Science.gov

Sample records for airborne remote sensors

  1. Vineyard zonal management for grape quality assessment by combining airborne remote sensed imagery and soil sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, I.; Martínez De Toda, F.; Martínez-Casasnovas, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    Vineyard variability within the fields is well known by grape growers, producing different plant responses and fruit characteristics. Many technologies have been developed in last recent decades in order to assess this spatial variability, including remote sensing and soil sensors. In this paper we study the possibility of creating a stable classification system that better provides useful information for the grower, especially in terms of grape batch quality sorting. The work was carried out during 4 years in a rain-fed Tempranillo vineyard located in Rioja (Spain). NDVI was extracted from airborne imagery, and soil conductivity (EC) data was acquired by an EM38 sensor. Fifty-four vines were sampled at véraison for vegetative parameters and before harvest for yield and grape analysis. An Isocluster unsupervised classification in two classes was performed in 5 different ways, combining NDVI maps individually, collectively and combined with EC. The target vines were assigned in different zones depending on the clustering combination. Analysis of variance was performed in order to verify the ability of the combinations to provide the most accurate information. All combinations showed a similar behaviour concerning vegetative parameters. Yield parameters classify better by the EC-based clustering, whilst maturity grape parameters seemed to give more accuracy by combining all NDVIs and EC. Quality grape parameters (anthocyanins and phenolics), presented similar results for all combinations except for the NDVI map of the individual year, where the results were poorer. This results reveal that stable parameters (EC or/and NDVI all-together) clustering outcomes in better information for a vineyard zonal management strategy.

  2. The NASA Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR): A New Sensor for Earth Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR) is a versatile new airborne imaging radiometer recently developed by NASA. The AESMIR design is unique in that it performs dual-polarized imaging at all standard passive microwave frequency bands (6-89 GHz) using only one sensor headscanner package, providing an efficient solution for Earth remote sensing applications (snow, soil moisture/land parameters, precipitation, ocean winds, sea surface temperature, water vapor, sea ice, etc.). The microwave radiometers themselves will incorporate state-of-the-art receivers, with particular attention given to instrument calibration for the best possible accuracy and sensitivity. The single-package design of AESMIR makes it compatible with high-altitude aircraft platforms such as the NASA ER-2s. The arbitrary 2-axis gimbal can perform conical and cross-track scanning, as well as fixed-beam staring. This compatibility with high-altitude platforms coupled with the flexible scanning configuration, opens up previously unavailable science opportunities for convection/precip/cloud science and co-flying with complementary instruments, as well as providing wider swath coverage for all science applications. By designing AESMIR to be compatible with these high-altitude platforms, we are also compatible with the NASA P-3, the NASA DC-8, C-130s and ground-based deployments. Thus AESMIR can provide low-, mid-, and high- altitude microwave imaging. Parallel filter banks allow AESMIR to simultaneously simulate the exact passbands of multiple satellite radiometers: SSM/I, TMI, AMSR, Windsat, SSMI/S, and the upcoming GPM/GMI and NPOESS/CMIS instruments --a unique capability among aircraft radiometers. An L-band option is also under development, again using the same scanner. With this option, simultaneous imaging from 1.4 to 89 GHz will be feasible. And, all receivers except the sounding channels will be configured for 4-Stokes polarimetric operation using high-speed digital

  3. Airborne remote sensors applied to engineering geology and civil works design investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelnett, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The usefulness of various airborne remote sensing systems in the detection and identification of regional and specific geologic structural features that may affect the design and location of engineering structures on major civil works projects is evaluated. The Butler Valley Dam and Blue Lake Project in northern California was selected as a demonstration site. Findings derived from the interpretation of various kinds of imagery used are given.

  4. Remote Sensing of Chlorophyll Fluorescence by the Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Morgan, F., II; Demajistre, R.; Cook, B. D.; Corp, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the amount of fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or Fraunhofer lines in the reflected solar spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is designed and constructed specifically for airborne and groundbased ChlF measurements using the line fill-in ChlF measurement technique. In this paper, we will present the design of this triple etalon Fabry-Perot imaging instrument and the results of its vegetation fluorescence measurements obtained from the ground in the laboratory and from a NASA Langley King Air during our 2014 airborne campaign over vegetated targets in North Carolina and Virginia.

  5. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  6. [Remote sensing of chlorophyll fluorescence at airborne level based on unmanned airship platform and hyperspectral sensor].

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Qi; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Ni, Zhuo-Ya; Wang, Ran; Wang, Qing-Shan

    2013-11-01

    The solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) has a close relationship with photosynthetic and is considered as a probe of plant photosynthetic activity. In this study, an airborne fluorescence detecting system was constructed by using a hyperspectral imager on board an unmanned airship. Both Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (FLD) and 3FLD used to extract ChlF require the incident solar irradiance, which is always difficult to receive at airborne level. Alternative FLD (aFLD) can overcome the problem by selecting non-fluorescent emitter in the image. However, aFLD is based on the assumption that reflectance is identical around the Fraunhofer line, which is not realistic. A new method, a3FLD, is proposed, which assumes that reflectance varies linearly with the wavelength around Fraunhofer line. The result of simulated data shows that ChlF retrieval error of a3FLD is significantly lower than that of aFLD when vegetation reflectance varies near the Fraunhofer line. The results of hyperspectral remote sensing data with the airborne fluorescence detecting system show that the relative values of retrieved ChlF of 5 kinds of plants extracted by both aFLD and a3FLD are consistent with vegetation growth stage and the ground-level ChlF. The ChlF values of aFLD are about 15% greater than a3FLD. In addition, using aFLD, some non-fluorescent objects have considerable ChlF value, while a3FLD can effectively overcome the problem.

  7. Interpretation of air pollution data as measured by an airborne remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.; Young, G. R.; Green, R. N.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation described is a continuation of the work reported by Smith et al. (1974) in which a single source was studied. In the current study, multiple sources of known location are considered. The study is concerned with the strength of each source and the resulting pollution concentration field. The characteristics of the remotely sensed data are discussed along with the parameter estimation procedure, the estimation of pollution parameters, and a numerical example.

  8. New Airborne Sensors and Platforms for Solving Specific Tasks in Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, G.

    2012-07-01

    A huge number of small and medium sized sensors entered the market. Today's mid format sensors reach 80 MPix and allow to run projects of medium size, comparable with the first big format digital cameras about 6 years ago. New high quality lenses and new developments in the integration prepared the market for photogrammetric work. Companies as Phase One or Hasselblad and producers or integrators as Trimble, Optec, and others utilized these cameras for professional image production. In combination with small camera stabilizers they can be used also in small aircraft and make the equipment small and easy transportable e.g. for rapid assessment purposes. The combination of different camera sensors enables multi or hyper-spectral installations e.g. useful for agricultural or environmental projects. Arrays of oblique viewing cameras are in the market as well, in many cases these are small and medium format sensors combined as rotating or shifting devices or just as a fixed setup. Beside the proper camera installation and integration, also the software that controls the hardware and guides the pilot has to solve much more tasks than a normal FMS did in the past. Small and relatively cheap Laser Scanners (e.g. Riegl) are in the market and a proper combination with MS Cameras and an integrated planning and navigation is a challenge that has been solved by different softwares. Turnkey solutions are available e.g. for monitoring power line corridors where taking images is just a part of the job. Integration of thermal camera systems with laser scanner and video capturing must be combined with specific information of the objects stored in a database and linked when approaching the navigation point.

  9. Airborne Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    conducted studies of the sediments, seagrass and corals . The objective is to correlate the hyperspectral imagery with the detailed in-situ measurements...seagrass and coral reefs (Mazel, 1998). In addition to the basic science there is a directed effort in remote sensing for seafloor imaging and...area includes different bottom types – coral , sand, seagrass – sometimes within the same local area, at a variety of depths. Most of the region is quite

  10. Data assimilation of an airborne multiple-remote-sensor system and of satellite images for the North Sea and Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Olaf; Hunsaenger, Thomas; Tufte, Lars; Barjenbruch, Ulrich

    2004-02-01

    Marine pollution in the sensible North and Baltic Sea forces an international aerial surveillance. Within this framework the German aerial surveillance operates an advanced instrumentation on board of two 'Dornier 228" aircrafts. The instrumentation consists of a set of state-of-the-art imaging remote sensors, like side looking airborne radar (SLAR), IR/UV line scanner and particularly a microwave radiometer (MWR) and a laser-fluoro-sensor (LFS). The most important aim is to detect oil discharges on the water surface, emitted accidentally or illegally. In case of discharge, the pollution has to be classified and quantified with a high accuracy. Another aim is to monitor biological and hydrological parameters, as there are the concentration of chlorophyll and dissolved organic matter (DOM) or the growth of phytoplancton. This paper describes the set of instruments and their potential to fulfill these demands. The SLAR operates to locate oil discharges and phytoplancton, whereas the IR/UV scanner allows to distinct the detected area. The IR/UV and especially the MWR sensor allow to quantify the thickness of the oil film. Finally, the LFS classifies the oil species as well as organic material. Emphasis is placed on the results of the sensor measurements and their synergy effects. The combination of the sensor data yields value added information for the operational users. An use of satellite data to improve the operational surveillance will be discussed. The potential and limitations of satellite and airborne data for the surveillance tasks will be compared.

  11. Analysis of remote sensing data collected for detection and mapping of oil spills: Reduction and analysis of multi-sensor airborne data of the NASA Wallops oil spill exercise of November 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Airborne, remotely sensed data of the NASA Wallops controlled oil spill were corrected, reduced and analysed. Sensor performance comparisons were made by registering data sets from different sensors, which were near-coincident in time and location. Multispectral scanner images were, in turn, overlayed with profiles of correlation between airborne and laboratory-acquired fluorosensor spectra of oil; oil-thickness contours derived (by NASA) from a scanning fluorosensor and also from a two-channel scanning microwave radiometer; and synthetic aperture radar X-HH images. Microwave scatterometer data were correlated with dual-channel (UV and TIR) line scanner images of the oil slick.

  12. An airborne remote sensing system for urban air quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. J.; Friedman, E. J.; Keitz, E. L.; Ward, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    Several NASA sponsored remote sensors and possible airborne platforms were evaluated. Outputs of dispersion models for SO2 and CO pollution in the Washington, D.C. area were used with ground station data to establish the expected performance and limitations of the remote sensors. Aircraft/sensor support requirements are discussed. A method of optimum flight plan determination was made. Cost trade offs were performed. Conclusions about the implementation of various instrument packages as parts of a comprehensive air quality monitoring system in Washington are presented.

  13. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris; Larson, David

    1997-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  14. Airborne thermography or infrared remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Goillot, C C

    1975-01-01

    Airborne thermography is part of the more general remote sensing activity. The instruments suitable for image display are infrared line scanners. A great deal of interest has developed during the past 10 years in airborne thermal remote sensing and many applications are in progress. Infrared scanners on board a satellite are used for observation of cloud cover; airborne infrared scanners are used for forest fire detection, heat budget of soils, detecting insect attack, diseases, air pollution damage, water stress, salinity stress on vegetation, only to cite some main applications relevant to agronomy. Using this system it has become possible to get a 'picture' of our thermal environment.

  15. Airborne remote sensing of forest biomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne sensor data of forest biomes obtained using an SAR, a laser profiler, an IR MSS, and a TM simulator are presented and examined. The SAR was utilized to investigate forest canopy structures in Mississippi and Costa Rica; the IR MSS measured forest canopy temperatures in Oregon and Puerto Rico; the TM simulator was employed in a tropical forest in Puerto Rico; and the laser profiler studied forest canopy characteristics in Costa Rica. The advantages and disadvantages of airborne systems are discussed. It is noted that the airborne sensors provide measurements applicable to forest monitoring programs.

  16. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  17. A model of the 1.6 GHz scatterometer. [performance of airborne scatterometer used as microwave remote sensor of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The performance was studied of the 1.6 GHz airborne scatterometer system which is used as one of several Johnson Space Center (JSC) microwave remote sensors to detect moisture content of soil. The system is analyzed with respect to its antenna pattern and coupling, the signal flow in the receiver data channels, and the errors in the signal outputs. The operational principle and the sensitivity of the system, as well as data handling are also described. The finite cross-polarized gains of all four 1.6 GHz scatterometer antennae are found to have profound influence on the cross-polarized backscattered signal returns. If these signals are not analyzed properly, large errors could result in the estimate of the cross-polarized coefficient. It is also found necessary to make corrections to the variations of the aircraft parameters during data reduction in order to minimize the error in the coefficient estimate. Finally, a few recommendations are made to improve the overall performance of the scatterometer system.

  18. Global Test Range: Toward Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Freudinger, Larry; DelFrate John H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planned global sensor network that will monitor the Earth's climate, and resources using airborne sensor systems. The vision is an intelligent, affordable Earth Observation System. Global Test Range is a lab developing trustworthy services for airborne instruments - a specialized Internet Service Provider. There is discussion of several current and planned missions.

  19. Airborne remote sensing applications to coastal wave research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Paul A.; Walsh, Edward J.; Krabill, William B.; Swift, Robert N.; Manizade, Serdar S.; Scott, John F.; Earle, Marshall D.

    1998-08-01

    Airborne sensors provide effective coverage of a broad region and are suitable for large-scale experiments. In this paper, two scanning sensors that use the direct ranging technique to measure surface wave displacement are described. On a NASA P-3 aircraft the sensors can complete one run across a 100-km continental shelf in 17 min. A case study is presented using radar-measured, two-dimensional surface topography to derive wave damping due to bottom friction. The results are in good agreement with an analytical model based on a quadratic formulation of bottom shear stress. This study demonstrates that remote sensing measurements can be used for rapid characterization of surface waves on the continental shelf and in coastal regions. Examples illustrated in this paper include the derivation of wavenumber spectra and estimation of the dissipation rate of shoaling ocean swell.

  20. NEON Airborne Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Karpowicz, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is the continental-scale research platform that will collect information on ecosystems across the United States to advance our understanding and ability to forecast environmental change at the continental scale. One of NEON's observing systems, the Airborne Observation Platform (AOP), will fly an instrument suite consisting of a high-fidelity visible-to-shortwave infrared imaging spectrometer, a full waveform small footprint LiDAR, and a high-resolution digital camera on a low-altitude aircraft platform. NEON AOP is focused on acquiring data on several terrestrial Essential Climate Variables including bioclimate, biodiversity, biogeochemistry, and land use products. These variables are collected throughout a network of 60 sites across the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico via ground-based and airborne measurements. Airborne remote sensing plays a critical role by providing measurements at the scale of individual shrubs and larger plants over hundreds of square kilometers. The NEON AOP plays the role of bridging the spatial scales from that of individual organisms and stands to the scale of satellite-based remote sensing. NEON is building 3 airborne systems to facilitate the routine coverage of NEON sites and provide the capacity to respond to investigator requests for specific projects. The first NEON imaging spectrometer, a next-generation VSWIR instrument, was recently delivered to NEON by JPL. This instrument has been integrated with a small-footprint waveform LiDAR on the first NEON airborne platform (AOP-1). A series of AOP-1 test flights were conducted during the first year of NEON's construction phase. The goal of these flights was to test out instrument functionality and performance, exercise remote sensing collection protocols, and provide provisional data for algorithm and data product validation. These test flights focused the following questions: What is the optimal remote

  1. remote sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Unold, Georg; Junker, Astrid; Altmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    High-throughput (HT) plant phenotyping systems enable the quantitative analysis of a variety of plant features in a fully automated fashion. The comprehensive phenomics infrastructure at IPK comprises three LemnaTec conveyor belt-based (plant-to-sensor) systems for the simultaneous analysis of large numbers of individual plants of different sizes. For monitoring of environmental conditions within the plant growth area and soil conditions in individual pots, highly modular and flexible remote sensing devices are required. We present the architecture of a wireless sensor network implemented in the HT plant phenotyping systems at IPK in the frame of the German Plant Phenotyping Network (DPPN). This system comprises 350 soil monitoring modules, each measuring water content, water matrix potential, temperature and electric conductivity. Furthermore small and large sensor platforms enable the continuous monitoring of environmental parameters such as incident photosynthetic active radiation, total radiation balance, relative humidity and CO2 concentration and more. Finally we present an introduction into data management and maintenance."

  2. Past, present, and future of the INTA airborne remote sensing laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz de Aguilar, Javier; Fernandez Renau, Alix; Gomez Sanchez, Jose A.; Gutierrez de la Camara, Oscar

    2003-04-01

    The remote sensing laboratory belongs to the Earth Observation, Remote Sensing and Atmospheric Research division of INTA. INTA is a government research organization of the Spanish Department of Defense. INTA has been performing airborne remote sensing campaigns since 1975. The Remote Sensing Laboratory is devoted to the application and development of both aerial and space remote sensing technqiues. It owns both, personnel and technology suitable to perform flight campaigns in order to acquire remote sensing images and, with the help of precise image processing techniques, extract useful information. Currently has two different airborne platforms, for remote sensing and for atmospheric research, and is in the process of specification of a new platform for generation research. INTA is partner of the Concerted Action 'European Fleet for Airborne Research'. This paper describes the INTA platform, sensors, systems and its integration in the aircraft. The experience in airborne remote sensing campaigns also described. The research campaigns performed show their application in comparison with satellite remote sensing. Some examples of this are, evaluation of future space sensors, calibration and validation of images acquired by operative space platforms, environmental impact of ecological distasters, ocean surfaces characteristics, wetland mapping and fire analysis.

  3. Innovativ Airborne Sensors for Disaster Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altan, M. O.; Kemper, G.

    2016-06-01

    Disaster management by analyzing changes in the DSM before and after the "event". Advantage of Lidar is that beside rain and clouds, no other weather conditions limit their use. As an active sensor, missions in the nighttime are possible. The new mid-format cameras that make use CMOS sensors (e.g. Phase One IXU1000) can capture data also under poor and difficult light conditions and might will be the first choice for remotely sensed data acquisition in aircrafts and UAVs. UAVs will surely be more and more part of the disaster management on the detailed level. Today equipped with video live cams using RGB and Thermal IR, they assist in looking inside buildings and behind. Thus, they can continue with the aerial survey where airborne anomalies have been detected.

  4. Monitoring marine pollution by airborne remote sensing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yuanfu, S.; Quanan, Z.

    1982-06-01

    In order to monitor marine pollution by airborne remote sensing techniques, some comprehensive test of airborne remote sensing, involving monitoring marine oil pollution, were performed at several bay areas of China. This paper presents some typical results of monitoring marine oil pollution. The features associated with the EM spectrum (visible, thermal infrared, and microwave) response of marine oil spills is briefly analyzed. It has been verified that the airborne oil surveillance systems manifested their advantages for monitoring the oil pollution of bay environments.

  5. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  6. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-jin; Jung, Jungkyo; Kang, Ki-mook; Kim, Seung Hee; Xu, Zhen; Hensley, Scott; Swan, Aaron; Duersch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge. PMID:26437413

  7. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-jin; Jung, Jungkyo; Kang, Ki-mook; Kim, Seung Hee; Xu, Zhen; Hensley, Scott; Swan, Aaron; Duersch, Michael

    2015-09-30

    Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge.

  8. Design and performance of a multiwavelength airborne polarimetric lidar for vegetation remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Songxin; Narayanan, Ram M

    2004-04-10

    The University of Nebraska has developed a multiwavelength airborne polarimetric lidar (MAPL) system to support its Airborne Remote Sensing Program for vegetation remote sensing. The MAPL design and instrumentation are described in detail. Characteristics of the MAPL system include lidar waveform capture and polarimetric measurement capabilities, which provide enhanced opportunities for vegetation remote sensing compared with current sensors. Field tests were conducted to calibrate the range measurement. Polarimetric calibration of the system is also discussed. Backscattered polarimetric returns, as well as the cross-polarization ratios, were obtained from a small forested area to validate the system's ability for vegetation canopy detection. The system has been packaged to fly abroad a Piper Saratoga aircraft for airborne vegetation remote sensing applications.

  9. Remote sensing for non-renewable resources - Satellite and airborne multiband scanners for mineral exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1986-01-01

    The application of remote sensing techniques to mineral exploration involves the use of both spatial (morphological) as well as spectral information. This paper is directed toward a discussion of the uses of spectral image information and emphasizes the newest airborne and spaceborne sensor developments involving imaging spectrometers.

  10. An airborne multispectral imaging system based on two consumer-grade cameras for agricultural remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of an airborne multispectral imaging system based on two identical consumer-grade cameras for agricultural remote sensing. The cameras are equipped with a full-frame complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor with 5616 × 3744 pixels. One came...

  11. Airborne Sensor Thermal Management Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K. K.

    2015-06-03

    The customer wants to outfit aircraft (de Havilland Twin Otter) with optical sensors. In previous product generations the sensor line-of-sight direction was fixed – the sensor’s direction relied on the orientation of the aircraft. The next generation sensor will be packaged in a rotatable turret so that the line-of-sight is reasonably independent of the aircraft’s orientation. This turret will be mounted on a boom protruding from the side of the aircraft. The customer wants to outfit aircraft (de Havilland Twin Otter) with optical sensors. In previous product generations the sensor line-of-sight direction was fixed – the sensor’s direction relied on the orientation of the aircraft. The next generation sensor will be packaged in a rotatable turret so that the line-of-sight is reasonably independent of the aircraft’s orientation. This turret will be mounted on a boom protruding from the side of the aircraft.

  12. Airborne laser sensors and integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark A.; Gardi, Alessandro; Ramasamy, Subramanian

    2015-11-01

    The underlying principles and technologies enabling the design and operation of airborne laser sensors are introduced and a detailed review of state-of-the-art avionic systems for civil and military applications is presented. Airborne lasers including Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR), Laser Range Finders (LRF), and Laser Weapon Systems (LWS) are extensively used today and new promising technologies are being explored. Most laser systems are active devices that operate in a manner very similar to microwave radars but at much higher frequencies (e.g., LIDAR and LRF). Other devices (e.g., laser target designators and beam-riders) are used to precisely direct Laser Guided Weapons (LGW) against ground targets. The integration of both functions is often encountered in modern military avionics navigation-attack systems. The beneficial effects of airborne lasers including the use of smaller components and remarkable angular resolution have resulted in a host of manned and unmanned aircraft applications. On the other hand, laser sensors performance are much more sensitive to the vagaries of the atmosphere and are thus generally restricted to shorter ranges than microwave systems. Hence it is of paramount importance to analyse the performance of laser sensors and systems in various weather and environmental conditions. Additionally, it is important to define airborne laser safety criteria, since several systems currently in service operate in the near infrared with considerable risk for the naked human eye. Therefore, appropriate methods for predicting and evaluating the performance of infrared laser sensors/systems are presented, taking into account laser safety issues. For aircraft experimental activities with laser systems, it is essential to define test requirements taking into account the specific conditions for operational employment of the systems in the intended scenarios and to verify the performance in realistic environments at the test ranges. To support the

  13. Cyberinfrastructure for Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004 the NASA Airborne Science Program has been prototyping and using infrastructure that enables researchers to interact with each other and with their instruments via network communications. This infrastructure uses satellite links and an evolving suite of applications and services that leverage open-source software. The use of these tools has increased near-real-time situational awareness during field operations, resulting in productivity improvements and the collection of better data. This paper describes the high-level system architecture and major components, with example highlights from the use of the infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of ongoing efforts to transition to operational status.

  14. Remote sensing of soil moisture using airborne hyperspectral data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, M.; Lewis, M.; Bosch, D.; Giraldo, Mario; Yamamoto, K.; Sullivan, D.; Kincaid, R.; Luna, R.; Allam, G.; Kvien, Craig; Williams, M.

    2011-01-01

    Landscape assessment of soil moisture is critical to understanding the hydrological cycle at the regional scale and in broad-scale studies of biophysical processes affected by global climate changes in temperature and precipitation. Traditional efforts to measure soil moisture have been principally restricted to in situ measurements, so remote sensing techniques are often employed. Hyperspectral sensors with finer spatial resolution and narrow band widths may offer an alternative to traditional multispectral analysis of soil moisture, particularly in landscapes with high spatial heterogeneity. This preliminary research evaluates the ability of remotely sensed hyperspectral data to quantify soil moisture for the Little River Experimental Watershed (LREW), Georgia. An airborne hyperspectral instrument with a short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) sensor was flown in 2005 and 2007 and the results were correlated to in situ soil moisture values. A significant statistical correlation (R2 value above 0.7 for both sampling dates) for the hyperspectral instrument data and the soil moisture probe data at 5.08 cm (2 inches) was determined. While models for the 20.32 cm (8 inches) and 30.48 cm (12 inches) depths were tested, they were not able to estimate soil moisture to the same degree.

  15. Remote sensing of soil moisture using airborne hyperspectral data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Michael P.; Lewis, Mark (David); Bosch, David D.; Giraldo, Mario; Yamamoto, Kristina H.; Sullivan, Dana G.; Kincaid, Russell; Luna, Ronaldo; Allam, Gopala Krishna; Kvien, Craig; Williams, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Landscape assessment of soil moisture is critical to understanding the hydrological cycle at the regional scale and in broad-scale studies of biophysical processes affected by global climate changes in temperature and precipitation. Traditional efforts to measure soil moisture have been principally restricted to in situ measurements, so remote sensing techniques are often employed. Hyperspectral sensors with finer spatial resolution and narrow band widths may offer an alternative to traditional multispectral analysis of soil moisture, particularly in landscapes with high spatial heterogeneity. This preliminary research evaluates the ability of remotely sensed hyperspectral data to quantify soil moisture for the Little River Experimental Watershed (LREW), Georgia. An airborne hyperspectral instrument with a short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) sensor was flown in 2005 and 2007 and the results were correlated to in situ soil moisture values. A significant statistical correlation (R 2 value above 0.7 for both sampling dates) for the hyperspectral instrument data and the soil moisture probe data at 5.08 cm (2 inches) was determined. While models for the 20.32 cm (8 inches) and 30.48 cm (12 inches) depths were tested, they were not able to estimate soil moisture to the same degree.

  16. ASPIS, A Flexible Multispectral System for Airborne Remote Sensing Environmental Applications

    PubMed Central

    Papale, Dario; Belli, Claudio; Gioli, Beniamino; Miglietta, Franco; Ronchi, Cesare; Vaccari, Francesco Primo; Valentini, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Airborne multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing is a powerful tool for environmental monitoring applications. In this paper we describe a new system (ASPIS) composed by a 4-CCD spectral sensor, a thermal IR camera and a laser altimeter that is mounted on a flexible Sky-Arrow airplane. A test application of the multispectral sensor to estimate durum wheat quality is also presented. PMID:27879875

  17. Second International Airborne Remote Sensing Conference and Exhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    cloud cover analysis, Quadantid meteor shower studies, extra-solar far infrared ionic structure lines measurement, Cape Kennedy launch support, and studies in air pollution, The Products and Services Exhibit showcased new sensor and image processing technologies, aircraft data collection services, unmanned vehicle technology, platform equipment, turn-key services, software a workstations, GPS services, publications, and processing and integration systems by 58 exhibitors. The participation of aircraft users and crews provided unique dialogue between those who plan data collection a operate the remote sensing technology, and those who supply the data processing and integration equipment. Research results using hyperspectral imagery, radar and optical sensors, lidar, digital aerial photography, a integrated systems were presented. Major research and development programs and campaigns we reviewed, including CNR's LARA Project and European Space Agency's 1991-1995 Airborne Campaign. The pre-conference short courses addressed airborne video, photogrammetry, hyperspectral data analysis, digital orthophotography, imagery and GIS integration, IFSAR, GPS, and spectrometer calibration.

  18. Parameterization of gaseous constituencies concentration profiles in the planetary boundary layer as required in support of airborne and satellite borne sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindle, E. C.; Condon, E.; Casas, J.

    1976-01-01

    The research to develop the capabilities for sensing air pollution constituencies using satellite or airborne remote sensors is reported. Sensor evaluation and calibration are analyzed including data reduction. The proposed follow-on research is presented.

  19. Assessment of Superflux relative to remote sensing. [airborne remote sensing of the Chesapeake Bay plume and shelf regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The state-of-the-art advancements in remote sensor technology due to the Superflux program are examined. Three major individual sensor technologies benefitted from the program: laser fluorosensors, optical-range scanners, and passive microwave sensors. Under Superflux, convincing evidence was obtained that the airborne oceanographic lidar fluorosensor can map chlorophyll, i.e., is linear, over a wide range from less than 0.5 to 5.0 mg/cu m. The lidar oceanographic probe dual-excitation concept for addressing phytoplankton color group composition was also demonstrated convincingly. Algorithm development, real time capabilities, and multisensor integration are also addressed.

  20. The Multi-Center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor, MACAWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Menzies, Robert T.; Howell, James; Johnson, Steven C.; Tratt, David M.; Olivier, Lisa D.; Banta, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    In 1992 the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory began a joint collaboration to develop an airborne high-energy Doppler laser radar (lidar) system for atmospheric research and satellite validation and simulation studies. The result is the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor, MACAWS, which has the capability to remotely sense the distribution of wind and absolute aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A factor critical to the programmatic feasibility and technical success of this collaboration has been the utilization of existing components and expertise which were developed for previous atmospheric research by the respective institutions. The motivation for the MACAWS program Is three-fold: to obtain fundamental measurements of sub-synoptic scale processes and features which may be used as a basis to improve sub-grid scale parameterizations in large-scale models; to obtain similar datasets in order to improve the understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to validate (simulate) the performance of existing (planned) satellite-borne sensors. Examples of the latter include participation in the validation of the NASA Scatterometer and the assessment of prospective satellite Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurement. Initial flight tests were made in September 1995; subsequent flights were made in June 1996 following improvements. This paper describes the MACAWS instrument, principles of operation, examples of measurements over the eastern Pacific Ocean and western United States, and future applications.

  1. Sensor fusion for airborne landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Miranda A.; Gader, Paul D.; Bolton, Jeremy; Zare, Alina; Mendez-Vasquez, Andres

    2006-05-01

    Sensor fusion has become a vital research area for mine detection because of the countermine community's conclusion that no single sensor is capable of detecting mines at the necessary detection and false alarm rates over a wide variety of operating conditions. The U. S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) evaluates sensors and algorithms for use in a multi-sensor multi-platform airborne detection modality. A large dataset of hyperspectral and radar imagery exists from the four major data collections performed at U. S. Army temperate and arid testing facilities in Autumn 2002, Spring 2003, Summer 2004, and Summer 2005. There are a number of algorithm developers working on single-sensor algorithms in order to optimize feature and classifier selection for that sensor type. However, a given sensor/algorithm system has an absolute limitation based on the physical phenomena that system is capable of sensing. Therefore, we perform decision-level fusion of the outputs from single-channel algorithms and we choose to combine systems whose information is complementary across operating conditions. That way, the final fused system will be robust to a variety of conditions, which is a critical property of a countermine detection system. In this paper, we present the analysis of fusion algorithms on data from a sensor suite consisting of high frequency radar imagery combined with hyperspectral long-wave infrared sensor imagery. The main type of fusion being considered is Choquet integral fusion. We evaluate performance achieved using the Choquet integral method for sensor fusion versus Boolean and soft "and," "or," mean, or majority voting.

  2. Estimating the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration using the water balance model WAVE and fine spatial resolution airborne remote sensing images from the DAIS-sensor: Experimental set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Veroustraete, F.; Feyen, J.

    2003-04-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ET) of agricultural land and forestland surfaces play an important role in the redistribution of water on the Earth's surface. Any change in evapotranspiration, either through change in vegetation or climate change, directly effects the available water resources. For quantifying these effects physical models need to be constructed. Most hydrological models have to deal with a lack of good spatial resolution, despite their good temporal information. Remote sensing techniques on the contrary determine the spatial pattern of landscape features and hence are very useful on large scales. The main objective of this research is the combination of the spatial pattern of remote sensing (using visible and thermal infrared spectrum) with the temporal pattern of the water balance model WAVE (Vanclooster et al., 1994 and 1996). To realise this, the following objectives are formulated: (i) relate soil and vegetation surface temperatures to actual evapotranspiration of forest and crops simulated with the water balance model WAVE using remote sensing derived parameters. Three methods will be used and mutually compared. Both airborne and satellite imagery will be implemented; (1) compare the spatial pattern of evapotranspiration, as a result of the three methods, with the energy balance model SEBAL (Bastiaanssen et al., 1998) and finally; (2) subject the up-scaled WAVE and SEBAL models to an uncertainty analysis using the GLUE-approach (Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimate) (Beven en Binley, 1992). To study the behaviour of the model beyond the field-scale (micro-scale), a meso-scale study was conducted at the test-site of DURAS (50°50'38"N, 5°08'50"W, Sint-Truiden). Airborne imagery from the DAIS/ROSIS sensor are available. For the determination of the spatial pattern of actual evapotranspiration the next two methods are considered: (1) relations between surface temperature, surface albedo and vegetation indices are linked with field

  3. Simulating optoelectronic systems for remote sensing with SENSOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Anko

    2003-04-01

    The consistent end-to-end simulation of airborne and spaceborne remote sensing systems is an important task and sometimes the only way for the adaptation and optimization of a sensor and its observation conditions, the choice and test of algorithms for data processing, error estimation and the evaluation of the capabilities of the whole sensor system. The presented software simulator SENSOR (Software ENvironment for the Simulation of Optical Remote sensing systems) includes a full model of the sensor hardware, the observed scene, and the atmosphere in between. It allows the simulation of a wide range of optoelectronic systems for remote sensing. The simulator consists of three parts. The first part describes the geometrical relations between scene, sun, and the remote sensing system using a ray tracing algorithm. The second part of the simulation environment considers the radiometry. It calculates the at-sensor radiance using a pre-calculated multidimensional lookup-table taking the atmospheric influence on the radiation into account. Part three consists of an optical and an electronic sensor model for the generation of digital images. Using SENSOR for an optimization requires the additional application of task-specific data processing algorithms. The principle of the end-to-end-simulation approach is explained, all relevant concepts of SENSOR are discussed, and examples of its use are given. The verification of SENSOR is demonstrated.

  4. Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhothermel, Jeffry; Jones, W. D.; Dunkin, J. A.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This effort involves development of a calibrated, pulsed coherent CO2 Doppler lidar, followed by a carefully-planned and -executed program of multi-dimensional wind velocity and aerosol backscatter measurements from the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The lidar, designated as the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS), will be applicable to two research areas. First, MACAWS will enable specialized measurements of atmospheric dynamical processes in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere in geographic locations and over scales of motion not routinely or easily accessible to conventional sensors. The proposed observations will contribute fundamentally to a greater understanding of the role of the mesoscale, helping to improve predictive capabilities for mesoscale phenomena and to provide insights into improving model parameterizations of sub-grid scale processes within large-scale circulation models. As such, it has the potential to contribute uniquely to major, multi-institutional field programs planned for the mid 1990's. Second, MACAWS measurements can be used to reduce the degree of uncertainty in performance assessments and algorithm development for NASA's prospective Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), which has no space-based instrument heritage. Ground-based lidar measurements alone are insufficient to address all of the key issues. To minimize costs, MACAWS is being developed cooperatively by the lidar remote sensing groups of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, and MSFC using existing lidar hardware and manpower resources. Several lidar components have already been exercised in previous airborne lidar programs (for example, MSFC Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) used in 1981,4 Severe Storms Wind Measurement Program; JPL Airborne Backscatter Lidar Experiment (ABLE) used in 1989,90 Global Backscatter Experiment Survey Missions). MSFC has been given responsibility for directing the overall

  5. Remote sensing of soil moisture using airborne hyperspectral data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Institute for Technology Development (ITD) has developed an airborne hyperspectral sensor system that collects electromagnetic reflectance data of the terrain. The system consists of sensors for three different sections of the electromagnetic spectrum; the Ultra-Violet (UV), Visible/Near Infrare...

  6. Airborne Remote Sensing for Earth Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrey, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Passive Remote Sensing Methods, Imaging Spectroscopy Approach, Remote Measurement via Spectral Fitting, Imaging Spectroscopy Mapping Wetland Dominants 2010 LA (AVIRIS), Deepwater Horizon Response I, Deepwater Horizon Response II, AVIRIS Ocean Color Studies.

  7. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Leidichj, Christopher; Papasin, Richard; Tran, Peter B.; Bass, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Networks of video cameras, meteorological sensors, and ancillary electronic equipment are under development in collaboration among NASA Ames Research Center, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These networks are to be established at and near airports to provide real-time information on local weather conditions that affect aircraft approaches and landings. The prototype network is an airport-approach-zone camera system (AAZCS), which has been deployed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and San Carlos Airport (SQL). The AAZCS includes remotely controlled color video cameras located on top of SFO and SQL air-traffic control towers. The cameras are controlled by the NOAA Center Weather Service Unit located at the Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center and are accessible via a secure Web site. The AAZCS cameras can be zoomed and can be panned and tilted to cover a field of view 220 wide. The NOAA observer can see the sky condition as it is changing, thereby making possible a real-time evaluation of the conditions along the approach zones of SFO and SQL. The next-generation network, denoted a remote tower sensor system (RTSS), will soon be deployed at the Half Moon Bay Airport and a version of it will eventually be deployed at Los Angeles International Airport. In addition to remote control of video cameras via secure Web links, the RTSS offers realtime weather observations, remote sensing, portability, and a capability for deployment at remote and uninhabited sites. The RTSS can be used at airports that lack control towers, as well as at major airport hubs, to provide synthetic augmentation of vision for both local and remote operations under what would otherwise be conditions of low or even zero visibility.

  8. Applications of airborne remote sensing in atmospheric sciences research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafin, R. J.; Szejwach, G.; Phillips, B. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper explores the potential for airborne remote sensing for atmospheric sciences research. Passive and active techniques from the microwave to visible bands are discussed. It is concluded that technology has progressed sufficiently in several areas that the time is right to develop and operate new remote sensing instruments for use by the community of atmospheric scientists as general purpose tools. Promising candidates include Doppler radar and lidar, infrared short range radiometry, and microwave radiometry.

  9. Multi-center airborne coherent atmospheric wind sensor (MACAWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.; Tratt, D.M.

    1996-11-01

    The Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) is an airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar designed to acquire remote multi-dimensional measurements of winds and absolute aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. These measurements enable study of atmospheric dynamic processes and features at scales of motion that may be undersampled by, or may be beyond the capability of, existing or planned sensors. MACAWS capabilities enable more realistic assessments of concepts in global tropospheric wind measurement with satellite Doppler lidar, as well as a unique capability to validate the NASA Scatterometer currently scheduled for launch in late 1996. MACAWS consists of a Joule-class CO{sub 2} coherent Doppler lidar on a ruggedized optical table, a programmable scanner to direct the lidar beam in the desired direction, and a dedicated inertial navigation system to account for variable aircraft attitude and speed. MACAWS was flown for the first time in September 1995, over the eastern Pacific Ocean and western US. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Airborne remote sensing for Deepwater Horizon oil spill emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroutil, Robert T.; Shen, Sylvia S.; Lewis, Paul E.; Miller, David P.; Cardarelli, John; Thomas, Mark; Curry, Timothy; Kudaraskus, Paul

    2010-08-01

    On April 28, 2010, the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) aircraft was deployed to Gulfport, Mississippi to provide airborne remotely sensed air monitoring and situational awareness data and products in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster. The ASPECT aircraft was released from service on August 9, 2010 after having flown over 75 missions that included over 250 hours of flight operation. ASPECT's initial mission responsibility was to provide air quality monitoring (i.e., identification of vapor species) during various oil burning operations. The ASPECT airborne wide-area infrared remote sensing spectral data was used to evaluate the hazard potential of vapors being produced from open water oil burns near the Deepwater Horizon rig site. Other significant remote sensing data products and innovations included the development of an advanced capability to correctly identify, locate, characterize, and quantify surface oil that could reach beaches and wetland areas. This advanced identification product provided the Incident Command an improved capability to locate surface oil in order to improve the effectiveness of oil skimmer vessel recovery efforts directed by the US Coast Guard. This paper discusses the application of infrared spectroscopy and multispectral infrared imagery to address significant issues associated with this national crisis. More specifically, this paper addresses the airborne remote sensing capabilities, technology, and data analysis products developed specifically to optimize the resources and capabilities of the Deepwater Horizon Incident Command structure personnel and their remediation efforts.

  11. Cloud detection using disposable airborne sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, K.; Harrison, R. G.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements from airborne platforms are important for studies of clouds' impact on the radiation balance and on precipitation. A range of small, low cost, disposable sensors has been developed for cloud detection from unmanned balloon or UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) platforms (Nicoll and Harrison, 2010). The techniques already deployed include exploiting the associated solar radiation modification, electric charge changes, and optical fluctuations due to cloud droplets. As well as needing to be inexpensive, the sensors are required to be lightweight (mass typically ~ 100g) with low consumption (typical power ~100mW), and have been tested alongside standard meteorological radiosondes, as well as on a small UAS (SUMO - Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (Reuder et al 2009)). Design criteria for these sensors will be discussed, as well as measurements from the test flights, through a variety of different cloud layers. The advantages of using optical and charge methods of cloud detection over the normal thermodynamic method deployed with conventional radiosondes (capacitative sensing of relative humidity combined with temperature measurements), will also be discussed. Nicoll K.A. and R.G. Harrison. Research Radiosondes, Met. Tech. Int. Nov 2010, 140 (2010). Reuder J., P. Brisset, M. Jonassen, M. Muller, S. Mayer. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO: A new tool for atmospheric boundary layer research Meteorologische Zeitschrift, Vol. 18, No. 2, 141-147 (2009).

  12. Airborne remote sensing combating marine pollution in the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, C.; Small, J.; Mason, D.

    1996-10-01

    The Marine Pollution Control Unit (MPCU) is a small command, control and rapid response Organization set up to exercise the responsibility accepted by the United Kingdom Government for counter pollution operations at sea when spilled oil (or other dangerous substances) from ships threatens major pollution of the UK coast. Resources used by WCU to respond to pollution incidents include two surveillance aircraft fitted with side-looking radar (SLAR), and infrared (IR) and ultra-violet (UV) Remote Sensing equipment. The paper will describe the use of Airborne Remote Sensing in an operational role and demonstrate how the United Kingdom Government responds to pollution incidents. The paper will also explain how Airborne Remote Sensing is used to patrol the waters surrounding the United Kingdom. Reference will be made to coordinated flights carried out under the Bonn Agreement, a non-mandatory support Organization involving all states bordering the North Sea, and the EU. 2 refs.

  13. The Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Menzies, Robert T.; Howell, James N.; Johnson, Steven C.; Tratt, David M.; Olivier, Lisa D.; Banta, Robert M.

    1998-04-01

    In 1992 the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory began a joint collaboration to develop an airborne high-energy Doppler laser radar (lidar) system for atmospheric research and satellite validation and simulation studies. The result is the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS), which has the capability to remotely sense the distribution of wind and absolute aerosol backscatter in three-dimensional volumes in the troposphere and lower stratosphere.A factor critical to the programmatic feasibility and technical success of this collaboration has been the utilization of existing components and expertise that were developed for previous atmospheric research by the respective institutions. For example, the laser transmitter is that of the mobile ground-based Doppler lidar system developed and used in atmospheric research for more than a decade at NOAA/ETL.The motivation for MACAWS is threefold: 1) to obtain fundamental measurements of subsynoptic-scale processes and features to improve subgrid-scale parameterizations in large-scale models, 2) to obtain datasets in order to improve the understanding of and predictive capabilities for meteorological systems on subsynoptic scales, and 3) to validate (simulate) the performance of existing (planned) satellite-borne sensors.Initial flight tests were made in September 1995; subsequent flights were made in June 1996 following system improvements. This paper describes the MACAWS instrument, principles of operation, examples of measurements over the eastern Pacific Ocean and western United States, and future applications.

  14. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Myers

    2003-11-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  15. Remote Attitude Measurement Sensor (RAMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. W.

    1989-01-01

    Remote attitude measurement sensor (RAMS) offers a low-cost, low-risk, proven design concept that is based on mature, demonstrated space sensor technology. The electronic design concepts and interpolation algorithms were tested and proven in space hardware like th Retroreflector Field Tracker and various star trackers. The RAMS concept is versatile and has broad applicability to both ground testing and spacecraft needs. It is ideal for use as a precision laboratory sensor for structural dynamics testing. It requires very little set-up or preparation time and the output data is immediately usable without integration or extensive analysis efforts. For on-orbit use, RAMS rivals any other type of dynamic structural sensor (accelerometer, lidar, photogrammetric techniques, etc.) for overall performance, reliability, suitability, and cost. Widespread acceptance and extensive usage of RAMS will occur only after some interested agency, such as OAST, adopts the RAMS concept and provides the funding support necessary for further development and implementation of RAMS for a specific program.

  16. FIRRE Remote Sensor Station (RSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshanks, J. R.; Wickstrand, E. L.; Kramer, T. A.; Laird, R. T.; Barngrover, C. M.; Gardner, C. W.

    2006-05-01

    The Family of Integrated Rapid Response Equipment (FIRRE) is an advanced technology demonstration program intended to develop a family of affordable, scalable, modular, and logistically supportable unmanned systems to meet urgent operational force protection needs and requirements worldwide. The near-term goal is to provide the best available unmanned ground systems to the warfighter in Iraq and Afghanistan. The overarching long-term goal is to develop a fully-integrated, layered force protection system of systems for our forward deployed forces that is networked with the future force C4ISR systems architecture. The intent of the FIRRE program is to reduce manpower requirements, enhance force protection capabilities, and reduce casualties through the use of unmanned systems. FIRRE is sponsored by the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense, Acquisitions, Technology and Logistics (OUSD AT&L), and is managed by the Product Manager, Force Protection Systems (PM-FPS). The Remote Sensor Station (RSS) provides FIRRE with the ability to remote (or extend the range of) manned/unmanned sensors. The RSS consists of three primary components: (1) an actively cooled and hermetically sealed (NEMA-4X) electronics enclosure, (2) a 22' telescoping tower, (3) and the PM-MEP 531A 2KW GENSET. The current configuration supports a Digital Imaging Infrared (DII) DI-5000 thermal imaging system/visual imaging system (TIS/VIS), a Syracuse Research Corporation (SRC) PPS-5D ground surveillance radar (GSR), an AN/PRS-9 (BAIS) unmanned ground sensor (UGS) receiver, an Intuicom Military Navigator II (MILNAVII) data link radio, and a DTC Communications Palladium 12000 audio/video (A/V) radio. The electronics box is insulated with a radiant barrier and fitted with a EIC Solutions 1500 BTU solid state thermoelectric cooler (TEC) capable of maintaining a safe operating temperature in extreme conditions (<120° Fahrenheit).

  17. Data processing of remotely sensed airborne hyperspectral data using the Airborne Processing Library (APL): Geocorrection algorithm descriptions and spatial accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Mark A.; Taylor, Benjamin H.; Grant, Michael G.; Shutler, Jamie D.

    2014-03-01

    Remote sensing airborne hyperspectral data are routinely used for applications including algorithm development for satellite sensors, environmental monitoring and atmospheric studies. Single flight lines of airborne hyperspectral data are often in the region of tens of gigabytes in size. This means that a single aircraft can collect terabytes of remotely sensed hyperspectral data during a single year. Before these data can be used for scientific analyses, they need to be radiometrically calibrated, synchronised with the aircraft's position and attitude and then geocorrected. To enable efficient processing of these large datasets the UK Airborne Research and Survey Facility has recently developed a software suite, the Airborne Processing Library (APL), for processing airborne hyperspectral data acquired from the Specim AISA Eagle and Hawk instruments. The APL toolbox allows users to radiometrically calibrate, geocorrect, reproject and resample airborne data. Each stage of the toolbox outputs data in the common Band Interleaved Lines (BILs) format, which allows its integration with other standard remote sensing software packages. APL was developed to be user-friendly and suitable for use on a workstation PC as well as for the automated processing of the facility; to this end APL can be used under both Windows and Linux environments on a single desktop machine or through a Grid engine. A graphical user interface also exists. In this paper we describe the Airborne Processing Library software, its algorithms and approach. We present example results from using APL with an AISA Eagle sensor and we assess its spatial accuracy using data from multiple flight lines collected during a campaign in 2008 together with in situ surveyed ground control points.

  18. Application of airborne remote sensing to the ancient Pompeii site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitiello, Fausto; Giordano, Antonio; Borfecchia, Flavio; Martini, Sandro; De Cecco, Luigi

    1996-12-01

    The ancient Pompeii site is in the Sarno Valley, an area of about 400 km2 in the South of Italy near Naples, that was utilized by man since old time (thousands of years ago). Actually the valley is under critical environmental conditions because of the relevant industrial development. ENEA is conducting various studies and research in the valley. ENEA is employing historical research, ground campaigns, cartography and up-to-date airborne multispectral remote sensing technologies to make a geographical information system. Airborne remote sensing technologies are very suitable for situations as that of the Sarno Valley. The paper describes the archaeological application of the research in progress as regarding the ancient site of Pompeii and its fluvial port.

  19. Airborne FTIR remote sensing of methane from the FAAM aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Grant; Illingworth, Samuel; Mead, Iq; Harlow, Chawn; Newman, Stuart; Vance, Alan

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the first campaign results for retrievals of methane (and other gases and thermodynamic parameters) from the Airborne Research Interferometer Evaluation System (ARIES) FTIR instrument on the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAE-146 aircraft. The ARIES is a thermal infrared BOMEM FTS tailored for airborne use and has an unapodised spectral resolution of 1 cm-1. It was developed as an IASI analogue for radiometric calibration of its satellite countepart. We will discuss the technical and theoretical assessment of the ARIES retrieval processor and present retrievals and interpretation of remote sampling over several years of campaign data in the tropics, around the UK, and in the high Arctic, during the Jaivex, GAUGE and MAMM campaigns respectively. Validation studies against airborne in situ data have shown that ARIES can achieve accuracties of ~2% in partial column retrievals of methane, while providing simultaneous information on a wide range of other trace gases typical of FTIR measurement. The ARIES has now beein in operation on the FAAM aircraft for a range of campaigns around the world and represents a useful validation bridge between high precision in situ point measurements (on the ground and by aircraft) and satellite remote sensing.

  20. ARE AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS A RISK FACTOR TO AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS IN REMOTE WESTERN NATIONAL PARKS (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) was initiated in 2002 by the National Park Service to determine if airborne contaminants were having an impact on remote western ecosystems. Multiple sample media (snow, water, sediment, fish and terrestrial vegetation...

  1. Airborne Remote Sensing of River Flow and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, S.; Anderson, S. P.; McLean, J.; Redford, R.

    2014-12-01

    River morphology, surface slope and flow are some of the fundamental measurements required for surface water monitoring and hydrodynamic research. This paper describes a method of combining bathymetric lidar with space-time processing of mid-wave infrared (MWIR) imagery to simultaneously measure bathymetry, currents and surface slope from an airborne platform. In May 2014, Areté installed a Pushbroom Imaging Lidar for Littoral Surveillance (PILLS) and a FLIR SC8000 MWIR imaging system sampling at 2 Hz in a small twin-engine aircraft. Data was collected over the lower Colorado River between Picacho Park and Parker. PILLS is a compact bathymetric lidar based on streak-tube sensor technology. It provides channel and bank topography and water surface elevation at 1 meter horizontal scales and 25 cm vertical accuracy. Surface currents are derived from the MWIR imagery by tracking surface features using a cross correlation algorithm. This approach enables the retrieval of currents along extended reaches at the forward speed of the aircraft with spatial resolutions down to 5 m with accuracy better than 10 cm/s. The fused airborne data captures current and depth variability on scales of meters over 10's of kilometers collected in just a few minutes. The airborne MWIR current retrievals are combined with the bathymetric lidar data to calculate river discharge which is then compared with real-time streamflow stations. The results highlight the potential for improving our understanding of complex river environments with simultaneous collections from multiple airborne sensors.

  2. BIOME: An Ecosystem Remote Sensor Based on Imaging Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, David L.; Hammer, Philip; Smith, William H.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Until recent times, optical remote sensing of ecosystem properties from space has been limited to broad band multispectral scanners such as Landsat and AVHRR. While these sensor data can be used to derive important information about ecosystem parameters, they are very limited for measuring key biogeochemical cycling parameters such as the chemical content of plant canopies. Such parameters, for example the lignin and nitrogen contents, are potentially amenable to measurements by very high spectral resolution instruments using a spectroscopic approach. Airborne sensors based on grating imaging spectrometers gave the first promise of such potential but the recent decision not to deploy the space version has left the community without many alternatives. In the past few years, advancements in high performance deep well digital sensor arrays coupled with a patented design for a two-beam interferometer has produced an entirely new design for acquiring imaging spectroscopic data at the signal to noise levels necessary for quantitatively estimating chemical composition (1000:1 at 2 microns). This design has been assembled as a laboratory instrument and the principles demonstrated for acquiring remote scenes. An airborne instrument is in production and spaceborne sensors being proposed. The instrument is extremely promising because of its low cost, lower power requirements, very low weight, simplicity (no moving parts), and high performance. For these reasons, we have called it the first instrument optimized for ecosystem studies as part of a Biological Imaging and Observation Mission to Earth (BIOME).

  3. Remote environmental sensor array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Geoffrey G.

    This thesis examines the creation of an environmental monitoring system for inhospitable environments. It has been named The Remote Environmental Sensor Array System or RESA System for short. This thesis covers the development of RESA from its inception, to the design and modeling of the hardware and software required to make it functional. Finally, the actual manufacture, and laboratory testing of the finished RESA product is discussed and documented. The RESA System is designed as a cost-effective way to bring sensors and video systems to the underwater environment. It contains as water quality probe with sensors such as dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, specific conductivity, oxidation-reduction potential and chlorophyll a. In addition, an omni-directional hydrophone is included to detect underwater acoustic signals. It has a colour, high-definition and a low-light, black and white camera system, which it turn are coupled to a laser scaling system. Both high-intensity discharge and halogen lighting system are included to illuminate the video images. The video and laser scaling systems are manoeuvred using pan and tilt units controlled from an underwater computer box. Finally, a sediment profile imager is included to enable profile images of sediment layers to be acquired. A control and manipulation system to control the instruments and move the data across networks is integrated into the underwater system while a power distribution node provides the correct voltages to power the instruments. Laboratory testing was completed to ensure that the different instruments associated with the RESA performed as designed. This included physical testing of the motorized instruments, calibration of the instruments, benchmark performance testing and system failure exercises.

  4. Remote query pressure measurement using magnetoelastic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Stoyanov, P. G.; Kouzoudis, D.; Ong, K. G.

    1999-12-01

    Two magnetostriction-based methods for measuring atmospheric pressure are presented. Each technique correlates changes in pressure with the characteristic resonant frequency of a magnetoelastic magnetostrictive thick-film sensor. In each case the sensor is monitored remotely, using an adjacently located pickup coil, without the use of physical connections to the sensor.

  5. Cross-calibration between airborne SAR sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Manfred; Olivier, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    As Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system performance and experience in SAR signature evaluation increase, quantitative analysis becomes more and more important. Such analyses require an absolute radiometric calibration of the complete SAR system. To keep the expenditure on calibration of future multichannel and multisensor remote sensing systems (e.g., X-SAR/SIR-C) within a tolerable level, data from different tracks and different sensors (channels) must be cross calibrated. The 1989 joint E-SAR/DC-8 SAR calibration campaign gave a first opportunity for such an experiment, including cross sensor and cross track calibration. A basic requirement for successful cross calibration is the stability of the SAR systems. The calibration parameters derived from different tracks and the polarimetric properties of the uncalibrated data are used to describe this stability. Quality criteria for a successful cross calibration are the agreement of alpha degree values and the consistency of radar cross sections of equally sized corner reflectors. Channel imbalance and cross talk provide additional quality in case of the polarimetric DC-8 SAR.

  6. Diffused Matrix Format: a new storage and processing format for airborne hyperspectral sensor images.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Pablo; Cristo, Alejandro; Koch, Magaly; Pérez, Rosa Ma; Schmid, Thomas; Hernández, Luz M

    2010-01-01

    At present, hyperspectral images are mainly obtained with airborne sensors that are subject to turbulences while the spectrometer is acquiring the data. Therefore, geometric corrections are required to produce spatially correct images for visual interpretation and change detection analysis. This paper analyzes the data acquisition process of airborne sensors. The main objective is to propose a new data format called Diffused Matrix Format (DMF) adapted to the sensor's characteristics including its spectral and spatial information. The second objective is to compare the accuracy of the quantitative maps derived by using the DMF data structure with those obtained from raster images based on traditional data structures. Results show that DMF processing is more accurate and straightforward than conventional image processing of remotely sensed data with the advantage that the DMF file structure requires less storage space than other data formats. In addition the data processing time does not increase when DMF is used.

  7. SENSOR: a tool for the simulation of hyperspectral remote sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Anko; Wiest, Lorenz; Keller, Peter; Reulke, Ralf; Richter, Rolf; Schaepman, Michael; Schläpfer, Daniel

    The consistent end-to-end simulation of airborne and spaceborne earth remote sensing systems is an important task, and sometimes the only way for the adaptation and optimisation of a sensor and its observation conditions, the choice and test of algorithms for data processing, error estimation and the evaluation of the capabilities of the whole sensor system. The presented software simulator SENSOR (Software Environment for the Simulation of Optical Remote sensing systems) includes a full model of the sensor hardware, the observed scene, and the atmosphere in between. The simulator consists of three parts. The first part describes the geometrical relations between scene, sun, and the remote sensing system using a ray-tracing algorithm. The second part of the simulation environment considers the radiometry. It calculates the at-sensor radiance using a pre-calculated multidimensional lookup-table taking the atmospheric influence on the radiation into account. The third part consists of an optical and an electronic sensor model for the generation of digital images. Using SENSOR for an optimisation requires the additional application of task-specific data processing algorithms. The principle of the end-to-end-simulation approach is explained, all relevant concepts of SENSOR are discussed, and first examples of its use are given. The verification of SENSOR is demonstrated. This work is closely related to the Airborne PRISM Experiment (APEX), an airborne imaging spectrometer funded by the European Space Agency.

  8. Remote sensor support requirements for planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddell, J. B.; Wheeler, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    The study approach, methods, results, and conclusions of remote sensor support requirements for planetary missions are summarized. Major efforts were made to (1) establish the scientific and engineering knowledge and observation requirements for planetary exploration in the 1975 to 1985 period; (2) define the state of the art and expected development of instrument systems appropriate for sensing planetary environments; (3) establish scaling laws relating performance and support requirements of candidate remote sensor systems; (4) establish fundamental remote sensor system capabilities, limitations, and support requirements during encounter and other dynamical conditions for specific missions; and (5) construct families of candidate remote sensors compatible with selected missions. It was recommended that these data be integrated with earlier results to enhance utility, and that more restrictions be placed on the system.

  9. Aerosol Optical Retrieval and Surface Reflectance from Airborne Remote Sensing Data over Land

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pignatti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550nm (τ550) and the surface reflectance (ρ) from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ550 with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ550 and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ550 retrieved by Module A (r2 = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08) and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r2 ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003). Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness. PMID:22163558

  10. Aerosol optical retrieval and surface reflectance from airborne remote sensing data over land.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pignatti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm (τ(550)) and the surface reflectance (ρ) from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ(550) with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ(550) and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ(550) retrieved by Module A (r(2) = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08) and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r(2) ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003). Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness.

  11. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Myers

    2004-05-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  12. A Nadir-adjusted Airborne Multi Spectral Imaging System (NAMSIS) for high-resolution remote sensing of carbon fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Scott, S.; Rahman, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing is widely used in vegetation monitoring, water stress detection and carbon cycle modeling. However, image pixels from high temporal resolution satellite sensors (such as MODIS) have coarse spatial resolution, much larger than the canopies they are supposed to characterize. An alternative solution for on-demand high spatial resolution remote sensing is sensors onboard low-flying aircrafts. Airborne remote sensing has been traditionally used in crop management studies. In this presentation we demonstrate the application of a relatively low-cost airborne sensor system with customized spectral band combinations for studying forest carbon fluxes. Our team has developed an Inertia Measurement Unit (IMU) controlled automated system to detach aircraft movements (pitch and roll) and engine vibration from the six-band programmable imager, in order to maintain the sensor at nadir view at all times during the flight. Flight lines are configured by a GPS-controleld system to simulate MODIS pixels. A feature-based algorithm is used to automatically generate a mosaic of individual images along the flight lines. This algorithm eliminates the need to mosiac and georeference images manually. An empirical line method is used to calculate reflectance from the raw data. Images from this airborne system produce reflectance values that are comparable with MODIS reflectance product. These high spatial resolution (~0.5 m) images deliver detailed information about tree species and phenological conditions within each MODIS pixel, and thus permit a high resolution spatio-temporal assessment of forest carbon fluxes.

  13. Polarimetric sensor systems for airborne ISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David; Foster, Joseph; Pezzaniti, Joseph; Harchanko, John; Aycock, Todd; Clark, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Over the last decade, polarimetric imaging technologies have undergone significant advancements that have led to the development of small, low-power polarimetric cameras capable of meeting current airborne ISR mission requirements. In this paper, we describe the design and development of a compact, real-time, infrared imaging polarimeter, provide preliminary results demonstrating the enhanced contrast possible with such a system, and discuss ways in which this technology can be integrated with existing manned and unmanned airborne platforms.

  14. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Myers

    2003-05-13

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This six-month technical report summarizes the progress for each of the proposed tasks, discusses project concerns, and outlines near-term goals. Ophir has completed a data survey of two major natural gas pipeline companies on the design requirements for an airborne, optical remote sensor. The results of this survey are disclosed in this report. A substantial amount of time was spent on modeling the expected optical signal at the receiver at different absorption wavelengths, and determining the impact of noise sources such as solar background, signal shot noise, and electronic noise on methane and ethane gas detection. Based upon the signal to noise modeling and industry input, Ophir finalized the design requirements for the airborne sensor, and released the critical sensor light source design requirements to qualified vendors. Responses from the vendors indicated that the light source was not commercially available, and will require a research and development effort to produce. Three vendors have responded positively with proposed design solutions. Ophir has decided to conduct short path optical laboratory experiments to verify the existence of methane and absorption at the specified wavelength, prior to proceeding with the light source selection. Techniques to eliminate common mode noise were also evaluated during the laboratory tests. Finally, Ophir has included a summary of the potential concerns for project success and has established future goals.

  15. Magnetoelastic sensors for remote query environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Ong, K. G.; Loiselle, K.; Stoyanov, P. G.; Kouzoudis, D.; Liu, Y.; Tong, C.; Tefiku, F.

    1999-10-01

    Magnetoelastic thin film sensors can be considered the magnetic analog of surface acoustic wave sensors, with the characteristic resonant frequency of the magnetoelastic sensor changing in response to different environmental parameters. We report on the application of magnetoelastic sensors for remote query measurement of pressure, temperature, liquid viscosity and, in combination with a glucose-responding mass-changing polymer, glucose concentrations. The advantage of using magnetoelastic sensors is that no direct physical connections, such as wires or cables, are required to obtain sensor information allowing the sensor to be monitored from inside sealed containers. Furthermore since it is the frequency response of the sensor that is monitored, rather than the amplitude, the relative orientation of the sensor with respect to the query field is unimportant.

  16. Validating surface energy balance fluxes derived from airborne remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Eguez, Jose Luis

    Remote sensing-derived energy balance components were compared against measured eddy covariance energy balance terms using heat flux source area models to validate the airborne multispectral remote sensing procedure in the estimation of instantaneous and daily evapotranspiration rates. A procedure was developed to generate raster layers of the footprint weights for weighting/integrating the different components of the energy balance model and obtain meaningful comparisons to similar energy balance terms measured at eddy covariance and/or Bowen ratio stations. Soil heat flux and surface aerodynamic temperature models were studied in an effort to improve the remote sensing estimation of distributed evapotranspiration rates. Aerial and ground data were acquired over a riparian corridor (Salt Cedar, Tamarix grove), soybean and cornfields (rainfed crops) in different ecosystems. The results confirmed that net radiation is well estimated with the remote sensing technique showing an estimation error of only -4.8 +/- 20.7 W m-2, (-0.5 +/- 3.6%). Linear and exponential soil heat flux models were found to correlate strongly to leaf area index and net radiation. The surface aerodynamic temperature term in the sensible heat flux equation was parameterized using surface radiometric temperature, air temperature, wind speed, and leaf area index. It is suggested that the surface aerodynamic temperature model be tested for a wide range of vegetation types, atmospheric stability conditions, surface heterogeneity, and ecosystems to assess the model limitations. The flux source area footprint model "FSAM" integrated heat flux pixels that compared better to measured values and it is recommended as a standard procedure to compare airborne remote sensing-derived heat fluxes against measured fluxes by eddy covariance systems; when compared to the "FASOWG" footprint model and simple arithmetic averages. Finally, the method that uses alfalfa reference daily evapotranspiration in

  17. Sensor motion control and mobile platforms for aquatic remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.

    2006-09-01

    Modern remote sensing systems used in repetitive environmental monitoring and surveillance applications are used on various platforms. These platforms can be categorized as stationary (fixed) or moving platforms. The sensing systems monitor the ambient environment which also may have inherent motion, such as the water surface with water waves. This is particularly the case for airborne or ship borne sensing of aquatic environments and is true for ground based walking or crawling systems. The time sequential comparison and spatial registration of sensor images, particularly "hyperspectral imagery" requires pixel to pixel registration for science based change and target (or medium) detection applications. These applications require sensor motion control combined with platform motion control. If the pixel sizes are small - on the order of 1 meter to less than 1 mm, then "nano-positioning accuracy" may be necessary for various aspects of the camera or surveillance sensor system, and/or related sensors used to control the moving platform. In this paper and presentation, an overview of converging technologies to sensor motion control and nano-positioning is discussed. The paper and presentation will demonstrate that the technologies converging on this aspect of remote sensing monitoring systems will require professionals with a combination of skills that are not readily available in today's workforce nor taught in educational programs today - especially at the undergraduate level. Thus there is a need to consider new avenues for educating professionals necessary to engineer and apply these converging technologies to important social environmental monitoring and surveillance needs.

  18. The Multi-Center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor: Recent Measurements and Future Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Darby, Lisa S.; Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    The coherent Doppler lidar, when operated from an airborne platform, offers a unique measurement capability for study of atmospheric dynamical and physical properties. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are at a disadvantage in terms of spatial resolution and coverage. Recent experience suggests airborne coherent Doppler lidar can yield unique wind measurements of--and during operation within--extreme weather phenomena. This paper presents the first airborne coherent Doppler lidar measurements of hurricane wind fields. The lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory jointly developed an airborne lidar system, the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS). The centerpiece of MACAWS is the lidar transmitter from the highly successful NOAA Windvan. Other field-tested lidar components have also been used, when feasible, to reduce costs and development time. The methodology for remotely sensing atmospheric wind fields with scanning coherent Doppler lidar was demonstrated in 1981; enhancements were made and the system was reflown in 1984. MACAWS has potentially greater scientific utility, compared to the original airborne scanning lidar system, owing to a factor of approx. 60 greater energy-per-pulse from the NOAA transmitter. MACAWS development was completed and the system was first flown in 1995. Following enhancements to improve performance, the system was re-flown in 1996 and 1998. The scientific motivation for MACAWS is three-fold: obtain fundamental measurements of subgrid scale (i.e., approx. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in hydrological, climate, and general

  19. Detecting coral reef substrate types by airborne and spaceborne hyperspectral sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutser, Tiit; Dekker, Arnold G.; Skirving, William

    2002-01-01

    Traditional approaches to remote sensing of coral reefs have been highly empirical, relying on classification of remote sensing images. We have chosen a physics based approach - the collection of reflectance spectra of different substrates and the determination of the inherent optical properties of the water column. This information, together with radiative transfer models of water and atmosphere as well as technical characteristics of different remote sensing sensors, allows us to estimate what benthic communities are spectrally resolvable with respect to water column depth and the sensor characteristics. A hyperspectral library of more than 140 different coral reefs substrates (living hard and soft corals, dead corals, rubble, sand, algae and sponges) were collected from the Great Barrier Reef. Hydrolight 4.1 model was used to simulate remote sensing reflectances above the water and a MODTRAN3 type in-house atmosphere model was used to simulate radiance at airborne and space borne sensor levels. Most of the spectral variability in reflectance of coral reef benthic communities occurs in the spectral range of 550-680 nm (green to red light). The water itself is a main limiting factor in remote detection of various reef substrates, as water itself is absorbing light strongly in the same part of the spectrum where most of the variability in reflectance spectra of different coral reef benthic substrates occurs. Hyperspectral information allows us to separate different substrates from each other more easily and in deeper waters than broad band sensors.

  20. Field of view selection for optimal airborne imaging sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Tristan M.; Barnard, P. Werner; Fildis, Halidun; Erbudak, Mustafa; Senger, Tolga; Alpman, Mehmet E.

    2014-05-01

    The choice of the Field of View (FOV) of imaging sensors used in airborne targeting applications has major impact on the overall performance of the system. Conducting a market survey from published data on sensors used in stabilized airborne targeting systems shows a trend of ever narrowing FOVs housed in smaller and lighter volumes. This approach promotes the ever increasing geometric resolution provided by narrower FOVs, while it seemingly ignores the influences the FOV selection has on the sensor's sensitivity, the effects of diffraction, the influences of sight line jitter and collectively the overall system performance. This paper presents a trade-off methodology to select the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor that is limited in aperture diameter by mechanical constraints (such as space/volume available and window size) by balancing the influences FOV has on sensitivity and resolution and thereby optimizing the system's performance. The methodology may be applied to staring array based imaging sensors across all wavebands from visible/day cameras through to long wave infrared thermal imagers. Some examples of sensor analysis applying the trade-off methodology are given that highlights the performance advantages that can be gained by maximizing the aperture diameters and choosing the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor used in airborne targeting applications.

  1. Captain, sensors report ...: Correction of Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing data acquired by airborne and satellite Systems have many impressive virtues for ecology and other sciences. They are synoptic. They are extremely cheap per data point. They cover large areas. They are not subjective. They detect features that are of clear and obvious interest for many uses. But, they also yield totally irreproducible measurements. Sensors that operate in the visible, near infrared and thermal portions of the spectrum are sensitive to a host of phenomena that are usually of little interest to the average user. Fully recognizing the power and sophistication of the algorithms currently available to users of remote sensing, the authors as long time developers (20+ years) of such algorithms, demonstrate that a host of other signals are convolved with the typical data set, and that many of these signals are very commonly not even recognized, and that these signals are often larger than the signal from the putative target. These derive from both geometric and radiometric sources as well as fundamental flaws in sensor engineering. Until such extraneous factors can be controlled or eliminated the utility of the data is greatly restricted. Finally, the authors lay out a design elements for a rational sensor and methods of deconvolving the complexity of the real world data using such a sensor.

  2. Miniature Sensors for Airborne Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our group is working to design a small,lightweight, low-cost real-time particulate matter(PM) sensor to enable better monitoring of PMconcentrations in air, with the goal of informingpolicymakers and regulators to provide betterpublic health. The sensor reads the massconcentratio...

  3. The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Asner, David M.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Day, Anthony R.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Jordan, David V.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Morris, Scott J.; Mullen, O Dennis; Myers, Allan W.; Pitts, W. Karl; Rohrer, John S.; Runkle, Robert C.; Seifert, Allen; Shergur, Jason M.; Stave, Sean C.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Thompson, Robert C.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; Willett, Jesse A.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2013-01-11

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gama ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach, we found, is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. Moreover, the system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications, including airborne and maritime operations.

  4. The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. E.; Aalseth, C. E.; Asner, D. M.; Bonebrake, C. A.; Day, A. R.; Dorow, K. E.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Jensen, J. L.; Johnson, K. I.; Jordan, D. V.; Morgen, G. P.; Morris, S. J.; Mullen, O. D.; Myers, A. W.; Pitts, W. K.; Rohrer, J. S.; Runkle, R. C.; Seifert, A.; Shergur, J. M.; Stave, S. C.; Tatishvili, G.; Thompson, R. C.; Todd, L. C.; Warren, G. A.; Willett, J. A.; Wood, L. S.

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gama ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. The system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications, including airborne and maritime operations.

  5. Multi-instrument remote sensor characterization study

    SciTech Connect

    Riese, C.; Best, L.; McLaughlin, S.; Eaton, F.; Hines, J.; Peterman, R.

    1996-12-31

    During April 1995, the US Environmental Protection Agency, in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, sponsored a Ground-Based Remote Sensor Characterization Study at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) near Erie, Colorado. The BAO is a 300-meter instrumented tower used as a ground-truth profile device for calibrating tower mounted in-situ or ground-based remote sensors. The following remote sensors were evaluated: 915 MHZ Boundary Layer Radar Profiler; Phased Array Sodar; Fixed-Beam Sodar; and 2.7 GHz FM-CW Backscatter Radar Profiler. This paper examines the excellent agreement among these various instruments and the BAO tower using traditional comparative graphic plots and tables. Data were collected at the BAO site continuously over a one-month period. The variety of synoptic weather features and diurnal inversion cycles during the month made the comparisons particularly useful for objective data comparison analyses. The relationship between the remote sensor data and current issues of air pollution meteorology such as tropospheric ozone management strategies is also examined.

  6. Airborne FLIR sensors for runway incursion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Cynthia; White, Joseph; Neece, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) sensors are potential components in hazard monitoring systems for general aviation aircraft. FLIR sensors can provide images of the runway area when normal visibility is reduced by meteorological conditions. We are investigating short wave infrared (SWIR) and long wave infrared (LWIR) cameras. Pre-recorded video taken from an aircraft on approach to landing provides raw data for our analysis. This video includes approaches under four conditions: clear morning, cloudy afternoon, clear evening, and clear night. We used automatic object detection techniques to quantify the ability of these sensors to alert the pilot to potential runway hazards. Our analysis is divided into three stages: locating the airport, tracking the runway, and detecting vehicle sized objects. The success or failure of locating the runway provides information on the ability of the sensors to provide situational awareness. Tracking the runway position from frame to frame provides information on the visibility of runway features, such as landing lights or runway edges, in the scene. Detecting small objects quantifies clutter and provides information on the ability of these sensors to image potential hazards. In this paper, we present results from our analysis of sample approach video.

  7. Guidelines for spaceborne microwave remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litman, V.; Nicholas, J.

    1982-01-01

    A handbook was developed to provide information and support to the spaceborne remote sensing and frequency management communities: to guide sensor developers in the choice of frequencies; to advise regulators on sensor technology needs and sharing potential; to present sharing analysis models and, through example, methods for determining sensor sharing feasibility; to introduce developers to the regulatory process; to create awareness of proper assignment procedures; to present sensor allocations; and to provide guidelines on the use and limitations of allocated bands. Controlling physical factors and user requirements and the regulatory environment are discussed. Sensor frequency allocation achievable performance and usefulness are reviewed. Procedures for national and international registration, the use of non-allocated bands and steps for obtaining new frequency allocations, and procedures for reporting interference are also discussed.

  8. Studying groundwater and surface water interactions using airborne remote sensing in Heihe River basin, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Hu, Y.; Zheng, C.

    2015-05-01

    Managing surface water and groundwater as a unified system is important for water resource exploitation and aquatic ecosystem conservation. The unified approach to water management needs accurate characterization of surface water and groundwater interactions. Temperature is a natural tracer for identifying surface water and groundwater interactions, and the use of remote sensing techniques facilitates basin-scale temperature measurement. This study focuses on the Heihe River basin, the second largest inland river basin in the arid and semi-arid northwest of China where surface water and groundwater undergoes dynamic exchanges. The spatially continuous river-surface temperature of the midstream section of the Heihe River was obtained by using an airborne pushbroom hyperspectral thermal sensor system. By using the hot spot analysis toolkit in the ArcGIS software, abnormally cold water zones were identified as indicators of the spatial pattern of groundwater discharge to the river.

  9. Airborne Sensor Potential for Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    guidelines for the d, vol-Ipitnet (A airborne sensor 3ppi ic~tions to the US Fish and Wililtifc...fr.iq J.Iqjsn *uld q~jq pooCg - A0,I- P.9A -41100fi uPall- -iied qus. o .;A (W.3 P.S’-.9. .1JI1OP. ua.l.t:4 𔃻𔃾lti P.,SC)Pts r.- aaop s0ul-~r9Iw

  10. Development of an airborne remote sensing system for crop pest management: System integration and verification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing along with Global Positioning Systems, Geographic Information Systems, and variable rate technology has been developed, which scientists can implement to help farmers maximize the economic and environmental benefits of crop pest management through precision agriculture. Airborne remo...

  11. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2002-01-01

    In response to recommendations from the National Aviation Weather Program Council, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working with industry to develop an electronic pilot reporting capability for small aircraft. This paper describes the Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) sensor development effort. NASA is working with industry to develop a sensor capable of measuring temperature, relative humidity, magnetic heading, pressure, icing, and average turbulence energy dissipation. Users of the data include National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) forecast modelers, air traffic controllers, flight service stations, airline operation centers, and pilots. Preliminary results from flight tests are presented.

  12. Remotely deployable aerial inspection using tactile sensors

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, C. N.; Cao, J.; Pierce, S. G.; Dobie, G.; Summan, R.; Sullivan, J. C.; Pipe, A. G.

    2014-02-18

    For structural monitoring applications, the use of remotely deployable Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) inspection platforms offer many advantages, including improved accessibility, greater safety and reduced cost, when compared to traditional manual inspection techniques. The use of such platforms, previously reported by researchers at the University Strathclyde facilitates the potential for rapid scanning of large areas and volumes in hazardous locations. A common problem for both manual and remote deployment approaches lies in the intrinsic stand-off and surface coupling issues of typical NDE probes. The associated complications of these requirements are obviously significantly exacerbated when considering aerial based remote inspection and deployment, resulting in simple visual techniques being the preferred sensor payload. Researchers at Bristol Robotics Laboratory have developed biomimetic tactile sensors modelled on the facial whiskers (vibrissae) of animals such as rats and mice, with the latest sensors actively sweeping their tips across the surface in a back and forth motion. The current work reports on the design and performance of an aerial inspection platform and the suitability of tactile whisking sensors to aerial based surface monitoring applications.

  13. Airborne infrared remote sensing characterization of submesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey; Marmorino, George; Miller, W. David; North, Ryan; Angel-Benavides, Ingrid; Baschek, Burckard

    2016-11-01

    Airborne remote sensing surveys off Santa Catalina Island, CA (33°30' N118°31' W) were conducted as part of a larger study of the occurrence and behavior of submesoscale phenomena. This builds upon previous work by DiGiacomo and Holt, who utilized SAR imagery to characterize the size and distribution of predominately cyclonic 'spiral eddies' in the Southern California Bight. In the present work the thermal surface expression of a single cyclonic eddy captured in February 2013 will be investigated. Advances made in methods to estimate eddy circulation and vorticity directly from the thermal imagery will be discussed and compared with in situ measurements. Inferences about localized mixing and flow instabilities can also be drawn from the imagery, and these too will be discussed in the context of in situ data. A simple model will be offered describing the three dimensional flow in the core of the eddy and how that can be used to explain the surface imagery. Connections between the signatures surrounding the eddy and the core itself will also be discussed in the context of the model.

  14. Collation of earth resources data collected by ERIM airborne sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasell, P. G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Earth resources imagery from nine years of data collection with developmental airborne sensors is cataloged for reference. The imaging sensors include single and multiband line scanners and side-looking radars. The operating wavelengths of the sensors include ultraviolet, visible and infrared band scanners, and X- and L-band radar. Imagery from all bands (radar and scanner) were collected at some sites and many sites had repeated coverage. The multiband scanner data was radiometrically calibrated. Illustrations show how the data can be used in earth resource investigations. References are made to published reports which have made use of the data in completed investigations. Data collection sponsors are identified and a procedure described for gaining access to the data.

  15. Optical fiber networks for remote fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered.

  16. Optical Fiber Networks for Remote Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered. PMID:22666011

  17. Icepod: A modular approach to the development of an airborne remote sensing and data acquisition platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frearson, N.; Bell, R. E.; Tinto, K. J.; Zappa, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    The New York Air National Guard [NYANG] provides regular airborne support to the National Science Foundation [NSF] moving science parties and their equipment onto and around the ice-sheets in both polar regions during the respective summer seasons. Icepod has been developed to utilize this readily available resource, providing the aircraft with a modular external pod attached to the rear-paratrooper door on either side of the NYANG's ski-equipped LC-130s. The pod is divided into five separate bays each approximately a 2ft cube within which can be mounted an array of remote sensors. Power, heating, sensor control and data management services are provided to each bay. An Ethernet network is used to transfer commands and data packets between the individual sensors and data acquisition system located inside the aircraft. Data for each sensor is stored on ruggedized and removable hard-drives that can be taken off the aircraft at the end of a flight for further analysis. In its current configuration the pod is equipped for the remote sensing of ice sheets and their margins and the bay's contain two radar systems, radar antennas, a vibration isolated optics bay including a scanning laser, Infra-red camera and high-definition visible wave camera. Sensor data is geo-referenced using GNSS and orientation sensors located inside the pod. A Pyrometer provides the downward looking IR Camera with the current sky temperature. In January 2013, the Icepod system was flight certified at the Stratton air base in Schenectady, New York. The system deployed to Greenland in April and July 2013 to test the instrumentation suite over ice and its ease of deployment with the NYANG. Icepod can be operated in two modes, a traditional dedicated science flight mode and a piggy-back mode. In piggy-back mode science parties and their cargo are delivered to their destinations with Icepod installed but stowed. Once they have been delivered the Icepod is deployed and measurements can be taken on the

  18. Remote fire detection using MMW radiometric sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnik, Lev S.; Manasson, Vladimir A.; Chapman, Robert E.; Mino, Robert M.; Kiseliov, Vladimir

    1998-08-01

    Lack of reliable fire warning and detection systems for urban/wildland interface, large area industrial facilities and transportation systems result each year in a loss of millions of dollars worth of property; it also endangers lives. Typical optical fire detection sensor do not work well under frequency encountered adverse atmospheric conditions and, in addition, are incapable of covering sizable areas. WaveBand has recently developed hardware to study the feasibility of fire detection using a millimeter wave (MMW) scanning radiometer. It has proven the advantages of remote fire detection even under adverse weather conditions and through fire-generated smoke, better immunity to false alarms than optical sensors, and larger area of coverage. Despite using a wavelength that is much longer than that of visible light, the MMW sensor can accurate pinpoint the location of a developing fire.

  19. Persistent unmanned airborne network support for cooperative sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ajay; Fernandes, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    In future we expect that UAV platoon based military / civilian missions would require persistent airborne network support for command, control and communication needs for the mission. Highly-dynamic mobile-wireless sensor networks operating in a large region present unique challenges in end-to-end communication for sensor data sharing and data fusion, particularly caused by the time varying connectivity of high-velocity nodes combined with the unreliability of the wireless communication channel. To establish an airborne communication network, a UAV must maintain a link(s) with other UAV(s) and/or base stations. A link between two UAVs is deemed to be established when the linked UAVs are in line of sight as well as within the transmission range of each other. Ideally, all the UAVs as well as the ground stations involved in command, control and communication operations must be fully connected. However, the continuous motion of UAVs poses a challenge to ensure full connectivity of the network. In this paper we explore the dynamic topological network configuration control under mission-related constraints in order to maintain connectivity among sensors enabling data sharing.

  20. Sensor integration and testing in an airborne environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricks, Timothy P.; Streling, Julie T.; Williams, Kirk W.

    2005-11-01

    The U.S. Army Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC) has been supporting captive flight testing of missile sensors and seekers since the 1980's. Successful integration and test of sensors in an airborne environment requires attention to a broad range of disciplines. Data collection requirements drive instrumentation and flight profile configurations, which along with cost and airframe performance factors influence the choice of test aircraft. Installation methods used for instrumentation must take into consideration environmental and airworthiness factors. In addition, integration of test equipment into the aircraft will require an airworthiness release; procedures vary between the government for military aircraft, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the use of private, commercial, or experimental aircraft. Sensor mounting methods will depend on the type of sensor being used, both for sensor performance and crew safety concerns. Pilots will require navigation input to permit the execution of accurate and repeatable flight profiles. Some tests may require profiles that are not supported by standard navigation displays, requiring the use of custom hardware/software. Test locations must also be considered in their effect on successful data collection. Restricted airspace may also be required, depending on sensor emissions and flight profiles.

  1. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group`s (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone`s malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed.

  2. A new type of remote sensors which allow directly forming certain statistical estimates of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlaskin, Boris; Guk, Elena; Karpenko, Andrey

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to the problems of statistical and structural pattern recognition, a signal processing and image analysis techniques has been considered. These problems are extremely important for tasks being solved by airborne and space borne remote sensing systems. Development of new remote sensors for image and signal processing is inherently connected with a possibility of statistical processing of images. Fundamentally new optoelectronic sensors "Multiscan" have been suggested in the present paper. Such sensors make it possible to form directly certain statistical estimates, which describe completely enough the different types of images. The sensors under discussion perform the Lebesgue-Stieltjes signal integration rather than the Cauchy-Riemann one. That permits to create integral functionals for determining statistical features of images. The use of the integral functionals for image processing provides a good agreement of obtained statistical estimates with required image information features. The Multiscan remote sensors allows to create a set of integral moments of an input image right up to high-order integral moments, to form a quantile representation of an input image, which provides a count number limited texture, to form a median, which provides a localisation of a low-contrast horizon line in fog, localisation of water flow boundary etc. This work presents both the description of the design concept of the new remote sensor and mathematical apparatus providing the possibility to create input image statistical features and integral functionals.

  3. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Species Diversity: The Utility of Integrated Airborne Hyperspectral and Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Keith Stuart

    The change, reduction, or extinction of species is a major issue currently facing the Earth. Efforts are underway to measure, monitor, and protect habitats that contain high species diversity. Remote sensing technology shows extreme value for monitoring species diversity by mapping ecosystems and using those land cover maps or other derived data as proxies to species number and distribution. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) consists of remote sensing instruments such as an imaging spectrometer, a full-waveform lidar, and a high-resolution color camera. AOP collected data over the Ordway-Swisher Biological Station (OSBS) in May 2014. A majority of the OSBS site is covered by the Sandhill ecosystem, which contains a very high diversity of vegetation species and is a native habitat for several threatened fauna species. The research presented here investigates ways to analyze the AOP data to map ecosystems at the OSBS site. The research attempts to leverage the high spatial resolution data and study the variability of the data within a ground plot scale along with integrating data from the different sensors. Mathematical features are derived from the data and brought into a decision tree classification algorithm (rpart), in order to create an ecosystem map for the site. The hyperspectral and lidar features serve as proxies for chemical, functional, and structural differences in the vegetation types for each of the ecosystems. K-folds cross validation shows a training accuracy of 91%, a validation accuracy of 78%, and a 66% accuracy using independent ground validation. The results presented here represent an important contribution to utilizing integrated hyperspectral and lidar remote sensing data for ecosystem mapping, by relating the spatial variability of the data within a ground plot scale to a collection of vegetation types that make up a given ecosystem.

  4. Wearable Sensors for Remote Health Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Sumit; Mondal, Tapas; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-01-12

    Life expectancy in most countries has been increasing continually over the several few decades thanks to significant improvements in medicine, public health, as well as personal and environmental hygiene. However, increased life expectancy combined with falling birth rates are expected to engender a large aging demographic in the near future that would impose significant  burdens on the socio-economic structure of these countries. Therefore, it is essential to develop cost-effective, easy-to-use systems for the sake of elderly healthcare and well-being. Remote health monitoring, based on non-invasive and wearable sensors, actuators and modern communication and information technologies offers an efficient and cost-effective solution that allows the elderly to continue to live in their comfortable home environment instead of expensive healthcare facilities. These systems will also allow healthcare personnel to monitor important physiological signs of their patients in real time, assess health conditions and provide feedback from distant facilities. In this paper, we have presented and compared several low-cost and non-invasive health and activity monitoring systems that were reported in recent years. A survey on textile-based sensors that can potentially be used in wearable systems is also presented. Finally, compatibility of several communication technologies as well as future perspectives and research challenges in remote monitoring systems will be discussed.

  5. Wearable Sensors for Remote Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Sumit; Mondal, Tapas; Deen, M. Jamal

    2017-01-01

    Life expectancy in most countries has been increasing continually over the several few decades thanks to significant improvements in medicine, public health, as well as personal and environmental hygiene. However, increased life expectancy combined with falling birth rates are expected to engender a large aging demographic in the near future that would impose significant  burdens on the socio-economic structure of these countries. Therefore, it is essential to develop cost-effective, easy-to-use systems for the sake of elderly healthcare and well-being. Remote health monitoring, based on non-invasive and wearable sensors, actuators and modern communication and information technologies offers an efficient and cost-effective solution that allows the elderly to continue to live in their comfortable home environment instead of expensive healthcare facilities. These systems will also allow healthcare personnel to monitor important physiological signs of their patients in real time, assess health conditions and provide feedback from distant facilities. In this paper, we have presented and compared several low-cost and non-invasive health and activity monitoring systems that were reported in recent years. A survey on textile-based sensors that can potentially be used in wearable systems is also presented. Finally, compatibility of several communication technologies as well as future perspectives and research challenges in remote monitoring systems will be discussed. PMID:28085085

  6. Airborne Digital Sensor System and GPS-aided inertial technology for direct geopositioning in rough terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, Richard D.

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution airborne digital cameras with onboard data collection based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) and inertial navigation systems (INS) technology may offer a real-time means to gather accurate topographic map information by reducing ground control and eliminating aerial triangulation. Past evaluations of this integrated system over relatively flat terrain have proven successful. The author uses Emerge Digital Sensor System (DSS) combined with Applanix Corporation?s Position and Orientation Solutions for Direct Georeferencing to examine the positional mapping accuracy in rough terrain. The positional accuracy documented in this study did not meet large-scale mapping requirements owing to an apparent system mechanical failure. Nonetheless, the findings yield important information on a new approach for mapping in Antarctica and other remote or inaccessible areas of the world.

  7. (DCT-FY08) Target Detection Using Multiple Modality Airborne and Ground Based Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0005 (DCT-FY08) Target Detection Using Multiple Modality Airborne and Ground Based Sensors Avideh Zakhor...Include area code) 17-08-2012 FINAL 4-1-2008 to 11-30-2011 (DCT-FY08) Target Detection Using Multiple Modality Airborne and Ground Based Sensors ...automatic, photo-realistic 3D models of building interiors. We have developed an ambulatory human operated backpack system made of a suite of sensors

  8. Remote monitoring of soil moisture using airborne microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    The current status of microwave radiometry is provided. The fundamentals of the microwave radiometer are reviewed with particular reference to airborne operations, and the interpretative procedures normally used for the modeling of the apparent temperature are presented. Airborne microwave radiometer measurements were made over selected flight lines in Chickasha, Oklahoma and Weslaco, Texas. Extensive ground measurements of soil moisture were made in support of the aircraft mission over the two locations. In addition, laboratory determination of the complex permittivities of soil samples taken from the flight lines were made with varying moisture contents. The data were analyzed to determine the degree of correlation between measured apparent temperatures and soil moisture content.

  9. Remote Sensing and Quantization of Analog Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.

    2011-01-01

    This method enables sensing and quantization of analog strain gauges. By manufacturing a piezoelectric sensor stack in parallel (physical) with a piezoelectric actuator stack, the capacitance of the sensor stack varies in exact proportion to the exertion applied by the actuator stack. This, in turn, varies the output frequency of the local sensor oscillator. The output, F(sub out), is fed to a phase detector, which is driven by a stable reference, F(sub ref). The output of the phase detector is a square waveform, D(sub out), whose duty cycle, t(sub W), varies in exact proportion according to whether F(sub out) is higher or lower than F(sub ref). In this design, should F(sub out) be precisely equal to F(sub ref), then the waveform has an exact 50/50 duty cycle. The waveform, D(sub out), is of generally very low frequency suitable for safe transmission over long distances without corruption. The active portion of the waveform, t(sub W), gates a remotely located counter, which is driven by a stable oscillator (source) of such frequency as to give sufficient digitization of t(sub W) to the resolution required by the application. The advantage to this scheme is that it negates the most-common, present method of sending either very low level signals (viz. direct output from the sensors) across great distances (anything over one-half meter) or the need to transmit widely varying higher frequencies over significant distances thereby eliminating interference [both in terms of beat frequency generation and in-situ EMI (electromagnetic interference)] caused by ineffective shielding. It also results in a significant reduction in shielding mass.

  10. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Leifer, I.; Bovensmann, H.; Eastwood, M.; Fladeland, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Gerilowski, K.; Green, R. O.; Kratwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Luna, B.; Thorpe, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of the NASA/ESA CO2 and Methane Experiment (COMEX) campaign in California during June and August/September 2014. COMEX was a multi-platform campaign to measure CH4 plumes released from anthropogenic sources including oil and gas infrastructure. We discuss principles for real-time spectral signature detection and measurement, and report performance on the NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG). AVIRIS-NG successfully detected CH4 plumes in real-time at Gb s-1 data rates, characterizing fugitive releases in concert with other in situ and remote instruments. The teams used these real-time CH4 detections to coordinate measurements across multiple platforms, including airborne in situ, airborne non-imaging remote sensing, and ground-based in situ instruments. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of real-time trace gas signature detection in an airborne science campaign, and presages many future applications.

  11. Airborne Dial Remote Sensing of the Arctic Ozone Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, Martin; Renger, Wolfgang; Ehret, Gerhard

    1992-01-01

    A combined ozone and aerosol LIDAR was developed at the Institute of Physics of the Atmosphere at the DLR in Oberpfaffenhofen. It is an airborne version, that, based on the DIAL-principle, permits the recording of two-dimensional ozone profiles. This presentation will focus on the ozone-part; the aerosol subsection will be treated later.

  12. ROAN Remote radio meteor detection sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesanu, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Only few meteor enthusiasts across the world today, approaches systematically the radio meteor detection technique, one of the reasons being the difficulty to build and install proper permanent antennas, especially when low-VHF frequency opportunity transmitters are used as illuminators. Other reasons were in the past the relatively high cost of the entire system, receivers and computers, and not ultimately the high power consumption of the system in a 24/7 operation, when using regular personal computers. The situation changed in the recent years with the advent of the low cost software defined radio SDR receivers and low consumption/cost single board computers SBC. A commercial off-the-shelf hardware based remote radio meteor detection sensor is presented.

  13. An airborne C-band scatterometer for remote sensing the air-sea interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, D. J.; Pazmany, A. L.; Boltniew, E.; Hevizi, L. G.; Mcintosh, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    An airborne C-band scatterometer system (C-Scat) has been developed for remote sensing of the air-sea interface. The sensor has been designed to fly on a number of research aircraft, beginning with the NASA Ames Research Center's C-130B, on which test flights were conducted in August of 1988. The scatterometer utilizes a 10-W solid-state power amplifier and a frequency-steered microstrip array antenna which is installed beneath the fuselage of the airplane. The antenna is electrically scanned in elevation from 20 to 50 deg off nadir, and it is mechanically rotated 360 deg in azimuth. The system is fully computer controlled and is capable of accurately measuring ocean-surface normalized radar cross section (NRCS) from altitudes as high as 25,000 feet. It has been developed to study the relationship between NRCS and ocean-surface roughness influences such as wind speed and direction, wave height and slope, and air-sea temperature difference.

  14. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Robert S.; Johnston, Joshua M.; Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion

    2016-01-01

    For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context. PMID:27548174

  15. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Allison, Robert S; Johnston, Joshua M; Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion

    2016-08-18

    For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context.

  16. Developing a Scalable Remote Sampling Design for the NEON Airborne Observation Platform (AOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musinsky, J.; Wasser, L. A.; Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Petroy, S. B.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; van Aardt, J. A.; Serbin, S.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) airborne observation platform (AOP) will collect co-registered high-resolution hyperspectral imagery, discrete and waveform LiDAR, and high-resolution digital photography for more than 60 terrestrial and 23 aquatic sites spread across the continental United States, Puerto Rico, Alaska and Hawaii on an annual basis over the next 30 years. These data, to be made freely available to the public, will facilitate the scaling of field-based biological, physical and chemical measurements to regional and continental scales, enabling a better understanding of the relationships between climate variability and change, land use change and invasive species, and their ecological consequences in areas not directly sampled by the NEON facilities. However, successful up-scaling of in situ measurements requires a flight sampling design that captures environmental heterogeneity and diversity (i.e., ecological and topographic gradients), is sensitive to temporal system variation (e.g., phenology), and can respond to major disturbance events. Alignment of airborne campaigns - composed of two payloads for nominal science acquisitions and one payload for PI-driven rapid-response campaigns -- with other ground, airborne (e.g., AVIRIS) and satellite (e.g., Landsat, MODIS) collections will further facilitate scaling between sensors and data sources of varying spatial and spectral resolution and extent. This presentation will discuss the approach, challenges and future goals associated with the development of NEON AOP's sampling design, using examples from the 2013 nominal flight campaigns in the Central Plains (NEON Domain 10) and the Pacific Southwest (Domain 17), and the rapid response flight campaign of the High Park Fire site outside of Fort Collins, CO. Determination of the specific flight coverage areas for each campaign involved analysis of the landscape scale ecological, geophysical and bioclimatic attributes and trends most closely

  17. Daily evapotranspiration estimates from extrapolating instantaneous airborne remote sensing ET values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, six extrapolation methods have been compared for their ability to estimate daily crop evapotranspiration (ETd) from instantaneous latent heat flux estimates derived from digital airborne multispectral remote sensing imagery. Data used in this study were collected during an experiment...

  18. A high-resolution airborne four-camera imaging system for agricultural remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes the design and testing of an airborne multispectral digital imaging system for remote sensing applications. The system consists of four high resolution charge coupled device (CCD) digital cameras and a ruggedized PC equipped with a frame grabber and image acquisition software. T...

  19. Supporting relief efforts of the 2010 Haitian earthquake using an airborne multimodal remote sensing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulring, Jason W.; McKeown, Donald M.; van Aardt, Jan; Casterline, May V.; Bartlett, Brent D.; Raqueno, Nina

    2011-06-01

    The small island nation of Haiti was devastated in early 2010 following a massive 7.0 earthquake that brought about widespread destruction of infrastructure, many deaths and large-scale displacement of the population in the nation's major cities. The World Bank and ImageCat, Inc tasked the Rochester Institute of Technology's (RIT) Wildfire Airborne Sensor Platform (WASP) to gather a multi-spectral and multi-modal assessment of the disaster over a seven-day period to be used for relief and reconstruction efforts. Traditionally, private sector aerial remote sensing platforms work on processing and product delivery timelines measured in days, a scenario that has the potential to reduce the value of the data in time-sensitive situations such as those found in responding to a disaster. This paper will describe the methodologies and practices used by RIT to deliver an open set of products typically within a twenty-four hour period from when they were initially collected. Response to the Haiti disaster can be broken down into four major sections: 1) data collection and logistics, 2) transmission of raw data from a remote location to a central processing and dissemination location, 3) rapid image processing of a massive amount of raw data, and 4) dissemination of processed data to global organizations utilizing it to provide the maximum benefit. Each section required it's own major effort to ensure the success of the overall mission. A discussion of each section will be provided along with an analysis of methods that could be implemented in future exercises to increase efficiency and effectiveness.

  20. Software and Equipment for Remote Testing of Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Brezovec, Barbara; Matko, Vojko

    2007-01-01

    An improved approach for remote testing of elements and systems is presented in this article. To ensure high reliability of products, tests must be done in the production phase to detect possible errors in working mode. Because environmental testing involves long-term processes the possibility of remote observation and remote controlling of tests is very useful solution. The concept is to connect the testing chamber with a personal computer, create a reliable driver and control it remotely over the local network or Internet from other client. It is designed for performing tests on wide area of sensors and sensor based systems.

  1. Concept for an airborne real-time ISR system with multi-sensor 3D data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraké, Laura; Schilling, Hendrik; Blohm, Christian; Hillemann, Markus; Lenz, Andreas; Becker, Merlin; Keskin, Göksu; Middelmann, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    In modern aerial Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance operations, precise 3D information becomes inevitable for increased situation awareness. In particular, object geometries represented by texturized digital surface models constitute an alternative to a pure evaluation of radiometric measurements. Besides the 3D data's level of detail aspect, its availability is time-relevant in order to make quick decisions. Expanding the concept of our preceding remote sensing platform developed together with OHB System AG and Geosystems GmbH, in this paper we present an airborne multi-sensor system based on a motor glider equipped with two wing pods; one carries the sensors, whereas the second pod downlinks sensor data to a connected ground control station by using the Aerial Reconnaissance Data System of OHB. An uplink is created to receive remote commands from the manned mobile ground control station, which on its part processes and evaluates incoming sensor data. The system allows the integration of efficient image processing and machine learning algorithms. In this work, we introduce a near real-time approach for the acquisition of a texturized 3D data model with the help of an airborne laser scanner and four high-resolution multi-spectral (RGB, near-infrared) cameras. Image sequences from nadir and off-nadir cameras permit to generate dense point clouds and to texturize also facades of buildings. The ground control station distributes processed 3D data over a linked geoinformation system with web capabilities to off-site decision-makers. As the accurate acquisition of sensor data requires boresight calibrated sensors, we additionally examine the first steps of a camera calibration workflow.

  2. Laser airborne remote sensing real-time acquisition, processing, and control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Brian T.; Pierson, Robert E.; Dropka, T. J.; Dowling, James A.; Lang, L. M.; Fox, Marsha J.

    1997-10-01

    The US Air Force Phillips Laboratory is evaluating the feasibility of long-standoff-range remote sensing of gaseous species present in trace amounts in the atmosphere. Extensive system integration in the laboratory and an airborne test are leading to remote sensing ground test and airborne missions within the next year. This paper describes the design, external interfaces. and initial performance of the Laser Airborne Remote Sensing acquisition, processing, and control system to be deployed on the Phillips Laboratory NC-135 research aircraft for differential absorption lidar system performance tests. The dual-CPU VME-based real-time computer system synchronizes experiment timing and pulsed CO2 laser operation up to 30 Hz while controlling optical subsystem components such as a laser grating, receiver gain, mirror alignment, and laser shutters. This real-time system acquires high rate detector signals from the outgoing and return laser pulses as well as a low rate health and status signals form the optical bench and the aircraft. Laser pulse and status data are processed and displayed in real time on one of four graphical user interfaces: one devoted to system control, one to remote mirror alignment, and two other interfaces for real-time data analysis and diagnostics. The dual-CPU and multi- layered software decouple time critical and non-critical tasks allowing great flexibility in flight-time display and processing.

  3. Self-refreshing characteristics of an airborne particle sensor using a bridged paddle oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsuk; Lee, Seung-Beck; Park, Bonghyun; Sul, Onejae

    2016-05-01

    We report on the self-refreshing characteristics of a micromachined airborne particle sensor. The sensor consists of a bridge-type beam having an oscillating paddle-type particle collector at its center. When a positive potential is applied to the paddle, the sensor is able to attract and collect negatively charged airborne particles while oscillating close to its resonant frequency and thereby measure their density from the change in the oscillating phase at ˜10 pg resolution. When the applied potential is removed, the collected particles are detached from the sensor due to momentum transfer from the oscillating paddle, thus demonstrating a self-refreshing capability.

  4. Airborne remote sensing to detect greenbug stress to wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation indices calculated from the quantity of reflected electromagnetic radiation have been used to quantify levels of stress to plants. Greenbugs cause stress to wheat plants and therefore multi-spectral remote sensing may be useful for detecting greenbug infested wheat fields. The objective...

  5. Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture Using Airborne Hyperspectral Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 14-02-2012 2. REPORT TYPE Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED /From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Remote Sensing of Soil...Murchie, S. L., Oden, S. F, Hayes, J. R., Bell, J. F, Krein, S. J., and A. Mastandrea, 1997, "Near Infrared Spectrometer for the near Earth Asteroid

  6. GIS Integration for Quantitatively Determining the Capabilities of Five Remote Sensors for Resource Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascucci, R. F.; Smith, A.

    1982-01-01

    To assist the U.S. Geological Survey in carrying out a Congressional mandate to investigate the use of side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for resources exploration, a research program was conducted to define the contribution of SLAR imagery to structural geologic mapping and to compare this with contributions from other remote sensing systems. Imagery from two SLAR systems and from three other remote sensing systems was interpreted, and the resulting information was digitized, quantified and intercompared using a computer-assisted geographic information system (GIS). The study area covers approximately 10,000 square miles within the Naval Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, and is situated between the foothills of the Brooks Range and the North Slope. The principal objectives were: (1) to establish quantitatively, the total information contribution of each of the five remote sensing systems to the mapping of structural geology; (2) to determine the amount of information detected in common when the sensors are used in combination; and (3) to determine the amount of unique, incremental information detected by each sensor when used in combination with others. The remote sensor imagery that was investigated included real-aperture and synthetic-aperture radar imagery, standard and digitally enhanced LANDSAT MSS imagery, and aerial photos.

  7. Aerosol Remote Sensing Applications for Airborne Multiangle, Multispectral Shortwave Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bismarck, Jonas; Ruhtz, Thomas; Starace, Marco; Hollstein, André; Preusker, René; Fischer, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol particles have an important impact on the surface net radiation budget by direct scattering and absorption (direct aerosol effect) of solar radiation, and also by influencing cloud formation processes (semi-direct and indirect aerosol effects). To study the former, a number of multispectral sky- and sunphotometers have been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Free University of Berlin in the past two decades. The latest operational developments were the multispectral aureole- and sunphotometer FUBISS-ASA2, the zenith radiometer FUBISS-ZENITH, and the nadir polarimeter AMSSP-EM, all designed for a flexible use on moving platforms like aircraft or ships. Currently the multiangle, multispectral radiometer URMS/AMSSP (Universal Radiation Measurement System/ Airborne Multispectral Sunphotometer and Polarimeter) is under construction for a Wing-Pod of the high altitude research aircraft HALO operated by DLR. The system is expected to have its first mission on HALO in 2011. The algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol and trace gas properties from the recorded multidirectional, multispectral radiation measurements allow more than deriving standard products, as for instance the aerosol optical depth and the Angstrom exponent. The radiation measured in the solar aureole contains information about the aerosol phasefunction and therefore allows conclusions about the particle type. Furthermore, airborne instrument operation allows vertically resolved measurements. An inversion algorithm, based on radiative transfer simulations and additionally including measured vertical zenith-radiance profiles, allows conclusions about the aerosol single scattering albedo and the relative soot fraction in aerosol layers. Ozone column retrieval is performed evaluating measurements from pixels in the Chappuis absorption band. A retrieval algorithm to derive the water-vapor column from the sunphotometer measurements is currently under development. Of the various airborne

  8. Airborne hyperspectral imaging in the visible-to-mid wave infrared spectral range by fusing three spectral sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Filipovs, Jevgenijs; Erinš, Gatis; Taskovs, Juris

    2014-10-01

    Airborne hyperspectral imaging is widely used for remote sensing of environment. The choice of spectral region usually depends on the availability and cost of the sensor. Visible-to-near infrared (400-1100 nm) spectral range corresponds to spectral sensitivity of relatively cheap Si detectors therefore it is the most commonly used. The implementation of shortwave infrared (1100-3000 nm) requires more expensive solutions, but can provide valuable information about the composition of the substance. Mid wave infrared (3000-8000 nm) is rarely used for civilian applications, but it provides information on the thermal emission of materials. The fusion of different sensors allows spectral analysis of a wider spectral range combining and improving already existing algorithms for the analysis of chemical content and classification. Here we introduce our Airborne Surveillance and Environmental Monitoring System (ARSENAL) that was developed by fusing seven sensors. The first test results from the fusion of three hyperspectral imaging sensors in the visible-to-mid wave infrared (365-5000 nm) are demonstrated. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to test correlation between principal components (PCs) and common vegetation indices.

  9. Measuring Radiant Emissions from Entire Prescribed Fires with Ground, Airborne and Satellite Sensors RxCADRE 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Matthew B.; Hudak, Andrew T.; Zajkowski, Thomas; Loudermilk, E. Louise; Schroeder, Wilfrid; Ellison, Luke; Kremens, Robert L.; Holley, William; Martinez, Otto; Paxton, Alexander; Bright, Benjamin C.; O'Brien, Joseph J.; Hornsby, Benjamin; Ichoku, Charles; Faulring, Jason; Gerace, Aaron; Peterson, David; Mauceri, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Characterising radiation from wildland fires is an important focus of fire science because radiation relates directly to the combustion process and can be measured across a wide range of spatial extents and resolutions. As part of a more comprehensive set of measurements collected during the 2012 Prescribed Fire Combustion and Atmospheric Dynamics Research (RxCADRE) field campaign, we used ground, airborne and spaceborne sensors to measure fire radiative power (FRP) from whole fires, applying different methods to small (2 ha) and large (.100 ha) burn blocks. For small blocks (n1/46), FRP estimated from an obliquely oriented long-wave infrared (LWIR) camera mounted on a boom lift were compared with FRP derived from combined data from tower-mounted radiometers and remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS). For large burn blocks (n1/43), satellite FRP measurements from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensors were compared with near-coincident FRP measurements derived from a LWIR imaging system aboard a piloted aircraft. We describe measurements and consider their strengths and weaknesses. Until quantitative sensors exist for small RPAS, their use in fire research will remain limited. For oblique, airborne and satellite sensors, further FRP measurement development is needed along with greater replication of coincident measurements, which we show to be feasible.

  10. Airborne remote sensing for geology and the environment; present and future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Ken; Knepper, Daniel H.

    1994-01-01

    In 1988, a group of leading experts from government, academia, and industry attended a workshop on airborne remote sensing sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and hosted by the Branch of Geophysics. The purpose of the workshop was to examine the scientific rationale for airborne remote sensing in support of government earth science in the next decade. This report has arranged the six resulting working-group reports under two main headings: (1) Geologic Remote Sensing, for the reports on geologic mapping, mineral resources, and fossil fuels and geothermal resources; and (2) Environmental Remote Sensing, for the reports on environmental geology, geologic hazards, and water resources. The intent of the workshop was to provide an evaluation of demonstrated capabilities, their direct extensions, and possible future applications, and this was the organizational format used for the geologic remote sensing reports. The working groups in environmental remote sensing chose to present their reports in a somewhat modified version of this format. A final section examines future advances and limitations in the field. There is a large, complex, and often bewildering array of remote sensing data available. Early remote sensing studies were based on data collected from airborne platforms. Much of that technology was later extended to satellites. The original 80-m-resolution Landsat Multispectral Scanner System (MSS) has now been largely superseded by the 30-m-resolution Thematic Mapper (TM) system that has additional spectral channels. The French satellite SPOT provides higher spatial resolution for channels equivalent to MSS. Low-resolution (1 km) data are available from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's AVHRR system, which acquires reflectance and day and night thermal data daily. Several experimental satellites have acquired limited data, and there are extensive plans for future satellites including those of Japan (JERS), Europe (ESA), Canada

  11. High Spatial Resolution Airborne Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of Urban Landscape Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used airborne multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data collected at a high spatial resolution (i.e., 10m) over several cities in the United States to study thermal energy characteristics of the urban landscape. These TIR data provide a unique opportunity to quantify thermal responses from discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape and to identify both the spatial arrangement and patterns of thermal processes across the city. The information obtained from these data is critical to understanding how urban surfaces drive or force development of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which exists as a dome of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities in contrast to surrounding non-urbanized areas. The UHI is most pronounced in the summertime where urban surfaces, such as rooftops and pavement, store solar radiation throughout the day, and release this stored energy slowly after sunset creating air temperatures over the city that are in excess of 2-4'C warmer in contrast with non-urban or rural air temperatures. The UHI can also exist as a daytime phenomenon with surface temperatures in downtown areas of cities exceeding 38'C. The implications of the UHI are significant, particularly as an additive source of thermal energy input that exacerbates the overall production of ground level ozone over cities. We have used the Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS), flown onboard a Lear 23 jet aircraft from the NASA Stennis Space Center, to acquire high spatial resolution multispectral TIR data (i.e., 6 bandwidths between 8.2-12.2 (um) over Huntsville, Alabama, Atlanta, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Sacramento, California. These TIR data have been used to produce maps and other products, showing the spatial distribution of heating and cooling patterns over these cities to better understand how the morphology of the urban landscape affects development of the UHI. In turn, these data have been used

  12. Airborne Remote Sensing (ARS) for Agricultural Research and Commercialization Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Ram; Bowen, Brent D.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Tremendous advances in remote sensing technology and computing power over the last few decades are now providing scientists with the opportunity to investigate, measure, and model environmental patterns and processes with increasing confidence. Such advances are being pursued by the Nebraska Remote Sensing Facility, which consists of approximately 30 faculty members and is very competitive with other institutions in the depth of the work that is accomplished. The development of this facility targeted at applications, commercialization, and education programs in the area of precision agriculture provides a unique opportunity. This critical area is within the scope of NASA goals and objectives of NASA s Applications, Technology Transfer, Commercialization, and Education Division and the Earth Science Enterprise. This innovative integration of Aerospace (Aeronautics) Technology Enterprise applications with other NASA enterprises serves as a model of cross-enterprise transfer of science with specific commercial applications.

  13. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Leifer, I.; Bovensmann, H.; Eastwood, M.; Fladeland, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Gerilowski, K.; Green, R. O.; Kratwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Luna, B.; Thorpe, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of the NASA/ESA CO2 and MEthane eXperiment (COMEX) campaign in California during June and August/September 2014. COMEX was a multi-platform campaign to measure CH4 plumes released from anthropogenic sources including oil and gas infrastructure. We discuss principles for real-time spectral signature detection and measurement, and report performance on the NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG). AVIRIS-NG successfully detected CH4 plumes in real-time at Gb s-1 data rates, characterizing fugitive releases in concert with other in situ and remote instruments. The teams used these real-time CH4 detections to coordinate measurements across multiple platforms, including airborne in situ, airborne non-imaging remote sensing, and ground-based in situ instruments. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of real-time trace-gas signature detection in an airborne science campaign, and presages many future applications. Post-analysis demonstrates matched filter methods providing noise-equivalent (1σ) detection sensitivity for 1.0 % CH4 column enhancements equal to 141 ppm m.

  14. Changing scale: from site thorough landscape to taskscape within airborne remote sensing perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyrko, Mikołaj; RÄ czkowski, Włodzimierz; Ruciński, Dominik

    2016-08-01

    In consequence of a long tradition, archaeologists focus on individual sites and features and not landscape itself. We propose to perceive the landscape as a taskscapes, a space where tasks are performed, by that its own identity is created. Airborne remote sensing methods establish a possibility of studies on a larger scale of and to perceive places as context for landscapes and vice versa. On the other hand we would like to draw attention to identification of paleoenvironment features in the context of past landscapes. Although it is not always possible to determine the relationship between these element and traces of past human activities, we must be aware that in the past they had and influence on human behavior. In this paper will address the question: how much do airborne remote sensing data through the ability to change the scale of our perspective upon archaeological sites and their local landscapes alter or enrich interpretation of the context of past human activities.

  15. Using High-Resolution Airborne Remote Sensing to Study Aerosol Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert; Munchak, Leigh; Mattoo, Shana; Marshak, Alexander; Wilcox, Eric; Gao, Lan; Yorks, John; Platnick, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The horizontal space in between clear and cloudy air is very complex. This so-called twilight zone includes activated aerosols that are not quite clouds, thin cloud fragments that are not easily observable, and dying clouds that have not quite disappeared. This is a huge challenge for satellite remote sensing, specifically for retrieval of aerosol properties. Identifying what is cloud versus what is not cloud is critically important for attributing radiative effects and forcings to aerosols. At the same time, the radiative interactions between clouds and the surrounding media (molecules, surface and aerosols themselves) will contaminate retrieval of aerosol properties, even in clear skies. Most studies on aerosol cloud interactions are relevant to moderate resolution imagery (e.g. 500 m) from sensors such as MODIS. Since standard aerosol retrieval algorithms tend to keep a distance (e.g. 1 km) from the nearest detected cloud, it is impossible to evaluate what happens closer to the cloud. During Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS), the NASA ER-2 flew with the enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator (eMAS), providing MODIS-like spectral observations at high (50 m) spatial resolution. We have applied MODIS-like aerosol retrieval for the eMAS data, providing new detail to characterization of aerosol near clouds. Interpretation and evaluation of these eMAS aerosol retrievals is aided by independent MODIS-like cloud retrievals, as well as profiles from the co-flying Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). Understanding aerosolcloud retrieval at high resolution will lead to better characterization and interpretation of long-term, global products from lower resolution (e.g.MODIS) satellite retrievals.

  16. Flight Tests of the DELICAT Airborne LIDAR System for Remote Clear Air Turbulence Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrancken, Patrick; Wirth, Martin; Ehret, Gerhard; Witschas, Benjamin; Veerman, Henk; Tump, Robert; Barny, Hervé; Rondeau, Philippe; Dolfi-Bouteyre, Agnès; Lombard, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    An important aeronautics application of lidar is the airborne remote detection of Clear Air Turbulence which cannot be performed with onboard radar. We report on a DLR-developed lidar system for the remote detection of such turbulent areas in the flight path of an aircraft. The lidar, consisting of a high-power UV laser transmitter and a direct detection system, was installed on a Dutch research aircraft. Flight tests executed in 2013 demonstrated the performance of the lidar system to detect local subtle variations in the molecular backscatter coefficient indicating the turbulence some 10 to 15 km ahead.

  17. Design and performance simulations for an airborne DIAL system for long-range remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, James A.; Kelly, Brian T.; Gonglewski, John D.; Fox, Marsha J.; Shilko, Michael L.; Higdon, Noah S.; Highland, Ronald G.; Senft, Daniel C.; Dean, David R.; Blackburn, John P.; Pierrottet, Diego F.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force Phillips Laboratory is evaluating the feasibility of long-standoff-range remote sensing of gaseous species present in trace amounts in the atmosphere. To date, the Phillips Laboratory program has been concerned with the preliminary design and performance analysis of a commercially available CO(subscript 2) laser-based DIAL system operating from mountain-top-observatory and airborne platform and more recently with long-range ground testing using a 21.8 km slant path from 3.05 km ASL to sea level as the initial steps in the design and development of an airborne system capability. Straightforward scaling of the performance of a near-term technology direct-detection LIDAR system with propagation range to a topographic target and with the average atmospheric absorption coefficient along the path has been performed. Results indicate that useful airborne operation of such a system should be possible for slant path ranges between 20 km and 50 km, depending upon atmospheric transmission at the operating wavelengths of the (superscript 13)C(superscript 16)O(subscript 2) source. This paper describes the design of the airborne system which will be deployed on the Phillips Laboratory NC-135 research aircraft for DIAL system performance tests at slant ranges of 20 km to 50 km, scheduled for the near future. Performance simulations for the airborne tests will be presented and related to performance obtained during initial ground-based tests.

  18. Application of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing for the retrieval of forest inventory parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Yegor V.; Kozoderov, Vladimir V.; Sokolov, Anton A.

    2016-04-01

    Collecting and updating forest inventory data play an important part in the forest management. The data can be obtained directly by using exact enough but low efficient ground based methods as well as from the remote sensing measurements. We present applications of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing for the retrieval of such important inventory parameters as the forest species and age composition. The hyperspectral images of the test region were obtained from the airplane equipped by the produced in Russia light-weight airborne video-spectrometer of visible and near infrared spectral range and high resolution photo-camera on the same gyro-stabilized platform. The quality of the thematic processing depends on many factors such as the atmospheric conditions, characteristics of measuring instruments, corrections and preprocessing methods, etc. An important role plays the construction of the classifier together with methods of the reduction of the feature space. The performance of different spectral classification methods is analyzed for the problem of hyperspectral remote sensing of soil and vegetation. For the reduction of the feature space we used the earlier proposed stable feature selection method. The results of the classification of hyperspectral airborne images by using the Multiclass Support Vector Machine method with Gaussian kernel and the parametric Bayesian classifier based on the Gaussian mixture model and their comparative analysis are demonstrated.

  19. Evaluation of satellites and remote sensors for atmospheric pollution measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, J.; Eldridge, R.; Friedman, E.; Keitz, E.

    1976-01-01

    An approach to the development of a prioritized list of scientific goals in atmospheric research is provided. The results of the analysis are used to estimate the contribution of various spacecraft/remote sensor combinations for each of several important constituents of the stratosphere. The evaluation of the combinations includes both single-instrument and multiple-instrument payloads. Attention was turned to the physical and chemical features of the atmosphere as well as the performance capability of a number of atmospheric remote sensors. In addition, various orbit considerations were reviewed along with detailed information on stratospheric aerosols and the impact of spacecraft environment on the operation of the sensors.

  20. Airborne multispectral remote sensing data to estimate several oenological parameters in vineyard production. A case study of application of remote sensing data to precision viticulture in central Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontana, Gianluca; Girard, Filippo; Belli, Claudio; Comandini, Maria Cristina; Pietromarchi, Paolo; Tiberi, Domenico; Papale, Dario

    2010-05-01

    It is widely recognized that environmental differences within the vineyard, with respect to soils, microclimate, and topography, can influence grape characteristics and crop yields. Besides, the central Italy landscape is characterized by a high level of fragmentation and heterogeneity It requires stringent Remote sensing technical features in terms of spectral, geometric and temporal resolution to aimed at supporting applications for precision viticulture. In response to the needs of the Italian grape and wine industry for an evaluation of precision viticulture technologies, the DISAFRI (University of Tuscia) and the Agricultural Research Council - Oenological research unit (ENC-CRA) jointly carried out an experimental study during the year 2008. The study was carried out on 2 areas located in the town of Velletri, near Rome; for each area, two varieties (red and white grape) were studied: Nero d'Avola and Sauvignon blanc in first area , Merlot and Sauvignon blanc in second. Remote sensing data were acquired in different periods using a low cost multisensor Airborne remote sensing platform developed by DISAFRI (ASPIS-2 Advanced Spectroscopic Imager System). ASPIS-2, an evolution of the ASPIS sensor (Papale et al 2008, Sensors), is a multispectral sensor based on 4 CCD and 3 interferential filters per CCD. The filters are user selectable during the flight and in this way Aspis is able to acquire data in 12 bands in the visible and near infrared regions with a bandwidth of 10 or 20 nm. To the purposes of this study 7 spectral band were acquired and 15 vegetation indices calculated. During the ripeness period several vegetative and oenochemical parameters were monitored. Anova test shown that several oenochemical variables, such as sugars, total acidity, polyphenols and anthocyanins differ according to the variety taken into consideration. In order to evaluate the time autocorrelation of several oenological parameters value, a simple linear regression between

  1. The NASA/NSERC Student Airborne Research Program Land Focus Group - a Paid Training Program in Multi-Disciplinary STEM Research for Terrestrial Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kefauver, S. C.; Ustin, S.; Davey, S. W.; Furey, B. J.; Gartner, A.; Kurzweil, D.; Siebach, K. L.; Slawsky, L.; Snyder, E.; Trammell, J.; Young, J.; Schaller, E.; Shetter, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Suborbital Education and Research Center (NSERC) is a unique six week multidisciplinary paid training program which directly integrates students into the forefront of airborne remote sensing science. Students were briefly trained with one week of lectures and laboratory exercises and then immediately incorporated into ongoing research projects which benefit from access to the DC-8 airborne platform and the MODIS-ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER) sensor. Students were split into three major topical categories of Land, Ocean, and Air for the data collection and project portions of the program. This poster details the techniques and structure used for the student integration into ongoing research, professional development, hypothesis building and results as developed by the professor and mentor of the Land focus group. Upon assignment to the Land group, students were issued official research field protocols and split into four field specialty groups with additional specialty reading assignments. In the field each group spent more time in their respective specialty, but also participated in all field techniques through pairings with UC Davis research team members using midday rotations. After the field campaign, each specialty group then gave summary presentations on the techniques, preliminary results, and significance to overall group objectives of their specialty. Then students were required to submit project proposals within the bounds of Land airborne remote sensing science and encouraging, but not requiring the use of the field campaign data. These proposals are then reviewed by the professor and mentor and students are met with one by one to discuss the skills of each student and objectives of the proposed research project. The students then work under the supervision of the mentor and benefit again from professor feedback in a formal

  2. The detection and mapping of oil on a marshy area by a remote luminescent sensor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarlane, C.; Watson, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing can be a cost-effective method for monitoring pollutants in large areas such as occur in oil spills. An opportunity to test a particular method arose when a well ruptured and for 23 days spewed a 90-meter fountain of oil into the air, dispersing the oil over a wide area. The method tested was an airborne luminescence detector with a Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (FLD) which was flown over the affected area 41 days after the well was capped to obtain a map or the deposition pattern. To calibrate the system, samples of Spartina (wire grass) and Phragmites (common reed) were collected from the contaminated area and the oil residues were eluted in cyclohexane and quantitatively analyzed in a fluorescence photometer. Good correlation was observed between the remote sensor (FLD) and the laboratory analysis. Isopleths defining the deposition pattern of oil were drawn from the remote sensing information. A discussion will be presented on the feasibility of using this instrument for similar contamination incidents for cleanup and damage assessment.

  3. Multicenter airborne coherent atmospheric wind sensor (MACAWS) instrument: recent upgrades and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, James N.; Rothermel, Jeffrey; Tratt, David M.; Cutten, Dean; Darby, Lisa S.; Hardesty, R. Michael

    1999-10-01

    The Multicenter Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor instrument is an airborne coherent Doppler laser radar (Lidar) capable of measuring atmospheric wind fields and aerosol structure. Since the first demonstration flights onboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft in September 1995, two additional science flights have been completed. Several system upgrades have also bee implemented. In this paper we discuss the system upgrades and present several case studies which demonstrate the various capabilities of the system.

  4. Airborne imaging sensors for environmental monitoring & surveillance in support of oil spills & recovery efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Jones, James; Frystacky, Heather; Coppin, Gaelle; Leavaux, Florian; Neyt, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Collection of pushbroom sensor imagery from a mobile platform requires corrections using inertial measurement units (IMU's) and DGPS in order to create useable imagery for environmental monitoring and surveillance of shorelines in freshwater systems, coastal littoral zones and harbor areas. This paper describes a suite of imaging systems used during collection of hyperspectral imagery in northern Florida panhandle and Gulf of Mexico airborne missions to detect weathered oil in coastal littoral zones. Underlying concepts of pushbroom imagery, the needed corrections for directional changes using DGPS and corrections for platform yaw, pitch, and roll using IMU data is described as well as the development and application of optimal band and spectral regions associated with weathered oil. Pushbroom sensor and frame camera data collected in response to the recent Gulf of Mexico oil spill disaster is presented as the scenario documenting environmental monitoring and surveillance techniques using mobile sensing platforms. Data was acquired during the months of February, March, April and May of 2011. The low altitude airborne systems include a temperature stabilized hyperspectral imaging system capable of up to 1024 spectral channels and 1376 spatial across track pixels flown from 3,000 to 4,500 feet altitudes. The hyperspectral imaging system is collocated with a full resolution high definition video recorder for simultaneous HD video imagery, a 12.3 megapixel digital, a mapping camera using 9 inch film types that yields scanned aerial imagery with approximately 22,200 by 22,200 pixel multispectral imagery (~255 megapixel RGB multispectral images in order to conduct for spectral-spatial sharpening of fused multispectral, hyperspectral imagery. Two high spectral (252 channels) and radiometric sensitivity solid state spectrographs are used for collecting upwelling radiance (sub-meter pixels) with downwelling irradiance fiber optic attachment. These sensors are utilized for

  5. Remote sensing of debris-covered glaciers: Change detection and analysis using multiple sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y.; Huh, K.; Mark, B. G.; La Frenierre, J.; Gulley, J. D.; Park, K.

    2013-12-01

    Debris-cover can insulate glaciers and hinder surface melting, but also challenges accurate assessment of change detection and subsequent risk evaluation of outburst floods from moraine-dammed supra-glacial lakes that endanger downstream inhabitants. These events have been predicted to increase frequency along with the coverage of debris as warming accelerates. Enhanced monitoring capability from optical air and space-borne sensors has improved the detection of changes in surface-derived characteristics such as areal and volumetric fluctuations as well as glacier velocity over debris-covered glaciers, improving the accuracy of geometric and temporal resolutions in hydrological analysis. In this study we present case studies from Nepal, Peru and Ecuador focusing on: 1) time series of debris-coverage and moraine-dammed lakes; and 2) the relationship of remotely sensed observable quantities from different sensors such as aerial photographs, ASTER, Landsat imagery and Airborne/Terrestrial Laser Scanner.

  6. Remote Environmental Monitoring With a Wireless Sensor Network System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizito, F.; Hopmans, J. W.; Bales, R.; Tuli, A.; Kamai, T.

    2007-12-01

    Wireless sensors have the potential to reveal dynamic environmental variables in remote landscapes at reduced long-term costs and offer a promising approach to revolutionize environmental monitoring. Better management of surface water in remote landscapes warrants close monitoring of moisture and temperature variability. This work describes field data demonstrating the functionality of a deployed wireless network system, consisting of various soil moisture sensors. Soil water potential sensors with an imbedded thermistor were deployed in a remote meadow along a topographic gradient with dense tree canopies in Wolverton Meadows in Sequoia National Park. The sensors responded to moisture and temperature variations and the wireless system met the goal of providing informative data on dynamic responses of soil moisture to rainfall and snowmelt. The deployed sensor system functioned well during harsh winter conditions at 7000 feet, requiring low power. The study highlights measurement accuracy limitations and presents an alternative, robust wireless Zigbee sensor network, using Crossbow motes. We demonstrate that deployment, implementation and long-term field monitoring in remote and challenging environments is possible with current technologies.

  7. Path-averaged atmospheric CO2 measurement using a 1.57 μm active remote sensor compared with multi-positioned in situ sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaizawa, Daisuke; Kawakami, Shuji; Nakajima, Masakatsu; Sawa, Yosuke; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Kameyama, Syumpei; Imaki, Masaharu; Hirano, Yoshihito; Ueno, Shinichi

    2009-08-01

    The Green-house gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT) was launched to determine the continental CO2 inventories. Its sensor is based on a passive remote sensing technique developed to achieve less than 1% relative accuracy for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Meanwhile, a laser remote sensor with the differential absorption spectrometry has been developed for a candidate of a future space-based mission to observe the atmospheric CO2 or other trace gases. A prototype of the newly developed active remote sensor has been performed to demonstrate a properly validated performance for ground-based and airborne systems. This study shows the results of the in-house and field measurements. The in-house measurement demonstrated the linearity with the correlation coefficient of over 0.99 between the instrumental response and the known CO2 density in the cell. The diurnal variation obtained from our system is consistent (correlation coefficient of 0.95) with that of multi-positioned in situ sensors, indicates the spatial responsibility of the atmospheric CO2 obtained from our remote sensor with two ~3-km observation paths.

  8. Atmospheric transformation of multispectral remote sensor data. [Great Lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The effects of earth's atmosphere were accounted for, and a simple algorithm, based upon a radiative transfer model, was developed to determine the radiance at earth's surface free of atmospheric effects. Acutal multispectral remote sensor data for Lake Erie and associated optical thickness data were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the atmospheric transformation algorithm. The basic transformation was general in nature and could be applied to the large scale processing of multispectral aircraft or satellite remote sensor data.

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman fiberoptic sensors for remote monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, D.L.; Alarie, J.P.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1995-09-01

    A new sensor design for remote surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements has been developed for environmental applications. The design features the modification of an optical fiber using layers of alumina microparticles and silver coatings for inducing the SERS effect at the sensing probe. A single fiber carries both the laser excitation and the SERS signal radiation, keeping optical parameters at the remote tip simple and consistent. The small tip size achievable with this configuration also demonstrates potential of this new design as a microsensor for in-situ measurement in microenvironments. Details of sensor tip fabrication and optical system design are described. SERS spectra of aqueous environmental samples acquired in-situ using the SERS sensor are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the SERS sensor.

  10. Aspects of detection and tracking of ground targets from an airborne EO/IR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam; Sithiravel, Rajiv; Daya, Zahir; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam

    2015-05-01

    An airborne EO/IR (electro-optical/infrared) camera system comprises of a suite of sensors, such as a narrow and wide field of view (FOV) EO and mid-wave IR sensors. EO/IR camera systems are regularly employed on military and search and rescue aircrafts. The EO/IR system can be used to detect and identify objects rapidly in daylight and at night, often with superior performance in challenging conditions such as fog. There exist several algorithms for detecting potential targets in the bearing elevation grid. The nonlinear filtering problem is one of estimation of the kinematic parameters from bearing and elevation measurements from a moving platform. In this paper, we developed a complete model for the state of a target as detected by an airborne EO/IR system and simulated a typical scenario with single target with 1 or 2 airborne sensors. We have demonstrated the ability to track the target with `high precision' and noted the improvement from using two sensors on a single platform or on separate platforms. The performance of the Extended Kalman filter (EKF) is investigated on simulated data. Image/video data collected from an IR sensor on an airborne platform are processed using an image tracking by detection algorithm.

  11. Interactive display/graphics systems for remote sensor data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, W. G.; Loe, D. L.; Wilson, E. L.; Whitley, S. L.; Sachen, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    A color-television display system and interactive graphics equipment on-line to an IBM 360/44 computer are used to develop a variety of interactive displays which aid in analyzing remote sensor data. These interactive displays are used to: (1) analyze data from a multispectral scanner; (2) develop automatic pattern recognition systems based on multispectral scanner measurements; and (3) analyze data from non-imaging sensors such as the infrared radiometer and microwave scatterometer.

  12. A wireless acoustic emission sensor remotely powered by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, F.; Huang, H.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, wireless sensing of acoustic emission (AE) signals using a battery-free sensor node remotely powered by light is presented. The wireless sensor consists of a piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) for AE signal acquisition and a wireless transponder that performs signal conditioning, frequency conversion, and wireless transmission. For signal conditioning, a voltage follower that consumes less than 2 mW was introduced to buffer the high impedance of the PWAS from the low impedance of the wireless transponder. A photocell-based energy harvester with a stable voltage output was developed to power the voltage follower so that the wireless AE sensor can operate without an external power source. The principle of operation of the battery-free wireless AE sensor node and the sensor interrogation system is described, followed by a detailed description of the hardware implementation. The voltage follower and the wireless channel were characterized by ultrasound pitch-catch and pencil lead break experiments.

  13. Airborne measurements in the longwave infrared using an imaging hyperspectral sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Jean-Pierre; Chamberland, Martin; Farley, Vincent; Marcotte, Frédérick; Rolland, Matthias; Vallières, Alexandre; Villemaire, André

    2008-07-01

    Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state is one important application. Analysis of the surface emissivity as a means to classify ground properties and usage is another one. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the requirements of these applications. Telops has developed the FIRST, a LWIR hyperspectral imager. The FIRST is based on the Fourier Transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. The FIRST, a man portable sensor, provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at 0.35mrad spatial resolution over the 8-12 μm spectral range at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25cm-1. The FIRST has been used in several field campaigns, including the demonstration of standoff chemical agent detection [http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.788027.1]. More recently, an airborne system integrating the FIRST has been developed to provide airborne hyperspectral measurement capabilities. The airborne system and its capabilities are presented in this paper. The FIRST sensor modularity enables operation in various configurations such as tripod-mounted and airborne. In the airborne configuration, the FIRST can be operated in push-broom mode, or in staring mode with image motion compensation. This paper focuses on the airborne operation of the FIRST sensor.

  14. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS USING FIELD PORTABLE AND AIRBORNE REMOTE IMAGING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing technologies are a class of instrument and sensor systems that include laser imageries, imaging spectrometers, and visible to thermal infrared cameras. These systems have been successfully used for gas phase chemical compound identification in a variety of field e...

  15. Thermal remote sensing: theory, sensors, and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Applications of thermal infrared remote sensing for Earth science research are both varied and wide in scope. They range from understanding thermal energy responses that drive land-atmosphere energy exchanges in the hydrologic cycle, to measurement of dielectric surface properties for snow, ice, an...

  16. High altitude airborne remote sensing mission using the advanced microwave precipitation radiometer (AMPR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galliano, J.; Platt, R. H.; Spencer, Roy; Hood, Robbie

    1991-01-01

    The advanced microwave precipitation radiometer (AMPR) is an airborne multichannel imaging radiometer used to better understand how the earth's climate structure works. Airborne data results from the October 1990 Florida thunderstorm mission in Jacksonville, FL, are described. AMPR data on atmospheric precipitation in mesoscale storms were retrieved at 10.7, 19.35, 37.1, and 85.5 GHz onboard the ER-2 aircraft at an altitude of 20 km. AMPR's three higher-frequency data channels were selected to operate at the same frequencies as the spaceborne special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I) presently in orbit. AMPR uses two antennas to receive the four frequencies: the lowest frequency channel uses a 9.7-in aperture lens antennas, while the three higher-frequency channels share a separate 5.3-in aperture lens antenna. The radiometer's temperature resolution performance is summarized.

  17. Sensors and sensory processing for airborne vibrations in silk moths and honeybees.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-19

    Insects use airborne vibrations caused by their own movements to control their behaviors and produce airborne vibrations to communicate with conspecific mates. In this review, I use two examples to introduce how insects use airborne vibrations to accurately control behavior or for communication. The first example is vibration-sensitive sensilla along the wing margin that stabilize wingbeat frequency. There are two specialized sensors along the wing margin for detecting the airborne vibration caused by wingbeats. The response properties of these sensors suggest that each sensor plays a different role in the control of wingbeats. The second example is Johnston's organ that contributes to regulating flying speed and perceiving vector information about food sources to hive-mates. There are parallel vibration processing pathways in the central nervous system related with these behaviors, flight and communication. Both examples indicate that the frequency of airborne vibration are filtered on the sensory level and that on the central nervous system level, the extracted vibration signals are integrated with other sensory signals for executing quick adaptive motor response.

  18. Remote classification from an airborne camera using image super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Woods, Matthew; Katsaggelos, Aggelos

    2017-02-01

    The image processing technique known as super-resolution (SR), which attempts to increase the effective pixel sampling density of a digital imager, has gained rapid popularity over the last decade. The majority of literature focuses on its ability to provide results that are visually pleasing to a human observer. In this paper, we instead examine the ability of SR to improve the resolution-critical capability of an imaging system to perform a classification task from a remote location, specifically from an airborne camera. In order to focus the scope of the study, we address and quantify results for the narrow case of text classification. However, we expect the results generalize to a large set of related, remote classification tasks. We generate theoretical results through simulation, which are corroborated by experiments with a camera mounted on a DJI Phantom 3 quadcopter.

  19. Analysis of Vegetation Within A Semi-Arid Urban Environment Using High Spatial Resolution Airborne Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Ridd, Merrill K.

    1998-01-01

    High spatial resolution (5 m) remote sensing data obtained using the airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) sensor for daytime and nighttime have been used to measure thermal energy responses for 2 broad classes and 10 subclasses of vegetation typical of the Salt Lake City, Utah urban landscape. Polygons representing discrete areas corresponding to the 10 subclasses of vegetation types have been delineated from the remote sensing data and are used for analysis of upwelling thermal energy for day, night, and the change in response between day and night or flux, as measured by the TIMS. These data have been used to produce three-dimensional graphs of energy responses in W/ sq m for day, night, and flux, for each urban vegetation land cover as measured by each of the six channels of the TIMS sensor. Analysis of these graphs provides a unique perspective for both viewing and understanding thermal responses, as recorded by the TIMS, for selected vegetation types common to Salt Lake City. A descriptive interpretation is given for each of the day, night, and flux graphs along with an analysis of what the patterns mean in reference to the thermal properties of the vegetation types surveyed in this study. From analyses of these graphs, it is apparent that thermal responses for vegetation can be highly varied as a function of the biophysical properties of the vegetation itself, as well as other factors. Moreover, it is also seen where vegetation, particularly trees, has a significant influence on damping or mitigating the amount of thermal radiation upwelling into the atmosphere across the Salt Lake City urban landscape. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  20. Security applications of a remote electric-field sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prance, Robert J.; Harland, Christopher J.; Prance, Helen

    2008-10-01

    A new generation of electric field sensors developed at the University of Sussex is enabling an alternative to contact voltage and non-contact magnetic field measurements. We have demonstrated the capability of this technology in a number of areas including ECG through clothing, remote off-body ECG, through wall movement sensing and electric field imaging. Clearly, there are many applications for a generic sensor technology with this capability, including long term vital sign monitoring. The non-invasive nature of the measurement also makes these sensors ideal for man/machine and human/robot interfacing. In addition, there are obvious security and biometric possibilities since we can obtain physiological data remotely, without the knowledge of the subject. This is a clear advantage if such systems are to be used for evaluating the psychological state of a subject. In this paper we report the results obtained with a new version of the sensor which is capable of acquiring electrophysiological signals remotely in an open unshielded laboratory. We believe that this technology opens up a new area of remote biometrics which could have considerable implications for security applications. We have also demonstrated the ability of EPS to function in closely-packed one and two dimensional arrays for real-time imaging.

  1. Proliferation detection using a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-08-01

    The authors discussed the potential of the resonance Raman chemical sensor as a remote sensor that can be used for gases, liquids or solids. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations or excitation frequency. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, the inelastic scattering cross-section can increase anywhere from 4 to 6 orders of magnitude which translates into increased sensing range or lower detection limits. It was also shown that differential cross-sections as small as 10{sup {minus}27} cm{sup 2}/sr do not preclude the use of this technique as being an important component in one`s remote-sensing arsenal. The results obtained in the early 1970s on various pollutants and the more recent work on atmospheric water cast a favorable light on the prospects for the successful development of a resonance Raman remote sensor. Currently, of the 20 CW agent-related {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals that the authors have investigated, 18 show enhancements ranging from 3 to 6 orders of magnitude. The absolute magnitudes of the measured resonance enhanced Raman cross-sections for these 18 chemicals suggest that detection and identification of trace quantities of the {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals, through a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor, could be achieved.

  2. Gulf stream ground truth project - Results of the NRL airborne sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.; Chen, D. T.; Hammond, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an airborne study of the waves in the Gulf Stream are presented. These results show that the active microwave sensors (high-flight radar and wind-wave radar) provide consistent and accurate estimates of significant wave height and surface wind speed, respectively. The correlation between the wave height measurements of the high-flight radar and a laser profilometer is excellent.

  3. Experiment of monitoring thermal discharge drained from nuclear plant through airborne infrared remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Difeng; Pan, Delu; Li, Ning

    2009-07-01

    The State Development and Planning Commission has approved nuclear power projects with the total capacity of 23,000 MW. The plants will be built in Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Guangdong, Shandong, Liaoning and Fujian Province before 2020. However, along with the nuclear power policy of accelerated development in our country, the quantity of nuclear plants and machine sets increases quickly. As a result the environment influence of thermal discharge will be a problem that can't be slid over. So evaluation of the environment influence and engineering simulation must be performed before station design and construction. Further more real-time monitoring of water temperature need to be arranged after fulfillment, reflecting variety of water temperature in time and provided to related managing department. Which will help to ensure the operation of nuclear plant would not result in excess environment breakage. At the end of 2007, an airborne thermal discharge monitoring experiment has been carried out by making use of MAMS, a marine multi-spectral scanner equipped on the China Marine Surveillance Force airplane. And experimental subject was sea area near Qin Shan nuclear plant. This paper introduces the related specification and function of MAMS instrument, and decrypts design and process of the airborne remote sensing experiment. Experiment showed that applying MAMS to monitoring thermal discharge is viable. The remote sensing on a base of thermal infrared monitoring technique told us that thermal discharge of Qin Shan nuclear plant was controlled in a small scope, never breaching national water quality standard.

  4. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distribution with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Jazembski, Maurice; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler laser radar (lidar), when operated from an airborne platform, is a unique tool for the study of atmospheric and surface processes and features. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are typically at a disadvantage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of an eye-safe approx. 1 Joule/pulse lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and flight computer system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically-resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is approx. 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (of order 1 micron diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and composition. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be approx. 1 meter per second. A variety of applications have been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of. flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the first measurements of eyewall and boundary layer winds within a

  5. The Relationship Between Fossil and Dairy Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Complex Urban Land-Use Patterns by In Situ and Remote Sensing Data from Surface Mobile, Airborne, and Satellite Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, I.; Melton, C.; Tratt, D. M.; Kuze, A.; Buckland, K. N.; Butz, A.; Deguchi, A.; Eastwood, M. L.; Fischer, M. L.; Frash, J.; Fladeland, M. M.; Gore, W.; Iraci, L. T.; Johnson, P. D.; Kataoka, F.; Kolyer, R.; Leen, J. B.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Shiomi, K.; Suto, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thompson, D. R.; Yates, E. L.; Van Damme, M.; Yokota, T.

    2015-12-01

    The GOSAT-COMEX-IASI Experiment (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite-CO2and Methane EXperiment) demonstrated a novel approach to airborne-surface mobile in situ data fusion for interpretation and validation of satellite and airborne remote sensing data of greenhouse gases and direct calculation of flux. Key data were collected for the Chino Dairy in the Los Angeles Basin, California and for the Kern River Oil Fields adjacent to Bakersfield, California. In situ surface and remote sensing greenhouse gas and ammonia observations were compared with IASI and GOSAT retreivals, while hyperspectral imaging data from the AVIRIS, AVIRIS NG, and Mako airborne sensors were analyzed to relate emissions and land use. Figure - platforms participating in the experiment. TANSO-FTS aboard the Ibuki satellite (GOSAT) provided targeted pixels to measure column greenhouse gases. AMOG is the AutoMObile Gas Surveyor which supports a suite of meteorology and in situ trace gas sensors for mobile high speed measurement. AVIRIS, the Airborne Visual InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer aboard the NASA ER-2 airplane collected hyperspectral imaging data at 20 m resolution from 60,000 ft. Mako is a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer that was flown on the Twin Otter International. AJAX is a fighter jet outfitted for science sporting meteorology and greenhouse gas sensors. RAMVan is an upward looking FTIR for measuring column methane and ammonia and other trace gases.

  6. Multi Sensor and Platforms Setups for Various Airborne Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, G.; Vasel, R.

    2016-06-01

    To combine various sensors to get a system for specific use became popular within the last 10 years. Metric mid format cameras meanwhile reach the 100 MPix and entered the mapping market to compete with the big format sensors. Beside that also other sensors as SLR Cameras provide high resolution and enter the aerial surveying market for orthophoto production or monitoring applications. Flexibility, purchase-costs, size and weight are common aspects to design multi-sensor systems. Some sensors are useful for mapping while others are part of environmental monitoring systems. Beside classical surveying aircrafts also UL Airplanes, Para/Trikes or UAVs make use of multi sensor systems. Many of them are customer specific while other already are frequently used in the market. This paper aims to show some setup, their application, what are the results and what are the pros and cons of them are.

  7. Adaptive Noise Reduction Techniques for Airborne Acoustic Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    25 4.3 Super Kraft Monocoupe 90A RC airplane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 4.4 Access panel for fuselage of...begin clipping. This is an important consideration for airborne acoustic sensing, as the sound level aboard a UAV must not cause saturation of the...specifications of the Monocoupe used for this experiment are in Table 4.3. 26 Figure 4.3: Super Kraft Monocoupe 90A RC airplane. Figure 4.4: Access panel for

  8. A wireless, remote query magnetoelastic CO2 sensor.

    PubMed

    Cai, Q Y; Cammers-Goodwin, A; Grimes, C A

    2000-12-01

    This paper presents a wireless, passive, remote query CO2 sensor comprising a ribbon-like magnetoelastic thick-film coated with a mass-changing CO2 responsive polymer synthesized from acrylamide and isooctylacrylate. In response to a magnetic field impulse, the magnetostrictive magnetoelastic sensor vibrates at a characteristic resonant frequency that is inversely dependent upon the mass of the attached CO2 responsive polymer. The mechanical vibrations of the magnetostrictive sensor launch magnetic flux, which can be detected remotely using a pickup coil. By monitoring the resonant frequency of the passive sensor, the atmospheric CO2 concentration can be determined without the need for physical connections to the sensor or specific alignment requirements. The effect of humidity and the CO2 responsive copolymer composition on the measurement sensitivity are reported. Greatest sensitivity is achieved with a polymer comprising a 1:1 mole ratio of acrylamide to isooctyl acrylate. A 0.7% change in atmospheric CO2 concentration can be detected for a 20 microns thick polymer coated sensor.

  9. A survey of natural aggregate properties and characteristics important in remote sensing and airborne geophysics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, D.H.; Langer, W.H.; Miller, S.

    1995-01-01

    Natural aggregate is vital to the construction industry. Although natural aggregate is a high volume/low value commodity that is abundant, new sources are becoming increasingly difficult to find and develop because of rigid industry specifications, political considerations, development and transportation costs, and environmental concerns. There are two primary sources of natural aggregate: (1) exposed or near-surface bedrock that can be crushed, and (2) deposits of sand and gravel. Remote sensing and airborne geophysics detect surface and near-surface phenomena, and may be useful for detecting and mapping potential aggregate sources; however, before a methodology for applying these techniques can be developed, it is necessary to understand the type, distribution, physical properties, and characteristics of natural aggregate deposits. The distribution of potential aggregate sources is closely tied to local geologic history. Conventional exploration for natural aggregate deposits has been largely a ground-based operation, although aerial photographs and topographic maps have been extensively used to target possible deposits. Today, the exploration process also considers factors such as the availability of the land, space and water supply for processing, political and environmental factors, and distance from the market; exploration and planning cannot be separated. There are many physical properties and characteristics by which to judge aggregate material for specific applications; most of these properties and characteristics pertain only to individual aggregate particles. The application of remote sensing and airborne geophysical measurements to detecting and mapping potential aggregate sources, however, is based on intrinsic bulk physical properties and extrinsic characteristics of the deposits that can be directly measured, mathematically derived from measurement, or interpreted with remote sensing and geophysical data. ?? 1995 Oxford UniversityPress.

  10. Preliminary data for the 20 May 1974, simultaneous evaluation of remote sensors experiment. [water pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Batten, C. E.; Bowker, D. E.; Bressette, W. E.; Grew, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Several remote sensors were simultaneously used to collect data over the tidal James River from Hopewell to Norfolk, Virginia. Sensors evaluated included the Multichannel-Ocean Color Sensor, multispectral scanners, and multispectral photography. Ground truth measurements and remotely sensed data are given. Preliminary analysis indicates that suspended sediment and concentrated industrial effluent are observable from all sensors.

  11. Airborne sensor systems under development at the NASA/NSTL/Earth Resources Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.; Meeks, Gerald R.

    1988-01-01

    The operational characteristics of the Airborne Bathymetric System (ABS) MSS and the Airborne Multispectral Pushbroom Scanner (AMPS), which are currently being developed at NASA's Earth Resources Laboratory (ERL), are described. The ABS MSS system scans through a swath width of + or - 40 deg from nadir and the sensor incorporates onboard calibration references for the visible and short-wavelength IR channels. The AMPS uses five separate f/1.8 refractive telecentric lens systems, each incorporating nine optical elements, and a replaceable fixed bandwidth filter.

  12. Michigan experimental multispectral mapping system: A description of the M7 airborne sensor and its performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasell, P. G., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of a multispectral band scanner for an airborne mapping system are discussed. The sensor operates in the ultraviolet, visual, and infrared frequencies. Any twelve of the bands may be selected for simultaneous, optically registered recording on a 14-track analog tape recorder. Multispectral imagery recorded on magnetic tape in the aircraft can be laboratory reproduced on film strips for visual analysis or optionally machine processed in analog and/or digital computers before display. The airborne system performance is analyzed.

  13. Calibration, Sensor Model Improvements and Uncertainty Budget of the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer APEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueni, A.

    2015-12-01

    ESA's Airborne Imaging Spectrometer APEX (Airborne Prism Experiment) was developed under the PRODEX (PROgramme de Développement d'EXpériences scientifiques) program by a Swiss-Belgian consortium and entered its operational phase at the end of 2010 (Schaepman et al., 2015). Work on the sensor model has been carried out extensively within the framework of European Metrology Research Program as part of the Metrology for Earth Observation and Climate (MetEOC and MetEOC2). The focus has been to improve laboratory calibration procedures in order to reduce uncertainties, to establish a laboratory uncertainty budget and to upgrade the sensor model to compensate for sensor specific biases. The updated sensor model relies largely on data collected during dedicated characterisation experiments in the APEX calibration home base but includes airborne data as well where the simulation of environmental conditions in the given laboratory setup was not feasible. The additions to the model deal with artefacts caused by environmental changes and electronic features, namely the impact of ambient air pressure changes on the radiometry in combination with dichroic coatings, influences of external air temperatures and consequently instrument baffle temperatures on the radiometry, and electronic anomalies causing radiometric errors in the four shortwave infrared detector readout blocks. Many of these resolved issues might be expected to be present in other imaging spectrometers to some degree or in some variation. Consequently, the work clearly shows the difficulties of extending a laboratory-based uncertainty to data collected under in-flight conditions. The results are hence not only of interest to the calibration scientist but also to the spectroscopy end user, in particular when commercial sensor systems are used for data collection and relevant sensor characteristic information tends to be sparse. Schaepman, et al, 2015. Advanced radiometry measurements and Earth science

  14. Optical cloud detection from a disposable airborne sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, R. Giles; Brus, David

    2016-04-01

    In-situ measurement of cloud droplet microphysical properties is most commonly made from manned aircraft platforms due to the size and weight of the instrumentation, which is both costly and typically limited to sampling only a few clouds. This work describes the development of a small, lightweight (<200g), disposable, optical cloud sensor which is designed for use on routine radiosonde balloon flights and also small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platforms. The sensor employs the backscatter principle, using an ultra-bright LED as the illumination source, with a photodiode detector. Scattering of the LED light by cloud droplets generates a small optical signal which is separated from background light fluctuations using a lock-in technique. The signal to noise obtained permits cloud detection using the scattered LED light, even in daytime. During recent field tests in Pallas, Finland, the retrieved optical sensor signal has been compared with the DMT Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) which measures cloud droplets in the size range from 0.5 to 50 microns. Both sensors were installed at the hill top observatory of Sammaltunturi during a field campaign in October and November 2015, which experienced long periods of immersion inside cloud. Preliminary analysis shows very good agreement between the CAPS and the disposable cloud sensor for cloud droplets >5micron effective diameter. Such data and calibration of the sensor will be discussed here, as will simultaneous balloon launches of the optical cloud sensor through the same cloud layers.

  15. Role of passive remote sensors. Sensor System Panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Capabilities of present passive systems are described and the development of passive remote sensing systems for the more abundant tropospheric trace species is recommended. The combination of nadir-viewing spectrometers and solar occultation for tropospheric measurement of those gases having large stratospheric burdens is discussed. Development of a nadir-viewing instrument capable of obtaining continuous spectra in narrower bands is recommended. Gas filter radiometers for species specific measurements and development of a spectral survey instrument are discussed. Further development of aerosol retrieval algorithms, including polarization techniques, for obtaining aerosol thickness and size distributions is advised. Recommendations of specific investigations to be pursued are presented.

  16. Analysis of potential debris flow source areas on Mount Shasta, California, by using airborne and satellite remote sensing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Hubbard, B.E.; Mars, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Remote sensing data from NASA's Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the first spaceborne imaging spectrometer, Hyperion, show hydrothermally altered rocks mainly composed of natroalunite, kaolinite, cristobalite, and gypsum on both the Mount Shasta and Shastina cones. Field observations indicate that much of the visible altered rock consists of talus material derived from fractured rock zones within and adjacent to dacitic domes and nearby lava flows. Digital elevation data were utilized to distinguish steeply sloping altered bedrock from more gently sloping talus materials. Volume modeling based on the imagery and digital elevation data indicate that Mount Shasta drainage systems contain moderate volumes of altered rock, a result that is consistent with Mount Shasta's Holocene record of mostly small to moderate debris flows. Similar modeling for selected areas at Mount Rainier and Mount Adams, Washington, indicates larger altered rock volumes consistent with the occurrence of much larger Holocene debris flows at those volcanoes. The availability of digital elevation and spectral data from spaceborne sensors, such as Hyperion and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER), greatly expands opportunities for studying potential debris flow source characteristics at stratovolcanoes around the world. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Advances in soil mapping: Mapping quartz content of soil surface using airborne hyperspectral remote sensing in the longwave-infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weksler, Shahar; Notesco, Gila; Ben-Dor, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing in the longwave-infrared (LWIR) spectral region has proven to be a new and efficient tool for mineral mapping (Adar et al. 2013). Minerals which are featureless in the visible, near-infrared and shortwave-infrared regions, e.g., quartz, have a unique fingerprint in the LWIR region (8-12 μm). This spectral region adds to the optical region in which several important minerals can be characterized with significant features (e.g., clay). Accordingly, using airborne hyperspectral remote-sensing data in the LWIR region is an important and practical means of classifying and quantifying minerals. Day and night airborne data, acquired by the AisaOWL sensor over Nitzana National Park in Israel, were used to demonstrate how LWIR region data can be used to map quartz content on the soil surface in a pixel-by-pixel process. The LWIR radiance image is composed of the surface emissivity (and hence the surface's chemical and physical properties), the radiant temperature (according to the Plank equation) and the atmospheric attenuation (which is different during the day and at night). In this work, we show that it is possible to separate surface emissivity, temperature and atmospheric attenuation by using the radiance measured from a vicarious calibration site which was found to be distinctive for the atmospheric contribution. Applying the spectrum of this area as a gain factor to each pixel in the image reduced the atmospheric effects while emphasizing the mineralogical features. Based on this finding and using the same vicarious calibration site used by Notesco et al. (2015), we further studied the possibility of mapping quartz in an area outside the vicarious calibration site. The resulting emissivity image of Nitzana soils (100 km away from the vicarious calibration site) enabled quantifying the quartz in each pixel and mapping its abundance. The day and night images showed a similar quartz distribution, thereby validating the methodology and

  18. Interactive display/graphics systems for remote sensor data analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, W. G.; Loe, D. L.; Wilson, E. L.; Whitley, S. L.; Sachen, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Using a color-television display system and interactive graphics equipment on-line to an IBM 360/44 computer, investigators at the Manned Spacecraft Center have developed a variety of interactive displays which aid in analyzing remote sensor data. This paper describes how such interactive displays are used to: (1) analyze data from a multispectral scanner, (2) develop automatic pattern recognition systems based on multispectral scanner measurements, and (3) analyze data from nonimaging sensors such as the infrared radiometer and microwave scatterometer.

  19. Measurements of Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence at 685 nm by Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, F.; Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Corp, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or solar Fraunhofer lines in the reflected spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is a triple etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer designed and optimized specifically for the ChlF sensing from an airborne platform using this line fill-in technique. In this paper, we will present the results of APFS ChlF measurements obtained from a NASA Langley King Air during two airborne campaigns (12/12 in 2014 and 5/20 in 2015) over various land, river, and vegetated targets in Virginia during stressed and growth seasons.

  20. Interpolating for the location of remote sensor data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puccinelli, E. F.; Kornfield, J.

    1981-01-01

    An interpolation algorithm is presented as a practical alternative to common interpolation and approximation methods when applied to the problem of determining the location of remote sensor data. This algorithm is based upon knowledge of the geometry of the problem and is shown to be inherently more accurate than common interpolation schemes which may be applied to all types of data. A practical location problem is used to demonstrate its accuracy and computational cost.

  1. Remote sensing: Physical principles, sensors and products, and the LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Steffen, C. A.; Lorenzzetti, J. A.; Stech, J. L.; Desouza, R. C. M.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques of data acquisition by remote sensing are introduced in this teaching aid. The properties of the elements involved (radiant energy, topograph, atmospheric attenuation, surfaces, and sensors) are covered. Radiometers, photography, scanners, and radar are described as well as their products. Aspects of the LANDSAT system examined include the characteristics of the satellite and its orbit, the multispectral band scanner, and the return beam vidicon. Pixels (picture elements), pattern registration, and the characteristics, reception, and processing of LANDSAT imagery are also considered.

  2. [A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Kan, Rui-feng; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Li-ming; Yu, Dian-qiang; Dong, Jin-ting; Han, Xiao-lei; Cui, Yi-ben; Liu, Jian-guo

    2012-02-01

    The detection of natural gas pipeline leak becomes a significant issue for body security, environmental protection and security of state property. However, the leak detection is difficult, because of the pipeline's covering many areas, operating conditions and complicated environment. A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage based on scanning wavelength differential absorption spectroscopy (SWDAS) is introduced. The improved soft threshold wavelet denoising was proposed by analyzing the characteristics of reflection spectrum. And the results showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was increased three times. When light intensity is 530 nA, the minimum remote sensitivity will be 80 ppm x m. A widely used SWDAS can make quantitative remote sensing of natural gas leak and locate the leak source precisely in a faster, safer and more intelligent way.

  3. The airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer - A new instrument of remote measurement of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.; Menzies, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    The Laser Absorption Spectrometer is a portable instrument developed by JPL for remote measurement of trace gases from an aircraft platform. It contains two carbon dioxide lasers, two optical heterodyne receivers, appropriate optics to aim the lasers at the ground and detect the backscattered energy, and signal processing and recording electronics. Operating in the differential-absorption mode, it is possible to monitor one atmospheric gas at a time and record the data in real time. The system can presently measure ozone, ethylene, water vapor, and chlorofluoromethanes with high sensitivity. Airborne measurements were made in early 1977 from the NASA/JPL twin-engine Beechcraft and in May 1977 from the NASA Convair 990 during the ASSESS-II Shuttle Simulation Study. These flights resulted in measurements of ozone concentrations in the lower troposphere which were compared with ground-based values provided by the Air Pollution Control District. This paper describes the details of the instrument and results of the airborne measurements.

  4. Distance measurement to high remote targets based on the airborne chaotic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Renke; Wang, Haiyan; Wu, Xueming

    2016-10-01

    According to the characteristics of chaotic laser, which has ability of novel anti-jamming, high bandwidth and detecting distance of the movement target to the millimeter precision, a modeling method of using airborne chaotic laser system to detect distance of high remote targets is proposed for the first time. The characteristics of chaotic laser and principle of interferometry distance were analyzed and the model of airborne chaotic laser ranging is established. Meanwhile, the influence of detection accuracy, which inducted by the main peak width of chaotic laser and the jamming signal is analyzed. According to the results of simulation analysis, we can get conclusions that the main factors of affecting the distance measurement are transmitted power, receiving sensitivity, and various losses of transmission medium. Autocorrelation characteristic of chaotic signal can also affect the dynamic range of the whole system. The main peak width of chaotic laser is the main factor of influencing the accuracy of measurement. However, the jamming signal affect distance measuring range and accuracy of measurement little. Finally, the model's effectiveness is proved by comparing the experience data and simulation data.

  5. Equivalent Sensor Radiance Generation and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters. Part 1; Equivalent Sensor Radiance Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, Galina; DaSilva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating equivalent sensor radiances from variables output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probably density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The equivalent sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies. We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products.) We focus on clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions, because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  6. Regional Drought Monitoring Based on Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Jinyoung; Im, Jungho; Park, Seonyoung

    2014-05-01

    Drought originates from the deficit of precipitation and impacts environment including agriculture and hydrological resources as it persists. The assessment and monitoring of drought has traditionally been performed using a variety of drought indices based on meteorological data, and recently the use of remote sensing data is gaining much attention due to its vast spatial coverage and cost-effectiveness. Drought information has been successfully derived from remotely sensed data related to some biophysical and meteorological variables and drought monitoring is advancing with the development of remote sensing-based indices such as the Vegetation Condition Index (VCI), Vegetation Health Index (VHI), and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) to name a few. The Scaled Drought Condition Index (SDCI) has also been proposed to be used for humid regions proving the performance of multi-sensor data for agricultural drought monitoring. In this study, remote sensing-based hydro-meteorological variables related to drought including precipitation, temperature, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture were examined and the SDCI was improved by providing multiple blends of the multi-sensor indices for different types of drought. Multiple indices were examined together since the coupling and feedback between variables are intertwined and it is not appropriate to investigate only limited variables to monitor each type of drought. The purpose of this study is to verify the significance of each variable to monitor each type of drought and to examine the combination of multi-sensor indices for more accurate and timely drought monitoring. The weights for the blends of multiple indicators were obtained from the importance of variables calculated by non-linear optimization using a Machine Learning technique called Random Forest. The case study was performed in the Republic of Korea, which has four distinct seasons over the course of the year and contains complex topography with a variety

  7. Miniature Wireless BioSensor for Remote Endoscopic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Brown, Keith; Issadore, David; Westervelt, Robert; Thompson, Chris; Obstein, Keith; Laine, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We have built a miniature wireless biosensor with fluorescence detection capability that explores the miniaturization limit for a self-powered sensor device assembled from the latest off-the-shelf technology. The device is intended as a remote medical sensor to be inserted endoscopically and remainin a patient's gastrointestinal tract for a period of weeks, recording and transmitting data as necessary. A sensing network may be formed by using multiple such devices within the patient, routing information to an external receiver that communicates through existing mobilephone networks to relay data remotely. By using a monolithic IC chip with integrated processor, memory, and 2.4 GHz radio,combined with a photonic sensor and miniature battery, we have developed a fully functional computing device in a form factorcompliantwith insertion through the narrowest endoscopic channels (less than 3mm x 3mm x 20mm). We envision similar devices with various types of sensors to be used in many different areas of the human body.

  8. Remote Sensing of Snow-covered Sea Ice with Ultra-wideband Airborne Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, S.; Gogineni, P. S.; Gomez-Garcia, D.; Leuschen, C.; Hale, R.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Paden, J. D.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    The extent and thickness of sea ice and snow play a critical role in the Earth's climate system. Both sea ice and snow have high albedo and control the heat exchange between the atmosphere and ocean and atmosphere and land. In terms of hydrology, the presence of sea ice and snow modulates the flow and the salinity of ocean water. This in turn can modify the weather patterns around the globe. Understanding the formation, coverage and the properties of sea ice and snow are important for both short-term and long-term climate modeling. The advancements in high-frequency electronics and digital signal processing enabled the development of ultra-wideband radars by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) for airborne measurements of snow and ice properties over large areas. CReSIS recently developed and deployed two ultra-wideband airborne radars, namely the Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder/Imager (MCoRDS/I) and the Snow Radar. The MCoRDS/I is designed to operate over the frequency range of 180-450 MHz for sounding land ice and imaging its ice-bed interface. We also took advantage of the deployment to explore the potential of UWB MCoRDS/I in sounding sea ice and collected data on flight lines flown as part of NASA Operation IceBridge mission during Spring 2015. Preliminary results show we sounded sea ice under favorable conditions. We will perform detailed processing and analysis of data over the next few months and we will compare results obtained are compared with existing altimetry-derived data products. The new snow radar, on the other hand, operating from 2 to 18 GHz, was deployed on the NRL Twin Otter aircraft in Barrow, AK. It was shown to have a vertical resolution of down to 1.5 cm which opens up the potential for thin snow measurement on both sea ice and land. Both of these new radars will be further optimized for future airborne missions to demonstrate their capabilities for sea ice and snow measurements. We will also show new technical

  9. The information of oil and gas micro-seepage in Dongsheng region of inner Mongolia based on the airborne hyperspectral remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Shu-Fang; Chen, Jian-Ping; Zhou, Mi

    2008-11-01

    The technology of hyper-spectral remote sensing which has higher spatial resolution characteristic, and optimizes the qualification of identifying and extracting salt mines, not only enhances the capacity of natural scenes detection and recognition, but also advances the level of quantitative remote sensing. It has important meaning for using the technology of hyper-spectral remote sensing to quantitative extraction. The paper investigate gas micro-seepage based on the Airborne Hyper-spectral Remote Sensing in Dongsheng of Inner Mongolia on the basis of gas micro-seepage theory using EO-1 Hyperion data collected by Satellite-Borne Sensor which has highest spatial resolution presently in the world. On the basis of data pretreated this paper adopts band math extracted the distribution of oil and gas micro-seepage using diagnostic assimilating spectrum of alteration minerals by the numbers. With eigenvector length model evaluates the research area comprehensive index, oil and gas micro-seepage information model of the research area is established and key regions of oil and gas micro-seepage are confirmed, which offers academic gist for oil and gas resource exploitation of Dongsheng.

  10. Predicting risk of invasive species occurrence - remote-sesning strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing is a means to describe characteristics of an area without physically sampling the area. Remote sensors can be mounted on a satellite, plane, or other airborne structure. Remotely sensed data allow for landscape perspectives on management issues. Sensors measure the electromagnetic ene...

  11. Remote Automatic Material On-Line Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, Erik

    2005-12-20

    Low cost NMR sensor for measuring moisture content of forest products. The Department of Energy (DOE) Industries of the Future (IOF) program seeks development and implementation of technologies that make industry more efficient--in particular, more energy-efficient. Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM), a wholly-owned subsidiary of GE Security, received an award under the program to investigate roles for low-cost Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technology in furtherance of these goals. Most NMR systems are designed for high-resolution spectroscopy applications. These systems use intense magnetic fields produced by superconducting magnets that drive price and operating cost to levels beyond industry tolerance. At low magnetic fields, achievable at low cost, one loses the ability to obtain spectroscopic information. However, measuring the time constants associated with the NMR signal, called NMR relaxometry, gives indications of chemical and physical states of interest to process control and optimization. It was the purpose of this effort to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of using such low-field, low-cost NMR to monitor parameters enabling greater process efficiencies. The primary target industry identified in the Cooperative Development Agreement was the wood industry, where the moisture content of wood is a key process parameter from the time the cut tree enters a mill until the time it is delivered as pieces of lumber. Extracting the moisture is energy consuming, and improvements in drying efficiency stand to reduce costs and emissions substantially. QM designed and developed a new, low-cost NMR instrument suitable for inspecting lumber up to 3 inches by 12 inches in cross section, and other materials of similar size. Low cost is achieved via an inexpensive, permanent magnet and low-cost NMR spectrometer electronics. Laboratory testing demonstrated that the NMR system is capable of accurate ({+-} 0.5%) measurements of the moisture content of wood for

  12. An Airborne A-Band Spectrometer for Remote Sensing Of Aerosol and Cloud Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael; Hostetler, Chris; Poole, Lamont; Holden, Carl; Rault, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric remote sensing with the O2 A-band has a relatively long history, but most of these studies were attempting to estimate surface pressure or cloud-top pressure. Recent conceptual studies have demonstrated the potential of spaceborne high spectral resolution O2 A-band spectrometers for retrieval of aerosol and cloud optical properties. The physical rationale of this new approach is that information on the scattering properties of the atmosphere is embedded in the detailed line structure of the O2 A-band reflected radiance spectrum. The key to extracting this information is to measure the radiance spectrum at very high spectral resolution. Instrument performance requirement studies indicate that, in addition to high spectral resolution, the successful retrieval of aerosol and cloud properties from A-band radiance spectra will also require high radiometric accuracy, instrument stability, and high signal-to-noise measurements. To experimentally assess the capabilities of this promising new remote sensing application, the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an airborne high spectral resolution A-band spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a plane holographic grating with a folded Littrow geometry to achieve high spectral resolution (0.5 cm-1) and low stray light in a compact package. This instrument will be flown in a series of field campaigns beginning in 2001 to evaluate the overall feasibility of this new technique. Results from these campaigns should be particularly valuable for future spaceborne applications of A-band spectrometers for aerosol and cloud retrievals.

  13. An Improved High-Sensitivity Airborne Transient Electromagnetic Sensor for Deep Penetration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shudong; Guo, Shuxu; Wang, Haofeng; He, Miao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Yu; Zhang, Shuang; Yuan, Zhiwen; Zhang, Haiyang; Fang, Dong; Zhu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The investigation depth of transient electromagnetic sensors can be effectively increased by reducing the system noise, which is mainly composed of sensor internal noise, electromagnetic interference (EMI), and environmental noise, etc. A high-sensitivity airborne transient electromagnetic (AEM) sensor with low sensor internal noise and good shielding effectiveness is of great importance for deep penetration. In this article, the design and optimization of such an AEM sensor is described in detail. To reduce sensor internal noise, a noise model with both a damping resistor and a preamplifier is established and analyzed. The results indicate that a sensor with a large diameter, low resonant frequency, and low sampling rate will have lower sensor internal noise. To improve the electromagnetic compatibility of the sensor, an electromagnetic shielding model for a central-tapped coil is established and discussed in detail. Previous studies have shown that unclosed shields with multiple layers and center grounding can effectively suppress EMI and eddy currents. According to these studies, an improved differential AEM sensor is constructed with a diameter, resultant effective area, resonant frequency, and normalized equivalent input noise of 1.1 m, 114 m2, 35.6 kHz, and 13.3 nV/m2, respectively. The accuracy of the noise model and the shielding effectiveness of the sensor have been verified experimentally. The results show a good agreement between calculated and measured results for the sensor internal noise. Additionally, over 20 dB shielding effectiveness is achieved in a complex electromagnetic environment. All of these results show a great improvement in sensor internal noise and shielding effectiveness. PMID:28106718

  14. An Improved High-Sensitivity Airborne Transient Electromagnetic Sensor for Deep Penetration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shudong; Guo, Shuxu; Wang, Haofeng; He, Miao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Yu; Zhang, Shuang; Yuan, Zhiwen; Zhang, Haiyang; Fang, Dong; Zhu, Jun

    2017-01-17

    The investigation depth of transient electromagnetic sensors can be effectively increased by reducing the system noise, which is mainly composed of sensor internal noise, electromagnetic interference (EMI), and environmental noise, etc. A high-sensitivity airborne transient electromagnetic (AEM) sensor with low sensor internal noise and good shielding effectiveness is of great importance for deep penetration. In this article, the design and optimization of such an AEM sensor is described in detail. To reduce sensor internal noise, a noise model with both a damping resistor and a preamplifier is established and analyzed. The results indicate that a sensor with a large diameter, low resonant frequency, and low sampling rate will have lower sensor internal noise. To improve the electromagnetic compatibility of the sensor, an electromagnetic shielding model for a central-tapped coil is established and discussed in detail. Previous studies have shown that unclosed shields with multiple layers and center grounding can effectively suppress EMI and eddy currents. According to these studies, an improved differential AEM sensor is constructed with a diameter, resultant effective area, resonant frequency, and normalized equivalent input noise of 1.1 m, 114 m², 35.6 kHz, and 13.3 nV/m², respectively. The accuracy of the noise model and the shielding effectiveness of the sensor have been verified experimentally. The results show a good agreement between calculated and measured results for the sensor internal noise. Additionally, over 20 dB shielding effectiveness is achieved in a complex electromagnetic environment. All of these results show a great improvement in sensor internal noise and shielding effectiveness.

  15. A Micro Aerosol Sensor for the Measurement of Airborne Ultrafine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Particle number concentration and particle size are the two key parameters used to characterize exposure to airborne nanoparticles or ultrafine particles that have attracted the most attention. This paper proposes a simple micro aerosol sensor for detecting the number concentration and particle size of ultrafine particles with diameters from 50 to 253 nm based on electrical diffusion charging. The sensor is composed of a micro channel and a couple of planar electrodes printed on two circuit boards assembled in parallel, which thus integrate charging, precipitating and measurement elements into one chip, the overall size of which is 98 × 38 × 25 mm3. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor is useful for measuring monodisperse aerosol particles with number concentrations from 300 to 2.5 × 104 /cm3 and particle sizes from 50 to 253 nm. The aerosol sensor has a simple structure and small size, which is favorable for use in handheld devices. PMID:26999156

  16. Active structural acoustic control using the remote sensor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, Jordan; Daley, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Active structural acoustic control (ASAC) is an effective method of reducing the sound radiation from vibrating structures. In order to implement ASAC systems using only structural actuators and sensors, it is necessary to employ a model of the sound radiation from the structure. Such models have been presented in the literature for simple structures, such as baffled rectangular plates, and methods of determining the radiation modes of more complex practical structures using experimental data have also been explored. A similar problem arises in the context of active noise control, where cancellation of a disturbance is required at positions in space where it is not possible to locate a physical error microphone. In this case the signals at the cancellation points can be estimated from the outputs of remotely located measurement sensors using the “remote microphone method”. This remote microphone method is extended here to the ASAC problem, in which the pressures at a number of microphone locations must be estimated from measurements on the structure of the radiating system. The control and estimation strategies are described and the performance is assessed for a typical structural radiation problem.

  17. Scanning infrared remote sensing system for identification, visualization, and quantification of airborne pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, Roland; Matz, Gerhard; Rusch, Peter

    2002-02-01

    Remote sensing by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry allows detection, identification, and quantification of airborne pollutants. In the case of leaks in pipelines or leaks in chemical plants, chemical accidents, terrorism, or war, hazardous compounds are often released into the atmosphere. Various Fourier-transform infrared spectrometers have been developed for the remote detection and identification of hazardous clouds. However, for the localization of a leak and a complete assessment of the situation in the case of the release of a hazardous cloud, information about the position and the size of a cloud is essential. Therefore, an imaging passive remote sensing system comprised of an interferometer (Bruker OPAG 22), a data acquisition, processing, and control system with a digital signal processor (FTIR DSP), an azimuth-elevation-scanning mirror, a video system with a DSP, and a personal computer has been developed. The FTIR DSP system controls the scanning mirror, collects the interferograms, and performs the Fourier transformation. The spectra are transferred to a personal computer and analyzed by a real-time identification algorithm that does not require background spectra for the analysis. The results are visualized by a video image, overlaid by false color images. For each target compound of a spectral library, images of the coefficient of correlation, the signal to noise ratio, the brightness temperature of the background, the difference between the temperature of the ambient air and the brightness temperature of the background, and the noise equivalent column density are produced. The column densities of all directions in which a target compound has been identified may be retrieved by a nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm and an additional false color image is displayed. The system has a high selectivity, low noise equivalent spectral radiance, and it allows identification, visualization, and quantification of pollutant clouds.

  18. NEON: the first continental-scale ecological observatory with airborne remote sensing of vegetation canopy biochemistry and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Brian R.; Kampe, Thomas U.; Kuester, Michele A.; Keller, Michael

    2009-08-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), being funded by the National Science Foundation, is a continental-scale research platform for discovering, understanding and forecasting the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on ecology. Local site-based flux tower and field measurements will be coordinated with high resolution, regional airborne remote sensing observations. The NEON Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) consists of an aircraft platform carrying remote sensing instrumentation designed to achieve sub-meter to meter scale ground resolution to bridge scales from organism and stand scales to the scale of satellite based remote sensing. Data from the AOP will be openly available to the science community and will provide quantitative information on land use change, and changes in ecological structure and chemistry including the presence and effects of invasive species. Remote sensing instrumentation consists of an imaging spectrometer measuring surface reflectance over the continuous wavelength range from 400 to 2500 nm with 10 nm resolution, a scanning, small footprint waveform LiDAR for 3-D canopy structure measurements and a high resolution airborne digital camera. The AOP science objectives, key mission requirements, the conceptual design and development status are presented.

  19. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  20. Remote sensing and human health: new sensors and new opportunities.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, L. R.; Lobitz, B. M.; Wood, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    Since the launch of Landsat-1 28 years ago, remotely sensed data have been used to map features on the earth's surface. An increasing number of health studies have used remotely sensed data for monitoring, surveillance, or risk mapping, particularly of vector-borne diseases. Nearly all studies used data from Landsat, the French Système Pour l'Observation de la Terre, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. New sensor systems are in orbit, or soon to be launched, whose data may prove useful for characterizing and monitoring the spatial and temporal patterns of infectious diseases. Increased computing power and spatial modeling capabilities of geographic information systems could extend the use of remote sensing beyond the research community into operational disease surveillance and control. This article illustrates how remotely sensed data have been used in health applications and assesses earth-observing satellites that could detect and map environmental variables related to the distribution of vector-borne and other diseases. PMID:10827111

  1. Remote sensing and human health: new sensors and new opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, L. R.; Lobitz, B. M.; Wood, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    Since the launch of Landsat-1 28 years ago, remotely sensed data have been used to map features on the earth's surface. An increasing number of health studies have used remotely sensed data for monitoring, surveillance, or risk mapping, particularly of vector-borne diseases. Nearly all studies used data from Landsat, the French Systeme Pour l'Observation de la Terre, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. New sensor systems are in orbit, or soon to be launched, whose data may prove useful for characterizing and monitoring the spatial and temporal patterns of infectious diseases. Increased computing power and spatial modeling capabilities of geographic information systems could extend the use of remote sensing beyond the research community into operational disease surveillance and control. This article illustrates how remotely sensed data have been used in health applications and assesses earth-observing satellites that could detect and map environmental variables related to the distribution of vector-borne and other diseases.

  2. Regolith landform mapping based on remote sensing data and airborne geophysics in Western Burkina Faso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelka, Vaclav; Baratoux, Lenka; Jessell, Mark; Naba, Seta

    2010-05-01

    The Precambrian granite-greenstone belts of West Africa are currently of great interest both to scientific community as well as the exploration industry. Studying and observing the geology of these ancient terrains is not an easy task mainly due to complex, deep weathering, which effectively masks the underlying bedrock. It is the weathered regolith material and its landforms that can be directly accessed by surface mapping. Knowing the distribution of these regolith landform units and understanding the processes which led to their formation is crucial for any kind of successful geological mapping or geochemical exploration project. In our research we have focused on regolith units in the Houndé and Boromo greenstone belts in Western Burkina Faso. We examined three approaches to map regolith material and subsequently regolith landform units: subpixel classification, based on spectral characteristics of indicative materials, a polarimetric segmentation of radar data, and a classification of an integrated dataset of remote sensing data and airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data. In situ spectral measurements were used to calibrate ASTER and LANDSAT scenes and served as endmember identifiers. A spectral library has been created containing over three hundred unique spectral measurements. ASTER and Landsat data were classified using the Mixture tuned matched filtering method. Wishart supervised classifier was used on ALOS PALSAR data. Classifications based on supervised maximum likelihood method and neural networks have been applied to an integrated dataset which included SRTM elevation data and airborne gamma-ray spectrometry. Feruginous duricrusts rich in hematite and goethite, clay rich mottled zones relics and fluvial sediments were mapped successfully in the region. The results were compared with existing regolith landform maps and field observations.

  3. Application of remote sensors in coastal zone observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillat, J. M.; Elachi, C.; Brown, W. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A review of processes taking place along coastlines and their biological consideration led to the determination of the elements which are required in the study of coastal structures and which are needed for better utilization of the resources from the oceans. The processes considered include waves, currents, and their influence on the erosion of coastal structures. Biological considerations include coastal fisheries, estuaries, and tidal marshes. Various remote sensors were analyzed for the information which they can provide and sites were proposed where a general ocean-observation plan could be tested.

  4. Analysis of interference to remote passive microwave sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Douglas; Tillotson, Tom

    1986-01-01

    The final acts of the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) were analyzed to determine potential interference to remote passive microwave sensors. Using interferer populations determined from the U.S. Government and FCC Master File Lists and assuming uniform geographical distribution of interferers, the level of interference from shared services and active services in adjacent and subharmonic bands was calculated for each of the 22 passive sensing bands. In addition, due to the theoretically large antennas required for passive sensing, an analysis was performed to determine if smaller antennas, i.e., relaxed resolution requirements, would have an effect on interference and to what extent.

  5. Anisotropy of thermal infrared remote sensing over urban areas : assessment from airborne data and modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, A.; Mestayer, P.; Lagouarde, J.-P.; Lee, J. H.

    2009-09-01

    Due to the morphological complexity of the urban canopy and to the variability in thermal properties of the building materials, the heterogeneity of the surface temperatures generates a strong directional anisotropy of thermal infrared remote sensing signal. Thermal infrared (TIR) data obtained with an airborne FLIR camera over Toulouse (France) city centre during the CAPITOUL experiment (feb. 2004 - feb. 2005) show brightness temperature anisotropies ranging from 3 °C by night to more than 10 °C by sunny days. These data have been analyzed in view of developing a simple approach to correct TIR satellite remote sensing from the canopy-generated anisotropy, and to further evaluate the sensible heat fluxes. The methodology is based on the identification of 6 different classes of surfaces: roofs, walls and grounds, sunlit or shaded, respectively. The thermo-radiative model SOLENE is used to simulate, with a 1 m resolution computational grid, the surface temperatures of an 18000 m² urban district, in the same meteorological conditions as during the observation. A pixel-by-pixel comparison with both hand-held temperature measurements and airborne camera images allows to assess the actual values of the radiative and thermal parameters of the scene elements. SOLENE is then used to simulate a generic street-canyon geometry, whose sizes average the morphological parameters of the actual streets in the district, for 18 different geographical orientations. The simulated temperatures are then integrated for different viewing positions, taking into account shadowing and masking, and directional temperatures are determined for the 6 surface classes. The class ratios in each viewing direction are derived from images of the district generated by using the POVRAY software, and used to weigh the temperatures of each class and to compute the resulting directional brightness temperature at the district scale for a given sun direction (time in the day). Simulated and measured

  6. Optimal feedback control of a bioreactor with a remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjan, S. C.; San, K. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sensors used to monitor bioreactor conditions directly often perform poorly in the face of adverse nonphysiological conditions. One way to circumvent this is to use a remote sensor block. However, such a configuration usually causes a significant time lag between measurements and the actual state values. Here, the problem of implementing feedback control strategies for such systems, described by nonlinear equations, is addressed. The problem is posed as an optimal control problem with a linear quadratic performance index. The linear control law so obtained is used to implement feedback. A global linearization technique as well as an expansion using Taylor series is used to linearize the nonlinear system, and the feedback is subsequently implemented.

  7. Integration of TerraSAR-X, RapidEye and airborne lidar for remote sensing of intertidal bedforms on the upper flats of Norderney (German Wadden Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, Winny; Jung, Richard; Schmidt, Alena; Ehlers, Manfred; Heipke, Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander; Farke, Hubert

    2016-11-01

    The Wadden Sea is a large coastal transition area adjoining the southern North Sea uniting ecological key functions with an important role in coastal protection. The region is strictly protected by EU directives and national law and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, requiring frequent quality assessments and regular monitoring. In 2014 an intertidal bedform area characterised by alternating crests and water-covered troughs on the tidal flats of the island of Norderney (German Wadden Sea sector) was chosen to test different remote sensing methods for habitat mapping: airborne lidar, satellite-based radar (TerraSAR-X) and electro-optical sensors (RapidEye). The results revealed that, although sensitive to different surface qualities, all sensors were able to image the bedforms. A digital terrain model generated from the lidar data shows crests and slopes of the bedforms with high geometric accuracy in the centimetre range, but high costs limit the operation area. TerraSAR-X data enabled identifying the positions of the bedforms reflecting the residual water in the troughs also with a high resolution of up to 1.1 m, but with larger footprints and much higher temporal availability. RapidEye data are sensitive to differences in sediment moisture employed to identify crest areas, slopes and troughs, with high spatial coverage but the lowest resolution (6.5 m). Monitoring concepts may differ in their remote sensing requirements regarding areal coverage, spatial and temporal resolution, sensitivity and geometric accuracy. Also financial budgets limit the selection of sensors. Thus, combining differing assets into an integrated concept of remote sensing contributes to solving these issues.

  8. Integration of TerraSAR-X, RapidEye and airborne lidar for remote sensing of intertidal bedforms on the upper flats of Norderney (German Wadden Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, Winny; Jung, Richard; Schmidt, Alena; Ehlers, Manfred; Heipke, Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander; Farke, Hubert

    2017-04-01

    The Wadden Sea is a large coastal transition area adjoining the southern North Sea uniting ecological key functions with an important role in coastal protection. The region is strictly protected by EU directives and national law and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, requiring frequent quality assessments and regular monitoring. In 2014 an intertidal bedform area characterised by alternating crests and water-covered troughs on the tidal flats of the island of Norderney (German Wadden Sea sector) was chosen to test different remote sensing methods for habitat mapping: airborne lidar, satellite-based radar (TerraSAR-X) and electro-optical sensors (RapidEye). The results revealed that, although sensitive to different surface qualities, all sensors were able to image the bedforms. A digital terrain model generated from the lidar data shows crests and slopes of the bedforms with high geometric accuracy in the centimetre range, but high costs limit the operation area. TerraSAR-X data enabled identifying the positions of the bedforms reflecting the residual water in the troughs also with a high resolution of up to 1.1 m, but with larger footprints and much higher temporal availability. RapidEye data are sensitive to differences in sediment moisture employed to identify crest areas, slopes and troughs, with high spatial coverage but the lowest resolution (6.5 m). Monitoring concepts may differ in their remote sensing requirements regarding areal coverage, spatial and temporal resolution, sensitivity and geometric accuracy. Also financial budgets limit the selection of sensors. Thus, combining differing assets into an integrated concept of remote sensing contributes to solving these issues.

  9. Airborne Remote-Sensing of Atmoshperic CH4 and CO2 Column Mixing Ratio With MAMap - First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretner, A.; Gerilowski, K.; Bovensmann, H.; Buchwitz, M.; Erzinger, J.; Burrows, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Methane Airborne Mapper (MAMap) performs quantitative CO2 and CH4 remote sensing measurements of the atmospheric column between an aircraft and the Earth's surface. Its two spectrometers cover wavelenghts of 1.59-1.62μm for CO2, 1.63-1.75μm for CH4 and 760nm for O2. A CH4 detection limit of <35ppbv and a resolution of <5% (at atmospheric background concentration of 1750ppbv) have been ascertained, which makes it possible to detect small changes within the atmospheric CH4 column at a local and regional scale. The atmospheric column mixing ratios of CH4 and CO2 were calculated using the WFM-DOAS algorithm which is known from the retrieval of CH4 and CO2 column concentrations from nadir measurements by SCIAMACHY. MAMap addresses the uncertainties in the current greenhouse gas emission budgets and provides a link between local ground-based small-scale and global satellite-based measurements. The aim of future MAMap research programs is the detection and quantification of CH4 and CO2 emission sources of both natural and anthropogenic origin. MAMap is designed for flexible operations at various planes, e.g. the DLR Dornier 228, the DLR 'Falcon' or the DLR Gulfstream 'HALO' aircraft. The results presented here were performed with a Cessna aircraft T207 at a flight height of 700m and a flight speed of 200km/h. The related ground pixel size covers 18m (across-track) x 10m (along track, albedo 0.18). The preliminary assessment of the sensor sensitivity under field campaign conditions includes measurements over a variety of natural and anthropogenic CH4 and CO2 emission sources, like coal-fired power plants, landfill sites, wetlands, a large number of different land surface types and a simulated CH4 source (CH4 released from a pressured gas bottle). First results will be reported.

  10. Quantifying the regional variation in forest ecosystem light-use efficiency using airborne remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbin, S. P.; Townsend, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Forests are a globally important resource, playing a critical role in the terrestrial carbon cycle and influencing climate through the exchange of mass and energy with the atmosphere. In order to better understand the continued role of forest ecosystems in the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere detailed assessments of carbon and nutrient cycling are needed along forest successional trajectories, across climatic regions, and in response to ephemeral disturbances. Remote sensing approaches offer great potential to estimate the landscape- to regional-scale productivity in the world's forests, as well as other critical constituents including nitrogen concentration, pigments, water content, morphology, and structure. In this project, we are utilizing imaging spectroscopy data in conjunction with extensive field measurements to derive spatially explicit estimates of light-use efficiency (LUE, ɛ), a key component in remote sensing of productivity, based on forest functional properties (i.e. chemistry and leaf morphology) and canopy architecture. We show a strong ability to map chemistry, morphology and LUE across diverse forest types. These data are being used in a diagnostic modeling framework driven by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensor to quantify regional variability in net primary productivity (NPP) in the Upper Great Lakes region. This research is furthering our understanding of ecosystem responses to global change by testing the links between forest ecosystem processes and mechanisms that can be remotely sensed, thereby advancing large-scale modeling abilities.

  11. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Tsoucalas, George; Anderson, Mark; Mulally, Daniel; Moninger, William; Mamrosh, Richard

    2004-01-01

    One of the recommendations of the National Aviation Weather Program Council was to expand and institutionalize the generation, dissemination, and use of automated pilot reports (PIREPS) to the full spectrum of the aviation community, including general aviation. In response to this and other similar recommendations, NASA initiated cooperative research into the development of an electronic pilot reporting capability (Daniels 2002). The ultimate goal is to develop a small low-cost sensor, collect useful meteorological observations below 25,000 ft., downlink the data in near real time, and use the data to improve weather forecasts. Primary users of the data include pilots, who are one targeted audience for the improved weather information that will result from the TAMDAR data. The weather data will be disseminated and used to improve aviation safety by providing pilots with enhanced weather situational awareness. In addition, the data will be used to improve the accuracy and timeliness of weather forecasts. Other users include air traffic controllers, flight service stations, and airline weather centers. Additionally, the meteorological data collected by TAMDAR is expected to have a significant positive impact on forecast accuracy for ground based applications.

  12. Ultrawideband synthetic vision sensor for airborne wire detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Robert J.; Larrick, J. F.; Cade, Jeffrey E.; Rivers, Eugene P., Jr.

    1998-07-01

    A low cost, miniature ultra wideband (UWB) radar has demonstrated the ability to detect suspended wires and other small obstacles at distances exceeding several hundred feet using an average output power of less than 10 microwatts. Originally developed as a high precision UWB radar altimeter for the Navy's Program Executive Office for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Cruise Missiles, an improved sensitivity version was recently developed for the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC Dahlgren Division) as part of the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory's Hummingbird program for rotary wing platforms. Utilizing a short pulse waveform of approximately 2.5 nanoseconds in duration, the receiver processor exploits the leading edge of the radar return pulse to achieve range resolutions of less than one foot. The resultant 400 MHz bandwidth spectrum produces both a broad frequency excitation for enhanced detection, as well as a low probability of intercept and detection (LPI/D) signature for covert applications. This paper describes the design and development of the ultra wideband sensor, as well as performance results achieved during field testing at NSWC's Dahlgren, VA facility. These results are compared with those achieved with a high resolution EHF radar and a laser-based detection system.

  13. Detecting trends in regional ecosystem functioning: the importance of field data for calibrating and validating NEON airborne remote sensing instruments and science data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkel, J.; Kuester, M. A.; Johnson, B. R.; Krause, K.; Kampe, T. U.; Moore, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a research facility under development by the National Science Foundation to improve our understanding of and ability to forecast the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on ecology. The infrastructure, designed to operate over 30 years or more, includes site-based flux tower and field measurements, coordinated with airborne remote sensing observations to observe key ecological processes over a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. NEON airborne data on vegetation biochemical, biophysical, and structural properties and on land use and land cover will be captured at 1 to 2 meter resolution by an imaging spectrometer, a small-footprint waveform-LiDAR and a high-resolution digital camera. Annual coverage of the 60 NEON sites and capacity to support directed research flights or respond to unexpected events will require three airborne observation platforms (AOP). The integration of field and airborne data with satellite observations and other national geospatial data for analysis, monitoring and input to ecosystem models will extend NEON observations to regions across the United States not directly sampled by the observatory. The different spatial scales and measurement methods make quantitative comparisons between remote sensing and field data, typically collected over small sample plots (e.g. < 0.2 ha), difficult. New approaches to developing temporal and spatial scaling relationships between these data are necessary to enable validation of airborne and satellite remote sensing data and for incorporation of these data into continental or global scale ecological models. In addition to consideration of the methods used to collect ground-based measurements, careful calibration of the remote sensing instrumentation and an assessment of the accuracy of algorithms used to derive higher-level science data products are needed. Furthermore, long-term consistency of the data collected by all

  14. NEON: the first continental-scale ecological observatory with airborne remote sensing of vegetation canopy biochemistry and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, Thomas U.; Johnson, Brian R.; Kuester, Michele; Keller, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ecological observation platform for discovering, understanding and forecasting the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecology. NEON will operate for 30 years and gather long-term data on ecological response changes and on feedbacks with the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. Local ecological measurements at sites distributed within 20 ecoclimatic domains across the contiguous United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico will be coordinated with high resolution, regional airborne remote sensing observations. The Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) is an aircraft platform carrying remote sensing instrumentation designed to achieve sub-meter to meter scale ground resolution, bridging scales from organisms and individual stands to satellite-based remote sensing. AOP instrumentation consists of a VIS/SWIR imaging spectrometer, a scanning small-footprint waveform LiDAR for 3-D canopy structure measurements and a high resolution airborne digital camera. AOP data will be openly available to scientists and will provide quantitative information on land use change and changes in ecological structure and chemistry including the presence and effects of invasive species. AOP science objectives, key mission requirements, and development status are presented including an overview of near-term risk-reduction and prototyping activities.

  15. Modified Michelson fiber-optic interferometer: A remote low-coherence distributed strain sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Libo

    2003-01-01

    A simple modified Michelson fiber-optic low-coherence interferometric quasi-distributed sensing system permitting absolute length measurement in remote reflective sensor array is proposed. The sensor reflective signals characteristics have been analyzed and the relationship between light signal intensities and sensors number was given for multiplexing potential evaluation. The proposed sensing scheme will be useful for the remote measurement of strain. An important application could be deformation sensing in smart structures. Experimentally, a three sensors array has been demonstrated.

  16. New optical sensor systems for high-resolution satellite, airborne and terrestrial imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Andreas; Börner, Anko; Lehmann, Frank

    2007-10-01

    The department of Optical Information Systems (OS) at the Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 25 years experience with high-resolution imaging technology. The technology changes in the development of detectors, as well as the significant change of the manufacturing accuracy in combination with the engineering research define the next generation of spaceborne sensor systems focusing on Earth observation and remote sensing. The combination of large TDI lines, intelligent synchronization control, fast-readable sensors and new focal-plane concepts open the door to new remote-sensing instruments. This class of instruments is feasible for high-resolution sensor systems regarding geometry and radiometry and their data products like 3D virtual reality. Systemic approaches are essential for such designs of complex sensor systems for dedicated tasks. The system theory of the instrument inside a simulated environment is the beginning of the optimization process for the optical, mechanical and electrical designs. Single modules and the entire system have to be calibrated and verified. Suitable procedures must be defined on component, module and system level for the assembly test and verification process. This kind of development strategy allows the hardware-in-the-loop design. The paper gives an overview about the current activities at DLR in the field of innovative sensor systems for photogrammetric and remote sensing purposes.

  17. A Method for Monitoring the Heat Flux from an Urban District with a Single Infrared Remote Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Aurélien; Mestayer, Patrice G.

    2014-07-01

    The proposed methodology relies on the modelling capabilities of the thermo-radiative model Suc(olene) to simulate the heat and radiation energy exchanges between an actual urban district and the atmosphere. It is based on the comparison of the simulated upward infrared and sensible heat flux diurnal cycles that may be measured by elevated sensors above the three-dimensional scene, as a function of sensor position: the heat flux is a function of an equivalent surface temperature given by the infrared sensor and an equivalent heat transfer coefficient deduced from Suc(olene) simulations with the actual geometry. The method is tested against measurements obtained in the city centre of Toulouse, France during an experimental campaign in 2004-2005. To improve the computation of the heat exchanges between air and building surfaces a new algorithm is first implemented, based on an empirical model of the wind distribution within street canyons. This improvement is assessed by a direct comparison of the simulated brightness surface temperatures of the Toulouse city centre to measurements obtained with an airborne infrared sensor. The optimization of the infrared remote sensor position is finally analyzed as a function of its height above the mean roof level: it allows evaluation of the heat flux from an urban district when the three different classes of surfaces (roofs, walls, grounds) have similar contributions to the infrared flux towards the sensor, and to the heat flux into the atmosphere.

  18. Comparison of NDVI fields obtained from different remote sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano Rodriguez, Juan; Alonso, Carmelo; Tarquis, Ana Maria; Benito, Rosa Maria; Hernandez Díaz-Ambrona, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Satellite image data have become an important source of information for monitoring vegetation and mapping land cover at several scales. Beside this, the distribution and phenology of vegetation is largely associated with climate, terrain characteristics and human activity. Various vegetation indices have been developed for qualitative and quantitative assessment of vegetation using remote spectral measurements. In particular, sensors with spectral bands in the red (RED) and near-infrared (NIR) lend themselves well to vegetation monitoring and based on them [(NIR - RED) / (NIR + RED)] Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been widespread used. Given that the characteristics of spectral bands in RED and NIR vary distinctly from sensor to sensor, NDVI values based on data from different instruments will not be directly comparable. The spatial resolution also varies significantly between sensors, as well as within a given scene in the case of wide-angle and oblique sensors. As a result, NDVI values will vary according to combinations of the heterogeneity and scale of terrestrial surfaces and pixel footprint sizes. Therefore, the question arises as to the impact of differences in spectral and spatial resolutions on vegetation indices like the NDVI and their interpretation as a drought index. During 2012 three locations (at Salamanca, Granada and Córdoba) were selected and a periodic pasture monitoring and botanic composition were achieved. Daily precipitation, temperature and monthly soil water content were measurement as well as fresh and dry pasture weight. At the same time, remote sensing images were capture by DEIMOS-1 and MODIS of the chosen places. DEIMOS-1 is based on the concept Microsat-100 from Surrey. It is conceived for obtaining Earth images with a good enough resolution to study the terrestrial vegetation cover (20x20 m), although with a great range of visual field (600 km) in order to obtain those images with high temporal resolution and at a

  19. Remote detection of water stress in orchard canopies using MODIS/ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tao; Riaño, David; Koltunov, Alexander; Whiting, Michael L.; Ustin, Susan L.

    2011-09-01

    Vegetation canopy water content (CWC) is an important parameter for monitoring natural and agricultural ecosystems. Previous studies focused on the observation of annual or monthly variations in CWC but lacked temporal details to study vegetation physiological activities within a diurnal cycle. This study provides an evaluation of detecting vegetation diurnal water stress using airborne data acquired with the MASTER instrument. Concurrent with the morning and afternoon acquisitions of MASTER data, an extensive field campaign was conducted over almond and pistachio orchards in southern San Joaquin Valley of California to collect CWC measurements. Statistical analysis of the field measurements indicated a significant decrease of CWC from morning to afternoon. Field measured CWC was linearly correlated to the normalized difference infrared index (NDII) calculated with atmospherically corrected MASTER reflectance data using either FLAASH or empirical line (EL). Our regression analysis demonstrated that both atmospheric corrections led to a root mean square error (RMSE) of approximately 0.035 kg/m2 for the estimation of CWC (R2=0.42 for FLAASH images and R2=0.45 for EL images). Remote detection of the subtle decline in CWC awaits an improved prediction of CWC. Diurnal CWC maps revealed the spatial patterns of vegetation water status in response to variations in irrigation treatment.

  20. Assessing stream temperature variations in the Pacific Northwest using airborne thermal infrared remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J.; Cherkauer, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    Stream temperature is an important indicator of water quality, and a significant concern for endangered cold-water fish species in the Pacific Northwest. Thermal-infrared (TIR) remote sensing allows for the observation of water temperatures in entire river systems in a relatively short space of time, as opposed to more traditional point-based in situ observing methods that can capture only localized water conditions. Point measurements can therefore miss important spatial patterns associated with various factors including exposure to solar radiation, urbanization, changes to riparian zone vegetation, and the presence of groundwater returns and springs. In this paper, we analyze moderate resolution TIR imagery collected from an airborne platform for the Green River in Washington State. Five-meter MODIS/ASTER (MASTER) imagery along the main channel of the Green River was acquired in multiple straight line passes with image overlaps occurring at time intervals of between 3 and 30 minutes on August 25 and 27, 2001. Overlaps of two adjacent images provide a detailed comparison of how stream temperature changes over relatively short time scales, while image captured from different days help identify persistent localized temperature differences. Trees and shrubs in the riparian zone increases shading of the stream and reduces along-stream increases in temperature compared to stream reaches with reduced shading, such as urban areas. Longitudinal profiles of stream temperature from upstream to downstream show that other factors, such as sandbars and cold-water seeps, also contribute to along-stream temperature variations.

  1. Operational considerations for the application of remotely sensed forest data from LANDSAT or other airborne platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, G. R.; Fethe, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    Research in the application of remotely sensed data from LANDSAT or other airborne platforms to the efficient management of a large timber based forest industry was divided into three phases: (1) establishment of a photo/ground sample correlation, (2) investigation of techniques for multi-spectral digital analysis, and (3) development of a semi-automated multi-level sampling system. To properly verify results, three distinct test areas were selected: (1) Jacksonville Mill Region, Lower Coastal Plain, Flatwoods, (2) Pensacola Mill Region, Middle Coastal Plain, and (3) Mississippi Mill Region, Middle Coastal Plain. The following conclusions were reached: (1) the probability of establishing an information base suitable for management requirements through a photo/ground double sampling procedure, alleviating the ground sampling effort, is encouraging, (2) known classification techniques must be investigated to ascertain the level of precision possible in separating the many densities involved, and (3) the multi-level approach must be related to an information system that is executable and feasible.

  2. Radiometric Normalization of Large Airborne Image Data Sets Acquired by Different Sensor Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, S.; Beshah, B. T.

    2016-06-01

    Generating seamless mosaics of aerial images is a particularly challenging task when the mosaic comprises a large number of im-ages, collected over longer periods of time and with different sensors under varying imaging conditions. Such large mosaics typically consist of very heterogeneous image data, both spatially (different terrain types and atmosphere) and temporally (unstable atmo-spheric properties and even changes in land coverage). We present a new radiometric normalization or, respectively, radiometric aerial triangulation approach that takes advantage of our knowledge about each sensor's properties. The current implementation supports medium and large format airborne imaging sensors of the Leica Geosystems family, namely the ADS line-scanner as well as DMC and RCD frame sensors. A hierarchical modelling - with parameters for the overall mosaic, the sensor type, different flight sessions, strips and individual images - allows for adaptation to each sensor's geometric and radiometric properties. Additional parameters at different hierarchy levels can compensate radiome-tric differences of various origins to compensate for shortcomings of the preceding radiometric sensor calibration as well as BRDF and atmospheric corrections. The final, relative normalization is based on radiometric tie points in overlapping images, absolute radiometric control points and image statistics. It is computed in a global least squares adjustment for the entire mosaic by altering each image's histogram using a location-dependent mathematical model. This model involves contrast and brightness corrections at radiometric fix points with bilinear interpolation for corrections in-between. The distribution of the radiometry fixes is adaptive to each image and generally increases with image size, hence enabling optimal local adaptation even for very long image strips as typi-cally captured by a line-scanner sensor. The normalization approach is implemented in HxMap software. It has been

  3. Overview of the first Multicenter Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment: conversion of a ground-based lidar for airborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, James N.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Rothermel, Jeffrey; Menzies, Robert T.

    1996-11-01

    The first Multi center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) field experiment demonstrated an airborne high energy TEA CO2 Doppler lidar system for measurement of atmospheric wind fields and aerosol structure. The system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 during September 1995 in a series of checkout flights to observe several important atmospheric phenomena, including upper level winds in a Pacific hurricane, marine boundary layer winds, cirrus cloud properties, and land-sea breeze structure. The instrument, with its capability to measure 3D winds and backscatter fields, promises to be a valuable tool for climate and global change, severe weather, and air quality research. In this paper, we describe the airborne instrument, assess its performance, discuss future improvements, and show some preliminary results from the September experiments.

  4. Overview of the first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment: Conversion of a ground-based lidar for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.N.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    The first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) field experiment demonstrated an airborne high energy TEA CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar system for measurement of atmospheric wind fields and aerosol structure. The system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 during September 1995 in a series of checkout flights to observe several important atmospheric phenomena, including upper level winds in a Pacific hurricane, marine boundary layer winds, cirrus cloud properties, and land-sea breeze structure. The instrument, with its capability to measure three-dimensional winds and backscatter fields, promises to be a valuable tool for climate and global change, severe weather, and air quality research. In this paper, the authors describe the airborne instrument, assess its performance, discuss future improvements, and show some preliminary results from September experiments.

  5. CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral remote sensing anomaly extraction of metallogenic prediction research in Gansu Beishan South Beach area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Yongfei; Zhao, Yingjun

    2014-11-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing has one of the technical advantages atlas. The known deposits of Gansu Beishan South Beach deposits as the study area, based on the theory of wall rock alteration, using airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (CASI/SASI), extracted mineralization alteration information and analysis. Based on airborne hyperspectral remote sensing mineral mapping results in the study area, Combining analysising of possible mineral formation fluid properties, spatial distribution characteristics and time evolution with analysising of mineral formation environment (lithology and tectonic environment), construction of the South Beach gold deposit location model, the deposit location model as a guide, comprehensive analysis of mineralization geological background and surface geochemical data, delineated mineralization favorable areas. The field investigation showed that signs of altered development of strong in the delineation of the mineralization favorable areas and metallogenic potential of better, is worth paying attention to the prospecting target area. Further explanation that the hyperspectral remote sensing can provide accurate and reliable information for the prospecting, and is worthy of further mining the ore prospecting potential.

  6. NASA/LMSC coherent LIDAR airborne shear sensor: System capabilities and flight test plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the NASA/LMSC Coherent Lidar Airborne Shear Sensor (CLASS) system flight tests is to evaluate the capability of an airborne coherent lidar system to detect, measure, and predict hazardous wind shear ahead of the aircraft with a view to warning flight crew of any impending dangers. On NASA's Boeing 737 Transport Systems Research Vehicle, the CLASS system will be used to measure wind velocity fields and, by incorporating such measurements with real-time aircraft state parameters, identify regions of wind shear that may be detrimental to the aircraft's performance. Assessment is to be made through actual wind shear encounters in flight. Wind shear measurements made by the class system will be compared to those made by the aircraft's in situ wind shear detection system as well as by ground-based Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and airborne Doppler radar. By examining the aircraft performance loss (or gain) due to wind shear that the lidar predicts with that actually experienced by the aircraft, the performance of the CLASS system as a predictive wind shear detector will be assessed.

  7. Effects of airborne particulates on remote spectrometry data collected for industrial accident response support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Paul E.

    2003-12-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 7 maintains an operational passive midwave/longwave airborne spectrometer system. This system provides near-real-time information on hazardous chemical releases (e.g., chemical constituents, column density and direction) for emergency personnel responding to industrial accidents. Industrial accidents range from ruptured tank cars caused by train derailments to explosions at industrial facilities. Airborne particles may be present as well, especially in accidents involving explosions and fire. This paper investigates how the presence of airborne particles can affect the identification of airborne chemical species in these situations.

  8. Effects of airborne particulates on remote spectrometry data collected for industrial accident response support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Paul E.

    2004-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 7 maintains an operational passive midwave/longwave airborne spectrometer system. This system provides near-real-time information on hazardous chemical releases (e.g., chemical constituents, column density and direction) for emergency personnel responding to industrial accidents. Industrial accidents range from ruptured tank cars caused by train derailments to explosions at industrial facilities. Airborne particles may be present as well, especially in accidents involving explosions and fire. This paper investigates how the presence of airborne particles can affect the identification of airborne chemical species in these situations.

  9. Airborne mapping of earth-atmosphere exchange processes and remote sensing of surface characteristics over heterogeneous areas

    SciTech Connect

    Schuepp, P.H.; Ogunjemiyo, S.; Mitic, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    Given the spatial heterogeneity of much of the biosphere, and the difficulty in establishing representative observation points at the surface, airborne flux observations coupled with airborne and satellite-based remote sensing plays an increasing role in the description of surface-atmosphere exchange processes. Our paper summarizes flux mapping procedures based on low level airborne sampling by the Canadian Twin Otter research aircraft, over three ecosystems with different degrees of spatial heterogeneity (grassland, mixed agricultural land and boreal forest). Observations show that the degree to which flux maps for heat, moisture and trace gases are correlated, among themselves and with maps of radiometrically observable surface features, cannot be generalized. This means that, wherever possible, algorithms for the prediction of surface-atmosphere exchange processes based on remote sensing observations should be developed for - and tested in - each structurally different ecosystem. The flexibility of deployment of aircraft serves well, both for the gathering of data to develop such algorithms, as well as for their testing at scales that integrate over an adequate sample of the various components that constitute a spatially heterogeneous ecosystem. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Use of airborne remote sensing to detect riverside Brassica rapa to aid in risk assessment of transgenic crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Luisa M.; Mason, David C.; Allainguillaume, Joel; Wilkinson, Mike J.

    2009-11-01

    High resolution descriptions of plant distribution have utility for many ecological applications but are especially useful for predictive modeling of gene flow from transgenic crops. Difficulty lies in the extrapolation errors that occur when limited ground survey data are scaled up to the landscape or national level. This problem is epitomized by the wide confidence limits generated in a previous attempt to describe the national abundance of riverside Brassica rapa (a wild relative of cultivated rapeseed) across the United Kingdom. Here, we assess the value of airborne remote sensing to locate B. rapa over large areas and so reduce the need for extrapolation. We describe results from flights over the river Nene in England acquired using Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) imagery, together with ground truth data. It proved possible to detect 97% of flowering B. rapa on the basis of spectral profiles. This included all stands of plants that occupied >2m square (>5 plants), which were detected using single-pixel classification. It also included very small populations (<5 flowering plants, 1-2m square) that generated mixed pixels, which were detected using spectral unmixing. The high detection accuracy for flowering B. rapa was coupled with a rather large false positive rate (43%). The latter could be reduced by using the image detections to target fieldwork to confirm species identity, or by acquiring additional remote sensing data such as laser altimetry or multitemporal imagery.

  11. A Decade Remote Sensing River Bathymetry with the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, P. J.; Legleiter, C. J.; Nelson, J. M.; Skinner, K.

    2012-12-01

    Since 2002, the first generation of the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research LiDAR (EAARL-A) sensor has been deployed for mapping rivers and streams. We present and summarize the results of comparisons between ground truth surveys and bathymetry collected by the EAARL-A sensor in a suite of rivers across the United States. These comparisons include reaches on the Platte River (NE), Boise and Deadwood Rivers (ID), Blue and Colorado Rivers (CO), Klamath and Trinity Rivers (CA), and the Shenandoah River (VA). In addition to diverse channel morphologies (braided, single thread, and meandering) these rivers possess a variety of substrates (sand, gravel, and bedrock) and a wide range of optical characteristics which influence the attenuation and scattering of laser energy through the water column. Root mean square errors between ground truth elevations and those measured by the EAARL-A ranged from 0.15-m in rivers with relatively low turbidity and highly reflective sandy bottoms to over 0.5-m in turbid rivers with less reflective substrates. Mapping accuracy with the EAARL-A has proved challenging in pools where bottom returns are either absent in waveforms or are of such low intensity that they are treated as noise by waveform processing algorithms. Resolving bathymetry in shallow depths where near surface and bottom returns are typically convolved also presents difficulties for waveform processing routines. The results of these evaluations provide an empirical framework to discuss the capabilities and limitations of the EAARL-A sensor as well as previous generations of post-processing software for extracting bathymetry from complex waveforms. These experiences and field studies not only provide benchmarks for the evaluation of the next generation of bathymetric LiDARs for use in river mapping, but also highlight the importance of developing and standardizing more rigorous methods to characterize substrate reflectance and in-situ optical properties at study sites

  12. Advances in airborne remote sensing of ecosystem processes and properties: toward high-quality measurement on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, Thomas U.; Asner, Gregory P.; Green, Robert O.; Eastwood, Michael; Johnson, Brian R.; Kuester, Michele

    2010-08-01

    Airborne remote sensing provides the opportunity to quantitatively measure biochemical and biophysical properties of vegetation at regional scales, therefore complementing surface and satellite measurements. Next-generation programs are poised to advance ecological research and monitoring in the United States, the tropical regions of the globe, and to support future satellite missions. The Carnegie Institution will integrate a next generation imaging spectrometer with a waveform LiDAR into the Airborne Taxonomic Mapping System (AToMS) to identify the chemical, structural and taxonomic makeup of tropical forests at an unprecedented scale and detail. The NEON Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) is under development with similar technologies with a goal to provide long-term measurements of ecosystems across North America. The NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRISng) is also under development to address the science measurement requirements for both the NASA Earth Science Research and Analysis Program and the spaceborne NASA HyspIRI Mission. Carnegie AToMS, NEON AOP, and AVIRISng are being built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a suite of instruments. We discuss the synergy between these programs and anticipated benefits to ecologists and decision-makers.

  13. Remote Respiration Monitoring Using Ultra-wideband Microwave Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashikatsuragi, Kenji; Nakahata, Youichiro; Matsunami, Isamu; Kajiwara, Akihiro

    Impulse based ultra-wideband radio has lately attracted considerable attention as medical monitoring sensor since it is expected to measure bio-signals of a patient on a bed such as respiration rate and heartbeat with a remote non-contact approach. It is also friendly to the environment including the human body due to the very low electromagnetic energy emission. Using conventional ranging scheme, however, high speed A/D device should be required in order to detect the small respiratory displacement. This paper suggests a respiratory monitoring scheme where the respiration rate is measured by observing the variation of the path strength from the patient. Therefore, it does not require high speed A/D. It also makes possible to design the simultaneous monitoring of multiple patients in hospital beds, for example. In this paper the measurements were conducted for various scenarios and the feasibility is discussed.

  14. Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS): Sensor improvements for 1994 and 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarture, C. M.; Chrien, T. G.; Green, R. O.; Eastwood, M. L.; Raney, J. J.; Hernandez, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    AVIRIS is a NASA-sponsored Earth-remote-sensing imaging spectrometer designed, built and operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). While AVIRIS has been operational since 1989, major improvements have been completed in most of the sensor subsystems during the winter maintenance cycles. As a consequence of these efforts, the capabilities of AVIRIS to reliably acquire and deliver consistently high quality, calibrated imaging spectrometer data continue to improve annually, significantly over those in 1989. Improvements to AVIRIS prior to 1994 have been described previously. This paper details recent and planned improvements to AVIRIS in the sensor task.

  15. Quantification of methane emission rates from coal mine ventilation shafts using airborne remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krings, T.; Gerilowski, K.; Buchwitz, M.; Hartmann, J.; Sachs, T.; Erzinger, J.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2013-01-01

    The quantification of emissions of the greenhouse gas methane is essential for attributing the roles of anthropogenic activity and natural phenomena in global climate change. Our current measurement systems and networks, whilst having improved during the last decades, are deficient in many respects. For example, the emissions from localised and point sources such as landfills or fossil fuel exploration sites are not readily assessed. A tool developed to better understand point sources of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane is the optical remote sensing instrument MAMAP (Methane airborne MAPper), operated from aircraft. After a recent instrument modification, retrievals of the column-averaged dry air mole fractions for methane XCH4 (or for carbon dioxide XCO2) derived from MAMAP data have a precision of about 0.4% or better and thus can be used to infer emission rate estimates using an optimal estimation inverse Gaussian plume model or a simple integral approach. CH4 emissions from two coal mine ventilation shafts in western Germany surveyed during the AIRMETH 2011 measurement campaign are used as examples to demonstrate and assess the value of MAMAP data for quantifying CH4 from point sources. While the knowledge of the wind is an important input parameter in the retrieval of emissions from point sources and is generally extracted from models, additional information from a turbulence probe operated on-board the same aircraft was utilised to enhance the quality of the emission estimates. Although flight patterns were optimised for remote sensing measurements, data from an in situ analyser for CH4 were found to be in good agreement with retrieved dry columns of CH4 from MAMAP and could be used to investigate and refine underlying assumptions for the inversion procedures. With respect to the total emissions of the mine at the time of the overflight, the inferred emission rate of 50.4 kt CH4 yr-1 has a difference of less than 1% compared to officially

  16. Novel remote sensor systems: design, prototyping, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayastha, V.; Gibbons, S.; Lamb, J. E.; Giedd, R. E.

    2014-06-01

    We have designed and tested a prototype TRL4 radio-frequency (RF) sensing platform containing a transceiver that interrogates a passive carbon nanotube (CNT)-based sensor platform. The transceiver can be interfaced to a server technology such as a Bluetooth® or Wi-Fi device for further connectivity. The novelty of a very-low-frequency (VLF) implementation in the transceiver design will ultimately enable deep penetration into the ground or metal structures to communicate with buried sensing platforms. The sensor platform generally consists of printed electronic devices made of CNTs on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and Kapton® substrates. This novel remote sensing system can be integrated with both passive and active sensing platforms. It offers unique characteristics suitable for a variety of sensing applications. The proposed sensing platforms can take on different form factors and the RF output of the sensing platforms could be modulated by humidity, temperature, pressure, strain, or vibration signals. Resonant structures were designed and constructed to operate in the very-high-frequency (VHF) and VLF ranges. In this presentation, we will report results of our continued effort to develop a commercially viable transceiver capable of interrogating the conformally mounted sensing platforms made from CNTs or silver-based nanomaterials on polyimide substrates over a broad range of frequencies. The overall performance of the sensing system with different sensing elements and at different frequency ranges will be discussed.

  17. Airborne Sunphotometer Studies of Aerosol Properties and Effects, Including Closure Among Satellite, Suborbital Remote, and In situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russlee, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Airborne sunphotometry has been used to measure aerosols from North America, Europe, and Africa in coordination with satellite and in situ measurements in TARFOX (1996), ACE-2 (1997), PRIDE (2000), and SAFARI 2000. Similar coordinated measurements of Asian aerosols are being conducted this spring in ACE-Asia and are planned for North American aerosols this summer in CLAMS. This paper summarizes the approaches used, key results, and implications for aerosol properties and effects, such as single scattering albedo and regional radiative forcing. The approaches exploit the three-dimensional mobility of airborne sunphotometry to access satellite scenes over diverse surfaces (including open ocean with and without sunglint) and to match exactly the atmospheric layers sampled by airborne in situ measurements and other radiometers. These measurements permit tests of the consistency, or closure, among such diverse measurements as aerosol size-resolved chemical composition; number or mass concentration; light extinction, absorption, and scattering (total, hemispheric back and 180 deg.); and radiative fluxes. In this way the airborne sunphotometer measurements provide a key link between satellite and in situ measurements that helps to understand any discrepancies that are found. These comparisons have led to several characteristic results. Typically these include: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements than between remote and in situ measurements. (2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements. (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from in situ measurements. Aerosol intensive properties derived from these closure studies have been combined with satellite-retrieved fields of optical depth to produce fields of regional radiative forcing. We show results for the North Atlantic derived from AVHRR optical depths and aerosol intensive properties from TARFOX and ACE-2. Companion papers

  18. Remote management for multipoint sensing systems using hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors.

    PubMed

    Goh, Lee See; Anoda, Yuji; Kazuhiro, Watanabe; Shinomiya, Norihiko

    2013-12-27

    This paper describes the design and experimental verification of a multipoint sensing system with hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors and its remote management using an internet-standard protocol. The study proposes two different types of design and conducts experiments to verify those systems' feasibility. In order to manage the sensing systems remotely, the management method uses a standard operation and maintenance protocol for internet: the Simple Network Management Protocol is proposed. The purpose of this study is to construct a multipoint sensing system remote management tool by which the system can also determine the status and the identity of fiber optic sensors. The constructed sensing systems are verified and the results have demonstrated that the first proposed system can distinguish the responses from different hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors remotely. The second proposed system shows that data communications are performed successfully while identifying the status of hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors remotely.

  19. Autonomous and Remote-Controlled Airborne and Ground-Based Robotic Platforms for Adaptive Geophysical Surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spritzer, J. M.; Phelps, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Low-cost autonomous and remote-controlled robotic platforms have opened the door to precision-guided geophysical surveying. Over the past two years, the U.S. Geological Survey, Senseta, NASA Ames Research Center, and Carnegie Mellon University Silicon Valley, have developed and deployed small autonomous and remotely controlled vehicles for geophysical investigations. The purpose of this line of investigation is to 1) increase the analytical capability, resolution, and repeatability, and 2) decrease the time, and potentially the cost and map-power necessary to conduct near-surface geophysical surveys. Current technology has advanced to the point where vehicles can perform geophysical surveys autonomously, freeing the geoscientist to process and analyze the incoming data in near-real time. This has enabled geoscientists to monitor survey parameters; process, analyze and interpret the incoming data; and test geophysical models in the same field session. This new approach, termed adaptive surveying, provides the geoscientist with choices of how the remainder of the survey should be conducted. Autonomous vehicles follow pre-programmed survey paths, which can be utilized to easily repeat surveys on the same path over large areas without the operator fatigue and error that plague man-powered surveys. While initial deployments with autonomous systems required a larger field crew than a man-powered survey, over time operational experience costs and man power requirements will decrease. Using a low-cost, commercially available chassis as the base for autonomous surveying robotic systems promise to provide higher precision and efficiency than human-powered techniques. An experimental survey successfully demonstrated the adaptive techniques described. A magnetic sensor was mounted on a small rover, which autonomously drove a prescribed course designed to provide an overview of the study area. Magnetic data was relayed to the base station periodically, processed and gridded. A

  20. The Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) Coastal Ocean Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; VanGorp, Byron E.; Green, Robert O.; Eastwppd, Michael; Wilson, Daniel W.; Richardson, Brandon; Dierssen, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    PRISM is an airborne pushbroom imaging spectrometer intended to address the needs of airborne coastal ocean science research. Its critical characteristics are high throughput and signal-to-noise ratio, high uniformity of response to reduce spectral artifacts, and low polarization sensitivity. We give a brief overview of the instrument and results from laboratory calibration measurements regarding the spatial, spectral, radiometric and polarization characteristics.

  1. Application of remote sensor data to geologic analysis of the Bonanza test site, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Compiler)

    1972-01-01

    A variety of remote sensor data has aided geologic mapping in central Colorado. This report summarizes the application of sensor data to both regional and local geologic mapping and presents some conclusions on the practical use of remote sensing for solving geologic mapping problems. It is emphasized that this study was not conducted primarily to test or evaluate remote sensing systems or data, but, rather, to apply sensor data as an accessory tool for geologic mapping. The remote sensor data used were acquired by the NASA Earth Observations Aircraft Program. Conclusions reached on the utility of the various sensor data and interpretation techniques for geologic mapping were by-products of attempts to use them.

  2. In situ correlative measurements for the ultraviolet differential absorption lidar and the high spectral resolution lidar air quality remote sensors: 1980 PEPE/NEROS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Beck, S. M.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In situ correlative measurements were obtained with a NASA aircraft in support of two NASA airborne remote sensors participating in the Environmental Protection Agency's 1980persistent elevated pollution episode (PEPE) and Northeast regional oxidant study (NEROS) field program in order to provide data for evaluating the capability of two remote sensors for measuring mixing layer height, and ozone and aerosol concentrations in the troposphere during the 1980 PEPE/NEROS program. The in situ aircraft was instrumented to measure temperature, dewpoint temperature, ozone concentrations, and light scattering coefficient. In situ measurements for ten correlative missions are given and discussed. Each data set is presented in graphical and tabular format aircraft flight plans are included.

  3. Future European and Japanese remote-sensing sensors and programs; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 1, 2, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, P.N.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to the METEOSAT second-generation program, the ESA earth observation polar platform program, a new satellite for a climatology study in the tropics, a medium-resolution imaging spectrometer, a Michelson interferometer for passive atmosphere sounding, an optical mapping instrument, an optical sensor system for Japanese earth resources satellite 1, a synthetic aperture radar of JERS-1, an ocean color and temperature scanner for Advanced Earth-Observing Satellite (ADEOS), an interferometric monitor for greenhouse gasses for ADEOS. Attention is also given to Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) for EOS-A, short-wave infrared subsystem design status of ASTER, ASTER calibration concept, Japanese polar orbit platform program, and airborne and spaceborne thermal multispectral remote sensing.

  4. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS): An Airborne Laser Altimeter for Mapping Vegetation and Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, J.; Rabine, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne laser altimeter designed to quickly and extensively map surface topography as well as the relative heights of other reflecting surfaces within the laser footprint. Since 1997, this instrument has primarily been used as the airborne simulator for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission, a spaceborne mission designed to measure tree height, vertical structure and ground topography (including sub-canopy topography). LVIS is capable of operating from 500 m to 10 km above ground level with footprint sizes from 1 to 60 m. Laser footprints can be randomly spaced within the 7 degree telescope field-of-view, constrained only by the operating frequency of the ND:YAG Q-switched laser (500 Hz). A significant innovation of the LVIS altimeter is that all ranging, waveform recording, and range gating are performed using a single digitizer, clock base, and detector. A portion of the outgoing laser pulse is fiber-optically fed into the detector used to collect the return signal and this entire time history of the outgoing and return pulses is digitized at 500 Msamp/sec. The ground return is then located using software digital signal processing, even in the presence of visibly opaque clouds. The surface height distribution of all reflecting surfaces within the laser footprint can be determined, for example, tree height and ground elevation. To date, the LVIS system has been used to monitor topographic change at Long Valley caldera, CA, as part of NASA's Topography and Surface Change program, and to map tree structure and sub-canopy topography at the La Selva Biological Research Station in Costa Rica, as part of the pre-launch calibration activities for the VCL mission. We present results that show the laser altimeter consistently and accurately maps surface topography, including sub-canopy topography, and vegetation height and structure. These results confirm the measurement concept of VCL and highlight the benefits of

  5. Estimating Turbulence in Mountainous Regions from Airborne In Situ and Remotely-Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Lukas; Serafin, Stefano; Grubišić, Vanda

    2013-04-01

    Turbulence in atmospheric flow over and around orographic obstacles has been at the focus of numerous studies in the past. Reasons for this range from primary interest in the turbulence-generating processes (gravity-wave breaking, downslope windstorms etc.) to, more recently, issues regarding flight safety. Our work focuses on the observational analysis of turbulence during events of boundary-layer separation and rotor formation. The study is based on observations from two recent field campaigns over the Medicine Bow Mountains in SE Wyoming (NASA06) and the Sierra Nevada in Southern California (T-REX). During these campaigns, the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) research aircraft flew straight-and-level legs aligned with the mean wind direction to document the variation of flow and turbulence over the mountain ridges. Aircraft in situ data of wind, pressure and temperature were recorded at a frequency of 25 Hz. The Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR), carried aboard UWKA, measured Doppler vertical wind velocities at multiple levels at a frequency of 30 Hz. The objective of this work is to quantify turbulence intensity during the observed boundary-layer separation and rotor formation events. To this end, estimates of the variance of vertical wind speed and the eddy-dissipation rate are computed from airborne in situ as well as remotely-sensed data. The comparison of two wave events during the NASA06 campaign reveals similar turbulence intensities with maximum eddy-dissipation rates in the range 0.25-0.30 m2 s-3. The dynamic origin of turbulence, however, appears to be different. For 26 January 2006, results are indicative of a breaking gravity wave aloft leading to wave-induced boundary-layer separation and rotor formation, with maximum turbulence levels located in the rotor interior. In contrast, on 5 February 2006, the lee wave pattern aloft remained laminar while the boundary-layer flow was heavily perturbed. The spatial distribution of turbulence in the flow suggests

  6. Nano-based chemical sensor array systems for uninhabited ground and airborne vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, Christina; Ruffin, Paul B.; Edwards, Eugene

    2009-03-01

    In a time when homemade explosive devices are being used against soldiers and in the homeland security environment, it is becoming increasingly evident that there is an urgent need for high-tech chemical sensor packages to be mounted aboard ground and air vehicles to aid soldiers in determining the location of explosive devices and the origin of bio-chemical warfare agents associated with terrorist activities from a safe distance. Current technologies utilize relatively large handheld detection systems that are housed on sizeable robotic vehicles. Research and development efforts are underway at the Army Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) to develop novel and less expensive nano-based chemical sensors for detecting explosives and chemical agents used against the soldier. More specifically, an array of chemical sensors integrated with an electronics control module on a flexible substrate that can conform to and be surface-mounted to manned or unmanned vehicles to detect harmful species from bio-chemical warfare and other explosive devices is being developed. The sensor system under development is a voltammetry-based sensor system capable of aiding in the detection of any chemical agent and in the optimization of sensor microarray geometry to provide nonlinear Fourier algorithms to characterize target area background (e.g., footprint areas). The status of the research project is reviewed in this paper. Critical technical challenges associated with achieving system cost, size, and performance requirements are discussed. The results obtained from field tests using an unmanned remote controlled vehicle that houses a CO2/chemical sensor, which detects harmful chemical agents and wirelessly transmits warning signals back to the warfighter, are presented. Finally, the technical barriers associated with employing the sensor array system aboard small air vehicles will be discussed.

  7. Airborne Detection of Iodine Oxide and Glyoxal in the Free Troposphere over the Remote Tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, B. K.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-12-01

    We present the first spectral proof for the presence of iodine oxide (IO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the free troposphere. Measurements were conducted with the University of Colorado Airborne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument aboard the NSF/NCAR GV research aircraft (HIAPER) over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean. As part of the HEFT-10 instrument test program a research flight was conducted on 29 January 2010 out of Hawaii to the equatorial Pacific Ocean south of Hawaii. IO and CHOCHO were observed in the marine boundary layer as well as in the free troposphere up to 14km altitude. Satellite data of the same area give inconsistent values and are inconclusive on the vertical distribution. Our measurements for the first time retrieve the vertical distribution of IO and CHOCHO over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean by means of experimentally well constrained inverse radiative transfer modeling.

  8. Visibility through the gaseous smoke in airborne remote sensing using a DSLR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabok, Mirahmad; Millington, Andrew; Hacker, Jorg M.; McGrath, Andrew J.

    2016-08-01

    Visibility and clarity of remotely sensed images acquired by consumer grade DSLR cameras, mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle or a manned aircraft, are critical factors in obtaining accurate and detailed information from any area of interest. The presence of substantial haze, fog or gaseous smoke particles; caused, for example, by an active bushfire at the time of data capture, will dramatically reduce image visibility and quality. Although most modern hyperspectral imaging sensors are capable of capturing a large number of narrow range bands of the shortwave and thermal infrared spectral range, which have the potential to penetrate smoke and haze, the resulting images do not contain sufficient spatial detail to enable locating important objects or assist search and rescue or similar applications which require high resolution information. We introduce a new method for penetrating gaseous smoke without compromising spatial resolution using a single modified DSLR camera in conjunction with image processing techniques which effectively improves the visibility of objects in the captured images. This is achieved by modifying a DSLR camera and adding a custom optical filter to enable it to capture wavelengths from 480-1200nm (R, G and Near Infrared) instead of the standard RGB bands (400-700nm). With this modified camera mounted on an aircraft, images were acquired over an area polluted by gaseous smoke from an active bushfire. Processed data using our proposed method shows significant visibility improvements compared with other existing solutions.

  9. Image-Based Airborne Sensors: A Combined Approach for Spectral Signatures Classification through Deterministic Simulated Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo; Herrera, P. Javier

    2009-01-01

    The increasing technology of high-resolution image airborne sensors, including those on board Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, demands automatic solutions for processing, either on-line or off-line, the huge amountds of image data sensed during the flights. The classification of natural spectral signatures in images is one potential application. The actual tendency in classification is oriented towards the combination of simple classifiers. In this paper we propose a combined strategy based on the Deterministic Simulated Annealing (DSA) framework. The simple classifiers used are the well tested supervised parametric Bayesian estimator and the Fuzzy Clustering. The DSA is an optimization approach, which minimizes an energy function. The main contribution of DSA is its ability to avoid local minima during the optimization process thanks to the annealing scheme. It outperforms simple classifiers used for the combination and some combined strategies, including a scheme based on the fuzzy cognitive maps and an optimization approach based on the Hopfield neural network paradigm. PMID:22399989

  10. SENSOR++: Simulation of Remote Sensing Systems from Visible to Thermal Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproth, C.; Schlüßler, E.; Scherbaum, P.; Börner, A.

    2012-07-01

    During the development process of a remote sensing system, the optimization and the verification of the sensor system are important tasks. To support these tasks, the simulation of the sensor and its output is valuable. This enables the developers to test algorithms, estimate errors, and evaluate the capabilities of the whole sensor system before the final remote sensing system is available and produces real data. The presented simulation concept, SENSOR++, consists of three parts. The first part is the geometric simulation which calculates where the sensor looks at by using a ray tracing algorithm. This also determines whether the observed part of the scene is shadowed or not. The second part describes the radiometry and results in the spectral at-sensor radiance from the visible spectrum to the thermal infrared according to the simulated sensor type. In the case of earth remote sensing, it also includes a model of the radiative transfer through the atmosphere. The final part uses the at-sensor radiance to generate digital images by using an optical and an electronic sensor model. Using SENSOR++ for an optimization requires the additional application of task-specific data processing algorithms. The principle of the simulation approach is explained, all relevant concepts of SENSOR++ are discussed, and first examples of its use are given, for example a camera simulation for a moon lander. Finally, the verification of SENSOR++ is demonstrated.

  11. A remote compact sensor for the real-time monitoring of human heartbeat and respiration rate.

    PubMed

    Jung Han Choi; Dong Kyun Kim

    2009-06-01

    A remote compact sensor system for the detection of human vital signs (heartbeat and respiration rate) is presented. The frequency band of 24 GHz is employed for remote sensing. For the compact size, the developed sensor uses a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave with a single antenna. The sensor system is composed of radio-frequency circuits, a signal conditioning block, a data-acquisition unit, and a signal-processing part. The peak detection of the power spectral density with a tracking algorithm is utilized for the real-time detection of human vital signs. The measurement result is compared with the commercial fingertip sensor. The comparison result shows excellent agreement.

  12. Investigation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds during VERDI and RACEPAC: Combining airborne remote sensing and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, André; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    To improve our understanding of Arctic mixed-phase clouds in sea-ice covered areas the airborne research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) and the Radiation-Aerosol-Cloud Experiment in the Arctic Circle (RACEPAC, April/May 2014) were initiated by a collaboration of German and French research institutes. The aircraft operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Germany were based in Inuvik, Canada from where the research flights of in total 149 flight hours (62 h during VERDI, 87 h during RACEPAC) were able to cover a wide area above the Canadian Beaufort. The aim of both campaigns was to combine remote sensing and in-situ cloud, aerosol and trace gas measurements to investigate interactions between radiation, cloud and aerosol particles. Remote sensing instrumentation contained a backscatter lidar and spectral solar radiation measurements including a hyperspectral camera. In-situ sampling was highlighted by a suit of comprehensive cloud particle probes, aerosol particle counters and mass spectroscopy as well as trace gas detectors. While during VERDI remote sensing and in-situ measurements were performed by one aircraft (Polar 5) subsequently, for RACEPAC two identical aircraft (Polar 5 & 6, Basler BT-67) were coordinated at different altitudes to horizontally collocate both remote sensing and in-situ measurements. In this way not only the combined analysis of radiative and microphysical processes in the clouds can by studied more reliably, also remote sensing methods can be validated efficiently. Here we will illustrate the scientific strategy of both projects including instrumentation and flight patterns of the research flights. Beside flight missions dedicated to sample low level clouds by remote sensing and in situ probing, flights were also coordinated with satellite overpasses and ground based stations. Exemplary results will be highlighted.

  13. Application of remote sensor data to geologic analysis of the Bonanza test site Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Compiler); Butler, R. W.; Fisher, J. C.; Huntley, D.; Hulstrom, R. L.; Knepper, D. H., Jr.; Muhm, J. R.; Sawatzky, D. L.; Worman, K. E.; Wychgram, D.

    1973-01-01

    Research activities on geologic remote sensing applications for Colorado are summarized. Projects include: regional and detailed geologic mapping, surficial and engineering geology, fracture studies, uranium exploration, hydrology, and data reduction and enhancement. The acquisition of remote sensor data is also discussed.

  14. Application of hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using airborne hyperspectral remote sensing: data taken in the Baixianishan region of Gansu Province as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sun; Zhao, Yingjun; Zhang, Donghui; Qin, Kai; Tian, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing, featured by integrated images and spectra, is now a frontier of the remote sensing. Using meticulous spectra, hyperspectral remote sensing technology can depict spectral features of objects in detail and are capable of identifying objects rather than simply discriminating them. This study took the Baixianishan region in Gansu Province as an example, and CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral data were utilized to extract and map alteration minerals by MTMF mapping method. Six hydrothermal alteration minerals were mapped, which contained limonite, sericite and epidote. In addition, we analyzed the types, combinations and distribution of the alteration minerals and divided three stages of hydrothermal activity. It is considered that the favorable ore-forming elements for gold deposits are middle Hercynian porphyraceous granite, fracture and veined distribution of sericite and limonite. The application of CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data in the Baixianishan area has achieved ideal results, indicative of their wide application potential in the geological research.

  15. Remote sensing of large scale methane emission sources with the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument over the Kern River and Kern Front Oil fields and validation through airborne in-situ measurements - Initial results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, K.; Krautwurst, S.; Kolyer, R.; Jonsson, H.; Krings, T.; Horstjann, M.; Leifer, I.; Schuettemeyer, D.; Fladeland, M. M.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2014-12-01

    During three flights performed with the MAMAP (Methane Airborne MAPper) airborne remote sensing instrument in the framework of the CO2 and MEthane Experiment (COMEX) - a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities - large scale methane plumes were detected over the Kern River and Kern Front Oil fields in the period between June 3 and 13, 2014. MAMAP was installed for these flights aboard of the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer (operate by the Ames Research Center, ARC), a 5 hole turbulence probe as well as a atmospheric measurement package (operated by CIRPAS), measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point and other atmospheric parameters. Data collected with the in-situ GHG analyzer will be used for validation of MAMAP remotely sensed data by acquiring vertical cross sections of the discovered plumes at a fixed downwind distance. Precise airborne wind information from the turbulence probe together with ground based wind data from the nearby airport will be used to estimate emission rates from the remote sensed and in-situ measured data. Remote sensed and in-situ data as well as initial flux estimates for the three flights will be presented.

  16. Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide and Methane Plumes from Combined Ground-Airborne Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Jamey; Mitchell, Taylor; Honeycutt, Wes; Materer, Nicholas; Ley, Tyler; Clark, Peter

    2016-11-01

    A hybrid ground-airborne sensing network for real-time plume monitoring of CO2 and CH4 for carbon sequestration is investigated. Conventional soil gas monitoring has difficulty in distinguishing gas flux signals from leakage with those associated with meteorologically driven changes. A low-cost, lightweight sensor system has been developed and implemented onboard a small unmanned aircraft and is combined with a large-scale ground network that measures gas concentration. These are combined with other atmospheric diagnostics, including thermodynamic data and velocity from ultrasonic anemometers and multi-hole probes. To characterize the system behavior and verify its effectiveness, field tests have been conducted with simulated discharges of CO2 and CH4 from compressed gas tanks to mimic leaks and generate gaseous plumes, as well as field tests over the Farnsworth CO2-EOR site in the Anadarko Basin. Since the sensor response time is a function of vehicle airspeed, dynamic calibration models are required to determine accurate location of gas concentration in space and time. Comparisons are made between the two tests and results compared with historical models combining both flight and atmospheric dynamics. Supported by Department of Energy Award DE-FE0012173.

  17. Remote sensing and airborne geophysics in the assessment of natural aggregate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, D.H.; Langer, W.H.; Miller, S.H.

    1994-01-01

    Natural aggregate made from crushed stone and deposits of sand and gravel is a vital element of the construction industry in the United States. Although natural aggregate is a high volume/low value commodity that is relatively abundant, new sources of aggregate are becoming increasingly difficult to find and develop because of rigid industry specifications, political considerations, development and transporation costs, and environmental concerns, especially in urban growth centers where much of the aggregate is used. As the demand for natural aggregate increases in response to urban growth and the repair and expansion of the national infrastructure, new sources of natural aggregate will be required. The USGS has recognized the necessity of developing the capability to assess the potential for natural aggregate sources on Federal lands; at present, no methodology exists for systematically describing and evaluating potential sources of natural aggregate. Because remote sensing and airborne geophysics can detect surface and nearsurface phenomena, these tools may useful for detecting and mapping potential sources of natural aggregate; however, before a methodology for applying these tools can be developed, it is necessary to understand the type, distribution, physical properties, and characteristics of natural aggregate deposits, as well as the problems that will be encountered in assessing their potential value. There are two primary sources of natural aggregate: (1) exposed or near-surface igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary bedrock that can be crushed, and (2) deposits of sand and gravel that may be used directly or crushed and sized to meet specifications. In any particular area, the availability of bedrock suitable for crushing is a function of the geologic history of the area - the processes that formed, deformed, eroded and exposed the bedrock. Deposits of sand and gravel are primarily surficial deposits formed by the erosion, transportation by water and ice

  18. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS): A Medium-Altitude, Digitization-Only, Airborne Laser Altimeter for Mapping Vegetation and Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Rabine, David L.; Hofton, Michelle A.

    1999-01-01

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne, scanning laser altimeter designed and developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. LVIS operates at altitudes up to 10 km above ground, and is capable of producing a data swath up to 1000 m wide nominally with 25 m wide footprints. The entire time history of the outgoing and return pulses is digitized, allowing unambiguous determination of range and return pulse structure. Combined with aircraft position and attitude knowledge, this instrument produces topographic maps with decimeter accuracy and vertical height and structure measurements of vegetation. The laser transmitter is a diode-pumped Nd:YAG oscillator producing 1064 nm, 10 nsec, 5 mJ pulses at repetition rates up to 500 Hz. LVIS has recently demonstrated its ability to determine topography (including sub-canopy) and vegetation height and structure on flight missions to various forested regions in the U.S. and Central America. The LVIS system is the airborne simulator for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission (a NASA Earth remote sensing satellite due for launch in 2000), providing simulated data sets and a platform for instrument proof-of-concept studies. The topography maps and return waveforms produced by LVIS provide Earth scientists with a unique data set allowing studies of topography, hydrology, and vegetation with unmatched accuracy and coverage.

  19. The airborne volcanic object imaging detector (AVOID): A new tool for airborne atmospheric remote sensing of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, F.; Durant, A.; Kylling, A.

    2012-04-01

    A new dual thermal imaging infrared camera system has been developed for aircraft in order to investigate water and volcanic clouds ahead. The system, AVOID, uses interference filters to discriminate clouds of water and ice from volcanic substances (silicates) by utilising the spectral features of these substances at wavelengths between 8-12 µm. Tests of the system were recently conducted in Sicily, in the vicinity of Mt Etna volcano and at Stromboli volcano, during emission of ash and SO2. The data were acquired from altitudes up to 12,000 ft, sampling from two cameras at frequencies down to 1 Hz. Corrections for the aircraft attitude were made using a very fast sampling attitude sensor, collocated with the imaging system. About 30 hours of data were acquired - over 90% of these measurements were of meteorological clouds of water droplets and ice. Using a radiative transfer model and information on the spectral refractive indices of water, ice and silicate ash, a retrieval scheme has been devised to determine the mass loading and effective particle radius of these substances and some preliminary results are presented. We have also developed a sophisticated simulation tool that allows us to model the 3D structure of clouds based on Monte Carlo radiative transfer. By utilising a narrow bandpass filter centred on 8.6 µm, AVOID can also detect SO2 gas and some illustrative examples are shown. During March 2012 the AVOID system will be mounted onto an AIRBUS A340 and flown at altitudes up to 38,000 ft. These tests will include measurements of clouds, as well as drifting volcanic ash and SO2 gas. We intend to present some of these initial results.

  20. Converting Snow Depth to SWE: The Fusion of Simulated Data with Remote Sensing Retrievals and the Airborne Snow Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, K.; Marks, D. G.; Painter, T. H.; Hedrick, A. R.; Deems, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Snow cover monitoring has greatly benefited from remote sensing technology but, despite their critical importance, spatially distributed measurements of snow water equivalent (SWE) in mountain terrain remain elusive. Current methods of monitoring SWE rely on point measurements and are insufficient for distributed snow science and effective management of water resources. Many studies have shown that the spatial variability in SWE is largely controlled by the spatial variability in snow depth. JPL's Airborne Snow Observatory mission (ASO) combines LiDAR and spectrometer instruments to retrieve accurate and very high-resolution snow depth measurements at the watershed scale, along with other products such as snow albedo. To make best use of these high-resolution snow depths, spatially distributed snow density data are required to leverage SWE from the measured snow depths. Snow density is a spatially and temporally variable property that cannot yet be reliably extracted from remote sensing techniques, and is difficult to extrapolate to basin scales. However, some physically based snow models have shown skill in simulating bulk snow densities and therefore provide a pathway for snow depth to SWE conversion. Leveraging model ability where remote sensing options are non-existent, ASO employs a physically based snow model (iSnobal) to resolve distributed snow density dynamics across the basin. After an adjustment scheme guided by in-situ data, these density estimates are used to derive the elusive spatial distribution of SWE from the observed snow depth distributions from ASO. In this study, we describe how the process of fusing model data with remote sensing retrievals is undertaken in the context of ASO along with estimates of uncertainty in the final SWE volume products. This work will likely be of interest to those working in snow hydrology, water resource management and the broader remote sensing community.

  1. Remote identification of potential boll weevil host plants: Airborne multispectral detection of regrowth cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regrowth cotton plants can serve as potential hosts for boll weevils during and beyond the production season. Effective methods for timely areawide detection of these host plants are critically needed to expedite eradication in south Texas. We acquired airborne multispectral images of experimental...

  2. Extending airborne electromagnetic surveys for regional active layer and permafrost mapping with remote sensing and ancillary data, Yukon Flats ecoregion, central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Minsley, Burke J.; Ji, Lei; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Smith, Bruce D.; Abraham, Jared D.; Rose, Joshua R.

    2013-01-01

    Machine-learning regression tree models were used to extrapolate airborne electromagnetic resistivity data collected along flight lines in the Yukon Flats Ecoregion, central Alaska, for regional mapping of permafrost. This method of extrapolation (r = 0.86) used subsurface resistivity, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) at-sensor reflectance, thermal, TM-derived spectral indices, digital elevation models and other relevant spatial data to estimate near-surface (0–2.6-m depth) resistivity at 30-m resolution. A piecewise regression model (r = 0.82) and a presence/absence decision tree classification (accuracy of 87%) were used to estimate active-layer thickness (ALT) (< 101 cm) and the probability of near-surface (up to 123-cm depth) permafrost occurrence from field data, modelled near-surface (0–2.6 m) resistivity, and other relevant remote sensing and map data. At site scale, the predicted ALTs were similar to those previously observed for different vegetation types. At the landscape scale, the predicted ALTs tended to be thinner on higher-elevation loess deposits than on low-lying alluvial and sand sheet deposits of the Yukon Flats. The ALT and permafrost maps provide a baseline for future permafrost monitoring, serve as inputs for modelling hydrological and carbon cycles at local to regional scales, and offer insight into the ALT response to fire and thaw processes.

  3. Airborne Particles: What We Have Learned About Their Role in Climate from Remote Sensing, and Prospects for Future Advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Desert dust, wildfire smoke, volcanic ash, biogenic and urban pollution particles, all affect the regional-scale climate of Earth in places and at times; some have global-scale impacts on the column radiation balance, cloud properties, atmospheric stability structure, and circulation patterns. Remote sensing has played a central role in identifying the sources and transports of airborne particles, mapping their three-dimensional distribution and variability, quantifying their amount, and constraining aerosol air mass type. The measurements obtained from remote sensing have strengths and limitations, and their value for characterizing Earths environment is enhanced immensely when they are combined with direct, in situ observations, and used to constrain aerosol transport and climate models. A similar approach has been taken to study the role particles play in determining the climate of Mars, though based on far fewer observations. This presentation will focus what we have learned from remote sensing about the impacts aerosol have on Earths climate; a few points about how aerosols affect the climate of Mars will also be introduced, in the context of how we might assess aerosol-climate impacts more generally on other worlds.

  4. Spatial Modeling and Variability Analysis for Modeling and Prediction of Soil and Crop Canopy Coverage Using Multispectral Imagery from an Airborne Remote Sensing System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on a previous study on an airborne remote sensing system with automatic camera stabilization for crop management, multispectral imagery was acquired using the MS-4100 multispectral camera at different flight altitudes over a 115 ha cotton field. After the acquired images were geo-registered an...

  5. Flexible Wing Base Micro Aerial Vehicles: Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) for Surveillance and Remote Sensor Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) will be developed for tracking individuals, locating terrorist threats, and delivering remote sensors, for surveillance and chemical/biological agent detection. The tasks are: (1) Develop robust MAV platform capable of carrying sensor payload. (2) Develop fully autonomous capabilities for delivery of sensors to remote and distant locations. The current capabilities and accomplishments are: (1) Operational electric (inaudible) 6-inch MAVs with novel flexible wing, providing superior aerodynamic efficiency and control. (2) Vision-based flight stability and control (from on-board cameras).

  6. Mining in subarctic Canada: airborne PM2.5 metal concentrations in two remote First Nations communities.

    PubMed

    Liberda, Eric N; Tsuji, Leonard J S; Peltier, Richard E

    2015-11-01

    Airborne particulate matter arising from upwind mining activities is a concern for First Nations communities in the western James Bay region of Ontario, Canada. Aerosol chemical components were collected in 2011 from two communities in northern Ontario. The chemical and mass concentration data of particulate matter collected during this study shows a significant difference in PM2.5 in Attawapiskat compared to Fort Albany. Elemental profiles indicate enhanced levels of some tracers thought to arise from mining activities, such as, K, Ni, and crustal materials. Both communities are remote and isolated from urban and industrial pollution sources, however, Attawapiskat First Nation has significantly enhanced levels of particulate matter, and it is likely that some of this arises from upwind mining activities.

  7. Comparison of Airborne Sunphotometer and Near-Coincident In Situ and Remotely Sensed Water Vapor Measurements during INTEX-ITCT 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P.; Ramirez, S.; Eilers, J.; Gore, W.; Howard, S.; Pommier, J.; Bates, T.; Quinn, P.; Chu, D. A.; Gao, B.; Fetzer, E.; McMillan, W.; Seemann, S. W.; Borbas, E.

    2005-12-01

    The NASA Ames 14-channel Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) took measurements from aboard a Jetstream 31 (J31) twin turboprop aircraft during 19 science flights (~53 flight hours) over the Gulf of Maine during the period 12 July to 8 August 2004. The flights were conducted in support of the INTEX-NA (INtercontinental chemical Transport EXperiment-North America) and ITCT (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation of anthropogenic pollution) field studies. AATS-14 measures the solar direct-beam transmission at 14 discrete wavelengths between 354 and 2138 nm, and provides instantaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 13 wavelengths and water vapor column content, which is derived from measurements at 940 nm and surrounding wavelengths. AATS-14 measurements obtained during aircraft ascents and descents are differentiated to yield vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and water vapor density. Specific J31 flight patterns were designed to address a variety of science goals and, therefore, included a mixture of vertical profiles (spiral and ramped ascents and descents) and constant altitude horizontal transects at a variety of altitudes. In general, flights were designed to include a near sea surface horizontal transect in a region of minimal cloud cover during or near the time of an Aqua and/or Terra satellite overpass, in addition to a low altitude flyby and vertical profile above the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown. In this paper, we will compare AATS-14 water vapor profiles with simultaneous measurements obtained with a Vaisala humidity sensor on board the J-31 and with spatially and temporally near-coincident data from radiosondes launched from the Ron Brown. AATS-14 data will also be compared with water vapor retrievals from measurements acquired by remote sensors on Aqua and Terra during near-coincident satellite overflights.

  8. Development of Novel, Simple, Multianalyte Sensors for Remote Environmental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, Sanford A.

    2000-06-01

    We will develop simple, inexpensive new chemical sensing materials which can be used as visual color test strips to sensitively and selectively report on the concentration and identity of environmental pollutants such as cations of Pb, U, Pu, Sr, Hg, Cs, Co as well as other species. We will develop inexpensive chemical test strips which can be immersed in water to determine these analytes in the field. We will also develop arrays of these chemical sensing materials which will be attached to fiber optic bundles to be used as rugged multichannel optrodes to simultaneously monitor numerous analytes remotely in hostile environments. These sensing materials are based on the intelligent polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) technology we recently developed. This sensing motif utilizes a mesoscopically periodic array of colloidal particles polymerized into an acrylamide hydrogel. This array Bragg diffracts light in the visible spectral region due to the periodic array of colloidal particles. This material also contains chelating agents for the analytes of interest. When an analyte binds, its charge is immobilized within the acrylamide hydrogel. The resulting Donnan potential causes an osmotic pressure which swells the array proportional to the concentration of analyte bound. The diffracted wavelength shifts and the color changes. The change in the wavelength diffracted reports on the identity and concentration of the target analyte. Our successful development of these simple, inexpensive highly sensitive chemical sensing optrodes, which are easily coupled to simple optical instrumentation, could revolutionize environmental monitoring. In addition, we will develop highly rugged versions, which can be attached to core penetrometers and which can be used to determine analytes in buried core samples. Research Progress and Implications This report summarizes work after 21 months of a three year project. We have developed a new method to crosslink our PCCA sensing

  9. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  10. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

  11. Airborne multispectral remote sensing with ground truth for areawide pest management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientists and engineers in areawide pest management programs have been developing, integrating, and evaluating multiple strategies and technologies into a systems approach for management of field crop insect pests. Remote sensing along with global positioning systems, geographic information system...

  12. Airborne multi-spectral remote sensing with ground truth for areawide pest management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientists and researchers have been developing, integrating, and evaluating multiple strategies and technologies into a systems approach for management of field crop insect pests. Remote sensing along with Global Positioning Systems, Geographic Information Systems, and variable rate technology are...

  13. Remote sensing of phytoplankton density and diversity in Narragansett Bay using an airborne fluorosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, F. H.; Brown, C. A., Jr.; Jarrett, O., Jr.; Campbell, J. W.; Staton, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    An aircraft-borne remote system is presented that utilizes narrow-band light from multiple dye lasers to excite selected algae photopigments and then measures the resultant flourescence emitted from chlorophyll a at 685 nm. Tests were conducted with both pure and mixed cultures of marine algae from a series of field tests taken from piers and bridges of Narragansett Bay, and a prototype remote fluorosensor was flown over the Bay during the 1978 winter-spring diatom bloom. Remote fluorescence obtained at hover points over sea-truth stations showed correlations with in situ fluorescence, total chlorophyll a, and cell count. It was concluded that the ratio of remote fluorescence to direct chlorophyll a concentration was less variable than expected, and the distribution of total chlorophyll a between two major photoplankton color groups showed three distinct areas, within the Bay, of green and golden-brown species.

  14. The Greenland ice sheet perennial firn aquifer: characteristics, extent and evolution obtained from airborne remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miège, C.; Forster, R. R.; Koenig, L.; Brucker, L.; Box, J. E.; Burgess, E. W.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of a perennial firn aquifer (PFA) was identified April 2011, in the southeast part of the Greenland ice sheet, from firn-core drilling, surface- and airborne-radar. The PFA is a component of the ice sheet hydrology and corresponds to a liquid water saturated firn aquifer, which persists over the winter without freezing. The average depth of the top of the aquifer is ~20 m below the surface, and is guided by surface topography, following surface undulations, similar to an unconfined aquifer observed in other groundwater aquifer systems. We use a combination of 400 MHz ground-based radar and the 600 to 900 MHz Accumulation Radar on board NASA's airborne Operation IceBridge (OIB) to identify and map PFA extent and evolution between 2011 and 2013. Here, we present an ice-sheet wide mapping of the PFA, including the 2013 field campaign with detailed ground-based radar grids near the firn core site drilled in April 2013 (PFA-13, 66.18°N, 39.04°W and 1563 m). At the PFA-13 location, OIB Accumulation Radar and ground-based radar data were acquired along the same track within two weeks in both 2011 and 2013, offering a unique comparison dataset. This dataset is used to analyze the three year (2011-2013) evolution of PFA top depth, i.e. stored meltwater volume, in areas where radar transects are repeated from one year to the next. This evolution suggests possible horizontal flow of this stored meltwater toward the ice-sheet margins but must be confirmed by further field investigations. In addition, we derive surface slope from latest digital elevation model available for Southeast Greenland and use this slope as parameter to interpolate the PFA top in the area between ground radar transects and airborne radar flight lines. This slope interpolation would aim to improve PFA water volume/extent estimations for areas without airborne radar coverage. The fate of this stored meltwater is currently unknown, even if flow is suggested and drainage into nearby crevasses

  15. Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network for Real Time Remote Monitoring of Sand Dynamics on Coastal Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzebon, Alessandro; Bove, Carmine; Cappelli, Irene; Alquini, Fernanda; Bertoni, Duccio; Sarti, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the architecture of a heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) to be deployed on coastal sand dunes is described, the aim of which is to provide real time measurements of physical parameters to better define the sediment transport in connection with Aeolian processes. The WSN integrates different typologies of sensors and is provided with both local and remote connection. In particular, three different typologies of sensors are integrated in the network: a multilayer anemometric station, a sensor developed ad-hoc to measure the sand dune level and a sand collector capable of measuring the weight of trapped sand and its quantity. Each sensor node is made up at least of a ZigBee radio module that is able to transmit the data collected by the sensor at a distance of about 100 meters. While the sand level sensor and the sand collector are provided only with this transmission module, the anemometric station also integrates a microprocessor board in charge of data processing. A Gateway node provided with a GSM connection for remote data transmission and a Zigbee radio module for Local Area communication has also been developed. This node is in charge of collecting all the data packets sent by the Sensor Nodes and transmit them to a remote server through GPRS connection. A Web server has been set up to collect these packets and store them in a database. The proposed WSN can provide both a static and a dynamic framework of sand transport processes acting on coastal dunes.

  16. Remotely controlled sensor apparatus for use in dig-face characterization system

    DOEpatents

    Josten, Nicholas E.; Svoboda, John M.

    1999-01-01

    A remotely controlled sensor platform apparatus useful in a dig-face characterization system is deployed from a mobile delivery device such as standard heavy construction equipment. The sensor apparatus is designed to stabilize sensors against extraneous motions induced by heavy equipment manipulations or other outside influences, and includes a terrain sensing and sensor elevation control system to maintain the sensors in close ground proximity. The deployed sensor apparatus is particularly useful in collecting data in work environments where human access is difficult due to the presence of hazardous conditions, rough terrain, or other circumstances that prevent efficient data collection by conventional methods. Such work environments include hazardous waste sites, unexploded ordnance sites, or construction sites. Data collection in these environments by utilizing the deployed sensor apparatus is desirable in order to protect human health and safety, or to assist in planning daily operations to increase efficiency.

  17. Remotely controlled sensor apparatus for use in dig-face characterization system

    DOEpatents

    Josten, N.E.; Svoboda, J.M.

    1999-05-25

    A remotely controlled sensor platform apparatus useful in a dig-face characterization system is deployed from a mobile delivery device such as standard heavy construction equipment. The sensor apparatus is designed to stabilize sensors against extraneous motions induced by heavy equipment manipulations or other outside influences, and includes a terrain sensing and sensor elevation control system to maintain the sensors in close ground proximity. The deployed sensor apparatus is particularly useful in collecting data in work environments where human access is difficult due to the presence of hazardous conditions, rough terrain, or other circumstances that prevent efficient data collection by conventional methods. Such work environments include hazardous waste sites, unexploded ordnance sites, or construction sites. Data collection in these environments by utilizing the deployed sensor apparatus is desirable in order to protect human health and safety, or to assist in planning daily operations to increase efficiency. 13 figs.

  18. The dynamic monitoring of warm-water discharge based on the airborne high-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Honglan; Xie, Feng; Liu, Chengyu; Liu, Zhihui; Zhang, Changxing; Yang, Gui; Wang, Jianyu

    2016-04-01

    The cooling water discharged from the coastal plants flow into the sea continuously, whose temperature is higher than original sea surface temperature (SST). The fact will have non-negligible influence on the marine environment in and around where the plants site. Hence, it's significant to monitor the temporal and spatial variation of the warm-water discharge for the assessment of the effect of the plant on its surrounding marine environment. The paper describes an approach for the dynamic monitoring of the warm-water discharge of coastal plants based on the airborne high-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing technology. Firstly, the geometric correction was carried out for the thermal infrared remote sensing images acquired on the aircraft. Secondly, the atmospheric correction method was used to retrieve the sea surface temperature of the images. Thirdly, the temperature-rising districts caused by the warm-water discharge were extracted. Lastly, the temporal and spatial variations of the warm-water discharge were analyzed through the geographic information system (GIS) technology. The approach was applied to Qinshan nuclear power plant (NPP), in Zhejiang Province, China. In considering with the tide states, the diffusion, distribution and temperature-rising values of the warm-water discharged from the plant were calculated and analyzed, which are useful to the marine environment assessment.

  19. Using Airborne Remote Sensing to Increase Situational Awareness in Civil Protection and Humanitarian Relief - the Importance of User Involvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, H.; Kiefl, R.; Henkel, F.; Wenxi, C.; Nippold, R.; Kurz, F.; Kippnich, U.

    2016-06-01

    Enhancing situational awareness in real-time (RT) civil protection and emergency response scenarios requires the development of comprehensive monitoring concepts combining classical remote sensing disciplines with geospatial information science. In the VABENE++ project of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) monitoring tools are being developed by which innovative data acquisition approaches are combined with information extraction as well as the generation and dissemination of information products to a specific user. DLR's 3K and 4k camera system which allow for a RT acquisition and pre-processing of high resolution aerial imagery are applied in two application examples conducted with end users: a civil protection exercise with humanitarian relief organisations and a large open-air music festival in cooperation with a festival organising company. This study discusses how airborne remote sensing can significantly contribute to both, situational assessment and awareness, focussing on the downstream processes required for extracting information from imagery and for visualising and disseminating imagery in combination with other geospatial information. Valuable user feedback and impetus for further developments has been obtained from both applications, referring to innovations in thematic image analysis (supporting festival site management) and product dissemination (editable web services). Thus, this study emphasises the important role of user involvement in application-related research, i.e. by aligning it closer to user's requirements.

  20. Airborne methane remote measurements reveal heavy-tail flux distribution in Four Corners region

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Andrew K.; Thompson, David R.; Hulley, Glynn; Kort, Eric Adam; Vance, Nick; Borchardt, Jakob; Krings, Thomas; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Sweeney, Colm; Conley, Stephen; Bue, Brian D.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Hook, Simon; Green, Robert O.

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) impacts climate as the second strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gas and air quality by influencing tropospheric ozone levels. Space-based observations have identified the Four Corners region in the Southwest United States as an area of large CH4 enhancements. We conducted an airborne campaign in Four Corners during April 2015 with the next-generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (near-infrared) and Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (thermal infrared) imaging spectrometers to better understand the source of methane by measuring methane plumes at 1- to 3-m spatial resolution. Our analysis detected more than 250 individual methane plumes from fossil fuel harvesting, processing, and distributing infrastructures, spanning an emission range from the detection limit ∼ 2 kg/h to 5 kg/h through ∼ 5,000 kg/h. Observed sources include gas processing facilities, storage tanks, pipeline leaks, and well pads, as well as a coal mine venting shaft. Overall, plume enhancements and inferred fluxes follow a lognormal distribution, with the top 10% emitters contributing 49 to 66% to the inferred total point source flux of 0.23 Tg/y to 0.39 Tg/y. With the observed confirmation of a lognormal emission distribution, this airborne observing strategy and its ability to locate previously unknown point sources in real time provides an efficient and effective method to identify and mitigate major emissions contributors over a wide geographic area. With improved instrumentation, this capability scales to spaceborne applications [Thompson DR, et al. (2016) Geophys Res Lett 43(12):6571–6578]. Further illustration of this potential is demonstrated with two detected, confirmed, and repaired pipeline leaks during the campaign. PMID:27528660

  1. Airborne methane remote measurements reveal heavy-tail flux distribution in Four Corners region.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Christian; Thorpe, Andrew K; Thompson, David R; Hulley, Glynn; Kort, Eric Adam; Vance, Nick; Borchardt, Jakob; Krings, Thomas; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Sweeney, Colm; Conley, Stephen; Bue, Brian D; Aubrey, Andrew D; Hook, Simon; Green, Robert O

    2016-08-30

    Methane (CH4) impacts climate as the second strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gas and air quality by influencing tropospheric ozone levels. Space-based observations have identified the Four Corners region in the Southwest United States as an area of large CH4 enhancements. We conducted an airborne campaign in Four Corners during April 2015 with the next-generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (near-infrared) and Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (thermal infrared) imaging spectrometers to better understand the source of methane by measuring methane plumes at 1- to 3-m spatial resolution. Our analysis detected more than 250 individual methane plumes from fossil fuel harvesting, processing, and distributing infrastructures, spanning an emission range from the detection limit [Formula: see text] 2 kg/h to 5 kg/h through [Formula: see text] 5,000 kg/h. Observed sources include gas processing facilities, storage tanks, pipeline leaks, and well pads, as well as a coal mine venting shaft. Overall, plume enhancements and inferred fluxes follow a lognormal distribution, with the top 10% emitters contributing 49 to 66% to the inferred total point source flux of 0.23 Tg/y to 0.39 Tg/y. With the observed confirmation of a lognormal emission distribution, this airborne observing strategy and its ability to locate previously unknown point sources in real time provides an efficient and effective method to identify and mitigate major emissions contributors over a wide geographic area. With improved instrumentation, this capability scales to spaceborne applications [Thompson DR, et al. (2016) Geophys Res Lett 43(12):6571-6578]. Further illustration of this potential is demonstrated with two detected, confirmed, and repaired pipeline leaks during the campaign.

  2. An Integrated Data Acquisition / User Request/ Processing / Delivery System for Airborne Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, B.; Chu, A.; Tung, W.

    2003-12-01

    Airborne science data has historically played an important role in the development of the scientific underpinnings for spaceborne missions. When the science community determines the need for new types of spaceborne measurements, airborne campaigns are often crucial in risk mitigation for these future missions. However, full exploitation of the acquired data may be difficult due to its experimental and transitory nature. Externally to the project, most problematic (in particular, for those not involved in requesting the data acquisitions) may be the difficulty in searching for, requesting, and receiving the data, or even knowing the data exist. This can result in a rather small, insular community of users for these data sets. Internally, the difficulty for the project is in maintaining a robust processing and archival system during periods of changing mission priorities and evolving technologies. The NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) has acquired data for a large and varied community of scientists and engineers for 15 years. AIRSAR is presently supporting current NASA Earth Science Enterprise experiments, such as the Soil Moisture EXperiment (SMEX) and the Cold Land Processes experiment (CLPX), as well as experiments conducted as many as 10 years ago. During that time, it's processing, data ordering, and data delivery system has undergone evolutionary change as the cost and capability of resources has improved. AIRSAR now has a fully integrated data acquisition/user request/processing/delivery system through which most components of the data fulfillment process communicate via shared information within a database. The integration of these functions has reduced errors and increased throughput of processed data to customers.

  3. Design of an Airborne Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) for the Coastal Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, P.; vanGorp, B.; Green, R. O.; Cohen, D.; Wilson, D.; Randall, D.; Rodriguez, J.; Polanco, O.; Dierssen, H.; Balasubramanian, K.; Vargas, R.; Hein, R.; Sobel, H.; Eastwood, M.

    2010-01-01

    PRISM is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer currently under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, intended to address the needs of airborne coastal ocean science research. We describe here the instrument design and the technologies that enable it to achieve its distinguishing characteristics. PRISM covers the 350-1050 nm range with a 3.1 nm sampling and a 33(deg) field of view. The design provides for high signal to noise ratio, high uniformity of response, and low polarization sensitivity. The complete instrument also incorporates two additional wavelength bands at 1240 and 1610 nm in a spot radiometer configuration to aid with atmospheric correction.

  4. ‘Baseline-offset’ scheme for a methane remote sensor based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wuwen; Sun, Liqun; Yi, Luying; Zhang, Enyao

    2016-08-01

    A new scheme for methane remote sensing is presented. Unlike a standard published remote sensor based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS), a reference cell is inserted into the measuring optical path. This scheme inherits the merits of WMS and can achieve high signal-to-noise ratio especially in a low concentration environment. Experimental results show that the presented remote sensor can detect ambient methane with a detection limit of 5 ppm m (parts per million · meter) at a distance of 10 m and 16 ppm m for 20 m. A methane leak test shows the sensor can detect a methane leak of 15 ml min-1 within a range up to 37 m.

  5. Respirable particulate monitoring with remote sensors. (Public health ecology: Air pollution)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring atmospheric aerosols in the respirable range from air or space platforms was studied. Secondary reflectance targets were located in the industrial area and near Galveston Bay. Multichannel remote sensor data were utilized to calculate the aerosol extinction coefficient and thus determine the aerosol size distribution. Houston Texas air sampling network high volume data were utilized to generate computer isopleth maps of suspended particulates and to establish the mass loading of the atmosphere. In addition, a five channel nephelometer and a multistage particulate air sampler were used to collect data. The extinction coefficient determined from remote sensor data proved more representative of wide areal phenomena than that calculated from on site measurements. It was also demonstrated that a significant reduction in the standard deviation of the extinction coefficient could be achieved by reducing the bandwidths used in remote sensor.

  6. Application of Remote Power-by-Light Switching in a Simplified BOTDA Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Mikel; Ullan, Angel; Zornoza, Ander; Loayssa, Alayn; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of spatial multiplexing as a means to reduce the costs of distributed sensing networks. We propose a new scheme in which remote power-by-light switching is deployed to scan multiple branches of a distributed sensing network based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. A proof-of-concept system is assembled with two 5-km sensor fiber branches that are alternatively monitored using a fast remotely controlled and optically powered optical switch. The multiplexed distributed sensor fibers were located 10 km away from the interrogation unit and a Raman pump is used to remotely power the switch. Furthermore, the deployed BOTDA unit uses an alternative configuration that can lead to simplified setups. PMID:24351644

  7. Capacity Model and Constraints Analysis for Integrated Remote Wireless Sensor and Satellite Network in Emergency Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Feihong; Xie, Zhidong; Bian, Dongming

    2015-11-17

    This article investigates the capacity problem of an integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network (IWSSN) in emergency scenarios. We formulate a general model to evaluate the remote sensor and satellite network capacity. Compared to most existing works for ground networks, the proposed model is time varying and space oriented. To capture the characteristics of a practical network, we sift through major capacity-impacting constraints and analyze the influence of these constraints. Specifically, we combine the geometric satellite orbit model and satellite tool kit (STK) engineering software to quantify the trends of the capacity constraints. Our objective in analyzing these trends is to provide insights and design guidelines for optimizing the integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network schedules. Simulation results validate the theoretical analysis of capacity trends and show the optimization opportunities of the IWSSN.

  8. Application of remote power-by-light switching in a simplified BOTDA sensor network.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Mikel; Ullan, Angel; Zornoza, Ander; Loayssa, Alayn; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2013-12-17

    We propose and demonstrate the use of spatial multiplexing as a means to reduce the costs of distributed sensing networks. We propose a new scheme in which remote power-by-light switching is deployed to scan multiple branches of a distributed sensing network based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. A proof-of-concept system is assembled with two 5-km sensor fiber branches that are alternatively monitored using a fast remotely controlled and optically powered optical switch. The multiplexed distributed sensor fibers were located 10 km away from the interrogation unit and a Raman pump is used to remotely power the switch. Furthermore, the deployed BOTDA unit uses an alternative configuration that can lead to simplified setups.

  9. Capacity Model and Constraints Analysis for Integrated Remote Wireless Sensor and Satellite Network in Emergency Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Feihong; Xie, Zhidong; Bian, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the capacity problem of an integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network (IWSSN) in emergency scenarios. We formulate a general model to evaluate the remote sensor and satellite network capacity. Compared to most existing works for ground networks, the proposed model is time varying and space oriented. To capture the characteristics of a practical network, we sift through major capacity-impacting constraints and analyze the influence of these constraints. Specifically, we combine the geometric satellite orbit model and satellite tool kit (STK) engineering software to quantify the trends of the capacity constraints. Our objective in analyzing these trends is to provide insights and design guidelines for optimizing the integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network schedules. Simulation results validate the theoretical analysis of capacity trends and show the optimization opportunities of the IWSSN. PMID:26593919

  10. Road Asphalt Pavements Analyzed by Airborne Thermal Remote Sensing: Preliminary Results of the Venice Highway

    PubMed Central

    Pascucci, Simone; Bassani, Cristiana; Palombo, Angelo; Poscolieri, Maurizio; Cavalli, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a fast procedure for evaluating asphalt pavement surface defects using airborne emissivity data. To develop this procedure, we used airborne multispectral emissivity data covering an urban test area close to Venice (Italy).For this study, we first identify and select the roads' asphalt pavements on Multispectral Infrared Visible Imaging Spectrometer (MIVIS) imagery using a segmentation procedure. Next, since in asphalt pavements the surface defects are strictly related to the decrease of oily components that cause an increase of the abundance of surfacing limestone, the diagnostic absorption emissivity peak at 11.2μm of the limestone was used for retrieving from MIVIS emissivity data the areas exhibiting defects on asphalt pavements surface.The results showed that MIVIS emissivity allows establishing a threshold that points out those asphalt road sites on which a check for a maintenance intervention is required. Therefore, this technique can supply local government authorities an efficient, rapid and repeatable road mapping procedure providing the location of the asphalt pavements to be checked. PMID:27879765

  11. Evaluation of the airborne imaging spectrometer for remote sensing of forest stand conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Charles E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Five pairs of plots were established in forest stands with one of each pair trenched and covered to prevent precipitation from reaching the tree roots. High winds and falling limbs destroyed the covers on three of the plots. The two remaining plots were in a red pine plantation and in a natural stand of sugar maple. Trees in both plots developed levels of moisture stress more than nine bars higher than control trees on the dates of overflights with the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) and the Collins' Airborne Spectroradiometer (CAS). Hemispherical reflectance from stressed and control trees was measured with a Beckman DK2A spectrophotometer. On the day of the AIS overflight, stressed maple foliage was less reflective than the control from 1000 to 1300 nm, but more reflective at wavelengths longer than 1300 nm. Pine foliage was less reflective than the control from 1000 to 1600 nm, but the difference was small at wavelengths longer than 1350 nm. AIS data collected showed brightness values for both maple and pine to be lower than for the controls from 1000 to 1300 nm. CAS data were used to determine the gain in species identification accuracy obtainable with high spectral resolution data.

  12. Remote Sensing of Multi-Level Wind Fields with High-Energy Airborne Scanning Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Olivier, Lisa D.; Banta, Robert M.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States.

  13. Remote sensing of multi-level wind fields with high-energy airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, J; Olivier, L; Banta, R; Hardesty, R M; Howell, J; Cutten, D; Johnson, S; Menzies, R; Tratt, D M

    1998-01-19

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the planetary boundary layer, free troposphere, and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States.

  14. Multispectral Imaging Systems for Airborne Remote Sensing to Support Agricultural Production Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing has shown promise as a tool for managing agricultural application and production. Earth-observing satellite systems have an advantage for large-scale analysis at regional levels but are limited in spatial resolution. High-resolution satellite systems have been available in recent year...

  15. Remote Sensing Sensors and Applications in Environmental Resources Mapping and Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Melesse, Assefa M.; Weng, Qihao; S.Thenkabail, Prasad; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2007-01-01

    The history of remote sensing and development of different sensors for environmental and natural resources mapping and data acquisition is reviewed and reported. Application examples in urban studies, hydrological modeling such as land-cover and floodplain mapping, fractional vegetation cover and impervious surface area mapping, surface energy flux and micro-topography correlation studies is discussed. The review also discusses the use of remotely sensed-based rainfall and potential evapotranspiration for estimating crop water requirement satisfaction index and hence provides early warning information for growers. The review is not an exhaustive application of the remote sensing techniques rather a summary of some important applications in environmental studies and modeling.

  16. Remote sensing sensors and applications in environmental resources mapping and modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melesse, Assefa M.; Weng, Qihao; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2007-01-01

    The history of remote sensing and development of different sensors for environmental and natural resources mapping and data acquisition is reviewed and reported. Application examples in urban studies, hydrological modeling such as land-cover and floodplain mapping, fractional vegetation cover and impervious surface area mapping, surface energy flux and micro-topography correlation studies is discussed. The review also discusses the use of remotely sensed-based rainfall and potential evapotranspiration for estimating crop water requirement satisfaction index and hence provides early warning information for growers. The review is not an exhaustive application of the remote sensing techniques rather a summary of some important applications in environmental studies and modeling.

  17. Design and implementation of a wireless sensor network-based remote water-level monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuhong; Cheng, Xiao; Gong, Peng; Yan, Ke

    2011-01-01

    The proposed remote water-level monitoring system (RWMS) consists of a field sensor module, a base station module, a data center module and a WEB releasing module. It has advantages in real time and synchronized remote control, expandability, and anti-jamming capabilities. The RWMS can realize real-time remote monitoring, providing early warning of events and protection of the safety of monitoring personnel under certain dangerous circumstances. This system has been successfully applied in Poyanghu Lake. The cost of the whole system is approximately 1,500 yuan (RMB).

  18. Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters . Pt. 1; Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation; [Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, G.; DaSilva, A. M.; Norris, P. M.; Platnick, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating synthetic sensor radiances from variable output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint, the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probability density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The simulated sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies.We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products). We focus on clouds because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  19. Estimating sediment and caesium-137 fluxes in the Ribble Estuary through time-series airborne remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, R; Tyler, A N; McDonald, P; Atkin, P A; Gleizon, P; Gilvear, D

    2011-03-01

    High spatial and temporal resolution airborne imagery were acquired for the Ribble Estuary, North West England in 1997 and 2003, to assess the application of time-series airborne remote sensing to quantify total suspended sediment and radionuclide fluxes during a flood and ebb tide sequence. Concomitant measurements of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and water column turbidity were obtained during the time-series image acquisition for the flood and ebb tide sequence on the 17th July 2003 to verify the assumption of a vertically well mixed estuary and thus justifying the vertical extrapolation of spatially integrated estimate of surface SPM. The ¹³⁷Cs activity concentrations were calculated from a relatively stable relationship between SPM and ¹³⁷Cs for the Ribble Estuary. Total estuary wide budgets of sediment and ¹³⁷Cs were obtained by combining the image-derived estimates of surface SPM and ¹³⁷Cs with estimates of water volume from a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model (VERSE) developed for the Ribble Estuary. These indicate that around 10,000 tons of sediment and 2.72 GBq of ¹³⁷Cs were deposited over the tidal sequence monitored in July 2003. This compared favourably with bed height elevation change estimated from field work. An uncertainty analysis on the total sediment and ¹³⁷Cs flux yielded a total budget of the order of 40% on the final estimate. The results represent a novel approach to providing a spatially integrated estimate of the total net sediment and radionuclide flux in an intertidal environment over a flood and ebb tide sequence.

  20. Development of Novel, Simple Multianalyte Sensors for Remote Environmental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Sanford A. Asher

    2003-02-18

    Advancement of our polymerized crystalline colloidal array chemical sensing technology. They have dramatically advanced their polymerized crystalline colloidal array chemical sensing technology. They fabricated nonselective sensors for determining pH and ionic strength. They also developed selective sensors for glucose and organophosphorus mimics of nerve gas agents. They developed a trace sensor for cations in water which utilized a novel crosslinking sensing motif. In all of these cases they have been able to theoretically model their sensor response by extending hydrogel volume phase transition theory. They also developed transient sampling methods to allow their ion sensing methods to operate at high ionic strengths. They also developed a novel optrode to provide for simple sampling.

  1. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Icing Sensor Performance During the 2003 Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, John J.; Schaffner, Philip R.; Minnis, Patrick; Nguyen, Louis; Delnore, Victor E.; Daniels, Taumi S.; Grainger, C. A.; Delene, D.; Wolff, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    The Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) sensor was deployed onboard the University of North Dakota Citation II aircraft in the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS II) from Nov 19 through December 14, 2003. TAMDAR is designed to measure and report winds, temperature, humidity, turbulence and icing from regional commercial aircraft (Daniels et. al., 2004). TAMDAR icing sensor performance is compared to a) in situ validation data from the Citation II sensor suite, b) Current Icing Potential products developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and available operationally on the NOAA Aviation Weather Center s Aviation Digital Data Server (ADDS) and c) NASA Advanced Satellite Aviation-weather Products (ASAP) cloud microphysical products.

  2. Mobile Phones Coupled with Remote Sensors for Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    applications can be created to utilize the sensor data to better convey information to the user . The controlled testing we conducted yielded good...as a real -time information system. The user being able to adjust the sensitivity of the sensor “on the fly” would also be a useful capability. 50...Postgraduate School, 2010. [13] Boettcher P. and Shaw G. “Energy-Constrained Collaborative Processing for Target Detection, Tracking , and Geolocation

  3. The Australian National Airborne Field Experiment 2005: Soil Moisture Remote Sensing at 60 Meter Resolution and Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, E. J.; Walker, J. P.; Panciera, R.; Kalma, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    Spatially-distributed soil moisture observations have applications spanning a wide range of spatial resolutions from the very local needs of individual farmers to the progressively larger areas of interest to weather forecasters, water resource managers, and global climate modelers. To date, the most promising approach for space-based remote sensing of soil moisture makes use of passive microwave emission radiometers at L-band frequencies (1-2 GHz). Several soil moisture-sensing satellites have been proposed in recent years, with the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission scheduled to be launched first in a couple years. While such a microwave-based approach has the advantage of essentially allweather operation, satellite size limits spatial resolution to 10's of km. Whether used at this native resolution or in conjunction with some type of downscaling technique to generate soil moisture estimates on a finer-scale grid, the effects of subpixel spatial variability play a critical role. The soil moisture variability is typically affected by factors such as vegetation, topography, surface roughness, and soil texture. Understanding and these factors is the key to achieving accurate soil moisture retrievals at any scale. Indeed, the ability to compensate for these factors ultimately limits the achievable spatial resolution and/or accuracy of the retrieval. Over the last 20 years, a series of airborne campaigns in the USA have supported the development of algorithms for spaceborne soil moisture retrieval. The most important observations involved imagery from passive microwave radiometers. The early campaigns proved that the retrieval worked for larger and larger footprints, up to satellite-scale footprints. These provided the solid basis for proposing the satellite missions. More recent campaigns have explored other aspects such as retrieval performance through greater amounts of vegetation. All of these campaigns featured extensive ground

  4. Multi-trophic invasion resistance in Hawaii: bioacoustics, field surveys, and airborne remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Boelman, Natalie T; Asner, Gregory P; Hart, Patrick J; Martin, Roberta E

    2007-12-01

    We used airborne imaging spectroscopy and scanning light detection and ranging (LiDAR), along with bioacoustic recordings, to determine how a plant species invasion affects avian abundance and community composition across a range of Hawaiian submontane ecosystems. Total avian abundance and the ratio of native to exotic avifauna were highest in habitats with the highest canopy cover and height. Comparing biophysically equivalent sites, stands dominated by native Metrosideros polymorpha trees hosted larger native avian communities than did mixed stands of Metrosideros and the invasive tree Morella faya. A multi-trophic analysis strongly suggests that native avifauna provide biotic resistance against the invasion of Morella trees and exotic birds, thus slowing invasion "meltdowns" that disrupt the functioning of native Hawaiian ecosystems.

  5. The relationship among sea surface roughness variations, oceanographic analyses, and airborne remote sensing analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oertel, G. F.; Wade, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was studied to determine whether it could image large scale estuaries and oceanic features such as fronts and to explain the electromagnetic interaction between SAR and the individual surface front features. Fronts were observed to occur at the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay. The airborne measurements consisted of data collection by SAR onboard an F-4 aircraft and real aperture side looking radar (SLAR) in Mohawk aircraft. A total of 89 transects were flown. Surface roughness and color as well as temperature and salinity were evaluated. Cross-frontal surveys were made. Frontal shear and convergence flow were obtained. Surface active organic materials, it was indicated, are present at the air-sea interface. In all, 2000 analyses were conducted to characterize the spatial and temporal variabilities associated with water mass boundaries.

  6. Passive and Self-Powered Autonomous Sensors for Remote Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sardini, Emilio; Serpelloni, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous sensors play a very important role in the environmental, structural, and medical fields. The use of this kind of systems can be expanded for several applications, for example in implantable devices inside the human body where it is impossible to use wires. Furthermore, they enable measurements in harsh or hermetic environments, such as under extreme heat, cold, humidity or corrosive conditions. The use of batteries as a power supply for these devices represents one solution, but the size, and sometimes the cost and unwanted maintenance burdens of replacement are important drawbacks. In this paper passive and self-powered autonomous sensors for harsh or hermetical environments without batteries are discussed. Their general architectures are presented. Sensing strategies, communication techniques and power management are analyzed. Then, general building blocks of an autonomous sensor are presented and the design guidelines that such a system must follow are given. Furthermore, this paper reports different proposed applications of autonomous sensors applied in harsh or hermetic environments: two examples of passive autonomous sensors that use telemetric communication are proposed, the first one for humidity measurements and the second for high temperatures. Other examples of self-powered autonomous sensors that use a power harvesting system from electromagnetic fields are proposed for temperature measurements and for airflow speeds. PMID:22399949

  7. Remote estimation of canopy nitrogen content in winter wheat using airborne hyperspectral reflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianfeng; Huang, Wenjiang; Kong, Weiping; Ye, Huichun; Luo, Juhua; Chen, Pengfei

    2016-11-01

    Timely and accurate assessment of canopy nitrogen content (CNC) provides valuable insight into rapid and real-time nitrogen status monitoring in crops. A semi-empirical approach based on spectral index was extensively used for nitrogen content estimation. However, in many cases, due to specific vegetation types or local conditions, the applicability and robustness of established spectral indices for nitrogen retrieval were limited. The objective of this study was to investigate the optimal spectral index for winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) CNC estimation using Pushbroom Hyperspectral Imager (PHI) airborne hyperspectral data. Data collected from two different field experiments that were conducted during the major growth stages of winter wheat in 2002 and 2003 were used. Our results showed that a significant linear relationship existed between nitrogen and chlorophyll content at the canopy level, and it was not affected by cultivars, growing conditions and nutritional status of winter wheat. Nevertheless, it varied with growth stages. Periods around heading stage mainly worsened the relationship and CNC estimation, and CNC assessment for growth stages before and after heading could improve CNC retrieval accuracy to some extent. CNC assessment with PHI airborne hyperspectra suggested that spectral indices based on red-edge band including narrowband and broadband CIred-edge, NDVI-like and ND705 showed convincing results in CNC retrieval. NDVI-like and ND705 were sensitive to detect CNC changes less than 5 g/m2, narrowband and broadband CIred-edge were sensitive to a wide range of CNC variations. Further evaluation of CNC retrieval using field measured hyperspectra indicated that NDVI-like was robust and exhibited the highest accuracy in CNC assessment, and spectral indices (CIred-edge and CIgreen) that established on narrow or broad bands showed no obvious difference in CNC assessment. Overall, our study suggested that NDVI-like was the optimal indicator for winter

  8. Airborne Geophysics and Remote Sensing Applied to Study Greenland Ice Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csatho, Beata M.

    2003-01-01

    Overview of project: we combined and jointly analysed geophysical, remote sensing and glaciological data for investigating the temporal changes in ice flow and the role of geologic control on glacial drainage. The project included two different studies, the investigation of recent changes of the Kangerlussuaq glacier and the study of geologic control of ice flow in NW Greenland, around the Humboldt, Petermann and Ryder glaciers.

  9. Leica ADS40 Sensor for Coastal Multispectral Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, John C.

    2007-01-01

    The Leica ADS40 Sensor as it is used for coastal multispectral imaging is presented. The contents include: 1) Project Area Overview; 2) Leica ADS40 Sensor; 3) Focal Plate Arrangements; 4) Trichroid Filter; 5) Gradient Correction; 6) Image Acquisition; 7) Remote Sensing and ADS40; 8) Band comparisons of Satellite and Airborne Sensors; 9) Impervious Surface Extraction; and 10) Impervious Surface Details.

  10. Mountainous Ecosystem Sensor Array (MESA): a mesh sensor network for climate change research in remote mountainous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. W.; Neal, D.; Frome, D.; Kavanagh, K.; Davis, A.; Gessler, P. E.; Hess, H.; Holden, Z. A.; Link, T. E.; Newingham, B. A.; Smith, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Developing sensor networks robust enough to perform unattended in the world's remote regions is critical since these regions serve as important benchmarks that lack anthropogenic influence. Paradoxically, the factors that make these remote, natural sites challenging for sensor networking are often what make them indispensable for climate change research. The MESA (Mountainous Ecosystem Sensor Array) project has faced these challenges and developed a wireless mesh sensor network across a 660 m topoclimatic gradient in a wilderness area in central Idaho. This sensor array uses advances in sensing, networking, and power supply technologies to provide near real-time synchronized data covering a suite of biophysical parameters used in ecosystem process models. The 76 sensors in the network monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, humidity, air and soil temperature, soil water content, precipitation, incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation, snow depth, wind speed and direction, and leaf wetness at synchronized time intervals ranging from two minutes to two hours and spatial scales from a few meters to two kilometers. We present our novel methods of placing sensors and network nodes above, below, and throughout the forest canopy without using meteorological towers. In addition, we explain our decision to use different forms of power (wind and solar) and the equipment we use to control and integrate power harvesting. Further, we describe our use of the network to sense and quantify its own power use. Using examples of environmental data from the project, we discuss how these data may be used to increase our understanding of the effects of climate change on ecosystem processes in mountainous environments. MESA sensor locations across a 700 m topoclimatic gradient at the University of Idaho Taylor Wilderness Research Station.

  11. Research-grade CMOS image sensors for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pe, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Magnan, Pierre; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Corbiere, Franck; Belliot, Pierre; Estribeau, Magali

    2004-11-01

    Imaging detectors are key elements for optical instruments and sensors on board space missions dedicated to Earth observation (high resolution imaging, atmosphere spectroscopy...), Solar System exploration (micro cameras, guidance for autonomous vehicle...) and Universe observation (space telescope focal planes, guiding sensors...). This market has been dominated by CCD technology for long. Since the mid-90s, CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) have been competing with CCDs for consumer domains (webcams, cell phones, digital cameras...). Featuring significant advantages over CCD sensors for space applications (lower power consumption, smaller system size, better radiations behaviour...), CMOS technology is also expanding in this field, justifying specific R&D and development programs funded by national and European space agencies (mainly CNES, DGA and ESA). All along the 90s and thanks to their increasingly improving performances, CIS have started to be successfully used for more and more demanding space applications, from vision and control functions requiring low-level performances to guidance applications requiring medium-level performances. Recent technology improvements have made possible the manufacturing of research-grade CIS that are able to compete with CCDs in the high-performances arena. After an introduction outlining the growing interest of optical instruments designers for CMOS image sensors, this paper will present the existing and foreseen ways to reach high-level electro-optics performances for CIS. The developments and performances of CIS prototypes built using an imaging CMOS process will be presented in the corresponding section.

  12. Sensor System Performance Evaluation and Benefits from the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, A.; Zhou, D.; Smith, W.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global-scale measurements of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring, and environmental change detection. Validation of the entire measurement system is crucial to achieving this goal and thus maximizing research and operational utility of resultant data. Field campaigns employing satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft are an essential part of this validation task. The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a fundamental contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This paper focuses on some of the challenges associated with validating advanced atmospheric sounders and the benefits obtained from employing airborne interferometers such as the NAST-I. Select results from underflights of the Aqua Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) obtained during recent field campaigns will be presented.

  13. Mapping Weathering and Alteration Minerals in the Comstock and Geiger Grade Areas using Visible to Thermal Infrared Airborne Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Greg R.; Calvin, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    To support research into both precious metal exploration and environmental site characterization a combination of high spatial/spectral resolution airborne visible, near infrared, short wave infrared (VNIR/SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) image data were acquired to remotely map hydrothermal alteration minerals around the Geiger Grade and Comstock alteration regions, and map the mineral by-products of weathered mine dumps in Virginia City. Remote sensing data from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), SpecTIR Corporation's airborne hyperspectral imager (HyperSpecTIR), the MODIS-ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER), and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEBASS) were acquired and processed into mineral maps based on the unique spectral signatures of image pixels. VNIR/SWIR and TIR field spectrometer data were collected for both calibration and validation of the remote data sets, and field sampling, laboratory spectral analyses and XRD analyses were made to corroborate the surface mineralogy identified by spectroscopy. The resulting mineral maps show the spatial distribution of several important alteration minerals around each study area including alunite, quartz, pyrophyllite, kaolinite, montmorillonite/muscovite, and chlorite. In the Comstock region the mineral maps show acid-sulfate alteration, widespread propylitic alteration and extensive faulting that offsets the acid-sulfate areas, in contrast to the larger, dominantly acid-sulfate alteration exposed along Geiger Grade. Also, different mineral zones within the intense acid-sulfate areas were mapped. In the Virginia City historic mining district the important weathering minerals mapped include hematite, goethite, jarosite and hydrous sulfate minerals (hexahydrite, alunogen and gypsum) located on mine dumps. Sulfate minerals indicate acidic water forming in the mine dump environment. While there is not an immediate threat to the community, there are clearly sources of

  14. A solid state laser development program for remote atmospheric sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomb, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of NASA Langley efforts to develop solid-state lasers for use in the Lidar Atmospheric Sounder and Altimeter (LASA) of the Space Station Earth Observing System is surveyed. The types of observations to be performed with LASA are listed, and the parameters of presently available lasers are compared with the LASA baseline goals: 2 kW output power; 500 kg weight; tunability to 727, 760, and 943 nm to within 500 fm; high spectral purity; efficiency greater than 3 percent; energy about 1 J/pulse, pulse length less than 100 nsec, and lifetime greater than 108 shots. The use of sensitized flashlamp-pumped laser materials or diode-laser pumping to improve performance is discussed, and particular attention is given to materials research on Ti:sapphire lasers, studies of higher-efficiency detectors, and the LASE and LITE airborne lidar and DIAL experiments.

  15. Multi-Sensor Registration of Earth Remotely Sensed Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Cole-Rhodes, Arlene; Eastman, Roger; Johnson, Kisha; Morisette, Jeffrey; Netanyahu, Nathan S.; Stone, Harold S.; Zavorin, Ilya; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Assuming that approximate registration is given within a few pixels by a systematic correction system, we develop automatic image registration methods for multi-sensor data with the goal of achieving sub-pixel accuracy. Automatic image registration is usually defined by three steps; feature extraction, feature matching, and data resampling or fusion. Our previous work focused on image correlation methods based on the use of different features. In this paper, we study different feature matching techniques and present five algorithms where the features are either original gray levels or wavelet-like features, and the feature matching is based on gradient descent optimization, statistical robust matching, and mutual information. These algorithms are tested and compared on several multi-sensor datasets covering one of the EOS Core Sites, the Konza Prairie in Kansas, from four different sensors: IKONOS (4m), Landsat-7/ETM+ (30m), MODIS (500m), and SeaWIFS (1000m).

  16. Passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from Oil Fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Thompson, David R.; Thorpe, Andrew K.; Kolyer, Richard W.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Frankenberg, Christian; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Fladeland, Matthew; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2016-04-01

    The CO2 and MEthane EXperiment (COMEX) was a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of the HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities. As a part of this effort, seven flights were performed between June 3 and September 4, 2014 with the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) remote sensing instrument (operated by the University of Bremen in cooperation with the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ) over the Kern River, Kern Front, and Poso Creek Oil Fields located in California's San Joaquin Valley. MAMAP was installed for the flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with: a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer operated by the NASA Ames Research Center, ARC; a 5-hole turbulence probe; and an atmospheric measurement package operated by CIRPAS measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point, and other atmospheric parameters. Three of the flights were accompanied by the Next Generation Airborne Visual InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG), operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, installed aboard a second Twin Otter aircraft. Large-scale, high-concentration CH4 plumes were detected by the MAMAP instrument over the fields and tracked over several kilometers. The spatial distribution of the MAMAP observed plumes was compared to high spatial resolution CH4 anomaly maps derived by AVIRIS-NG imaging spectroscopy data. Remote sensing data collected by MAMAP was used to infer CH4 emission rates and their distributions over the three fields. Aggregated emission estimates for the three fields were compared to aggregated emissions inferred by subsequent airborne in-situ validation measurements collected by the Picarro instrument. Comparison of remote sensing and in-situ flux estimates will be presented, demonstrating the ability of airborne remote sensing data to provide accurate emission estimates for concentrations above the

  17. Identification and Atmospheric Transport of Microcystin Around Southern California Using Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlin, J.; Kudela, R. M.; Broughton, J.

    2014-12-01

    Microcystin, a hepatotoxin produced by the cyanobacteria Microcystis, has been known to contaminate fresh water sources around southern California. Ingesting this toxin can cause death in animals and illnesses in humans, which has promoted the World Health Organization (WHO) and California to establish preliminary guidelines for microcystin concentrations in the water (1 μg/L in drinking water and 0.8 μg/L for recreational exposure respectively). However, very few studies have been done to assess the effects of this toxin when aerosolized, even though Fitzgeorge et al. (1994) describes the toxin as potentially 12x more deadly if inhaled rather than swallowed. This project aimed to identify areas with the potential for high microcystin concentrations using airborne data and then model the potential atmospheric transport of the toxin. After applying the Master Scattering Line Height (MSLH) and Aphanizomenon-Microcystis Index (AMI) algorithms to Airborne Visible/ Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), multiple water bodies were identified as having the potential for Microcystis, although many of the observed water bodies had AMI values indicating the presence of Aphanizomenon-- a non-toxic cyanobacteria that is usually present before Microcystis. A relationship between toxins and biomass was developed and used to estimate the amount of phycocyanin and dissolved microcystin in the water. Brevetoxin, common in the Florida 'red tides', was used as a proxy to estimate the amount of microcystin that becomes aerosolized given a known water concentration (Kirkpatrick et al, 2010). These amounts were then run and averaged with the HYSPLIT dispersion model for 4 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours. The final results show that most areas are exposed to less than 0.1 ng/m^3 after 4 hours. As a worst case scenario, one final model was run to show the exposure amount when Pinto Lake was observed to have the maximum amount of microcystin recorded in 2007. The results show that after 4

  18. A simulation of remote sensor systems and data processing algorithms for spectral feature classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arduini, R. F.; Aherron, R. M.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A computational model of the deterministic and stochastic processes involved in multispectral remote sensing was designed to evaluate the performance of sensor systems and data processing algorithms for spectral feature classification. Accuracy in distinguishing between categories of surfaces or between specific types is developed as a means to compare sensor systems and data processing algorithms. The model allows studies to be made of the effects of variability of the atmosphere and of surface reflectance, as well as the effects of channel selection and sensor noise. Examples of these effects are shown.

  19. Airborne multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing: Examples of applications to the study of environmental and engineering problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, R.; Marino, C.M.

    1997-10-01

    The availability of a new aerial survey capability carried out by the CNR/LARA (National Research Council - Airborne Laboratory for the Environmental Research) by a new spectroradiometer AA5000 MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer) on board a CASA 212/200 aircraft, enable the scientists to obtain innovative data sets, for different approach to the definitions and the understanding of a variety of environmental and engineering problems. The 102 MIVIS channels spectral bandwidths are chosen to meet the needs of scientific research for advanced applications of remote sensing data. In such configuration MIVIS can offer significant contributions to problem solving in wide sectors such as geologic exploration, agricultural crop studies, forestry, land use mapping, idrogeology, oceanography and others. LARA in 1994-96 has been active over different test-sites in joint-venture with JPL, Pasadena, different European Institutions and Italian University and Research Institutes. These aerial surveys allow the national and international scientific community to approach the use of Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in environmental problems of very large interest. The sites surveyed in Italy, France and Germany include a variety of targets such as quarries, landfills, karst cavities areas, landslides, coastlines, geothermal areas, etc. The deployments gathered up to now more than 300 GBytes of MIVIS data in more than 30 hours of VLDS data recording. The purpose of this work is to present and to comment the procedures and the results at research and at operational level of the past campaigns with special reference to the study of environmental and engineering problems.

  20. Airborne in situ vertical profiling of HDO/H216O in the subtropical troposphere during the MUSICA remote sensing validation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Zahn, A.; Balzer, M.; Bouquet, H.; McManus, J. B.; González-Ramos, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical profiles of water vapor (H2O) and its isotope ratio D / H expressed as δ D(H2O were measured in situ by the ISOWAT II diode-laser spectrometer during the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA) airborne campaign. We present recent modifications of the instrument design. The instrument calibration on the ground as well as in flight is described. Based on the calibration measurements, the humidity-dependent uncertainty of our airborne data is determined. For the majority of the airborne data we achieved an accuracy (uncertainty of the mean) of Δ(δ D) ≈ 10‰. Vertical profiles between 150 and ~7000 m were obtained during 7 days in July and August 2013 over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean near Tenerife. The flights were coordinated with ground-based (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change, NDACC) and space-based (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, IASI) FTIR remote-sensing measurements of δ D(H2O) as a means to validate the remote sensing humidity and δ D(H2O) data products. The results of the validation are presented in detail in a separate paper (Schneider et al., 2014). The profiles were obtained with a high vertical resolution of around 3 m. By analyzing humidity and δ D(H2O) correlations we were able to identify different layers of airmasses with specific isotopic signatures. The results are discussed.

  1. Airborne in situ vertical profiling of HDO / H216O in the subtropical troposphere during the MUSICA remote sensing validation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Zahn, A.; Balzer, M.; Bouquet, H.; McManus, J. B.; Gonzalez-Ramos, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2015-05-01

    Vertical profiles of water vapor (H2O) and its isotope ratio D / H expressed as δD(H2O) were measured in situ by the ISOWAT II diode-laser spectrometer during the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA) airborne campaign. We present recent modifications of the instrument design. The instrument calibration on the ground as well as in flight is described. Based on the calibration measurements, the humidity-dependent uncertainty of our airborne data is determined. For the majority of the airborne data we achieved an accuracy (uncertainty of the mean) of Δ(δD) ≈10‰. Vertical profiles between 150 and ~7000 m were obtained during 7 days in July and August 2013 over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean near Tenerife. The flights were coordinated with ground-based (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change, NDACC) and space-based (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, IASI) FTIR remote sensing measurements of δD(H2O) as a means to validate the remote sensing humidity and δD(H2O) data products. The results of the validation are presented in detail in a separate paper (Schneider et al., 2014). The profiles were obtained with a high vertical resolution of around 3 m. By analyzing humidity and δD(H2O) correlations we were able to identify different layers of air masses with specific isotopic signatures. The results are discussed.

  2. Engineering a laser remote sensor for atmospheric pressure and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.; Korb, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A system for the remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature is described. Resonant lines in the 7600 Angstrom oxygen A band region are used and an organic dye laser beam is tuned to measure line absorption changes with temperature or pressure. A reference beam outside this band is also transmitted for calibration. Using lidar techniques, profiling of these parameters with altitude can be accomplished.

  3. Airborne spacecraft - A remotely powered, high-altitude RPV for environmental applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngblood, J. W.; Darnell, W. L.; Johnson, R. W.; Harriss, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A high-altitude, unmanned, propeller-driven electric airplane is proposed for remote sensing of environmental phenomena. With motive power from surface-mounted solar arrays or microwave receivers, flight endurance of weeks to months could be anticipated. The proposed system offers unique capability for monitoring oceanic and atmospheric characteristics on local or regional scales. Coastal marine and tropospheric research activities, which require temporal resolutions of 2-72 hours, would be prime application areas. Potential missions might include the monitoring of ocean disposals, episodic marine biological events, and river/ocean interactions. Preliminary sizing and performance calculations are presented along with possible mission scenarios and payload complements.

  4. A spectroradiometer for airborne remote sensing. [for geological, vegetation and hydrological mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y.; Collins, W.

    1978-01-01

    A remote sensing system for use in light aircraft is discussed with attention to its applications in measuring geologic zones of alteration, vegetation canopies, and the spectral properties of water bodies. A parallel electro-optical input spectroradiometer configuration with 500 channels operating in the 400-1100 nm region is described. A resolution of 18 meters square from an altitude of 600 m at 200 kmh is obtained with 4-digit spectral radiance data at 2.5 spectra/sec on a 9-track tape in computer compatible format.

  5. Inductive Coupling Method for Remote Powering of Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-03

    expensive wiring harnesses . [0005] The wiring harnesses can add significant weight to the vessel and each power connection from the harness to a...sensor requires a penetration through the hull. The wiring harnesses and penetrations can add significantly to the costs of the vessel. Additionally, each

  6. REMOTE DETECTION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION USING FLUIDIZED SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Narasi Sridhar; Garth Tormoen; Ashok Sabata

    2005-10-31

    Pipelines present a unique challenge to monitoring because of the great geographical distances they cover, their burial depth, their age, and the need to keep the product flowing without much interruption. Most other engineering structures that require monitoring do not pose such combined challenges. In this regard, a pipeline system can be considered analogous to the blood vessels in the human body. The human body has an extensive ''pipeline'' through which blood and other fluids are transported. The brain can generally sense damage to the system at any location and alert the body to provide temporary repair, unless the damage is severe. This is accomplished through a vast network of fixed and floating sensors combined with a vast and extremely complex communication/decision making system. The project described in this report mimics the distributed sensor system of our body, albeit in a much more rudimentary fashion. Internal corrosion is an important factor in pipeline integrity management. At present, the methods to assess internal corrosion in pipelines all have certain limitations. In-line inspection tools are costly and cannot be used in all pipelines. Because there is a significant time interval between inspections, any impact due to upsets in pipeline operations can be missed. Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA) is a procedure that can be used to identify locations of possible internal corrosion. However, the uncertainties in the procedure require excavation and location of damage using more detailed inspection tools. Non-intrusive monitoring techniques can be used to monitor internal corrosion, but these tools also require pipeline excavation and are limited in the spatial extent of corrosion they can examine. Therefore, a floating sensor system that can deposit at locations of water accumulation and communicate the corrosion information to an external location is needed. To accomplish this, the project is divided into four main tasks related to

  7. Land cover classification based on object-oriented with airborne lidar and high spectral resolution remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfang; Liu, Zhengjun; Xu, Qiangqiang; Ren, Haicheng; Zhou, Xingyu; Yuan, Yonghua

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve land cover classification accuracy of the coastal tidal wetland area in Dafeng, this paper take advantage of hyper-spectral remote sensing image with high spatial resolution airborne Lidar data. The introduction of feature extraction, band selection and nDSM models to reduce the dimension of the original image. After segmentation process that combining FNEA segmentation with spectral differences segmentation method, the paper finalize the study area through the establishment of the rule set classification of land cover classification. The results show that the proposed classification for land cover classification accuracy has improved significantly, including housing, shadow, water, vegetation classification of high precision. That is to say that the method can meet the needs of land cover classification of the coastal tidal wetland area in Dafeng. This innovation is the introduction of principal component analysis, and the use of characteristic index, shape and characteristics of various types of data extraction nDSM feature to improve the accuracy and speed of land cover classification.

  8. Remote sensing measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio in the planetary boundary layer using cloud slicing with airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Anand K.; Mao, Jianping; Abshire, James B.; Allan, Graham R.

    2015-03-01

    We have measured the CO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR) within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using cloud slicing with an airborne pulsed integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar from flight altitudes of up to 13 km. During a flight over Iowa in summer 2011, simultaneous measurement of the optical range and CO2 absorption to clouds and the ground were made using time-resolved detection of pulse echoes from each scattering surface. We determined the CO2 absorption in the PBL by differencing the two lidar-measured absorption line shapes, one to a broken shallow cumulus cloud layer located at the top of the PBL and the other to the ground. Solving for the CO2 VMR in the PBL and that of the free troposphere, we measured a ≈15 ppm (4%) drawdown in the PBL. Both CO2 VMRs were within ≈3 ppm of in situ CO2 profile measurements. We have also demonstrated cloud slicing using scatter from thin, diffuse cirrus clouds and cumulus clouds, which allowed solving for the CO2 VMR for three vertical layers. The technique and retrieval algorithm are applicable to a space-based lidar instrument as well as to lidar IPDA measurements of other trace gases. Thus, lidar cloud slicing also offers promise toward space-based remote sensing of vertical trace gas profiles in the atmosphere using a variety of clouds.

  9. Sediment grain size estimation using airborne remote sensing, field sampling, and robust statistic.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Elena; Pereda, Raúl; Luis, Julio Manuel de; Medina, Raúl; Viguri, Javier

    2011-10-01

    Remote sensing has been used since the 1980s to study parameters in relation with coastal zones. It was not until the beginning of the twenty-first century that it started to acquire imagery with good temporal and spectral resolution. This has encouraged the development of reliable imagery acquisition systems that consider remote sensing as a water management tool. Nevertheless, the spatial resolution that it provides is not adapted to carry out coastal studies. This article introduces a new methodology for estimating the most fundamental physical property of intertidal sediment, the grain size, in coastal zones. The study combines hyperspectral information (CASI-2 flight), robust statistic, and simultaneous field work (chemical and radiometric sampling), performed over Santander Bay, Spain. Field data acquisition was used to build a spectral library in order to study different atmospheric correction algorithms for CASI-2 data and to develop algorithms to estimate grain size in an estuary. Two robust estimation techniques (MVE and MCD multivariate M-estimators of location and scale) were applied to CASI-2 imagery, and the results showed that robust adjustments give acceptable and meaningful algorithms. These adjustments have given the following R(2) estimated results: 0.93 in the case of sandy loam contribution, 0.94 for the silty loam, and 0.67 for clay loam. The robust statistic is a powerful tool for large dataset.

  10. A magnetostatic-coupling based remote query sensor for environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Stoyanov, P. G.; Liu, Y.; Tong, C.; Ong, K. G.; Loiselle, K.; Shaw, M.; Doherty, S. A.; Seitz, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of in situ, remotely monitored magnetism-based sensor is presented that is comprised of an array of magnetically soft, magnetostatically-coupled ferromagnetic thin-film elements or particles combined with a chemically responsive material that swells or shrinks in response to the analyte of interest. As the chemically responsive material changes size the distance between the ferromagnetic elements changes, altering the inter-element magnetostatic coupling. This in turn changes the coercive force of the sensor, the amplitude of the voltage spikes detected in nearby pick-up coils upon magnetization reversal and the number of higher-order harmonics generated by the flux reversal. Since the sensor is monitored through changes in magnetic flux, no physical connections such as wires or cables are needed to obtain sensor information, nor is line of sight alignment required as with laser telemetry; the sensors can be detected from within sealed, opaque or thin metallic enclosures.

  11. A remote sensor for detecting methane based on palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Li, Guomin

    2013-07-10

    The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID), and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 µm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs) are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI) and the comparative analog identifier (∆AID). Results validate the sensor's ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ∆AID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm.

  12. REMOTE, a Wireless Sensor Network Based System to Monitor Rowing Performance

    PubMed Central

    Llosa, Jordi; Vilajosana, Ignasi; Vilajosana, Xavier; Navarro, Nacho; Suriñach, Emma; Marquès, Joan Manuel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we take a hard look at the performance of REMOTE, a sensor network based application that provides a detailed picture of a boat movement, individual rower performance, or his/her performance compared with other crew members. The application analyzes data gathered with a WSN strategically deployed over a boat to obtain information on the boat and oar movements. Functionalities of REMOTE are compared to those of RowX [1] outdoor instrument, a commercial wired sensor instrument designed for similar purposes. This study demonstrates that with smart geometrical configuration of the sensors, rotation and translation of the oars and boat can be obtained. Three different tests are performed: laboratory calibration allows us to become familiar with the accelerometer readings and validate the theory, ergometer tests which help us to set the acquisition parameters, and on boat tests shows the application potential of this technologies in sports. PMID:22423204

  13. A 868MHz-based wireless sensor network for ground truthing of soil moisture for a hyperspectral remote sensing campaign - design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näthe, Paul; Becker, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture and plant available water are important environmental parameters that affect plant growth and crop yield. Hence, they are significant parameters for vegetation monitoring and precision agriculture. However, validation through ground-based soil moisture measurements is necessary for accessing soil moisture, plant canopy temperature, soil temperature and soil roughness with airborne hyperspectral imaging systems in a corresponding hyperspectral imaging campaign as a part of the INTERREG IV A-Project SMART INSPECTORS. At this point, commercially available sensors for matric potential, plant available water and volumetric water content are utilized for automated measurements with smart sensor nodes which are developed on the basis of open-source 868MHz radio modules, featuring a full-scale microcontroller unit that allows an autarkic operation of the sensor nodes on batteries in the field. The generated data from each of these sensor nodes is transferred wirelessly with an open-source protocol to a central node, the so-called "gateway". This gateway collects, interprets and buffers the sensor readings and, eventually, pushes the data-time series onto a server-based database. The entire data processing chain from the sensor reading to the final storage of data-time series on a server is realized with open-source hardware and software in such a way that the recorded data can be accessed from anywhere through the internet. It will be presented how this open-source based wireless sensor network is developed and specified for the application of ground truthing. In addition, the system's perspectives and potentials with respect to usability and applicability for vegetation monitoring and precision agriculture shall be pointed out. Regarding the corresponding hyperspectral imaging campaign, results from ground measurements will be discussed in terms of their contributing aspects to the remote sensing system. Finally, the significance of the wireless sensor

  14. Intercomparison of Land Surface Remote Sensing Products From Various Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobron, N.; Pinty, B.; Mélin, F.; Taberner, M.; Verstraete, M.; Widlowski, J.

    2003-12-01

    The biophysical activities on land surfaces are documented from spectral measurements made in space. Advances in the understanding of radiation transfer and availability of higher performance instruments have lead to the development of a new generation of geophysical products able to provide reliable, accurate information on the state and evolution of terrestrial environments. Specifically, a series of optimized algorithms have been developed to estimate the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) for various instruments. Such an approach allows the synergistic use of FAPAR products derived from different sensors and the construction of global FAPAR time series independent from the life time of these specific sensors. The outline of the methodology will be summarized and the preliminary results of an inter-comparison exercise conducted with SeaWiFS, MERIS(ENVISAT), MISR(Terra) and MODIS(Terra) products will be presented.

  15. EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

    2006-10-12

    Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

  16. Battlefield innovation: a case-study of remote sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orson, Jay A.; Hague, Tyler N.

    2007-10-01

    Evolving threats encountered by coalition forces in Operation Iraqi Freedom drive the need for innovations in airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities. In many cases, disruptive capabilities are created by linking existing technologies and new radical technologies in a novel way. Some of the radical technologies used in achieving these disruptive capabilities are existing prototypes or one-of-a-kind systems that are thrust into the field to quickly react to emerging threats. Horned Owl is one such rapidly developed innovative technical solution designed to meet immediate battlefield needs. This paper focuses on two key areas of this initiative. The first is the innovation champion establishing a collaborative environment which fosters creativity and allows the project to mature the disruptive capability. The second is the practical implication, or challenges of deploying experimental systems in a battlefield environment. Discussions of these two areas provide valuable lessons to guide future innovation champions when presented with the dual task of balancing system maturation with meeting operational demand. Contents of this paper are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Air Force.

  17. Remote sensing of wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roller, N. E. G.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of using remote sensing to inventory wetlands and the related topics of proper inventory design and data collection are discussed. The material presented shows that aerial photography is the form of remote sensing from which the greatest amount of wetlands information can be derived. For extensive, general-purpose wetlands inventories, however, the use of LANDSAT data may be more cost-effective. Airborne multispectral scanners and radar are, in the main, too expensive to use - unless the information that these sensors alone can gather remotely is absolutely required. Multistage sampling employing space and high altitude remote sensing data in the initial stages appears to be an efficient survey strategy for gathering non-point specific wetlands inventory data over large areas. The operational role of remote sensing insupplying inventory data for application to several typical wetlands management problems is illustrated by summary descriptions of past ERIM projects.

  18. A tunable MWIR laser remote sensor for chemical vapor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Thomas L.; Noblett, Patricia M.; Otting, William D.

    1998-01-01

    The Air Force vision for Global Virtual Presence suggests a need for active remote sensing systems that provide both global coverage and the ability to detect multiple gaseous chemical species at low concentration from a significant standoff distance. The system will need to have acceptable weight, volume, and power characteristics, as well as a long operating lifetime for integration with various surveillance platforms. Laser based remote sensing systems utilizing the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique are promising for long range chemical sensing applications. Recent advancements in pulsed, diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) technology and in tunable optical parametric oscillators (OPO) make broadly tunable laser transmitters possible for the DIAL system. Also the characteristic narrow spectral bandwidth of these laser devices provides high measurement sensitivity and spectral selectivity with the potential to avoid interfering species. Rocketdyne has built and tested a tunable, midwave infrared (MWIR) DIAL system using DPSSL/OPO technology. The key to the system is a novel tuning and line narrowing technology developed for the OPO. The tuning system can quickly adjust to the desired wavelength and precisely locate a narrow spectral feature of interest. Once the spectral feature is located, a rapid dither tuning technique is employed. The laser pulses are tuned ``on'' and ``off'' the spectral resonance of a molecule with precise and repeatable performance as required to make the DIAL measurement. To date, the breadboard system has been tested by measuring methane, ethane, and sulfur dioxide in a calibrated gas cell at a range of 60 meters.

  19. Integrated Active Fire Retrievals and Biomass Burning Emissions Using Complementary Near-Coincident Ground, Airborne and Spaceborne Sensor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Wilfrid; Ellicott, Evan; Ichoku, Charles; Ellison, Luke; Dickinson, Matthew B.; Ottmar, Roger D.; Clements, Craig; Hall, Dianne; Ambrosia, Vincent; Kremens, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ground, airborne and spaceborne data were collected for a 450 ha prescribed fire implemented on 18 October 2011 at the Henry W. Coe State Park in California. The integration of various data elements allowed near coincident active fire retrievals to be estimated. The Autonomous Modular Sensor-Wildfire (AMS) airborne multispectral imaging system was used as a bridge between ground and spaceborne data sets providing high quality reference information to support satellite fire retrieval error analyses and fire emissions estimates. We found excellent agreement between peak fire radiant heat flux data (less than 1% error) derived from near-coincident ground radiometers and AMS. Both MODIS and GOES imager active fire products were negatively influenced by the presence of thick smoke, which was misclassified as cloud by their algorithms, leading to the omission of fire pixels beneath the smoke, and resulting in the underestimation of their retrieved fire radiative power (FRP) values for the burn plot, compared to the reference airborne data. Agreement between airborne and spaceborne FRP data improved significantly after correction for omission errors and atmospheric attenuation, resulting in as low as 5 difference between AquaMODIS and AMS. Use of in situ fuel and fire energy estimates in combination with a collection of AMS, MODIS, and GOES FRP retrievals provided a fuel consumption factor of 0.261 kg per MJ, total energy release of 14.5 x 10(exp 6) MJ, and total fuel consumption of 3.8 x 10(exp 6) kg. Fire emissions were calculated using two separate techniques, resulting in as low as 15 difference for various species

  20. Airborne passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from oil fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Initial results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Kolyer, Richard W.; Thompson, David R.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Fladeland, Matthew; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2015-04-01

    On several flights performed over the Kern River, Kern Front, and Poso Creek Oil Fields in California between June 3 and September 4, 2014, in the framework of the CO2 and MEthane Experiment (COMEX) - a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of the HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities - the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) remote sensing instrument (operated by the University of Bremen in cooperation with the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ) detected large-scale, high-concentration, methane plumes. MAMAP was installed for the flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer (operated by the NASA Ames Research Center, ARC), a 5-hole turbulence probe and an atmospheric measurement package (operated by CIRPAS), measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point, and other atmospheric parameters. Some of the flights were accompanied by the next generation of the Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG), operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, installed aboard a second Twin Otter aircraft (operated by Twin Otter International). Data collected with the in-situ GHG analyzer were used for validation of the MAMAP and AVIRIS-NG remotely sensed data. The in-situ measurements were acquired in vertical cross sections of the discovered plumes at fixed distances downwind of the sources. Emission rates are estimated from both the remote and in-situ data using wind information from the turbulence probe together with ground-based wind data from the nearby airport. Remote sensing and in-situ data as well as initial flux estimates for selected flights will be presented.

  1. Evaluation of Surface Energy Balance models for mapping evapotranspiration using very high resolution airborne remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, George

    Agriculture is the largest (90%) consumer of all fresh water in the world. The consumptive use of water by vegetation represented by the process evapotranspiration (ET) has a vital role in the dynamics of water, carbon and energy fluxes of the biosphere. Consequently, mapping ET is essential for making water a sustainable resource and also for monitoring ecosystem response to water stress and changing climate. Over the past three decades, numerous thermal remote sensing based ET mapping algorithms were developed and these have brought a significant theoretical and technical advancement in the spatial modeling of ET. Though these algorithms provided a robust, economical, and efficient tool for ET estimations at field and regional scales, yet the uncertainties in flux estimations were large, making evaluation a difficult task. The main objective of this study was to evaluate and improve the performance of widely used remote sensing based energy balance models, namely: the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution and with Internalized Calibration (METRIC), and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS). Data used in this study was collected as part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional field campaign BEAREX (Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote Sensing Experiment) that was conducted during 2007 and 2008 summer cropping seasons at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) in Bushland, Texas. Seventeen high resolution remote sensing images taken from multispectral sensors onboard aircraft and field measurements of the agro-meteorological variables from the campaign were used for model evaluation and improvement. Overall relative error measured in terms of mean absolute percent difference (MAPD) for instantaneous ET (mm h -1) were 22.7%, 23.2%, and 12.6% for SEBAL, METRIC, and SEBS, respectively. SEBAL and METRIC performances for irrigated fields representing higher ET

  2. Quantification of methane emission rates from coal mine ventilation shafts using airborne remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krings, T.; Gerilowski, K.; Buchwitz, M.; Hartmann, J.; Sachs, T.; Erzinger, J.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2012-10-01

    The quantification of emissions of the greenhouse gas methane is essential for attributing the roles of anthropogenic activity and natural phenomena in global climate change. Our current measurement systems and networks whilst having improved during the last decades, are deficient in many respects. For example, the emissions from localised and point sources such as landfills or fossil fuel exploration sites are not readily assessed. A tool developed to better understand point sources of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane is the optical remote sensing instrument MAMAP, operated from aircraft. After a recent instrument modification, retrievals of the column averaged dry air mole fractions for methane XCH4 (or for carbon dioxide XCO2) derived from MAMAP data, have a precision of about 0.4% or better and thus can be used to infer emission rate estimates using an optimal estimation inverse Gaussian plume model or a simple integral approach. CH4 emissions from two coal mine ventilation shafts in Western Germany surveyed during the AIRMETH 2011 measurement campaign are used as examples to demonstrate and assess the value of MAMAP data for quantifying CH4 from point sources. While the knowledge of the wind is an important input parameter in the retrieval of emissions from point sources and is generally extracted from models, additional information from a turbulence probe operated on-board the same aircraft was utilised to enhance the quality of the emission estimates. Although flight patterns were optimised for remote sensing measurements, data from an in-situ analyser for CH4 were found to be in good agreement with retrieved dry columns of CH4 from MAMAP and could be used to investigate and refine underlying assumptions for the inversion procedures. With respect to the total emissions of the mine at the time of the overflight, the inferred emission rate of 50.4 kt CH4 yr-1 has a difference of less than 1% compared to officially reported values by the mine

  3. Spacecraft technology. [development of satellites and remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Developments in spacecraft technology are discussed with emphasis on the Explorer satellite program. The subjects considered include the following: (1) nutational behavior of the Explorer-45 satellite, (2) panoramic sensor development, (3) onboard camera signal processor for Explorer satellites, and (4) microcircuit development. Information on the zero gravity testing of heat pipes is included. Procedures for cleaning heat treated aluminum heat pipes are explained. The development of a five-year magnetic tape, an accurate incremental angular encoder, and a blood freezing apparatus for leukemia research are also discussed.

  4. Portable remote laser sensor for methane leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Hinkley, E. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A portable laser system for remote detection of methane gas leaks and concentrations is disclosed. The system transmitter includes first and second lasers, tuned respectively to a wavelength coincident with a strong absorption line of methane and a reference wavelength which is weakly absorbed by methane gas. The system receiver includes a spherical mirror for collecting the reflected laser radiation and focusing the collected radiation through a narrowband optical filter onto an optial detector. The filter is tuned to the wavelength of the two lasers, and rejects background noise. The output of the optical detector is processed by a lock-in detector synchronized to the chopper, and which measures the difference between the first wavelength signal and the reference wavelength signal.

  5. Husbandry Trace Gas Emissions from a Dairy Complex By Mobile in Situ and Airborne and Spaceborne Remote Sensing: A Comex Campaign Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, I.; Tratt, D. M.; Bovensmann, H.; Buckland, K. N.; Burrows, J. P.; Frash, J.; Gerilowski, K.; Iraci, L. T.; Johnson, P. D.; Kolyer, R.; Krautwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Leen, J. B.; Hu, C.; Melton, C.; Vigil, S. A.; Yates, E. L.; Zhang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field study reviews on the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) found significant underestimation from fossil fuel industry and husbandry. The 2014 COMEX campaign seeks to develop methods to derive CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) from remote sensing data by combining hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages synergies between high spatial resolution HSI column abundance maps and moderate spectral/spatial resolution NIS. Airborne husbandry data were collected for the Chino dairy complex (East Los Angeles Basin) by NIS-MAMAP, HSI-Mako thermal-infrared (TIR); AVIRIS NG shortwave IR (SWIR), with in situ surface mobile-AMOG Surveyor (AutoMObile greenhouse Gas)-and airborne in situ from a Twin Otter and the AlphaJet. AMOG Surveyor uses in situ Integrated Cavity Off Axis Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, H2O, H2S and NH3 at 5-10 Hz, 2D winds, and thermal anomaly in an adapted commuter car. OA-ICOS provides high precision and accuracy with excellent stability. NH3 and CH4 emissions were correlated at dairy size-scales but not sub-dairy scales in surface and Mako data, showing fine-scale structure and large variations between the numerous dairies in the complex (herd ~200,000-250,000) embedded in an urban setting. Emissions hotspots were consistent between surface and airborne surveys. In June, surface and MAMAP data showed a weak overall plume, while surface and Mako data showed a stronger plume in late (hotter) July. Multiple surface plume transects using NH3 fingerprinting showed East and then NE advection out of the LA Basin consistent with airborne data. Long-term trends were investigated in satellite data. This study shows the value of synergistically combined NH3 and CH4 remote sensing data to the task of CH4 source attribution using airborne and space-based remote sensing (IASI for NH3) and top of atmosphere sensitivity calculations for Sentinel V and Carbon Sat (CH4).

  6. Magnetically remote-controlled optical sensor spheres for monitoring oxygen or pH.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, Günter; Koren, Klaus; Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, Ingo

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic sensor macrospheres (MagSeMacs), i.e., stainless steel spheres coated with optical chemical sensors, are presented as an alternative to existing optical sensor patches and fiber-optical dip-probes. Such spheres can either be reversibly attached to the tip of an optical fiber (dip-probe) or trapped inside a vessel for read-out through the side wall. Moving the magnetic separator at the exterior enables measurements at varying positions with a single sensor. Moreover, the sensor's replacement is rapid and contactless. We measured dissolved oxygen or pH in stirred liquids, rotating flasks, and 24-well plates with a SensorDish-reader device for parallel cell culture monitoring. In these applications, MagSeMacs proved to be advantageous over conventional sensor patches and magnetic optical sensor particles because of their magnetism, spherical shape, reflectance, and size. These properties resulted in strong but reversible fixation, magnetic remote-controllability, short response times, high signal intensities, and simplified handling.

  7. An Optical Fibre Depth (Pressure) Sensor for Remote Operated Vehicles in Underwater Applications.

    PubMed

    Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Omerdic, Edin; Capocci, Romano; Lewis, Elfed; Newe, Thomas; Leen, Gabriel; Toal, Daniel; Dooly, Gerard

    2017-02-19

    A miniature sensor for accurate measurement of pressure (depth) with temperature compensation in the ocean environment is described. The sensor is based on an optical fibre Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) combined with a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG). The EFPI provides pressure measurements while the Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) provides temperature measurements. The sensor is mechanically robust, corrosion-resistant and suitable for use in underwater applications. The combined pressure and temperature sensor system was mounted on-board a mini remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) in order to monitor the pressure changes at various depths. The reflected optical spectrum from the sensor was monitored online and a pressure or temperature change caused a corresponding observable shift in the received optical spectrum. The sensor exhibited excellent stability when measured over a 2 h period underwater and its performance is compared with a commercially available reference sensor also mounted on the ROV. The measurements illustrates that the EFPI/FBG sensor is more accurate for depth measurements (depth of ~0.020 m).

  8. An Optical Fibre Depth (Pressure) Sensor for Remote Operated Vehicles in Underwater Applications

    PubMed Central

    Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Omerdic, Edin; Capocci, Romano; Lewis, Elfed; Newe, Thomas; Leen, Gabriel; Toal, Daniel; Dooly, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    A miniature sensor for accurate measurement of pressure (depth) with temperature compensation in the ocean environment is described. The sensor is based on an optical fibre Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) combined with a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG). The EFPI provides pressure measurements while the Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) provides temperature measurements. The sensor is mechanically robust, corrosion-resistant and suitable for use in underwater applications. The combined pressure and temperature sensor system was mounted on-board a mini remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) in order to monitor the pressure changes at various depths. The reflected optical spectrum from the sensor was monitored online and a pressure or temperature change caused a corresponding observable shift in the received optical spectrum. The sensor exhibited excellent stability when measured over a 2 h period underwater and its performance is compared with a commercially available reference sensor also mounted on the ROV. The measurements illustrates that the EFPI/FBG sensor is more accurate for depth measurements (depth of ~0.020 m). PMID:28218727

  9. Quantifying geomorphic and riparian land cover changes either side of a large flood event using airborne remote sensing: River Tay, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Gilvear, David J.

    1999-09-01

    The potential of high resolution multi-spectral airborne remote sensing to detect and quantify changes in channel morphology and riparian land cover are illustrated. The River Tay is a partially embanked wandering gravel bed river, and Airborne Thematic Mapper data, which collect reflectance in the visible, near, mid and thermal infrared, were acquired in 1992 and 1994 either side of a 1:65 recurrence-interval flood event. Imagery was radiometrically, atmospherically and geometrically corrected in order to minimise atmospheric and geometric changes between the 1992 and 1994 scenes. A maximum likelihood classifier was then used on each image and change was quantitatively mapped using a classification comparison approach. Bathymetric mapping was undertaken by applying a Lyzenga algorithm to ATM bands 5, 6 and 8 to account for an exponential decrease in electromagnetic radiation penetration through the water column with depth. Despite the magnitude of the flood event, no major changes in channel position or form occurred but the change detection algorithms revealed subtle changes not observed in the field. Bar head accretion, bar tail formation and extension, bar dissection, localised bank erosion and the overriding of low level vegetated islands by gravel lobes were the main forms of change. On the floodplain, flood embankment failures resulted in fans of sands and gravels on agricultural land. More generally, the study reveals the potential for using airborne remote sensing to detect change in fluvial systems and as a mutually complementary tool to field survey.

  10. Multi-resolution processing for fractal analysis of airborne remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggi, S.; Quattrochi, D.; Lam, N.

    1992-01-01

    Fractal geometry is increasingly becoming a useful tool for modeling natural phenomenon. As an alternative to Euclidean concepts, fractals allow for a more accurate representation of the nature of complexity in natural boundaries and surfaces. Since they are characterized by self-similarity, an ideal fractal surface is scale-independent; i.e. at different scales a fractal surface looks the same. This is not exactly true for natural surfaces. When viewed at different spatial resolutions parts of natural surfaces look alike in a statistical manner and only for a limited range of scales. Images acquired by NASA's Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner are used to compute the fractal dimension as a function of spatial resolution. Three methods are used to determine the fractal dimension - Schelberg's line-divider method, the variogram method, and the triangular prism method. A description of these methods and the results of applying these methods to a remotely-sensed image is also presented. Five flights were flown in succession at altitudes of 2 km (low), 6 km (mid), 12 km (high), and then back again at 6 km and 2 km. The area selected was the Ross Barnett reservoir near Jackson, Mississippi. The mission was flown during the predawn hours of 1 Feb. 1992. Radiosonde data was collected for that duration to profile the characteristics of the atmosphere. This corresponds to 3 different pixel sizes - 5m, 15m, and 30m. After, simulating different spatial sampling intervals within the same image for each of the 3 image sets, the results are cross-correlated to compare the extent of detail and complexity that is obtained when data is taken at lower spatial intervals.

  11. Remote sensing of land scenarios with an airborne 94-GHz synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, Helmut; Makaruschka, R.; Baars, E. Peter

    1996-06-01

    The scattering process of electromagnetic waves is dominated by the match between wavelength and the geometric dimensions of surface structures. With respect to the microwave radar bands millimeter-waves are better matched to small surface features of terrain. Therefore this frequency band is able to gain additional information on the terrain of interest. For high resolution imaging SAR is the favorite solution also for millimeter-wave frequencies. Compared to more classical radar bands millimeter-waves offer advantages in the SAR processing, because due to the higher primary resolution at a given antenna aperture sources of image distortions such as range migration or depth of focus can be neglected at these frequencies. Moreover the inherently short aperture time for a given resolution improves the relation to the time constant of flight instabilities and makes motion compensation a simple process. A coherent, polarimetric, high range resolution radar, operating at a nominal frequency of 94 GHz, has been installed onboard an aircraft to allow remote sensing measurements in a side looking synthetic aperture approach. The radar-raw-data were registered together with time code and inertial data of the aircraft and later on evaluated by an off-line SAR-processor. The resulting images then had to undergo an automatic recognition process to extract certain complex targets using a knowledge based production system. The paper describes the measurement system and discusses the evaluation procedures with emphasis on the applied SAR algorithm. Examples of radar images at 94 GHz are shown and samples of pattern recognition derived from the SAR images are shown.

  12. Dynamics of plankton populations in upwelling areas. [by remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szekielda, K.

    1974-01-01

    Recent investigations of the upwelling area along the NW Coast of Africa which include studies with satellites are discussed. The detection of patchiness in temperature and plankton distribution in the upwelling area is of special interest because they can be investigated from space synoptically with repeated coverage. The recent satellite missions provide recordings in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum (EMR) as well as in the visible part. The information from those two parts of the EMR is useful for establishing the sea surface temperature and plankton distribution in upwelling areas. The temperature distribution as observed with infrared sensors and the patchiness in plankton patterns are discussed as observed with the most recent satellites, namely the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) and NOAA-2.

  13. Spatially explicit modelling of forest structure and function using airborne lidar and hyperspectral remote sensing data combined with micrometeorological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Valerie Anne

    This research models canopy-scale photosynthesis at the Groundhog River Flux Site through the integration of high-resolution airborne remote sensing data and micrometeorological measurements collected from a flux tower. Light detection and ranging (lidar) data are analysed to derive models of tree structure, including: canopy height, basal area, crown closure, and average aboveground biomass. Lidar and hyperspectral remote sensing data are used to model canopy chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoid concentrations (known to be good indicators of photosynthesis). The integration of lidar and hyperspectral data is applied to derive spatially explicit models of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR) absorbed by the canopy as well as a species classification for the site. These products are integrated with flux tower meteorological measurements (i.e., air temperature and global solar radiation) collected on a continuous basis over 2004 to apply the C-Fix model of carbon exchange to the site. Results demonstrate that high resolution lidar and lidar-hyperspectral integration techniques perform well in the boreal mixedwood environment. Lidar models are well correlated with forest structure, despite the complexities introduced in the mixedwood case (e.g., r2=0.84, 0.89, 0.60, and 0.91, for mean dominant height, basal area, crown closure, and average aboveground biomass). Strong relationships are also shown for canopy scale chlorophyll/carotenoid concentration analysis using integrated lidar-hyperspectral techniques (e.g., r2=0.84, 0.84, and 0.82 for Chl(a), Chl(a+b), and Chl(b)). Examination of the spatially explicit models of fPAR reveal distinct spatial patterns which become increasingly apparent throughout the season due to the variation in species groupings (and canopy chlorophyll concentration) within the 1 km radius surrounding the flux tower. Comparison of results from the modified local-scale version of the C-Fix model to tower gross ecosystem

  14. Identifying trout refuges in the Indian and Hudson Rivers in northern New York through airborne thermal infrared remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ernst, Anne G.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Calef, Fred J.; Freehafer, Douglas A.; Kremens, Robert L.

    2015-10-09

    The locations and sizes of potential cold-water refuges for trout were examined in 2005 along a 27-kilometer segment of the Indian and Hudson Rivers in northern New York to evaluate the extent of refuges, the effects of routine flow releases from an impoundment, and how these refuges and releases might influence trout survival in reaches that otherwise would be thermally stressed. This river segment supports small populations of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), brown trout (Salmo trutta), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and also receives regular releases of reservoir-surface waters to support rafting during the summer, when water temperatures in both the reservoir and the river frequently exceed thermal thresholds for trout survival. Airborne thermal infrared imaging was supplemented with continuous, in-stream temperature loggers to identify potential refuges that may be associated with tributary inflows or groundwater seeps and to define the extent to which the release flows decrease the size of existing refuges. In general, the release flows overwhelmed the refuge areas and greatly decreased the size and number of the areas. Mean water temperatures were unaffected by the releases, but small-scale heterogeneity was diminished. At a larger scale, water temperatures in the upper and lower segments of the reach were consistently warmer than in the middle segment, even during passage of release waters. The inability of remote thermal infrared images to consistently distinguish land from water (in shaded areas) and to detect groundwater seeps (away from the shallow edges of the stream) limited data analysis and the ability to identify potential thermal refuge areas.

  15. Measuring landscape-scale spread and persistence of an invaded submerged plant community from airborne remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria J; Khanna, Shruti; Hestir, Erin L; Greenberg, Jonathan A; Ustin, Susan L

    2016-09-01

    Processes of spread and patterns of persistence of invasive species affect species and communities in the new environment. Predicting future rates of spread is of great interest for timely management decisions, but this depends on models that rely on understanding the processes of invasion and historic observations of spread and persistence. Unfortunately, the rates of spread and patterns of persistence are difficult to model or directly observe, especially when multiple rates of spread and diverse persistence patterns may be co-occurring over the geographic distribution of the invaded ecosystem. Remote sensing systematically acquires data over large areas at fine spatial and spectral resolutions over multiple time periods that can be used to quantify spread processes and persistence patterns. We used airborne imaging spectroscopy data acquired once a year for 5 years from 2004 to 2008 to map an invaded submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) community across 2220 km(2) of waterways in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA, and measured its spread rate and its persistence. Submerged aquatic vegetation covered 13-23 km(2) of the waterways (6-11%) every year. Yearly new growth accounted for 40-60% of the SAV area, ~50% of which survived to following year. Spread rates were overall negative and persistence decreased with time. From this dataset, we were able to identify both radial and saltatorial spread of the invaded SAV in the entire extent of the Delta over time. With both decreasing spread rate and persistence, it is possible that over time the invasion of this SAV community could decrease its ecological impact. A landscape-scale approach allows measurements of all invasion fronts and the spatial anisotropies associated with spread processes and persistence patterns, without spatial interpolation, at locations both proximate and distant to the focus of invasion at multiple points in time.

  16. Remote Raman Sensor System for Testing of Rocks and Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Ismail, Syed; Sanford, Stephen P.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    2007-01-01

    Recent and future explorations of Mars and lunar surfaces through rovers and landers have spawned great interest in developing an instrument that can perform in-situ analysis of minerals on planetary surfaces. Several research groups have anticipated that for such analysis, Raman spectroscopy is the best suited technique because it can unambiguously provide the composition and structure of a material. A remote pulsed Raman spectroscopy system for analyzing minerals was demonstrated at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the University of Hawaii. This system utilizes a 532 nm pulsed laser as an excitation wavelength, and a telescope with a 4-inch aperture for collecting backscattered radiation. A spectrograph equipped with a super notch filter for attenuating Rayleigh scattering is used to analyze the scattered signal. To form the Raman spectrum, the spectrograph utilizes a holographic transmission grating that simultaneously disperses two spectral tracks on the detector for increased spectral range. The spectrum is recorded on an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera system, which provides high gain to allow detection of inherently weak Stokes lines. To evaluate the performance of the system, Raman standards such as calcite and naphthalene are analyzed. Several sets of rock and gemstone samples obtained from Ward s Natural Science are tested using the Raman spectroscopy system. In addition, Raman spectra of combustible substances such acetone and isopropanol are also obtained. Results obtained from those samples and combustible substances are presented.

  17. Development of Novel, Simple, Multianalyte Sensors For Remote Environmental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, Sanfor A.

    1999-06-01

    We will develop simple, inexpensive new chemical sensing materials which can be used as visual color test strips to sensitively and selectively report on the concentration and identity of environmental pollutants such as cations of Pb, U, Pu, Sr, Hg, Cs, Co as well as other species. We will develop inexpensive chemical test strips which can be immersed in water to determine these analytes in the field. We will also develop arrays of these chemical sensing materials which will be attached to fiber optic bundles to be used as rugged multichannel optrodes to simultaneously monitor numerous analytes remotely in hostile environments. These sensing materials are based on the intelligent polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) technology we recently developed. This sensing motif utilizes a mesoscopically periodic array of colloidal particles polymerized into an acrylamide hydrogel. This array Bragg diffracts light in the visible spectral region due to the periodic array of colloidal particles. This material also contains chelating agents for the analytes of interest. When an analyte binds, its charge is immobilized within the acrylamide hydrogel. The resulting Donnan potential causes an osmotic pressure which swells the array proportional to the concentration of analyte bound. The diffracted wavelength shifts and the color changes. The change in the wavelength diffracted reports on the identity and concentration of the target analyte.

  18. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  19. Airborne hyperspectral sensor radiometric self-calibration using near-infrared properties of deep water and vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieux, Kévin; Nouchi, Vincent; Merminod, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    Retrieving the water-leaving reflectance from airborne hyperspectral data implies to deal with three steps. Firstly, the radiance recorded by an airborne sensor comes from several sources: the real radiance of the object, the atmospheric scattering, sky and sun glint and the dark current of the sensor. Secondly, the dispersive element inside the sensor (usually a diffraction grating or a prism) could move during the flight, thus shifting the observed spectra on the wavelengths axis. Thirdly, to compute the reflectance, it is necessary to estimate, for each band, what value of irradiance corresponds to a 100% reflectance. We present here our calibration method, relying on the absorption features of the atmosphere and the near-infrared properties of common materials. By choosing proper flight height and flight lines angle, we can ignore atmospheric and sun glint contributions. Autocorrelation plots allow to identify and reduce the noise in our signals. Then, we compute a signal that represents the high frequencies of the spectrum, to localize the atmospheric absorption peaks (mainly the dioxygen peak around 760 nm). Matching these peaks removes the shift induced by the moving dispersive element. Finally, we use the signal collected over a Lambertian, unit-reflectance surface to estimate the ratio of the system's transmittances to its near-infrared transmittance. This transmittance is computed assuming an average 50% reflectance of the vegetation and nearly 0% for water in the near-infrared. Results show great correlation between the output spectra and ground measurements from a TriOS Ramses and the water-insight WISP-3.

  20. Monitoring Animal Behaviour and Environmental Interactions Using Wireless Sensor Networks, GPS Collars and Satellite Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Handcock, Rebecca N.; Swain, Dave L.; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; Patison, Kym P.; Wark, Tim; Valencia, Philip; Corke, Peter; O'Neill, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Remote monitoring of animal behaviour in the environment can assist in managing both the animal and its environmental impact. GPS collars which record animal locations with high temporal frequency allow researchers to monitor both animal behaviour and interactions with the environment. These ground-based sensors can be combined with remotely-sensed satellite images to understand animal-landscape interactions. The key to combining these technologies is communication methods such as wireless sensor networks (WSNs). We explore this concept using a case-study from an extensive cattle enterprise in northern Australia and demonstrate the potential for combining GPS collars and satellite images in a WSN to monitor behavioural preferences and social behaviour of cattle. PMID:22412327

  1. A manual for inexpensive methods of analyzing and utilizing remote sensor data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elifrits, C. D.; Barr, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Instructions are provided for inexpensive methods of using remote sensor data to assist in the completion of the need to observe the earth's surface. When possible, relative costs were included. Equipment need for analysis of remote sensor data is described, and methods of use of these equipment items are included, as well as advantages and disadvantages of the use of individual items. Interpretation and analysis of stereo photos and the interpretation of typical patterns such as tone and texture, landcover, drainage, and erosional form are described. Similar treatment is given to monoscopic image interpretation, including LANDSAT MSS data. Enhancement techniques are detailed with respect to their application and simple techniques of creating an enhanced data item. Techniques described include additive and subtractive (Diazo processes) color techniques and enlargement of photos or images. Applications of these processes, including mappings of land resources, engineering soils, geology, water resources, environmental conditions, and crops and/or vegetation, are outlined.

  2. Application of remote sensor data to geologic analysis of the Bonanza test site, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Hayden Pass (Orient mine area) includes 60 sq miles of the northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains and San Luis Valley in south-central Colorado. Based on interpretation of the remote sensor data, a geologic map was prepared and compared with a second geologic map, prepared from interpretation of both remote sensor data and field data. Comparison of the two maps gives an indication of the usefulness and reliability of the remote sensor data. The relative utility of color and color infrared photography was tested. The photography was used successfully to locate 75% of all faults in a portion of the geologically complex Bonanza volcanic center and to map and correctly identify 93% of all quaternary deposits and 62% of all areas of tertiary volcanic outcrop. Using a filter wheel photometer, more than 8,600 measurements of band reflectance of several sedimentary rocks were performed. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) the typical spectral reflectance curve shows a gradual increase with increasing wavelength; (2) the average band reflectance is about 0.20; and (3) within a formation, the minimum natural variation is about 0.04, or about 20% of the mean band reflectance.

  3. Nitrogen dioxide observations from the Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) airborne instrument: Retrieval algorithm and measurements during DISCOVER-AQ Texas 2013

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) airborne instrument is a test bed for upcoming air quality satellite instruments that will measure backscattered ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared light from geostationary orbit. GeoTASO flew on the NASA F...

  4. Test-bed for the remote health monitoring system for bridge structures using FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Hyung; Park, Ki-Tae; Joo, Bong-Chul; Hwang, Yoon-Koog

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports on test-bed for the long-term health monitoring system for bridge structures employing fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, which is remotely accessible via the web, to provide real-time quantitative information on a bridge's response to live loading and environmental changes, and fast prediction of the structure's integrity. The sensors are attached on several locations of the structure and connected to a data acquisition system permanently installed onsite. The system can be accessed through remote communication using an optical cable network, through which the evaluation of the bridge behavior under live loading can be allowed at place far away from the field. Live structural data are transmitted continuously to the server computer at the central office. The server computer is connected securely to the internet, where data can be retrieved, processed and stored for the remote web-based health monitoring. Test-bed revealed that the remote health monitoring technology will enable practical, cost-effective, and reliable condition assessment and maintenance of bridge structures.

  5. Evaluation of atmospheric trace constituent sensors operating from remote space and airborne platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, E.; Kindle, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    A laboratory gas analysis system was developed specifically to make trace level measurements of carbon monoxide. To assure that the data collected with this system are correctly aligned with other established methods for making these measurements, an intercalibration study was conducted. The calibration gas was analyzed by the various participating laboratories and found to contain 1.28 ppm CO. Samples were collected at 25 deg, 35 deg, and 45 deg N for profile data to study the variation in concentrations of CO and CH4 as a function of altitude and latitude in continental air over the eastern seaboard of the United States. The experiment was repeated several months later to determine if there were seasonally dependent variations in the CO and CH4 concentrations.

  6. Distinctive Order Based Self-Similarity descriptor for multi-sensor remote sensing image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, Amin; Ebadi, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    Robust, well-distributed and accurate feature matching in multi-sensor remote sensing image is a difficult task duo to significant geometric and illumination differences. In this paper, a robust and effective image matching approach is presented for multi-sensor remote sensing images. The proposed approach consists of three main steps. In the first step, UR-SIFT (Uniform robust scale invariant feature transform) algorithm is applied for uniform and dense local feature extraction. In the second step, a novel descriptor namely Distinctive Order Based Self Similarity descriptor, DOBSS descriptor, is computed for each extracted feature. Finally, a cross matching process followed by a consistency check in the projective transformation model is performed for feature correspondence and mismatch elimination. The proposed method was successfully applied for matching various multi-sensor satellite images as: ETM+, SPOT 4, SPOT 5, ASTER, IRS, SPOT 6, QuickBird, GeoEye and Worldview sensors, and the results demonstrate its robustness and capability compared to common image matching techniques such as SIFT, PIIFD, GLOH, LIOP and LSS.

  7. A remote quantitative Fugl-Meyer assessment framework for stroke patients based on wearable sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Xiong, Daxi; Guo, Liquan; Wang, Jiping

    2016-05-01

    To extend the use of wearable sensor networks for stroke patients training and assessment in non-clinical settings, this paper proposes a novel remote quantitative Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) framework, in which two accelerometer and seven flex sensors were used to monitoring the movement function of upper limb, wrist and fingers. The extreme learning machine based ensemble regression model was established to map the sensor data to clinical FMA scores while the RRelief algorithm was applied to find the optimal features subset. Considering the FMA scale is time-consuming and complicated, seven training exercises were designed to replace the upper limb related 33 items in FMA scale. 24 stroke inpatients participated in the experiments in clinical settings and 5 of them were involved in the experiments in home settings after they left the hospital. Both the experimental results in clinical and home settings showed that the proposed quantitative FMA model can precisely predict the FMA scores based on wearable sensor data, the coefficient of determination can reach as high as 0.917. It also indicated that the proposed framework can provide a potential approach to the remote quantitative rehabilitation training and evaluation.

  8. Remote interrogation of WDM fiber-optic intensity sensors deploying delay lines in the virtual domain.

    PubMed

    Montero, David Sánchez; Vázquez, Carmen

    2013-05-07

    In this work a radio-frequency self-referencing WDM intensity-based fiber-optic sensor operating in reflective configuration and using virtual instrumentation is presented. The use of virtual delay lines at the reception stage, along with novel flexible self-referencing techniques, and using a single frequency, avoids all-optical or electrical-based delay lines approaches. This solution preserves the self-referencing and performance characteristics of the proposed WDM-based optical sensing topology, and leads to a more compact solution with higher flexibility for the multiple interrogation of remote sensing points in a sensor network. Results are presented for a displacement sensor demonstrating the concept feasibility.

  9. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers.

  10. Optical Passive Sensor Calibration for Satellite Remote Sensing and the Legacy of NOAA and NIST Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Datla, Raju; Weinreb, Michael; Rice, Joseph; Johnson, B. Carol; Shirley, Eric; Cao, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the cooperative efforts of scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to improve the calibration of operational satellite sensors for remote sensing of the Earth’s land, atmosphere and oceans. It gives a chronological perspective of the NOAA satellite program and the interactions between the two agencies’ scientists to address pre-launch calibration and issues of sensor performance on orbit. The drive to improve accuracy of measurements has had a new impetus in recent years because of the need for improved weather prediction and climate monitoring. The highlights of this cooperation and strategies to achieve SI-traceability and improve accuracy for optical satellite sensor data are summarized1. PMID:26601030

  11. Bluetooth-based sensor networks for remotely monitoring the physiological signals of a patient.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Xiao, Hannan

    2009-11-01

    Integrating intelligent medical microsensors into a wireless communication network makes it possible to remotely collect physiological signals of a patient, release the patient from being tethered to monitoring medical instrumentations, and facilitate the patient's early hospital discharge. This can further improve life quality by providing continuous observation without the need of disrupting the patient's normal life, thus reducing the risk of infection significantly, and decreasing the cost of the hospital and the patient. This paper discusses the implementation issues, and describes the overall system architecture of our developed Bluetooth sensor network for patient monitoring and the corresponding heart activity sensors. It also presents our approach to developing the intelligent physiological sensor nodes involving integration of Bluetooth radio technology, hardware and software organization, and our solutions for onboard signal processing.

  12. Optical Passive Sensor Calibration for Satellite Remote Sensing and the Legacy of NOAA and NIST Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Datla, Raju; Weinreb, Michael; Rice, Joseph; Johnson, B Carol; Shirley, Eric; Cao, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the cooperative efforts of scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to improve the calibration of operational satellite sensors for remote sensing of the Earth's land, atmosphere and oceans. It gives a chronological perspective of the NOAA satellite program and the interactions between the two agencies' scientists to address pre-launch calibration and issues of sensor performance on orbit. The drive to improve accuracy of measurements has had a new impetus in recent years because of the need for improved weather prediction and climate monitoring. The highlights of this cooperation and strategies to achieve SI-traceability and improve accuracy for optical satellite sensor data are summarized.

  13. TRACE-P OH and HO2 Measurements with the Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) on the DC-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.; Martinez-Harder, Monica; Harder, Hartwig

    2004-01-01

    The Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) measures OH and HO2 from the NASA DC-8. This instrument detects OH by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in detection chambers at low pressure and detects HO2 by chemical conversion with NO followed by LIF detection. The demonstrated detection limit (S/N=2, 5 min.) for OH is about 0.005 pptv (1x10(exp 6)/cu cm at 2 km altitude) and for HO2 is 0.05 pptv (1x10(exp 6)/cu cm at 2 km altitude). We will use ATHOS to measure OH, HO2, and HO2/OH during TRACE- P, analyze these results by comparing them against fundamental relationships and computer models, and publish the analyses. TRACE-P HO(x), measurements will help develop a clearer picture of the atmospheric oxidation and 0 3 production that occur as Asian pollution spreads across the Pacific Ocean.

  14. The development of a power spectral density processor for C and L band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. A., III; Chladek, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A real-time signal processor was developed for the NASA/JSC L-and C-band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems. The purpose of the effort was to reduce ground data processing costs. Conversion of two quadrature channels of data (like and cross polarized) was made to obtain Power Spectral Density (PSD) values. A chirp-z transform (CZT) approach was used to filter the Doppler return signal and improved high frequency and angular resolution was realized. The processors have been tested with record signals and excellent results were obtained. CZT filtering can be readily applied to scatterometers operating at other wavelengths by altering the sample frequency. The design of the hardware and software and the results of the performance tests are described in detail.

  15. Microwave remote sensing of hydrologic parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    A perspective on the implementation of microwave sensors in future airborne and spaceborne observations of hydrologic parameters is presented. The rationale is based on a review of the status and future trends of active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave research as applied to the remote sensing of soil moisture content, snowpack water equivalent, freeze/thaw boundaries, lake ice thickness, surface water area, and the specification of watershed runoff coefficients. Analyses and observations based on data acquired from ground based, airborne and spaceborne platforms, and an evaluation of advantages and limitations of microwave sensors are included.

  16. Using airborne HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) to evaluate model and remote sensing estimates of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenberg, Christian; Kulawik, Susan S.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Chevallier, Frédéric; Daube, Bruce; Kort, Eric A.; O'Dell, Christopher; Olsen, Edward T.; Osterman, Gregory

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, space-borne observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) have been increasingly used in global carbon-cycle studies. In order to obtain added value from space-borne measurements, they have to suffice stringent accuracy and precision requirements, with the latter being less crucial as it can be reduced by just enhanced sample size. Validation of CO2 column-averaged dry air mole fractions (XCO2) heavily relies on measurements of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). Owing to the sparseness of the network and the requirements imposed on space-based measurements, independent additional validation is highly valuable. Here, we use observations from the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) flights from 01/2009 through 09/2011 to validate CO2 measurements from satellites (Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite - GOSAT, Thermal Emission Sounder - TES, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder - AIRS) and atmospheric inversion models (CarbonTracker CT2013B, Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) v13r1). We find that the atmospheric models capture the XCO2 variability observed in HIPPO flights very well, with correlation coefficients (r2) of 0.93 and 0.95 for CT2013B and MACC, respectively. Some larger discrepancies can be observed in profile comparisons at higher latitudes, in particular at 300 hPa during the peaks of either carbon uptake or release. These deviations can be up to 4 ppm and hint at misrepresentation of vertical transport. Comparisons with the GOSAT satellite are of comparable quality, with an r2 of 0.85, a mean bias μ of -0.06 ppm, and a standard deviation σ of 0.45 ppm. TES exhibits an r2 of 0.75, μ of 0.34 ppm, and σ of 1.13 ppm. For AIRS, we find an r2 of 0.37, μ of 1.11 ppm, and σ of 1.46 ppm, with latitude-dependent biases. For these comparisons at least 6, 20, and 50 atmospheric soundings have been averaged for GOSAT, TES, and AIRS

  17. Remote Measurements of Snowfalls in Wakasa Bay, Japan with Airborne Millimeter- wave Imaging Radiometer and Cloud Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Austin, R.; Liu, G. S.; Racette, P. E.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we explore the application of combined millimeter-wave radar and radiometry to remotely measure snowfall. During January-February of 2003, a field campaign was conducted with the NASA P-3 aircraft in Wakasa Bay, Japan for the validation of the AMSRE microwave radiometer on board the Aqua satellite. Among the suite of instruments-on board the P-3 aircraft were the Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the 94 GHz Airborne Cloud Radar (ACR) which is co-owned and operated by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/University of Massachusetts. MIR is a total power, across-track scanning radiometer that measures radiation at the frequencies of 89, 150, 183.3 +/- 1, 183.3 +/- 3, 183.3 +/-7, 220, and 340 GHz. The MIR has flown many successful missions since its completion in May 1992. ACR is a newer instrument and flew only a few times prior to the Wakasa Bay deployment. These two instruments which are particularly well suited for the detection of snowfall functioned normally during flights over snowfall and excellent data sets were acquired. On January 14, 28, and 29 flights were conducted over snowfall events. The MIR and ACR detected strong signals during periods of snowfall over ocean and land. Results from the analysis of these concurrent data sets show that (1) the scattering of millimeter-wave radiation as detected by the MIR is strongly correlated with ACR radar reflectivity profiles, and (2) the scattering is highly frequency-dependent, the higher the frequency the stronger the scattering. Additionally, the more transparent channels of the MIR (e.g., 89, 150, and 220 GHz) are found to display ambiguous signatures of snowfall because of their exposure to surface features. Thus, the snowfall detection and retrievals of snowfall parameters, such as the ice water path (IWP) and median mass diameter (D(me)) are best conducted at the more opaque channels near 183.3 GHz and 340 GHz. Retrievals of IWP and D(me) using

  18. Wireless Source Localization and Signal Collection from an Airborne Symmetric Line Array Sensor Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    predictions, covert sensors could be deployed along known supply lines to monitor enemy troop movements, or RFID sensors could be 8 deployed throughout a...ICACT, Phoenix Park, Korea, Feb. 2009. [28] W. ying and W. Kaixi, “The building of logistics management system using RFID and WSN technology

  19. A generalised random encounter model for estimating animal density with remote sensor data.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tim C D; Moorcroft, Elizabeth A; Freeman, Robin; Rowcliffe, J Marcus; Jones, Kate E

    2015-05-01

    Wildlife monitoring technology is advancing rapidly and the use of remote sensors such as camera traps and acoustic detectors is becoming common in both the terrestrial and marine environments. Current methods to estimate abundance or density require individual recognition of animals or knowing the distance of the animal from the sensor, which is often difficult. A method without these requirements, the random encounter model (REM), has been successfully applied to estimate animal densities from count data generated from camera traps. However, count data from acoustic detectors do not fit the assumptions of the REM due to the directionality of animal signals.We developed a generalised REM (gREM), to estimate absolute animal density from count data from both camera traps and acoustic detectors. We derived the gREM for different combinations of sensor detection widths and animal signal widths (a measure of directionality). We tested the accuracy and precision of this model using simulations of different combinations of sensor detection widths and animal signal widths, number of captures and models of animal movement.We find that the gREM produces accurate estimates of absolute animal density for all combinations of sensor detection widths and animal signal widths. However, larger sensor detection and animal signal widths were found to be more precise. While the model is accurate for all capture efforts tested, the precision of the estimate increases with the number of captures. We found no effect of different animal movement models on the accuracy and precision of the gREM.We conclude that the gREM provides an effective method to estimate absolute animal densities from remote sensor count data over a range of sensor and animal signal widths. The gREM is applicable for count data obtained in both marine and terrestrial environments, visually or acoustically (e.g. big cats, sharks, birds, echolocating bats and cetaceans). As sensors such as camera traps and acoustic

  20. High fidelity remote sensing of snow properties from MODIS and the Airborne Snow Observatory: Snowflakes to Terabytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T.; Mattmann, C. A.; Brodzik, M.; Bryant, A. C.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Ramirez, P.; Rittger, K. E.; Seidel, F. C.; Zimdars, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    The response of the cryosphere to climate forcings largely determines Earth's climate sensitivity. However, our understanding of the strength of the simulated snow albedo feedback varies by a factor of three in the GCMs used in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, mainly caused by uncertainties in snow extent and the albedo of snow-covered areas from imprecise remote sensing retrievals. Additionally, the Western US and other regions of the globe depend predominantly on snowmelt for their water supply to agriculture, industry and cities, hydroelectric power, and recreation, against rising demand from increasing population. In the mountains of the Upper Colorado River Basin, dust radiative forcing in snow shortens snow cover duration by 3-7 weeks. Extended to the entire upper basin, the 5-fold increase in dust load since the late-1800s results in a 3-week earlier peak runoff and a 5% annual loss of total runoff. The remotely sensed dynamics of snow cover duration and melt however have not been factored into hydrological modeling, operational forecasting, and policymaking. To address these deficiencies in our understanding of snow properties, we have developed and validated a suite of MODIS snow products that provide accurate fractional snow covered area and radiative forcing of dust and carbonaceous aerosols in snow. The MODIS Snow Covered Area and Grain size (MODSCAG) and MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) algorithms, developed and transferred from imaging spectroscopy techniques, leverage the complete MODIS surface reflectance spectrum. The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. We have created the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and scanning LiDAR system, to quantify SWE and snow albedo, generate unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete

  1. Extended ocular hazard distances associated with intrabeam aided viewing of the Sandia remote sensing system, airborne aura laser (Big Sky Variant).

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-08-01

    A laser hazard analysis to determine the Extended Ocular Hazard Distances associated with a possible intrabeam aided viewing of the Sandia Remote Sensing System (SRSS) airborne AURA laser (Big Sky Laser Technology) was performed based on the 2000 version of the American National Standard Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for the Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for the Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The AURA lidar system is installed in the instrument pod of a Proteus airframe and is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites. The targets are located at various distances (ranges) from the airborne platform. Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD) and maximum ''eye-safe'' dwell times for various operational altitudes associated with unaided intrabeam exposure of ground personnel were determined and presented in a previous SAND report. Although the target areas are controlled and the use of viewing aids are prohibited there is the possibility of the unauthorized use of viewing aids such as binoculars. This aided viewing hazard analysis is supplemental to the previous SAND report for the laser hazard analysis of the airborne AURA.

  2. Fully switchable multi-wavelength fiber laser based interrogator system for remote and versatile fiber optic sensors multiplexing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo Acha, M.; DeMiguel-Soto, V.; Ortigosa, A.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2014-05-01

    A novel interrogation system for multiple fiber optic sensor technologies and based on a fully-switchable multiwavelength fiber laser (MWFL) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The MWFL can generate any wavelength combination with a minimum emission line distance up to 50 GHz fitting the ITU grid specifications. On the other hand, as proof of concept sensor network, two different networks were multiplexed by using a remote powered by light fiber optic switch. They are based on two different sensor technologies. One of them based on PCF intensity sensors and multiplexed by using an 8 port WDM and the other one based on wavelength temperature/strain FBG sensors.

  3. Secure Authentication for Remote Patient Monitoring with Wireless Medical Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Hayajneh, Thaier; Mohd, Bassam J; Imran, Muhammad; Almashaqbeh, Ghada; Vasilakos, Athanasios V

    2016-03-24

    There is broad consensus that remote health monitoring will benefit all stakeholders in the healthcare system and that it has the potential to save billions of dollars. Among the major concerns that are preventing the patients from widely adopting this technology are data privacy and security. Wireless Medical Sensor Networks (MSNs) are the building blocks for remote health monitoring systems. This paper helps to identify the most challenging security issues in the existing authentication protocols for remote patient monitoring and presents a lightweight public-key-based authentication protocol for MSNs. In MSNs, the nodes are classified into sensors that report measurements about the human body and actuators that receive commands from the medical staff and perform actions. Authenticating these commands is a critical security issue, as any alteration may lead to serious consequences. The proposed protocol is based on the Rabin authentication algorithm, which is modified in this paper to improve its signature signing process, making it suitable for delay-sensitive MSN applications. To prove the efficiency of the Rabin algorithm, we implemented the algorithm with different hardware settings using Tmote Sky motes and also programmed the algorithm on an FPGA to evaluate its design and performance. Furthermore, the proposed protocol is implemented and tested using the MIRACL (Multiprecision Integer and Rational Arithmetic C/C++) library. The results show that secure, direct, instant and authenticated commands can be delivered from the medical staff to the MSN nodes.

  4. Secure Authentication for Remote Patient Monitoring with Wireless Medical Sensor Networks †

    PubMed Central

    Hayajneh, Thaier; Mohd, Bassam J; Imran, Muhammad; Almashaqbeh, Ghada; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.

    2016-01-01

    There is broad consensus that remote health monitoring will benefit all stakeholders in the healthcare system and that it has the potential to save billions of dollars. Among the major concerns that are preventing the patients from widely adopting this technology are data privacy and security. Wireless Medical Sensor Networks (MSNs) are the building blocks for remote health monitoring systems. This paper helps to identify the most challenging security issues in the existing authentication protocols for remote patient monitoring and presents a lightweight public-key-based authentication protocol for MSNs. In MSNs, the nodes are classified into sensors that report measurements about the human body and actuators that receive commands from the medical staff and perform actions. Authenticating these commands is a critical security issue, as any alteration may lead to serious consequences. The proposed protocol is based on the Rabin authentication algorithm, which is modified in this paper to improve its signature signing process, making it suitable for delay-sensitive MSN applications. To prove the efficiency of the Rabin algorithm, we implemented the algorithm with different hardware settings using Tmote Sky motes and also programmed the algorithm on an FPGA to evaluate its design and performance. Furthermore, the proposed protocol is implemented and tested using the MIRACL (Multiprecision Integer and Rational Arithmetic C/C++) library. The results show that secure, direct, instant and authenticated commands can be delivered from the medical staff to the MSN nodes. PMID:27023540

  5. A land use and land cover classification system for use with remote sensor data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, James R.; Hardy, Ernest E.; Roach, John T.; Witmer, Richard E.

    1976-01-01

    The framework of a national land use and land cover classification system is presented for use with remote sensor data. The classification system has been developed to meet the needs of Federal and State agencies for an up-to-date overview of land use and land cover throughout the country on a basis that is uniform in categorization at the more generalized first and second levels and that will be receptive to data from satellite and aircraft remote sensors. The proposed system uses the features of existing widely used classification systems that are amenable to data derived from remote sensing sources. It is intentionally left open-ended so that Federal, regional, State, and local agencies can have flexibility in developing more detailed land use classifications at the third and fourth levels in order to meet their particular needs and at the same time remain compatible with each other and the national system. Revision of the land use classification system as presented in U.S. Geological Survey Circular 671 was undertaken in order to incorporate the results of extensive testing and review of the categorization and definitions.

  6. Technology Trends and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, Steve; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The science and application of remote sensing is flourishing in the digital age. Geographical information systems can provide a broad range of information tailored to the specific needs of disaster managers. Recent advances in airborne platforms, sensors and information technologies have come together provide the ability to put geo-registered, multispectral imagery on the web in near real-time. Highlights of a demonstration of NASA's First Response Experiment (FiRE) will be presented.

  7. Estimating the relationship between urban 3D morphology and land surface temperature using airborne LiDAR and Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Urban forests are known for mitigating the urban heat island effect and heat-related health issues by reducing air and surface temperature. Beyond the amount of the canopy area, however, little is known what kind of spatial patterns and structures of urban forests best contributes to reducing temperatures and mitigating the urban heat effects. Previous studies attempted to find the relationship between the land surface temperature and various indicators of vegetation abundance using remote sensed data but the majority of those studies relied on two dimensional area based metrics, such as tree canopy cover, impervious surface area, and Normalized Differential Vegetation Index, etc. This study investigates the relationship between the three-dimensional spatial structure of urban forests and urban surface temperature focusing on vertical variance. We use a Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor image (acquired on July 24, 2014) to estimate the land surface temperature of the City of Sacramento, CA. We extract the height and volume of urban features (both vegetation and non-vegetation) using airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and high spatial resolution aerial imagery. Using regression analysis, we apply empirical approach to find the relationship between the land surface temperature and different sets of variables, which describe spatial patterns and structures of various urban features including trees. Our analysis demonstrates that incorporating vertical variance parameters improve the accuracy of the model. The results of the study suggest urban tree planting is an effective and viable solution to mitigate urban heat by increasing the variance of urban surface as well as evaporative cooling effect.

  8. A Remote Sensor for Detecting Methane Based on Palladium-Decorated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Li, Guomin

    2013-01-01

    The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID), and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 μm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs) are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI) and the comparative analog identifier (ΔAID). Results validate the sensor's ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ΔAID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm. PMID:23845931

  9. Application of remote sensors in mapping rice area and forecasting its production: a review.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Mostafa K; Hassan, Quazi K; Chowdhury, Ehsan H

    2015-01-05

    Rice is one of the staple foods for more than three billion people worldwide. Rice paddies accounted for approximately 11.5% of the World's arable land area during 2012. Rice provided ~19% of the global dietary energy in recent times and its annual average consumption per capita was ~65 kg during 2010-2011. Therefore, rice area mapping and forecasting its production is important for food security, where demands often exceed production due to an ever increasing population. Timely and accurate estimation of rice areas and forecasting its production can provide invaluable information for governments, planners, and decision makers in formulating policies in regard to import/export in the event of shortfall and/or surplus. The aim of this paper was to review the applicability of the remote sensing-based imagery for rice area mapping and forecasting its production. Recent advances on the resolutions (i.e., spectral, spatial, radiometric, and temporal) and availability of remote sensing imagery have allowed us timely collection of information on the growth and development stages of the rice crop. For elaborative understanding of the application of remote sensing sensors, following issues were described: the rice area mapping and forecasting its production using optical and microwave imagery, synergy between remote sensing-based methods and other developments, and their implications as an operational one. The overview of the studies to date indicated that remote sensing-based methods using optical and microwave imagery found to be encouraging. However, there were having some limitations, such as: (i) optical remote sensing imagery had relatively low spatial resolution led to inaccurate estimation of rice areas; and (ii) radar imagery would suffer from speckles, which potentially would degrade the quality of the images; and also the brightness of the backscatters were sensitive to the interacting surface. In addition, most of the methods used in forecasting rice yield were

  10. Monitoring of bacteria growth using a wireless, remote query resonant-circuit sensor: application to environmental sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, K. G.; Wang, J.; Singh, R. S.; Bachas, L. G.; Grimes, C. A.; Daunert, S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A new technique is presented for in-vivo remote query measurement of the complex permittivity spectra of a biological culture solution. A sensor comprised of a printed inductor-capacitor resonant-circuit is placed within the culture solution of interest, with the impedance spectrum of the sensor measured using a remotely located loop antenna; the complex permittivity spectra of the culture is calculated from the measured impedance spectrum. The remote query nature of the sensor platform enables, for example, the in-vivo real-time monitoring of bacteria or yeast growth from within sealed opaque containers. The wireless monitoring technique does not require a specific alignment between sensor and antenna. Results are presented for studies conducted on laboratory strains of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli JM109, Pseudomonas putida and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  11. Research on application of photoelectric rotary encoder in space optical remote sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Qi, Shao-fan; Wang, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Zhan-dong

    2016-11-01

    For space optical remote sensor, especially wide swath detecting sensor, the focusing control system for the focal plane should be well designed to obtain the best image quality. The crucial part of this system is the measuring instrument. For previous implements, the potentiometer, which is essentially a voltage divider, is usually introduced to conduct the position in feedback closed-loop control process system. However, the performances of both electro-mechanical and digital potentiometers is limited in accuracy, temperature coefficients, and scale range. To have a better performance of focal plane moving detection, this article presents a new measuring implement with photoelectric rotary encoder, which consists of the photoelectric conversion system and the signal process system. In this novel focusing control system, the photoelectric conversion system is fixed on main axis, which can transform the angle information into a certain analog signal. Through the signal process system, after analog-to-digital converting and data format processing of the certain analog signal, the focusing control system can receive the digital precision angle position which can be used to deduct the current moving position of the focal plane. For utilization of space optical remote sensor in aerospace areas, the reliability design of photoelectric rotary encoder system should be considered with highest priority. As mentioned above, this photoelectric digital precision angle measurement device is well designed for this real-time control and dynamic measurement system, because its characters of high resolution, high accuracy, long endurance, and easy to maintain.

  12. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  13. In situ ozone data for evaluation of the laser absorption spectrometer ozone remote sensor: 1979 southeastern Virginia urban plume study summer field program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ozone data from the 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Study (SEV-UPS) field program are presented. The SEV-UPS was conducted for evaluation of an ozone remote sensor, the Laser Absorption Spectrometer. During the measurement program, remote-sensor evaluation was in two areas; (1) determination of the remote sensor's accuracy, repeatability, and operational characteristics, and (2) demonstration of the application of remotely sensed ozone data in air-quality studies. Data from six experiments designed to provide in situ ozone data for evaluation of the sensor in area 1, above, are presented. Experiments consisted of overflights of a test area with the remote sensor aircraft while in situ measurements with a second aircraft and selected surface stations provided correlative ozone data within the viewing area of the remote sensor.

  14. Benefits of Sharing Information from Commercial Airborne Forward-Looking Sensors in the Next Generation Air Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Philip R.; Harrah, Steven; Neece, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    The air transportation system of the future will need to support much greater traffic densities than are currently possible, while preserving or improving upon current levels of safety. Concepts are under development to support a Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) that by some estimates will need to support up to three times current capacity by the year 2025. Weather and other atmospheric phenomena, such as wake vortices and volcanic ash, constitute major constraints on airspace system capacity and can present hazards to aircraft if encountered. To support safe operations in the NextGen environment advanced systems for collection and dissemination of aviation weather and environmental information will be required. The envisioned NextGen Network Enabled Weather (NNEW) infrastructure will be a critical component of the aviation weather support services, providing access to a common weather picture for all system users. By taking advantage of Network Enabled Operations (NEO) capabilities, a virtual 4-D Weather Data Cube with aviation weather information from many sources will be developed. One new source of weather observations may be airborne forward-looking sensors, such as the X-band weather radar. Future sensor systems that are the subject of current research include advanced multi-frequency and polarimetric radar, a variety of Lidar technologies, and infrared imaging spectrometers.

  15. Cloud and aerosol characterization for the ARM central facility: Multiple remote sensor techniques development

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.

    1992-04-30

    This research project designed to investigate how atmospheric remote sensing technology can best be applied to the characterization of the cloudy atmosphere. Our research program addresses basic atmospheric remote sensing questions, but at the same time is clearly directed toward providing information crucial to the ARM (Atmospheric Remote Sensing) program and for application to the Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART). The instrumentation that is being brought into play includes a variety of art-of-the-art sensors. Available at NOAA WPL are polarization Doppler K{sub a}-band (0.86 mm) and X-band (3.2 cm) radars, a C0{sub 2}(10.6 {mu}m) Doppler lidar with sequential ' polarization measurement capabilities, a three-channel (20.6, 31.65 and 90 GHz) microwave radiometer, and variety of visible and infrared radiometers. Instrumentation at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) includes a polarization ruby (0.643 {mu}m) lidar, a narrow-beam (0.14{degree}) mid-infrared (9.5--11.5 {mu}m) radiometer coaligned with the lidar, several other radiometers in the visible and infrared spectral regions, and an advanced two-color (1.06 and 0.532 {mu}m), four-channel Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) and all-sky video imaging system that have only recently been developed under the ARM IDP.

  16. Towards Automatic Single-Sensor Mapping by Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahokas, E.; Hyyppä, J.; Yu, X.; Liang, X.; Matikainen, L.; Karila, K.; Litkey, P.; Kukko, A.; Jaakkola, A.; Kaartinen, H.; Holopainen, M.; Vastaranta, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of the Optech Titan multispectral airborne laser scanner in the fields of mapping and forestry. Investigation was targeted to six land cover classes. Multispectral laser scanner data can be used to distinguish land cover classes of the ground surface, including the roads and separate road surface classes. For forest inventory using point cloud metrics and intensity features combined, total accuracy of 93.5% was achieved for classification of three main boreal tree species (pine, spruce and birch).When using intensity features - without point height metrics - a classification accuracy of 91% was achieved for these three tree species. It was also shown that deciduous trees can be further classified into more species. We propose that intensity-related features and waveform-type features are combined with point height metrics for forest attribute derivation in area-based prediction, which is an operatively applied forest inventory process in Scandinavia. It is expected that multispectral airborne laser scanning can provide highly valuable data for city and forest mapping and is a highly relevant data asset for national and local mapping agencies in the near future.

  17. Survey of L Band Tower and Airborne Sensor Systems Relevant to Upcoming Soil Moisture Missions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Basic research on the physics of microwave remote sensing of soil moisture has been conducted for almost thirty years using ground-based (tower- or truck-mounted) microwave instruments at L band frequencies. Early small point-scale studies were aimed at improved understanding and verification of mi...

  18. Optical Communication System for Remote Monitoring and Adaptive Control of Distributed Ground Sensors Exhibiting Collective Intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Comprehensive management of the battle-space has created new requirements in information management, communication, and interoperability as they effect surveillance and situational awareness. The objective of this proposal is to expand intelligent controls theory to produce a uniquely powerful implementation of distributed ground-based measurement incorporating both local collective behavior, and interoperative global optimization for sensor fusion and mission oversight. By using a layered hierarchal control architecture to orchestrate adaptive reconfiguration of autonomous robotic agents, we can improve overall robustness and functionality in dynamic tactical environments without information bottlenecks. In this concept, each sensor is equipped with a miniaturized optical reflectance modulator which is interactively monitored as a remote transponder using a covert laser communication protocol from a remote mothership or operative. Robot data-sharing at the ground level can be leveraged with global evaluation criteria, including terrain overlays and remote imaging data. Information sharing and distributed intelli- gence opens up a new class of remote-sensing applications in which small single-function autono- mous observers at the local level can collectively optimize and measure large scale ground-level signals. AS the need for coverage and the number of agents grows to improve spatial resolution, cooperative behavior orchestrated by a global situational awareness umbrella will be an essential ingredient to offset increasing bandwidth requirements within the net. A system of the type described in this proposal will be capable of sensitively detecting, tracking, and mapping spatial distributions of measurement signatures which are non-stationary or obscured by clutter and inter- fering obstacles by virtue of adaptive reconfiguration. This methodology could be used, for example, to field an adaptive ground-penetrating radar for detection of underground structures in

  19. Study Of Remote Sensor Spectral Responses And Data Processing Algorithms For Feature Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, F. O.; Davis, R. E.; Fales, C. L.; Ardiuni, R. F.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-10-01

    A computational model of the deterministic and stochastic processes involved in remote sensing is used to study and compare the performance of sensor spectral responses and data processing algorithms for classifying spectral features. The simulated spectral responses include those of the U.S. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the French Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre (SPOT). The simulated data processing algorithms include the computationally simple boundary approximation method (BAM) to discriminate between general target categories such as vegetation, bare land, water, snow, and clouds, and the maximum likelihood (MLH) and mean-square distance (MSD) classifications to discriminate between specific targets such as various crop types.

  20. Spline function approximation techniques for image geometric distortion representation. [for registration of multitemporal remote sensor imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anuta, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    Least squares approximation techniques were developed for use in computer aided correction of spatial image distortions for registration of multitemporal remote sensor imagery. Polynomials were first used to define image distortion over the entire two dimensional image space. Spline functions were then investigated to determine if the combination of lower order polynomials could approximate a higher order distortion with less computational difficulty. Algorithms for generating approximating functions were developed and applied to the description of image distortion in aircraft multispectral scanner imagery. Other applications of the techniques were suggested for earth resources data processing areas other than geometric distortion representation.

  1. Analyses of the lunar surface with advanced remote sensors: Expectations for the 1990's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, Carle M.

    1991-01-01

    Today's advanced sensor capabilities provide unprecedented opportunities for exploration that mesh well with the science requirements for a sophisticated integration of several types of remotely acquired information. Science priorities for the 1990's include an evaluation of the global composition and structure of the primordial lunar crust in order to model its origin and evolution, using the Moon as a natural laboratory to study the impact process and time-cumulative events at 1 AU, and, ultimately, constraining the origin of the Moon and its relation to Earth.

  2. An airborne laser fluorosensor for the detection of oil on water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. H.; Hickman, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    The successful operation of an airborne laser fluorosensor system is reported that makes it possible to detect and map surface oil, either of natural-seepage or spill origin, on large bodies of water. Preliminary results indicate that the sensitivity of the instrument exceeds that of conventional passive remote sensors currently available for oil spill detection.

  3. Cardiac Care Assistance using Self Configured Sensor Network—a Remote Patient Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma Dhulipala, V. R.; Kanagachidambaresan, G. R.

    2014-04-01

    Pervasive health care systems are used to monitor patients remotely without disturbing the normal day-to-day activities in real-time. Wearable physiological sensors required to monitor various significant ecological parameters of the patients are connected to Body Central Unit (BCU). Body Sensor Network (BSN) updates data in real-time and are designed to transmit alerts against abnormalities which enables quick response by medical units in case of an emergency. BSN helps monitoring patient without any need for attention to the subject. BSN helps in reducing the stress and strain caused by hospital environment. In this paper, mathematical models for heartbeat signal, electro cardio graph (ECG) signal and pulse rate are introduced. These signals are compared and their RMS difference-fast Fourier transforms (PRD-FFT) are processed. In the context of cardiac arrest, alert messages of these parameters and first aid for post-surgical operations has been suggested.

  4. Monitoring of atmospheric aerosol emissions using a remotely piloted air vehicle (RPV)-Borne Sensor Suite

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a small sensor system, the micro-atmospheric measurement system ({mu}-AMS), to monitor and track aerosol emissions. The system was developed to fly aboard a remotely piloted air vehicle, or other mobile platform, to provide real-time particle measurements in effluent plumes and to collect particles for chemical analysis. The {mu}-AMS instrument measures atmospheric parameters including particle mass concentration and size distribution, temperature, humidity, and airspeed, altitude and position (by GPS receiver) each second. The sensor data are stored onboard and are also down linked to a ground station in real time. The {mu}-AMS is battery powered, small (8 in. dia x 36 in.), and lightweight (15 pounds). Aerosol concentrations and size distributions from above ground explosive tests, airbone urban pollution, and traffic-produced particulates are presented.

  5. Global Coverage Measurement Planning Strategies for Mobile Robots Equipped with a Remote Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Muhammad Asif; Trincavelli, Marco; Cirillo, Marcello; Schaffernicht, Erik; Lilienthal, Achim J.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of gas detection is relevant to many real-world applications, such as leak detection in industrial settings and landfill monitoring. In this paper, we address the problem of gas detection in large areas with a mobile robotic platform equipped with a remote gas sensor. We propose an algorithm that leverages a novel method based on convex relaxation for quickly solving sensor placement problems, and for generating an efficient exploration plan for the robot. To demonstrate the applicability of our method to real-world environments, we performed a large number of experimental trials, both on randomly generated maps and on the map of a real environment. Our approach proves to be highly efficient in terms of computational requirements and to provide nearly-optimal solutions. PMID:25803707

  6. Global coverage measurement planning strategies for mobile robots equipped with a remote gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Arain, Muhammad Asif; Trincavelli, Marco; Cirillo, Marcello; Schaffernicht, Erik; Lilienthal, Achim J

    2015-03-20

    The problem of gas detection is relevant to many real-world applications, such as leak detection in industrial settings and landfill monitoring. In this paper, we address the problem of gas detection in large areas with a mobile robotic platform equipped with a remote gas sensor. We propose an algorithm that leverages a novel method based on convex relaxation for quickly solving sensor placement problems, and for generating an efficient exploration plan for the robot. To demonstrate the applicability of our method to real-world environments, we performed a large number of experimental trials, both on randomly generated maps and on the map of a real environment. Our approach proves to be highly efficient in terms of computational requirements and to provide nearly-optimal solutions.

  7. Remote query measurement of pressure, fluid-flow velocity, and humidity using magnetoelastic thick-film sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Kouzoudis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Free-standing magnetoelastic thick-film sensors have a characteristic resonant frequency that can be determined by monitoring the magnetic flux emitted from the sensor in response to a time varying magnetic field. This property allows the sensors to be monitored remotely without the use of direct physical connections, such as wires, enabling measurement of environmental parameters from within sealed, opaque containers. In this work, we report on application of magnetoelastic sensors to measurement of atmospheric pressure, fluid-flow velocity, temperature, and mass load. Mass loading effects are demonstrated by fabrication of a remote query humidity sensor, made by coating the magnetoelastic thick film with a thin layer of solgel deposited Al2O3 that reversibly changes mass in response to humidity. c2000 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Nimbus 7 SMMR sensor with airborne radiometers and surface observations in the Norwegian Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Cavalieri, D.; Crawford, J.; Campbell, W. J.; Farrelly, B.; Johannessen, J.; Johannessen, O. M.; Svendsen, E.; Kloster, K.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements made by the Nimbus 7 SMMR are compared with near simultaneous observations using the airborne SMMR simulator and with surface observations. The area of the test is in the Norwegian Sea between Bear Island and Northern Norway. It is noted that during the observation period two low-pressure systems were located in the test area, giving a spatial wind variation from 3-20 m/s. It is shown that the use of the currently available brightness temperatures and algorithms for SMMR does not give universally satisfactory results for SST and wind speed under extreme weather conditions. In addition, the SMMR simulator results are seen as indicating the need for more work on calibration.

  9. Remote identification of potential polar bear maternal denning habitat in northern Alaska using airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. M.; Durner, G. M.; Stoker, J.; Shideler, R.; Perham, C.; Liston, G. E.

    2013-12-01

    Polar bear (Ursus maritimus) populations throughout the Arctic are being threatened by reductions in critical sea ice habitat. Throughout much of their range, polar bears give birth to their young in winter dens that are excavated in snowdrifts. New-born cubs, which are unable to survive exposure to Arctic winter weather, require 2-3 months of the relatively warm, stable, and undisturbed environment of the den for their growth. In the southern Beaufort Sea (BS), polar bears may den on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP).The proportion of dens occurring on land has increased because of reductions in stable multi-year ice, increases in unconsolidated ice, and lengthening of the fall open-water period. Large portions of the ACP are currently being used for oil and gas activities and proposed projects will likely expand this footprint in the near future. Since petroleum exploration and development activities increase during winter there is the potential for human activities to disturb polar bears in maternal dens. Thus, maps showing the potential distribution of terrestrial denning habitat can help to mitigate negative interactions. Prior remote sensing efforts have consisted of manual interpretation of vertical aerial photography and automated classification of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (IfSAR) derived digital terrain models (DTM) (5-m spatial resolution) focused on the identification of snowdrift forming landscape features. In this study, we assess the feasibility of airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data (2-m spatial resolution) for the automated classification of potential polar bear maternal denning habitat in a 1,400 km2 area on the central portion of the ACP. The study region spans the BS coast from the Prudhoe Bay oilfield in the west to near Point Thompson in the east and extends inland from 10 to 30 km. Approximately 800 km2 of the study area contains 19 known den locations, 51 field survey sites with information on bank height and

  10. Validating MODIS above-cloud aerosol optical depth retrieved from "color ratio" algorithm using direct measurements made by NASA's airborne AATS and 4STAR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Remer, Lorraine; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, John; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Segal Rosenheimer, Michal; Spurr, Rob

    2016-10-01

    We present the validation analysis of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) retrieved from the "color ratio" method applied to MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance measurements using the limited direct measurements made by NASA's airborne Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) sensors. A thorough search of the airborne database collection revealed a total of five significant events in which an airborne sun photometer, coincident with the MODIS overpass, observed partially absorbing aerosols emitted from agricultural biomass burning, dust, and wildfires over a low-level cloud deck during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS 2013 campaigns, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne matchups revealed a good agreement (root-mean-square difference < 0.1), with most matchups falling within the estimated uncertainties associated the MODIS retrievals (about -10 to +50 %). The co-retrieved cloud optical depth was comparable to that of the MODIS operational cloud product for ACE-ASIA and SEAC4RS, however, higher by 30-50 % for the SAFARI-2000 case study. The reason for this discrepancy could be attributed to the distinct aerosol optical properties encountered during respective campaigns. A brief discussion on the sources of uncertainty in the satellite-based ACAOD retrieval and co-location procedure is presented. Field experiments dedicated to making direct measurements of aerosols above cloud are needed for the extensive validation of satellite-based retrievals.

  11. A Large-Scale Remote Wireless Data Acquisition Network for Environmental Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. F.; Natvig, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past nine years we have constructed a large-scale wireless telemetry network that connects remote environmental research experiments and wildlife monitoring webcams to the Internet. This network, which connects back to the University of New Mexico Sevilleta Field Station, is distributed across several thousand square kilometers in central New Mexico, providing real-time automated data acquisition from nearly fifty dataloggers and thousands of sensors located at meteorological stations, global change experiments, and eddy covariance flux towers. This is one of the largest remote environmental wireless data acquisition networks in the world. While the majority of sites connected to this network are within the boundaries of the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, the network includes several sites outside the Refuge, with the most distant link being nearly one hundred kilometers from the Sevilleta Field Station. An ancillary network in the Valles Caldera National Preserve in northern New Mexico exists to provide remote connectivity to additional environmental research experiments. Hundreds of person hours and thousands of vehicle miles are saved each year by eliminating regular visits to download data at these remote sites. Additionally, this network allows for prompt detection of equipment and power failures, reducing data loss. The use of Wi-Fi devices has permitted tremendous flexibility in the overall network design while keeping costs low. Moreover, such devices have allowed wireless links averaging more than ten kilometers and in several instances, exceeding thirty kilometers. Here, we describe the basic elements of this remote wireless data acquisition network, including network design, equipment choices, power options, and datalogger interfaces.

  12. Remote detection of nitroaromatic explosives in soil using distributed sensor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, Robert J.; Hance, Bradley G.; Schmitt, Randal L.; Johnson, Mark S.; Hargis, Philip J., Jr.

    2001-10-01

    Environmental fate and transport studies of explosives in soil indicate that 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and similar products such as dinitrotoluene (DNT) are major contributors to the trace chemical signature emanating from buried landmines. Chemical analysis methods are under development that have great potential to detect mines, or to rapidly classify electromagnetically detected anomalies as mines vs. 'mine-like objects'. However, these chemical methods are currently confined to point sensors. In contrast, we have developed a method that can remotely determine the presence of nitroaromatic explosives in surface soil. This method utilizes a novel distributed granular sensor approach in combination with uv-visible fluorescence LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology. We have produced prototype sensor particles that combine sample preconcentration, explosives sensing, signal amplification, and optical signal output functions. These particles can be sprayed onto soil areas that are suspected of explosives contamination. By design, the fluorescence emission spectrum of the distributed particles is strongly affected by absorption of nitroaromatic explosives from the surrounding environment. Using ~1mg/cm2 coverage of the sensor particles on natural soil, we have observed significant spectral changes due to TNT concentrations in the ppm range (mg TNT/kg soil) on 2-inch diameter targets at a standoff distance of 0.5 km.

  13. A high-performance miniaturized time division multiplexed sensor system for remote structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Glynn D.; Everall, Lorna A.; Sugden, Kate; Bennion, Ian

    2004-09-01

    We report for the first time the design, implementation and commercial application of a hand-held optical time division multiplexed, distributed fibre Bragg grating sensor system. A unique combination of state-of-the art electronic and optical components enables system miniaturization whilst maintaining exceptional performance. Supporting more than 100 low-cost sensors per channel, the battery-powered system operates remotely via a wireless GSM link, making it ideal for real-time structural health monitoring in harsh environments. Driven by highly configurable timing electronics, an off-the-shelf telecommunications semiconductor optical amplifier performs combined amplification and gating. This novel optical configuration boasts a spatial resolution of less than 20cm and an optical signal to noise ratio of better than 30dB, yet utilizes sensors with reflectivity of only a few percent and does not require RF speed signal processing devices. This paper highlights the performance and cost advantages of a system that utilizes TDM-style mass manufactured commodity FBGs. Created in continual lengths, these sensors reduce stock inventory, eradicate application-specific array design and simplify system installation and expansion. System analysis from commercial installations in oil exploration, wind energy and vibration measurement will be presented, with results showing kilohertz interrogation speed and microstrain resolution.

  14. Evaluation of SMART sensor displays for multidimensional precision control of Space Shuttle remote manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Brown, J. W.; Lewis, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    An enhanced proximity sensor and display system was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and tested on the full scale Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The sensor system, integrated with a four-claw end effector, measures range error up to 6 inches, and pitch and yaw alignment errors within + or 15 deg., and displays error data on both graphic and numeric displays. The errors are referenced to the end effector control axes through appropriate data processing by a dedicated microcomputer acting on the sensor data in real time. Both display boxes contain a green lamp which indicates whether the combination of range, pitch and yaw errors will assure a successful grapple. More than 200 test runs were completed in early 1980 by three operators at JSC for grasping static and capturing slowly moving targets. The tests have indicated that the use of graphic/numeric displays of proximity sensor information improves precision control of grasp/capture range by more than a factor of two for both static and dynamic grapple conditions.

  15. A multi-sensor remote sensing approach for measuring primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, Catherine

    1989-01-01

    It is proposed to develop a multi-sensor remote sensing method for computing marine primary productivity from space, based on the capability to measure the primary ocean variables which regulate photosynthesis. The three variables and the sensors which measure them are: (1) downwelling photosynthetically available irradiance, measured by the VISSR sensor on the GOES satellite, (2) sea-surface temperature from AVHRR on NOAA series satellites, and (3) chlorophyll-like pigment concentration from the Nimbus-7/CZCS sensor. These and other measured variables would be combined within empirical or analytical models to compute primary productivity. With this proposed capability of mapping primary productivity on a regional scale, we could begin realizing a more precise and accurate global assessment of its magnitude and variability. Applications would include supplementation and expansion on the horizontal scale of ship-acquired biological data, which is more accurate and which supplies the vertical components of the field, monitoring oceanic response to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, correlation with observed sedimentation patterns and processes, and fisheries management.

  16. Comparison of fractal dimensions based on segmented NDVI fields obtained from different remote sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, C.; Benito, R. M.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite image data have become an important source of information for monitoring vegetation and mapping land cover at several scales. Beside this, the distribution and phenology of vegetation is largely associated with climate, terrain characteristics and human activity. Various vegetation indices have been developed for qualitative and quantitative assessment of vegetation using remote spectral measurements. In particular, sensors with spectral bands in the red (RED) and near-infrared (NIR) lend themselves well to vegetation monitoring and based on them [(NIR - RED) / (NIR + RED)] Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been widespread used. Given that the characteristics of spectral bands in RED and NIR vary distinctly from sensor to sensor, NDVI values based on data from different instruments will not be directly comparable. The spatial resolution also varies significantly between sensors, as well as within a given scene in the case of wide-angle and oblique sensors. As a result, NDVI values will vary according to combinations of the heterogeneity and scale of terrestrial surfaces and pixel footprint sizes. Therefore, the question arises as to the impact of differences in spectral and spatial resolutions on vegetation indices like the NDVI. The aim of this study is to establish a comparison between two different sensors in their NDVI values at different spatial resolutions. Scaling analysis and modeling techniques are increasingly understood to be the result of nonlinear dynamic mechanisms repeating scale after scale from large to small scales leading to non-classical resolution dependencies. In the remote sensing framework the main characteristic of sensors images is the high local variability in their values. This variability is a consequence of the increase in spatial and radiometric resolution that implies an increase in complexity that it is necessary to characterize. Fractal and multifractal techniques has been proven to be useful to extract

  17. Making Carbon Emissions Remotely Sensible: Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL), its Near-Surface Survey of Carbon Gases and Isotopologues on Alaska's North Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E. J.; Sayres, D. S.; Healy, C. E.; Munster, J. B.; Baker, B.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed process-oriented study of the mechanisms of conversion in the Arctic of fossil carbon to atmospheric gas is progressing, but necessarily limited to a few point locations and requiring detailed subsurface measurements inaccessible to remote sensing. Airborne measurements of concentration, transport and flux of these carbon gases at sufficiently low altitude to reflect surface variations can tie such local measurements to remotely observable features of the landscape. Carbon dioxide and water vapor have been observable for over 20 years from low-altitude small aircraft in the Arctic and elsewhere. Methane has been more difficult, requiring large powerful aircraft or limited flask samples. Recent developments in spectroscopy, however, have reduced the power and weight required to measure methane at rates suitable for eddy-covariance flux estimates. The Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL) takes advantage of Integrated Cavity-Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, and water vapor in a new airborne system. The system, moreover, measures these gases' stable isotopologues every two seconds or faster helping to separate thermogenic from biogenic emissions. Paired with the Best Airborne Turbulence (BAT) probe developed for small aircraft by NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory and a light twin-engine aircraft adapted by Aurora Flight Sciences Inc., the FOCAL measures at 6 m spacing, covering 100 km in less than 30 minutes. It flies between 10 m and 50 m above ground interspersed with profiles to the top of the boundary layer and beyond. This presentation gives an overview of the magnitude and variation in fluxes and concentrations of CH4, CO2, and H2O with space, time, and time of day in a spatially extensive survey, more than 7500 km total in 15 flights over roughly a 100 km square during the month of August 2013. An extensive data set such as this at low altitude with high-rate sampling addresses features that repeat on 1 km scale

  18. Airborne cable detection with a W-band FMCW imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshi, D. S.; Liu, Y.; Mai, K.; Bui, L.; Shih, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Numerous accidents occur each year due to wire strikes for both military and commercial helicopters leading to a significant number of fatalities. The millimeter-wave sensor presents itself as an ideal candidate for a solution because it can see the very small attributes of the typical power line/cable wire as well as operate when visual conditions worsen due to environmental issues such as fog, smoke or dust. This paper presents recent results on the development of a W-band FMCW imaging sensor with potential application to cable detection and imaging. The sensor front end is integrated with a radar signal generator, processor, and data acquisition unit for the purpose of closing the loop between prototype demonstration and system development. Real-time imaging is achieved at a 10 Hz frame rate with a field of view of 30°. A complete flight demonstration of this system was performed on a Honeywell-operated AStar helicopter to validate the flight-worthiness of the sensor under close to actual operational conditions. The development of such technology that can detect and avoid obstacles such as cables and wires especially for rotorcraft platforms will save lives, assets, and enable the execution of more complex and dangerous tactical missions.

  19. Airborne Passive Remote Sensing of the Troposphere in Nashville/Middle Tennessee Area During the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rider, D. M.; Worden, H. M.; Beer, R.; Nandi, S.; Sparks, L. C.

    1998-01-01

    In July of 1995 the Airborne Emission Spectrometer was deployed to Nashville, Tennessee to participate in the 1995 Ozone Study Intensive Campaign of the Southern Oxidants Study. AES is a high resolution mid-infrared interferometer that measures the spectrum of upwelling radiation in the 650-4250 cm-1 range.

  20. Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM): Laboratory and Field Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Van Gorp, Byron; Green, Robert O.; Eastwood, Michael; Boardman, Joseph; Richardson, Brandon S.; Rodriguez, Jose I.; Urquiza, Eugenio; Franklin, Brian D.; Gao, Bo-Cai

    2012-01-01

    We report the characteristics of the Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer, an airborne sensor specifically designed for the challenges of coastal ocean research. PRISM has high signal to noise ratio and uniformity, as well as low polarization sensitivity. Acquisition of high quality data has been demonstrated with the first engineering flight.

  1. MAPSAR Image Simulation Based on L-band Polarimetric Data from the SAR-R99B Airborne Sensor (SIVAM System)

    PubMed Central

    Mura, José Claudio; Paradella, Waldir Renato; Dutra, Luciano Vieira; dos Santos, João Roberto; Rudorff, Bernardo Friedrich Theodor; de Miranda, Fernando Pellon; da Silva, Mario Marcos Quintino; da Silva, Wagner Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology applied to generate simulated multipolarized L-band SAR images of the MAPSAR (Multi-Application Purpose SAR) satellite from the airborne SAR R99B sensor (SIVAM System). MAPSAR is a feasibility study conducted by INPE (National Institute for Space Research) and DLR (German Aerospace Center) targeting a satellite L-band SAR innovative mission for assessment, management and monitoring of natural resources. Examples of simulated products and their applications are briefly discussed. PMID:22389590

  2. Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). A description of the sensor, ground data processing facility, laboratory calibration, and first results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, Gregg (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The papers in this document were presented at the Imaging Spectroscopy 2 Conference of the 31st International Symposium on Optical and Optoelectronic Applied Science and Engineering, in San Diego, California, on 20 and 21 August 1987. They describe the design and performance of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) sensor and its subsystems, the ground data processing facility, laboratory calibration, and first results.

  3. A Real-Time Health Monitoring System for Remote Cardiac Patients Using Smartphone and Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kakria, Priyanka; Tripathi, N. K.; Kitipawang, Peerapong

    2015-01-01

    Online telemedicine systems are useful due to the possibility of timely and efficient healthcare services. These systems are based on advanced wireless and wearable sensor technologies. The rapid growth in technology has remarkably enhanced the scope of remote health monitoring systems. In this paper, a real-time heart monitoring system is developed considering the cost, ease of application, accuracy, and data security. The system is conceptualized to provide an interface between the doctor and the patients for two-way communication. The main purpose of this study is to facilitate the remote cardiac patients in getting latest healthcare services which might not be possible otherwise due to low doctor-to-patient ratio. The developed monitoring system is then evaluated for 40 individuals (aged between 18 and 66 years) using wearable sensors while holding an Android device (i.e., smartphone under supervision of the experts). The performance analysis shows that the proposed system is reliable and helpful due to high speed. The analyses showed that the proposed system is convenient and reliable and ensures data security at low cost. In addition, the developed system is equipped to generate warning messages to the doctor and patient under critical circumstances. PMID:26788055

  4. Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing of Forest Dynamics in Central Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, K. J.; Sun, G.; Kharuk, V. I.; Howl, J.

    2011-01-01

    The forested regions of Siberia, Russia are vast and contain about a quarter of the world's forests that have not experienced harvesting. However, many Siberian forests are facing twin pressures of rapidly changing climate and increasing timber harvest activity. Monitoring the dynamics and mapping the structural parameters of the forest is important for understanding the causes and consequences of changes observed in these areas. Because of the inaccessibility and large extent of this forest, remote sensing data can play an important role for observing forest state and change. In Central Siberia, multi-sensor remote sensing data have been used to monitor forest disturbances and to map above-ground biomass from the Sayan Mountains in the south to the taiga-tundra boundaries in the north. Radar images from the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C)/XSAR mission were used for forest biomass estimation in the Sayan Mountains. Radar images from the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 (JERS-1), European Remote Sensing Satellite-1 (ERS-1) and Canada's RADARSAT-1, and data from ETM+ on-board Landsat-7 were used to characterize forest disturbances from logging, fire, and insect damage in Boguchany and Priangare areas.

  5. Continuous Water Vapor Profiles from Operational Ground-Based Active and Passive Remote Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. D.; Feltz, W. F.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, offers unique operational water vapor profiling capabilities, including active and passive remote sensors as well as traditional in situ radiosonde measurements. Remote sensing technologies include an automated Raman lidar and an automated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), which are able to retrieve water vapor profiles operationally through the lower troposphere throughout the diurnal cycle. Comparisons of these two water vapor remote sensing methods to each other and to radiosondes over an 8-month period are presented and discussed, highlighting the accuracy and limitations of each method. Additionally, the AERI is able to retrieve profiles of temperature while the Raman lidar is able to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles operationally. These data, coupled with hourly wind profiles from a 915-MHz wind profiler, provide complete specification of the state of the atmosphere in noncloudy skies. Several case studies illustrate the utility of these high temporal resolution measurements in the characterization of mesoscale features within a 3-day time period in which passage of a dryline, warm air advection, and cold front occurred.

  6. Remote distinction of a noxious weed (musk thistle: Carduus nutans) using airborne hyperspectral imagery and the support vector machine classifier

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote detection of invasive plant species using geospatial imagery may significantly improve monitoring, planning, and management practices by eliminating shortfalls such as observer bias and accessibility involved in ground-based surveys. The use of remote sensing for accurate mapping invasion ex...

  7. Evaluation of an airborne remote sensing platform consisting of two consumer-grade cameras for crop identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing systems based on consumer-grade cameras have been increasingly used in scientific research and remote sensing applications because of their low cost and ease of use. However, the performance of consumer-grade cameras for practical applications have not been well documented in related ...

  8. A MGy radiation-hardened sensor instrumentation link for nuclear reactor monitoring and remote handling

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeeck, Jens; Cao, Ying; Van Uffelen, Marco; Mont Casellas, Laura; Damiani, Carlo; Morales, Emilio Ruiz; Santana, Roberto Ranz; De Cock, Wouter; Vermeeren, Ludo; Steyaert, Michiel; Leroux, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Decommissioning, dismantling and remote handling applications in nuclear facilities all require robotic solutions that are able to survive in radiation environments. Recently raised safety, radiation hardness and cost efficiency demands from both the nuclear regulatory and the society impose severe challenges in traditional methods. For example, in case of the dismantling of the Fukushima sites, solutions that survive accumulated doses higher than 1 MGy are mandatory. To allow remote operation of these tools in nuclear environments, electronics were used to be shielded with several centimeters of lead or even completely banned in these solutions. However, shielding electronics always leads to bulky and heavy solutions, which reduces the flexibility of robotic tools. It also requires longer repair time and produces extra waste further in a dismantling or decommissioning cycle. In addition, often in current reactor designs, due to size restrictions and the need to inspect very tight areas there are limitations to the use of shielding. A MGy radiation-hardened sensor instrumentation link developed by MAGyICS provides a solution to build a flexible, easy removable and small I and C module with MGy radiation tolerance without any shielding. Hereby it removes all these pains to implement electronics in robotic tools. The demonstrated solution in this poster is developed for ITER Remote Handling equipments operating in high radiation environments (>1 MGy) in and around the Tokamak. In order to obtain adequately accurate instrumentation and control information, as well as to ease the umbilical management, there is a need of front-end electronics that will have to be located close to those actuators and sensors on the remote handling tool. In particular, for diverter remote handling, it is estimated that these components will face gamma radiation up to 300 Gy/h (in-vessel) and a total dose of 1 MGy. The radiation-hardened sensor instrumentation link presented here, consists

  9. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, S.K.; Meliker, J.R.; Goovaerts, P.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, geographic information systems (GIS) have increasingly been used for reconstructing individual-level exposures to environmental contaminants in epidemiological research. Remotely sensed data can be useful in creating space-time models of environmental measures. The primary advantage of using remotely sensed data is that it allows for study at the local scale (e.g., residential level) without requiring expensive, time-consuming monitoring campaigns. The purpose of our study was to identify how land surface remotely sensed data are currently being used to study the relationship between cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessment applications. We present the results of a comprehensive literature review of epidemiological research where remotely sensed imagery or land cover maps derived from remotely sensed imagery were applied. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the most commonly used imagery data (aerial photographs and Landsat satellite imagery) and land cover maps.

  10. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    MAXWELL, SUSAN K.; MELIKER, JAYMIE R.; GOOVAERTS, PIERRE

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, geographic information systems (GIS) have increasingly been used for reconstructing individual-level exposures to environmental contaminants in epidemiological research. Remotely sensed data can be useful in creating space-time models of environmental measures. The primary advantage of using remotely sensed data is that it allows for study at the local scale (e.g., residential level) without requiring expensive, time-consuming monitoring campaigns. The purpose of our study was to identify how land surface remotely sensed data are currently being used to study the relationship between cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessment applications. We present the results of a comprehensive literature review of epidemiological research where remotely sensed imagery or land cover maps derived from remotely sensed imagery were applied. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the most commonly used imagery data (aerial photographs and Landsat satellite imagery) and land cover maps. PMID:19240763

  11. Low-cost lightweight airborne laser-based sensors for pipeline leak detection and reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Wainner, Richard T.; Laderer, Matthew C.; Allen, Mark G.; Rutherford, James; Wehnert, Paul; Dey, Sean; Gilchrist, John; Corbi, Ron; Picciaia, Daniele; Andreussi, Paolo; Furry, David

    2013-05-01

    Laser sensing enables aerial detection of natural gas pipeline leaks without need to fly through a hazardous gas plume. This paper describes adaptations of commercial laser-based methane sensing technology that provide relatively low-cost lightweight and battery-powered aerial leak sensors. The underlying technology is near-infrared Standoff Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (sTDLAS). In one configuration, currently in commercial operation for pipeline surveillance, sTDLAS is combined with automated data reduction, alerting, navigation, and video imagery, integrated into a single-engine single-pilot light fixed-wing aircraft or helicopter platform. In a novel configuration for mapping landfill methane emissions, a miniaturized ultra-lightweight sTDLAS sensor flies aboard a small quad-rotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

  12. Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS): Recent improvements to the sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrien, Thomas G.; Green, Robert O.; Sarture, Charles M.; Chovit, Christopher; Eastwood, Michael L.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    1993-01-01

    AVIRIS is a NASA-sponsored Earth-looking imaging spectrometer designed, built and operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Spectral, radiometric and geometric characteristics of the data acquired by AVIRIS are given in Table 1. AVIRIS has been operational since 1989, however in each year since 1989 major improvements have been completed in most of the subsystems of the sensor. As a consequence of these efforts, the capabilities of AVIRIS to acquire and deliver calibrated imaging spectrometer data of high quality have improved significantly over those in 1989. Improvements to AVIRIS prior to 1992 have been described previously (Porter et al., 1990, Chrien et al., 1991, & Chrien et al., 1992). In the following sections of this paper we describe recent and planned improvements to AVIRIS in the sensor task.

  13. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Spuler, S. M.; Spowart, M.; Lenschow, D. H.; Friesen, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s-1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents) that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  14. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Spuler, S. M.; Spowart, M.; Lenschow, D. H.; Friesen, R. B.

    2014-03-01

    A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with an uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s-1 (standard error) and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard-error uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the Global Positioning System, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents) that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that the new laser air-motion sensor, combined with parametrized fits to correction factors for the measured dynamic and ambient pressure, provides a measurement of temperature that is independent of any other temperature sensor.

  15. Airborne Visible / Infrared Imaging Spectrometer AVIS: Design, Characterization and Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Oppelt, Natascha; Mauser, Wolfram

    2007-01-01

    The Airborne Visible / Infrared imaging Spectrometer AVIS is a hyperspectral imager designed for environmental monitoring purposes. The sensor, which was constructed entirely from commercially available components, has been successfully deployed during several experiments between 1999 and 2007. We describe the instrument design and present the results of laboratory characterization and calibration of the system's second generation, AVIS-2, which is currently being operated. The processing of the data is described and examples of remote sensing reflectance data are presented.

  16. Mapping Palm Swamp Wetland Ecosystems in the Peruvian Amazon: a Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podest, E.; McDonald, K. C.; Schroeder, R.; Pinto, N.; Zimmerman, R.; Horna, V.

    2012-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems are prevalent in the Amazon basin, especially in northern Peru. Of specific interest are palm swamp wetlands because they are characterized by constant surface inundation and moderate seasonal water level variation. This combination of constantly saturated soils and warm temperatures year-round can lead to considerable methane release to the atmosphere. Because of the widespread occurrence and expected sensitivity of these ecosystems to climate change, it is critical to develop methods to quantify their spatial extent and inundation state in order to assess their carbon dynamics. Spatio-temporal information on palm swamps is difficult to gather because of their remoteness and difficult accessibility. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing is an effective tool for characterizing these ecosystems since it is sensitive to surface water and vegetation structure and allows monitoring large inaccessible areas on a temporal basis regardless of atmospheric conditions or solar illumination. We developed a remote sensing methodology using multi-sensor remote sensing data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR), Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM, and Landsat to derive maps at 100 meter resolution of palm swamp extent and inundation based on ground data collections; and combined active and passive microwave data from AMSR-E and QuikSCAT to derive inundation extent at 25 kilometer resolution on a weekly basis. We then compared information content and accuracy of the coarse resolution products relative to the high-resolution datasets. The synergistic combination of high and low resolution datasets allowed for characterization of palm swamps and assessment of their flooding status. This work has been undertaken partly within the framework of the JAXA ALOS Kyoto & Carbon Initiative. PALSAR data have been provided by JAXA. Portions of this work were carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  17. The potential for synthesizing multi-sensor remote sensing data for global volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtney, M.; Pritchard, M. E.; Carn, S. A.; McCormick, B.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Jay, J.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanoes exhibit variable eruption frequencies and styles, from near-continuous eruptions of effusive lavas to more intermittent, explosive eruptions. The monitoring frequency necessary to capture precursory signals at any volcano remains uncertain, as some warnings allot hours for evacuation. Likewise, no precursory signal appears deterministic for each volcano. Volcanic activity manifests in a variety of ways (i.e. tremor, deformation), thus requiring multiple monitoring mechanisms (i.e. geodetic, geochemical, geothermal). We are developing databases to compare relationships among remotely sensed volcanic unrest signals and eruptions. Satellite remote sensing utilizes frequent temporal measurements (daily to bi-weekly), an essential component of worldwide volcano monitoring. Remote sensing methods are also capable of detecting diverse precursory signals such as ground deformation from satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar—InSAR— (multiple space agencies), degassing from satellite spectroscopy (i.e. OMI SO2 from NASA), and hot spots from thermal infrared (i.e. MODIS from NASA). We present preliminary results from seven SAR satellites and two thermal infrared satellites for 24 volcanoes with prominent SO2 emissions. We find near-continuous emissions at Ibu (Indonesia) since 2008 corresponded with hotspots and 10 cm of subsidence, with degassing and comparable subsidence observed at Pagan (Marianas). A newcomer to volcano monitoring, remote sensing data are only beginning to be utilized on a global scale, let alone as a synthesized dataset for monitoring developing eruptions. We foresee a searchable tool for rapidly accessing basic volcanic unrest characteristics for different types of volcanoes and whether or not they resulted in eruption. By including data from multiple satellite sensors in our database we hope to develop quantitative assessments for calculating the likelihood of eruption from individual events.

  18. FTIR remote sensor measurements of air pollutants in the petrochemical industrial park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rong T.; Chang, Shih-Yi; Chung, Y. W.; Tzou, H. C.; Tso, Tai-Ly

    1995-09-01

    As FT-IR remote sensing techniques become more accessible, there are increasing interests to apply this open-path measurement method to detect and measure airborne pollutants. Thus a research for VOCs emission pollutants in the petrochemical industry park is conducted. In this study, we focused on the identification of the gaseous pollutants as well as the location of the VOCs pollutants from different factories. Measurement is sampled at every half hour period to obtain the time series plots of observed gas concentration for the gaseous pollutants. Besides the inherent components in ambient air such as carbon monoxide, methane, and ozone, the results of the measurement indicate that the major pollutants detected in this industrial park include vinyl chloride, chloroform, hydrogen chloride, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,3-butadiene, ethylene, propylene, n-hexane, acetic acid, methyl acetate and ammonia. Some of these toxic pollutants are carcinogens and also the chloride related compounds are potentially a threat to the depletion of ozone. All of these measurements indicate that the pattern of the pollutants for each location is significantly different from each other pattern. In addition, the concentrations and the presence of absence of pollutants were dramatically affected by wind directions. Under this case, suspicious polluting plants are successfully being identified by examining the pattern of compounds, pollutant's concentration time series, metrology, and manufacturing process.

  19. Application of Remote Sensors in Mapping Rice Area and Forecasting Its Production: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh, Mostafa K.; Hassan, Quazi K.; Chowdhury, Ehsan H.

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the staple foods for more than three billion people worldwide. Rice paddies accounted for approximately 11.5% of the World's arable land area during 2012. Rice provided ∼19% of the global dietary energy in recent times and its annual average consumption per capita was ∼65 kg during 2010–2011. Therefore, rice area mapping and forecasting its production is important for food security, where demands often exceed production due to an ever increasing population. Timely and accurate estimation of rice areas and forecasting its production can provide invaluable information for governments, planners, and decision makers in formulating policies in regard to import/export in the event of shortfall and/or surplus. The aim of this paper was to review the applicability of the remote sensing-based imagery for rice area mapping and forecasting its production. Recent advances on the resolutions (i.e., spectral, spatial, radiometric, and temporal) and availability of remote sensing imagery have allowed us timely collection of information on the growth and development stages of the rice crop. For elaborative understanding of the application of remote sensing sensors, following issues were described: the rice area mapping and forecasting its production using optical and microwave imagery, synergy between remote sensing-based methods and other developments, and their implications as an operational one. The overview of the studies to date indicated that remote sensing-based methods using optical and microwave imagery found to be encouraging. However, there were having some limitations, such as: (i) optical remote sensing imagery had relatively low spatial resolution led to inaccurate estimation of rice areas; and (ii) radar imagery would suffer from speckles, which potentially would degrade the quality of the images; and also the brightness of the backscatters were sensitive to the interacting surface. In addition, most of the methods used in forecasting rice yield

  20. Tagless remote refractometric sensor based on WGMs in quantum dot-embedded microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shuo; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2008-02-01

    Optical resonances in microspheres have recently been applied to biosensing applications. The resonances, known as Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) result from the total internal reflection of the light propagating inside the high index spherical surface within a lower index medium. The evanescent field of the WGM, which extends beyond the microsphere surface, is sensitive to the changes in the local refractive index in the surrounding medium. The high Q factor associated with WGMs enables a highly sensitive sensor element. Here we present a refractometric sensor with high sensitivity based on quantum dot (QD) embedded polystyrene microspheres. Ultrashort laser pulses are used to induce two photon excited luminescence from the QDs inside the microspheres. By optimizing the detection area of the microsphere, an enhanced resonance signal to background ratio can be achieved. Theoretical calculations of the resonance peak shifts are compared with the experimental data. Refractometric sensing based on WGMs is a technique that does not require analyte labeling. In this work, QDs are used as a local, broadband light source within the microspheres to enable remote excitation of the resonant modes. The sensor has great potential in many biosensing applications.

  1. Overview of the NASA tropospheric environmental quality remote sensing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, F.; Ayers, W. G.; Hoell, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper will summarize the current NASA Tropospheric Environmental Quality Remote Sensing Program for studying the global and regional troposphere from space, airborne and ground-based platforms. As part of the program to develop remote sensors for utilization from space, NASA has developed a series of passive and active remote sensors which have undergone field test measurements from airborne and ground platforms. Recent measurements with active lidar and passive gas filter correlation and infrared heterodyne techniques will be summarized for measurements of atmospheric aerosols, CO, SO2, O3, and NH3. These measurements provide the data base required to assess the sensitivity of remote sensors for applications to urban and regional field measurement programs. Studies of Earth Observation Satellite Systems are currently being performed by the scientific community to assess the capability of satellite imagery to detect regions of elevated pollution in the troposphere. The status of NASA sponsored research efforts in interpreting satellite imagery for determining aerosol loadings over land and inland bodies of water will be presented, and comments on the potential of these measurements to supplement in situ and airborne remote sensors in detecting regional haze will be made.

  2. Satellite and airborne oil spill remote sensing: State of the art and application to the BP DeepWater Horizon oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leifer, I.; Clark, R.; Jones, C.; Holt, B.; Svejkovsky, J.; Swayze, G.

    2011-01-01

    The vast, persistent, and unconstrained oil release from the DeepWater Horizon (DWH) challenged the spill response, which required accurate quantitative oil assessment at synoptic and operational scales. Experienced observers are the mainstay of oil spill response. Key limitations are weather, scene illumination geometry, and few trained observers, leading to potential observer bias. Aiding the response was extensive passive and active satellite and airborne remote sensing, including intelligent system augmentation, reviewed herein. Oil slick appearance strongly depends on many factors like emulsion composition and scene geometry, yielding false positives and great thickness uncertainty. Oil thicknesses and the oil to water ratios for thick slicks were derived quantitatively with a new spectral library approach based on the shape and depth of spectral features related to C-H vibration bands. The approach used near infrared, imaging spectroscopy data from the AVIRIS (Airborne Visual/InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer) instrument on the NASA ER-2 stratospheric airplane. Extrapolation to the total slick used MODIS satellite visual-spectrum broadband data, which observes sunglint reflection from surface slicks; i.e., indicates the presence of oil and/or surfactant slicks. Oil slick emissivity is less than seawater's allowing MODIS thermal infrared (TIR) nighttime identification; however, water temperature variations can cause false positives. Some strong emissivity features near 6.7 and 9.7 ??m could be analyzed as for the AVIRIS short wave infrared features, but require high spectral resolution data. TIR spectral trends can allow fresh/weathered oil discrimination. Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SSAR) provided synoptic data under all-sky conditions by observing oil dampening of capillary waves; however, SSAR typically cannot discriminate thick from thin oil slicks. Airborne UAVSAR's significantly greater signal-to-noise ratio and fine spatial resolution allowed

  3. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Backscatter and Earth Surface Targets By Use of An Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Over Western North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Airborne lidar systems are used to determine wind velocity and to measure aerosol or cloud backscatter variability. Atmospheric aerosols, being affected by local and regional sources, show tremendous variability. Continuous wave (cw) lidar can obtain detailed aerosol loading with unprecedented high resolution (3 sec) and sensitivity (1 mg/cubic meter) as was done during the 1995 NASA Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission over western North America and the Pacific Ocean. Backscatter variability was measured at a 9.1 micron wavelength cw focused CO2 Doppler lidar for approximately 52 flight hours, covering an equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 30,000 km in the troposphere. Some quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents at altitudes that ranged from approximately 0.1 to 12 km. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and ocean were observed. Mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was approximately 6 x 10(exp -11)/ms/r, consistent with previous lidar datasets. While these atmospheric measurements were made, the lidar also retrieved a distinct backscatter signal from the Earth's surface from the unfocused part of the focused cw lidar beam during aircraft rolls. Atmospheric backscatter can be highly variable both spatially and temporally, whereas, Earth-surface backscatter is relatively much less variant and can be quite predictable. Therefore, routine atmospheric backscatter measurements by an airborne lidar also give Earth surface backscatter which can allow for investigating the Earth terrain. In the case where the Earth's surface backscatter is coming from a well-known and fairly uniform region, then it can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities during flight. These Earth surface measurements over varying Californian terrain during the mission were compared with laboratory backscatter measurements using the same lidar of various

  4. Magnetoelastic sensors in combination with nanometer-scale honeycombed thin film ceramic TiO2 for remote query measurement of humidity.

    PubMed

    Grimes, C A; Kouzoudis, D; Dickey, E C; Qian, D; Anderson, M A; Shahidain, R; Lindsey, M; Green, L

    2000-05-01

    Ribbonlike magnetoelastic sensors can be considered the magnetic analog of an acoustic bell; in response to an externally applied magnetic field impulse the sensors emit magnetic flux with a characteristic resonant frequency. The magnetic flux can be detected external to the test area using a pick-up coil, enabling query remote monitoring of the sensor. The characteristic resonant frequency of a magnetoelastic sensor changes in response to mass loads. [L.D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Theory of Elasticity, 3rd ed. (Pergamon, New York, 1986). p. 100].Therefore, remote query chemical sensors can be fabricated by combining the magnetoelastic sensors with a mass changing, chemically responsive layer. In this work magnetoelastic sensors are coated with humidity-sensitive thin films of ceramic, nanodimensionally porous TiO2 to make remote query humidity sensors.

  5. Magnetoelastic sensors in combination with nanometer-scale honeycombed thin film ceramic TiO2 for remote query measurement of humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Kouzoudis, D.; Dickey, E. C.; Qian, D.; Anderson, M. A.; Shahidain, R.; Lindsey, M.; Green, L.

    2000-01-01

    Ribbonlike magnetoelastic sensors can be considered the magnetic analog of an acoustic bell; in response to an externally applied magnetic field impulse the sensors emit magnetic flux with a characteristic resonant frequency. The magnetic flux can be detected external to the test area using a pick-up coil, enabling query remote monitoring of the sensor. The characteristic resonant frequency of a magnetoelastic sensor changes in response to mass loads. [L.D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Theory of Elasticity, 3rd ed. (Pergamon, New York, 1986). p. 100].Therefore, remote query chemical sensors can be fabricated by combining the magnetoelastic sensors with a mass changing, chemically responsive layer. In this work magnetoelastic sensors are coated with humidity-sensitive thin films of ceramic, nanodimensionally porous TiO2 to make remote query humidity sensors. c2000 American Institute of Physics.

  6. The research of remote sensing in karst collapse remote sense based on airborne LiDAR system: taking Meitanba mining area in Hunan Province as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Zhihong; Wang, Hao; Wu, Fang; Guo, Zhaocheng

    2014-11-01

    Taking Meitanba mining area in Hunan Province as an example, by using the achieved high accuracy and high resolution point-cloud data and digital image data by airborne LiDAR system, this research built the 3D landform of the vegetation-covered areas, got the features of micro landform in the areas, and offered quantity factors for research of geo phenomenon which related to regional landforms and geoscience process. Based on the high accuracy data from airborne LiDAR system and combined with the basic data of geology,the forming mechanism of the karst collapse of Meitanba mining area in Hunan Province and the relationship of surface collapse and mining activities are analyzed. The research mentioned that the reason of the karst collapse in Meitanba mining area is with the basic conditions of forming karst landform and plus the increasing water flow and exchange rate of the underground water, and then the water level decrease, finally different degrees of the regional karst collapse have happened.

  7. Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-Flight Measurements (ACLAIM) Flight Testing of the Lidar Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soreide, David C.; Bogue, Rodney K.; Ehernberger, L. J.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Bowdle, David A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the ACLAIM program is ultimately to establish the viability of light detection and ranging (lidar) as a forward-looking sensor for turbulence. The goals of this flight test are to: 1) demonstrate that the ACLAIM lidar system operates reliably in a flight test environment, 2) measure the performance of the lidar as a function of the aerosol backscatter coefficient (beta), 3) use the lidar system to measure atmospheric turbulence and compare these measurements to onboard gust measurements, and 4) make measurements of the aerosol backscatter coefficient, its probability distribution and spatial distribution. The scope of this paper is to briefly describe the ACLAIM system and present examples of ACLAIM operation in flight, including comparisons with independent measurements of wind gusts, gust-induced normal acceleration, and the derived eddy dissipation rate.

  8. International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, Fourth Thematic Conference: Remote Sensing for Exploration Geology, San Francisco, CA, April 1-4, 1985, Proceedings. Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    State of the art applications of remote sensing in geological exploration programs are discussed along with research and development activities aimed at increasing the future capabilities of this technology for exploration geology. The topics considered include: technical issues in the state of the art; regional exploration models; remote sensing applications for hydrocarbon exploration; commercialization of remote sensing satellites; and data integration. Also addressed are: remote sensing applications for mineral exploration; geobotanical and environmental remote sensing; image processing techniques and applications; advanced sensors, radar, and airborne systems; and engineering, logistics, and marine applications.

  9. International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, Fourth Thematic Conference: Remote Sensing for Exploration Geology, San Francisco, CA, April 1-4, 1985, Proceedings. Volumes 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    State of the art applications of remote sensing in geological exploration programs are discussed along with research and development activities aimed at increasing the future capabilities of this technology for exploration geology. The topics considered include: technical issues in the state of the art; regional exploration models; remote sensing applications for hydrocarbon exploration; commercialization of remote sensing satellites; and data integration. Also addressed are: remote sensing applications for mineral exploration; geobotanical and environmental remote sensing; image processing techniques and applications; advanced sensors, radar, and airborne systems; and engineering, logistics, and marine applications.

  10. Remote sensing space science enabled by the multiple instrument distributed aperture sensor (MIDAS) concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, Joseph T.; Duncan, Alan; Stubbs, David; Sigler, Robert D.; Kendrick, Richard L.; Smith, Eric H.; Mason, James E.; Delory, Gregory; Lipps, Jere H.; Manga, Michael; Graham, James R.; de Pater, Imke; Reiboldt, Sarah; Bierhaus, Edward; Dalton, James B.; Fienup, James R.; Yu, Jeffrey W.

    2004-11-01

    The science capabilities and features of an innovative and revolutionary approach to remote sensing imaging systems aimed at increasing the return on future planetary science missions many fold are described. Our concept, called Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS), provides a large-aperture, wide-field, diffraction-limited telescope at a fraction of the cost, mass and volume of conventional space telescopes, by integrating advanced optical imaging interferometer technologies into a multi-functional remote sensing science payload. MIDAS acts as a single front-end actively controlled telescope array for use on common missions, reducing the cost, resources, complexity, and risks of developing a set of back-end science instruments (SIs) tailored to each specific mission. By interfacing to multiple science instruments, MIDAS enables either sequential or concurrent SI operations in all functional modes. Passive imaging modes enable remote sensing at diffraction-limited resolution sequentially by each SI, as well as at somewhat lower resolution by multiple SIs acting concurrently on the image, such as in different wavebands. MIDAS inherently provides nanometer-resolution hyperspectral passive imaging without the need for any moving parts in the SI's. Our optical design features high-resolution imaging for long dwell times at high altitudes, <1m GSD from the 5000km extent of spiral orbits, thereby enabling regional remote sensing of dynamic planet surface processes, as well as ultra-high resolution of 2cm GSD from a 100km science orbit that enable orbital searches for signs of life processes on the planet surface. In its active remote sensing modes, using an integrated solid-state laser source, MIDAS enables LIDAR, vibrometry, surface illumination, ablation, laser spectroscopy and optical laser communications. The powerful combination of MIDAS passive and active modes, each with sequential or concurrent SI operations, increases potential science return

  11. Development of a Three Dimensional Wireless Sensor Network for Terrain-Climate Research in Remote Mountainous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, K.; Davis, A.; Gessler, P.; Hess, H.; Holden, Z.; Link, T. E.; Newingham, B. A.; Smith, A. M.; Robinson, P.

    2011-12-01

    Developing sensor networks that are robust enough to perform in the world's remote regions is critical since these regions serve as important benchmarks compared to human-dominated areas. Paradoxically, the factors that make these remote, natural sites challenging for sensor networking are often what make them indispensable for climate change research. We aim to overcome these challenges by developing a three-dimensional sensor network arrayed across a topoclimatic gradient (1100-1800 meters) in a wilderness area in central Idaho. Development of this sensor array builds upon advances in sensing, networking, and power supply technologies coupled with experiences of the multidisciplinary investigators in conducting research in remote mountainous locations. The proposed gradient monitoring network will provide near real-time data from a three-dimensional (3-D) array of sensors measuring biophysical parameters used in ecosystem process models. The network will monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, humidity, air and soil temperature, soil water content, precipitation, incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation, snow depth, wind speed and direction, tree stem growth and leaf wetness at time intervals ranging from seconds to days. The long-term goal of this project is to realize a transformative integration of smart sensor networks adaptively communicating data in real-time to ultimately achieve a 3-D visualization of ecosystem processes within remote mountainous regions. Process models will be the interface between the visualization platforms and the sensor network. This will allow us to better predict how non-human dominated terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems function and respond to climate dynamics. Access to the data will be ensured as part of the Northwest Knowledge Network being developed at the University of Idaho, through ongoing Idaho NSF-funded cyber infrastructure initiatives, and existing data management systems funded by NSF, such as

  12. Discrimination techniques employing both reflective and thermal multispectral signals. [for remote sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Crane, R. B.; Richardson, W.

    1973-01-01

    Recent improvements in remote sensor technology carry implications for data processing. Multispectral line scanners now exist that can collect data simultaneously and in registration in multiple channels at both reflective and thermal (emissive) wavelengths. Progress in dealing with two resultant recognition processing problems is discussed: (1) More channels mean higher processing costs; to combat these costs, a new and faster procedure for selecting subsets of channels has been developed. (2) Differences between thermal and reflective characteristics influence recognition processing; to illustrate the magnitude of these differences, some explanatory calculations are presented. Also introduced, is a different way to process multispectral scanner data, namely, radiation balance mapping and related procedures. Techniques and potentials are discussed and examples presented.

  13. First measurements of the Twomey indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, Graham; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Veron, Dana E.; Previdi, Michael

    2003-03-01

    We demonstrate first measurements of the aerosol indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors at a continental US site. The response of nonprecipitating, ice-free clouds to changes in aerosol loading is quantified in terms of a relative change in cloud-drop effective radius for a relative change in aerosol extinction under conditions of equivalent cloud liquid water path. This is done in a single column of air at a temporal resolution of 20 s (spatial resolution of ~100 m). Cloud-drop effective radius is derived from a cloud radar and microwave radiometer. Aerosol extinction is measured below cloud base by a Raman lidar. Results suggest that aerosols associated with maritime or northerly air trajectories tend to have a stronger effect on clouds than aerosols associated with northwesterly trajectories that also have local influence. There is good correlation (0.67) between the cloud response and a measure of cloud turbulence.

  14. Earth Resources: A continuing bibliography with indexes, issue 2. [remote sensors and data acquisition techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Reports, articles, and other documents announced between April and June 1974 in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR), and International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA) are cited. Documents related to the identification and evaluation by means of sensors in spacecraft and aircraft of vegetation, minerals, and other natural resources, and the techniques and potentialities of surveying and keeping up-to-date inventories of such riches are included along with studies of such natural phenomena as earthquakes, volcanoes, ocean currents, and magnetic fields; and such cultural phenomena as cities, transportation networks, and irrigation systems. The components and use of remote sensing and geophysical instrumentation, their subsystems, observational procedures, signature and analyses and interpretive techniques for gathering data are, described. All reports generated under NASA's Earth Resources Survey Program for the time period covered are included.

  15. Implementation of multichannel sensors for remote biomedical measurements in a microsystems format.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Erik A; Wang, Lei; Cui, Li; Tang, Tong Boon; Ahmadian, Mansour; Astaras, Alexander; Reid, Stuart W J; Yam, Philippa S; Murray, Alan F; Flynn, Brian W; Beaumont, Steve P; Cumming, David R S; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2004-03-01

    A novel microelectronic "pill" has been developed for in situ studies of the gastro-intestinal tract, combining microsensors and integrated circuits with system-level integration technology. The measurement parameters include real-time remote recording of temperature, pH, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen. The unit comprises an outer biocompatible capsule encasing four microsensors, a control chip, a discrete component radio transmitter, and two silver oxide cells (the latter providing an operating time of 40 h at the rated power consumption of 12.1 mW). The sensors were fabricated on two separate silicon chips located at the front end of the capsule. The robust nature of the pill makes it adaptable for use in a variety of environments related to biomedical and industrial applications.

  16. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Wiemann, Dora K.; Choi, Junoh; Howell, Stephen W.

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  17. Remote monitoring of soldier safety through body posture identification using wearable sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subir; Quwaider, Muhannad

    2008-04-01

    The physical safety and well being of the soldiers in a battlefield is the highest priority of Incident Commanders. Currently, the ability to track and monitor soldiers rely on visual and verbal communication which can be somewhat limited in scenarios where the soldiers are deployed inside buildings and enclosed areas that are out of visual range of the commanders. Also, the need for being stealth can often prevent a battling soldier to send verbal clues to a commander about his or her physical well being. Sensor technologies can remotely provide various data about the soldiers including physiological monitoring and personal alert safety system functionality. This paper presents a networked sensing solution in which a body area wireless network of multi-modal sensors can monitor the body movement and other physiological parameters for statistical identification of a soldier's body posture, which can then be indicative of the physical conditions and safety alerts of the soldier in question. The specific concept is to leverage on-body proximity sensing and a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based mechanism that can be applied for stochastic identification of human body postures using a wearable sensor network. The key idea is to collect relative proximity information between wireless sensors that are strategically placed over a subject's body to monitor the relative movements of the body segments, and then to process that using HMM in order to identify the subject's body postures. The key novelty of this approach is a departure from the traditional accelerometry based approaches in which the individual body segment movements, rather than their relative proximity, is used for activity monitoring and posture detection. Through experiments with body mounted sensors we demonstrate that while the accelerometry based approaches can be used for differentiating activity intensive postures such as walking and running, they are not very effective for identification and

  18. Airborne Navigation Sensors Using The Global Positioning System (GPS) / Precise Positioning Service (PPS) for Area Navigation (RNAV) in Required Navigation Performance (RNP) Airspace; RNP-20 RNAV Through RNP-0.3 RNAV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-11

    GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ( GPS ) I PRECISE POSITIONING SERVICE (PPS) FOR AREA NAVIGATION (RNA...Navigation Sensors Using The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) / Precise Positioning Service (PPS) For Area Navigation (RNAV) In Required Navigation...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Subject: MSO-C145, AIRBORNE NAVIGATION SENSORS USING THE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ( GPS

  19. Improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source for system-level testing of remote optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance. Keywords: Calibration, radiometry, remote sensing, source.

  20. Airborne forward-pointing UV Rayleigh lidar for remote clear air turbulence detection: system design and performance.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, Patrick; Wirth, Martin; Ehret, Gerhard; Barny, Hervé; Rondeau, Philippe; Veerman, Henk

    2016-11-10

    A high-performance airborne UV Rayleigh lidar system was developed within the European project DELICAT. With its forward-pointing architecture, it aims at demonstrating a novel detection scheme for clear air turbulence (CAT) for an aeronautics safety application. Due to its occurrence in clear and clean air at high altitudes (aviation cruise flight level), this type of turbulence evades microwave radar techniques and in most cases coherent Doppler lidar techniques. The present lidar detection technique relies on air density fluctuation measurement and is thus independent of backscatter from hydrometeors and aerosol particles. The subtle air density fluctuations caused by the turbulent air flow demand exceptionally high stability of the setup and in particular of the detection system. This paper describes an airborne test system for the purpose of demonstrating this technology and turbulence detection method: a high-power UV Rayleigh lidar system is installed on a research aircraft in a forward-looking configuration for use in cruise flight altitudes. Flight test measurements demonstrate this unique lidar system being able to resolve air density fluctuations occurring in light-to-moderate CAT at 5 km or moderate CAT at 10 km distance. A scaling of the determined stability and noise characteristics shows that such performance is adequate for an application in commercial air transport.

  1. A real-time heart rate analysis for a remote millimeter wave I-Q sensor.

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, S.; Liao, S.; Elmer, T.; Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C.

    2011-06-01

    This paper analyzes heart rate (HR) information from physiological tracings collected with a remote millimeter wave (mmW) I-Q sensor for biometric monitoring applications. A parameter optimization method based on the nonlinear Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used. The mmW sensor works at 94 GHz and can detect the vital signs of a human subject from a few to tens of meters away. The reflected mmW signal is typically affected by respiration, body movement, background noise, and electronic system noise. Processing of the mmW radar signal is, thus, necessary to obtain the true HR. The down-converted received signal in this case consists of both the real part (I-branch) and the imaginary part (Q-branch), which can be considered as the cosine and sine of the received phase of the HR signal. Instead of fitting the converted phase angle signal, the method directly fits the real and imaginary parts of the HR signal, which circumvents the need for phase unwrapping. This is particularly useful when the SNR is low. Also, the method identifies both beat-to-beat HR and individual heartbeat magnitude, which is valuable for some medical diagnosis applications. The mean HR here is compared to that obtained using the discrete Fourier transform.

  2. Monitoring drought using multi-sensor remote sensing data in cropland of Gansu Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Linglin; Shan, Jie; Xiang, Daxiang

    2014-03-01

    Various drought monitoring models have been developed from different perspectives, as drought is impacted by various factors (precipitation, evaporation, runoff) and usually reflected in various aspects (vegetation condition, temperature). Cloud not only plays an important role in the earth's energy balance and climate change, but also directly impacts the regional precipitation and evaporation. As a result, the change of cloud cover and cloud type can be used to monitor drought. This paper proposes a new drought composite index, the Drought Composite Index (DCI), for drought monitoring based on multi-sensor remote sensing data in cropland of Gansu Province. This index combines the cloud classification data (CLS) from FY satellite and Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) which was calculated using the maximum and minimum NDVI values for the same time period from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Pearson correlation was performed to correlate NDVI, VCI, CLS and DCI values to precipitation data and soil moisture (SM) data collected from 20 meteorological stations during the growing season of 2011 and 2012. Better agreement was observed between DCI and precipitation as compared with that between NDVI/VCI and precipitation, especially the one-month precipitation, and there is an obvious time lag in the response of vegetation to precipitation. In addition, the results indicated that DCI well reflected precipitation fluctuations in the study area promising a possibility for early drought awareness necessary and near real-time drought monitoring.

  3. A more acceptable endoluminal implantation for remotely monitoring ingestible sensors anchored to the stomach wall.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hidetoshi; Izumi, Shintaro; Yoshimoto, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Several types of implant devices have been proposed and introduced into healthcare and telemedicine systems for monitoring physiological parameters, sometimes for very long periods of time. To our disappointment, most of the devices are implanted invasively and by surgery. We often have to surgically remove such devices after they have finished their mission or before the battery becomes worn out. Wearable devices have the possibility to become new modalities for monitoring vital parameters less-invasively. However, for round-the-clock monitoring of data from sensors over long periods of time, it would be better to put them inside the body to avoid causing inconvenience to patients in their daily lives. This study tested a less invasive endoluminal approach and innovative tools (developed during our research into therapeutic capsule endoscopy) for remotely anchoring ingestible sensors to the stomach wall. Preliminary investigations are also described about wireless communication (NFC, ZigBee, and Bluetooth) for low power consumption and inductive extracorporeal power feeding wirelessly to the circuits in a phantom lined with swine gastric mucosa. Electrocardiogram and pH were monitored and those parameters were successfully transmitted by wireless communication ICs to the Internet via a portable device.

  4. Implementation of the remote measuring system for addiction patients in rehabilitation applying vital sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Myung-Jae; Lee, Ki-Young; Kwon, Young-Man

    2014-01-01

    Recently, with the rapid development of related ubiquitous industries, ubiquitous-Zone (u-Zone) development is being promoted to build a ubiquitous environment within a specific area. From a health care system perspective, in particular, u-Zone is expected to contribute to reducing cost and effort to manage patients’ condition such as in-patients, addiction patients and mental patients. In contrast, the current health care system only targets specific persons or continues to expand the internal system of hospitals. As addiction patients are on the rise in terms of drug addiction, including alcohol and narcotics, behavioural addiction attributable to the exposure to games, gambling, Internet and mobile communications and shopping is also becoming a problem. That is why it is difficult to collect data for the daily addiction status, which causes difficulties in systematic management and accurate diagnosis. Therefore, this paper suggests a remote measuring system to collect continuous condition data, which monitors the addiction patients via the vital sign measuring sensor within u-Zone. That is, the system collects their condition information from the sensors measuring heart rate, body temperature and acceleration, based on which the specialists determine the patient's emotional state. These data are expected to become the basis of diagnosing and managing addiction patients. PMID:26019608

  5. Review of remote-sensor potential for wind-energy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hooke, W.H.

    1981-03-01

    This report evaluates a number of remote-sensing systems such as radars, lidars, and acoustic echo sounders which are potential alternatives to the cup- and propeller anemometers routinely used in wind energy siting. The high costs and demanding operational requirements of these sensors currently preclude their use in the early stages of a multi-phase wind energy siting strategy such as that recently articulated by Hiester and Pennell (1981). Instead, these systems can be used most effectively in the lattermost stages of the siting process - what Hiester and Pennell (1981) refer to as the site development phase, necessary only for the siting of large wind-energy conversion systems (WECS) or WECS clusters. Even for this particular application only four techniques appear to be operational now; that is, if used properly, these techniques should provide the data sets currently considered adequate for wind-energy siting purposes. They are, in rough order of increasing expense and operating demands: optical transverse wind sensors; acoustic Doppler sounders; time-of-flight and continuous wave (CW) Doppler lidar; and frequency-modulated, continuous wave (FM-CW) Doppler radar.

  6. An investigation for the development of an integrated optical data preprocessor. [preprocessing remote sensor outputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verber, C. M.; Kenan, R. P.; Hartman, N. F.; Chapman, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory model of a 16 channel integrated optical data preprocessor was fabricated and tested in response to a need for a device to evaluate the outputs of a set of remote sensors. It does this by accepting the outputs of these sensors, in parallel, as the components of a multidimensional vector descriptive of the data and comparing this vector to one or more reference vectors which are used to classify the data set. The comparison is performed by taking the difference between the signal and reference vectors. The preprocessor is wholly integrated upon the surface of a LiNbO3 single crystal with the exceptions of the source and the detector. He-Ne laser light is coupled in and out of the waveguide by prism couplers. The integrated optical circuit consists of a titanium infused waveguide pattern, electrode structures and grating beam splitters. The waveguide and electrode patterns, by virtue of their complexity, make the vector subtraction device the most complex integrated optical structure fabricated to date.

  7. Digital imaging and remote sensing image generator (DIRSIG) as applied to NVESD sensor performance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly E.; Choi, Hee-sue S.; Kaur, Balvinder; Olson, Jeffrey T.; Hill, Clayton F.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2016-05-01

    The US Army's Communications Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (referred to as NVESD) is developing a virtual detection, recognition, and identification (DRI) testing methodology using simulated imagery as a means of augmenting the field testing component of sensor performance evaluation, which is expensive, resource intensive, time consuming, and limited to the available target(s) and existing atmospheric visibility and environmental conditions at the time of testing. Existing simulation capabilities such as the Digital Imaging Remote Sensing Image Generator (DIRSIG) and NVESD's Integrated Performance Model Image Generator (NVIPM-IG) can be combined with existing detection algorithms to reduce cost/time, minimize testing risk, and allow virtual/simulated testing using full spectral and thermal object signatures, as well as those collected in the field. NVESD has developed an end-to-end capability to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Simple detection algorithms have been used on the degraded images generated by NVIPM-IG to determine the relative performance of the algorithms on both DIRSIG-simulated and collected images. Evaluating the degree to which the algorithm performance agrees between simulated versus field collected imagery is the first step in validating the simulated imagery procedure.

  8. Implementation of the remote measuring system for addiction patients in rehabilitation applying vital sensor.

    PubMed

    Lim, Myung-Jae; Lee, Ki-Young; Kwon, Young-Man

    2014-11-14

    Recently, with the rapid development of related ubiquitous industries, ubiquitous-Zone (u-Zone) development is being promoted to build a ubiquitous environment within a specific area. From a health care system perspective, in particular, u-Zone is expected to contribute to reducing cost and effort to manage patients' condition such as in-patients, addiction patients and mental patients. In contrast, the current health care system only targets specific persons or continues to expand the internal system of hospitals. As addiction patients are on the rise in terms of drug addiction, including alcohol and narcotics, behavioural addiction attributable to the exposure to games, gambling, Internet and mobile communications and shopping is also becoming a problem. That is why it is difficult to collect data for the daily addiction status, which causes difficulties in systematic management and accurate diagnosis. Therefore, this paper suggests a remote measuring system to collect continuous condition data, which monitors the addiction patients via the vital sign measuring sensor within u-Zone. That is, the system collects their condition information from the sensors measuring heart rate, body temperature and acceleration, based on which the specialists determine the patient's emotional state. These data are expected to become the basis of diagnosing and managing addiction patients.

  9. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  10. Airborne observations of bioaerosol over the Southeast United States using a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Luke D.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Chen, Gao; Corr, Chelsea A.; Crumeyrolle, Suzanne N.; Diskin, Glenn; Hudgins, Charlie; Martin, Robert; Mikoviny, Tomas; Moore, Richard; Shook, Michael; Thornhill, K. Lee; Winstead, Edward L.; Wisthaler, Armin; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2016-07-01

    Biological aerosols represent a diverse subset of particulate matter that is emitted directly to the atmosphere in the form of (but not limited to) bacteria, fungal spores, pollens, viruses, and plant debris. These particles can have local air quality implications, but potentially play a larger climate role by acting as efficient ice nucleating particles (INPs) and cloud condensation nuclei. We have deployed a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor on the NASA DC-8 aircraft to (1) quantify boundary layer (BL) variability of fluorescent biological aerosol particle (FBAP) concentrations in the Southeast United States (SEUS), (2) link this variability explicitly to land cover heterogeneity in the region, and (3) examine the vertical profile of bioaerosols in the context of convective vertical redistribution. Flight-averaged FBAP concentrations ranged between 0.1 and 0.43 scm-3 (cm-3 at standard temperature and pressure) with relatively homogeneous concentrations throughout the region; croplands showed the highest concentrations in the BL (0.37 scm-3), and lowest concentrations were associated with evergreen forests (0.24 scm-3). Observed FBAP concentrations are in generally good agreement with model parameterized emission rates for bacteria, and discrepancies are likely the result of fungal spore contributions. Shallow convection in the region is shown to be a relatively efficient lofting mechanism as the vertical transport efficiency of FBAP is at least equal to black carbon aerosol, suggesting that ground-level FBAP survives transport into the free troposphere to be available for INP activation. Comparison of the fraction of coarse-mode particles that were biological (fFBAP) suggested that the SEUS (fFBAP = 8.5%) was a much stronger source of bioaerosols than long-range transport during a Saharan Air Layer (SAL) dust event (fFBAP = 0.17%) or summertime marine emissions in the Gulf of Mexico (fFBAP = 0.73%).

  11. A low power on-chip class-E power amplifier for remotely powered implantable sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ture, Kerim; Kilinc, Enver G.; Dehollain, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a low power fully integrated class-E power amplifier and its integration with remotely powered sensor system. The class-E power amplifier is suitable solution for low-power applications due to its high power efficiency. However, the required high inductance values which make the on-chip integration of the power amplifier difficult. The designed power amplifier is fully integrated in the remotely powered sensor system and fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS process. The power is transferred to the implantable sensor system at 13.56 MHz by using an inductively coupled remote powering link. The induced AC voltage on the implant coil is converted into a DC voltage by a passive full-wave rectifier. A voltage regulator is used to suppress the ripples and create a clean and stable 1.8 V supply voltage for the sensor and communication blocks. The data collected from the sensors is transmitted by on-off keying modulated low-power transmitter at 1.2 GHz frequency. The transmitter is composed of a LC tank oscillator and a fully on-chip class-E power amplifier. An additional output network is used for the power amplifier which makes the integration of the power amplifier fully on-chip. The integrated power amplifier with 0.2 V supply voltage has a drain efficiency of 31.5% at -10 dBm output power for 50 Ω load. The measurement results verify the functionality of the power amplifier and the remotely powered implantable sensor system. The data communication is also verified by using a commercial 50 Ω chip antenna and has 600 kbps data rate at 1 m communication distance.

  12. Development of Ecogenomic Sensors for Remote Detection of Marine Microbes, Their Genes and Gene Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholin, C.; Preston, C.; Harris, A.; Birch, J.; Marin, R.; Jensen, S.; Roman, B.; Everlove, C.; Makarewicz, A.; Riot, V.; Hadley, D.; Benett, W.; Dzenitis, J.

    2008-12-01

    An internet search using the phrase "ecogenomic sensor" will return numerous references that speak broadly to the idea of detecting molecular markers indicative of specific organisms, genes or other biomarkers within an environmental context. However, a strict and unified definition of "ecogenomic sensor" is lacking and the phrase may be used for laboratory-based tools and techniques as well as semi or fully autonomous systems that can be deployed outside of laboratory. We are exploring development of an ecogenomic sensor from the perspective of a field-portable device applied towards oceanographic research and water quality monitoring. The device is known as the Environmental Sample Processor, or ESP. The ESP employs wet chemistry molecular analytical techniques to autonomously assess the presence and abundance of specific organisms, their genes and/or metabolites in near real-time. Current detection chemistries rely on low- density DNA probe and protein arrays. This presentation will emphasize results from 2007-8 field trials when the ESP was moored in Monterey Bay, CA, as well as current engineering activities for improving analytical capacity of the instrument. Changes in microbial community structure at the rRNA level were observed remotely in accordance with changing chemical and physical oceanographic conditions. Current developments include incorporation of a reusable solid phase extraction column for purifying nucleic acids and a 4-channel real-time PCR module. Users can configure this system to support a variety of PCR master mixes, primer/probe combinations and control templates. An update on progress towards fielding a PCR- enabled ESP will be given along with an outline of plans for its use in coastal and oligotrophic oceanic regimes.

  13. Assessment of Superflux relative to fisheries research and monitoring. [airborne remote sensing of the Chesapeake bay plume and shelf regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the findings of the Superflux program relative to fishery research and monitoring are reviewed. The actual and potential influences of the plume on the shelf ecosystem contiguous to the mouth of Chesapeake Bay are described and insights derived from the combined use of in situ and remotely sensed data are presented.

  14. A Novel High Sensitivity Sensor for Remote Field Eddy Current Non-Destructive Testing Based on Orthogonal Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojie; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Zhanbin; Jia, Yueling

    2014-01-01

    Remote field eddy current is an effective non-destructive testing method for ferromagnetic tubular structures. In view of conventional sensors' disadvantages such as low signal-to-noise ratio and poor sensitivity to axial cracks, a novel high sensitivity sensor based on orthogonal magnetic field excitation is proposed. Firstly, through a three-dimensional finite element simulation, the remote field effect under orthogonal magnetic field excitation is determined, and an appropriate configuration which can generate an orthogonal magnetic field for a tubular structure is developed. Secondly, optimized selection of key parameters such as frequency, exciting currents and shielding modes is analyzed in detail, and different types of pick-up coils, including a new self-differential mode pick-up coil, are designed and analyzed. Lastly, the proposed sensor is verified experimentally by various types of defects manufactured on a section of a ferromagnetic tube. Experimental results show that the proposed novel sensor can largely improve the sensitivity of defect detection, especially for axial crack whose depth is less than 40% wall thickness, which are very difficult to detect and identify by conventional sensors. Another noteworthy advantage of the proposed sensor is that it has almost equal sensitivity to various types of defects, when a self-differential mode pick-up coil is adopted. PMID:25615738

  15. Retrieval of Vegetation Structure and Carbon Balance Parameters Using Ground-Based Lidar and Scaling to Airborne and Spaceborne Lidar Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahler, A. H.; Ni-Meister, W.; Woodcock, C. E.; Li, X.; Jupp, D. L.; Culvenor, D.

    2006-12-01

    This research uses a ground-based, upward hemispherical scanning lidar to retrieve forest canopy structural information, including tree height, mean tree diameter, basal area, stem count density, crown diameter, woody biomass, and green biomass. These parameters are then linked to airborne and spaceborne lidars to provide large-area mapping of structural and biomass parameters. The terrestrial lidar instrument, Echidna(TM), developed by CSIRO Australia, allows rapid acquisition of vegetation structure data that can be readily integrated with downward-looking airborne lidar, such as LVIS (Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor), and spaceborne lidar, such as GLAS (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) on ICESat. Lidar waveforms and vegetation structure are linked for these three sensors through the hybrid geometric-optical radiative-transfer (GORT) model, which uses basic vegetation structure parameters and principles of geometric optics, coupled with radiative transfer theory, to model scattering and absorption of light by collections of individual plant crowns. Use of a common model for lidar waveforms at ground, airborne, and spaceborne levels facilitates integration and scaling of the data to provide large-area maps and inventories of vegetation structure and carbon stocks. Our research plan includes acquisition of Echidna(TM) under-canopy hemispherical lidar scans at North American test sites where LVIS and GLAS data have been or are being acquired; analysis and modeling of spatially coincident lidar waveforms acquired by the three sensor systems; linking of the three data sources using the GORT model; and mapping of vegetation structure and carbon-balance parameters at LVIS and GLAS resolutions based on Echidna(TM) measurements.

  16. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Sensor Validation and Verification on National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Lockheed WP-3D Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsoucalas, George; Daniels, Taumi S.; Zysko, Jan; Anderson, Mark V.; Mulally, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aviation Safety and Security Program, the Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting project (TAMDAR) developed a low-cost sensor for aircraft flying in the lower troposphere. This activity was a joint effort with support from Federal Aviation Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and industry. This paper reports the TAMDAR sensor performance validation and verification, as flown on board NOAA Lockheed WP-3D aircraft. These flight tests were conducted to assess the performance of the TAMDAR sensor for measurements of temperature, relative humidity, and wind parameters. The ultimate goal was to develop a small low-cost sensor, collect useful meteorological data, downlink the data in near real time, and use the data to improve weather forecasts. The envisioned system will initially be used on regional and package carrier aircraft. The ultimate users of the data are National Centers for Environmental Prediction forecast modelers. Other users include air traffic controllers, flight service stations, and airline weather centers. NASA worked with an industry partner to develop the sensor. Prototype sensors were subjected to numerous tests in ground and flight facilities. As a result of these earlier tests, many design improvements were made to the sensor. The results of tests on a final version of the sensor are the subject of this report. The sensor is capable of measuring temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and icing. It can compute pressure altitude, indicated air speed, true air speed, ice presence, wind speed and direction, and eddy dissipation rate. Summary results from the flight test are presented along with corroborative data from aircraft instruments.

  17. State of the Art Satellite and Airborne Marine Oil Spill Remote Sensing: Application to the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    biofilm (Cunliffe & Murrell, 2009). To aid in standardizing reporting, the visual appearance of con- firmed oil slicks with respect to slick...International Journal of Remote Sensing, 11, 1741–1753. Boström, C. -E., Gerde, P., Hanberg, A., et al. (2002). Cancer risk assessment, indicators, and...microlayer is a gelatinous biofilm . International Society for Microbiology Ecology Journal, 3, 1001–1003. Dennison, P. E., & Matheson, D. S. (2011

  18. Assessment of Superflux relative to marine science and oceanography. [airborne remote sensing of the Chesapeake Bay plume and shelf regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esaias, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    A general assessment of the Superflux project is made in relation to marine science and oceanography. It is commented that the program clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of state-of-the-art technology required to study highly dynamic estuarine plumes, and the necessity of a broadly interdisciplinary, interactive remote sensing and shipboard program required to significantly advance the understanding of transport processes and impacts of estuarine outflows.

  19. Commercial Applications Multispectral Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birk, Ronald J.; Spiering, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Office of Commercial Programs is funding a multispectral sensor system to be used in the development of remote sensing applications. The Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor (ATLAS) is designed to provide versatility in acquiring spectral and spatial information. The ATLAS system will be a test bed for the development of specifications for airborne and spaceborne remote sensing instrumentation for dedicated applications. This objective requires spectral coverage from the visible through thermal infrared wavelengths, variable spatial resolution from 2-25 meters; high geometric and geo-location accuracy; on-board radiometric calibration; digital recording; and optimized performance for minimized cost, size, and weight. ATLAS is scheduled to be available in 3rd quarter 1992 for acquisition of data for applications such as environmental monitoring, facilities management, geographic information systems data base development, and mineral exploration.

  20. Investigation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds by combining airborne remote sensing and in situ observations during VERDI, RACEPAC and ACLOUD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, André; Bierwirth, Eike; Borrmann, Stephan; Crewell, Susanne; Herber, Andreas; Hoor, Peter; Jourdan, Olivier; Krämer, Martina; Lüpkes, Christof; Mertes, Stephan; Neuber, Roland; Petzold, Andreas; Schnaiter, Martin; Schneider, Johannes; Weigel, Ralf; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Wendisch, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    To improve our understanding of Arctic mixed-phase clouds a series of airborne research campaigns has been initiated by a collaboration of German research institutes. Clouds in areas dominated by a close sea-ice cover were observed during the research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) and the Radiation-Aerosol-Cloud Experiment in the Arctic Circle (RACEPAC, April/May 2014) which both were based in Inuvik, Canada. The aircraft (Polar 5 & 6, Basler BT-67) operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Germany did cover a wide area above the Canadian Beaufort with in total 149 flight hours (62h during VERDI, 87h during RACEPAC). For May/June 2017 a third campaign ACLOUD (Arctic Clouds - Characterization of Ice, aerosol Particles and Energy fluxes) with base in Svalbard is planned within the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre TR 172 ArctiC Amplification: Climate Relevant Atmospheric and SurfaCe Processes, and Feedback Mechanisms (AC)3 to investigate Arctic clouds in the transition zone between open ocean and sea ice. The aim of all campaigns is to combine remote sensing and in-situ cloud, aerosol and trace gas measurements to investigate interactions between radiation, cloud and aerosol particles. While during VERDI remote sensing and in-situ measurements were performed by one aircraft subsequently, for RACEPAC and ACLOUD two identical aircraft are coordinated at different altitudes to horizontally collocate both remote sensing and in-situ measurements. The campaign showed that in this way radiative and microphysical processes in the clouds can by studied more reliably and remote sensing methods can be validated efficiently. Here we will illustrate the scientific strategy of the projects including the progress in instrumentation. Differences in the general synoptic and sea ice situation and related changes in cloud properties at the different locations and seasons will be

  1. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  2. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  3. Detection, Identification, Location, and Remote Sensing using SAW RFID Sensor Tags

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, we will consider the problem of simultaneous detection, identification, location estimation, and remote sensing for multiple objects. In particular, we will describe the design and testing of a wireless system capable of simultaneously detecting the presence of multiple objects, identifying each object, and acquiring both a low-resolution estimate of location and a high-resolution estimate of temperature for each object based on wireless interrogation of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) radiofrequency identification (RFID) sensor tags affixed to each object. The system is being studied for application on the lunar surface as well as for terrestrial remote sensing applications such as pre-launch monitoring and testing of spacecraft on the launch pad and monitoring of test facilities. The system utilizes a digitally beam-formed planar receiving antenna array to extend range and provide direction-of-arrival information coupled with an approximate maximum-likelihood signal processing algorithm to provide near-optimal estimation of both range and temperature. The system is capable of forming a large number of beams within the field of view and resolving the information from several tags within each beam. The combination of both spatial and waveform discrimination provides the capability to track and monitor telemetry from a large number of objects appearing simultaneously within the field of view of the receiving array. In the presentation, we will summarize the system design and illustrate several aspects of the operational characteristics and signal structure. We will examine the theoretical performance characteristics of the system and compare the theoretical results with results obtained from experiments in both controlled laboratory environments and in the field.

  4. Novel Networked Remote Laboratory Architecture for Open Connectivity Based on PLC-OPC-LabVIEW-EJS Integration. Application in Remote Fuzzy Control and Sensors Data Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    González, Isaías; Calderón, Antonio José; Mejías, Andrés; Andújar, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the design and implementation of a network for integrating Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), the Object-Linking and Embedding for Process Control protocol (OPC) and the open-source Easy Java Simulations (EJS) package is presented. A LabVIEW interface and the Java-Internet-LabVIEW (JIL) server complete the scheme for data exchange. This configuration allows the user to remotely interact with the PLC. Such integration can be considered a novelty in scientific literature for remote control and sensor data acquisition of industrial plants. An experimental application devoted to remote laboratories is developed to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of the proposed approach. The experiment to be conducted is the parameterization and supervision of a fuzzy controller of a DC servomotor. The graphical user interface has been developed with EJS and the fuzzy control is carried out by our own PLC. In fact, the distinctive features of the proposed novel network application are the integration of the OPC protocol to share information with the PLC and the application under control. The user can perform the tuning of the controller parameters online and observe in real time the effect on the servomotor behavior. The target group is engineering remote users, specifically in control- and automation-related tasks. The proposed architecture system is described and experimental results are presented. PMID:27809229

  5. Novel Networked Remote Laboratory Architecture for Open Connectivity Based on PLC-OPC-LabVIEW-EJS Integration. Application in Remote Fuzzy Control and Sensors Data Acquisition.

    PubMed

    González, Isaías; Calderón, Antonio José; Mejías, Andrés; Andújar, José Manuel

    2016-10-31

    In this paper the design and implementation of a network for integrating Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), the Object-Linking and Embedding for Process Control protocol (OPC) and the open-source Easy Java Simulations (EJS) package is presented. A LabVIEW interface and the Java-Internet-LabVIEW (JIL) server complete the scheme for data exchange. This configuration allows the user to remotely interact with the PLC. Such integration can be considered a novelty in scientific literature for remote control and sensor data acquisition of industrial plants. An experimental application devoted to remote laboratories is developed to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of the proposed approach. The experiment to be conducted is the parameterization and supervision of a fuzzy controller of a DC servomotor. The graphical user interface has been developed with EJS and the fuzzy control is carried out by our own PLC. In fact, the distinctive features of the proposed novel network application are the integration of the OPC protocol to share information with the PLC and the application under control. The user can perform the tuning of the controller parameters online and observe in real time the effect on the servomotor behavior. The target group is engineering remote users, specifically in control- and automation-related tasks. The proposed architecture system is described and experimental results are presented.

  6. A Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Approach for Railway Corridor Ground Hazard Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kromer, Ryan; Hutchinson, Jean; Lato, Matt; Gauthier, Dave; Edwards, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Characterizing and monitoring ground hazard processes is a difficult endeavor along mountainous transportation corridors. This is primarily due to the quantity of hazard sites, complex topography, limited and sometimes hazardous access to sites, and obstructed views. The current hazard assessment approach for Canadian railways partly relies on the ability of inspection employees to assess hazard from track level, which isn't practical in complex slope environments. Various remote sensing sensors, implemented on numerous platforms have the potential to be used in these environments. They are frequently found to be complementary in their use, however, an optimum combination of these approaches has not yet been found for an operational rail setting. In this study, we investigate various cases where remote sensing technologies have been used to characterize and monitor ground hazards along railway corridors across the Canadian network, in order to better understand failure mechanisms, identify hazard source zones and to provide early warning. Since early 2012, a series of high resolution gigapixel images, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), Aerial laser scanning (ALS), ground based photogrammetry, oblique aerial photogrammetry (from helicopter and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) platforms), have been collected at ground hazard sites throughout the Canadian rail network. On a network level scale, comparison of sequential ALS scanning data has been found to be an ideal methodology for observing large-scale change and prioritizing high hazard sites for more detailed monitoring with terrestrial methods. The combination of TLS and high resolution gigapixel imagery at various temporal scales has allowed for a detailed characterization of the hazard level posed by the slopes, the identification of the main failure modes, an analysis of hazard activity, and the observation failure precursors such as deformation, rockfall and tension crack opening. At sites not feasible for ground

  7. Improvements in Virtual Sensors: Using Spatial Information to Estimate Remote Sensing Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Srivastava, Ashok N.; Stroeve, Julienne

    2005-01-01

    Various instruments are used to create images of the Earth and other objects in the universe in a diverse set of wavelength bands with the aim of understanding natural phenomena. Sometimes these instruments are built in a phased approach, with additional measurement capabilities added in later phases. In other cases, technology may mature to the point that the instrument offers new measurement capabilities that were not planned in the original design of the instrument. In still other cases, high resolution spectral measurements may be too costly to perform on a large sample and therefore lower resolution spectral instruments are used to take the majority of measurements. Many applied science questions that are relevant to the earth science remote sensing community require analysis of enormous amounts of data that were generated by instruments with disparate measurement capabilities. In past work [1], we addressed this problem using Virtual Sensors: a method that uses models trained on spectrally rich (high spectral resolution) data to "fill in" unmeasured spectral channels in spectrally poor (low spectral resolution) data. We demonstrated this method by using models trained on the high spectral resolution Terra MODIS instrument to estimate what the equivalent of the MODIS 1.6 micron channel would be for the NOAA AVHRR2 instrument. The scientific motivation for the simulation of the 1.6 micron channel is to improve the ability of the AVHRR2 sensor to detect clouds over snow and ice. This work contains preliminary experiments demonstrating that the use of spatial information can improve our ability to estimate these spectra.

  8. Wearable dry sensors with bluetooth connection for use in remote patient monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Gaetano; Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario; Jin, Craig; McEwan, Alistair; van Schaik, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Cost reduction has become the primary theme of healthcare reforms globally. More providers are moving towards remote patient monitoring, which reduces the length of hospital stays and frees up their physicians and nurses for acute cases and helps them to tackle staff shortages. Physiological sensors are commonly used in many human specialties e.g. electrocardiogram (ECG) electrodes, for monitoring heart signals, and electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes, for sensing the electrical activity of the brain, are the most well-known applications. Consequently there is a substantial unmet need for physiological sensors that can be simply and easily applied by the patient or primary carer, are comfortable to wear, can accurately sense parameters over long periods of time and can be connected to data recording systems using Bluetooth technology. We have developed a small, battery powered, user customizable portable monitor. This prototype is capable of recording three-axial body acceleration, skin temperature, and has up to four bio analogical front ends. Moreover, it is also able of continuous wireless transmission to any Bluetooth device including a PDA or a cellular phone. The bio-front end can use long-lasting dry electrodes or novel textile electrodes that can be embedded in clothes. The device can be powered by a standard mobile phone which has a Ni-MH 3.6 V battery, to sustain more than seven days continuous functioning when using the Bluetooth Sniff mode to reduce TX power. In this paper, we present some of the evaluation experiments of our wearable personal monitor device with a focus on ECG applications.

  9. Propagation Limitations in Remote Sensing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Multi-sensors and systems in remote sensing ; Radar sensing systems over land; Remote sensing techniques in oceanography; Influence of...propagation media and background; Infrared techniques in remote sensing ; Photography in remote sensing ; Analytical studies in remote sensing .

  10. Use of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer to calibrate the optical sensor on board the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Conel, James E.; Vandenbosch, Jeannette; Shimada, Masanobu

    1993-01-01

    We describe an experiment to calibrate the optical sensor (OPS) on board the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 with data acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). On 27 Aug. 1992 both the OPS and AVIRIS acquired data concurrently over a calibration target on the surface of Rogers Dry Lake, California. The high spectral resolution measurements of AVIRIS have been convolved to the spectral response curves of the OPS. These data in conjunction with the corresponding OPS digitized numbers have been used to generate the radiometric calibration coefficients for the eight OPS bands. This experiment establishes the suitability of AVIRIS for the calibration of spaceborne sensors in the 400 to 2500 nm spectral region.

  11. Neural networks in data analysis and modeling for detecting littoral oil-spills by airborne laser fluorosensor remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bin; An, Jubai; Brown, Carl E.; Chen, Weiwei

    2003-05-01

    In this paper an artificial neural network (ANN) approach, which is based on flexible nonlinear models for a very broad class of transfer functions, is applied for multi-spectral data analysis and modeling of airborne laser fluorosensor in order to differentiate between classes of oil on water surface. We use three types of algorithm: Perceptron Network, Back-Propagation (B-P) Network and Self-Organizing feature Maps (SOM) Network. Using the data in form of 64-channel spectra as inputs, the ANN presents the analysis and estimation results of the oil type on the basis of the type of background materials as outputs. The ANN is trained and tested using sample data set to the network. The results of the above 3 types of network are compared in this paper. It is proved that the training has developed a network