Content from Airborne Sun Photometer Measurements During SOLVE II: Comparison with SAGE III, POAM III,THOMAS and GOME Measurements. Comparison with SAGE 111, POAM 111, TOMS and GOME Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Yee, J.-H.; Trepte, C.; Thomason, L.; Pitts, M.

    2003-01-01

    During the Second SAGE 111 Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II), the 14- channel NASA Ames Airborne Trackmg Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was mounted on the NASA DC-8 and successfully measured spectra of total and aerosol optical depth (TOD and AOD) during the sunlit portions of eight science flights. Values of ozone column content above the aircraft have been derived from the AATS-14 data by using a linear least squares method. For each AATS-14 measured TOD spectrum, this method iteratively finds the ozone column content that yields the best match between measured and calculated TOD. The calculations assume the known Chappuis ozone band shape and a three-parameter AOD shape (quadratic in log-log space). Seven of the AATS-14 channels (each employing an interference filter with a nominal full-width at half maximum bandpass of -5 nm) are within the Chappuis band, with center wavelengths between 452.9 nm and 864.5 nm. One channel (604.4 nm) is near the peak, and three channels (499.4, 519.4 and 675.1 nm) have ozone absorption within 30-40% of that at the peak. For the typical DC-8 SOLVE II cruising altitudes of approx. 8-12 km and the background stratospheric aerosol conditions that prevailed during SOLVE 11, absorption of incoming solar radiation by ozone comprised a significant fraction of the aerosol-plus-ozone optical depth measured in the four AATS-14 channels centered between 499.4 and 675.1 nm. Typical AODs above the DC-8 ranged from 0.003-0.008 in these channels. For comparison, an ozone overburden of 0.3 atm-cm (300 DU) translates to ozone optical depths of 0.009,0.014, 0.041, and 0.012, respectively, at these same wavelengths. In this paper, we compare AATS-14 values of ozone column content with temporally and spatially near-coincident values derived from measurements acquired by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement 111 (POAM III) satellite sensors. We also compare AATS-14 ozone

  17. Airborne Measurements of Nitric Oxide, Nitrogen Dioxide, Ozone, and Total Reactive Nitrogen During the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Mary Anne

    2000-01-01

    Fabrication of the University of Michigan Multichannel Chemiluminescence Instrument (UMMCI) was completed in early 1996 and the instrument participated in test flights on the NASA P3B at Wallops Island prior to integration and deployment for the PEM- Tropics A Mission. The UMMCI consists of 4 channels for simultaneous measurements of ozone and NO with the option for measurements of NO2 and NOy (total reactive nitrogen) when converters are placed upstream of the NO channels. Each NO channel consists of a zeroing volume and reaction vessel, while the ozone channel consists of an ozone catalyst (or scrubber) trap that is not in line with the reaction vessel. The detectors in all for channels are Hamamatsu photomultiplier tubes, which are followed by pulse amplifier discriminators on the NO channels and an electrometer on the ozone channel. Schematics of the Detector Module and NOx/03 Probe Insert and Diagrams of the Control and Data System, the Power and Ground System, the Gas Flow System, and the Calibration System Flow are attached. Intercomparisons were conducted with G. Gregory, NASA/Langley, during the test flights (following prior calibration of the ozone generator/calibrators at the Wallops Long-Path Absorption facility). Initial test results appeared to be reasonable, and instrument characterization studies proceeded for the ozone channel and the 3 NO channels until deployment for integration for the PEM-Tropics Mission. Ozone data was obtained for Flights #4, and 6-2 1, and finalized data was submitted to the PEM-Tropics Data Archive and to the Science Team during the April 1997 Data Workshop. Although it initially appeared that the instrument sensitivity varied, subsequent tests showed that this was the fault of a leak in the ozone calibrator. In fact; the instrument sensitivity has not been observed to vary in a large number of tests over the years since the PEM-Tropics mission. We have, therefore, a very high degree of confidence in the O3 data that we

  18. Airborne Lidar measurements of aerosols, mixed layer heights, and ozone during the 1980 PEPE/NEROS summer field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Shipley, S. T.; Butler, C. F.; Ismail, S.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed summary of the NASA Ultraviolet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV DIAL) data archive obtained during the EPA Persistent Elevated Pollution Episode/Northeast Regional Oxidant Study (PEPE/NEROS) Summer Field Experiment Program (July through August 1980) is presented. The UV dial data set consists of remote measurements of mixed layer heights, aerosol backscatter cross sections, and sequential ozone profiles taken during 14 long-range flights onboard the NASA Wallops Flight Center Electra aircraft. These data are presented in graphic and tabular form, and they have been submitted to the PEPE/NEROS data archive on digital magnetic tape. The derivation of mixing heights and ozone profiles from UV Dial signals is discussed, and detailed intercomparisons with measurements obtained by in situ sensors are presented.

  19. Airborne and Ground-Based Measurements Using a High-Performance Raman Lidar. Part 2; Ground Based

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Cadirola, Martin; Venable, Demetrius; Connell, Rasheen; Rush, Kurt; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The same RASL hardware as described in part I was installed in a ground-based mobile trailer and used in a water vapor lidar intercomparison campaign, hosted at Table Mountain, CA, under the auspices of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The converted RASL hardware demonstrated high sensitivity to lower stratospheric water vapor indicating that profiling water vapor at those altitudes with sufficient accuracy to monitor climate change is possible. The measurements from Table Mountain also were used to explain the reason, and correct , for sub-optimal airborne aerosol extinction performance during the flight campaign.

  20. AROTEL Temperature Retrievals Within PSC's Using Raman Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas; Hoegy, Walt; Heaps, William; Twigg, Larry; Sumnicht, Grant; Hostetler, Chris; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) made temperature retrievals within Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) on several flights during the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) campaign. The location of the PSCs was confirmed using simultaneously acquired data from the NASA Langley Aerosol lidar. Retrievals were made on flight dates 991207, 991210 and 000127 from just above the aircraft to 25 kilometers geometric altitude. Raman temperature retrievals are, to first order, insensitive to Mie interference because the Raman signals are red shifted by 2331 cm(exp -1) from the initial laser wavelength. Backscattering from clouds and aerosols is consequently not observed by the detector; however, extinction does impact the measurement and limits retrievals to optically thin clouds. Comparisons between retrievals employing Rayleigh and Raman scattering show the Raman temperatures to be significantly warmer than those employing Rayleigh scattering. Uncertainties are a function of altitude: at 25 km they were approximately 3 K. Temperature profiles could not be retrieved for optically thick clouds.

  1. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  2. A Composite View of Ozone Evolution in the 1995-1996 Northern Winter Polar Vortex Developed from Airborne Lidar and Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Browell, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The processes which contribute to the ozone evolution in the high latitude northern lower stratosphere are evaluated using a three dimensional model simulation and ozone observations. The model uses winds and temperatures from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System. The simulation results are compared with ozone observations from three platforms: the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) which was flown on the NASA DC-8 as part of the Vortex Ozone Transport Experiment; the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS); the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM II) solar occultation instrument. Time series for the different data sets are consistent with each other, and diverge from model time series during December and January. The model ozone in December and January is shown to be much less sensitive to the model photochemistry than to the model vertical transport, which depends on the model vertical motion as well as the model vertical gradient. We evaluate the dependence of model ozone evolution on the model ozone gradient by comparing simulations with different initial conditions for ozone. The modeled ozone throughout December and January most closely resembles observed ozone when the vertical profiles between 12 and 20 km within the polar vortex closely match December DIAL observations. We make a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty in the vertical advection using diabatic trajectory calculations. The net transport uncertainty is significant, and should be accounted for when comparing observations with model ozone. The observed and modeled ozone time series during December and January are consistent when these transport uncertainties are taken into account.

  3. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  4. Ozone and Water Vapor Measurements by Raman Lidar in the Planetary Boundary Layer: Error Sources and Field Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazzarotto, Benoit; Frioud, Max; Larcheveque, Gilles; Mitev, Valentin; Quaglia, Philippe; Simeonov, Valentin; Thompson, Anne; VandenBergh, Hubert; Calpini, Bertrand; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Why do we need time series of ozone and water vapor profiles at low altitude? The degradation of air quality is a very serious environmental problem that affects urban and industrial areas worldwide. Air pollution injures human health and ecosystems, diminishes crop yield, and spoils patrimony and materials. The phenomena involved in air pollution are very complex. Once emitted into the atmosphere, (primary) pollutants are transported, dispersed, transformed by gas/solid phase change and chemical reaction, and finally removed by dry and wet deposition. Most challenging is the fact that the health and environmental impacts of secondary pollutants (formed in the atmosphere) are frequently more severe than those of their precursors (primary pollutants). This is the case of ozone and other photochemical pollutants, such as peroxyacetil nitrate (PAN) and secondary particles, produced in the atmosphere by the photo-oxidation volatile organic compounds (VOC) catalyzed by nitrogen oxides (NO(sub x)). Photochemical air pollution is a complex science because of the non-linearity of its response to changes in primary emission.

  5. Decadal changes in ozone and precursor emissions in the Los Angeles California region using in-situ airborne and ground-based field observations, roadside monitoring data, and surface network measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Flynn, J. H.; Frost, G. J.; Grossberg, N.; Harley, R. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Lefer, B. L.; Lueb, R.; Parrish, D. D.; Peischl, J.

    2011-12-01

    In-situ observations from the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) surface network show decreases in ozone (O3), nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and select volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). Decreases in CO, NOx, and VOCs reflect changes, such as improved catalytic converters and reformulated fuels etc., that have been implemented in response to increasingly strict emissions standards placed upon on-road vehicles in the state of California. Here, we compare changes in emissions ratios of NOx and VOCs to CO determined from surface network data collected since 1994 to changes in emissions ratios from biennial roadside studies conducted in west Los Angeles since 1999 and airborne and ground-based measurements from three independent field campaigns conducted in California in 2002, 2008, and 2010. Using the more extensive in-situ surface network data set, we show that decreasing ozone is positively correlated with decreasing abundances of NOx and VOCs and with decreasing VOC/NOx ratio over time. The changes observed from 1994 to present suggest that reductions in both NOx and VOCs and the VOC/NOx ratio over the years have been effective in reducing ozone in the SoCAB.

  6. Airborne LIDAR Measurements of Water Vapor, Ozone, Clouds, and Aerosols in the Tropics Near Central America During the TC4 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kooi, Susan; Fenn, Marta; Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard; Hair, John; Browell, Edward; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn; Burton, Sharon; Simpson, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Large scale distributions of ozone, water vapor, aerosols, and clouds were measured throughout the troposphere by two NASA Langley lidar systems on board the NASA DC-8 aircraft as part of the Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC4) over Central and South America and adjacent oceans in the summer of 2007. Special emphasis was placed on the sampling of convective outflow and transport, sub-visible cirrus clouds, boundary layer aerosols, Saharan dust, volcanic emissions, and urban and biomass burning plumes. This paper presents preliminary results from this campaign, and demonstrates the value of coordinated measurements by the two lidar systems.

  7. Comparison of POAM III ozone measurements with correlative aircraft and balloon data during SOLVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpe, Jerry D.; Fromm, Mike; Hoppel, Karl; Bevilacqua, Richard M.; Randall, Cora E.; Browell, Edward V.; Grant, William B.; McGee, Thomas; Burris, John; Twigg, Laurence; Richard, Erik C.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Margitan, James J.; Sen, Bhaswar; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Boesch, Hartmut; Fitzenberger, Richard; Goutail, Florence; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre

    2003-03-01

    The Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III instrument operated continuously during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) mission, making approximately 1400 ozone profile measurements at high latitudes both inside and outside the Arctic polar vortex. The wealth of ozone measurements obtained from a variety of instruments and platforms during SOLVE provided a unique opportunity to compare correlative measurements with the POAM III data set. In this paper, we validate the POAM III version 3.0 ozone against measurements from seven different instruments that operated as part of the combined SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign. These include the airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (UV DIAL) and the Airborne Raman Ozone and Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) instruments on the DC-8, the dual-beam UV-Absorption Ozone Photometer on the ER-2, the MkIV Interferometer balloon instrument, the Laboratoire de Physique Molèculaire et Applications and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LPMA/DOAS) balloon gondola, the JPL in situ ozone instrument on the Observations of the Middle Stratosphere (OMS) balloon platform, and the Système D'Analyze par Observations Zénithales (SAOZ) balloon sonde. The resulting comparisons show a remarkable degree of consistency despite the very different measurement techniques inherent in the data sets and thus provide a strong validation of the POAM III version 3.0 ozone. This is particularly true in the primary 14-30 km region, where there are significant overlaps with all seven instruments. At these altitudes, POAM III agrees with all the data sets to within 7-10% with no detectable bias. The observed differences are within the combined errors of POAM III and the correlative measurements. Above 30 km, only a handful of SOLVE correlative measurements exist and the comparisons are highly variable. Therefore, the results are inconclusive. Below 14 km, the SOLVE comparisons also show

  8. Comparison of POAM III ozone measurements with correlative aircraft and balloon data during SOLVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpe, Jerry D.; Fromm, Mike; Hoppel, Karl; Bevilacqua, Richard M.; Randall, Cora E.; Browell, Edward V.; Grant, William B.; McGee, Thomas; Burris, John; Twigg, Laurence; Richard, Erik C.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Margitan, James J.; Sen, Bhaswar; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Boesch, Hartmut; Fitzenberger, Richard; Goutail, Florence; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre

    2002-03-01

    The Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III instrument operated continuously during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) mission, making approximately 1400 ozone profile measurements at high latitudes both inside and outside the Arctic polar vortex. The wealth of ozone measurements obtained from a variety of instruments and platforms during SOLVE provided a unique opportunity to compare correlative measurements with the POAM III data set. In this paper, we validate the POAM III version 3.0 ozone against measurements from seven different instruments that operated as part of the combined SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign. These include the airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (UV DIAL) and the Airborne Raman Ozone and Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) instruments on the DC-8, the dual-beam UV-Absorption Ozone Photometer on the ER-2, the MkIV Interferometer balloon instrument, the Laboratoire de Physique Molèculaire et Applications and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LPMA/DOAS) balloon gondola, the JPL in situ ozone instrument on the Observations of the Middle Stratosphere (OMS) balloon platform, and the Système D'Analyze par Observations Zénithales (SAOZ) balloon sonde. The resulting comparisons show a remarkable degree of consistency despite the very different measurement techniques inherent in the data sets and thus provide a strong validation of the POAM III version 3.0 ozone. This is particularly true in the primary 14-30 km region, where there are significant overlaps with all seven instruments. At these altitudes, POAM III agrees with all the data sets to within 7-10% with no detectable bias. The observed differences are within the combined errors of POAM III and the correlative measurements. Above 30 km, only a handful of SOLVE correlative measurements exist and the comparisons are highly variable. Therefore, the results are inconclusive. Below 14 km, the SOLVE comparisons also show

  9. Airborne determination of the temporo-spatial distribution of benzene, toluene, nitrogen oxides and ozone in the boundary layer across Greater London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. D.; Lee, J. D.; Davison, B.; Vaughan, A.; Purvis, R. M.; Harvey, A.; Lewis, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2015-05-01

    Highly spatially resolved mixing ratios of benzene and toluene, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone (O3) were measured in the atmospheric boundary layer above Greater London during the period 24 June to 9 July 2013 using a Dornier 228 aircraft. Toluene and benzene were determined in situ using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), NOx by dual-channel NOx chemiluminescence and O3 mixing ratios by UV absorption. Average mixing ratios observed over inner London at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. were 0.20 ± 0.05, 0.28 ± 0.07, 13.2 ± 8.6, 21.0 ± 7.3 and 34.3 ± 15.2 ppbv for benzene, toluene, NO, NO2 and NOx respectively. Linear regression analysis between NO2, benzene and toluene mixing ratios yields a strong covariance, indicating that these compounds predominantly share the same or co-located sources within the city. Average mixing ratios measured at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. over outer London were always lower than over inner London. Where traffic densities were highest, the toluene / benzene (T / B) concentration ratios were highest (average of 1.8 ± 0.5 ppbv ppbv-1), indicative of strong local sources. Daytime maxima in NOx, benzene and toluene mixing ratios were observed in the morning (~ 40 ppbv NOx, ~ 350 pptv toluene and ~ 200 pptv benzene) and in the mid-afternoon for ozone (~ 40 ppbv O3), all at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l.

  10. Airborne determination of the temporo-spatial distribution of benzene, toluene, nitrogen oxides and ozone in the boundary layer across Greater London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. D.; Lee, J. D.; Davison, B.; Vaughan, A.; Purvis, R. M.; Lewis, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2014-10-01

    Highly spatially resolved mixing ratios of benzene and toluene, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone (O3) were measured in the atmospheric boundary layer above Greater London during the period 24 June to 9 July 2013 using a Dornier 228 aircraft. Toluene and benzene were determined in-situ using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), NOx by dual channel NOx chemiluminescence and O3 mixing ratios by UV absorption. Average mixing ratios observed over inner London at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. were 0.20 ± 0.05, 0.28 ± 0.07, 13.2 ± 8.6, 21.0 ± 7.3 and 34.3 ± 15.2 ppbv for benzene, toluene, NO, NO2 and NOx respectively. Linear regression analysis between NO2, benzene and toluene mixing ratios yielded a trimodal distribution indicating that these compounds predominantly share the same or co-located sources within the city and that a significant fraction of NOx is directly emitted as NO2. Average mixing ratios measured at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. over outer London were always lower than over inner London. Where traffic densities were highest, the toluene / benzene (T / B) concentration ratios were highest (average of 1.8 ± 0.3 ppbv ppbv-1) indicative of strong local sources. Daytime maxima in NOx, benzene and toluene mixing ratios were observed in the morning (~40 ppbv NOx, ~350 pptv toluene and ~200 pptv benzene) and for ozone in the mid-afternoon (~40 ppbv O3) all at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l.

  11. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  12. Airborne Transparencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Lois Thommason

    1984-01-01

    Starting from a science project on flight, art students discussed and investigated various means of moving in space. Then they made acetate illustrations which could be used as transparencies. The projection phenomenon made the illustrations look airborne. (CS)

  13. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  14. Tropospheric Ozone Near-Nadir-Viewing IR Spectral Sensitivity and Ozone Measurements from NAST-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Larar, Allen M.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared ozone spectra from near nadir observations have provided atmospheric ozone information from the sensor to the Earth's surface. Simulations of the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) from the NASA ER-2 aircraft (approximately 20 km altitude) with a spectral resolution of 0.25/cm were used for sensitivity analysis. The spectral sensitivity of ozone retrievals to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature and water vapor is assessed in order to understand the relationship between the IR emissions and the atmospheric state. In addition, ozone spectral radiance sensitivity to its ozone layer densities and radiance weighting functions reveals the limit of the ozone profile retrieval accuracy from NAST-I measurements. Statistical retrievals of ozone with temperature and moisture retrievals from NAST-I spectra have been investigated and the preliminary results from NAST-I field campaigns are presented.

  15. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  16. Influence of suspended inorganic sediment on airborne laser fluorosensor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Esaias, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of Poole and Esaias (1982) are presently extended to an examination of the influence of inorganic sediment on the water Raman normalization procedure, as well as an assessment of the potential for using the Raman signal to monitor surface water attenuation properties. An optically perfect lidar system is assumed which has geometric properties representative of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar, and is mounted on an airborne platform flying at an altitude of 150 m above the water surface. The results obtained suggest that caution should be exercised in attempts to quantitatively monitor changes in optical attenuation by means of remote measurements of the Raman scattering signal.

  17. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  18. In situ ozone measurements within the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole from a high-altitude ER-2 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proffitt, M. H.; Steinkamp, M. J.; Powell, J. A.; Mclaughlin, R. J.; Mills, O. A.; Schmeltekopf, A. L.; Thompson, T. L.; Tuck, A. F.; Tyler, T.; Chan, K. R.

    1989-01-01

    In situ ozone measurements were made from the ER-2 aircraft during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment both inside and outside the ozone hole. Midday measurements from late August until late September during aircraft ascent near 53 deg S latitude indicate no clear temporal trend in ozone mixing ratio but instead reflect the distance of the measurement from the chemically perturbed region. The measurements made within the ozone hole at 72 deg S show altitude-dependent decreases in ozone of 61 percent at a potential temperature of 425 K down to 39 percent at 365 K. Temporal trends are also calculated at various positions relative to the boundary of the chemically perturbed region to locate the region of large ozone decreases and thereby accurately locate the boundary of the ozone hole.

  19. In situ ozone measurements within the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole from a high-altitude ER-2 aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Proffitt, M.H.; Steinkamp, M.J.; Powell, J.A. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder ); McLaughlin, R.J.; Mills, O.A.; Schmeltekopf, A.L.; Thompson, T.L.; Tuck, A.F.; Tyler, T.; Winkler, R.H. ); Chan, K.R. )

    1989-11-30

    In situ ozone measurements were made from the ER-2 aircraft during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment both inside and outside the ozone hole. Midday measurements from late August until late September during aircraft ascent near 53{degree}S latitude indicate no clear temporal trend in ozone mixing ratio but instead reflect the distance of the measurement from the chemically perturbed region. The measurements made within the ozone hole at 72{degree}S show altitude dependent decreases in ozone of 61% at a potential temperature of 425 K down to 39% at 365 K. Temporal trends are also calculated at various positions relative to the boundary of the chemically perturbed region to locate the region of large ozone decreases and thereby accurately locate the boundary of the ozone hole.

  20. Aircraft deployment, and airborne arctic stratospheric expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Estelle; Tuck, Adrian; Hipskind, Steve; Toon, Brian; Wegener, Steve

    1990-01-01

    The Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition had two primary objectives: to study the production and loss mechanisms of ozone in the north polar stratosphere and to study the effect on ozone distribution of the Arctic Polar Vortex and of the cold temperatures associated with the formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds. Two specially instrumented NASA aircraft were flown over the Arctic region. Each aircraft flew to acquire data on the meteorological, chemical and cloud physical phenomena that occur in the polar stratosphere during winter. The chemical processes which occur in the polar stratosphere during winter were also observed and studied. The data acquired are being analyzed.

  1. Stimulated Raman amplification, oscillation, and linewidth in barium nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Christopher J.; Chyba, Thomas H.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of Raman gain in a Ba(NO3)2 crystal are reported at 532 nm using a Raman oscillator/amplifier arrangement for differential absorption lidar measurements of ozone. The experimentally determined gain coefficient will be compared with theoretical results. The effect of single and multi-longitudinal mode pumping upon the amplification process will be discussed. Measurement of the Raman linewidth for 1st 2nd and 3d stokes shifts arc presented.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  3. Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.; Toon, Owen B.

    1993-01-01

    The sudden onset of ozone depletion in the antarctic vortex set a precedent for both the time scale and the severity of global change. The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE), staged from Punta Arenas, Chile, in 1987, established that CFCs, halons, and methyl bromide, the dominant sources of chlorine and bromine radicals in the stratosphere, control the rate of ozone destruction over the Antarctic; that the vortex is depleted in reactive nitrogen and water vapor; and that diabatic cooling during the antarctic winter leads to subsidence within the vortex core, importing air from higher altitudes and lower latitudes. This last conclusion is based on observed dramatic distortion in the tracer fields, most notably N2O. In 1989, the first Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE-I), staged from Stavanger, Norway, and using the same aircraft employed for AAOE (the NASA ER-2 and the NASA DC-8), discovered that while NO(x) and to some degree NO(y) were perturbed within the arctic vortex, there was little evidence for desiccation. Under these (in contrast to the antarctic) marginally perturbed conditions, however, Cl0 was found to be dramatically enhanced such that a large fraction of the available (inorganic) chlorine resided in the form of Cl0 and its dimer ClOOCl. This leaves two abiding issues for the northern hemisphere and the mission of the second Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE-II): (1) Will significant ozone erosion occur within the arctic vortex in the next ten years as chlorine loading in the stratosphere exceeds four parts per billion by volume? and (2) Which mechanisms are responsible for the observed ozone erosion poleward of 30 deg N in the winter/spring northern hemisphere reported in satellite observations?

  4. Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.; Toon, Owen B.

    1993-01-01

    The sudden onset of ozone depletion in the antarctic vortex set a precedent for both the time scale and the severity of global change. The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE), stages from Punta Arenas, Chile, in 1987, established that CFCs, halons, and methyl bromide, the dominant sources of chlorine and bromide radicals in the stratosphere, control the rate of ozone destruction over the Antarctic; that the vortex is depleted in reactive nitrogen and water vapor; and that diabatic cooling during the antarctic winter leads to subsidence within the vortex core, importing air from higher altitudes and lower latitudes. This last conclusion is based on observed dramatic distortion in the tracer fields, most notably N2O. In 1989, the first Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE-1), staged from Stavanger, Norway, and using the same aircraft employed for AAOE (the NASA ER-2 and the NASA DC-8), discovered that while NO(x) and to some degree NO(y) were perturbed within the arctic vortex, there was little evidence for desiccation. Under these (in contrast to the antarctic) marginally perturbed conditions, however, ClO was found to be dramatically enhanced such that a large fraction of the available (inorganic) chlorine resided in the form of ClO and its dimer ClOOCl. This leaves two abiding issues for the northern hemisphere and the mission of the second Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE-2): (1) Will significant ozone erosion occur within the arctic vortex in the next ten years as chlorine loading in the stratosphere exceeds four parts per billion by volume? (2) Which mechanisms are responsible for the observed ozone erosion poleward of 30 deg N in the winter/spring northern hemisphere reported in satellite observations?

  5. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  6. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  7. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  8. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates.

  9. The Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition - Prologue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard; Plumb, Alan; Condon, Estelle

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to the initial scientific results of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE), as well as data from other atmospheric experiments and analyses carried out during the Arctic polar winter of 1989. Mission objectives of the AASE were to study the mechanisms of ozone depletion and redistribution in the northern polar stratosphere, including the influences of Arctic meteorology, and polar stratospheric clouds formed at low temperatures. Some major aspects of the AASE are described including: logistics and operations, meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, trace composition and chemistry, and ozone depletion. It is concluded that the Arctic-89 experiments have provided the scientific community with a wealth of new information that will contribute to a better understanding of the polar winter stratosphere and the critical problem of global ozone depletion.

  10. Ozone variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duetsch, H. U.

    1983-09-01

    The annual and long-term variations in the atmospheric ozone layer were examined on the basis of 55 yr of data taken at Aroya, Switzerland and 25 yr of data gathered by the global ozone network. Attention was given to annual and biennial variations, which showed that the midlatitude peak concentration was affected by a quasi-biennial variation of the tropical stratospheric circulation. Smaller scale circulation patterns were dominant in the lower stratosphere, although an observed negative trend of the total ozone was equally distributed between the troposphere and 24 km altitude. The global ozone increase detected in the 1960s was possible due to general circulation alterations, but may also have been influenced by injection of NO(x) into the atmosphere during atomic bomb testing.

  11. Controlled Exposure of Healthy Young Volunteers to Ozone Causes Cardiovascular Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recent epidemiology studies have reported associations between acute ozone exposure and mortality. Such studies have previously reported associations between airborne particulate matter pollution (PM) and mortality and support for a causal relationship has come from c...

  12. Controlled exposure of healthy young volunteers to ozone causes cardiovascular effects**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recent epidemiology studies have reported associations between acute ozone exposure and mortality. Such studies have previously reported associations between airborne particulate matter pollution (PM) and mortality and support for a causal relationship has come from c...

  13. Ozone, Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    In the early part of the 20th century, ground-based and balloon-borne measurements discovered that most of atmosphere's ozone is located in the stratosphere with highest concentrations located between 15 and 30 km (9,3 and 18.6 miles). For a long time, it was believed that tropospheric ozone originated from the stratosphere and that most of it was destroyed by contact with the earth's surface. Ozone, O3, was known to be produced by the photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen, O2, a process that can only occur at wavelengths shorter than 242 nm. Because such short-wave-length radiation is present only in the stratosphere, no tropospheric ozone production is possible by this mechanism. In the 1940s, however, it became obvious that production of ozone was also taking place in the troposphere. The overall reaction mechanism was eventually identified by Arie Haagen-Smit of the California Institute of Technology, in highly polluted southern California. The copious emissions from the numerous cars driven there as a result of the mass migration to Los Angeles after World War 2 created the new unpleasant phenomenon of photochemical smog, the primary component of which is ozone. These high levels of ozone were injuring vegetable crops, causing women's nylons to run, and generating increasing respiratory and eye-irritation problems for the populace. Our knowledge of tropospheric ozone increased dramatically in the early 1950s as monitoring stations and search centers were established throughout southern California to see what could be done to combat this threat to human health and the environment.

  14. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  15. Chemistry, Dynamics, and Radiation of Ozone Loss: Airborne Measurements of OH, HO2, N02, Cl0, BrO, IO, ClON02, BrON02, CIOOCl, and H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    2005-01-01

    This research addresses, through a combination of in situ and remote aircraft-borne Which mechanisms are responsible for the continuing erosion of ozone over midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere? Will the rapid loss of ozone over the Arctic in late winter continue to worsen over the next two decades? Are these large losses dynamically coupled to midlatitudes? Which mechanisms dictate the rate of exchange of material between the troposphere and stratosphere? How will these processes change in response to changes in climate? Will regional scale pollution episodes, that are emerging as predictable seasonal events, significantly affect the middle-to-upper troposphere chemical composition. If so, how will these changes alter the chemical composition of the middle world? What changes are predicted for the overworld? Why has the arctic stratosphere become colder in the late winter phase in recent years? Have increases in tropical upper troposphere temperatures increased the temperature gradient such as to change the trajectories of vertically propagating waves, thus reducing the effectiveness of the meridional circulation for transport of heat, momentum and ozone from the tropics to high latitudes?

  16. Chemistry, Dynamics, and Radiation of Ozone Loss: Airborne Measurements of OH, HO2, NO2, ClO, BrO, IO, ClONO2, BrONO2, ClOOCl, and H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    2005-01-01

    This grant continued the research initially funded under NAG1-01095. This research addresses, through a combination of in situ and remote aircraft-borne instruments, the following scientific questions: Which mechanisms are responsible for the continuing erosion of ozone over midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere? Will the rapid loss of ozone over the Arctic in late winter continue to worsen over the next two decades? Are these large losses dynamically coupled to midlatitudes? Which mechanisms dictate the rate of exchange of material between the troposphere and stratosphere? How will these processes change in response to changes in climate? Will regional scale pollution episodes, that are emerging as predictable seasonal events, significantly affect the middle-to-upper troposphere chemical composition. If so, how will these changes alter the chemical composition of the middle world? What changes are predicted for the overworld? Why has the arctic stratosphere become colder in the late winter phase in recent years? Have increases in tropical upper troposphere temperatures increased the temperature gradient such as to change the trajectories of vertically propagating waves, thus reducing the effectiveness of the meridional circulation for transport of heat, momentum and ozone from the tropics to high latitudes?

  17. Enhanced Raman Monitor Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westenskow, Dwayne

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous contaminants stems from the need to ensure a healthy and safe environment. NASA/Ames needs sensors that are able to monitor common atmospheric gas concentrations as well as trace amounts of contaminant gases. To provide an accurate assessment of air quality, a monitoring system would need to be continuous and on-line with full spectrum capabilities, allowing simultaneous detection of all gas components in a sample, including both combustible and non-combustible gases. The system demands a high degree of sensitivity to detect low gas concentrations in the low-ppm and sub-ppm regions. For clean and healthy air ('good' category), criteria established by the EPA requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 4 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) in an 8 hour period, 60 ppb of ozone(O3) in a one hour period and 30 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a 24 hour period. One step below this is the National Ambient Air Quality Standard ('moderate' category) which requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 9 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO), 120 ppb of ozone (O3) and 140 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) for their respective time periods. Ideally a monitor should be able to detect the concentrations specified in the 'good' category. To benchmark current abilities of Raman technology in gas phase analysis, laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the RASCAL II anesthetic gas monitor.

  18. Raman Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Shona; Priore, Ryan J.; Nelson, Matthew P.; Treado, Patrick J.

    2012-07-01

    The past decade has seen an enormous increase in the number and breadth of imaging techniques developed for analysis in many industries, including pharmaceuticals, food, and especially biomedicine. Rather than accept single-dimensional forms of information, users now demand multidimensional assessment of samples. High specificity and the need for little or no sample preparation make Raman imaging a highly attractive analytical technique and provide motivation for continuing advances in its supporting technology and utilization. This review discusses the current tools employed in Raman imaging, the recent advances, and the major applications in this ever-growing analytical field.

  19. Ozone in the stratosphere. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning empirical and theoretical studies and analyses of stratospheric ozone. The processing of upper atmospheric ozone concentrations that vary with ozone transport, formation, and depletion, and data collection using ground-based, airborne and satellite-borne instrumentation and sensors are examined. Citations cover studies on atmospheric composition, reaction kinetics, particle physics, chemical reactions, photochemistry, and atmospheric models of ozone. Investigations are based on the photochemistry, ozone constituents, and long-term measurement data. References to the Antarctic October depletion phenomenon are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Ozone in the stratosphere. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning empirical and theoretical studies and analyses of stratospheric ozone. The processing of upper atmospheric ozone concentrations that vary with ozone transport, formation, and depletion, and data collection using ground-based, airborne and satellite-borne instrumentation and sensors are examined. Citations cover studies on atmospheric composition, reaction kinetics, particle physics, chemical reactions, photochemistry, and atmospheric models of ozone. Investigations are based on the photochemistry, ozone constituents, and long-term measurement data. References to the Antarctic October depletion phenomenon are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. The Antarctic Ozone Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For…

  2. DC-8 and ER-2 in Sweden for the Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This 48 second video shows Dryden's Airborne Science aircraft in Kiruna Sweden in January 2000. The DC-8 and ER-2 conducted atmospheric studies for the Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE).

  3. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements by Airborne Sun Photometer in SOLVE II: Comparisons to SAGE III, POAM III and Airborne Spectrometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Ramirez, S.; Yee, J-H.; Swartz, W.; Shetter, R.

    2004-01-01

    The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) measured solar-beam transmission on the NASA DC-8 during the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II). This paper presents AATS-14 results for multiwavelength aerosol optical depth (AOD), including its spatial structure and comparisons to results from two satellite sensors and another DC-8 instrument. These are the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III), the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement III (POAM III) and the Direct beam Irradiance Airborne Spectrometer (DIAS).

  4. The fate of airborne polycyclic organic matter.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, T; Ramdahl, T; Bjørseth, A

    1983-01-01

    Biological tests have shown that a significant part of the mutagenicity of organic extracts of collected airborne particulate matter is not due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It is possible that part of these unknown compounds are transformation products of PAH. This survey focuses on the reaction of PAH in the atmosphere with other copollutants, such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, ozone and free radicals and their reaction products. Photochemically induced reactions of PAH are also included. The reactivity of particle-associated PAH is discussed in relation to the chemical composition and the physical properties of the carrier. Recommendations for future work are given. PMID:6825615

  5. Heterogeneous physicochemistry of the polar ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Processes occurring in the polar winter stratosphere, which involve polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), are investigated using observations from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. In particular, data on the properties of PSCs and their physical chemistry, the microphysical processes and time constants for cloud processes, the heterogeneous chemical processes and their time constants, and nonlinearities in the long-term ozone trend associated with physical and chemical processes are examined. The chemical reactions leading to the depletion of the inert chlorine reservoir in a presence of type I PSCs are established, and it is shown that type II PSCs contribute to chemical processing that sustains the chemical imbalance of the polar stratosphere. It is shown that, using a simple model, the decadal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole may be understood through nonlinearities in the heterogeneous chemistry, with possible contributing effects of variations in stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations.

  6. Aerosol Remote Sensing Applications for Airborne Multiangle, Multispectral Shortwave Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bismarck, Jonas; Ruhtz, Thomas; Starace, Marco; Hollstein, André; Preusker, René; Fischer, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol particles have an important impact on the surface net radiation budget by direct scattering and absorption (direct aerosol effect) of solar radiation, and also by influencing cloud formation processes (semi-direct and indirect aerosol effects). To study the former, a number of multispectral sky- and sunphotometers have been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Free University of Berlin in the past two decades. The latest operational developments were the multispectral aureole- and sunphotometer FUBISS-ASA2, the zenith radiometer FUBISS-ZENITH, and the nadir polarimeter AMSSP-EM, all designed for a flexible use on moving platforms like aircraft or ships. Currently the multiangle, multispectral radiometer URMS/AMSSP (Universal Radiation Measurement System/ Airborne Multispectral Sunphotometer and Polarimeter) is under construction for a Wing-Pod of the high altitude research aircraft HALO operated by DLR. The system is expected to have its first mission on HALO in 2011. The algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol and trace gas properties from the recorded multidirectional, multispectral radiation measurements allow more than deriving standard products, as for instance the aerosol optical depth and the Angstrom exponent. The radiation measured in the solar aureole contains information about the aerosol phasefunction and therefore allows conclusions about the particle type. Furthermore, airborne instrument operation allows vertically resolved measurements. An inversion algorithm, based on radiative transfer simulations and additionally including measured vertical zenith-radiance profiles, allows conclusions about the aerosol single scattering albedo and the relative soot fraction in aerosol layers. Ozone column retrieval is performed evaluating measurements from pixels in the Chappuis absorption band. A retrieval algorithm to derive the water-vapor column from the sunphotometer measurements is currently under development. Of the various airborne

  7. Earth's Endangered Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panofsky, Hans A.

    1978-01-01

    Included are (1) a discussion of ozone chemistry; (2) the effects of nitrogen fertilizers, fluorocarbons, and high level aircraft on the ozone layer; and (3) the possible results of a decreasing ozone layer. (MR)

  8. Interagency cooperative scientific program to investigate antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    NASA, The Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Science Foundation and its National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the Chemical Manufacturer's Association have announced a cooperative investigation of the Antarctic ozone hole. The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment will fly specially instrumented NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft into the Antarctic ozone hole from August 17 through September 29. The experiments have been designed not only to test existing Antarctic ozone hole theories but to provide for a wide base of high quality atmospheric data in the event that none of the current hypotheses proves to be adequate. This experiment is prompted by recent observations that have shown a dramatic and unexpected downward trend in the amount of ozone in a column of air over the Antarctic in the period between late winter and early spring.

  9. Ozone crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Roan, S.

    1989-01-01

    The author presents an account of the depletion of the atmosphere's ozone layer since the discovery of the phenomenon 15 years ago. The book recounts the flight to ban chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) and describes the science, the people, and the politics involved, up to the March 1988 international treaty restricting CFC production. It surveys the media's coverage, describes the struggle for remedies, and offers a prognosis for the future.

  10. Atmospheric Science Research Using Raman Lidar at NASA/GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A broad overview of the research that is taking place in the Code 924 Raman Lidar group will be presented. The measurement capabilities of two instruments, the Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) and the Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL), will be discussed. Case studies to be presented include: 1) high resolution measurements of water vapor during a boundary layer bore wave event; 2) a study of the influence of thin cirrus clouds on satellite retrievals of water vapor; 3) the retrieval of warm cloud properties such as droplet radius and number density; and 4) remote aerosol characterization using multiwavelength lidar and others.

  11. First Results of Total Ozone from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) using the DOAS Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veefkind, J. P.; de Haan, J. F.; Bhartia, P. K.; Yang, K.; Brinksma, E. J.; Kroon, M.; Levelt, P. F.

    2004-12-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is one of four instruments on the NASA EOS-Aura satellite, that was successfully launched on July 15, 2004. OMI is an imaging spectrometer in the ultraviolet and visible part of the spectrum (270 to 500 nm) and was contributed to the Aura mission by The Netherlands and Finland. With its unprecedented spatial resolution of 13x24 km2 at nadir and daily global coverage, OMI promises highly interesting scientific results and will make a major contribution to our understanding of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and climate change. In this contribution we intend to present the first results of the OMI total ozone product derived using the DOAS technique. This product is one of two OMI total ozone products, the other product is based on the TOMS method. The DOAS implementation for OMI includes state-of-the-art features, such as improved methods for accounting for rotational Raman scattering and atmospheric temperature changes. These new features use the full spectral capabilities of the OMI instrument to derive the total ozone column. We anticipate to present global maps of ozone as well as results of initial validation with ground based observations. Also, we will compare with other satellite data products, such as derived from SCIAMACHY and TOMS. First comparisons between the two OMI total ozone products, derived using the DOAS and TOMS methods, will be presented. We intend to show (potential) users of the total ozone products the benefits of OMI's spatial resolution and daily global coverage.

  12. Ozone Hole Over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) show the progressive depletion of ozone over Antarctica from 1979 to 1999. This 'ozone hole' has extended to cover an area as large as 10.5 million square miles in September 1998. The previous record of 10.0 million square miles was set in 1996. The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year between late August and early October. Regions with higher levels of ozone are shown in red. NASA and NOAA instruments have been measuring Antarctic ozone levels since the early 1970s. Large regions of depleted ozone began to develop over Antarctica in the early 1980s. Ozone holes of substantial size and depth are likely to continue to form during the next few years, scientists hope to see a reduction in ozone loss as levels of ozone-destroying CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are gradually reduced. Credit: Images by Greg Shirah, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  13. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of Antarctic ozone levels and the discovery of a hole in the Antarctic region are examined. The effects of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) on the level of stratospheric ozone are analyzed. Three cycles explaining the cause of ozone depletion in the poles are proposed. A comparison of field data and proposed depletion cycles reveals that the chemical origin of the ozone hole is due to CFCs. The potential global effects of the Antarctic ozone hole are discussed.

  14. Summary of aircraft results for 1978 southeastern Virginia urban plume measurement study of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Wornom, D. E.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.; Sebacher, D. I.

    1980-01-01

    Ozone production was determined from aircraft and surface in situ measurements, as well as from an airborne laser absorption spectrometer. Three aircraft and approximately 10 surface stations provided air-quality data. Extensive meteorological, mixing-layer-height, and ozone-precursor data were also measured. Approximately 50 hrs (9 flight days) of data from the aircraft equipped to monitor ozone, nitrogen oxides, dewpoint temperature, and temperature are presented. In addition, each experiment conducted is discussed.

  15. Inherent optical properties of the ocean: retrieval of the absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter from airborne laser spectral fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Vodacek, Anthony; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Blough, Neil V.

    1995-10-01

    The absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) at 355 nm has been retrieved from airborne laser-induced and water Raman-normalized CDOM fluorescence. Four combined airborne and ship field experiments have demonstrated that (1) the airborne CDOM fluorescence-to--water Raman ratio is linearly related to concurrent quinine-sulfate-standardized CDOM shipboard fluorescence measurements over a wide range of water masses (coastal to blue water); (2) the vicarious calibration of the airborne fluorosensor in units traceable to a fluorescence standard can be established and then maintained over an extended time period by tungsten lamp calibration; (3) the vicariously calibrated airborne CDOM fluorescence-to-water Raman ratio can be directly applied to previously developed

  16. Observation of ozone enhancement in the lower troposphere over East Asia from a space-borne ultraviolet spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, S.; Liu, X.; Ono, A.; Yang, K.; Chance, K.

    2015-09-01

    We report observations from space using ultraviolet (UV) radiance for significant enhancement of ozone in the lower troposphere over central and eastern China (CEC). The recent retrieval products of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite revealed the spatial and temporal variation of ozone distributions in multiple layers in the troposphere. We compared the OMI-derived ozone over Beijing with airborne measurements by the Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) program. The correlation between OMI and MOZAIC ozone in the lower troposphere was reasonable, which assured the reliability of OMI ozone retrievals in the lower troposphere under enhanced ozone conditions. The ozone enhancement was clearly observed over CEC, with Shandong Province as its center, and was most notable in June in any given year. Similar seasonal variations were observed throughout the 9-year OMI measurement period of 2005 to 2013. A considerable part of this ozone enhancement could be attributed to the emissions of ozone precursors from industrial activities and automobiles, and possibly from open crop residue burning (OCRB) after the winter wheat harvest. The ozone distribution presented in this study is also consistent with some model studies. The lower tropospheric ozone distribution is first shown from OMI retrieval in this study, and the results will be useful in clarifying any unknown factors that influence ozone distribution by comparison with model simulations.

  17. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  18. Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkraus, J. M.; Wright, M. W.; Rheingans, B. E.; Steinkraus, D. E.; George, W. P.; Aljabri, A.; Hall, J. L.; Scott, D. C.

    2012-06-01

    One novel approach towards addressing the need for innovative instrumentation and investigation approaches is the integration of a suite of four spectrometer systems to form the Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometers (MAPS) for prospecting on Mars.

  19. Global tropospheric ozone investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.

    1998-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is one of the most important trace gases in the troposphere, and it is responsible for influencing many critical chemical and radiative processes. Ozone contributes to the formation of the hydroxyl radical (OH), which is central to most chemical reactions in the lower atmosphere, and it absorbs UV, visible, and infrared radiation which affects the energy budget and atmospheric temperatures. In addition, O3 can be used as a tracer of atmospheric pollution and stratosphere troposphere exchange. At elevated concentrations, O3 can also produce detrimental biological and human health effects. The US National Research Council (NRC) Board on Sustainable Development reviewed the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) [NRC, 1995], and it identified tropospheric chemistry as one of the high priority areas for the USGCRP in the next decade. The NRC identified the following specific challenges in tropospheric chemistry. Although we understand the reason for the high levels of 03 over several regions of the world, we need to better establish the distribution of O3 in the troposphere in order to document and understand the changes in the abundance of global tropospheric O3. This information is needed to quantify the contribution of O3 to the Earth' s radiative balance and to understand potential impacts on the health of the biosphere. Having recognized the importance of particles in the chemistry of the stratosphere, we must determine how aerosols and clouds affect the chemical processes in the troposphere. This understanding is essential to predict the chemical composition of the atmosphere and to assess the resulting forcing effects in the climate system. We must determine if the self-cleansing chemistry of the atmosphere is changing as a result of human activities. This information is required to predict the rate at which pollutants are removed from the atmosphere. Over nearly two decades, airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) systems have been used in

  20. Fiber-Optic Coupled Lidar Receiver System to Measure Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, David Brent; Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of ozone in the atmosphere has become increasingly important over the past two decades. Significant increases of ozone concentrations in the lower atmosphere, or troposphere, and decreases in the upper atmosphere, or stratosphere, have been attributed to man-made causes. High ozone concentrations in the troposphere pose a health hazard to plants and animals and can add to global warming. On the other hand, ozone in the stratosphere serves as a protective barrier against strong ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. Man-made CFC's (chlorofluorocarbons) act as a catalyst with a free oxygen atom and an ozone molecule to produce two oxygen molecules therefore depleting the protective layer of ozone in the stratosphere. The beneficial and harmful effects of ozone require the study of ozone creation and destruction processes in the atmosphere. Therefore, to provide an accurate model of these processes, an ozone lidar system must be able to be used frequently with as large a measurement range as possible. Various methods can be used to measure atmospheric ozone concentrations. These include different airborne and balloon measurements, solar occulation satellite techniques, and the use of lasers in lidar (high detection and ranging,) systems to probe the atmosphere. Typical devices such as weather balloons can only measure within the direct vicinity of the instrument and are therefore used infrequently. Satellites use solar occulation techniques that yield low horizontal and vertical resolution column densities of ozone.

  1. Airborne pipeline leak detection: UV or IR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, François; Gravel, Jean-François; Allard, Martin

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a study of different approaches to the measurement of the above ground vapor plume created by the spill caused by a small 0.1 l/min (or less) leak in an underground liquid petroleum pipeline. The scenarios are those for the measurement from an airborne platform. The usual approach is that of IR absorption, but in the case of liquid petroleum products, there are drawbacks that will be discussed, especially when using alkanes to detect a leak. The optical measurements studied include UV enhanced Raman lidar, UV fluorescence lidar and IR absorption path integrated lidars. The breadboards used for testing the different approaches will be described along with the set-ups for leak simulation. Although IR absorption would intuitively be the most sensitive, it is shown that UV-Raman could be an alternative. When using the very broad alkane signature in the IR, the varying ground spectral reflectance are a problem. It is also determined that integrated path measurements are preferred, the UV enhanced Raman measurements showing that the vapor plume stays very close to the ground.

  2. Ozone Trend Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The detection of anthropogenic disturbances in the Earth's ozone layer was studied. Two topics were addressed: (1) the level at which a trend in total ozoning is detected by existing data sources; and (2) empirical evidence in the prediction of the depletion in total ozone. Error sources are identified. The predictability of climatological series, whether empirical models can be trusted, and how errors in the Dobson total ozone data impact trend detectability, are discussed.

  3. Ozone Layer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  4. Ozone Antimicrobial Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is a potent germicide that has been used extensively for water purification. In Europe, 90 percent of the municipal water systems are treated with ozone, and in France, ozone has been used to treat drinking water since 1903. However, there is limited information on the bioc...

  5. Ozone drinking water treatment handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This book explains how ozone can be used to provide primary disinfection, while minimizing halogenated by-products. This is of use to those who design pilot plant studies in full scale ozone plants-and those who employ ozone and regulatory personnel. Detailed section on components of an ozonization system outlines feed gas preparation (air and oxygen), ozone generation, ozone contacting, ozone off gas destruction, monitoring and control of ozonation systems, engineering aspects of ozone, cost factors in ozone technology, case histories (European and U.S.).

  6. Remote sensing of subsurface water temperature by laser Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.; Caputo, B.; Guagliardo, J. L.; Hoge, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes experimental remote sensing of subsurface water temperature using the Raman spectroscopic technique. By the use of a pulsed laser and range gating detection techniques, Raman scattering is analyzed as a function of depth in a radar-like echo mode, and thus subsurface profiles of temperature and transmission are obtained. Experiments are described in which Raman data using polarization spectroscopy has been obtained from a ship as a function of depth in ocean water near Grand Bahama Island. A spectral temperature accuracy of + or - 1 C has been obtained from this data in the first two optical attenuation lengths. Raman data obtained from ocean water using the NASA airborne oceanographic lidar is also presented.

  7. Ozone variations in the Scandinavian sector of the Arctic during the AASE campaign and 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, K.; Larsen, S.H.H.; Thorkelsson, B.; Shumilov, O.I.

    1994-08-15

    In this paper the authors present ground based ozone measurements carried out at Tromso for the year 1989, when the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) carried out measurements over the Arctic. The ground based measurements give no evidence of the ozone depletions observed as part of the AASE. The authors present the measurements for 1989, superimposed on the average, and standard deviation readings extending as far back as 1935.

  8. Airborne lidar measurements of pollution transport in central and southern California during CalNEX 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J., II; Hardesty, R.; Langford, A. O.; Banta, R. M.; Brewer, A.; Davies, F.; Sandberg, S.; Marchbanks, R.; Weickmann, A.

    2010-12-01

    During the CalNEX experiment from May through July 2010, we co-deployed NOAA’s airborne ozone and aerosol lidar TOPAZ and the University of Leeds scanning Doppler wind lidar on a Twin Otter aircraft. We flew a total of 46 missions over central and southern California, focusing primarily on the Los Angeles Basin and Sacramento areas. The downward-looking lidars provided highly resolved measurements of ozone concentration, aerosol backscatter, and wind speed and direction in the boundary layer and lower free troposphere. We will use the airborne lidar data to characterize transport of ozone and aerosols on regional and local scales. In particular, we will focus on pollutant transport between air basins and the role of flow patterns in complex terrain, such as gap flows and orographic lifting and venting along mountain slopes, on pollutant distribution.

  9. Intracavity Raman lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y.B.; Ackerhalt, J.R.; Krasinski, J.S.; Heller, D.F.

    1989-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of intracavity Raman lasers are presented. Advantages of intracavity Raman lasers, particularly for low-emission cross section and broadly tunable vibronic gain media, are described. Experimental studies of a hydrogen gas Raman laser pumped inside the cavity of an alexandrite laser are presented. A theoretical model of the dynamics of a unidirectional intracavity Raman ring laser is developed and solved analytically. This model is adapted to simulate experiments.

  10. Airborne data acquisition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Arro, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    The introduction of standards on acceptable procedures for assessing building heat loss has created a dilemma for the contractor performing airborne thermographic surveys. These standards impose specifications on instrumentation, data acquisition, recording, interpretation, and presentation. Under the standard, the contractor has both the obligation of compliance and the requirement of offering his services at a reasonable price. This paper discusses the various aspects of data acquisition for airborne thermographic surveys and various techniques to reduce the costs of this operation. These techniques include the calculation of flight parameters for economical data acquisition, the selection and use of maps for mission planning, and the use of meteorological forecasts for flight scheduling and the actual execution of the mission. The proper consideration of these factors will result in a cost effective data acquisition and will place the contractor in a very competitive position in offering airborne thermographic survey services.

  11. Imaging with Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2010-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy, based on the inelastic scattering of a photon, has been widely used as an analytical tool in many research fields. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has also been explored for biomedical applications (e.g. cancer diagnosis) because it can provide detailed information on the chemical composition of cells and tissues. For imaging applications, several variations of Raman spectroscopy have been developed to enhance its sensitivity. This review article will provide a brief summary of Raman spectroscopy-based imaging, which includes the use of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS, primarily used for imaging the C-H bond in lipids), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, for which a variety of nanoparticles can be used as contrast agents), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs, with its intrinsic Raman signal). The superb multiplexing capability of SERS-based Raman imaging can be extremely powerful in future research where different agents can be attached to different Raman tags to enable the interrogation of multiple biological events simultaneously in living subjects. The primary limitations of Raman imaging in humans are those also faced by other optical techniques, in particular limited tissue penetration. Over the last several years, Raman spectroscopy imaging has advanced significantly and many critical proof-of-principle experiments have been successfully carried out. It is expected that imaging with Raman Spectroscopy will continue to be a dynamic research field over the next decade.

  12. Ozone and the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the stratospheric ozone is effective in absorbing almost all radiation below 300 nm at heights below 300 km. The distribution of global ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, and the latitudinal variations of the total ozone column over four seasons are considered. The theory of the ozone layer production is discussed together with catalytic reactions for ozone loss and the mechanisms of ozone transport. Special attention is given to the anthropogenic perturbations, such as SST exhaust gases and freon gas from aerosol cans and refrigerators, that may cause an extensive destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer and thus have a profound impact on the world climate and on life.

  13. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Specifications and preliminary design of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system, which is to be constructed for installation and used on a NASA Wallops Flight Center (WFC) C-54 research aircraft, are reported. The AOL system is to provide an airborne facility for use by various government agencies to demonstrate the utility and practicality of hardware of this type in the wide area collection of oceanographic data on an operational basis. System measurement and performance requirements are presented, followed by a description of the conceptual system approach and the considerations attendant to its development. System performance calculations are addressed, and the system specifications and preliminary design are presented and discussed.

  14. Airborne rain mapping radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Parks, G. S.; Li, F. K.; Im, K. E.; Howard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne scanning radar system for remote rain mapping is described. The airborne rain mapping radar is composed of two radar frequency channels at 13.8 and 24.1 GHz. The radar is proposed to scan its antenna beam over + or - 20 deg from the antenna boresight; have a swath width of 7 km; a horizontal spatial resolution at nadir of about 500 m; and a range resolution of 120 m. The radar is designed to be applicable for retrieving rainfall rates from 0.1-60 mm/hr at the earth's surface, and for measuring linear polarization signatures and raindrop's fall velocity.

  15. Observations over Hurricanes from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A.; Yang, K.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    There is an apparent inconsistency between the total column ozone derived from the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and aircraft observations within the eye region of tropical cyclones. The higher spectral resolution, coverage, and sampling of the ozone monitoring instrument (OMI) on NASA s Aura satellite as compared with TOMS allows for improved ozone retrievals by including estimates of cloud pressure derived simultaneously using the effects of rotational Raman scattering. The retrieved cloud pressures from OM1 are more appropriate than the climatological cloud-top pressures based on infrared measurements used in the TOMS and initial OM1 algorithms. We find that total ozone within the eye of hurricane Katrina is significantly overestimated when we use climatological cloud pressures. Using OMI-retrieved cloud pressures, total ozone in the eye is similar to that in the surrounding area. The corrected total ozone is in better agreement with aircraft measurements that imply relatively small or negligible amounts of stratospheric intrusion into the eye region of tropical cyclones.

  16. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  17. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  18. Airborne study of ozone formation over Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luria, Menachem; Valente, Ralph J.; Bairai, Solomon; Parkhurst, William J.; Tanner, Roger L.

    Twelve research fights were performed during August 2005 over the Dallas (Texas) metropolitan area. The primary objective was to estimate the relative contribution of primary emissions from large point sources, i.e., major power plants, compared with mobile sources in terms of O 3 production. The distinction between the source types was derived from concurrent measurements of SO 2 (tracer for point sources) and CO (tracer for mobile sources) relative to levels of O 3 and NO x (the O 3 precursor). The flights also examined the vertical structure of the atmosphere and its effect on the dispersion/dilution of the trace gases. During the first half of the study the O 3 levels in the Dallas area were relatively low and only during the second half were significantly elevated O 3 levels observed. For the latter period the relationship between maximum O 3 levels, the air mass chemical age and the O 3 yield are evaluated. The results also revealed that mobile sources are the main contributors to the elevated O 3 levels in the Dallas area.

  19. Filter measurement results from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandrud, B. W.; Sperry, P. D.; Sanford, L.; Kelly, K. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.

    1989-01-01

    Filter samples obtained as part of the AAOE to determine the total nitrate, sulfate, acidic chloride, and acidic fluoride content along the flight path of the NASA ER-2 are studied. These compounds were obtained in the aerosol and vapor phase. The ratio of particulate sulfate observed outside the chemically perturbed region (CPR) of the vortex to that inside the CPR was 2.6. The ratio of total acidic chloride to total acidic flouride within the CPR is near 1, indicating the removal of chloride from the air mass or the partitioning of chloride into an unmeasured species.

  20. Experimental feasibility of the airborne measurement of absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne lidar oil spill experiments carried out to determine the practicability of the AOFSCE (absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency) computational model are described. The results reveal that the model is suitable over a considerable range of oil film thicknesses provided the fluorescence efficiency of the oil does not approach the minimum detection sensitivity limitations of the lidar system. Separate airborne lidar experiments to demonstrate measurement of the water column Raman conversion efficiency are also conducted to ascertain the ultimate feasibility of converting such relative oil fluorescence to absolute values. Whereas the AOFSCE model is seen as highly promising, further airborne water column Raman conversion efficiency experiments with improved temporal or depth-resolved waveform calibration and software deconvolution techniques are thought necessary for a final determination of suitability.

  1. Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, F. C.; Markle, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator enables prospecting for fluorescent materials, hydrography with fluorescent dyes, and plant studies based on fluorescence of chlorophyll. Optical unit design is the coincidence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum occurring at the characteristic wavelengths of some fluorescent materials.

  2. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  3. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  4. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  5. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  6. [Ozone exposure and asthma].

    PubMed

    Kleis, S; Louis, R; Bartsch, P

    2003-03-01

    Ozone is a pollutant the production of which depends on weather conditions and car engine combustion. Numerous epidemiological studies have indicated that high ozone levels correlated with morbidity in asthma. Experimental studies have shown that exposure of healthy subjects and asthmatics to ozone levels comparable to those measured in ambient air during hot summer days can generate respiratory symptoms, neutrophilic airways inflammation and lung function impairment. Lung function changes following ozone exposure are more pronounced in asthmatics and are dependent on the duration and intensity of exposure, a previous exposure and the nutritional status of the subjects. The airway epithelial cell layer is likely to play a pivotal role in initiating the inflammatory process following ozone exposure. Control of ambient air ozone levels must be a target for public health authorities.

  7. Biological effects of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M. )

    1989-09-01

    Tropospheric ozone, a classic anthropogenic air pollutant, is going to remain a troublesome byproduct of contemporary civilization for many decades. We have known for some time that the hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides from motor vehicles, together with actinic radiation, account for local and regional photochemistry leading to prolonged afternoon ozone peaks. We also now know that agricultural burning and intensive animal husbandry elevate regional and mesoscale concentrations of ozone and its precursors, and that remote background levels of ozone have been rising steadily throughout this century. The changes we will have to make in emission controls to appreciably reduce current tropospheric ozone levels will have profound effects on our transportation systems, consumer products, and lifestyles. As a society, we will have to make difficult choices about the levels of ozone-associated health, welfare, and natural system damage we will tolerate, or conversely, how much we are willing to pay for controls which can minimize the damage.

  8. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  9. Chemical Loss of Ozone in the Arctic Polar Vortex in the Winter of 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Lait, L. R.; Newman, P. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Chan, K. R.; Proffitt, M. H.; Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Baumgardner, D.; Dye, J. E.; Wilson, J. C.; Elkins, J. W.; Anderson, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of chlorine monoxide, bromine monoxide, and ozone are extrapolated globally, with the use of meteorological tracers, to infer the loss rates for ozone in the Arctic lower stratosphere during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II (AASE II) in the winter of 1991-1992. The analysis indicates removal of 15 to 20 percent of ambient ozone because of elevated concentrations of chlorine monoxide and bromine monoxide. Observations during AASE II define rates of removal of chlorine monoxide attributable to reaction with nitrogen dioxide (produced by photolysis of nitric acid) and to production of hydrochloric acid. Ozone loss ceased in March as concentrations of chlorine monoxide declined. Ozone losses could approach 50 percent if regeneration of nitrogen dioxide were inhibited by irreversible removal of nitrogen oxides (denitrification), as presently observed in the Antarctic, or without denitrification if inorganic chlorine concentrations were to double.

  10. Chemical loss of ozone in the Arctic polar vortex in the winter of 1991- 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Lait, L. R.; Newman, P. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Proffitt, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of chlorine monoxide, bromine monoxide, and ozone are extrapolated globally, with the use of meteorological tracers, to infer the loss rates for ozone in the Arctic lower stratosphere during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II (AASE II) in the winter of 1991-1992. The analysis indicates removal of 15 to 20 percent of ambient ozone because of elevated concentrations of chlorine monoxide and bromine monoxide. Observations during AASE II define rates of removal of chlorine monoxide attributable to reaction with nitrogen dioxide (produced by photolysis of nitric acid) and to production of hydrochloric acid. Ozone loss ceased in March as concentrations of chlorine monoxide declined. Ozone losses could approach 50 percent if regeneration of nitrogen dioxide were inhibited by irreversible removal of nitrogen oxides (denitrification), as presently observed in the Antarctic, or without denitrification if inorganic chlorine concentrations were to double.

  11. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Processes that may be responsible for the thinning in the ozone layer above the South Pole are described. The chlorine catalytic cycle which destroys ozone is described, as are the major types of reactions that are believed to interfere with this cycle by forming chlorine reservoirs. The suspected contributions of polar stratospheric clouds to these processes are examined. Finally, the possibility that the ozone hole may be due more to a shift in atmospheric dynamics than to chemical destruction is addressed.

  12. Changes in stratospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Cicerone, R J

    1987-07-01

    The ozone layer in the upper atmosphere is a natural feature of the earth's environment. It performs several important functions, including shielding the earth from damaging solar ultraviolet radiation. Far from being static, ozone concentrations rise and fall under the forces of photochemical production, catalytic chemical destruction, and fluid dynamical transport. Human activities are projected to deplete substantially stratospheric ozone through anthropogenic increases in the global concentrations of key atmospheric chemicals. Human-induced perturbations may be occurring already.

  13. Lidar Observation of Ozone Profiles in the Equatorial Tropopause Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo, M.; Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone in the tropics zone is significant in terms of the oxidizing efficiency and greenhouse effect. However, in the upper troposphere, the ozone budget in the tropics has not been fully understood yet because of the sparsity of the range-resolved observations of vertical ozone concentration profiles. We have constructed the lidar facility for survey of atmospheric structure over troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere and low thermosphere over Kototabang (100.3E, 0.2S), Indonesia in the equatorial region. The lidar system consists of the Mie and Raman lidars for tropospheric aerosol, water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements, the Rayleigh lidar for stratospheric and mesospheric temperature measurements and the Resonance lidar for metallic species such as Na, Fe, Ca ion measurements and temperature measurements in the mesopause region. The lidar observations started from 2004, and routine observations of clouds and aerosol in the troposphere and stratosphere are continued now. We have installed DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system for high-resolution measurements of vertical ozone profiles in the equatorial tropopause region over Kototabang. There were many ozone DIAL systems in the world, but their systems are almost optimized for stratospheric ozone layer measurement or tropospheric ozone measurement. Because of deep ozone absorption in the UV region, the wavelength selection is important. Over the equatorial region, the tropopause height is almost 17km. So we use 305nm for on-line and 355nm for off-line using second harmonics of dye laser and third harmonics of Nd:YAG laser. We have observed large ozone enhancement in the upper troposphere, altitude of 13-17km in June 2014, concurring with a zonal wind oscillation associated with the equatorial Kelvin wave around the tropopause[1] at equatorial region. References Fujiwara, M. et al., JGR, 103, D15, 19,173-19,182, 1998.

  14. Diesel Exhaust Modulates Ozone-induced Lung Function Decrements in Healthy Human Volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential effects of combinations of dilute whole diesel exhaust (DE) and ozone (03), each a common component of ambient airborne pollutant mixtures, on lung function were examined. Healthy young human volunteers were exposed for 2 hr to pollutants while exercising (~50 L/min...

  15. Adsorption air cleaning from ozone.

    PubMed

    Baltrenas, Pranas; Paliulis, Dainius; Vasarevicius, Saulius; Simaitis, Ramutis

    2003-01-01

    Not much has been written about air cleaning from ozone. The aim of this paper was to demonstrate the possibility of adsorption air cleaning from ozone. The second aim was to investigate the dependence of the efficiency of ozone removal from the air on the height of the adsorber layer and on concentrations of ozone, and to obtain empirical formulas for calculating the efficiency of ozone treatment. Equipment for air cleaning from ozone and nitrogen and sulphur dioxides is suggested.

  16. [Air-borne disease].

    PubMed

    Lameiro Vilariño, Carmen; del Campo Pérez, Victor M; Alonso Bürger, Susana; Felpeto Nodar, Irene; Guimarey Pérez, Rosa; Pérez Alvarellos, Alberto

    2003-11-01

    Respiratory protection is a factor which worries nursing professionals who take care of patients susceptible of transmitting microorganisms through the air more as every day passes. This type of protection covers the use of surgical or hygienic masks against the transmission of infection by airborne drops to the use of highly effective masks or respirators against the transmission of airborne diseases such as tuberculosis or SARS, a recently discovered disease. The adequate choice of this protective device and its correct use are fundamental in order to have an effective protection for exposed personnel. The authors summarize the main protective respiratory devices used by health workers, their characteristics and degree of effectiveness, as well as the circumstances under which each device is indicated for use. PMID:14705591

  17. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  18. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  19. Initial Retrieval Validation from the Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, WIlliam L.; Larar, Allen M.; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Mango, Stephen A.; Schluessel, Peter; Calbet, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx) was conducted during April 2007 mainly for validation of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp satellite, but also included a strong component focusing on validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard the AQUA satellite. The cross validation of IASI and AIRS is important for the joint use of their data in the global Numerical Weather Prediction process. Initial inter-comparisons of geophysical products have been conducted from different aspects, such as using different measurements from airborne ultraspectral Fourier transform spectrometers (specifically, the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST-I) and the Scanning-High resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) aboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft), UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe146-301 aircraft insitu instruments, dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and ground based Raman Lidar. An overview of the JAIVEx retrieval validation plan and some initial results of this field campaign are presented.

  20. Remote Raman measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  1. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles.

  2. Mammalian airborne allergens.

    PubMed

    Aalberse, Rob C

    2014-01-01

    Historically, horse dandruff was a favorite allergen source material. Today, however, allergic symptoms due to airborne mammalian allergens are mostly a result of indoor exposure, be it at home, at work or even at school. The relevance of mammalian allergens in relation to the allergenic activity of house dust extract is briefly discussed in the historical context of two other proposed sources of house dust allergenic activity: mites and Maillard-type lysine-sugar conjugates. Mammalian proteins involved in allergic reactions to airborne dust are largely found in only 2 protein families: lipocalins and secretoglobins (Fel d 1-like proteins), with a relatively minor contribution of serum albumins, cystatins and latherins. Both the lipocalin and the secretoglobin family are very complex. In some instances this results in a blurred separation between important and less important allergenic family members. The past 50 years have provided us with much detailed information on the genomic organization and protein structure of many of these allergens. However, the complex family relations, combined with the wide range of post-translational enzymatic and non-enzymatic modifications, make a proper qualitative and quantitative description of the important mammalian indoor airborne allergens still a significant proteomic challenge. PMID:24925404

  3. Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Beverly Kaye

    2009-04-01

    Ozone, an ambient pollutant, is transformed into other airborne pollutants in the indoor environment. In this dissertation, the type and amount of byproducts that result from ozone reactions with common indoor surfaces, surface residues, and vapors were determined, pollutant concentrations were related to occupant exposure, and frameworks were developed to predict byproduct concentrations under various indoor conditions. In Chapter 2, an analysis is presented of secondary organic aerosol formation from the reaction of ozone with gas-phase, terpene-containing consumer products in small chamber experiments under conditions relevant for residential and commercial buildings. The full particle size distribution was continuously monitored, and ultrafine and fine particle concentrations were in the range of 10 to>300 mu g m-3. Particle nucleation and growth dynamics were characterized.Chapter 3 presents an investigation of ozone reactions with aircraft cabin surfaces including carpet, seat fabric, plastics, and laundered and worn clothing fabric. Small chamber experiments were used to determine ozone deposition velocities, ozone reaction probabilities, byproduct emission rates, and byproduct yields for each surface category. The most commonly detected byproducts included C1?C10 saturated aldehydes and skin oil oxidation products. For all materials, emission rates were higher with ozone than without. Experimental results were used to predict byproduct exposure in the cabin and compare to other environments. Byproduct levels are predicted to be similar to ozone levels in the cabin, which have been found to be tens to low hundreds of ppb in the absence of an ozone converter. In Chapter 4, a model is presented that predicts ozone uptake by and byproduct emission from residual chemicals on surfaces. The effects of input parameters (residue surface concentration, ozone concentration, reactivity of the residue and the surface, near-surface airflow conditions, and

  4. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  5. Airborne Passive Remote Sensing of the Troposphere in Nashville/Middle Tennessee Area During the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rider, D. M.; Worden, H. M.; Beer, R.; Nandi, S.; Sparks, L. C.

    1998-01-01

    In July of 1995 the Airborne Emission Spectrometer was deployed to Nashville, Tennessee to participate in the 1995 Ozone Study Intensive Campaign of the Southern Oxidants Study. AES is a high resolution mid-infrared interferometer that measures the spectrum of upwelling radiation in the 650-4250 cm-1 range.

  6. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  7. Improvements in Raman Lidar Measurements Using New Interference Filter Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Potter, John R.; Tola, Rebecca; Veselovskii, Igor; Cadirola, Martin; Rush, Kurt; Comer, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band interference filters with improved transmission in the ultra-violet have been developed under NASA-funded research and used in the Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL) in ground-based, upward-looking tests. Measurements were made of atmospheric water vapor, cirrus cloud optical properties and carbon dioxide that improve upon any previously demonstrated using Raman lidar. Daytime boundary and mixed layer profiling of water vapor mixing ratio up to an altitude of approximately 4 h is performed with less than 5% random error using temporal and spatial resolution of 2-minutes and 60 - 210, respectively. Daytime cirrus cloud optical depth and extinction-to-backscatter ratio measurements are made using 1 -minute average. Sufficient signal strength is demonstrated to permit the simultaneous profiling of carbon dioxide and water vapor mixing ratio into the free troposphere during the nighttime. A description of the filter technology developments is provided followed by examples of the improved Raman lidar measurements.

  8. Surface Ozone in Kiev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavrina, A. V.; Mikulskaya, I. A.; Kiforenko, S. I.; Blum, O. B.; Sheminova, V. A.; Veles, A. A.

    The study of total ozone over Kiev and its concentration changes with height in the troposphere has been made on the base of ground-based observations with the infrared Fourier-spectrometer in the Main Astronomical Observatory of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (MAO NASU) as part of ESA-NIVR-KNMI project no 2907 "OMI validation by ground based remote sensing: ozone columns and atmospheric profiles "(2005-2008) [1,2,4]. Ground-level ozone in Kiev for an episode of its high concentrations in August 2000 was also simulated with the model of urban air pollution UAM-V [5,6]. In 2008 the satellite data Aura-OMI on profiles of ozone in the atmosphere OMO3PR became available (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/ Aura/data-holdings/OMI/ omo3pr_v003.shtml). They include ozone content in the lower layer of the atmosphere, beginning from 2005, which can be used to evaluate the ground-level ozone in all cities of Ukraine. The comparison of the data of ozone air pollution in Kiev (ozone - the pollutant of the first class of danger) and medical statistics data of of respiratory system (RS) diseases of the city population was carried out with the package "Statistica". A regression analysis, prognostic regression modelling, and retrospective prognosis of the epidemiological situation with respect to RS pathologies in Kiev in 2000-2006 were performed.

  9. Ozone and temperature trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Fioletov, Vitali; Bishop, Lane; Godin, Sophie; Bojkov, Rumen D.; Kirchhoff, Volker; Chanin, Marie-Lise; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Zerefos, Christos S.; Chu, William

    1991-01-01

    An update of the extensive reviews of the state of knowledge of measured ozone trends published in the Report of the International Ozone Trends Panel is presented. The update contains a review of progress since these reports, including reviewing of the ozone records, in most cases through March 1991. Also included are some new, unpublished reanalyses of these records including a complete reevaluation of 29 stations located in the former Soviet Union. The major new advance in knowledge of the measured ozone trend is the existence of independently calibrated satellite data records from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAG) instruments. These confirm many of the findings, originally derived from the Dobson record, concerning northern mid-latitude changes in ozone. We now have results from several instruments, whereas the previously reported changes were dependent on the calibration of a single instrument. This update will compare the ozone records from many different instruments to determine whether or not they provide a consistent picture of the ozone change that has occurred in the atmosphere. The update also briefly considers the problem of stratospheric temperature change. As in previous reports, this problem received significantly less attention, and the report is not nearly as complete. This area needs more attention in the future.

  10. Saving Our Ozone Shield.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacoste, Beatrice

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the introduction and continued use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as related to stratospheric ozone depletion. Presents the characteristics of CFCs conducive to the chemical reaction with ozone, the history of CFC use and detection of related environmental problems, health hazards, and alternatives to CFC use. (MCO)

  11. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  12. Observing trends in total ozone and extreme ozone events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-05-01

    The ozone layer in the stratosphere has been recovering since the 1989 Montreal Protocol reduced the use of ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons. Fitzka et al. observed trends in total ozone levels and the vertical distribution of ozone at Hoher Sonnblick, a mountain in Austria, from 1994 to 2011.

  13. Differential absorption lidar system for routine monitoring of tropospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Sunesson, J A; Apituley, A; Swart, D P

    1994-10-20

    A differential absorption lidar system for routine profiling of tropospheric ozone for daytime and nighttime operation is described. The system uses stimulated Raman scattering in hydrogen and deuterium of 266-nm radiation from a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser. Ozone profiles from altitudes of 600 m to approximately 5 km have been obtained with analog detection. Implementing corrections for differential Rayleigh scattering, differential absorption from oxygen, sulphur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide, and differential aerosol extinction and backscatter can reduce the total system inaccuracy to 5-15% for a clear day and 20-30% for a hazy day, except at the top of the mixed layer. Photon counting must be installed to increase the measurement range from 5 to 15 km. An example of an application of routine measurements of tropospheric ozone profiles is given.

  14. Origin and Properties of Plumes of High Ozone Observed During the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000)

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, Peter H.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, Stephen R.; Nunnermacker, L. J.; Lee, Y.- N.; Weinstein-Lloyd, Judy; Zheng, J.; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2004-09-14

    Using airborne observations of hydrocarbon and related trace-gas species, we compare plume compositions over different parts of Houston, and to trace the source regions for high O3 plumes. Ozone formation over eastern Houston was found to be very rapid (up to 140 ppb/hr) with very efficient ozone production efficiencies (up to 28) driven by the high concentrations of reactive hydrocarbons emitted by industries in eastern Houston.

  15. Ozone in equatorial latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, L.; Zimmermann, G.; Trinkkeller, B.

    The presence of ozone in the atmosphere protects the biosphere against harmful solar UV radiation. The ozone distribution in the atmosphere is maintained on the basis of a complex system of reactions. The amount of atmospheric ozone might be reduced as a consequence of human activities. Such reduction in the atmospheric ozone could affect climate and biological processes on earth. As a part of plans for a further enhancement of the global surveillance of the atmospheric ozone layer, a series of radiation experiments concerning the quartz-ultraviolet region were conducted as a joint project of the German Democratic Republic and the USSR. The experiments had the objective to measure the radiative flux of the solar UV radiation and to determine absorption and dispersion of the radiation in the upper atmosphere. The investigation included the launching of 12 rockets from a research vessel in the Indian Ocean near the equator and 34 balloon flights.

  16. Measurement of ozone concentration in the lower stratosphere and upper troposhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, A. A.; Burlakov, V. D.; Dolgii, S. I.; Nevzorov, A. V.; Romanovskii, O. A.; Gridnev, Yu. V.

    2015-11-01

    We describe an ozone lidar and consider an algorithm for retrieving the ozone concentration, taking into consideration the aerosol correction. Results of lidar measurements at wavelengths 299 and 341 nm well agree with model estimates, indicating that ozone is sensed with acceptable accuracies in the altitude range of about 6-18 km. It should be noted that the retrieved profiles of altitude distribution of ozone concentration more closely resemble those from satellite data than according to Krueger model. A lidar is developed and put into operation at Siberian Lidar Station (SLS) to measure the vertical ozone distribution (VOD) in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere. Sensing is performed according to the method of differential absorption and scattering at wavelength pair 299/341 nm, which are respectively the first and second Stokes components of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) conversion of the fourth harmonic of Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) in hydrogen.

  17. Coherent Raman Umklappscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, L.; Lanin, A. A.; Jha, P. K.; Traverso, A. J.; Voronine, D. V.; Dorfman, K. E.; Fedotov, A. B.; Welch, G. R.; Sokolov, A. V.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Scully, M. O.

    2011-10-01

    We identify the conditions for coherent Raman scattering to enable the generation of phase-matched, highly directional, nearly-backward-propagating light beams. Our analysis indicates a unique possibility for standoff detection of trace gases using their rotational and vibrational spectroscopic signals. We demonstrate spatial selectivity of Raman transitions and variability of possible Umklappscattering implementation schemes and laser sources.

  18. Raman crystallography of RNA.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bo; Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chase, Elaine; Chadalavada, Durga M; Golden, Barbara L; Carey, Paul R; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2009-10-01

    Raman crystallography is the application of Raman spectroscopy to single crystals. This technique has been applied to a variety of protein molecules where it has provided unique information about biopolymer folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here, we describe the application of Raman crystallography to functional RNA molecules. RNA represents unique opportunities and challenges for Raman crystallography. One issue that confounds studies of RNA is its tendency to adopt multiple non-functional folds. Raman crystallography has the advantage that it isolates a single state of the RNA within the crystal and can evaluate its fold, metal ion binding properties (ligand identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), proton binding properties (identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), and catalytic potential. In particular, base-specific stretches can be identified and then associated with the binding of metal ions and protons. Because measurements are carried out in the hanging drop at ambient, rather than cryo, conditions and because RNA crystals tend to be approximately 70% solvent, RNA dynamics and conformational changes become experimentally accessible. This review focuses on experimental setup and procedures, acquisition and interpretation of Raman data, and determination of physicochemical properties of the RNA. Raman crystallographic and solution biochemical experiments on the HDV RNA enzyme are summarized and found to be in excellent agreement. Remarkably, characterization of the crystalline state has proven to help rather than hinder functional characterization of functional RNA, most likely because the tendency of RNA to fold heterogeneously is limited in a crystalline environment. Future applications of Raman crystallography to RNA are briefly discussed.

  19. Portable raman explosives detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven; Scharff, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in portable Raman instruments have dramatically increased their application to emergency response and forensics, as well as homeland defense. This paper reviews the relevant attributes and disadvantages of portable Raman spectroscopy, both essentially and instrumentally, to the task of explosives detection in the field.

  20. Ocean Raman Scattering in Satellite Backscatter UV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Joiner, Joanna; Gleason, James; Bhartia, Pawan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ocean Raman scattering significantly contributes to the filling-in of solar Fraunhofer lines measured by satellite backscatter ultraviolet (buy) instruments in the cloudless atmosphere over clear ocean waters. A model accounting for this effect in buy measurements is developed and compared with observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GONE). The model extends existing models for ocean Raman scattering to the UV spectral range. Ocean Raman scattering radiance is propagated through the atmosphere using a concept of the Lambert equivalent reflectively and an accurate radiative transfer model for Rayleigh scattering. The model and observations can be used to evaluate laboratory measurements of pure water absorption in the UV. The good agreement between model and observations suggests that buy instruments may be useful for estimating chlorophyll content.

  1. The Hole in the Ozone Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamers, Jeanne S.; Jacob, Anthony T.

    This document contains information on the hole in the ozone layer. Topics discussed include properties of ozone, ozone in the atmosphere, chlorofluorocarbons, stratospheric ozone depletion, effects of ozone depletion on life, regulation of substances that deplete the ozone layer, alternatives to CFCs and Halons, and the future of the ozone layer.…

  2. Fundamentals of ISCO Using Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using ozone involves the introduction of ozone gas (O3) into the subsurface to degrade organic contaminants of concern. Ozone is tri-molecular oxygen (O2) that is a gas under atmospheric conditions and is a strong oxidant. Ozone may react with ...

  3. The Two Faces of Ozone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Provides answers to questions regarding the ozone problem: (1) nature of ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere; (2) possibility of sending the excess ozone at ground level to the stratosphere; (3) possibility of producing pure ozone and carrying it to the stratosphere; and (4) banning chlorofluorocarbons. (YP)

  4. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  5. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  6. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules.

  7. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  8. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  9. Ozone - plant surface reactions an important ozone loss term?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Canaval, Eva; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billions dollar per year. Plant injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: How much ozone enters the plant through open stomata and how much ozone is lost by chemical reactions at the plant surface? Until now surface losses are estimated from measured total ozone deposition fluxes and calculated stomatal conductance values. While stomatal conductance of CO2 and H2O is well understood and extensively used in describing plant atmosphere gas exchange, stomatal conductance of ozone is not well known. Here we use different Nicotiana tabacum varieties and find that surface reactions of ozone with diterpenoids synthesized by glandular trichomes reduce ozone flux through open stomata. Our measurements reveal that fast ozone loss at the plant surface is accompanied with prompt release of oxygenated volatile compounds. In the ozone fumigation experiments of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties the release of specific volatile oxy-VOCs allowed to identify the semi volatile precursor compounds at the plant surface. Ozone fumigation experiments with Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), two common species in the Northern Hemisphere, show also a significant ozone loss at the plant surface for Picea abies. Fluid dynamic calculations of ozone transport in the diffusive leaf boundary layer reveal a vertical but no horizontal ozone gradient thus reducing ozone fluxes through the pores in case of efficient ozone scavenging plant surfaces. We explain this efficient ozone protection mechanism by the porous surface architecture of plants in combination with unsaturated semi-volatile compounds deposited at the plant surface. These results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at

  10. Ozone Profiles and Tropospheric Ozone from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Sioris, C. E.; Sparr, R. J. D.; Kuregm, T. P.; Martin, R. V.; Newchurch, M. J.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    Ozone profiles are derived from backscattered radiances in the ultraviolet spectra (290-340 nm) measured by the nadir-viewing Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment using optimal estimation. Tropospheric O3 is directly retrieved with the tropopause as one of the retrieval levels. To optimize the retrieval and improve the fitting precision needed for tropospheric O3, we perform extensive wavelength and radiometric calibrations and improve forward model inputs. Retrieved O3 profiles and tropospheric O3 agree well with coincident ozonesonde measurements, and the integrated total O3 agrees very well with Earth Probe TOMS and Dobson/Brewer total O3. The global distribution of tropospheric O3 clearly shows the influences of biomass burning, convection, and air pollution, and is generally consistent with our current understanding.

  11. The 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study (SEV-UPS): Surface and airborne studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. H.; Eaton, W. C.; Saeger, M. L.; Strong, R. B.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of two surface monitoring stations (one in downtown Norfolk, Virginia, one south of the city near the Great Dismal Swamp) and the collection of 40 hours of airborne measurements is described. Surface site measurements of ozone, oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, temperature, dew point, b sub seat, and condensation nuclei were made. Instrument calibrations, quality assurance audits, and preliminary data analysis in support of the Urban Plume Study were also made. The air pollution problems that were addressed are discussed. Data handling procedures followed for the surface stations are presented. The operation of the aircraft sampling platform is described. Aircraft sampling procedures are discussed. A preliminary descriptive analysis of the aircraft data is given along with data or plots for surface sites, airborne studies, hydrocarbon species, and instrument performance audits. Several of the aircraft flights clearly show the presence of an urban ozone plume downwind of Norfolk in the direction of the mean wind flow.

  12. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  13. Airborne ballistic camera tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redish, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    An operational airborne ballistic camera tracking system was tested for operational and data reduction feasibility. The acquisition and data processing requirements of the system are discussed. Suggestions for future improvements are also noted. A description of the data reduction mathematics is outlined. Results from a successful reentry test mission are tabulated. The test mission indicated that airborne ballistic camera tracking systems are feasible.

  14. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown. PMID:23406937

  15. Polar Ozone Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, a great deal of attention has been focused on the polar regions to both identify the chemistry and physics of the large losses, and to provide an understanding of the future of polar ozone. In this review talk, I will discuss the secular trends of ozone in both the Antarctic and Arctic regions, and I will review some of the principal research results of the last few years. In particular, I will emphasize some of the results from the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign that occurred over the course of the winter of 1999-2000.

  16. Arctic ozone loss

    SciTech Connect

    Zurer, P.S.

    1989-03-06

    Scientists have returned from the first comprehensive probe of the Arctic stratosphere with unexpectedly dire results: The winter atmosphere in the north polar region is loaded with the same destructive chlorine compounds that cause the Antarctic ozone hole. Atmospheric researchers who only a few weeks ago were comforted by the thought that the warmer Northern Hemisphere is strongly protected from the processes that lead to massive losses of ozone during spring in Antarctica now see very little standing in the way of an Arctic ozone hole.

  17. The evolution of the ozone collar in the Antarctic lower stratosphere during early August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Mariotti, A.; Mechoso, C.R.; Legras, B.; Daniel, V.

    2000-02-01

    The ozone evolution in the lower stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere during the period 5--10 August 1994 is analyzed. The analysis focuses on the ozone collar (the band of maximum values in ozone mixing ratio around the Antarctic ozone hole at these altitudes) and the development of collar filaments. Ozone mixing ratios provided by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by an ER-2 aircraft participating in the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of stratospheric Aircraft campaign are compared with values at corresponding locations in high-resolution isentropic maps obtained by using the numerical scheme of contour advection with surgery (CAS). The CAS reconstructed ozone maps provide a view of the way in which air masses are exported from the outskirts of the collar to form the tongues of higher mixing ratios observed at lower latitudes on MLS synoptic maps. There is an overall consistency between the datasets insofar as the collar location is concerned. This location seems to be primarily defined by the local properties of the flow. Nevertheless the CAS reconstructed collar tends to become weaker than that depicted by MLS data. By means of radioactive calculation estimates, it is argued that diabatic descent may be responsible for maintaining the ozone concentration approximately constant in the collar while filaments isentropically disperse collarlike mixing ratios from this region toward lower latitudes.

  18. Validation of ozone measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, E.; Walker, K. A.; Kar, J.; Boone, C. D.; McElroy, C. T.; Bernath, P. F.; Drummond, J. R.; Skelton, R.; McLeod, S. D.; Hughes, R. C.; Nowlan, C. R.; Dufour, D. G.; Zou, J.; Nichitiu, F.; Strong, K.; Baron, P.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Blumenstock, T.; Bodeker, G. E.; Borsdorff, T.; Bourassa, A. E.; Bovensmann, H.; Boyd, I. S.; Bracher, A.; Brogniez, C.; Burrows, J. P.; Catoire, V.; Ceccherini, S.; Chabrillat, S.; Christensen, T.; Coffey, M. T.; Cortesi, U.; Davies, J.; de Clercq, C.; Degenstein, D. A.; de Mazière, M.; Demoulin, P.; Dodion, J.; Firanski, B.; Fischer, H.; Forbes, G.; Froidevaux, L.; Fussen, D.; Gerard, P.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Goutail, F.; Granville, J.; Griffith, D.; Haley, C. S.; Hannigan, J. W.; Höpfner, M.; Jin, J. J.; Jones, A.; Jones, N. B.; Jucks, K.; Kagawa, A.; Kasai, Y.; Kerzenmacher, T. E.; Kleinböhl, A.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Kramer, I.; Küllmann, H.; Kuttippurath, J.; Kyrölä, E.; Lambert, J.-C.; Livesey, N. J.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Lloyd, N. D.; Mahieu, E.; Manney, G. L.; Marshall, B. T.; McConnell, J. C.; McCormick, M. P.; McDermid, I. S.; McHugh, M.; McLinden, C. A.; Mellqvist, J.; Mizutani, K.; Murayama, Y.; Murtagh, D. P.; Oelhaf, H.; Parrish, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Piccolo, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Randall, C. E.; Robert, C.; Roth, C.; Schneider, M.; Senten, C.; Steck, T.; Strandberg, A.; Strawbridge, K. B.; Sussmann, R.; Swart, D. P. J.; Tarasick, D. W.; Taylor, J. R.; Tétard, C.; Thomason, L. W.; Thompson, A. M.; Tully, M. B.; Urban, J.; Vanhellemont, F.; Vigouroux, C.; von Clarmann, T.; von der Gathen, P.; von Savigny, C.; Waters, J. W.; Witte, J. C.; Wolff, M.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents extensive {bias determination} analyses of ozone observations from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite instruments: the ACE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) instrument. Here we compare the latest ozone data products from ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO with coincident observations from nearly 20 satellite-borne, airborne, balloon-borne and ground-based instruments, by analysing volume mixing ratio profiles and partial column densities. The ACE-FTS version 2.2 Ozone Update product reports more ozone than most correlative measurements from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere. At altitude levels from 16 to 44 km, the average values of the mean relative differences are nearly all within +1 to +8%. At higher altitudes (45-60 km), the ACE-FTS ozone amounts are significantly larger than those of the comparison instruments, with mean relative differences of up to +40% (about +20% on average). For the ACE-MAESTRO version 1.2 ozone data product, mean relative differences are within ±10% (average values within ±6%) between 18 and 40 km for both the sunrise and sunset measurements. At higher altitudes ( 35-55 km), systematic biases of opposite sign are found between the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise and sunset observations. While ozone amounts derived from the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise occultation data are often smaller than the coincident observations (with mean relative differences down to -10%), the sunset occultation profiles for ACE-MAESTRO show results that are qualitatively similar to ACE-FTS, indicating a large positive bias (mean relative differences within +10 to +30%) in the 45-55 km altitude range. In contrast, there is no significant systematic difference in bias found for the ACE-FTS sunrise and sunset measurements.

  19. Raman scattering in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.F.

    1988-09-30

    A tutorial presentation is given of Raman scattering in crystals. The physical concepts are emphasized rather than the detailed mathematical formalism. Starting with an introduction to the concepts of phonons and conservation laws, the effects of photon-phonon interactions are presented. This interaction concept is shown for a simple cubic crystal and is extended to a uniaxial crystal. The correlation table method is used for determining the number and symmetry of the Raman active modes. Finally, examples are given to illustrate the relative ease of using this group theoretical method and the predictions are compared with measured Raman spectra. 37 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Ozone Correlative Measurements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the necessary parameters for the correlation of data on Earth ozone. Topics considered were: (1) measurement accuracy; (2) equipment considerations (SBUV); and (3) ground based measurements to support satellite data.

  1. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Domb, William C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The 21st century dental practice is quite dynamic. New treatment protocols and new materials are being developed at a rapid pace. Ozone dental therapy falls into the category of new treatment protocols in dentistry, yet ozone is not new at all. Ozone therapy is already a major treatment modality in Europe, South America and a number of other countries. What is provided here will not be an exhaustive scientific treatise so much as a brief general introduction into what dentists are now doing with ozone therapies and the numerous oral/systemic links that make this subject so important for physicians so that, ultimately, they may serve their patients more effectively and productively. PMID:25363268

  2. The role of chlorine chemistry in Antarctic ozone loss - Implications of new kinetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Jose M.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien Dak

    1990-01-01

    New kinetic data yielding a slower formation rate and larger absorption cross sections of Cl2O2 are incorporated into a photochemical model to reassess the role of chlorine chemistry in accounting for the ozone reductions derived from TOMS observations in different regions of the Antarctic polar vortex during 1987. The model is further constrained by existing measurements from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and the National Ozone Expedition II. Calculated concentrations of ClO based on the new kinetic data increase by almost a factor of two between the collar and core regions of the vortex during the second half of September. The calculated ozone reductions in the vortex core appear to be consistent with the TOMS observations in spite of the slower rate for the self-reaction of ClO.

  3. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

    2000-08-31

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift

  4. The ozone backlash

    SciTech Connect

    Taubes, G.

    1993-06-11

    While evidence for the role of chlorofluorocarbons in ozone depletion grows stronger, researchers have recently been subjected to vocal public criticism of their theories-and their motives. Their understanding of the mechanisms of ozone destruction-especially the annual ozone hole that appears in the Antarctic-has grown stronger, yet everywhere they go these days, they seem to be confronted by critics attacking their theories as baseless. For instance, Rush Limbaugh, the conservative political talk-show host and now-best-selling author of The Way Things Ought to Be, regularly insists that the theory of ozone depletion by CFCs is a hoax: bladerdash and poppycock. Zoologist Dixy Lee Ray, former governor of the state of Washington and former head of the Atomic Energy Commission, makes the same argument in her book, Trashing the Planet. The Wall Street Journal and National Review have run commentaries by S. Fred Singer, a former chief scientists for the Department of Transportation, purporting to shoot holes in the theory of ozone depletion. Even the June issue of Omni, a magazine with a circulation of more than 1 million that publishes a mixture of science and science fiction, printed a feature article claiming to expose ozone research as a politically motivated scam.

  5. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  6. Effects of ozone on airway epithelial permeability and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, P A; Ranga, V; Stutts, M J

    1991-12-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive form of oxygen produced in the atmosphere by photochemical reactions involving substrates emitted from automobile engines. Outdoor air concentrations as high as 0.4 parts per million (ppm) occur. The respiratory tract extracts about 90% of inhaled ozone. From the chemical reactivity of ozone, it is expected to attack organic molecules located on or near the respiratory surfaces. The airways are covered with a cohesive layer of epithelial cells that forms the boundary between the external environment and the respiratory tissues. One important role of this epithelial layer is its barrier function. Airborne particles that deposit (and dissolve) in the airway surface liquid are not readily absorbed, and soluble tissue components are excluded from the surface liquid. The epithelium also controls the volume and composition of the surface liquid. One important process in this regard is the absorption and secretion of ions and water. We have studied the effects of inhalation of ozone on the barrier function (permeability to dissolved molecules) and the ion transport activity of epithelium using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. All our experiments were performed with male Hartley strain guinea pigs. Conscious, unrestrained animals were exposed to a concentration of ozone of 1 ppm for three hours in controlled environmental chambers in the Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Research Triangle Park, NC. Such exposures caused a marked increase in the rate of appearance in blood of various water-soluble compounds instilled onto the surface of the trachea, indicating increased permeability of the airway epithelium. This interpretation was supported by electron microscopy, which showed that the tracer molecule horseradish peroxidase was present in the intercellular spaces of tracheal epithelium from ozone-exposed, but not air-exposed (control), animals. However, when the tracheas were excised after ozone

  7. Slower ozone production in Houston, Texas following emission reductions: evidence from Texas Air Quality Studies in 2000 and 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Cohan, D. S.; Henderson, B. H.

    2014-03-01

    Airborne measurements from two Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) field campaigns have been used to investigate changes of ozone production in Houston, Texas, from 2000 to 2006, a period of major emission reduction measures for petrochemical and other sources. Simultaneous declines in nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) and highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs) were observed between the two periods. We simulate HOx (OH and HO2) and organic radicals with a box model, the Dynamically Simple Model of Atmospheric Chemical Complexity, constrained by available airborne observations. Parameters such as total radical production, total OH reactivity of VOCs and ozone production rate (OPR) are computed to characterize the change of ozone production between 2000 and 2006 in the Houston area. The reduction in HRVOCs led to a decline in total radical production by 20-50%. Ozone production rates in the Houston area declined by 40-50% from 2000 to 2006, to which the reduction in NOx and HRVOCs made large contributions. Despite the significant decline in OPR, ozone production efficiency held steady, and VOC-sensitive conditions dominated during times of most rapid ozone formation, while the slow ozone formation continued to be NOx-limited. Our results highlight the importance of a balanced approach of ongoing HRVOC controls with NOx controls to further reduce O3 levels in the Houston area.

  8. Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    As noted above, traditional spectroscopy of the electronic structure of the inner shells of atoms, molecules, and solids is limited by the lifetime broadening of the core-excited states. This limitation can also be avoided with the non-radiative analog of X-ray Raman scattering - resonant Auger Raman spectroscopy. We have used this technique to study the K-shell excitation spectrum of argon as the photon energy is continuously scanned across threshold.

  9. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  10. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  11. Free-surface microfluidics for detection of airborne explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhart, Carl; Piorek, Brian; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Lee, Seung Joon; Moskovits, Martin

    2008-11-01

    A novel microfluidic, remote-sensing, chemical detection platform has been developed for real-time sensing of airborne agents. The key enabling technology is a newly developed concept termed Free-Surface Fluidics (FSF), where one or more fluidic surfaces of a microchannel flow are confined by surface tension and exposed to the surrounding atmosphere. The result is a unique open channel flow environment that is driven by pressure through surface tension, and not subject to body forces, such as gravity. Evaporation and flow rates are controlled by microchannel geometry, surface chemistry and precisely-controlled temperature profiles. The free-surface fluidic architecture is combined with Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) to allow for real-time profiling of atmospheric species and detection of airborne agents. The aggregation of SERS nanoparticles is controlled using microfluidics, to obtain dimer nanoparticle clusters at known streamwise positions in the microchannel. These dimers form SERS hot-spots, which amplify the Raman signal by 8 -- 10 orders of magnitude. Results indicate that explosive agents such as DNT, TNT, RDX, TATP and picric acid in the surrounding atmosphere can be readily detected by the SERS system. Due to the amplification of the SERS system, explosive molecules with concentrations of parts per trillion can be detected, even in the presence of interferent molecules having six orders of magnitude higher concentration.

  12. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  13. Monitoring Tropospheric Ozone Enhancement in the Front Range Using the Gsfc Tropoz DIAL during Discover - AQ 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Hoff, R. M.; Twigg, L.; Sumnicht, G. K.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Fort Collins, CO from 200 m to 16 km AGL. These measurements were taken as part of NASA's DISCOVER-AQ campaign in July/August 2014. Measurements were made during simultaneous aircraft spirals over the lidar site as well as collocated ozonesonde launches. Ozone enhancement from local sources typically occurred in the mid-afternoon convection period, especially when there was light winds and low cloud cover. Interesting ozone profiles and time series data will be shown. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. Three of these lidars, including the GSFC TROPOZ DIAL, recorded measurements during the DISCOVER-AQ campaign. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived.

  14. Ozone Depletion by Hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M.; Fleming, E. L.; Newman, P. A.; Li, F.; Mlawer, E. J.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Bailey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are second-generation replacements for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons and other substances that caused the 'ozone hole'. Atmospheric concentrations of HFCs are projected to increase dramatically in the coming decades. Coupled chemistry-climate simulations forced by these projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere in 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs modulate atmospheric temperature, thereby changing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and enhancing the stratospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Sensitivity simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to atmospheric change in 2050, as compared with HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation and dynamics, for a likely 2050 climate, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 4.3x10-4 to 3.5x10-2; previously HFCs were assumed to have negligible ODPs since these species lack chlorine or bromine atoms. The ozone impacts of HFCs are further investigated with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). The GEOSCCM is a three-dimensional, fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model with interactive stratospheric chemistry. Sensitivity simulations in which CO2, CFC-11 and HCFC-22 are enhanced individually are used as proxies for the atmospheric response to the HFC concentrations expected by the mid-21st century. Sensitivity simulations provide quantitative estimates of the impacts of these greenhouse gases on global total ozone, and can be used to assess their effects on the recovery of Antarctic ozone.

  15. Ozonation of Canadian Athabasca asphaltene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Zhixiong

    Application of ozonation in the petrochemical industry for heavy hydrocarbon upgrading has not been sufficiently explored. Among heavy hydrocarbons, asphaltenes are the heaviest and the most difficult fractions for analysis and treatment. Therefore, ozonation of asphaltenes presents an interesting application in the petrochemical industry. Commercial application of ozonation in the petrochemical industry has three obstacles: availability of an ozone-resistant and environmentally friendly solvent, the precipitation of ozonation intermediates during reaction, and recovery of the solvent and separation of the ozonation products. Preliminary ozonation of Athabasca oil sands asphaltene in nonparticipating solvents encountered serious precipitation of the ozonation intermediates. The precipitated intermediates could be polymeric ozonides and intermolecular ozonides or polymeric peroxides. Because the inhomogeneous reaction medium caused low ozone efficiency, various participating solvents such as methanol and acetic acid were added to form more soluble hydroperoxides. The mass balance results showed that on average, one asphaltene molecule reacted with 12 ozone molecules through the electrophilic reaction and the subsequent decomposition of ozonation intermediates generated acetone extractable products. GC/MS analysis of these compounds indicated that the free radical reactions could be important for generation of volatile products. The extensively ozonated asphaltene in the presence of participating solvents were refluxed with methanol to generate more volatile products. GC/MS analysis of the methanol-esterified ozonation products indicated that most volatile products were aliphatic carboxylic acid esters generated through cleavage of substituents. Reaction kinetics study showed that asphaltene ozonation was initially a diffusion rate-controlled reaction and later developed to a chemical reaction rate-controlled reaction after depletion of the reactive aromatic sites

  16. Recovery of the Ozone Layer: The Ozone Depleting Gas Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, David J.; Montzka, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    The stratospheric ozone layer, through absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation, protects all biological systems on Earth. In response to concerns over the depletion of the global ozone layer, the U.S. Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 mandates that NASA and NOAA monitor stratospheric ozone and ozone-depleting substances. This information is critical for assessing whether the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer, an international treaty that entered into force in 1989 to protect the ozone layer, is having its intended effect of mitigating increases in harmful ultraviolet radiation. To provide the information necessary to satisfy this congressional mandate, both NASA and NOAA have instituted and maintained global monitoring programs to keep track of ozone-depleting gases as well as ozone itself. While data collected for the past 30 years have been used extensively in international assessments of ozone layer depletion science, the language of scientists often eludes the average citizen who has a considerable interest in the health of Earth's protective ultraviolet radiation shield. Are the ozone-destroying chemicals declining in the atmosphere? When will these chemicals decline to pre-ozone hole levels so that the Antarctic ozone hole might disappear? Will this timing be different in the stratosphere above midlatitudes?

  17. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  18. Ozone Contamination in Aircraft Cabins. Appendix A: Ozone toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The recommendation that at various altitudes the amount of air with which ozone has mixed changes, thus changing the volume per volume relationship is discussed. The biological effects of ozone on human health and the amount of ozone necessary to produce symptoms were investigated.

  19. CONTRIBUTION TO INDOOR OZONE LEVELS OF AN OZONE GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. xperiment were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. he generated ozone and the in-room ...

  20. "OZONE SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN CMAQ'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone source attribution has been used to support various policy purposes including interstate transport (Cross State Air Pollution Rule) by U.S. EPA and ozone nonattainment area designations by State agencies. Common scientific applications include tracking intercontinental tran...

  1. Ozone Minimums, 1979 to 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    Minimum concentration of ozone in the southern hemisphere for each year from 1979-2013 (there is no data from 1995). Each image is the day of the year with the lowest concentration of ozone. A grap...

  2. Advances in Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor, Cirrus Clouds and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Potter, John R.; Tola, Rebecca; Rush, Kurt; Veselovskii, Igor; Cadirola, Martin; Comer, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band interference filters with improved transmission in the ultraviolet have been developed under NASA-funded research and used in the Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL) in ground- based, upward-looking tests. RASL is an airborne Raman Lidar system designed to measure water vapor mixing ratio, and aerosol backscatter/extinction/depolarization. It also possesses the capability to make experimental measurements of cloud liquid water and carbon dioxide. It is being prepared for first flight tests during the summer of 2006. With the newly developed filters installed in RASL, measurements were made of atmospheric water vapor, cirrus cloud optical properties and carbon dioxide that improve upon any previously demonstrated using Raman lidar. Daytime boundary layer profiling of water vapor mixing ratio is performed with less than 5% random error using temporal and spatial resolution of 2-minutes and 60 - 210, respectively. Daytime cirrus cloud optical depth and extinction- to-backscatter ratio measurements are made using 1-minute average. Sufficient signal strength is demonstrated to permit the simultaneous profiling of carbon dioxide and water vapor mixing ratio into the free troposphere during the nighttime. Downward-looking from an airborne RASL should possess the same measurement statistics with approximately a factor of 5 - 10 decrease in averaging time. A description of the technology improvements are provided followed by examples of the improved Raman lidar measurements.

  3. Ozone Enhancement in the Lower Troposphere over Central and Eastern China as Observed from the space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, T.; Hayashida, S.; Ono, A.; Kayaba, S.; Kajino, M.; Deushi, M.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Yamaji, K.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The recent roducts of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) retrieved by Liu et al. (2010) revealed spatial and temporal variations in ozone distributions in multiple tropospheric layers. We compared the OMI-derived ozone over Beijing with the airborne measurements conducted by the Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) program. The reliability of the OMI ozone retrievals was verified at the lower troposphere under enhanced ozone conditions (Hayashida et al. 2015). Ozone enhancement was clearly observed over Central and Eastern China (CEC), with Shandong Province as its center and most notably in June in any given year. The seasonality of the ozone enhancement was similar throughout the nine-year OMI measurement period of 2005 to 2013. As introduced by Hayashida et al. (2015), we have defined ΔO3 as the difference between the retrieved ozone and a priori value. To identify the area of significant ozone enhancement in further detail, the areas whose ΔO3 show similar seasonal variation were grouped into a cluster using the statistical tool R. As a result, the area covering the provinces of Shandong, Hebei, and Shanxi presents a clear seasonal variation, with the maximum in June. The time series of ΔO3 at around 115-125°E along 36°N indicate clear seasonal variation with significant enhancement in June or July every year. At the western locations (<110°E), there is only a slight ozone enhancement in summer. In the east of the CEC, the amplitude of ozone enhancement in summer diminishes toward the east, as observed at 130°E, suggesting an outflow of ozone plumes from China. The lower tropospheric ozone distribution maps retrieved using OMI products are generally consistent with the results from the model simulations by MRI-CCM2 of the Meteorological Research Institute Japan as far as emissions due to industrial activities and automobile exhaust are concerned, although there are still a few differences in the ozone mixing

  4. The world ozone dilemma; Research and results with remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtak, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in order to study the chemically perturbed region of the Antarctic and the Arctic, NASA initiated airborne and satellite imaging of the ozone depletion through the specialized ER-2 plane (at {approximately}18 km) and the modified DC-8-72 aircraft (at {approximately}12.5 km) with remote sensing systems onboard. Instruments onboard the ER-2 and DC-8 NASA research aircraft surveyed the atmosphere from various altitudes and instruments on the Nimbus-7 satellite analyzed reflected sunlight. Measurements were designed to gauge not only the extent of ozone depletion over the Antarctic/Arctic, but other chemical changes in the stratosphere. Activities carried out within programs of remote sensing and in situ measurements by aircraft are compared to TOMS onboard the Nimbus-7, as well as Dobson network ground stations. Through these methods, scientists have been extremely successful in mapping the huge hole in the ozone layer that appeared over Antarctica, which is particularly extensive for about two months of each year and to confirm ozone loss in the Arctic area.

  5. Evidence for diabatic cooling and poleward transport within and around the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profitt, M. H.; Kelly, K. K.; Powell, J. A.; Gary, B. L.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Chan, K. R.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric dynamics at altitudes of 17.5-19 km were analyzed using measurements of N2O, total water, total odd-nitrogen species, and potential vorticity (derived from pressures, temperatures, and wind speeds) obtained aboard the ER-2 aircraft flown in the period between August 23 and September 22 during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. Results indicated a consistent gradual poleward movement of air, extending from about 10 deg in latitude outside the boundary of the ozone hole to about 5 deg inside. Evidence is presented of ongoing diabatic cooling throughout this zone, both inside and outside the chemically perturbed region.

  6. Airborne chemistry: acoustic levitation in chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Nilsson, Staffan

    2004-04-01

    This review with 60 references describes a unique path to miniaturisation, that is, the use of acoustic levitation in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry applications. Levitation of small volumes of sample by means of a levitation technique can be used as a way to avoid solid walls around the sample, thus circumventing the main problem of miniaturisation, the unfavourable surface-to-volume ratio. Different techniques for sample levitation have been developed and improved. Of the levitation techniques described, acoustic or ultrasonic levitation fulfils all requirements for analytical chemistry applications. This technique has previously been used to study properties of molten materials and the equilibrium shape()and stability of liquid drops. Temperature and mass transfer in levitated drops have also been described, as have crystallisation and microgravity applications. The airborne analytical system described here is equipped with different and exchangeable remote detection systems. The levitated drops are normally in the 100 nL-2 microL volume range and additions to the levitated drop can be made in the pL-volume range. The use of levitated drops in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry offers several benefits. Several remote detection systems are compatible with acoustic levitation, including fluorescence imaging detection, right angle light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Applications include liquid/liquid extractions, solvent exchange, analyte enrichment, single-cell analysis, cell-cell communication studies, precipitation screening of proteins to establish nucleation conditions, and crystallisation of proteins and pharmaceuticals. PMID:14762640

  7. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic investigation on Lamiaceae plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, P.; Popp, J.; Kiefer, W.

    1999-05-01

    The essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgaris are studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The containing monoterpenes can be identified by their Raman spectra. Further the essential oils are investigated in their natural environment, the so-called oil cells of these Lamiaceae plants, with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This method has the advantage to enhance Raman signals and furthermore the SERS effect leads to fluorescence quenching.

  8. Ozone depletion by hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Fleming, Eric L.; Newman, Paul A.; Li, Feng; Mlawer, Eli; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Bailey, Roshelle

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are projected to increase considerably in the coming decades. Chemistry climate model simulations forced by current projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere increasingly through 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs increase tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, thereby enhancing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and modifying the atmospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to HFC-related atmospheric change in 2050; its effects are comparable to the combined impacts of HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a, and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation, and dynamics, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 0.39 × 10-3 to 30.0 × 10-3, approximately 100 times larger than previous ODP estimates which were based solely on chemical effects.

  9. Airborne GLM Simulator (FEGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Stewart, M. F.; Podgorny, S.; Corredor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Real time lightning observations have proven to be useful for advanced warning and now-casting of severe weather events. In anticipation of the launch of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard GOES-R that will provide continuous real time observations of total (both cloud and ground) lightning, the Fly's Eye GLM Simulator (FEGS) is in production. FEGS is an airborne instrument designed to provide cal/val measurements for GLM from high altitude aircraft. It consists of a 5 x 5 array of telescopes each with a narrow passband filter to isolate the 777.4 nm neutral oxygen emission triplet radiated by lightning. The telescopes will measure the optical radiance emitted by lightning that is transmitted through the cloud top with a temporal resolution of 10 μs. When integrated on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, the FEGS array with its 90° field-of-view will observe a cloud top area nearly equal to a single GLM pixel. This design will allow FEGS to determine the temporal and spatial variation of light that contributes to a GLM event detection. In addition to the primary telescope array, the instrument includes 5 supplementary optical channels that observe alternate spectral emission features and will enable the use of FEGS for interesting lightning physics applications. Here we present an up-to-date summary of the project and a description of its scientific applications.

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of biological agents using FTIR, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Soto-Feliciano, Kristina; De La Cruz-Montoya, Edwin; Pacheco Londoño, Leonardo C.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) requires a minimum of sample allows fast identification of microorganisms. The use of this technique for characterizing the spectroscopic signatures of these agents and their stimulants has recently gained considerable attention due to the fact that these techniques can be easily adapted for standoff detection from considerable distances. The techniques also show high sensitivity and selectivity and offer near real time detection duty cycles. This research focuses in laying the grounds for the spectroscopic differentiation of Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., Salmonella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli, together with identification of their subspecies. In order to achieve the proponed objective, protocols to handle, cultivate and analyze the strains have been developed. Spectroscopic similarities and marked differences have been found for Spontaneous or Normal Raman spectra and for SERS using silver nanoparticles have been found. The use of principal component analysis (PCA), discriminate factor analysis (DFA) and a cluster analysis were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat bacterial from their spectra collected on single bacteria. The DFA from the bacteria Raman spectra show a little discrimination between the diverse bacterial species however the results obtained from the SERS demonstrate to be high discrimination technique. The spectroscopic study will be extended to examine the spores produced by selected strains since these are more prone to be used as Biological Warfare Agents due to their increased mobility and possibility of airborne transport. Micro infrared spectroscopy as well as fiber coupled FTIR will also be used as possible sensors of target compounds.

  11. Ozone and cardiovascular injury.

    PubMed

    Srebot, Vera; Gianicolo, Emilio A L; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; Sicari, Rosa

    2009-06-24

    Air pollution is increasingly recognized as an important and modifiable determinant of cardiovascular diseases in urban communities. The potential detrimental effects are both acute and chronic having a strong impact on morbidity and mortality. The acute exposure to pollutants has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, heart failure and life-threatening arrhythmias. The long-terms effects are related to the lifetime risk of death from cardiac causes. The WHO estimates that air pollution is responsible for 3 million premature deaths each year. The evidence supporting these data is very strong nonetheless, epidemiologic and observational data have the main limitation of imprecise measurements. Moreover, the lack of clinical experimental models makes it difficult to demonstrate the individual risk. The other limitation is related to the lack of a clear mechanism explaining the effects of pollution on cardiovascular mortality. In the present review we will explore the epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence of the effects of ozone on cardiovascular diseases. The pathophysiologic consequences of air pollutant exposures have been extensively investigated in pulmonary systems, and it is clear that some of the major components of air pollution (e.g. ozone and particulate matter) can initiate and exacerbate lung disease in humans 1. It is possible that pulmonary oxidant stress mediated by particulate matter and/or ozone (O3) exposure can result in downstream perturbations in the cardiovasculature, as the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems are intricately associated, and it is well documented that specific environmental toxins (such as tobacco smoke 2) introduced through the lungs can initiate and/or accelerate cardiovascular disease development. Indeed, several epidemiologic studies have proved that there is an association between PM and O3 and the increased incidence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality 3. Most of the

  12. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  13. Detection of explosives based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Salb, Christian; Gundrum, Lars; Niederkrüger, Matthias; Christou, Konstantin; Beushausen, Volker; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2010-08-10

    In this study we present a device based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the detection of airborne explosives. The explosives are resublimated on a cooled nanostructured gold substrate. The explosives trinitrotoluene (TNT) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) are used. The SERS spectrum of the explosives is analyzed. Thus, TNT is deposited from an acetonitrile solution on the gold substrate. In the case of TATP, first the bulk TATP Raman spectrum was recorded and compared with the SERS spectrum, generated by deposition out of the gas phase. The frequencies of the SERS spectrum are hardly shifted compared to the spectrum of bulk TATP. The influence of the nanostructured gold substrate temperature on the signals of TATP was studied. A decrease in temperature up to 200 K increased the intensities of the TATP bands in the SERS spectrum; below 200 K, the TATP fingerprint disappeared. PMID:20697437

  14. Detection of explosives based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Salb, Christian; Gundrum, Lars; Niederkrüger, Matthias; Christou, Konstantin; Beushausen, Volker; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2010-08-10

    In this study we present a device based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the detection of airborne explosives. The explosives are resublimated on a cooled nanostructured gold substrate. The explosives trinitrotoluene (TNT) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) are used. The SERS spectrum of the explosives is analyzed. Thus, TNT is deposited from an acetonitrile solution on the gold substrate. In the case of TATP, first the bulk TATP Raman spectrum was recorded and compared with the SERS spectrum, generated by deposition out of the gas phase. The frequencies of the SERS spectrum are hardly shifted compared to the spectrum of bulk TATP. The influence of the nanostructured gold substrate temperature on the signals of TATP was studied. A decrease in temperature up to 200 K increased the intensities of the TATP bands in the SERS spectrum; below 200 K, the TATP fingerprint disappeared.

  15. Antarctic total ozone in 1958

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, P.A. )

    1994-04-22

    The Antarctic ozone hole results from catalytic destruction of ozone by chlorine radicals. The hole develops in August, reaches its full depth in early October, and is gone by early December of each year. Extremely low total ozone measurements were made at the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville station in 1958. These measurements were derived from spectrographic plates of the blue sky, the moon, and two stars. These Dumont plate data are inconsistent with 1958 Dobson spectrophotometer ozone measurements, inconsistent with present-day Antarctic observations, and inconsistent with meteorological and theoretical information. There is no credible evidence for an ozone hole in 1958.

  16. Karlson ozone sterilizer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.

    1984-05-07

    The authors have a functional sterilization system employing ozone as a sterilization agent. This final report covers the work that led to the first medical sterilizer using ozone as the sterilizing agent. The specifications and the final design were set by hospital operating room personnel and public safety standards. Work on kill tests using bacteria, viruses and fungi determined the necessary time and concentration of ozone necessary for sterilization. These data were used in the Karlson Ozone Sterilizer to determine the length of the steps of the operating cycle and the concentration of ozone to be used. 27 references.

  17. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  18. Airborne measurements of solar and planetary near ultraviolet radiation during the NASA/ESA CV-900 spacelab simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivjee, G. G.

    1977-01-01

    Results from a comparative study of the feasibility of employing experiment operators on the space shuttle to acquire scientifically worthwhile data are presented. The experiments performed during these tests included spectral observations of the Sun and Venus in the near ultraviolet region. The solar measurements were analyzed to determine ozone abundance in the terrestrial atmosphere. Using a detailed spectral matching technique to compare airborne solar UV measurements with synthetic spectral profiles of sunlight, it is deduced that in winter the total atmospheric ozone abundance is about 0.33 atm/cm at midlatitudes in the northern hemisphere.

  19. Airborne Laser Polar Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Gerald W.

    1973-01-01

    A polar nephelometer has been developed at NCAR to measure the angular variation of the intensity of light scattered by air molecules and particles. The system has been designed for airborne measurements using outside air ducted through a 5-cm diameter airflow tube; the sample volume is that which is common to the intersection of a collimated source beam and the detector field of view within the airflow tube. The source is a linearly polarized helium-neon laser beam. The optical system defines a collimated field-of-view (0.5deg half-angle) through a series of diaphragms located behind a I72-mm focal length objective lens. A photomultiplier tube is located immediately behind an aperture in the focal plane of the objective lens. The laser beam is mechanically chopped (on-off) at a rate of 5 Hz; a two-channel pulse counter, synchronized to the laser output, measures the photomultiplier pulse rate with the light beam both on and off. The difference in these measured pulse rates is directly proportional to the intensity of the scattered light from the volume common to the intersection of the laser beam and the detector field-of-view. Measurements can be made at scattering angles from 15deg to 165deg with reference to the direction of propagation of the light beam. Intermediate angles are obtained by selecting the angular increments desired between these extreme angles (any multiple of 0.1deg can be selected for the angular increment; 5deg is used in normal operation). Pulses provided by digital circuits control a stepping motor which sequentially rotates the detector by pre-selected angular increments. The synchronous photon-counting system automatically begins measurement of the scattered-light intensity immediately after the rotation to a new angle has been completed. The instrument has been flown on the NASA Convair 990 airborne laboratory to obtain data on the complex index of refraction of atmospheric aerosols. A particle impaction device is operated simultaneously

  20. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  1. Ozone and Cavitation Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon, Ernestina; Traversoni, Leonardo

    2009-09-01

    From laboratory measurements it is well known that the addition of ozone and cavitation enhances the properties of both, understanding for that the ones related to disinfection and carbon removal from waste water. This paper shows modeling of such phenomena that gives some light to the understanding of it and also provides the opportunity to improve the effectiveness of the current procedures.

  2. Dobson ozone spectrophotometer modification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a modified version of the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer in which several outdated electronic design features have been replaced by circuitry embodying more modern design concepts. The resulting improvement in performance characteristics has been obtained without changing the principle of operation of the original instrument.

  3. Ozone Layer Educator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide has been developed through a collaborative effort involving the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It is part of an ongoing commitment to ensure that the results of scientific research on ozone depletion are…

  4. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L.

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  5. Ozone, CFCs and aerosols.

    PubMed

    1989-07-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are, from the chemist's point of view, unique compounds with very valuable properties. They are inert, cheap and stable. But they also have devastating effects on the environment, destroying the ozone layer and adding to global warming or the greenhouse effect.

  6. Ozone decomposing filter

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.; Whinnery, L.L. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  7. Raman Crystallography and Other Biochemical Applications of Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Paul R.

    2006-05-01

    Recent studies using a Raman microscope have shown that single protein crystals provide an ideal platform to undertake Raman difference spectroscopic analyses under nonresonance conditions. This approach, termed Raman crystallography, provides a means of characterizing chemical events within the crystal such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. In many cases Raman crystallography goes hand in hand with X-ray crystallographic studies because the Raman results can inform the X-ray crystallographer about the status of chemical events in the crystal prior to flash freezing and X-ray analysis. In turn, the combined data from the Raman and X-ray analyses are highly synergistic and offer novel perspectives on structure and dynamics in enzyme active sites. In a related area, protein misfolding, Raman microscopy can provide detailed insights into the chemistry of the amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease and into the intermediates on the α-synuclein protein misfolding pathway implicated in Parkinson's disease.

  8. Validation of ozone measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, E.; Walker, K. A.; Kar, J.; Boone, C. D.; McElroy, C. T.; Bernath, P. F.; Drummond, J. R.; Skelton, R.; McLeod, S. D.; Hughes, R. C.; Nowlan, C. R.; Dufour, D. G.; Zou, J.; Nichitiu, F.; Strong, K.; Baron, P.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Blumenstock, T.; Bodeker, G. E.; Borsdorff, T.; Bourassa, A. E.; Bovensmann, H.; Boyd, I. S.; Bracher, A.; Brogniez, C.; Burrows, J. P.; Catoire, V.; Ceccherini, S.; Chabrillat, S.; Christensen, T.; Coffey, M. T.; Cortesi, U.; Davies, J.; de Clercq, C.; Degenstein, D. A.; de Mazière, M.; Demoulin, P.; Dodion, J.; Firanski, B.; Fischer, H.; Forbes, G.; Froidevaux, L.; Fussen, D.; Gerard, P.; Godin-Beekman, S.; Goutail, F.; Granville, J.; Griffith, D.; Haley, C. S.; Hannigan, J. W.; Höpfner, M.; Jin, J. J.; Jones, A.; Jones, N. B.; Jucks, K.; Kagawa, A.; Kasai, Y.; Kerzenmacher, T. E.; Kleinböhl, A.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Kramer, I.; Küllmann, H.; Kuttippurath, J.; Kyrölä, E.; Lambert, J.-C.; Livesey, N. J.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Lloyd, N. D.; Mahieu, E.; Manney, G. L.; Marshall, B. T.; McConnell, J. C.; McCormick, M. P.; McDermid, I. S.; McHugh, M.; McLinden, C. A.; Mellqvist, J.; Mizutani, K.; Murayama, Y.; Murtagh, D. P.; Oelhaf, H.; Parrish, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Piccolo, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Randall, C. E.; Robert, C.; Roth, C.; Schneider, M.; Senten, C.; Steck, T.; Strandberg, A.; Strawbridge, K. B.; Sussmann, R.; Swart, D. P. J.; Tarasick, D. W.; Taylor, J. R.; Tétard, C.; Thomason, L. W.; Thompson, A. M.; Tully, M. B.; Urban, J.; Vanhellemont, F.; von Clarmann, T.; von der Gathen, P.; von Savigny, C.; Waters, J. W.; Witte, J. C.; Wolff, M.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents extensive validation analyses of ozone observations from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite instruments: the ACE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) instrument. The ACE satellite instruments operate in the mid-infrared and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectral regions using the solar occultation technique. In order to continue the long-standing record of solar occultation measurements from space, a detailed quality assessment is required to evaluate the ACE data and validate their use for scientific purposes. Here we compare the latest ozone data products from ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO with coincident observations from satellite-borne, airborne, balloon-borne and ground-based instruments, by analysing volume mixing ratio profiles and partial column densities. The ACE-FTS version 2.2 Ozone Update product reports more ozone than most correlative measurements from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere. At altitude levels from 16 to 44 km, the mean differences range generally between 0 and +10% with a slight but systematic positive bias (typically +5%). At higher altitudes (45-60 km), the ACE-FTS ozone amounts are significantly larger than those of the comparison instruments by up to ~40% (typically +20%). For the ACE-MAESTRO version 1.2 ozone data product, agreement within ±10% (generally better than ±5%) is found between 18 and 40 km for the sunrise and sunset measurements. At higher altitudes (45-55 km), systematic biases of opposite sign are found between the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise and sunset observations. While ozone amounts derived from the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise occultation data are often smaller than the coincident observations (by as much as -10%), the sunset occultation profiles for ACE-MAESTRO show results that are qualitatively similar to ACE-FTS and indicate a large positive bias (+10 to +30

  9. A New Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Fluctuation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in the Baltimore - Washington D.C. Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99 N, 76.84 W, 57 meters ASL) from 400 m to 12 km AGL. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19 percent from 0-1.5 km, 10-18 percent from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25 percent from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore

  10. A new differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington DC region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.) from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0-1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25% from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington DC area.

  11. Excimer laser system for atmospheric remote sensing of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, K. O.; Ogura, G. T.; Mckee, T. J.; Mcgee, T.

    1987-01-01

    A high-power narrow-linewidth XeCl excimer laser system developed for use by NASA in the remote sensing of atmospheric ozone is described. The laser system is designed for incorporation in a DIAL lidar utilizing stimulated Raman generation for the reference wavelength and sophisticated data averaging techniques. The laser output has a linewidth of 0.002 nm and a beam divergence of 0.15 mrad (FWHM). The laser was operated over a six-hour period with a constant average power of 18 W and a wavelength stable to within + or - 0.0006 nm.

  12. Remote sensing capabilities of the GEO-CAPE airborne simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Matthew G.; Janz, Scott J.

    2014-09-01

    The Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Airborne Simulator (GCAS) was designed and built at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) as a technology demonstration instrument for the atmospheric science study group of GEO-CAPE and potential validation instrument for NASA's Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring Pollution (TEMPO) mission. GCAS was designed to make high altitude remote sensing observations of tropospheric and boundary layer pollutants, coastal and ocean water leaving radiances, and visible imagery for cloud and surface information. The instrument has participated in one flight campaign in Houston, TX as part of the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) in September 2013. An overview of the instrument's design, characterization, and preliminary slant column retrievals of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) during the DISCOVER-AQ campaign will be provided in this paper.

  13. Airborne laser topographic mapping results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Collins, J. G.; Link, L. E.; Swift, R. N.; Butler, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of terrain mapping experiments utilizing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) over forested areas are presented. The flight tests were conducted as part of a joint NASA/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (CE) investigation aimed at evaluating the potential of an airborne laser ranging system to provide cross-sectional topographic data on flood plains that are difficult and expensive to survey using conventional techniques. The data described in this paper were obtained in the Wolf River Basin located near Memphis, TN. Results from surveys conducted under winter 'leaves off' and summer 'leaves on' conditions, aspects of day and night operation, and data obtained from decidous and coniferous tree types are compared. Data processing techniques are reviewed. Conclusions relative to accuracy and present limitations of the AOL, and airborne lidar systems in general, to terrain mapping over forested areas are discussed.

  14. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  15. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  16. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It...

  17. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It...

  18. Airborne Transmission of Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Warfel, Jason M.; Beren, Joel; Merkel, Tod J.

    2012-01-01

    Pertussis is a contagious, acute respiratory illness caused by the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Although it is widely believed that transmission of B. pertussis occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets, no controlled study has ever documented airborne transmission of pertussis. We set out to determine if airborne transmission occurs between infected and naive animals, utilizing the baboon model of pertussis. Our results showed that 100% of exposed naive animals became infected even when physical contact was prevented, demonstrating that pertussis transmission occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets. PMID:22807521

  19. Ozone variability over Antarctic continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concepcion Parrondo, Mā; Yela, Margarita; Gil, Manuel; Ochoa, Hector

    2010-05-01

    Ozonesoundings data from Antarctic Belgrano Station (78°S, 34°W) carried out since 1999 are used to analyze the inter-annual variability of ozone in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Tropospheric ozone has been calculated integrating the ozone content from the ground up to the ozone tropopause for each ozonesounding using Betan et al. [1996], definition. The annual cycle of the tropospheric ozone values shows an increase from summer to winter months. In August, tropospheric ozone almost doubles the values in February. Dynamical and chemical factors responsible of this behaviour are presented. Ozone loss rate during September in the lower stratosphere for the eleven year record is presented. The highest inter-annual ozone variability in observed during November and December in the lower stratosphere (12-27 km). Minimum ozone values concentration in the 20-27 km layer are found in November 2008. Mean 2008 December 12-20 km partial column remained below 40 DU, lower by 35% than the 2000-2005 mean. We present the relationship between the potential vorticity, timing of the vortex breakup date, the strength of the vortex and ozone concentration at different levels in an attempt to find dynamical features responsible for the observed behavior.

  20. CFCS and the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Hayman, G D

    1997-05-01

    Ozone is an important constituent of the atmosphere. Ozone forms a distinct layer in the lower stratosphere known as the ozone layer. The ozone layer acts as a fragile shield because it protects man and other life forms from exposure to harmful short-wavelength ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The agents, particularly chemical, which affect the amount of ozone present in the atmosphere have been a source of concern for more than 20 years. This has been reinforced by the dramatic decline of stratospheric ozone levels first measured in Antarctica and now apparent worldwide. The combination of routine measurements of ozone depletion, careful laboratory studies and mathematical modelling of ozone in the atmosphere, has demonstrated that the reactive fragments produced when chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons and other halogenated compounds break down in the stratosphere are responsible for the ozone loss. As CFCs have widespread and sometimes apparently essential uses in modern society, there has been an intense effort to develop safe, effective replacements which have a negligible or much smaller impact on the environment. The Montreal Protocol, signed by over 140 nations, has been implemented to control and phase out the chemical compounds responsible for ozone loss.

  1. Effects of ozone on airway epithelial permeability and ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, P.A.; Ranga, V.; Stutts, M.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive form of oxygen produced in the atmosphere by photochemical reactions involving substrates emitted from automobile engines. Outdoor air concentrations as high as 0.4 parts per million (ppm) occur. The respiratory tract extracts about 90% of inhaled ozone. From the chemical reactivity of ozone, it is expected to attack organic molecules located on or near the respiratory surfaces. The airways are covered with a cohesive layer of epithelial cells that forms the boundary between the external environment and the respiratory tissues. One important role of this epithelial layer is its barrier function. Airborne particles that deposit (and dissolve) in the airway surface liquid are not readily absorbed, and soluble tissue components are excluded from the surface liquid. The epithelium also controls the volume and composition of the surface liquid. One important process in this regard is the absorption and secretion of ions and water. We have studied the effects of inhalation of ozone on the barrier function (permeability to dissolved molecules) and the ion transport activity of epithelium using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. All our experiments were performed with male Hartley strain guinea pigs. Conscious, unrestrained animals were exposed to a concentration of ozone of 1 ppm for three hours in controlled environmental chambers in the Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Research Triangle Park, NC. Such exposures caused a marked increase in the rate of appearance in blood of various water-soluble compounds instilled onto the surface of the trachea, indicating increased permeability of the airway epithelium.

  2. Precision ozone calibration system based on vapor pressures of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1987-01-01

    A precision ozone calibration system for stratospheric research has been developed and evaluated. Vapor pressures above solid ozone are mixed with a carrier gas (N2) to produce stratospheric ozone mixing ratios at total pressures of 1 to cover 20 torr. The uncertainty in the ozone mixing ratios is approximately + or - 1.5 percent, the stability of ozone is + or - 0.3 percent. Experiments to be calibrated may sample the gas mixture over a wide range of flow rates; the maximum throughput of gas with corrections of less than 1 percent to ozone is about 200 torr 1/min. A mass spectrometer system continuously monitors the purity and stability of the N2-O3 gas mixture.

  3. NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights Data from the 1982 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of El Chichon ... continuing to January 1984. Transcribed from the following NASA Tech Reports: McCormick, M. P., and M. T. Osborn, Airborne lidar ...

  4. Measurements of Stratospheric Pinatubo Aerosol Extinction Profiles by a Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abo, Makoto; Nagasawa, Chikao

    1992-01-01

    The Raman lidar has been used for remote measurements of water vapor, ozone and atmospheric temperature in the lower troposphere because the Raman cross section is three orders smaller than the Rayleigh cross section. We estimated the extinction coefficients of the Pinatubo volcanic aerosol in the stratosphere using a Raman lidar. If the precise aerosol extinction coefficients are derived, the backscatter coefficient of a Mie scattering lidar will be more accurately estimated. The Raman lidar has performed to measure density profiles of some species using Raman scattering. Here we used a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser for transmitter and received nitrogen vibrational Q-branch Raman scattering signal. Ansmann et al. (1990) derived tropospherical aerosol extinction profiles with a Raman lidar. We think that this method can apply to dense stratospheric aerosols such as Pinatubo volcanic aerosols. As dense aerosols are now accumulated in the stratosphere by Pinatubo volcanic eruption, the error of Ramen lidar signal regarding the fluctuation of air density can be ignored.

  5. Balloonborne ozone and aerosol measurements in the antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, D.J.; Harder, J.W.; Rolf, S.R.; Rosen, J.M. )

    1987-01-01

    The National Ozone Expedition (NOZE) was mounted in 1986 using winter fly-in flights to McMurdo Station in August, which is approximately the time the ozone reduction begins. The University of Wyoming Atmospheric Physics group participated in this expedition through balloonborne measurements of the vertical distribution of ozone and aerosol particles. Between 24 August and 6 November, 33 ozone soundings, 6 aerosol sounding, and 3 condensation nuclei soundings were conducted using polyethylene balloons which were able to penetrate the cold (< {minus}80C) antarctic stratosphere. The authors summarize these results here.

  6. Ozone and ozone byproducts in the cabins of commercial aircraft.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Clifford; Weschler, Charles J; Mohan, Kris; Vallarino, Jose; Spengler, John D

    2013-05-01

    The aircraft cabin represents a unique indoor environment due to its high surface-to-volume ratio, high occupant density, and the potential for high ozone concentrations at cruising altitudes. Ozone was continuously measured and air was sampled on sorbent traps, targeting carbonyl compounds, on 52 transcontinental U.S. or international flights between 2008 and 2010. The sampling was predominantly on planes that did not have ozone scrubbers (catalytic converters). Peak ozone levels on aircraft without catalytic convertors exceeded 100 ppb, with some flights having periods of more than an hour when the ozone levels were >75 ppb. Ozone was greatly reduced on relatively new aircraft with catalytic convertors, but ozone levels on two flights whose aircraft had older convertors were similar to those on planes without catalytic convertors. Hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO) were detected in the aircraft cabin at sub- to low ppb levels. Linear regression models that included the log transformed mean ozone concentration, percent occupancy, and plane type were statistically significant and explained between 18 and 25% of the variance in the mixing ratio of these carbonyls. Occupancy was also a significant factor for 6-MHO, but not the linear aldehydes, consistent with 6-MHO's formation from the reaction between ozone and squalene, which is present in human skin oils. PMID:23517299

  7. Degradation of carbofuran by ozonation.

    PubMed

    Suneethi, S; Joseph, Kurian

    2009-04-01

    Degradation of commercial grade carbofuran (2, 3 dihydro-2, 2-dimethyl-7 benzo furanyl-N-methyl carbamate) in aqueous solution by ozone oxidation was investigated using bench scale experiments. The degradation rate was strongly influenced by the ozone dosage, pH, initial concentration of carbofuran and contact time of ozonation. Carbofuran solution of 200ppm concentration was degraded by 79% within 10 minutes consuming 87 mg of ozone at pH 4. The associated TOC reduction was observed to be 53%. Ammonium (20 mg/L) and nitrate (30 mg/L) ions were detected in the effluent as degradation products of ozonation. The results support the effectiveness of ozonation for degradation of organic pesticides such as carbofuran.

  8. Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) 2014 Western Pacific Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, E.; Pfister, L.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) is a series of airborne campaigns focused on understanding physical processes in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) and their role in atmospheric chemistry and climate. ATTREX is using the high-altitude, long-duration NASA Global Hawk Unmanned Air System to make in situ and remote-sensing measurements spanning the Pacific. A particular ATTREX emphasis is to better understand the dehydration of air as it passes through the cold tropical tropopause region. The ATTREX payload contains 12 in situ and remote sensing instruments that measure water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, chlorofluorocarbons, nitrous oxide), reactive chemical compounds (ozone, bromine, nitrous oxide), meteorological parameters, and radiative fluxes. During January-March, 2014, the Global Hawk was deployed to Guam for ATTREX flights. Six science flights were conducted from Guam (in addition to the transits across the Pacific), resulting in over 100 hours of Western Pacific TTL sampling and about 180 vertical profiles through the TTL. I will provide an overview of the dataset, with examples of the measurements including meteorological parameters, clouds and water vapor, and chemical tracers.

  9. Ozone Risk Assessment Utilities

    1999-08-10

    ORAMUS is a user-friendly, menu-driven software system that calculates and displays user-selected risk estimates for health effects attributable to short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone. Inputs to the risk assessment are estimates of exposure to ozone and exposure-response relationships to produce overall risk estimates in the form of probability distributions. Three fundamental models are included: headcount risk, benchmark risk, and hospital admissions. Exposure-response relationships are based on results of controlled human exposure studies. Exposure estimates aremore » based on the EPA''s probabilistic national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) exposure model, pNEM/Osub3, which simulates air quality associated with attainment of alternative NAAQS. Using ORAMUS, risk results for 27 air quality scenarios, air quality in 9 urban areas, 33 health endpoints, and 4 chronic health endpoints can be calculated.« less

  10. Stimulated Raman photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving label-free, molecular-specific imaging with high spatial resolution in deep tissue is often considered the grand challenge of optical imaging. To accomplish this goal, significant optical scattering in tissues has to be overcome while achieving molecular specificity without resorting to extrinsic labeling. We demonstrate the feasibility of developing such an optical imaging modality by combining the molecularly specific stimulated Raman excitation with the photoacoustic detection. By employing two ultrashort excitation laser pulses, separated in frequency by the vibrational frequency of a targeted molecule, only the specific vibrational level of the target molecules in the illuminated tissue volume is excited. This targeted optical absorption generates ultrasonic waves (referred to as stimulated Raman photoacoustic waves) which are detected using a traditional ultrasonic transducer to form an image following the design of the established photoacoustic microscopy. PMID:21059930

  11. Ozonated olive oils and the troubles.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    One of the commonly used methods for ozone therapy is ozonated oils. Most prominent type of used oils is extra virgin olive oil. But still, each type of unsaturated oils may be used for ozonation. There are a lot of wrong knowledge on the internet about ozonated oils and its use as well. Just like other ozone therapy studies, also the studies about ozone oils are inadequate to avoid incorrect knowledge. Current data about ozone oil and its benefits are produced by supplier who oversees financial interests and make misinformation. Despite the rapidly increasing ozone oil sales through the internet, its quality and efficacy is still controversial. Dozens of companies and web sites may be easily found to buy ozonated oil. But, very few of these products are reliable, and contain sufficiently ozonated oil. This article aimed to introduce the troubles about ozonated oils and so to inform ozonated oil users. PMID:26401346

  12. Ozone, Air Quality, and Asthma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in both the Earth's upper and lower atmospheres. The protective ozone in the upper atmosphere is very different from the harmful ozone in the lower atmosphere. Ozone that exists naturally 10 to 30 miles ( ...

  13. C. V. Raman and the Discovery of the Raman Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajinder

    In 1928 the Indian physicist C. V. Raman (1888-1970) discovered the effect named after him virtually simultaneously with the Russian physicists G. S. Landsberg (1890-1957) and L. I. Mandelstam (1879-1944). I first provide a biographical sketch of Raman through his years in Calcutta (1907-1932) and Bangalore (after 1932). I then discuss his scientific work in acoustics, astronomy, and optics up to 1928, including his views on Albert Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis and on Arthur Holly Compton's discovery of the Compton effect, with particular reference to Compton's debate on it with William Duane in Toronto in 1924, which Raman witnessed. I then examine Raman's discovery of the Raman effect and its reception among physicists. Finally, I suggest reasons why Landsberg and Mandelstam did not share the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1930 with Raman.

  14. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  15. Airborne fungi--a resurvey

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.H.; Prince, H.E.; Raymer, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    A 15-month survey of airborne fungi at 14 geographical stations was conducted to determine the incidence of different fungal genera. Five of these stations were surveyed 25 years earlier. A comparison between previous studies and present surveys revealed similar organisms at each station with slight shifts in frequency of dominant genera.

  16. Airborne chemicals and forest health

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, J.N.; Cowling, E.B.

    1987-02-01

    Over the past few years the possible contribution of acid rain to the problem of forest decline has been a cause of increasing public concern. Research has begun to determine whether airborne chemicals are causing or contributing to visible damage and mortality in eastern spruce-fir and sugar maple forests and to changes in tree growth, usually without visible symptoms, in other parts of North America. This paper describes some of the complex biological relationships that determine health and productivity of forests and that make it difficult to distinguish effects of airborne chemicals from effects of natural stress. It describes four major research approaches for assessment of the effects of airborne chemicals on forests, and it summarizes current understanding of the known and possible effects of airborne chemicals on forest trees in North America and Europe. It also briefly describes the major air quality and forest health research programs in North America, and it assesses how ell these programs are likely to meet information needs during the coming decade. 69 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  17. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  18. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar results. Spring removal experiments, April 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Hoge, F.

    1985-06-21

    This document contains the preliminary results from the analysis of data acquired with the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) during the recent Spring Removal Experiment (SPREX). A total of four flights were made with the NASA P-3A aircraft in direct support of the SPREX studies. In addition, a single pass extending from the Sargasso Sea, across the Gulf Stream, and into Savannah was flown as the final leg of the ONR sponsored BIOWATT experiment. The relative distribution of surface temperature and the concentration of chlorophyll and phycoerythrin photopigments across the study area are provided. Also included are along track profiles of sea surface temperature and chlorophyll and phycoerythrin fluorescence emission for each of the individual flight lines. Both the chlorophyll and phycoerythrin laser induced fluorescence signals have been normalized by the water Raman backscatter signal and are each expressed as relative ratio's.

  19. Protecting the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Munasinghe, M; King, K

    1992-06-01

    Stratospheric ozone layer depletion has been recognized as a problem by the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol (MP). The ozone layer shields the earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which is more pronounced at the poles and around the equator. Industrialized countries have contributed significantly to the problem by releasing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons into the atmosphere. The effect of these chemicals, which were known for their inertness, nonflammability, and nontoxicity, was discovered in 1874. Action to deal with the effects of CFCs and halons was initiated in 1985 in a 49-nation UN meeting. 21 nations signed a protocol limiting ozone depleting substances (ODS): CFCs and halons. Schedules were set based on each country's use in 1986; the target phaseout was set for the year 2000. The MP restricts trade in ODSs and weights the impact of substances to reflect the extent of damage; i.e., halons are 10 times more damaging than CFCs. ODS requirements for developing countries were eased to accommodate scarce resources and the small fraction of ODS emissions. An Interim Multilateral Fund under the Montreal Protocol (IMFMP) was established to provide loans to finance the costs to developing countries in meeting global environmental requirements. The IMFMP is administered by the World Bank, the UN Environmental Program, and the UN Development Program. Financing is available to eligible countries who use .3 kg of ODS/person/year. Rapid phaseout in developed countries has occurred due to strong support from industry and a lower than expected cost. Although there are clear advantages to rapid phaseout, there were no incentives included in the MP for rapid phaseout. Some of the difficulties occur because the schedules set minimum targets at the lowest possible cost. Also, costs cannot be minimized by a country-specific and ODS-specific process. The ways to improve implementation in scheduling and

  20. Protecting beans from ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    1983-03-01

    A chemical treatment to protect navy beans from ozone damage increased yields by an average of more than 20% in 3 years of tests. An experimental antioxidant chemical, EDU, made by the DuPont company was tested as soil applications and sprays on several varieties and under a variety of soil and planting conditions. The average yield increases were between 16 and 24%. Chemical treatment also increased snap bean pod production by 12%.

  1. Ozone attainment: A different perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, W.B. )

    1988-01-01

    Recent attention on the ozone non-attainment issue has been focused on Washington. Both Congress and the EPA have made efforts at addressing the post-1987 crisis in the many non-attainment areas. In contrast to the political activity, this paper presents some interesting technical perspectives on ozone attainment for many areas of the U.S.. Issues such as transport, climate and natural ozone sources are discussed in the context of exceedance frequency for several geographical areas of the country.

  2. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Tang, Yongji; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2014-01-15

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10 wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300 °C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O{sub 3} attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides.

  3. Catalytic ozonation of oxalate with a cerium supported palladium oxide: an efficient degradation not relying on hydroxyl radical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Weiwei; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The cerium supported palladium oxide (PdO/CeO(2)) at a low palladium loading was found very effective in catalytic ozonation of oxalate, a probe compound that is difficult to be efficiently degraded in water with hydroxyl radical oxidation and one of the major byproducts in ozonation of organic matter. The oxalate was degraded into CO(2) during the catalytic ozonation. The molar ratio of oxalate degraded to ozone consumption increased with increasing catalyst dose and decreasing ozone dosage and pH under the conditions of this study. The maximum molar ratio reached around 1, meaning that the catalyst was highly active and selective for oxalate degradation in water. The catalytic ozonation, which showed relatively stable activity, does not promote hydroxyl radical generation from ozone. Analysis with ATR-FTIR and in situ Raman spectroscopy revealed that 1) oxalate was adsorbed on CeO(2) of the catalyst forming surface complexes, and 2) O(3) was adsorbed on PdO of the catalyst and further decomposed to surface atomic oxygen (*O), surface peroxide (*O(2)), and O(2) gas in sequence. The results indicate that the high activity of the catalyst is related to the synergetic function of PdO and CeO(2) in that the surface atomic oxygen readily reacts with the surface cerium-oxalate complex. This kind of catalytic ozonation would be potentially effective for the degradation of polar refractory organic pollutants and hydrophilic natural organic matter.

  4. Ozone transport commission developments

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    On September 27, 1994, the states of the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) signed an important memorandum of understanding (MOU) agreeing to develop a regional strategy for controlling stationary sources of nitrogen oxide emissions. Specifically, the states of the Ozone Transport Region, OTR, agreed to propose regulations for the control of NOx emissions from boilers and other indirect heat exchangers with a maximum gross heat input rate of at least 250 million BTU per hour. The Ozone Transport Region was divided into Inner, Outer and Northern Zones. States in the Outer Zone agreed to reduce NOx emissions by 55%. States in the Inner Zone agreed to reduce NOx emissions 65%. Facilities in both zones have the option to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.2 pounds per million Btu by May 1, 1999. This option provides fairness for the gas-fired plants which already have relatively low NOx emissions. Additionally, States in the Inner and Outer Zones agreed to reduce their NOx emissions by 75% or to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.15 pounds per million BTU by May 1, 2003. The Northern Zone States agree to reduce their rate of NOx emissions by 55% from base year levels by May 1, 2003, or to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.2 pounds per million BTU. As part of this MOU, States also agreed to develop a regionwide trading mechanism to provide a cost-effective mechanism for implementing the reductions.

  5. Airborne measurements of spatial NO2 distributions during AROMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Seyler, André; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Ruhtz, Thomas; Lindemann, Carsten; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry. In addition to their directly harmful effects on the respiratory system of living organisms, they influence the levels of tropospheric ozone and contribute to acid rain and eutrophication of ecosystems. As they are produced in combustion processes, they can serve as an indicator for anthropogenic air pollution. In September 2014 several European research groups conducted the ESA funded Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign to test and intercompare newly developed airborne observation sytsems dedicated to air quality satellite validation studies. The IUP Bremen contributed to this campaign with its Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution (AirMAP) on board a Cessna 207 turbo, operated by the FU Berlin. AirMAP allows the retrieval of integrated NO2 column densities in a stripe below the aircraft at a fine spatial resolution of up to 30 x 80 m2, at a typical flight altitude. Measurements have been performed over the city of Bucharest, creating for the first time high spatial resolution maps of Bucharest's NO2 distribution in a time window of approx. 2 hours. The observations were synchronised with ground-based car MAX-DOAS measurements for comparison. In addition, measurements were taken over the city of Berlin, Germany and at the Rovinari power plant, Romania. In this work the results of the research flights will be presented and conclusions will be drawn on the quality of the measurements, their applicability for satellite data validation and possible improvements for future measurements.

  6. Stratospheric ozone: Impact of human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Michael B.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    1989-12-01

    Current knowledge of the chemistry of the stratosphere is reviewed using measurements from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment to test the accuracy of our treatment of processes at mid-latitudes, and results from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) to examine our understanding of processes for the polar environment. It is shown that, except for some difficulties with N 2O 5 and possibly ClNO 3, gas phase models for nitrogen and chlorine species at 30°N in spring are in excellent agreement with the data from ATMOS. Heterogeneous processes may have an influence on the concentrations of NO 2, N 2O 5, HNO 3, and ClNO 3 for the lower stratosphere at 48°S in fall. Comparison of model and observed concentrations of O 3 indicate good agreement at 30°N, with less satisfactory results at 48°S. The discrepancy between the loss rate of O 3 observed over the course of the AAOE mission in 1987 and loss rates calculated using measured concentrations of ClO and BrO is found to be even larger than that reported by Anderson et al. (1989, J. geophys. Res.94, 11480). There appear to be loss processes for removal of O 3 additional to the HOC1 mechanism proposed by Solomon et al. (1986, Nature321, 755), the ClO-BrO scheme favored by McElroy et al. (1986, Nature321, 759), and the ClO dimer mechanism introduced by Molina and Molina (1987, J. phys. Chem.91, 433). There is little doubt that industrial halocarbons have a significant impact on stratospheric O 3. Controls on emissions more stringent than those defined by the Montreal Protocol will be required if the Antarctic Ozone Hole is not to persist as a permanent feature of the stratosphere.

  7. Ozone measurement systems improvements studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. W.; Guard, K.; Holland, A. C.; Spurling, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Results are summarized of an initial study of techniques for measuring atmospheric ozone, carried out as the first phase of a program to improve ozone measurement techniques. The study concentrated on two measurement systems, the electro chemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde and the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer, and consisted of two tasks. The first task consisted of error modeling and system error analysis of the two measurement systems. Under the second task a Monte-Carlo model of the Dobson ozone measurement technique was developed and programmed for computer operation.

  8. Routing architecture and security for airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei; Xie, Peng; Li, Jason; Xu, Roger; Levy, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Airborne networks are envisioned to provide interconnectivity for terrestial and space networks by interconnecting highly mobile airborne platforms. A number of military applications are expected to be used by the operator, and all these applications require proper routing security support to establish correct route between communicating platforms in a timely manner. As airborne networks somewhat different from traditional wired and wireless networks (e.g., Internet, LAN, WLAN, MANET, etc), security aspects valid in these networks are not fully applicable to airborne networks. Designing an efficient security scheme to protect airborne networks is confronted with new requirements. In this paper, we first identify a candidate routing architecture, which works as an underlying structure for our proposed security scheme. And then we investigate the vulnerabilities and attack models against routing protocols in airborne networks. Based on these studies, we propose an integrated security solution to address routing security issues in airborne networks.

  9. Autonomous Ozone and Aerosol Lidar Platform: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.

    2014-12-01

    Environment Canada is developing an autonomous tropospheric ozone and aerosol lidar system for deployment in support of short-term field studies. Tropospheric ozone and aerosols (PM10 and PM2.5) are important atmospheric constituents in low altitude pollution affecting human health and vegetation. Ozone is photo-chemically active with nitrogen oxides and can have a distinct diurnal variability. Aerosols contribute to the radiative budget, are a tracer for pollution transport, undergo complex mixing, and contribute to visibility and cloud formation. This particular instrument will employ two separate lidar transmitter and receiver assemblies. The tropospheric ozone lidar, based on the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique, uses the fourth harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser directed into a CO2 Raman cell to produce 276 nm, 287nm and 299 nm (first to third Stokes lines) output wavelengths. The aerosol lidar is based on the 3+2 design using a tripled Nd:YAG to output 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064nm wavelengths. Both lidars will be housed in a modified cargo trailer allowing for easy deployment to remote areas. The unit can be operated and monitored 24 hours a day via an internet link and requires an external power source. Simultaneous ozone and aerosol lidar measurements will provide the vertical context necessary to understand the complex mixing and transformation of pollutants - particularly when deployed near other ground-based in-situ sensors. Preliminary results will be shown from a summer field study at the Centre For Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE).

  10. Airborne observations of astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivjee, G. G.

    1976-01-01

    The UV spectra of the sun, as well as the differences and ratios of planetary and solar spectra, are presented. The results indicate that SO, SO2 and ClO2 may be present in Venus' atmosphere, and Formaldehyde CH2O and ClO2 on Jupiter. The solar UV measurements were analyzed to deduce ozone concentration in the earth's atmosphere.

  11. Comparison of satellite measurements of ozone and ozone trends

    SciTech Connect

    Rusch, D.W.; Clancy, R.T.; Bhartia, P.K. |

    1994-10-01

    Measurements of ozone retrieved from satellite instruments over the 1979-1991 period are compared. The instruments used are the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS), the solar backscattered ultraviolet experiment (SBUV), and stratospheric aerosol and gas experiments (SAGE) I and II. Although there is good agreement between the absolute densities of ozone as measured by the various instruments, the long-term changes (1979-1990) disagree sharply as a function of pressure and in the integrated ozone amount. In the upper stratosphere, SBUV trends are negative with maximum values of about -1.5%/year at high latitudes. Combined SAGE I and II trends are slightly positive in this region and peak near 0.5%/year at equatorial latitudes. In the lower stratosphere, SBUV trends reflect small decreases in ozone, generally less than -0.4%/year except at high southern latitudes where the trends rearch values of approximately -1.5%/year. SAGE ozone trends exhibit large decreases particularly in the equatorial regions where decreases of 3-6%/year are seen at pressures between 60 and 90 mbar. At higher latitudes, SAGE trends are more comparable to SBUV trends in the lower stratosphere. Total ozone trends from TOMS and SBUV agree within their uncertainties. Near-zero trends are indicated at low latitudes, and larger, negative trends (approximately -0.5%/year) are indicated near the poles. The SAGE column ozone trends depend upon the base level altitude of integration but do not exhibit a strong latitude dependence.

  12. Sensitivty of ozone production to organic nitrate formation in Sacramento and Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, E. C.; Cohen, R. C.

    2010-12-01

    Total alkyl and multifunctional nitrates (ΣANs) are formed by a minor channel of the NO + RO2 reaction and thus represent a termination step of ozone production. ΣANs formation becomes most significant in the cross-over regime between NOx saturated (VOC limited) and NOx limited ozone production. In models that fail to account for changing rates of ΣANs formation, the NOx and VOC levels are considered independent parameters: to lower ozone production all that is needed is to decrease the limiting parameter. It has been recently shown that this view on ozone production may lead to counterproductive air quality control strategies (Farmer et al., 2010 submitted). Using both an analytical model and measurements from Mexico City, Farmer et al. demonstrated that ΣANs formation effectively couples VOCs and NOx. Analytical models show that VOC reduction strategies that result in a decrease in ΣANs yield will result in increased ozone production for NOx less than 3 ppb. We expand upon the work of Farmer et al. by investigating the sensitivity of ozone production to ΣANs formation using a regional three dimensional chemical transport model, WRF-CHEM. The standard chemistry treats all ΣANs species as a single model species with a given lifetime and NOx recycling efficiency. We implement a revised ΣANs representation that treats monofunctional, multifunctional saturated, multifunctional unsaturated, aromatic, isoprene, and monoterpene nitrates as unique model species with appropriate lifetimes and NOx recycling efficiencies. We investigate how this improved ΣANs representation affects ozone, and we compare these results to ground and airborne measurements in the Sacramento and Los Angeles areas. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of ozone formation to ΣANs formation rate, lifetime, and NOx recycling efficiency.

  13. Evidence for diabatic cooling and poleward transport within and around the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Proffitt, M.H.; Powell, J.A. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder ); Kelly, K.K. ); Gray, B.L. ); Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J.R.; Strahan, S.E.; Chan, K.R. )

    1989-11-30

    Combining in situ measurements of nitrous oxide, total water, and NO{sub y} with meteorological data, including potential vorticity, taken during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment, a consistent picture emerges of a gradual poleward movement of air extending from about 10{degree} in latitude outside the boundary of the ozone hole to about 5{degree} inside. The data analysis is concentrated in the potential temperature range of 425-450 K, corresponding to geometric altitudes of 17.5-19 km. Evidence of ongoing diabatic cooling throughout this region is presented, and cooling rates of about 1.75 K in potential temperature per day (approximately 0.8 K per day in temperature at constant pressure) are calculated from the data outside the boundary of the ozone hole. An interpretation of the data is presented that describes the movement of air that has come from lower latitudes into the ozone hole, as diabatically descending and spiraling poleward. The result of this spiraling motion is a dominantly advective flow of ozone rich air across the boundary and into the ozone hole. This simple picture precludes requiring extensive isentropic mixing with accompanying vertical descent to maintain the steep poleward isentropic gradients found in nitrous oxide. Data are presented to show that the necessary accompanying outflow of stratospheric air from within the ozone hole occurs at potential temperatures less than 425 K and that, during the mission, there was no significant transport of processed air across the boundary and out of the ozone hole from 425 to 450 K. Arguments involving conservation of angular momentum are also used to support this model.

  14. First look at the NOAA Aircraft-based Tropospheric Ozone Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, M.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; McClure-Begley, A.; Lin, M.; Tarasick, D.; Johnson, B. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network's aircraft program has operated since the 1990s as part of the NOAA Global Monitoring Division network to capture spatial and temporal variability in greenhouse tracers (i.e. CO2, CO, N2O, methane, SF6, halo- and hydro-carbons). Since 2005 the suite of airborne measurements also includes ozone, humidity and temperature profiling through the troposphere (up to 8 km). Light commercial aircraft are equipped with modified 2B Technology ozone monitors (Model 205DB), incorporate temperature and humidity probes, and include global positioning system instrumentation. The dataset was analyzed for tropospheric ozone variability at five continental US stations. As site locations within the Tropospheric Aircraft Ozone Measurement Program have flights only once (four times at one site) a month and begun a decade ago, this raises the question of whether this sampling frequency allows the derivation of an accurate vertical climatology of ozone values. We interpret the representativeness of the vertical and seasonal ozone distribution from aircraft measurements using multi-decadal hindcast simulations conducted with the GFDL AM3 chemistry-climate model. When available, climatology derived from co-located ozone-sonde data will be used for comparisons. The results of the comparisons are analyzed to establish altitude ranges in the troposphere where the aircraft climatology would be deemed to be the most representative. Aircraft-based climatologies are tested from two approaches: comparing the aircraft-based climatology to the daily sampled model and to the subset of model data with matching aircraft dates. Whenever the model and aircraft climatologies show significant seasonal differences, further information is gathered from a seasonal Gaussian distribution plot. We will report on the minimum frequency in flights that can provide adequate climatological representation of seasonal and vertical variability in tropospheric ozone.

  15. Indoor ozone/terpene reactions as a source of indoor particles

    SciTech Connect

    Weschler, C.J.; Shields, H.C.

    1998-12-31

    The present study examines the effect that a series of reactions between ozone and selected terpenes has on the concentrations and size distributions of airborne particles in a typical office setting. In the first set of experiments, known concentrations of ozone and a selected terpene (either d-limonene, a-terpinene, or a mix of terpenes found in a terpene based cleaner) were deliberately introduced into office air. Subsequent particle formation and redistribution was monitored with an eight-channel optical particle counter. The office with the deliberately supplemented ozone and terpene levels had concentrations of particles in the 0.1--0.2 mm diameter size range that were as much as 20 times larger than those measured in a comparable office without the supplemented ozone. Concentrations in the larger size ranges also were affected, and the magnitude of the effect increased with time, indicating the importance of coagulation and condensation processes. In the second set of experiments, d-limonene was deliberately introduced into office air, but ozone was not supplemented; instead, the indoor ozone concentrations were those that happened to be present (primarily as a consequence of outdoor-to-indoor transport). In these experiments, the concentrations of the 0.1--0.2 mm particles tracked those of indoor ozone (the limiting reagent) and were as much as 10 times greater than levels measured in a comparable office that did not contain d-limonene. The results demonstrate that ozone terpene reactions can be a significant source of sub-micron particles in indoor settings, and further illustrate the potential for reactions among commonly occurring indoor pollutants to markedly influence indoor environments.

  16. Lidar observation of ozone over Tsukuba (36 deg N, 140 deg E)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakane, H.; Hayashida, S.; Matsui, I.; Sugimoto, N.; Minato, A.; Sasano, Y.

    1994-01-01

    An ozone lidar system was installed at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) in Tsukuba, Japan in March 1988 and has been measuring vertical profiles of ozone (15 - 45 km) since September 1988. The lidar system consists of a XeCl (308 nm) excimer laser, its deuterium Raman shifter (339 nm), a XeF excimer laser (351 nm), a 2 m telescope, a receiving system and a data processing system. The precision of the derived ozone concentration is about 10 percent of an altitude of 40 km for a 4 hr observation. Temperature profiles (30 - 80 km) are also obtained from the Rayleigh scattering signals at 351 nm. Approximate 50 ozone measurements are carried out in a year and variations of vertical profiles of ozone such as seasonal variations and shorter-term variations are observed. Systematic errors due to aerosols had been negligible until the arrival of the stratospheric aerosols injected by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. Effects of the volcanic aerosols on ozone measurements depend on the differences between wavelengths used as the on- and off-resonance.

  17. Mobile lidar system for measurement of water vapor mixing ratio and ozone number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Vapor Lidar was modified and extended to make differential absorption measurements of ozone. Water vapor measurements make use of a weak molecular scattering process known as Raman scattering. It is characterized by a shift in wavelength of the scattered beam of light relative to the incident one. Some of the energy of the incident photon is converted to vibrational or rotational energy within the molecule leaving the scattered photon shifted to a slightly longer wavelength. When performing water vapor measurements, profiles are acquired of water vapor mixing ratio from near the ground to beyond 7 km every 2 minutes. By forming a color composite image of the individual profiles, the spatial and temporal evolution of water vapor is visible with vertical resolution of 75 to 150m and temporal resolution of 2 minutes. The ozone lidar is intended for use as a cross calibration facility for other stationary ozone lidar systems. The ozone measurement employs the technique known as differential absorption. The backscattered laser radiation from two different wavelengths is measured. Successful measurements of 308 nm returns were made from 80 km with an averaging period of 6 hours. Using these data and a standard atmosphere density curve, an ozone number density profile was made which agrees very well with the standard ozone curve between 20 and 40 km.

  18. Ultraviolet Radiation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R.

    2003-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun produces ozone in the stratosphere and it participates in the destruction of ozone. Absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone is the primary heating mechanism leading to the maximum in temperature at the stratopause. Variations of solar ultraviolet radiation on both the 27-day solar rotation period and the 11-year solar cycle affect ozone by several mechanisms. The temperature and ozone in the upper stratosphere respond to solar uv variations as a coupled system. An increase in uv leads to an increase in the production of ozone through the photolysis of molecular oxygen. An increase in uv leads to an increase in temperature through the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in temperature leads to a partially-offsetting decrease in ozone through temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficients. The ozone variation modulates the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in ozone at solar maximum enhances the uv heating. The processes are understood and supported by long-term data sets. Variation in the upper stratospheric temperatures will lead to a change in the behavior of waves propagating upward from the troposphere. Changes in the pattern of wave dissipation will lead to acceleration or deceleration of the mean flow and changes in the residual or transport circulation. This mechanism could lead to the propagation of the solar cycle uv variation from the upper stratosphere downward to the lower stratosphere. This process is not well-understood and has been the subject of an increasing number of model studies. I will review the data analyses for solar cycle and their comparison to model results.

  19. On the usefulness of an airborne lidar for O3 layer analysis in the free troposphere and the planetary boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Ancellet, G; Ravetta, F

    2003-02-01

    Ozone vertical profiling with a lidar is well adapted to the spatial and temporal O3 variability analysis either in the free troposphere, when studying the respective impact of chemical production and dynamical processes, or in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) when characterizing the diurnal evolution of ozone plumes during pollution episodes. Comparisons with other measuring techniques (ozonesonde and aircraft in-situ measurements) demonstrate the lidar ability to characterize narrow layers (< 500 m) with a good accuracy (deltaO3 < 5-10 ppb). Application of airborne or ground-based operation of the CNRS airborne ozone lidar show its ability (i) to observe O3 layering above the PBL during two field experiments held to study air pollution in the Po Valley, Northern Italy, and the city of Marseille, Southern France, (ii) to improve airborne campaign planning (real time information on position of O3 layers) and analysis (three-dimensional perspective for layers detected by in-situ measurements) when chemical characterization of narrow O3 layers in the free troposphere is sought, (iii) to map O3 inhomogeneity down to an horizontal scale of 10-20 km within or above the polluted PBL by airborne measurements. For O3 pollution studies, understanding the origin and the life cycle of O3 layering is the first priority, and in this case the optimum use of the lidar remains the continuous operation of a ground-based instrument.

  20. Trace Tropospheric Species Sensing-Fabry-Perot Interferometer (TTSS-FPI): spaceborne sensor concept studies for measuring tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschell, Jeffery J.; Hastings, C. T.; Chrien, Thomas; Larar, Allen M.; Cook, William B.; Mills, Carl S.; Flood, Michael A.; Skinner, Wilbert R.

    2005-01-01

    We present results of studies of instrument concepts for a spaceborne imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer to measure tropospheric ozone. Ozone is recognized as one of the most important trace constituents of the troposphere. Tropospheric ozone is responsible for acute and chronic human health problems and contributes toward destruction of plant and animal populations. Furthermore, it is a greenhouse gas and contributes toward radiative forcing and climate change. Tropospheric ozone levels have been increasing and will continue to do so as concentrations of precursor gases (oxides of nitrogen, methane, and other hydrocarbons) necessary for the photochemical formation of tropospheric ozone continue to rise. Space-based detection and monitoring of tropospheric ozone is critical for enhancing scientific understanding of creation and transport of this important trace gas and for providing data needed to help develop strategies for mitigating impacts of exposure to elevated concentrations of tropospheric ozone. Measurement concept details are discussed in a companion paper by Larar et al. Development of an airborne prototype instrument for this application is discussed by Cook et al. in another companion paper.

  1. Unequivocal detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic Ozone Hole through significant increases in atmospheric layers with minimum ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Jos; van Weele, Michiel; van der A, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    An important new landmark in present day ozone research is presented through MLS satellite observations of significant ozone increases during the ozone hole season that are attributed unequivocally to declining ozone depleting substances. For many decades the Antarctic ozone hole has been the prime example of both the detrimental effects of human activities on our environment as well as how to construct effective and successful environmental policies. Nowadays atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are on the decline and first signs of recovery of stratospheric ozone and ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole have been observed. The claimed detection of significant recovery, however, is still subject of debate. In this talk we will discuss first current uncertainties in the assessment of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole by using multi-variate regression methods, and, secondly present an alternative approach to identify ozone hole recovery unequivocally. Even though multi-variate regression methods help to reduce uncertainties in estimates of ozone recovery, great care has to be taken in their application due to the existence of uncertainties and degrees of freedom in the choice of independent variables. We show that taking all uncertainties into account in the regressions the formal recovery of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole cannot be established yet, though is likely before the end of the decade (before 2020). Rather than focusing on time and area averages of total ozone columns or ozone profiles, we argue that the time evolution of the probability distribution of vertically resolved ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole contains a better fingerprint for the detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole. The advantages of this method over more tradition methods of trend analyses based on spatio-temporal average ozone are discussed. The 10-year record of MLS satellite measurements of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole shows a

  2. Raman accumulator as a fusion laser driver

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Swingle, J.C.

    1982-03-31

    Apparatus for simultaneous laser pulse amplification and compression, using multiple pass Raman scattering in one Raman cell and pulse switchout from the optical cavity through use of a dichroic device associated with the Raman cell.

  3. Raman accumulator as a fusion laser driver

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Swingle, James C.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus for simultaneous laser pulse amplification and compression, using multiple pass Raman scattering in one Raman cell and pulse switchout from the optical cavity through use of a dichroic device associated with the Raman cell.

  4. Plant responses to tropospheric ozone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropospheric ozone is the second most abundant air pollutant and an important component of the global climate change. Over five decades of research on the phytotoxicity of ozone in model plants systems, crop plants and forest trees have provided some insight into the physiological, biochemical and m...

  5. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-12-07

    A process and resulting product are provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  6. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    During the period March 1977 through May 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center and three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at the Churchill Research Range. One additional flight was conducted at Wallops Flight Center in support of Nimbus 4 SBUV. Data results and flight profiles for the period covered are presented.

  7. Atmospheric iodine abates smog ozone.

    PubMed

    HAMILTON, W F; LEVINE, M; SIMON, E

    1963-04-12

    Traces of iodine in test samples of irradiated photochemical smog atmospheres either inhibit ozone formation or lower its concentration. Eye and respiratory irritation are reduced qualitatively. Iodine is more effective in suppressing ozone in a photochemical smog atmosphere than it is in purified air.

  8. Modelling the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutzen, P. J.; Bruhl, C.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers performed model calculations of the ozone depletions taking place in the Antarctic lower stratosphere. Making the assumption that odd nitrogen is frozen out on stratospheric haze particles, an analysis is given of how much homogeneous reactions can contribute to ozone loss during September-October. Comparisons with observations indicate the potential importance of reactions with HCl in the polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  9. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Serkiz, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  10. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    During the period December 1976 through February 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center, two special soundings were taken at Antigua, West Indies, and at the Churchill Research Range, monthly activities were initiated to establish stratospheric ozone climatology. This report presents the data results and flight profiles for the period covered.

  11. Simplified ozone detection by chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Rogowski, R. S.; Richards, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ozone is detected by film coated with solid, such as rubrene, that reacts with ozone to degree proportional to concentration in sample gas. Gas flow is stopped, and film is heated to produce light (chemiluminescence) in proportion to amount of reacted material on sensor.

  12. Airborne measurements of organic bromine compounds in the Pacific tropical tropopause layer.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Maria A; Atlas, Elliot L; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Lloveras, Xavier; Kinnison, Douglas E; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Filus, Michal; Harris, Neil R P; Meneguz, Elena; Ashfold, Matthew J; Manning, Alistair J; Cuevas, Carlos A; Schauffler, Sue M; Donets, Valeria

    2015-11-10

    Very short-lived brominated substances (VSLBr) are an important source of stratospheric bromine, an effective ozone destruction catalyst. However, the accurate estimation of the organic and inorganic partitioning of bromine and the input to the stratosphere remains uncertain. Here, we report near-tropopause measurements of organic brominated substances found over the tropical Pacific during the NASA Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment campaigns. We combine aircraft observations and a chemistry-climate model to quantify the total bromine loading injected to the stratosphere. Surprisingly, despite differences in vertical transport between the Eastern and Western Pacific, VSLBr (organic + inorganic) contribute approximately similar amounts of bromine [∼6 (4-9) parts per trillion] [corrected] to the stratospheric input at the tropical tropopause. These levels of bromine cause substantial ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere, and any increases in future abundances (e.g., as a result of aquaculture) will lead to larger depletions. PMID:26504212

  13. Airborne measurements of organic bromine compounds in the Pacific tropical tropopause layer.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Maria A; Atlas, Elliot L; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Lloveras, Xavier; Kinnison, Douglas E; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Filus, Michal; Harris, Neil R P; Meneguz, Elena; Ashfold, Matthew J; Manning, Alistair J; Cuevas, Carlos A; Schauffler, Sue M; Donets, Valeria

    2015-11-10

    Very short-lived brominated substances (VSLBr) are an important source of stratospheric bromine, an effective ozone destruction catalyst. However, the accurate estimation of the organic and inorganic partitioning of bromine and the input to the stratosphere remains uncertain. Here, we report near-tropopause measurements of organic brominated substances found over the tropical Pacific during the NASA Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment campaigns. We combine aircraft observations and a chemistry-climate model to quantify the total bromine loading injected to the stratosphere. Surprisingly, despite differences in vertical transport between the Eastern and Western Pacific, VSLBr (organic + inorganic) contribute approximately similar amounts of bromine [∼6 (4-9) parts per trillion] [corrected] to the stratospheric input at the tropical tropopause. These levels of bromine cause substantial ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere, and any increases in future abundances (e.g., as a result of aquaculture) will lead to larger depletions.

  14. Airborne measurements of organic bromine compounds in the Pacific tropical tropopause layer

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Maria A.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Lloveras, Xavier; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Filus, Michal; Harris, Neil R. P.; Meneguz, Elena; Ashfold, Matthew J.; Manning, Alistair J.; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Donets, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Very short-lived brominated substances (VSLBr) are an important source of stratospheric bromine, an effective ozone destruction catalyst. However, the accurate estimation of the organic and inorganic partitioning of bromine and the input to the stratosphere remains uncertain. Here, we report near-tropopause measurements of organic brominated substances found over the tropical Pacific during the NASA Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment campaigns. We combine aircraft observations and a chemistry−climate model to quantify the total bromine loading injected to the stratosphere. Surprisingly, despite differences in vertical transport between the Eastern and Western Pacific, VSLBr (organic + inorganic) contribute approximately similar amounts of bromine [∼6 (4−9) parts per thousand] to the stratospheric input at the tropical tropopause. These levels of bromine cause substantial ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere, and any increases in future abundances (e.g., as a result of aquaculture) will lead to larger depletions. PMID:26504212

  15. Effects of a modular two-step ozone-water and annealing process on silicon carbide graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Matthew J.; Polley, Craig; Dirscherl, Kai; Burwell, Gregory; Palmgren, Pâl; Niu, Yuran; Lundstedt, Anna; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Guy, Owen J.; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan; Yakimova, Rositsa; Grennberg, Helena

    2014-08-01

    By combining ozone and water, the effect of exposing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide to an aggressive wet-chemical process has been evaluated after high temperature annealing in ultra high vacuum. The decomposition of ozone in water produces a number of oxidizing species, however, despite long exposure times to the aqueous-ozone environment, no graphene oxide was observed after the two-step process. The systems were comprehensively characterized before and after processing using Raman spectroscopy, core level photoemission spectroscopy, and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy together with low energy electron diffraction, low energy electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In spite of the chemical potential of the aqueous-ozone reaction environment, the graphene domains were largely unaffected raising the prospect of employing such simple chemical and annealing protocols to clean or prepare epitaxial graphene surfaces.

  16. Effects of a modular two-step ozone-water and annealing process on silicon carbide graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Matthew J. Lundstedt, Anna; Grennberg, Helena; Polley, Craig; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan; Dirscherl, Kai; Burwell, Gregory; Guy, Owen J.; Palmgren, Pål; Yakimova, Rositsa

    2014-08-25

    By combining ozone and water, the effect of exposing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide to an aggressive wet-chemical process has been evaluated after high temperature annealing in ultra high vacuum. The decomposition of ozone in water produces a number of oxidizing species, however, despite long exposure times to the aqueous-ozone environment, no graphene oxide was observed after the two-step process. The systems were comprehensively characterized before and after processing using Raman spectroscopy, core level photoemission spectroscopy, and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy together with low energy electron diffraction, low energy electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In spite of the chemical potential of the aqueous-ozone reaction environment, the graphene domains were largely unaffected raising the prospect of employing such simple chemical and annealing protocols to clean or prepare epitaxial graphene surfaces.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of a high-k dielectric on MoS2 using trimethylaluminum and ozone.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lanxia; Qin, Xiaoye; Lucero, Antonio T; Azcatl, Angelica; Huang, Jie; Wallace, Robert M; Cho, Kyeongjae; Kim, Jiyoung

    2014-08-13

    We present an Al2O3 dielectric layer on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) with ozone/trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water/TMA as precursors. The results of atomic force microscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy show that using TMA and ozone as precursors leads to the formation of uniform Al2O3 layers, in contrast to the incomplete coverage we observe when using TMA/H2O as precursors. Our Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate minimal variations in the MoS2 structure after ozone treatment at 200 °C, suggesting its excellent chemical resistance to ozone.

  18. Next-Generation NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System.

    PubMed

    Wright, C W; Hoge, F E; Swift, R N; Yungel, J K; Schirtzinger, C R

    2001-01-20

    The complete design and flight test of the next-generation Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL-3) is detailed. The application of new technology has allowed major reductions in weight, volume, and power requirements compared with the earlier AOL sensor. Subsystem designs for the new AOL sensor include new technology in fiber optics, spectrometer detector optical train, miniature photomultiplier modules, dual-laser wavelength excitation from a single small laser source, and new receiver optical configuration. The new design reduced telescope size and maintained the same principal fluorescence and water Raman bands but essentially retained a comparable measurement accuracy. A major advancement is the implementation of single-laser simultaneous excitation of two physically separate oceanic target areas: one stimulated by 532 nm and the other by 355 nm. Backscattered fluorescence and Raman signals from both targets are acquired simultaneously by use of the same telescope and spectrometer-detector system. Two digital oscilloscopes provide temporal- and depth-resolved data from each of seven spectral emission bands.

  19. Effects of ozone and endotoxin coexposure on rat airway epithelium: potentiation of toxicant-induced alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J G; Hotchkiss, J A; Harkema, J R

    2001-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone is the major oxidizing component in photochemical smog and is one of the most pervasive problems to human health of the criteria air pollutants for which the National Ambient Air Quality Standards have been designated by the Clean Air Act. Although many adverse health effects of ozone exposure have been documented in both humans and laboratory animals, controversy surrounds the establishment and implementation of ozone standards set forth by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Because people are commonly exposed to more than one air pollutant at a time, studies that examine coexposures to airborne materials may be more relevant for assessing their risks to human health. Airborne biogenic substances such as pollens, spores, and bacterial products are ubiquitous in the environment, and when inhaled can cause adverse respiratory symptoms. One such biogenic agent, bacterial endotoxin, is a potent stimulus of airway inflammation and is a ubiquitous airborne contaminant commonly found in domestic, agricultural, and industrial settings. Little is known about the interaction of exposures to biogenic substances and criteria air pollutants such as ozone. In the last few years we have performed a series of studies in rodents that examined the biologic responses of the respiratory epithelium after airway exposures to both endotoxin and ozone. When exposed to ozone (0.5 ppm 8 hr/day for 3 days), Fischer rats develop lesions in the nasal transitional epithelium, whereas intranasal instillation of endotoxin (20 microg) elicits epithelial lesions in the respiratory epithelium of the nose and conducting airways. Our studies were designed to examine how exposure to one toxicant may affect the airway epithelial lesions induced by the other toxicant. We investigated the potential role of acute inflammation in the enhancement of airway epithelial lesions after exposure of these two toxicants in neutrophil-sufficient and neutrophil-deficient rodents. A summary

  20. Effects of ozone and endotoxin coexposure on rat airway epithelium: potentiation of toxicant-induced alterations.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J G; Hotchkiss, J A; Harkema, J R

    2001-08-01

    Tropospheric ozone is the major oxidizing component in photochemical smog and is one of the most pervasive problems to human health of the criteria air pollutants for which the National Ambient Air Quality Standards have been designated by the Clean Air Act. Although many adverse health effects of ozone exposure have been documented in both humans and laboratory animals, controversy surrounds the establishment and implementation of ozone standards set forth by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Because people are commonly exposed to more than one air pollutant at a time, studies that examine coexposures to airborne materials may be more relevant for assessing their risks to human health. Airborne biogenic substances such as pollens, spores, and bacterial products are ubiquitous in the environment, and when inhaled can cause adverse respiratory symptoms. One such biogenic agent, bacterial endotoxin, is a potent stimulus of airway inflammation and is a ubiquitous airborne contaminant commonly found in domestic, agricultural, and industrial settings. Little is known about the interaction of exposures to biogenic substances and criteria air pollutants such as ozone. In the last few years we have performed a series of studies in rodents that examined the biologic responses of the respiratory epithelium after airway exposures to both endotoxin and ozone. When exposed to ozone (0.5 ppm 8 hr/day for 3 days), Fischer rats develop lesions in the nasal transitional epithelium, whereas intranasal instillation of endotoxin (20 microg) elicits epithelial lesions in the respiratory epithelium of the nose and conducting airways. Our studies were designed to examine how exposure to one toxicant may affect the airway epithelial lesions induced by the other toxicant. We investigated the potential role of acute inflammation in the enhancement of airway epithelial lesions after exposure of these two toxicants in neutrophil-sufficient and neutrophil-deficient rodents. A summary

  1. Source attribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a harmful pollutant with adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. As well as these effects, tropospheric ozone is also a powerful greenhouse gas, with an anthropogenic radiative forcing one quarter of that of CO2. Along with methane and atmospheric aerosol, tropospheric ozone belongs to the so-called Short Lived Climate forcing Pollutants, or SLCP. Recent work has shown that efforts to reduce concentrations of SLCP in the atmosphere have the potential to slow the rate of near-term climate change, while simultaneously improving public health and reducing crop losses. Unlike many other SLCP, tropospehric ozone is not directly emitted, but is instead influenced by two distinct sources: transport of air from the ozone-rich stratosphere; and photochemical production in the troposphere from the emitted precursors NOx (oxides of nitrogen), CO (Carbon Monoxide), and VOC (volatile organic compounds, including methane). Better understanding of the relationship between ozone production and the emissions of its precursors is essential for the development of targeted emission reduction strategies. Several modeling methods have been employed to relate the production of tropospheric ozone to emissions of its precursors; emissions perturbation, tagging, and adjoint sensitivity methods all deliver complementary information about modelled ozone production. Most studies using tagging methods have focused on attribution of tropospheric ozone production to emissions of NOx, even though perturbation methods have suggested that tropospheric ozone is also sensitive to VOC, particularly methane. In this study we describe the implementation into a global chemistry-climate model of a scheme for tagging emissions of NOx and VOC with an arbitrary number of labels, which are followed through the chemical reactions of tropospheric ozone production in order to perform attribution of tropospehric ozone to its emitted precursors. Attribution is performed to both

  2. Large aperture scanning airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Bindschadler, R.; Boers, R.; Bufton, J. L.; Clem, D.; Garvin, J.; Melfi, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    A large aperture scanning airborne lidar facility is being developed to provide important new capabilities for airborne lidar sensor systems. The proposed scanning mechanism allows for a large aperture telescope (25 in. diameter) in front of an elliptical flat (25 x 36 in.) turning mirror positioned at a 45 degree angle with respect to the telescope optical axis. The lidar scanning capability will provide opportunities for acquiring new data sets for atmospheric, earth resources, and oceans communities. This completed facility will also make available the opportunity to acquire simulated EOS lidar data on a near global basis. The design and construction of this unique scanning mechanism presents exciting technological challenges of maintaining the turning mirror optical flatness during scanning while exposed to extreme temperatures, ambient pressures, aircraft vibrations, etc.

  3. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  4. Magnetic airborne survey - geophysical flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros Camara, Erick; Nei Pereira Guimarães, Suze

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a technical review process in the area of airborne acquisition of geophysical data, with emphasis for magnetometry. In summary, it addresses the calibration processes of geophysical equipment as well as the aircraft to minimize possible errors in measurements. The corrections used in data processing and filtering are demonstrated with the same results as well as the evolution of these techniques in Brazil and worldwide.

  5. Development of an Ozone UV DIAL System at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlome, M.; Simeonov, V.; Parlange, M.; van den Bergh, H.

    2009-04-01

    An ozone UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is developed and added to the existing multi-wavelength Lidar operated at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (HARSJ, 3580 m ASL, 46.55° N, 7.98° E). The system is based on a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (Continuum Powerlite 8000) providing the laser emission of 266 nm at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The initial radiation is focused through a high pressure Nitrogen-Raman cell responsible for the generation of the DIAL wavelengths suitable for ozone detection (284, 304 nm) by the stimulated Raman scattering technique. The 76 cm diameter Cassegrain telescope in the HARSJ's astronomical dome is used as receiver for measurements up to the tropopause. The existing multi-wavelength polychromator fixed at the telescopes rear end is equipped with the additional ozone detection channel. The performance of the system is illustrated by inter-comparison with an ECC ozone sonde launched by the Swiss Meteorological Institute at Payerne (SMI, 491 m ASL, 46.83°N, 6.96 E). The retrieved data are found to be in good agreement with the balloon sounding and cover an altitude range of 2 to 10 km above the HARSJ. Since the scientific community disagrees about the real amount of air mass exchange driven by stratosphere troposphere exchange (STE), this new instrument is capable to supply the STE research with remote sensing data from an unique location.

  6. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  7. NASA Student Airborne Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, E. L.; Shetter, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) is a unique summer internship program for advanced undergraduates and early graduate students majoring in the STEM disciplines. SARP participants acquire hands-on research experience in all aspects of an airborne research campaign, including flying onboard an major NASA resource used for studying Earth system processes. In summer 2012, thirty-two participants worked in four interdisciplinary teams to study surface, atmospheric, and oceanographic processes. Participants assisted in the operation of instruments onboard the NASA P-3B aircraft where they sampled and measured atmospheric gases and imaged land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Along with airborne data collection, students participated in taking measurements at field sites. Mission faculty and research mentors helped to guide participants through instrument operation, sample analysis, and data reduction. Over the eight-week program, each student developed an individual research project from the data collected and delivered a conference-style final presentation on his/her results. We will discuss the results and effectiveness of the program from the first four summers and discuss plans for the future.

  8. Options to accelerate ozone recovery: ozone and climate benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. S.; Fleming, E. L.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-08-01

    Hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) and N2O are evaluated in terms of effects on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC), globally-averaged total column ozone, and radiative forcing through 2100. Due to the established success of the Montreal Protocol, these actions can have only a fraction of the impact on ozone depletion that regulations already in force have had. If all anthropogenic ODS and N2O emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2% during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional restrictions. Direct radiative forcing by 2100 would be about 0.23 W/m2 lower from the elimination of anthropogenic N2O emissions and about 0.005 W/m2 lower from the destruction of the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) bank. Due to the potential impact of N2O on future ozone levels, we provide an approach to incorporate it into the EESC formulation, which is used extensively in ozone depletion analyses. The ability of EESC to describe total ozone changes arising from additional ODS and N2O controls is also quantified.

  9. Nitroaromatic hydrocarbon ozonation in water. 1: Single ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, F.J.; Encinar, J.M.; Alonso, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Single ozonation of two nitroaromatic hydrocarbons (nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene) under different experimental conditions (ozone feed rate, pH, temperature, hydroxyl radical scavengers) has been studied. The absence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, pHs 7--9, and temperatures below 30 C are optimum conditions for nitroaromatic removal. Due to the importance of hydroxyl radical reactions, removal rates in natural water are much lower than those observed in laboratory ultrapure water. Rate constants of the direct reaction between ozone and nitroaromatic hydrocarbons at 20 C have been found to be lower than 6 M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. More than 99% of nitroaromatic removal is due to hydroxyl radical oxidation. Single ozonation of nitroaromatics can then be classified as a real advanced oxidation technology. Nitrophenols, compounds very reactive toward ozone and hydroxyl radicals, and 2,6-dinitrobenzaldehyde, identified in the single ozonation of nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, respectively, are some of the first intermediates of single ozonation.

  10. Raman amplification of matter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Schneble, Dominik; Campbell, Gretchen K.; Streed, Erik W.; Boyd, Micah; Pritchard, David E.; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2004-04-01

    We demonstrate a Raman amplifier for matter waves, where the amplified atoms and the gain medium are in two different hyperfine states. This amplifier is based on a form of superradiance that arises from self-stimulated Raman scattering in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

  11. Second International Airborne Remote Sensing Conference and Exhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The conference provided four days of displays and scientific presentations on applications, technology, a science of sub-orbital data gathering and analysis. The twelve displayed aircraft equipped with sophisticated instrumentation represented a wide range of environmental and reconnaissance missions,including marine pollution control, fire detection, Open Skies Treaty verification, thermal mapping, hydrographical measurements, military research, ecological and agricultural observations, geophysical research, atmospheric and meterological observations, and aerial photography. The U.S. Air Force and the On-Site Inspection Agency displayed the new Open Skies Treaty verification Boeing OC 135B that promotes international monitoring of military forces and activities. SRl's Jetstream uses foliage and ground penetrating SAR for forest inventories, toxic waste delineation, and concealed target and buried unexploded ordnance detection. Earth Search Sciences's Gulfstream 1 with prototype miniaturized airborne hyperspectral imaging equipment specializes in accurate mineral differentiation, low-cost hydrocarbon exploration, and nonproliferation applications. John E. Chance and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers displayed the Bell 2 helicopter with SHOALS that performs hydrographic surveying of navigation projects, coastal environment assessment, and nautical charting surveys. Bechtel Nevada and U.S. DOE displayed both the Beech King AIR B-200 platform equipped to provide first response to nuclear accidents and routine environmental surveillance, and the MBB BO-105 helicopter used in spectral analysis for environmental assessment and military appraisal. NASA Ames Research Center's high-altitude Lockheed ER-2 assists in earth resources monitoring research in atmospheric chemistry, oceanography, and electronic sensors; ozone and greenhouse studies and satellite calibration and data validation. Ames also showcased the Learjet 24 Airborne Observatory that completed missions in Venus

  12. Raman Spectroscopy of Cocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Frank; Reardon, Paul; Ochoa, Romulo; Abourahma, Heba; Marti, Marcus; Dimeo, Rachel

    2010-02-01

    Cocrystals are a class of compounds that consist of two or more molecules that are held together by hydrogen bonding. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are those that contain an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) as one of the components. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are of particular interest and have gained a lot of attention in recent years because they offer the ability to modify the physical properties of the API, like solubility and bioavailability, without altering the chemical structure of the API. The APIs that we targeted for our studies are theophylline (Tp) and indomethacin (Ind). These compounds have been mixed with complementary coformers (cocrystal former) that include acetamide (AcONH2), melamine (MLM), nicotinic acid (Nic-COOH), 4-cyanopyridine (4-CNPy) and 4-aminopyridine (4-NH2Py). Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize these cocrystals. Spectra of the cocrystals were compared to those of the coformers to analyze for peak shifts, specifically those corresponding to hydrogen bonding. A 0.5 m CCD Spex spectrometer was used, in a micro-Raman setup, for spectral analysis. An Argon ion Coherent laser at 514.5 nm was used as the excitation source. )

  13. Total ozone changes in the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Doiron, Scott D.; Sechrist, Frank; Galimore, Reginald

    1988-01-01

    The development of the Antarctic ozone minimum was observed in 1987 with the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument. In the first half of August the near-polar (60 and 70 deg S) ozone levels were similar to those of recent years. By September, however, the ozone at 70 and 80 deg S was clearly lower than any previous year including 1985, the prior record low year. The levels continued to decrease throughout September until October 5 when a new record low of 109 DU was established at a point near the South Pole. This value is 29 DU less than the lowest observed in 1985 and 48 DU less than the 1986 low. The zonal mean total ozone at 60 deg S remained constant throughout the time of ozone hole formation. The ozone decline was punctuated by local minima formed away from the polar night boundary at about 75 deg S. The first of these, on August 15 to 17, formed just east of the Palmer Peninsula and appears to be a mountain wave. The second major minimum formed on September 5 to 7 again downwind of the Palmer Peninsula. This event was larger in scale than the August minimum and initiated the decline of ozone across the polar region. The 1987 ozone hole was nearly circular and pole centered for its entire life. In previous years the hole was perturbed by intrusions of the circumpolar maximum into the polar regions, thus causing the hole to be elliptical. The 1987 hole also remained in place until the end of November, a few days longer than in 1985, and this persistence resulted in the latest time for recovery to normal values yet observed.

  14. Is the Ozone Hole over Your Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Eugene C.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a survey of first year university science students regarding their understanding of the ozone layer, ozone depletion, and the effect of ozone depletion on Australia. Suggests that better teaching resources for environmental issues such as ozone depletion and global warming are needed before improvements in student understanding can be…

  15. Atmospheric ozone and man-made pollution.

    PubMed

    Fabian, P

    1976-06-01

    Atmospheric photochemistry and transport processes, related to the ozone layer, are discussed. Natural or man-made changes of the biosphere, variations of radiation, or general circulation as well as anthropogenic release of ozone-destroying catalysts are likely to alter the earth's ozone shield. The possible effects of ozone depletion caused by supersonic aircraft, nuclear weapons, nitrogen fertilizers, and chlorofluoromethanes are discussed.

  16. Hadamard transform visible Raman spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tilotta, D.C.; Freeman, R.D.; Fateley, W.G.

    1987-11-01

    The successful application of LC-SLM Hadamard transform spectrometry as a simultaneous multiwavelength detection system to Raman spectroscopy is presented. Multiplexed Raman data are obtained with the use of an Ar/sup +/ laser lasing at 514.5 nm and a room-temperature silicon photodiode. A conventional 90/sup 0/ scattering geometry is employed for measurements. It is demonstrated that the LC-SLM Hadamard transform Raman spectrometer possesses the capability of performing spectral subtraction and the ability to obtain depolarization ratios of Raman bands, and can function as a selectively tunable optical filter for both Rayleigh line rejection and optical band notching. It is also demonstrated that, for the Hadamard transform Raman experiment, the silicon photodiode used as the detector produces spectra with slightly better signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained with the photomultiplier tube (PMT) used as the detector, although the PMT shows an increase in sensitivity.

  17. Blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Enejder, Annika M K; Koo, Tae-Woong; Oh, Jeankun; Hunter, Martin; Sasic, Slobodan; Feld, Michael S; Horowitz, Gary L

    2002-11-15

    Concentrations of multiple analytes were simultaneously measured in whole blood with clinical accuracy, without sample processing, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were acquired with an instrument employing nonimaging optics, designed using Monte Carlo simulations of the influence of light-scattering-absorbing blood cells on the excitation and emission of Raman light in turbid medium. Raman spectra were collected from whole blood drawn from 31 individuals. Quantitative predictions of glucose, urea, total protein, albumin, triglycerides, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were made by means of partial least-squares (PLS) analysis with clinically relevant precision (r(2) values >0.93). The similarity of the features of the PLS calibration spectra to those of the respective analyte spectra illustrates that the predictions are based on molecular information carried by the Raman light. This demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative measurements of biomolecular contents in highly light-scattering and absorbing media. PMID:18033426

  18. Airborne high spectral resolution lidar for measuring aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients.

    PubMed

    Esselborn, Michael; Wirth, Martin; Fix, Andreas; Tesche, Matthias; Ehret, Gerhard

    2008-01-20

    An airborne high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) based on an iodine absorption filter and a high-power frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser has been developed to measure backscatter and extinction coefficients of aerosols and clouds. The instrument was operated aboard the Falcon 20 research aircraft of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in May-June 2006 to measure optical properties of Saharan dust. A detailed description of the lidar system, the analysis of its data products, and measurements of backscatter and extinction coefficients of Saharan dust are presented. The system errors are discussed and airborne HSRL results are compared to ground-based Raman lidar and sunphotometer measurements.

  19. Corona discharge influences ozone concentrations near rats.

    PubMed

    Goheen, Steven C; Gaither, Kari; Anantatmula, Shantha M; Mong, Gary M; Sasser, Lyle B; Lessor, Delbert

    2004-02-01

    Ozone can be produced by corona discharge either in dry air or when one electrode is submerged in water. Since ozone is toxic, we examined whether ozone production by corona near laboratory animals could reach levels of concern. Male rats were exposed to a corona discharge and the concentration of ozone produced was measured. The resulting concentration of ozone ranged from ambient levels to 250 ppb when animals were located 1 cm from a 10 kV source. Similar ozone concentrations were observed when a grounded water source was present. Possible explanations for, as well as concerns regarding, ozone production under these conditions are discussed. PMID:14735560

  20. First upper Tropospheric and lower Stratospheric Ozone Observations with the UV DIAL System at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlome, Marcel; Simeonov, Valentin; Parlange, Marc; van den Bergh, Hubert

    2010-05-01

    An ozone UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system was developed and added to the existing multi-wavelength lidar operated at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (HARSJ, 3580 m ASL, 46.55° N, 7.98° E). The system uses the quadrupled Nd:YAG laser emission at 266 nm to produce the ozone UV DIAL wavelengths (284, 304 nm) in a high pressure Raman cell filled with N2 by stimulated Raman scattering. The 76 cm diameter Cassegrain telescope in the HARSJ's astronomical dome is used as receiver for measurements up to the tropopause. For the sake of simplicity, the existing multi-wavelength polychromator fixed at the telescope rear end is equipped with the additional ozone detection channel. Thereby, a concave imaging diffraction grating is used for the spectral separation of the ozone UV DIAL wavelengths. With the current design, the ozone UV DIAL system provides hourly-averaged ozone profiles reaching from 6 km to 12 km ASL with a vertical resolution better than 400m at 6 km ASL and 1000m at 12 km ASL. The relative statistical error of the profiles is 10% at 12 km ASL. The performance of the system is illustrated by an inter-comparison with eight quasi simultaneously obtained ECC ozone sonde profiles from the Swiss Meteorological Institute - Payerne (SMI, 491 m ASL, 46.83°N, 6.96 E) 80 km in north western direction from HARSJ. The relative differences between the UV DIAL and the sonde profiles were found to be lower than 20% in a horizontally homogeneous atmosphere. This intercomparison has shown that the ozone UV DIAL system is capable to accurately reproduce the vertical ozone distribution within its operational range domain. An intercomparison with vertical profiles taken in the vicinity of HARSJ by an airplane-borne UV-photometer confirmed the performance of the ozone UV DIAL system. First time series (up to 21 hours) of hourly averaged ozone UV DIAL profiles were taken in August and September 2009. From these measurements, an ozone rich layer of air

  1. Unprecedented Arctic ozone loss in 2011.

    PubMed

    Manney, Gloria L; Santee, Michelle L; Rex, Markus; Livesey, Nathaniel J; Pitts, Michael C; Veefkind, Pepijn; Nash, Eric R; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Froidevaux, Lucien; Poole, Lamont R; Schoeberl, Mark R; Haffner, David P; Davies, Jonathan; Dorokhov, Valery; Gernandt, Hartwig; Johnson, Bryan; Kivi, Rigel; Kyrö, Esko; Larsen, Niels; Levelt, Pieternel F; Makshtas, Alexander; McElroy, C Thomas; Nakajima, Hideaki; Parrondo, Maria Concepción; Tarasick, David W; von der Gathen, Peter; Walker, Kaley A; Zinoviev, Nikita S

    2011-10-27

    Chemical ozone destruction occurs over both polar regions in local winter-spring. In the Antarctic, essentially complete removal of lower-stratospheric ozone currently results in an ozone hole every year, whereas in the Arctic, ozone loss is highly variable and has until now been much more limited. Here we demonstrate that chemical ozone destruction over the Arctic in early 2011 was--for the first time in the observational record--comparable to that in the Antarctic ozone hole. Unusually long-lasting cold conditions in the Arctic lower stratosphere led to persistent enhancement in ozone-destroying forms of chlorine and to unprecedented ozone loss, which exceeded 80 per cent over 18-20 kilometres altitude. Our results show that Arctic ozone holes are possible even with temperatures much milder than those in the Antarctic. We cannot at present predict when such severe Arctic ozone depletion may be matched or exceeded. PMID:21964337

  2. Brewer Umkehr ozone profile retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Disterhoft, P.; Lantz, K. O.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R. D.; Flynn, L. E.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Stanek, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Dobson Umkehr network has been a key data set for stratospheric ozone trend calculations (WMO Ozone assessments) and has earned its place as a benchmark network for stratospheric ozone profile observations. The Umkehr data has also been used to provide a long-term reference to the merging of the satellite ozone records (MOD), estimate the seasonal influence of an 11-year solar signal in the vertical distribution of stratospheric ozone, and to assess the ability of several remote and in-situ sensing systems in capturing ozone variability. It was found that Dobson Umkehr measurement errors were often comparable to errors derived for satellite and ozone-sounding methods. The Umkehr measurements are also available from the Brewer spectrophotometers [McElroy et al., 1995]. In 2005, the Dobson Umkehr algorithm (UMK04) was modified to retrieve ozone profile data from Brewer Umkehr measurements taken at two spectral channels [Petropavlovskikh et al, 2011]. The PC version of the Brewer algorithm was developed by M. Stanek (IOC, Canada and Czech Republic Meteorological Institute) in close collaboration with I. Petropavlovskikh. It was implemented at the NEUBrew network for operational processing of Umkehr data retrieved daily for all operational sites. The most recently developed Brewer ozone retrieval algorithm (MSBU) utilizes measurements that are currently available from the operational Brewer instruments. Umkehr measurements at multiple wavelength channels (similar to the satellite BUV method) and significantly reduced range of solar zenith angle are used for the twice a day operational ozone profile retrievals. Intercomparisons against ozone climatology, sounding, satellite overpasses and Dobson ozone datasets for NOASA/Goddard, Boulder, CO and MLO, HI sites are presented in this paper. The MSBU algorithm reduces noise in the intra-annual variability of the Brewer retrieved ozone as compared to the single pair ozone retrieval. Tropospheric ozone retrievals also

  3. Effects of stratospheric ozone recovery on photochemistry and ozone air quality in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wu, S.; Huang, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2014-04-01

    There has been significant stratospheric ozone depletion since the late 1970s due to ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). With the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, stratospheric ozone is expected to recover towards its pre-1980 level in the coming decades. In this study, we examine the implications of stratospheric ozone recovery for the tropospheric chemistry and ozone air quality with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). With a full recovery of the stratospheric ozone, the projected increases in ozone column range from 1% over the low latitudes to more than 10% over the polar regions. The sensitivity factor of troposphere ozone photolysis rate, defined as the percentage changes in surface ozone photolysis rate for 1% increase in stratospheric ozone column, shows significant seasonal variation but is always negative with absolute value larger than one. The expected stratospheric ozone recovery is found to affect the tropospheric ozone destruction rates much more than the ozone production rates. Significant decreases in surface ozone photolysis rates due to stratospheric ozone recovery are simulated. The global average tropospheric OH decreases by 1.7%, and the global average lifetime of tropospheric ozone increases by 1.5%. The perturbations to tropospheric ozone and surface ozone show large seasonal and spatial variations. General increases in surface ozone are calculated for each season, with increases by up to 0.8 ppbv in the remote areas. Increases in ozone lifetime by up to 13% are found in the troposphere. The increased lifetimes of tropospheric ozone in response to stratospheric ozone recovery enhance the intercontinental transport of ozone and global pollution, in particular for the summertime. The global background ozone attributable to Asian emissions is calculated to increase by up to 15% or 0.3 ppbv in the Northern Hemisphere in response to the projected stratospheric ozone recovery.

  4. Total ozone trend over Cairo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, G. K. Y.

    1994-01-01

    A world wide interest in protecting ozone layer against manmade effects is now increasing. Assessment of the ozone depletion due to these activities depends on how successfully we can separate the natural variabilities from the data. The monthly mean values of total ozone over Cairo (30 05N) for the period 1968-1988, have been analyzed using the power spectral analysis technique. The technique used in this analysis does not depend on a pre-understanding of the natural fluctuations in the ozone data. The method depends on increasing the resolution of the spectral peaks in order to obtain the more accurate sinusoidal fluctuations with wavelength equal to or less than record length. Also it handles the possible sinusoidal fluctuations with wavelength equal to or less than record length. The results show that it is possible to detect some of the well known national fluctuations in the ozone record such as annual, semiannual, quasi-biennial and quasi-quadrennial oscillations. After separating the natural fluctuations from the ozone record, the trend analysis of total ozone over Cairo showed that a decrease of about -1.2% per decade has occurred since 1979.

  5. Trends in ozone profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, H.; Aikin, A.; Barnes, R.; Chandra, S.; Cunnold, D.; Deluisi, J.; Gille, J. C.; Hudson, R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1989-01-01

    From an examination of the agreements and differences between different satellite instruments, it is difficult to believe that existing satellite instruments determine upper stratospheric ozone much better than 4 pct.; by extension, it probably would require at least a 4 pct. change to be reliably detected as a change. The best estimates of the vertical profiles of ozone change in the upper stratosphere between 1979 and 1986 are judged to be those given by the two SAGE satellite instruments. SAGE-2 minus SAGE-1 gives a much lower ozone reduction than that given by the archived Solar Backscatter UV data. The average SAGE profiles of ozone changes between 20 and 50 degs north and between 20 and 50 degs south are given. The SAGE-1 and SAGE-2 comparison gives an ozone reduction of about 4 pct. at 25 km over temperate latitudes. Five ground based Umkehr stations between 36 and 52 degs north, corrected for the effects of volcanic aerosols, report an ozone reduction between 1979 and 1987 at Umkehr layer 8 of 9 + or - 5 pct. The central estimate of upper stratospheric ozone reduction given by SAGE at 40 km is less than the central value estimated by the Umkehr method at layer 8.

  6. Correlative studies of satellite ozone sensor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovill, J. E.; Ellis, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    Comparisons are made between total ozone measurements made by four satellite ozone sensors (TOMS, SBUV, TOVS and MFR). The comparisons were made during July 1979 when all sensors were operating simultaneously. The TOMS and SBUV sensors were observed to measure less total ozone than the MFR sensor, 10 and 15 Dobson units (DU) respectively. The MFR and TOMS sensors measured less ozone than the TOVS sensor, 19 and 28 DU, respectively. Latitudinal variability of the total ozone comparisons is discussed.

  7. The Antarctic ozone lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanutti, L.; Castagnoli, F.; del Guasta, M.; Morandi, M.; Sacco, V. M.; Zuccagnoli, L.; Godin, S.; Megie, G.; Porteneuve, J.

    1992-07-01

    A new complex lidar system, designated POLE, for measuring tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, stratospheric aerosols, and polar stratospheric and tropospheric clouds is described. The lidar system is comprised of a Rayleigh lidar, an upper stratospheric ozone lidar, a low-altitude or tropospheric ozone lidar, and an aerosol backscattering depolarization lidar. The paper describes the characteristics of these lidars and the measurements obtained by each of them, together with the features of various subsystems of POLE, and presents results of measurements performed during the 1991 antarctic winter.

  8. The National Ozone Expedition, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, S. )

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen scientists from four separate institutions came to McMurdo Station during the period from August to November, 1986, to carry out an intensive stratospheric measurement program aimed at obtaining further data on the antarctic ozone hole. The results from the composite of experiments strongly suggest that chemistry (specifically, the chemistry of anthropogenically produced halocarbon species) probably plays an important role in the development of the antarctic ozone hole. If the antarctic ozone hole is due to mankind's use of chlorofluorocarbons, then it represents the first time that the environment has been shown to be sensitive to man's activities on a global scale.

  9. Pressure Measurements Using an Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar. Part 1; Analysis of the Systematic Error Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, Cyrille N.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Korb, C. Laurence; Evans, Keith D.; Palm, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Remote airborne measurements of the vertical and horizontal structure of the atmospheric pressure field in the lower troposphere are made with an oxygen differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A detailed analysis of this measurement technique is provided which includes corrections for imprecise knowledge of the detector background level, the oxygen absorption fine parameters, and variations in the laser output energy. In addition, we analyze other possible sources of systematic errors including spectral effects related to aerosol and molecular scattering interference by rotational Raman scattering and interference by isotopic oxygen fines.

  10. Ozone and Ozonated Oils in Skin Diseases: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Travagli, V.; Zanardi, I.; Valacchi, G.; Bocci, V.

    2010-01-01

    Although orthodox medicine has provided a variety of topical anti-infective agents, some of them have become scarcely effective owing to antibiotic- and chemotherapeutic-resistant pathogens. For more than a century, ozone has been known to be an excellent disinfectant that nevertheless had to be used with caution for its oxidizing properties. Only during the last decade it has been learned how to tame its great reactivity by precisely dosing its concentration and permanently incorporating the gas into triglycerides where gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated substrates leading to therapeutically active ozonated derivatives. Today the stability and efficacy of the ozonated oils have been already demonstrated, but owing to a plethora of commercial products, the present paper aims to analyze these derivatives suggesting the strategy to obtain products with the best characteristics. PMID:20671923

  11. Dobson spectrophotometer ozone measurements during international ozone rocketsonde intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the total ozone content of the atmosphere, made with seven ground based instruments at a site near Wallops Island, Virginia, are discussed in terms for serving as control values with which the rocketborne sensor data products can be compared. These products are profiles of O3 concentration with altitude. By integrating over the range of altitudes from the surface to the rocket apogee and by appropriately estimating the residual ozone amount from apogee to the top of the atmosphere, a total ozone amount can be computed from the profiles that can be directly compared with the ground based instrumentation results. Dobson spectrophotometers were used for two of the ground-based instruments. Preliminary data collected during the IORI from Dobson spectrophotometers 72 and 38 are presented. The agreement between the two and the variability of total ozone overburden through the experiment period are discussed.

  12. Indoor ozone/terpene reactions as a source of indoor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, Helen C.

    This paper reports effects of reactions between ozone and selected terpenes on the concentrations and size distributions of airborne particles in a typical indoor setting. The studies were conducted in adjacent, identical offices. In the first set of experiments, known concentrations of ozone and a selected terpene (either d-limonene, α-terpinene, or a terpene-based cleaner whose major constituent is α-pinene) were deliberately introduced into one of the offices while the other office served as a control. Subsequent particle formation and redistribution were monitored with an eight-channel optical particle counter. Particle formation was observed in each terpene system, but was greatest in the case of d-limonene. The number of particles in the 0.1-0.2 μm diameter size range was as much as 20 times larger in the office with deliberately supplemented ozone and d-limonene than in the office serving as the control. The concentration differences in the larger size ranges developed with time, indicating the importance of coagulation and condensation processes in this indoor environment. In the second set of experiments, d-limonene was deliberately introduced into one of the offices, but ozone was not supplemented in either office; instead, the indoor ozone concentrations were those that happened to be present (primarily as a consequence of outdoor-to-indoor transport). In the office that contained supplemental d-limonene, the concentrations of the 0.1-0.2 μm particles tracked those of indoor ozone (the limiting reagent) and were as much as 10 times greater than levels measured in the comparable office that did not contain supplemental d-limonene. The results demonstrate that ozone/ terpene reactions can be a significant source of sub-micron particles in indoor settings, and further illustrate the potential for reactions among commonly occurring indoor pollutants to markedly influence indoor environments.

  13. Sensitivity Studies for Assimilated Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Winslow, Nathan; Wargan, Krzysztof; Rood, Richard; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    An ozone data assimilation system at the NASA/Goddard Data Assimilation Office (DAO) produces three-dimensional global ozone fields. They are obtained by assimilating ozone retrieved from the Solar Backscatter UltraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument and the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) measurements into an off-line parameterized chemistry and transport model. In this talk we focus on the quality of lower stratospheric assimilated ozone profiles. Ozone in the lower stratosphere plays a key role in the forcing of climate. A biased ozone field in this region will adversely impact calculations of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange and, when used as a first guess in retrievals, the values determined from satellite observations. The SBUV/2 ozone data have a coarse vertical resolution with increased uncertainty below the ozone maximum, and TOMS provides only total ozone columns. Thus, the assimilated ozone profiles in the lower stratosphere are only weakly constrained by the incoming SBUV and TOMS data. Consequently, the assimilated ozone distribution should be sensitive to changes in inputs to the statistical analysis scheme. We investigate the sensitivity of assimilated ozone profiles to changes in a variety of system inputs: TOMS and SBUV/2 data selection, forecast and observations error covariance models, inclusion or omission of a parameterized chemistry model, and different versions of DAO assimilated wind fields used to drive the transport model. Comparisons of assimilated ozone fields with independent observations, primarily ozone sondes, are used to determine the impact of each of these changes.

  14. Raman Lidar (RL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK

    2009-03-01

    The Raman lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (SGPRL) is an active, ground-based laser remote sensing instrument that measures height and time resolved profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and several cloud- and aerosol-related quantities. The system is a non-commercial custom-built instrument developed by Sandia National Laboratories specifically for the ARM Program. It is fully computer automated, and will run unattended for many days following a brief (~5-minute) startup period. The self-contained system (requiring only external electrical power) is housed in a climate-controlled 8’x8’x20’ standard shipping container.

  15. Stimulated rotational Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, C. G.; Rafanelli, G. L.; Capps, D. M.; Drutman, C.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering (SRRS) processes on high energy laser directed energy weapon systems was studied. The program had 3 main objectives; achieving an accurate description of the physical processes involved in SRRS; developing a numerical algorithm to confidently evaluate SRRS-induced losses in the propagation of high energy laser beams in the uplink and downlink segments of the optical trains of various strategic defense system scenarios; and discovering possible methods to eliminate, or at least reduce, the deleterious effects of SRRS on the energy deposition on target. The following topics are discussed: the motivation for the accomplishments of the DOE program; the Semiclassical Theory of Non-Resonant SRRS for Diatomic Homonuclear Molecules; and then the following appendices; Calculation of the Dipole Transition Reduced Matrix Element, Guided Tour of Hughes SRRS Code, Running the Hughes SRRS Code, and Hughes SRRS Code Listing.

  16. Raman imaging of extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Alian; Korotev, Randy L.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Ling, Zongcheng

    2015-07-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been proposed and is under extensive development for surface exploration missions to planetary bodies of our Solar System. It reveals information on molecular structure and chemistry. The spatial distribution of molecular species in natural geological samples and planetary materials has significance for the geological processes by which they formed. Raman imaging is the best way to combine the molecular identification and characterization of geologic materials with their spatial distribution. This paper reports Raman imaging studies of five types of extraterrestrial materials and three terrestrial samples using a state-of-the-art Raman imaging system. The Raman spectral features of major, minor, and trace species in these samples, together with their spatial correlations revealed by these Raman imaging studies indicate the genetic relationships and the geological processes that these materials have been experienced. For robotic planetary surface exploration mission, a simple yet very useful molecular map of a sample can be generated by using line-scan or grid-scan of an in situ Raman system with tightly focused laser beam.

  17. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  18. Cherenkov-Raman maser. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, K.O.

    1980-05-01

    The first observations of coherent microwave radiation resulting from Cherenkov-Raman backscattering have been made and are reported. An extensive experimental investigation of vacuum Raman backscattering has also been made. Theoretical models are presented to calculate the frequency and the gain at interaction for both the Raman and the Cerenkov-Raman backscattering interactions. Experimental data are compared to theoretical predictions.

  19. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Linda Anne; Connatser, Raynella Magdalene; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  20. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

  1. Airborne wavemeter validation and calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, Joseph H., Jr.; Rinsland, Pamela L.; Kist, Edward H., Jr.; Geier, Erika B.; Banziger, Curtis G.

    1992-01-01

    This manuscript outlines a continuing effort to validate and verify the performance of an airborne autonomous wavemeter for tuning solid state lasers to a desired wavelength. The application is measuring the vertical profiles of atmospheric water vapor using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. Improved wavemeter performance data for varying ambient temperatures are presented. This resulted when the electronic grounding and shielding were improved. The results with short pulse duration lasers are also included. These lasers show that similar performance could be obtained with lasers operating in the continuous and the pulsed domains.

  2. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  3. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  4. Cyberinfrastructure for Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004 the NASA Airborne Science Program has been prototyping and using infrastructure that enables researchers to interact with each other and with their instruments via network communications. This infrastructure uses satellite links and an evolving suite of applications and services that leverage open-source software. The use of these tools has increased near-real-time situational awareness during field operations, resulting in productivity improvements and the collection of better data. This paper describes the high-level system architecture and major components, with example highlights from the use of the infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of ongoing efforts to transition to operational status.

  5. Requirements for airborne vector gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Colombo, O.; Hein, G.; Knickmeyer, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

  6. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of shocked water

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Graham, W.B.; Walrafen, G.E.

    1983-07-01

    Raman scattering has been used extensively to study the vibrational and rotational properties of molecules under a variety of conditions. Here, interest is in the behavior of water molecules shocked to high pressures and temperatures. Behind the shock front the water molecules undergo changes in bonding and the molecules may become ionized. Raman spectroscopy can be used to determine the molecular species behind the shock front. In addition, changes in Raman spectra can yield information regarding inter- and intramolecular potentials and the temperature behind the shock front.

  8. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. PMID:17205741

  9. Multicolor stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fa-Ke; Ji, Minbiao; Fu, Dan; Ni, Xiaohui; Freudiger, Christian W.; Holtom, Gary; Xie, X. Sunney

    2012-08-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has opened up a wide range of biochemical imaging applications by probing a particular Raman-active molecule vibrational mode in the specimen. However, the original implementation with picosecond pulse excitation can only realize rapid chemical mapping with a single Raman band. Here we present a novel SRS microscopic technique using a grating-based pulse shaper for excitation and a grating-based spectrograph for detection to achieve simultaneous multicolor SRS imaging with high sensitivity and high acquisition speeds. In particular, we use a linear combination of the measured CH2 and CH3 stretching signals to map the distributions of protein and lipid contents simultaneously.

  10. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations.

  11. Toolsets for Airborne Data - URS and New Documentation

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-03-23

    ... airborne field missions, documentation, and EOSDIS User Registration System (URS) authentication. This web application features an intuitive user interface for variable selection across different airborne field studies and ...

  12. Air Quality Guide for Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... is one of our nation’s most common air pollutants. Use the chart below to help reduce your ... human health. Ozone forms when two types of pollutants (VOCs and NOx) react in sunlight. These pollutants ...

  13. A search For Artic ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Four atmospheric scientists took off with their instruments for Greenland last week, where they will try to see if depletion of stratospheric ozone in the Arctic can be detected as it has been in Antarctica since 1985.Members of the scientific team include Susan Solomon and George Mount of the Aeronomy Laboratory at the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA) in Boulder, Colo., and Ryan Sanders and Roger Jakoubec of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science in Norman, Okla. These four participated in previous National Ozone Expedition (NOZE) investigations at McMurdo Station in Antarctica that helped document the ozone “hole,” decreases of up to 50% in ozone during the early austral spring in September and October of the last 2 years (1986-1987).

  14. Ozonation of cooling tower waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; French, K. R.; Howe, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Continuous ozone injection into water circulating between a cooling tower and heat exchanger with heavy scale deposits inhibits formation of further deposits, promotes flaking of existing deposits, inhibits chemical corrosion and controls algae and bacteria.

  15. Biological effects of ozone reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of increased UV radiation on the biosphere are described with ongoing research, and research areas that should be investigated. Some mention is also made of the potential climatic effects of ozone reduction on agriculture and the biosphere.

  16. Ozone - Current Air Quality Index

    MedlinePlus

    ... reducing exposure to extremely high levels of particle pollution is available here . Fires: Current Conditions Click to ... Air Quality Basics Air Quality Index | Ozone | Particle Pollution | Smoke from fires | What You Can Do Health ...

  17. Meeting Review: Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Huebert, Barry; Wilson, Chuck

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings from the Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop are presented. The two central topics of discussion were the role of aerosols in atmospheric processes and the difficulties in characterizing aerosols. The following topics were discussed during the working sessions: airborne observations to date; identification of inlet design issues; inlet modeling needs and directions; objectives for aircraft experiments; and future laboratory and wind tunnel studies.

  18. Airborne Relay-Based Regional Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuman; Noh, Hongjun; Lim, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based pseudolite systems have some limitations, such as low vertical accuracy, multipath effects and near-far problems. These problems are not significant in airborne-based pseudolite systems. However, the monitoring of pseudolite positions is required because of the mobility of the platforms on which the pseudolites are mounted, and this causes performance degradation. To address these pseudolite system limitations, we propose an airborne relay-based regional positioning system that consists of a master station, reference stations, airborne relays and a user. In the proposed system, navigation signals are generated from the reference stations located on the ground and are relayed via the airborne relays. Unlike in conventional airborne-based systems, the user in the proposed system sequentially estimates both the locations of airborne relays and his/her own position. Therefore, a delay due to monitoring does not occur, and the accuracy is not affected by the movement of airborne relays. We conducted several simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. Based on the simulation results, we demonstrated that the proposed system guarantees a higher accuracy than airborne-based pseudolite systems, and it is feasible despite the existence of clock offsets among reference stations. PMID:26029953

  19. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  20. Global Test Range: Toward Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Freudinger, Larry; DelFrate John H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planned global sensor network that will monitor the Earth's climate, and resources using airborne sensor systems. The vision is an intelligent, affordable Earth Observation System. Global Test Range is a lab developing trustworthy services for airborne instruments - a specialized Internet Service Provider. There is discussion of several current and planned missions.

  1. A Simple Method for Collecting Airborne Pollen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Peter G.; DiGiovanni, Franco; Ho, Rong H.; Taki, Hisatomo; Ferguson, Kristyn A.; Pawlowski, Agata K.

    2006-01-01

    Pollination is a broad area of study within biology. For many plants, pollen carried by wind is required for successful seed set. Airborne pollen also affects human health. To foster studies of airborne pollen, we introduce a simple device--the "megastigma"--for collecting pollen from the air. This device is flexible, yielding easily obtained data…

  2. The Continuous wavelet in airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Liu, L.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne gravimetry is an efficient method to recover medium and high frequency band of earth gravity over any region, especially inaccessible areas, which can measure gravity data with high accuracy,high resolution and broad range in a rapidly and economical way, and It will play an important role for geoid and geophysical exploration. Filtering methods for reducing high-frequency errors is critical to the success of airborne gravimetry due to Aircraft acceleration determination based on GPS.Tradiontal filters used in airborne gravimetry are FIR,IIR filer and so on. This study recommends an improved continuous wavelet to process airborne gravity data. Here we focus on how to construct the continuous wavelet filters and show their working principle. Particularly the technical parameters (window width parameter and scale parameter) of the filters are tested. Then the raw airborne gravity data from the first Chinese airborne gravimetry campaign are filtered using FIR-low pass filter and continuous wavelet filters to remove the noise. The comparison to reference data is performed to determinate external accuracy, which shows that continuous wavelet filters applied to airborne gravity in this thesis have good performances. The advantages of the continuous wavelet filters over digital filters are also introduced. The effectiveness of the continuous wavelet filters for airborne gravimetry is demonstrated through real data computation.

  3. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  4. Understanding ozone formation and the radical budget during oil sands plume transport in the Athabasca region of Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, S. G.; Leithead, A.; Li, S. M.; Wang, D. K.; O'brien, J.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liu, P.; Liggio, J.

    2015-12-01

    The sources of ozone and hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the Alberta oil sands (OS) region have not previously been well characterized. In the summer of 2013, airborne measurements of various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2+NO) and ozone were made in the Athabasca OS region between August 13 and September 7, 2013. Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) and whole air samples were used to measure VOCs. A box model incorporating the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.3), was constrained by measured chemical species and meteorological parameters and used to simulate the evolution of an OS plume. In doing so, an improved understanding of the chemical factors controlling the radical budget and the evolution of ozone in oil sands plumes is achieved. Our results indicate that approximately 20% of the in-plume generated OH radicals are derived from primary sources (HCHO, O3 and HONO photolysis). The remaining OH is derived from the recycling of hydroperoxyl radical (HO2). The HO2 and alkyl peroxyl radical (RO2) chemistry leads to 35% of the ozone formation in the plume, while the main sink for ozone in the plume was via reactions with alkenes (anthropogenic and biogenic). The results of this work will help to characterize ozone formation and the factors influencing its atmospheric fate in the oil sands region.

  5. Method of sterilization using ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods of using ozone have been developed which sterilize instruments and medical wastes, oxidize, organics found in wastewater, clean laundry, break down contaminants in soil into a form more readily digested by microbes, kill microorganisms present in food products, and destroy toxins present in food products. The preferred methods for killing microorganism and destroying toxins use pressurized, humidified, and concentrated ozone produced by an electrochemical cell.

  6. Ozone Treatment For Cooling Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwelder, Rick; Baldwin, Leroy V.; Feeney, Ellen S.

    1990-01-01

    Report presents results of study of cooling tower in which water treated with ozone instead of usual chemical agents. Bacteria and scale reduced without pollution and at low cost. Operating and maintenance costs with treatment about 30 percent of those of treatment by other chemicals. Corrosion rates no greater than with other chemicals. Advantage of ozone, even though poisonous, quickly detected by smell in very low concentrations.

  7. Using ozone to treat cooling tower water

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, L.

    1995-07-01

    Ozone is a controversial but promising alternative to chemicals for treating water in cooling towers. A powerful disinfectant, ozone can prevent biofouling of heat exchange surfaces, and may mitigate scale and corrosion. Ozone treatment of cooling towers can cut costs for energy, water, sewage, and regulatory compliance. Ozone treatment is an electrotechnology, but ozone equipment represents only a small electric load. Although ozone has provided excellent results in some cooling tower applications, its effectiveness has not been proven conclusively. Less than 1,000 cooling towers use ozone water treatment in the United States. Acceptance of this technology is increasing, however, as indicated by its use by such large firms as IBM, AT and T, DuPont, and Xerox, and by its adoption by some chemical water treatment suppliers. The energy efficiency implications of ozone treatment are being researched. Southern California Edison found that in some systems, ozone treatment improved chiller efficiency up to 20 percent due to cleaner heat exchange surfaces.

  8. Corona Discharge Influences Ozone Concentrations Near Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gaither, Kari A.; Anantatmula, Shantha M.; Mong, Gary M.; Sasser, Lyle B.; Lessor, Delbert L.

    2004-02-26

    Ozone is produced by corona discharge in air. Its production is enhanced near grounded water. Whether grounded animals behave like grounded water, producing more ozone was investigated. Rats were exposed to corona discharge in a plastic cage. The concentration of ozone in the gas phase was monitored. The ozone concentration exceeded ambient levels only in the presence of corona discharge and either rats or water. When water or rats were exposed to corona discharge, ozone levels were more than 10 times higher than controls. Ozone levels increased rapidly with applied voltage. There was also a correlation between the distance of the corona needle to the rats and the amount of ozone produced. As the distance increased, ozone production decreased. These results are discussed in relation to the potential exposure of mammals to ozone in the vicinity of corona discharge and electric fields.

  9. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.

  10. The 2002 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Nash, E. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million km2. This area is most strongly controlled by levels of inorganic chlorine and bromine oncentrations. In addition, dynamical variations modulate the size of the ozone hole by either cooling or warming the polar vortex collar region. We will review the size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. Using a simple trajectory model, we will demonstrate the sensitivity of the ozone hole to dynamical forcing, and we will use these observations to discuss the size of the ozone hole during the 2002 Austral spring. We will further show how the Cly decreases in the stratosphere will cause the ozone hole to decrease by 1-1.5% per year. We will also show results from a 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) that has been continuously run since 1999. These CTM results directly show how strong dynamics acts to reduce the size of the ozone hole.

  11. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  12. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  13. Airborne cw Doppler lidar (ADOLAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Stefan; Werner, Christian; Nagel, E.; Herrmann, H.; Klier, M.; Knott, H. P.; Haering, R.; Wildgruber, J.

    1994-12-01

    During the last 10 years the DLR container LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometer) was used for many wind related measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. The experience out of this were used to construct an airborne Doppler lidar ADOLAR. Based on the available Doppler lidars it is now proposed to perform a campaign to demonstrate the concept of the spaceborne sensor ALADIN, and to answer some questions concerning the signal quality from clouds, water and land. For the continuous wave CO2 laser, the energy is focused by the telescope into the region of investigation. Some of the radiation is back scattered by small aerosol particles drifting with the wind speed through the sensing volume. The back scattered radiation is collected by the telescope and detected by coherent technique. With the laser Doppler method one gets the radial wind component. To determine the magnitude and direction of the horizontal wind, some form of scanning in azimuth and elevation is required. To keep the airborne system compact, the transceiver optics is directly coupled to a wedge scanner which provides the conical scan with the axis in Nadir direction from the aircraft. The system ADOLAR was tested in 1994. Results of the flight over the lake Ammersee are presented and are compared with the data of the inertial reference system of the aircraft.

  14. Airborne thermography applications in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Eduardo H.; Selles, Eduardo J.; Costanzo, Marcelo; Franco, Oscar; Diaz, Jose

    2002-03-01

    Forest fires in summer and sheep buried under the snow in winter have become important problems in the south of our country, in the region named Patagonia. We are studying to find a solution by means of an airborne imaging system whose construction we have just finished. It is a 12 channel multispectral airborne scanner system that can be mounted in a Guarani airplane or in a Learjet; the first is a non- pressurized aircraft for flight at low height and the second is a pressurized one for higher flights. The scanner system is briefly described. Their sensors can detect radiation from the ultra violet to the thermal infrared. The images are visualized in real time in a monitor screen and can be stored in the hard disc of the PC for later processing. The use of this scanner for some applications that include the prevention and fighting of forest fires and the study of the possibility of detection of sheep under snow in the Patagonia is now being accomplished. Theoretical and experimental results in fire detection and a theoretical model for studying the possibility of detection of the buried sheep are presented.

  15. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes–anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  16. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines.

  17. Raman spectroscopy in halophile research.

    PubMed

    Jehlička, Jan; Oren, Aharon

    2013-12-10

    Raman spectroscopy plays a major role in robust detection of biomolecules and mineral signatures in halophile research. An overview of Raman spectroscopic investigations in halophile research of the last decade is given here to show advantages of the approach, progress made as well as limits of the technique. Raman spectroscopy is an excellent tool to monitor and identify microbial pigments and other biomolecules in extant and extinct halophile biomass. Studies of bottom gypsum crusts from salterns, native evaporitic sediments, halite inclusions, and endoliths as well as cultures of halophilic microorganisms permitted to understand the content, distribution, and behavior of important molecular species. The first papers describing Raman spectroscopic detection of microbiological and geochemical key markers using portable instruments are highlighted as well.

  18. Raman spectroscopy in halophile research

    PubMed Central

    Jehlička, Jan; Oren, Aharon

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy plays a major role in robust detection of biomolecules and mineral signatures in halophile research. An overview of Raman spectroscopic investigations in halophile research of the last decade is given here to show advantages of the approach, progress made as well as limits of the technique. Raman spectroscopy is an excellent tool to monitor and identify microbial pigments and other biomolecules in extant and extinct halophile biomass. Studies of bottom gypsum crusts from salterns, native evaporitic sediments, halite inclusions, and endoliths as well as cultures of halophilic microorganisms permitted to understand the content, distribution, and behavior of important molecular species. The first papers describing Raman spectroscopic detection of microbiological and geochemical key markers using portable instruments are highlighted as well. PMID:24339823

  19. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes-anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  20. Kinetic Crystallography by Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Paul R.; Chen, Yuanyuan; Gong, Bo; Kalp, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectra, obtained using a Raman microscope, offer an unique and incisive approach to follow interactions and reactions inside a single crystal under soak-in or soak-out conditions. The utility of this approach derives from the finding that the Raman spectra from single macromolecular crystals, under normal (non-resonance) conditions, are extremely stable, with a low “light background,” and provide ideal platforms for Raman difference spectroscopy. In turn, this allows the interrogation of sub-molecular changes in very large and complex macromolecular environments. There is often great synergy with X-ray crystallography, with the Raman spectroscopist providing crystallography colleagues with the best soak-in conditions to generate a targeted intermediate for flash freezing and X-ray analysis. On the other hand, X-ray structures at points along a reaction pathway provide invaluable benchmarks for interpreting the Raman data from populations seen by Raman to be changing in real-time. These principles will be illustrated by two reactions: The first involves a complex, branching reaction pathway underlying the inhibition of β-lactamases by clinically important pharmaceutical compounds, where different combinations of drug and enzyme function in different regions of the pathway. The second shows how temporal data can be derived for several events in the initiation step of RNA synthesis—more specifically, when one GTP molecule is joined to one ATP molecule to form a G•A dimer in the active site of a 115,000 Dalton crystalline RNA polymerase. Finally, we will summarize the extension of Raman microscopy to nucleic acid crystals and the information that has been obtained for RNA-based enzymes. PMID:20797452

  1. Raman investigation of diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li-Ming

    1993-12-31

    Extensive Raman investigations were conducted on a wide range of diamond films whose structures were dilineated by optical and confocal microscopy. The Raman Spectra from one extreme of this range indicates a very intense 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} line diagnostic of bulk crystalline diamond. Microscopy of the corresponding film shows the presence of many large true diamond crystallite. The 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} Raman line at the other extreme of the range, however, is virtually absent. It is replaced, at this extreme, by a very broad Raman contour whose maxima occur near 1355 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1575 cm{sup {minus}1}. Optical microscopy now reveals a complete lack of diamond crystallites. The ratio of the integrated Raman intensity of the 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} diamond line to the integral of the entire broad contour extending from {approx}1200 cm{sup {minus}1} to 1800 cm{sup {minus}1}, with maxima near 1355 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1575 cm{sup {minus}1}, was determined. This ratio rises with increasing diamond crystallite size, and it decreases as true diamond crystallites are replaced by diamond-like, but amorphous, hard carbon, which produces the broad Raman contour. The measured intensity ratio was analyzed in terms of a differential equation related to phonon coupling. The increase of the intensity ratio of the 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} diagnostic diamond peak is due to phono-phonon coupling between the diamond crystallites, as the concentration of the amorphous diamond-like carbon decreases. Confocal microscopy indicates many amorphous-like regions interspersed between diamond crystallites which account for the intensity loss, and agree with the Raman intensity measurements. These Raman measurements crystallinity versus amorphous hard-carbon character of thin diamond film.

  2. TOMS: The Antarctic ozone hole and ozone trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument aboard Nimbus 7 has proved invaluable for the investigation of the recent rapid decline in the springtime total ozone over the Antarctic. The principle problem discussed is that of observing the atmosphere over long periods of time to determine whether or not trends and/or slow oscillations are taking place. Total ozone is an excellent summary parameter for the state of the stratosphere. It responds to temperature changes, and in the long term, is expected to respond to chemical changes. Thus, when changes take place in total ozone, such as the springtime Antarctic decrease it is a clear indication of an important problem, both because of environmental potential and scientific importance. TOMS is actually an overkill for this problem. Significantly more data is taken than is necessary. Tests have shown that maps produced on a 2 by 4 degree grid are essentially equivalent to those produced from the entire gridded data set. Because the critical aspect of the search for changes in ozone is continuous data, reflight of a polar orbiting TOMS is important. Included in the flight should be a stratospheric temperature sensor and, if possible, a modification to obtain some ozone altitude information. A critical aspect of the problem is timeliness of the data. This is the only drawback of the existing TOMS. It is expected that in the very near future the processing will be done within two weeks of real time. This is critical to the process of discovery of phenomena such as the Antarctic ozone hole.

  3. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  4. The 1991 Antarctic ozone hole - TOMS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Schoeberl, Mark; Newman, Paul; Stolarski, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Antarctic springtime ozone decline, as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), was similar to those of earlier deep ozone hole years, 1987, 1989, and 1990. The minimum total ozone value was recorded on October 5, 1991 at 108 Dobson units near the South Pole. This was 8 DU lower than in any of the earlier years. Four of the last five years have exhibited an extensive, deep ozone hole. The area of the hole was about the same as in 1987, 1989, and 1990. The recovery of the low total ozone values occurred in mid-November as the polar vortex broke up.

  5. Impact of downward-mixing ozone on surface ozone accumulation in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ho

    2008-04-01

    The ozone that initially presents in the previous day's afternoon mixing layer can remain in the nighttime atmosphere and then be carried over to the next morning. Finally, this ozone can be brought to the ground by downward mixing as mixing depth increases during the daytime, thereby increasing surface ozone concentrations. Variation of ozone concentration during each of these periods is investigated in this work. First, ozone concentrations existing in the daily early morning atmosphere at the altitude range of the daily maximum mixing depth (residual ozone concentrations) were measured using tethered ozonesondes on 52 experimental days during 2004-2005 in southern Taiwan. Daily downward-mixing ozone concentrations were calculated by a box model coupling the measured daily residual ozone concentrations and daily mixing depth variations. The ozone concentrations upwind in the previous day's afternoon mixing layer were estimated by the combination of back air trajectory analysis and known previous day's surface ozone distributions. Additionally, the relationship between daily downward-mixing ozone concentration and daily photochemically produced ozone concentration was examined. The latter was calculated by removing the former from daily surface maximum ozone concentration. The measured daily residual ozone concentrations distributed at 12-74 parts per billion (ppb) with an average of 42 +/- 17 ppb are well correlated with the previous upwind ozone concentration (R2 = 0.54-0.65). Approximately 60% of the previous upwind ozone was estimated to be carried over to the next morning and became the observed residual ozone. The daily downward-mixing ozone contributes 48 +/- 18% of the daily surface maximum ozone concentration, indicating that the downward-mixing ozone is as important as daily photochemically produced ozone to daily surface maximum ozone accumulation. The daily downward-mixing ozone is poorly correlated with the daily photochemically produced ozone and

  6. Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David; Clayton, Marian; Schmid, Beat; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Orgren, John; Andrews, Elisabeth; Goldsmith, John E. M.; Jonsson, Hafidi

    2006-01-01

    Raman lidar water vapor and aerosol extinction profiles acquired during the daytime over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern Oklahoma (36.606 N, 97.50 W, 315 m) are evaluated using profiles measured by in situ and remote sensing instruments deployed during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (IOP). The automated algorithms used to derive these profiles from the Raman lidar data were first modified to reduce the adverse effects associated with a general loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar since early 2002. The Raman lidar water vapor measurements, which are calibrated to match precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from coincident microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements were, on average, 5-10% (0.3-0.6 g/m(exp 3) higher than the other measurements. Some of this difference is due to out-of-date line parameters that were subsequently updated in the MWR PWV retrievals. The Raman lidar aerosol extinction measurements were, on average, about 0.03 km(exp -1) higher than aerosol measurements derived from airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical thickness and in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption. This bias, which was about 50% of the mean aerosol extinction measured during this IOP, decreased to about 10% when aerosol extinction comparisons were restricted to aerosol extinction values larger than 0.15 km(exp -1). The lidar measurements of the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio and airborne Sun photometer measurements of the aerosol optical thickness were used along with in situ measurements of the aerosol size distribution to retrieve estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo (omega(sub o)) and the effective complex refractive index. Retrieved values of omega(sub o) ranged from (0.91-0.98) and were in generally good agreement with omega(sub o) derived from airborne in situ measurements of scattering and absorption. Elevated aerosol

  7. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  8. Resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Kitagawa, Teizo

    2014-01-01

    Flavin is a general name given to molecules having the heteroaromatic ring system of 7,8-dimethylisoalloxazine but practically means riboflavin (Rfl), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in biological systems, whose structures are illustrated in Fig. 1, together with the atomic numbering scheme and ring numbering of the isoalloxazine moiety. As the isoalloxazine skeleton cannot be synthesized in human cells, it is obtained from diet as Rfl (vitamin B2). FAD and FMN can act as cofactors in flavoenzymes but Rfl does not. Most flavoenzymes catalyze redox reactions of substrates (Miura, Chem Rec 1:183-194, 2001). When O2 serves as the oxidant in the oxidation half cycle of an enzymic reaction, the enzyme is called "flavo-oxidase" but when others do, the enzyme is called "flavo-dehydrogenase." The difference between the two types of oxidative catalysis arises from delicate differences in the π-electron distributions in the isoalloxazine ring, which can be revealed by Raman spectroscopy (Miura, Chem Rec 1:183-194, 2001). Since a flavin is an extremely versatile molecule, the scientific field including chemistry, biochemistry, and enzymology is collectively called "flavonology." It was found recently, however, that the flavin also acts as a chromophore to initiate light-induced DNA repair and signal transductions (Sancar, Chem Rev 103:2203-2237, 2003).

  9. Distribution of total ozone and stratospheric ozone in the tropics - Implications for the distribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack; Larsen, Jack C.

    1987-01-01

    Climatologies of total columnar ozone and integrated stratospheric ozone amounts at low latitudes (15 deg N to 15 deg S), derived from satellite observations, are presented. A significant longitudinal variability in total ozone is present, with highest values generally located between 60 deg W and 60 deg E. The integrated stratospheric component of total ozone, on the other hand, does not exhibit a longitudinal preference for high values. Therefore it is hypothesized that the climatological longitudinal distribution of total ozone reflects the variability of the abundance of tropospheric ozone at low latitudes. Furthermore, it is speculated that in situ photochemical production of ozone resulting from biomass burning may be responsible for the observed enhancement of total ozone at these longitudes.

  10. Assimilation of MLS and OMI Ozone Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.-P.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone data from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were assimilated into the ozone model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). This assimilation produces ozone fields that are superior to those from the operational GMAO assimilation of Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument data. Assimilation of Aura data improves the representation of the "ozone hole" and the agreement with independent Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III and ozone sonde data. Ozone in the lower stratosphere is captured better: mean state, vertical gradients, spatial and temporal variability are all improved. Inclusion of OMI and MLS data together, or separately, in the assimilation system provides a way of checking how consistent OMI and MLS data are with each other, and with the ozone model. We found that differences between OMI total ozone column data and model forecasts decrease after MLS data are assimilated. This indicates that MLS stratospheric ozone profiles are consistent with OMI total ozone columns. The evaluation of error characteristics of OMI and MLS ozone will continue as data from newer versions of retrievals becomes available. We report on the initial step in obtaining global assimilated ozone fields that combine measurements from different Aura instruments, the ozone model at the GMAO, and their respective error characteristics. We plan to use assimilated ozone fields in estimation of tropospheric ozone. We also plan to investigate impacts of assimilated ozone fields on numerical weather prediction through their use in radiative models and in the assimilation of infrared nadir radiance data from NASA's Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS).

  11. Bioassaying for ozone with pollen systems.

    PubMed Central

    Feder, W A

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity to ozone of pollen germinating in vitro is closely correlated with ozone sensitivity of the pollen parent. Ozone-sensitive and tolerant pollen populations have been identified in tobacco, petunia, and tomato cultivars. The rate of tube elongation can be reversibly slowed or stopped by exposure to low concentrations of ozone. Tube growth rates in the presence of a range of ozone dosages, of pollen populations exhibiting differing ozone sensitivity can be measured and different growth rates can be correlated with ozone dosages. The performance of selected pollen populations can then be used to bioassay ozone in ambient air by introducing the air sample into a growth chamber where ozone-sensitive pollen in growing. Petunia and tobacco pollen are especially useful because they store well at ordinary freezer temperatures and do not require special preparation prior to storage. Modified Brewbacker's growth medium is suitable for growth of both these pollen types. Four useful cultivars are Bel W-3, ozone-sensitive and Bel B, ozone-tolerant tobacco, and White Bountiful, ozone-sensitive and Blue Lagoon, ozone-tolerant petunia. Observations can be made directly by using a TV scanner, or by time lapse or interval photography. Year-round pollen production can be achieved in the greenhouse. Harvested pollen can be tested, packaged, and transported to user facilities without loss of vigor. Pollen populations are inexpensive to produce, respond reliably, and are simple to use as a bioassay for air quality. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:7460876

  12. A Study on Generation Ice Containing Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Koyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiromi

    Ozone has the capability of sterilization and deodorization due to high oxidation power. It is also effective for the conservation of perishable foods and purification of water. However, ozone has a disadvantage, that is, conservation of ozone is difficult because it changes back into oxygen. Recently, ice containing ozone is taken attention for the purpose of its conservation. The use of ice containing ozone seems to keep food fresher when we conserve and transport perishable foods due to effects of cooling and sterilization of ice containing ozone. In the present study, we investigated the influence of temperatures of water dissolving ozone on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in water. We also investigated the influence of cooling temperature, ice diameter, initial temperatures of water dissolving ozone and container internal pressure of the water dissolving ozone on ozone concentration in the ice. In addition, we investigated the influence of the ice diameter on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in the ice. It was confirmed that the solidification experimental data can be adjusted by a correlation between ozone concentration in the ice and solidification time.

  13. Health effects of particulate air pollution and airborne desert dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Pozzer, A.; Giannadaki, D.; Fnais, M.

    2013-12-01

    Air pollution by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has increased strongly with industrialization and urbanization. In the past decades this increase has taken place at a particularly high pace in South and East Asia. We estimate the premature mortality and the years of human life lost (YLL) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 and airborne desert dust (DU2.5) on regional and national scales (Giannadaki et al., 2013; Lelieveld et al., 2013). This is based on high-resolution global model calculations that resolve urban and industrial regions in relatively great detail. We apply an epidemiological health impact function and find that especially in large countries with extensive suburban and rural populations, air pollution-induced mortality rates have been underestimated given that previous studies largely focused on the urban environment. We calculate a global premature mortality by anthropogenic aerosols of 2.2 million/year (YLL ≈ 16 million/year) due to lung cancer and cardiopulmonary disease. High mortality rates by PM2.5 are found in China, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Indonesia. Desert dust DU2.5 aerosols add about 0.4 million/year (YLL ≈ 3.6 million/year). Particularly significant mortality rates by DU2.5 occur in Pakistan, China and India. The estimated global mean per capita mortality caused by airborne particulates is about 0.1%/year (about two thirds of that caused by tobacco smoking). We show that the highest premature mortality rates are found in the Southeast Asia and Western Pacific regions (about 25% and 46% of the global rate, respectively) where more than a dozen of the most highly polluted megacities are located. References: Giannadaki, D., A. Pozzer, and J. Lelieveld, Modeled global effects of airborne desert dust on air quality and premature mortality, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss. (submitted), 2013. Lelieveld, J., C. Barlas, D. Giannadaki, and A. Pozzer, Model calculated global, regional and megacity premature mortality due to air pollution by ozone

  14. Observing Tropospheric Ozone From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The importance of tropospheric ozone embraces a spectrum of relevant scientific issues ranging from local environmental concerns, such as damage to the biosphere and human health, to those that impact global change questions, Such is climate warming. From an observational perspective, the challenge is to determine the tropospheric ozone global distribution. Because its lifetime is short compared with other important greenhouse gases that have been monitored over the past several decades, the distribution of tropospheric ozone cannot be inferred from a relatively small set of monitoring stations. Therefore, the best way to obtain a true global picture is from the use of space-based instrumentation where important spatial gradients over vast ocean expanses and other uninhabited areas can be properly characterized. In this paper, the development of the capability to measure tropospheric ozone from space over the past 15 years is summarized. Research in the late 1980s successfully led to the determination of the climatology of tropospheric ozone as a function of season; more recently, the methodology has improved to the extent where regional air pollution episodes can be characterized. The most recent modifications now provide quasi-global (50 N) to 50 S) maps on a daily basis. Such a data set would allow for the study of long-range (intercontinental) transport of air pollution and the quantification of how regional emissions feed into the global tropospheric ozone budget. Future measurement capabilities within this decade promise to offer the ability to provide Concurrent maps of the precursors to the in situ formation of tropospheric ozone from which the scientific community will gain unprecedented insight into the processes that control global tropospheric chemistry

  15. A mobile differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground-based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.), from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the DIAL technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm, with multiple receivers. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high-pressure hydrogen and deuterium, using helium as buffer gas. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range-resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange (STE) of ozone is shown, to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as to assess the validation and calibration of data. There was a low amount of aerosol aloft, and an iterative aerosol correction has been performed on the retrieved data, which resulted in less than a 3 ppb correction to the final ozone concentration. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0 to 1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5 to 3 km, and 11-25% from 3 to 12 km according to the relevant aerosol concentration aloft. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area.

  16. Study on Raman spectra of synthetic celluloses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Na; Zhu, Changjun; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of aliphatic polyamide fiber and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The results show that Raman peaks beyond 1200 cm-1 appear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sodium hydroxide, while the Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sulfuric acid. Raman peaks beyond 1750 cm-1 decrease for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sodium hydroxide, while Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear, except weak peaks around 3000 cm-1 , for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sulfuric acid. The variations of the Raman spectra are primarily related to the changes of chemical bonds and molecular structures.

  17. Long-Term Variability of Airborne Asian Dust Observed from TOMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Hsu, N. C.; Seftor, C. J.; Holben, B. N.; Holben, B. N.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that airborne Asian dust may not only play an important role in the regional radiation budget, but also influence the air quality over North America through long-range transport. In this paper, we use satellite data to investigate the long-term variability of airborne Asian dust as well as the daily variation of the dust aerosol distribution. By combining the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aerosol index with National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) wind data, our analysis shows a strong correlation between the generation of dust storms in the region and the passage of springtime weather fronts. This is consistent with earlier studies performed by other researchers. According to both the Nimbus-7 and Earth-Probe TOMS data the Takla Makan desert, the Gobi desert, and the and region of Inner Mongolia are major sources of the eastward-flowing airborne Asian dust. Heavily populated areas in eastern China (e.g., Beijing) are often on the primary path of the dust storms originating in these desert regions. The increasing desertification north of the Beijing region has served to exacerbate problems stemming from these storms. The time series derived from 20 years of TOMS aerosol index data shows the first significant satellite evidence of the atmospheric effect of increasing desertification, indicating that the amount of dust blown eastward has increased strongly during the past few years including the year 2000.

  18. Autonomous Ozone and Aerosol LIDAR Profiling of the Troposphere: A Synergistic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    LIDAR technology is an excellent tool to probe the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere at high spatial and temporal resolution. This provides the critical vertical context for the interpretation of ground-based chemistry measurements, airborne measurements and model/satellite verification and validation. In recent years, Environment Canada has designed several autonomous aerosol LIDAR systems for deployment across several regions of Canada. The current system builds on the successes of these autonomous LIDARS but using a synergistic approach by combining tropospheric ozone DIAL (Differential Absorption LIDAR) technology with simultaneous 3+2+1 aerosol LIDAR measurements. It operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week except during precipitation events. The system is operated remotely and the data are updated every hour to a website to allow near real-time capability. A few case studies are shown emphasizing the synergistic approach of coupling ozone and aerosol profiles to better understand air quality impacts on local and regional scales.

  19. Global deposition of airborne dioxin.

    PubMed

    Booth, Shawn; Hui, Joe; Alojado, Zoraida; Lam, Vicky; Cheung, William; Zeller, Dirk; Steyn, Douw; Pauly, Daniel

    2013-10-15

    We present a global dioxin model that simulates one year of atmospheric emissions, transport processes, and depositions to the earth's terrestrial and marine habitats. We map starting emission levels for each land area, and we also map the resulting deposits to terrestrial and marine environments. This model confirms that 'hot spots' of deposition are likely to be in northern Europe, eastern North America, and in parts of Asia with the highest marine dioxin depositions being the northeast and northwest Atlantic, western Pacific, northern Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean. It also reveals that approximately 40% of airborne dioxin emissions are deposited to marine environments and that many countries in Africa receive more dioxin than they produce, which results in these countries being disproportionately impacted. Since human exposure to dioxin is largely through diet, this work highlights food producing areas that receive higher atmospheric deposits of dioxin than others.

  20. The Sandia Airborne Computer (SANDAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Nava, E.J.

    1992-06-01

    The Sandia Airborne Computer (SANDAC) is a small, modular, high performance, multiprocessor computer originally designed for aerospace applications. It can use a combination of Motorola 68020 and 68040 based processor modules along with AT&T DSP32C based signal processing modules. The system is designed to use up to 15 processors in almost any combination and a complete system can include up to 20 modules. Depending on the mix of processors, total computational throughput can range from 2.5 to greater than 225 Million Instructions Per Second (MIPS). The system is designed so that processors can access all resources in the machine and the inter-processor communication details are completely transparent to the software. In addition to processors, the system includes input/output, memory, and special function modules. Because of its ease of use, small size, durability, and configuration flexibility, SANDAC has been used on applications ranging from missile navigation, guidance, and control systems to medical imaging systems.

  1. Modis-N airborne simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cech, Steven D.

    1992-01-01

    All required work associated with the above referenced contract has been successfully completed at this time. The Modis-N Airborne Simulator has been developed from existing AB184 Wildfire spectrometer parts as well as new detector arrays, optical components, and associated mechanical and electrical hardware. The various instrument components have been integrated into an operational system which has undergone extensive laboratory calibration and testing. The instrument has been delivered to NASA Ames where it will be installed on the NASA ER-2. The following paragraphs detail the specific tasks performed during the contract effort, the results obtained during the integration and testing of the instrument, and the conclusions which can be drawn from this effort.

  2. Comparison of measured ozone in southeastern Virginia with computer predictions from a photochemical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakelyn, N. T.; Gregory, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Data for one day of the 1977 southeastern Virginia urban plume study are compared with computer predictions from a traveling air parcel model using a contemporary photochemical mechanism with a minimal description of nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) constitution and chemistry. With measured initial NOx and O3 concentrations and a current separate estimate of urban source loading input to the model, and for a variation of initial NMHC over a reasonable range, an ozone increase over the day is predicted from the photochemical simulation which is consistent with the flight path averaged airborne data.

  3. OZONE GENERATORS IN INDOOR AIR SETTINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives information on home/office ozone generators. It discusses their current uses as amelioratives for environmental tobacco smoke, biocontaminants, volatile organic compounds, and odors and details the advantages and disadvantages of each. Ozone appears to work well ...

  4. NASA satellite helps airliners avoid ozone concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Results from a test to determine the effectiveness of satellite data for helping airlines avoid heavy concentrations of ozone are reported. Information from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, aboard the Nimbus-7 was transmitted, for use in meteorological forecast activities. The results show: (1) Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer profile of total ozone in the atmosphere accurately represents upper air patterns and can be used to locate meteorological activity; (2) route forecasting of highly concentrated ozone is feasible; (3) five research aircraft flights were flown in jet stream regions located by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer to determine winds, temperatures, and air composition. It is shown that the jet stream is coincides with the area of highest total ozone gradient, and low total ozone amounts are found where tropospheric air has been carried along above the tropopause on the anticyclonic side of the subtropical jet stream.

  5. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Stephen A.; Schauffler, Sue

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. Herein we demonstrate an ozone hole parametric model. This model is based upon: 1) a new algorithm for estimating C1 and Br levels over Antarctica and 2) late-spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This parametric model explains 95% of the ozone hole area s variance. We use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur in approximately 2068. The ozone hole area will very slowly decline over the next 2 decades. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until approximately 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  6. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. In this talk we will demonstrate an ozone hole parametric model. This model is based upon: 1) a new algorithm for estimating 61 and Br levels over Antarctica and 2) late-spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This parametric model explains 95% of the ozone hole area's variance. We use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur in approximately 2068. The ozone hole area will very slowly decline over the next 2 decades. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until approximately 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  7. Calculations of Polar Ozone Loss Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Wu, J.

    1999-01-01

    We calculate vortex-averaged ozone loss rates at 465-K potential temperature during the Aug.-Sept. time period in the southern hemisphere and Feb.-Mar. time period in the northern hemisphere. Ozone loss rates are calculated two ways. First, from the time series of measurements of 03. Second, from measurements of ClO, from which ozone loss is inferred based on our theories of Cl-catalyzed ozone destruction. Both measurement sets are from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument. We find good agreement between vortex-averaged ozone loss rates calculated from these methods. Our analysis provides no support for recent work suggesting that current theories of Cl-catalyzed ozone loss underestimate the observed decrease in polar ozone during the ozone "hole" period.

  8. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  9. [Ozone decline and UV increase].

    PubMed

    Winkler, P; Trepte, S

    2004-02-01

    The following results have been obtained from long-term observations on the ozone layer and UV at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeigenberg:The seasonally varying decline of the ozone layer determines the maximum exposure to UV. Since ozone decline shows the highest rates in the spring months the UV exposure has most strongly increased in this time of the year. This is especially important because in spring the human skin is not adapted to UV exposure. Weather changes from day to day can induce rapid ozone reductions in spring about -30% which in turn is followed by an increase in UV of about 40%. Clouds, especially the transparent cirrus clouds (high clouds consisting of ice particles) have increased in frequency during spring and fall while a decrease is observed in summer. This change in cloudiness reduces the daily UV dose in spring and fall while it is enhanced in summer. With increasing height above sea level UV rises by roughly 10% per 1000 m (rule of thumb). Snow reflects the UV-radiation by up to 80% enhancing the UV-doses at relevant conditions. Strong volcano eruptions destroy ozone in the stratosphere additionally during 1-2 years after the eruption. Therafter the ozone layer recovers. In April 1993, after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (1991), the UV burden was still 40% higher than average. Miniholes and streamers can appear unexpected on a short-time scale and cross over Central Europe within 1-2 days, thus enhancing UV irradiation. The human skin reacts to UV exposure depending on the type of skin. The campaign "Sonne(n) mit Verstand" of the Bavarian Ministries for Environment, for Health and for Education informs about the danger of UV radiation (see www.sonne-mit-ver-stand.de). The German Weather Service informs the public on present developments of the ozone layer and relevant topics byits ozone bulletin, which is also available via internet under (www.dwd.de/deFundE/Observator/MOHp/hp2/ozon/bulletin.htm).

  10. [Ozone decline and UV increase].

    PubMed

    Winkler, P; Trepte, S

    2004-02-01

    The following results have been obtained from long-term observations on the ozone layer and UV at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeigenberg:The seasonally varying decline of the ozone layer determines the maximum exposure to UV. Since ozone decline shows the highest rates in the spring months the UV exposure has most strongly increased in this time of the year. This is especially important because in spring the human skin is not adapted to UV exposure. Weather changes from day to day can induce rapid ozone reductions in spring about -30% which in turn is followed by an increase in UV of about 40%. Clouds, especially the transparent cirrus clouds (high clouds consisting of ice particles) have increased in frequency during spring and fall while a decrease is observed in summer. This change in cloudiness reduces the daily UV dose in spring and fall while it is enhanced in summer. With increasing height above sea level UV rises by roughly 10% per 1000 m (rule of thumb). Snow reflects the UV-radiation by up to 80% enhancing the UV-doses at relevant conditions. Strong volcano eruptions destroy ozone in the stratosphere additionally during 1-2 years after the eruption. Therafter the ozone layer recovers. In April 1993, after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (1991), the UV burden was still 40% higher than average. Miniholes and streamers can appear unexpected on a short-time scale and cross over Central Europe within 1-2 days, thus enhancing UV irradiation. The human skin reacts to UV exposure depending on the type of skin. The campaign "Sonne(n) mit Verstand" of the Bavarian Ministries for Environment, for Health and for Education informs about the danger of UV radiation (see www.sonne-mit-ver-stand.de). The German Weather Service informs the public on present developments of the ozone layer and relevant topics byits ozone bulletin, which is also available via internet under (www.dwd.de/deFundE/Observator/MOHp/hp2/ozon/bulletin.htm). PMID:14770335

  11. Total ozone, ozone vertical distributions, and stratospheric temperatures at South Pole, Antarctica, in 1986 and 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.; Reitelbach, P. J.; Franchois, P. R.; Kuester, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-six electrochemical cell (ECC) ozonesondes were flown at South Pole, Antarctica, during 1987 in a continuing program to document year-round changes in Antarctica ozone that are dynamically and photochemically induced. Dobson spectrophotometer total ozone observations were also made. For the twilight months of March and September when Dobson instrument observations cannot be made at South Pole, total ozone amounts were deduced from the ECC ozonesonde soundings. ECC sonde total ozone data obtained during the polar night (April to August), supplemented the sparse total ozone data obtained from Dobson instrument moon observations. Similar ozone profile and total ozone observations were made at South Pole in 1986.

  12. Ozone concentration in the cabin of a Gates Learjet measured simultaneously with atmospheric ozone concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Perkins, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    A Gates Learjet Model 23 was instrumented with monitors to measure simultaneously the atmospheric and the cabin concentrations of ozone at altitudes up to 13 kilometers. Six data flights were made in February 1978. Results indicated that only a small amount of the atmospheric ozone is destroyed in the cabin pressurization system. Ozone concentrations measured in the cabin near the conditioned-air outlets were only slightly lower than the atmospheric ozone concentration. For the two cabin configurations tested, the ozone retention in the cabin was 63 and 41 percent of the atmospheric ozone concentration. Maximum cabin ozone concentration measured during these flights was 410 parts per billion by volume.

  13. Airborne thermography or infrared remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Goillot, C C

    1975-01-01

    Airborne thermography is part of the more general remote sensing activity. The instruments suitable for image display are infrared line scanners. A great deal of interest has developed during the past 10 years in airborne thermal remote sensing and many applications are in progress. Infrared scanners on board a satellite are used for observation of cloud cover; airborne infrared scanners are used for forest fire detection, heat budget of soils, detecting insect attack, diseases, air pollution damage, water stress, salinity stress on vegetation, only to cite some main applications relevant to agronomy. Using this system it has become possible to get a 'picture' of our thermal environment.

  14. Student Investigations of Tropospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, S.; Johnson, L.; Merrill, J.; Johnson, R.; Renee, B.; Fortney, M.; Renee, D.

    2006-12-01

    Hands-on field work and data collection have been shown to be a major factor in motivating students in the study of geoscience and environmental science. An existing high-altitude balloon program at Medgar Evers College(MEC) has developed a new student research initiative focused on tropospheric ozone profile investigations. This effort was launched with involvement in the Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS) 2006 campaign of coordinated observations organized by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The participation was stimulated by a collaboration between faculty at the University of Rhode Island (URI) and faculty at Medgar Evers College, a minority-serving institution. URI provided training, background material, access to lab facilities and continues to assist faculty at MEC in the engagement of minority students in this research experience. Undergraduate and graduate students are involved in all phases of the ozone study including ozonesonde preparation and calibration (URI), launch and communications (Paradox, NY), and data analysis (Medgar Evers College) which is being incorporated into selected courses in Environmental Science, Physical Science and Computer Science. A companion educational project involved high school students with a teacher-mentor in surface ozone measurements using the GLOBE protocol as well as linkages with the ozone profile study. This presentation describes the student-based participation, the URI-MEC collaboration, results from the ozone profiles as well as the details of ongoing curriculum integration and future work. The project is partially supported by the NASA Aura Education and Public Outreach program.

  15. Raman spectroscopies in shock-compressed materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Shaner, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering have been used to measure temperatures and changes in molecular vibrational frequencies for detonating and shocked materials. Inverse Raman and Raman induced Kerr effect spectroscopies have been suggested as diagnostic probes for determining and phenomenology of shock-induced chemical reactions. The practicality, advantages, and disadvantages of using Raman scattering techniques as diagnostic probes of microscopic phenomenology through and immediately behind the shock front of shock-compressed molecular systems are discussed.

  16. Ultrafine particle removal and ozone generation by in-duct electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Poppendieck, Dustin G; Rim, Donghyun; Persily, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to airborne ultrafine particles (UFP, < 100 nm) has been shown to have adverse health effects and can be elevated in buildings. In-duct electrostatic precipitator filters (ESP) have been shown to be an effective particulate control device for reducing UFP concentrations (20-100 nm) in buildings, although they have the potential to increase indoor ozone concentrations. This study investigated residential ESP filters to reduce ultrafine particles between 4 to 15 nm and quantified the resulting ozone generation. In-duct ESPs were operated in the central air handling unit of a test house. Results for the two tested ESP brands indicate that removal efficiency of 8 to 14 nm particles was near zero and always less than 10% (± 15%), possibly due to particle generation or low charging efficiency. Adding a media filter downstream of the ESP increased the decay rate for particles in the same size range. Continuous operation of one brand of ESP raised indoor ozone concentrations to 77 ppbv and 20 ppbv for a second brand. Using commercial filters containing activated carbon downstream of the installed ESP reduced the indoor steady-state ozone concentrations between 6% and 39%.

  17. Ultrafine particle removal and ozone generation by in-duct electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Poppendieck, Dustin G; Rim, Donghyun; Persily, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to airborne ultrafine particles (UFP, < 100 nm) has been shown to have adverse health effects and can be elevated in buildings. In-duct electrostatic precipitator filters (ESP) have been shown to be an effective particulate control device for reducing UFP concentrations (20-100 nm) in buildings, although they have the potential to increase indoor ozone concentrations. This study investigated residential ESP filters to reduce ultrafine particles between 4 to 15 nm and quantified the resulting ozone generation. In-duct ESPs were operated in the central air handling unit of a test house. Results for the two tested ESP brands indicate that removal efficiency of 8 to 14 nm particles was near zero and always less than 10% (± 15%), possibly due to particle generation or low charging efficiency. Adding a media filter downstream of the ESP increased the decay rate for particles in the same size range. Continuous operation of one brand of ESP raised indoor ozone concentrations to 77 ppbv and 20 ppbv for a second brand. Using commercial filters containing activated carbon downstream of the installed ESP reduced the indoor steady-state ozone concentrations between 6% and 39%. PMID:24387032

  18. Ozone hole won`t worsen?

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1995-10-20

    The timing was fitting. Last week, the chemistry Nobel Prize went to the researchers who first linked chlorine-containing pollutants with stratospheric ozone loss. And last week brought the climax in the annual drama of Antarctic ozone destruction, which begins when the spring sun triggers the ozone-depleting reactions. Satellite and balloon observations showed that the ozone hole is about as deep and wide as ever. But new computer modeling of hole formation suggests that future holes will be no larger.

  19. Surface-enhanced hyper-Raman and Raman hyperspectral mapping.

    PubMed

    Gühlke, Marina; Heiner, Zsuzsanna; Kneipp, Janina

    2016-06-01

    We investigate distributions of crystal violet and malachite green on plasmonic surfaces by principal component analysis (PCA) imaging of surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS) data. As a two-photon excited Raman scattering process, SEHRS provides chemical structure information based on molecular vibrations, but follows different selection rules than the normal, one-photon excited surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Therefore, simultaneous hyperspectral mapping using SEHRS excited at 1064 nm and SERS excited at 532 nm improves spatially resolved multivariate discrimination based on complementary vibrational information. The possibility to map distributions of the structurally similar dyes crystal violet and malachite green demonstrates the potential of this approach for multiplex imaging of complex systems. PMID:27166200

  20. Vertical Structure, Transport, and Mixing of Ozone and Aerosols Observed During NEAQS/ICARTT 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Hardesty, R. M.; Brewer, W. A.; Alvarez, R. J.; Sandberg, S. P.; Tucker, S. C.; Intrieri, J. M.; Marchbanks, R. D.; McCarty, B. J.; Banta, R. M.; Darby, L. S.; White, A. B.

    2005-12-01

    During the 2004 New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS), which was conducted within the framework of the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) field experiment, airborne and shipborne lidar remote sensing instruments were deployed to characterize the 3-dimensional structure of ozone, aerosol, and low-level wind fields in the New England region. The 2004 measurements confirmed findings from the smaller-scale NEAQS 2002 experiment: the vertical structure and transport patterns of pollutant plumes from the Boston and New York City urban areas are strongly modified when they are advected over the Gulf of Maine. Because of strong vertical wind shear and a very stable atmosphere over the cold ocean water the plumes tend to get sheared apart and the resulting pieces of the plumes stay confined in layers aloft, isolated from the surface. Most notably, ozone concentrations aloft are very often significantly higher than ozone levels near the ocean surface. These elevated pollution plumes over the Gulf of Maine can affect air quality in coastal New England only when they are transported back over land. This can be accomplished by the large-scale flow or by local circulations such as the sea breeze. Once over land the elevated plumes may impact surface air quality by direct transport to higher terrain (e.g., Cadillac Mountain, ME) or by being fumigated down to the surface. Alternatively, but probably more rarely, an elevated pollution plume over the ocean may be mixed down to the surface by mechanically generated turbulence and then transported back to land within the marine boundary layer. We will use airborne and shipborne lidar remote sensing data to characterize the vertical distribution of ozone and aerosols over coastal New England, in particular the difference in plume structure over land and water. We will also show observational evidence for several of the processes described above that may mix down and transport

  1. Airborne Measurements of Aerosol Size Distributions During PACDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Gandrud, B.; Campos, T.; Kok, G.; Stith, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Pacific Dust Experiment (PACDEX) is an airborne project that attempts to characterize the indirect aerosol effect by tracing plumes of dust and pollution across the Pacific Ocean. This project occurred during April-May 2007 and used the NSF/NCAR HIAPER research aircraft. When a period of strong generation of dust particles and pollution was detected by ground-based and satellite sensors, then the aircraft was launched from Colorado to Alaska, Hawaii, and Japan. Its mission was to intercept and track these plumes from Asia, across the Pacific Ocean, and ultimately to the edges of North America. For more description, see the abstract by Stith and Ramanathan (this conference) and other companion papers on PACDEX. The HIAPER aircraft carried a wide variety of sensors for measuring aerosols, cloud particles, trace gases, and radiation. Sampling was made in several weather regimes, including clean "background" air, dust and pollution plumes, and regions with cloud systems. Altitude ranges extended from 100 m above the ocean to 13.4 km. This paper reports on aerosol measurements made with a new Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), a Radial Differential Mobility Analyzer (RDMA), a water-based CN counter, and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP). These cover the size range 10 nm to 10 um diameter. In clear air, dust was detected with the UHSAS and CDP. Polluted air was identified with high concentrations of carbon monoxide, ozone, and CN. Aerosol size distributions will be presented, along with data to define the context of weather regimes.

  2. Airborne measurements of total reactive odd nitrogen (NO(y))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebler, G.; Fahey, D. W.; Ridley, B. A.; Gregory, G. L.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne total reactive odd nitrogen measurements were made during August and September 1986 over the continental United States and off the west coast over the Pacific Ocean during NASA's Global Tropospheric Experiment/Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation 2 program. Measurements were made in the marine and continental boundary layer and the free troposphere up to 6.1 km altitude. NO(y) mixing ratios between 24 pptv and more than 1 ppbv were found, with median values of 101 pptv in the marine boundary layer, 298 pptv in the marine free troposphere, and 288 pptv in the continental free troposphere, respectively. The marine troposphere exhibited layered structure which was also seen in the simultaneously measured ozone mixing ratio and dew point temperature. The averaged vertical NO(y) profile over the ocean does not show a distinct gradient. The NO(y) mixing ratio over the continent decreases with increasing altitude. The latter is consistent with our understanding that the continents are the major source region for these gases.

  3. The effects of improved residential furnace filtration on airborne particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fugler, D.; Bowser, D.; Kwan, W.

    2000-07-01

    Forced air furnaces with distributed ducting systems have always had an air filter, but traditionally the filter quality was only adequate to protect the furnace fan and heat exchanger from debris. In the past several years, there has been an increasing number of more effective particulate filters that are being marketed to reduce airborne particulate or dust. These include upgraded panel filters, passive electrostatic, active electrostatic, and HEPA or near-HEPA variants. Consumers are bewildered by the lack of standardized and comprehensible performance results and need better advice on whether it would be useful for them to upgrade their current furnace filter. In order to help them make these decisions, the whole range of available furnace filters were tested in six occupied houses. The filter efficiency was determined by particulate measurement in the ducting system before and after the filter. Indoor particulates were measured in a bedroom and living room, and outdoor levels were monitored simultaneously. Testing encompassed several weeks in each house, and the results are available in the whole range of particle sizes. The project also looked at the air-cleaning effectiveness of a stand-alone air cleaner and at the ozone production of electrostatic precipitators installed in 20 houses. Test results will be helpful in specifying suitable filtration for houses.

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF BROMOHYDRINS IN OZONATED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because ozonation is becoming a popular alternative to chlorination for disinfection of drinking water and because little is known about the potential adverse effects of ozonation disinfection by-products (DBPs), we have sought to identify ozone DBPs, particularly brominated orga...

  5. Generation and delivery device for ozone gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Craig C. (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides an ozone generation and delivery system that lends itself to small scale applications and requires very low maintenance. The system preferably includes an anode reservoir and a cathode phase separator each having a hydrophobic membrane to allow phase separation of produced gases from water. The hydrogen gas, ozone gas and water containing ozone may be delivered under pressure.

  6. Ozone, Climate, and Global Atmospheric Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Joel S.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of global atmospheric problems relating to ozone depletion and global warming. Provides background information on the composition of the earth's atmosphere and origin of atmospheric ozone. Describes causes, effects, and evidence of ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect. A vignette provides a summary of a 1991 assessment of…

  7. A Chemiluminescence Detector for Ozone Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, H.; And Others

    An ozone detector was built and evaluated for its applicability in smog chamber studies. The detection method is based on reaction of ozone with ethylene and measurement of resultant chemiluminescence. In the first phase of evaluation, the detector's response to ozone was studied as a function of several instrument parameters, and optimum…

  8. Tropospheric Ozone and Photochemical Smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillman, S.

    2003-12-01

    The question of air quality in polluted regions represents one of the issues of geochemistry with direct implications for human well-being. Human health and well-being, along with the well-being of plants, animals, and agricultural crops, are dependent on the quality of air we breathe. Since the start of the industrial era, air quality has become a matter of major importance, especially in large cities or urbanized regions with heavy automobile traffic and industrial activity.Concern over air quality existed as far back as the 1600s. Originally, polluted air in cities resulted from the burning of wood or coal, largely as a source of heat. The industrial revolution in England saw a great increase in the use of coal in rapidly growing cities, both for industrial use and domestic heating. London suffered from devastating pollution events during the late 1800s and early 1900s, with thousands of excess deaths attributed to air pollution (Brimblecombe, 1987). With increasing use of coal, other instances also occurred in continental Europe and the USA. These events were caused by directly emitted pollutants (primary pollutants), including sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulates. They were especially acute in cities with northerly locations during fall and winter when sunlight is at a minimum. These original pollution events gave rise to the term "smog" (a combination of smoke and fog). Events of this type have become much less severe since the 1950s in Western Europe and the US, as natural gas replaced coal as the primary source of home heating, industrial smokestacks were designed to emit at higher altitudes (where dispersion is more rapid), and industries were required to install pollution control equipment.Beginning in the 1950s, a new type of pollution, photochemical smog, became a major concern. Photochemical smog consists of ozone (O3) and other closely related species ("secondary pollutants") that are produced photochemically from directly

  9. A N2-Raman lidar on board ULA for Arctic atmospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cacqueray, Victor; Chazette, Patrick; Totems, Julien; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Shang, Xiaoxia; Marpillat, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    A key scientific question relative to atmospheric studies in the Arctic is the quantification and the vertical distribution of aerosols and their interactions with clouds in the lower troposphere. In May 2016, as part of the PARCS (Pollution in the ARCtic System) project, we will conduct an experiment in order to assess the optical properties and concentrations of aerosols near the North-Cape in Norway. This campaign will involve a new airborne N2-Raman lidar (355 nm) on board an Ultra Light Aircraft (ULA) and an original instrumental synergy between ground-based radar (95 GHz) and N2-H2O Raman lidar. The airborne experimental preparation for this campaign was divided in two weeks: the first week of experiments above the Rhône valley in June 2015 and the second in the Maurienne valley in the French Alps in December 2015. The capability of the N2-Raman lidar to perform measurements from the ULA during daytime has been checked. After the first campaign of tests, the laser emitted energy per pulse has been upgraded to improve the signal to noise ratio. Both the strategies and the main results of the two field campaigns will be presented. We will focus on the error budget for the retrieval of the aerosol optical thickness in the first atmospheric kilometer. We will present in addition the potential of such a lidar to monitor industrial pollution plumes in the planetary boundary layer. The airborne lidar measurements will be analysed taking into account the synergy with an in situ particle sizer (FIDAS) provided by the ADDAIR Company.

  10. Coordinated Airborne, Spaceborne, and Ground-Based Measurements of Massive, Thick Aerosol Layers During the Dry Season in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hlavka, D. L.; McGill, M. J.; Holben, B. N.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J.; Torres, O.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the dry-season airborne campaign of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000), unique coordinated observations were made of massive, thick aerosol layers. These layers were often dominated by aerosols from biomass burning. We report on airborne Sunphotometer measurements of aerosol optical depth (lambda=354-1558 nm), columnar water vapor, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and water vapor density that were obtained aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft. We compare these with ground-based AERONET Sun/sky radiometer results, with ground based lidar data MPL-Net), and with measurements from a downward-pointing lidar aboard the high-flying NASA ER-2 aircraft. Finally, we show comparisons between aerosol optical depths from the Sunphotometer and those retrieved over land and over water using four spaceborne sensors (TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer), MISR (Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer) and ATSR-2 (Along Track Scanning Radiometer)).

  11. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  12. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-07

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  13. SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE PAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposures to airborne particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in several populations in the US, Japan, and Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors, developed for human exposure biomonitoring studies were used to collect fine particles (<_ 1....

  14. Antarctic Ozone: Theory and Observation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salawitch, Ross Jay

    The amount of ozone observed in October over Antarctica has fallen steadily and precipitously in the last decade. Observational data describing the phenomenology of the Antarctic ozone reduction are reviewed, followed by the presentation of theories that seek to account for the observed ozone reductions while satisfying other available constraints. We begin with a discussion of the thermodynamic properties of solid phases containing HCl and HNO_3. The presence of clouds in the Antarctic stratosphere, caused be extremely low temperatures during spring, leads to condensation and precipitation of HNO_3, and condensation and reaction of HCl. Both processes lead to the conversion of unreactive forms of chlorine to chlorine oxides, which participate in a sequence of chemical reactions that consume ozone. A chemical model that incorporates the influence of cloud catalyzed heterogeneous reactions is compared in detail to the interferometric measurements of HCl, ClNO_3, HNO_3 , NO_2, and NO obtained over Antarctica during the spring of 1986 (Farmer et al., 1987). Model results are consistent with observed temporal trends of these species and with trends for total column ozone reported by Stolarski et al. (1986). Loss of ozone is attributed to the catalytic influence of chlorine and bromine radicals, in cycles suggested by McElroy et al. (1986b) and Molina and Molina (1987). Constraints are then placed on the abundance of stratospheric bromine by analysis of observations of OClO over Antarctica during the spring of 1986 (Solomon et al., 1987a). The diurnal variation of OClO is consistent with 16 +/- 4 ppt of stratospheric bromine if a fraction of the overall ClO + BrO reaction proceeds through a channel resulting in the production of BrCl. Bromine levels in this range would contribute approximately 20% of the total ozone loss. Finally, it is shown that the production of reactive chlorine oxides by heterogeneous processes depends on the initial concentration of HCl relative

  15. Stratospheric ozone effects on temperature.

    PubMed

    Reck, R A

    1976-05-01

    Calculated surface temperature changes, DeltaT(8), due to stratospheric ozone depletion (at 35 degrees N latitude in April) are less than previously estimated and range between -0.6 and +0.9 degrees K. The sign of DeltaT(8), is determined by the surface albedo and the presence or absence of a low-lying particulate layer (heating with particles, cooling without particles). The calculations indicate that a 90 percent stratospheric ozone depletion does not cause the temperature inversion at the tropopause to vanish, although it is weakened substantially.

  16. Structured line illumination Raman microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kozue; Palonpon, Almar F.; Smith, Nicholas I.; Chiu, Liang-da; Kasai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    In the last couple of decades, the spatial resolution in optical microscopy has increased to unprecedented levels by exploiting the fluorescence properties of the probe. At about the same time, Raman imaging techniques have emerged as a way to image inherent chemical information in a sample without using fluorescent probes. However, in many applications, the achievable resolution is limited to about half the wavelength of excitation light. Here we report the use of structured illumination to increase the spatial resolution of label-free spontaneous Raman microscopy, generating highly detailed spatial contrast from the ensemble of molecular information in the sample. Using structured line illumination in slit-scanning Raman microscopy, we demonstrate a marked improvement in spatial resolution and show the applicability to a range of samples, including both biological and inorganic chemical component mapping. This technique is expected to contribute towards greater understanding of chemical component distributions in organic and inorganic materials. PMID:26626144

  17. Structured line illumination Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kozue; Palonpon, Almar F.; Smith, Nicholas I.; Chiu, Liang-Da; Kasai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-12-01

    In the last couple of decades, the spatial resolution in optical microscopy has increased to unprecedented levels by exploiting the fluorescence properties of the probe. At about the same time, Raman imaging techniques have emerged as a way to image inherent chemical information in a sample without using fluorescent probes. However, in many applications, the achievable resolution is limited to about half the wavelength of excitation light. Here we report the use of structured illumination to increase the spatial resolution of label-free spontaneous Raman microscopy, generating highly detailed spatial contrast from the ensemble of molecular information in the sample. Using structured line illumination in slit-scanning Raman microscopy, we demonstrate a marked improvement in spatial resolution and show the applicability to a range of samples, including both biological and inorganic chemical component mapping. This technique is expected to contribute towards greater understanding of chemical component distributions in organic and inorganic materials.

  18. Raman spectroscopy under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C

    2004-11-05

    We report the results of Raman measurements of various materials under simultaneous conditions of high temperature and high pressure in the diamond anvil cell (DAC). High temperatures are generated by laser heating or internal resistive (ohmic) heating or a combination of both. We present Raman spectra of cubic boron nitride (cBN) to 40 GPa and up to 2300 K that show a continuous pressure and temperature shift of the frequency of the transverse optical mode. We have also obtained high-pressure Raman spectra from a new noble metal nitride, which we synthesized at approximately 50 GPa and 2000 K. We have obtained high-temperature spectra from pure nitrogen to 39 GPa and up to 2000 K, which show the presence of a hot band that has previously been observed in CARS measurements. These measurements have also allowed us to constrain the melting curve and to examine changes in the intramolecular potential with pressure.

  19. UV Raman spectroscopy of hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Loppnow, G R; Shoute, L; Schmidt, K J; Savage, A; Hall, R H; Bulmer, J T

    2004-11-15

    In this paper, the UV Raman spectra of a large number of saturated and alkyl-substituted monocyclic, bicyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are obtained at 220 and 233 nm excitation wavelengths. Also included are nitrogen- and sulphur-containing hydrocarbons. The spectra obtained are fluorescence free, even for such highly fluorescent compounds as perylene, consistent with earlier reports of UV Raman spectra of hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon UV Raman spectra exhibit greatly improved signal-to-noise ratio when in the neat liquid or solution state compared with the neat solid state, suggesting that some surface degradation occurs under the conditions used here. Assignments are given for most of the bands and clear marker bands for the different classes of hydrocarbons are readily observable, although their relative intensities vary greatly. These results are discussed in the context of structure and symmetry to develop a consistent, molecular-based model of vibrational group frequencies. PMID:15482987

  20. Airborne measurements of stratospheric constituents over Antarctica in the austral spring, 1987. II - Halogen and nitrogen trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, M. T.; Mankin, William G.; Goldman, Aaron

    1989-01-01

    The IR absorption spectra of the polar stratosphere, recorded by a Fourier transform spectrometer aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment, were used to derive vertical column amounts above flight altitude of HCl, HF, NO, NO2, ClONO2, and HNO3 in the region of disturbed ozone chemistry during September 1987. Significant reductions in the amounts of HCl, NO, NO2, and HNO3 were observed within the confines of the polar vortex, compared with amounts outside the vortex. When compared with the springtime observations by the same instrument in the Northern Hemisphere, the HCl and NO2 species displayed the most dramatic depletions. The results obtained are generally in agreement with the earlier ground measurements conducted at the McMurdo Station.

  1. Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements at the DOE SGP CART Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was deployed to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Cloud and Radiation Testbed site in northern Oklahoma September - December, 2000 for two DOE sponsored field campaigns: 1) the Water Vapor Intensive Operations Experiment 2000 and 2) the Atmospheric Radiations Measurement First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Experiment Experiment (AFWEX). WvIOP2000 focussed on water vapor measurements in the lower troposphere while AFWEX focussed on upper tropospheric water vapor. For the first time ever, four water vapor lidars were operated simultaneously: one airborne and three ground-based systems. Intercomparisons of these measurements and others will be presented at the meeting.

  2. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size. PMID:27102066

  3. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-04-22

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size.

  4. Field Raman spectrograph for environmental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Carrabba, M.M.

    1995-03-01

    The use of Raman Spectroscopy in the screening of soils, ground water, and surface waters for pollutants is described. A probe accessory for conducting surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy is undergoing testing for dilute chlorinated solvents.

  5. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  6. Options to Accelerate Ozone Recovery: Ozone and Climate Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, E. L.; Daniel, J. S.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone primarily originated from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine). Representatives from governments have met periodically over the years to establish international regulations starting with the Montreal Protocol in 1987, which greatly limited the release of these ozone-depleting substances (DDSs). Two global models have been used to investigate the impact of hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ODSs on total column ozone. The investigations primarily focused on chlorine- and bromine-containing gases, but some computations also included nitrous oxide (N2O). The Montreal Protocol with ODS controls have been so successful that further regulations of chlorine- and bromine-containing gases could have only a fraction of the impact that regulations already in force have had. if all anthropogenic ODS emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2% during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional ODS restrictions. Chlorine- and bromine-containing gases and nitrous oxide are also greenhouse gases and lead to warming of the troposphere. Elimination of N 20 emissions would result in a reduction of radiative forcing of 0.23 W/sq m in 2100 than presently computed and destruction of the CFC bank would produce a reduction in radiative forcing of 0.005 W/sq m in 2100. This paper provides a quantitative way to consider future regulations of the CFC bank and N 20 emissions

  7. Options to accelerate ozone recovery:ozone and climate benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. S.; Fleming, E. L.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-04-01

    Hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs), including N2O, are evaluated in terms of effects on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC), globally-averaged total column ozone, and radiative forcing through 2100. Due to the established success of the Montreal Protocol, these actions can have only a fraction of the impact that regulations already in force have had. If all anthropogenic ODS emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2{%} during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional ODS restrictions. Radiative forcing by 2100 would be about 0.23 W/m2 lower due to the elimination of N2O emissions and about 0.005 W/m2 lower due to destruction of the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) bank. The ability of EESC to be a suitable metric for total ozone is also quantified. Responding to the recent suggestion that N2O should be considered an ODS, we provide an approach to incorporate N2O into the EESC formulation.

  8. Acetone oxidation using ozone on manganese oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yan; Reed, Corey; Lee, Yong-Kul; Oyama, S Ted

    2005-09-22

    Supported manganese oxide catalysts were prepared by the impregnation of alumina foam blocks washcoated with alumina and silica. The manganese content based on the weight of the washcoats was 10 wt % calculated as MnO2. Fourier transform profiles of the Mn K-edge EXAFS spectra for these samples gave three distinctive peaks at 0.15, 0.25, and 0.32 nm and were close to the profiles of Mn3O4 and beta-MnO2. The number of surface active sites was determined through oxygen chemisorption measurements at a reduction temperature (Tred = 443 K) obtained from temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) experiments. Acetone catalytic oxidation was studied from room temperature to 573 K, and was found to be highly accelerated by the use of ozone on both catalysts with substantial reductions in the reaction temperature. The only carbon-containing product detected was CO2. The alumina-supported catalyst was found to be more active than the silica-supported catalyst in acetone and ozone conversion, with higher turnover frequencies (TOFs) for both reactions. The pressure drop through the foam was low and increased little (0.003 kPa/10 000 h(-1)) with space velocity. In situ steady-state Raman spectroscopy measurements during the acetone catalytic oxidation reaction showed the presence of an adsorbed acetone species with a C-H bond at 2930 cm(-1) and a peroxide species derived from ozone with an O-O bond at 890 cm(-1).

  9. Acetone Oxidation using Ozone on Manganese Oxide Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xi,Y.; Reed, C.; Lee, Y.; Oyama, S.

    2005-01-01

    Supported manganese oxide catalysts were prepared by the impregnation of alumina foam blocks washcoated with alumina and silica. The manganese content based on the weight of the washcoats was 10 wt % calculated as MnO{sub 2}. Fourier transform profiles of the Mn K-edge EXAFS spectra for these samples gave three distinctive peaks at 0.15, 0.25, and 0.32 nm and were close to the profiles of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {beta}-MnO{sub 2}. The number of surface active sites was determined through oxygen chemisorption measurements at a reduction temperature (T{sub red} = 443 K) obtained from temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) experiments. Acetone catalytic oxidation was studied from room temperature to 573 K, and was found to be highly accelerated by the use of ozone on both catalysts with substantial reductions in the reaction temperature. The only carbon-containing product detected was CO{sub 2}. The alumina-supported catalyst was found to be more active than the silica-supported catalyst in acetone and ozone conversion, with higher turnover frequencies (TOFs) for both reactions. The pressure drop through the foam was low and increased little (0.003 kPa/10 000 h{sup -1}) with space velocity. In situ steady-state Raman spectroscopy measurements during the acetone catalytic oxidation reaction showed the presence of an adsorbed acetone species with a C-H bond at 2930 cm{sup -1} and a peroxide species derived from ozone with an O-O bond at 890 cm{sup -1}.

  10. Downscaling of Airborne Wind Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechner, Uwe; Schmehl, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Airborne wind energy systems provide a novel solution to harvest wind energy from altitudes that cannot be reached by wind turbines with a similar nominal generator power. The use of a lightweight but strong tether in place of an expensive tower provides an additional cost advantage, next to the higher capacity factor and much lower total mass. This paper investigates the scaling effects of airborne wind energy systems. The energy yield of airborne wind energy systems, that work in pumping mode of operation is at least ten times higher than the energy yield of conventional solar systems. For airborne wind energy systems the yield is defined per square meter wing area. In this paper the dependency of the energy yield on the nominal generator power for systems in the range of 1 kW to 1 MW is investigated. For the onshore location Cabauw, The Netherlands, it is shown, that a generator of just 1.4 kW nominal power and a total system mass of less than 30 kg has the theoretical potential to harvest energy at only twice the price per kWh of large scale airborne wind energy systems. This would make airborne wind energy systems a very attractive choice for small scale remote and mobile applications as soon as the remaining challenges for commercialization are solved.

  11. Challenges and opportunities of airborne metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles.

  12. Challenges and Opportunities of Airborne Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles. PMID:25953766

  13. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  14. Heating by the Raman instability

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.G.; Kruer, W.L.

    1980-04-11

    Computer simulations are presented of the reflection and heating due to stimulated Raman backscatter of intense laser light in large regions of underdense plasma. The heated electron distribution is found to be approximately a Maxwellian of temperature (m/sub e//2)v/sub p//sup 2/, where v/sub p/ is the phase velocity of the electron plasma wave. A simple model of the reflection is presented. Raman may cause a pre-heat problem with large laser fusion reactor targets.

  15. The Chemistry and Physics of Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Randall R.

    Perhaps no other environmental issue has captured as much widespread public interest and concern as stratospheric ozone depletion due to man-made chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Increasing scientific understanding of the connections between CFCs and global-scale ozone changes, highlighted by observations of dramatic ozone loss in the Antarctic, has led to a landmark international treaty and subsequent treaty amendments. As outgrowths of these developments, stratospheric ozone depletion has found its way into science fiction fare and the term “ozone hole” has become part of the English lexicon.

  16. Defense meteorological satellite measurements of total ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovill, J. E.; Ellis, J. S.; Luther, F. M.; Sullivan, T. J.; Weichel, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A multichannel filter radiometer (MFR) on Defense Meteorological Satellites (DMS) that measured total ozone on a global-scale from March 1977 - February 1980 is described. The total ozone data measured by the MFR were compared with total ozone data taken by surfaced-based Dobson spectrophotometers. When comparisons were made for five months, the Dobson spectrophotometer measured 2-5% more total ozone than the MFR. Comparisons between the Dobson spectrophotometer and the MFR showed a reduced RMS difference as the comparisons were made at closer proximity. A Northern Hemisphere total ozone distribution obtained from MFR data is presented.

  17. SSTs, nitrogen fertiliser and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.; Poppoff, I. G.; Capone, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A recently revised model of the stratosphere is used to show that a substantial enhancement in the ozone layer could accompany worldwide SST fleet operations and that water vapor may be an important factor in SST assessments. Revised rate coefficients for various ozone-destroying reactions are employed in calculations which indicate a slight increase in the total content of stratospheric ozone for modest-sized fleets of SSTs flying below about 25 km. It is found that water-vapor chemical reactions can negate in large part the NOx-induced ozone gains computed below 25 km and that increased use of nitrogen fertilizer might also enhance the ozone layer.

  18. Tropospheric Enhancement of Ozone over the UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Naveed Ali; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Kaminski, Jacek; Struzewska, Joanna; Durka, Pawel; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    We use the Global Environmental Multiscale - Air Quality (GEM-AQ) model to interpret the vertical profiles of ozone acquired with ozone sounding experiments at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi airport. The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the chemical and dynamical structures in the atmosphere of this unique subtropical location (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E). Ozone observations for years 2012 - 2013 reveal elevated ozone abundances in the range from 70 ppbv to 120 ppbv near 500-400 hPa during summer. The ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than these values. The preliminary results indicate that summertime enhancement in ozone is associated with the Arabian anticyclones centered over the Zagros Mountains in Iran and the Asir and Hijaz Mountain ranges in Saudi Arabia, and is consistent with TES observations of deuterated water. The model also shows considerable seasonal variation in the tropospheric ozone which is transported from the stratosphere by dynamical processes. The domestic production of ozone in the middle troposphere is estimated and compared GEM-AQ model. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in the UAE is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries in the Gulf region. We will present ozone sounding data and GEM-AQ results including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  19. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  20. Nanoparticle Based Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, C E; Huser, T R; Hollars, C W; Jusinski, L; Laurence, T; Lane, S M

    2005-01-03

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is a powerful tool for the investigation of biological samples. Following a brief introduction to Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, several examples of biophotonic applications of SERS are discussed. The concept of nanoparticle based sensors using SERS is introduced and the development of these sensors is discussed.