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Sample records for airborne sar airsar

  1. Proceedings of the Third Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Third Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop was held on 23-24 May 1991 at JPL. Thirty oral presentations were made and 18 poster papers displayed during the workshop. Papers from these 25 presentations are presented which include analyses of AIRSAR operations and studies in SAR remote sensing, ecology, hydrology, soil science, geology, oceanography, volcanology, and SAR mapping and data handling. Results from these studies indicate the direction and emphasis of future orbital radar-sensor missions that will be launched during the 1990's.

  2. Geocoding of AIRSAR/TOPSAR SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holecz, Francesco; Lou, Yungling; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that radar interferometry is a promising method for determination of digital elevation information and terrain slope from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. A multipolarimetric radar AIRSAR operates in the P, L, and C bands on board the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The TOPSAR, a special mode of the AIRSAR system, is able to collect single pass interferometric C and/or L band VV polarized data. A possible configuration of the AIRSAR/TOPSAR system is to acquire single pass interferometric data at C-band VV polarization and polarimetric radar data at the two other lower frequencies. The advantage of this configuration is to acquire digital topographic information at the same time the radar data is collected. The digital elevation information can therefore be used to correctly calibrate the SAR data. In this paper, a procedure to geocode the new AIRSAR/TOPSAR data is presented and an earlier AIRSAR/TOPSAR image is geocoded and evaluated in terms of geometric accuracy.

  3. Geocoding of AIRSAR/TOPSAR SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holecz, Francesco; Lou, Yun-Ling; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated and recognized that radar interferometry is a promising method for the determination of digital elevation information and terrain slope from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. An important application of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) data in areas with topographic variations is that the derived elevation and slope can be directly used for the absolute radiometric calibration of the amplitude SAR data as well as for scattering mechanisms analysis. On the other hand polarimetric SAR data has long been recognized as permitting a more complete inference of natural surfaces than a single channel radar system. In fact, imaging polarimetry provides the measurement of the amplitude and relative phase of all transmit and receive polarizations. On board the NASA DC-8 aircraft, NASA/JPL operates the multifrequency (P, L and C bands) multipolarimetric radar AIRSAR. The TOPSAR, a special mode of the AIRSAR system, is able to collect single-pass interferometric C- and/or L-band VV polarized data. A possible configuration of the AIRSAR/TOPSAR system is to acquire single-pass interferometric data at C-band VV polarization and polarimetric radar data at the two other lower frequencies. The advantage of this system configuration is to get digital topography information at the same time the radar data is collected. The digital elevation information can therefore be used to correctly calibrate the SAR data. This step is directly included in the new AIRSAR Integrated Processor. This processor uses a modification of the full motion compensation algorithm described by Madsen et al. (1993). However, the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with the additional products such as local incidence angle map, and the SAR data are in a geometry which is not convenient, since especially DEMs must be referred to a specific cartographic reference system. Furthermore, geocoding of SAR data is important for multisensor and/or multitemporal purposes. In this paper, a procedure to

  4. Characterization of wetland, forest, and agricultural ecosystems in Belize with airborne radar (AIRSAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Kevin O.; Rey-Benayas, Jose Maria; Paris, Jack F.

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar-C/X-SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) Experiment includes the study of wetland dynamics in the seasonal tropics. In preparation for these wetland studies, airborne P, L, and C band radar (AIRSAR) data of Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico acquired by NASA and JPL in March 1990 were analyzed. The first phase of our study focuses on AIRSAR data from the Gallon Jug test site in northwestern Belize, for which ground data were also collected during the three days prior to the overflight. One of the main objectives of the Gallon Jug study is to develop a method for characterizing wetland vegetation types and their flooding status with multifrequency polarimetric radar data.

  5. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yun-Jin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996, was divided into two smaller workshops:(1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop. This current paper, Volume 2 of the Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, presents the summaries for The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop.

  6. Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) on left rear fuselage of DC-8 Airborne Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A view of the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) antenna on the left rear fuselage of the DC-8. The AIRSAR captures images of the ground from the side of the aircraft and can provide precision digital elevation mapping capabilities for a variety of studies. The AIRSAR is one of a number of research systems that have been added to the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  7. PacRIM II: A review of AirSAR operations and system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, D.; Chu, A.; Lou, Y.; Miller, T.; O'Leary, E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we briefly review the AirSAR system, its expected performance, and quality of data obtained during that mission. We discuss the system hardware calibration methodologies, and present quantitative performance values of radar backscatter and interferometric height errors (random and systematic) from PACRIM II calibration data.

  8. Operations Manager Tim Miller checks out software for the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Tim Miller checks out software for the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR). He was the AIRSAR operations manager for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The AIRSAR produces imaging data for a range of studies conducted by the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  9. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 3: AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the third containing summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  10. Summaries of the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 3: AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the preliminary agenda and summaries for the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, on 1-5 June 1992. This main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on June 1 and 2; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on June 3; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2; and (3) the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on June 4 and 5; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3.

  11. Summaries of the 4th Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 3: AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Fourth Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held in Washington, D.C. on October 25-29, 1993. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on October 25-26, whose summaries appear in Volume 1; The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on October 27, whose summaries appear in Volume 2; and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on October 28-29, whose summaries appear in this volume, Volume 3.

  12. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  13. Comparison of JPL-AIRSAR and DLR E-SAR images from the MAC Europe 1991 campaign over testsite Oberpfaffenhofen: Frequency and polarization dependent backscatter variations from agricultural fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmullius, C.; Nithack, J.

    1992-01-01

    On July 12, the MAC Europe '91 (Multi-Sensor Airborne Campaign) took place over test site Oberpfaffenhofen. The DLR Institute of Radio-Frequency Technology participated with its C-VV, X-VV, and X-HH Experimental Synthetic Aperture Radar (E-SAR). The high resolution E-SAR images with a pixel size between 1 and 2 m and the polarimetric AIRSAR images were analyzed. Using both sensors in combination is a unique opportunity to evaluate SAR images in a frequency range from P- to X-band and to investigate polarimetric information.

  14. Investigation of AIRSAR signatures of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, G. R.; Lee, J. S.; Schuler, D. L.; Marmorino, G. O.; Askari, F.; Hoppel, K.; Kaiser, J. A. C.; Keller, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) measurements were made on 20 July 1990 during the NRL Gulf Stream (GS) experiment which addressed a number of scientific questions relating to SAR imaging of the ocean surface in the presence of variable currents and the background thermohaline circulation. The nature of the electromagnetic (e.m.) backscatter from the North edge of the GS using polarimetric signatures and amplitude imagery from the AIRSAR data is addressed.

  15. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, March 4-8, 1996. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yunjin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1. The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  16. On evaluating the accuracy of SAR sea-ice classification using multifrequency polarimetric AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Rignot, Eric

    1993-01-01

    We investigate how multifrequency and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery enhances present capability to discriminate different ice conditions in single-frequency, single-polarization satellite SAR data. Frequencies considered are C- (lambda = 5.6cm), L- (lambda = 24cm) and P- (lambda = 68cm) band. Radar backscatter characteristics of six radiometrically and polarimetrically distinct ice types are selected from a cluster analysis of the multifrequency polarimetric SAR data and used to classify SAR images. Validation of these ice conditions is based on information provided by aerial photos, weather and ice surface measurements acquired at an ice camp, together with airborne passive microwave imagery, and visual analysis of the SAR data. The six identified sea-ice types are: (1) multiyear sea-ice; (2) compressed first year ice; (3) first year rubble and ridges; (4) first year rough ice; (5) first year smooth ice; and (6) thin ice. Open water is absent in all analyzed data. Classification of the SAR imagery into those six ice types is performed using a Bayesian Maximum A Posteriori classifier. Two complete scenes acquired at different dates in different locations are classified. The scenes were chosen such that they are representative of typical ice conditions in the Beaufort Sea in March 1988 and because ancillary information is available for validating the segmentation of various ice surface conditions.

  17. A Vegetation Classification of the Opunohu Valley (Moorea Island, French Polynesia) based on a Relative Canopy-Height Class Set Using AirSAR and MASTER Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, B.; Thomas, J.; Capolsini, P.

    2003-12-01

    This paper addresses the vegetation mapping and land use of Opunohu Valley (Moorea Island - French Polynesia) using JPL-AirSAR and MASTER (MODIS/ASTER simulator) images acquired during the PACRIM2 mission (Aug. 2000). These sensors are different but can be considered as complementary since MASTER is a 20 meters ground resolution multispectral imaging scanner with 50 channels distributed in the visible-shortwave infrared, mid infrared and thermal infrared, and AirSAR is a C-band (TOPSAR) and L-band (POLSAR), 5meters ground resolution radar sensor. Our main application field deals with the complex and fragile vegetation cover of south pacific volcanic islands. We presently focus on Opunohu Valley because of its highly representative diversity of vegetation and land cover (found in other polynesian volcanic islands), including different types of forests, coconut fields, grass fields, fern lands, urban zones, agricultural areas, etc... We first defined an original set of classes based on the relative canopy-height of vegetation, we then composed a well-suited RGB SAR-composite image in order to visually discriminate our vegetation classes. An interesting "pineapple fields" class (an important economic resource in Moorea island) proved to particularly discriminate from height-related "grass fields" class because of its structural properties, which lead to a particular signature on SAR images. Using a supervised maximum likelihood algorithm, two classification maps have been defined on both the AirSAR and the MASTER images, using aerial photographs as a ground truth training set. The vegetal species included in each class as well as the classification results are further discussed and the MASTER and AirSAR based classification maps are compared.

  18. Geometric rectification and geocoding of JPL's AIRSAR data over hilly terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroof, H.; Degrandi, G.; Sieber, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    A post-processing system was developed to georeference and geocode airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data collected by the JPL-Airborne SAR (AIRSAR) System over hilly terrain during the 1990 MAESTRO1 campaign. Georectification relates image coordinates and object coordinates while the geocoding involves resampling. The georectification method uses a hybrid method based upon a number of navigational parameters and minimal two ground-control points which are referenced in both image and map space. The calculation of the intersection of the SAR signal wavefront and a digital elevation model allowed, within certain error bounds, acquisition of the object-to-image and image-to-object relationships.

  19. Airborne SAR imagery to support hydraulic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, S.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite images and airborne SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery are increasingly widespread and they are effective tools for measuring the size of flood events and for assessment of damage. The Hurricane Katrina disaster and the tsunami catastrophe in Indian Ocean countries are two recent and sadly famous examples. Moreover, as well known, the inundation maps can be used as tools to calibrate and validate hydraulic model (e.g. Horritt et al., Hydrological Processes, 2007). We carry out an application of a 1D hydraulic model coupled with a high resolution DTM for predicting the flood inundation processes. The study area is a 16 km reach of the River Severn, in west-central England, for which, four maps of inundated areas, obtained through airborne SAR images, and hydrometric data are available. The inundation maps are used for the calibration/validation of a 1D hydraulic model through a comparison between airborne SAR images and the results of hydraulic simulations. The results confirm the usefulness of inundation maps as hydraulic modelling tools and, moreover, show that 1D hydraulic model can be effectively used when coupled with high resolution topographic information.

  20. Geologic mapping in Death Valley, California/Nevada using NASA/JPL airborne systems (AVIRIS, TIMS, and AIRSAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Dietz, John B.; Kiereinyoung, Kathryn S.

    1991-01-01

    A multi-sensor aircraft campaign called the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) conducted during 1989 resulted in acquisition of high quality multispectral images in the visible, near infrared, shortwave infrared, thermal infrared, and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The airborne data sets include the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Ancillary data include Landsat Thematic Mapper, laboratory and field spectral measurements, and traditional geologic mapping. The GRSFE data for a site in the northern Death Valley, (California and Nevada) region were calibrated to physical units and geometrically registered to a map base. Various aspects of this experiment are briefly discussed.

  1. Quantitative investigations of geologic surfaces utilizing airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data for Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data were collected over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. These two data sets were used to quantitatively characterize both the mineralogy and surface structure of the valley floor. Field mapping and characterization of the salt flats across the valley identified 16 separate units. The AVIRIS data were calibrated using the 'empirical line' method, and spectra extracted for the 16 units. A water vapor map was generated from the AVIRIS data and showed spatial variations in its distribution due to evaporation of surface water. Unmixing of the 16 spectral units produced maps of endmember abundance.

  2. Airborne X-band SAR tomography for forest volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, Fiona; Woodhouse, Iain H.; Mulgrew, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    We evaluate the usefulness of X-band, airborne (helicopter) data for tomography over forestry regions and discuss the use of compressive sensing algorithms to aid X-band airborne tomography. This work examines if there is any information that can be gained from forest volumes when analysing forestry sites using X-band data. To do so, different forest scenarios were simulated and a fast SAR simulator was used to model airborne multipass SAR data, at X-band, with parameters based on Leonardo's PicoSAR instrument. Model simulations considered varying factors that affect the height determination when using tomography. The main parameters that are considered here are: motion errors of the platform, the spacing of the flight paths, the resolution of the SAR images and plant life being present under the canopy (an understory). It was found that residual motion errors from the airborne platform cause the largest error in the tomographic profile.

  3. ISRO's dual frequency airborne SAR pre-cursor to NISAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, V. Manavala; Suneela, T. J. V. D.; Bhan, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have jointly embarked on NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) operating in L-band and S-band, which will map Earth's surface every 12 days. As a pre-cursor to the NISAR mission, ISRO is planning an airborne SAR (L&S band) which will deliver NISAR analogue data products to the science community. ISRO will develop all the hardware with the aim of adhering to system design aspects of NISAR to the maximum extent possible. It is a fully polarimetric stripmap SAR and can be operated in single, dual, compact, quasi-quad and full polarimetry modes. It has wide incidence angle coverage from 24°-77° with swath coverage from 5.5km to 15 km. Apart from simultaneous imaging operations, this system can also operate in standalone L/S SAR modes. This system is planned to operate from an aircraft platform with nominal altitude of 8000meters. Antenna for this SAR will be rigidly mounted to the aircraft, whereas, motion compensation will be implemented in the software processor to generate data products. Data products for this airborne SAR will be generated in slant & ground range azimuth dimension and geocoded in HDF5/Geotiff formats. This airborne SAR will help to prepare the Indian scientific community for optimum utilization of NISAR data. In-order to collect useful science data, airborne campaigns are planned from end of 2016 onwards.

  4. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  5. Airborne SAR determination of relative ages of Walker Valley moraines, eastern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, A.; Isacks, B.; Bloom, A.; Fielding, E.; Mcmurry, D.

    1991-01-01

    A regional study of the distribution and elevations of Pleistocene moraines in the Andes requires a method of determining relative age from space. One of our primary objectives is to establish the relative chronology of major climatic events responsible for glaciation in the Andes and other regions that are difficult to access on the ground and where suitable material for absolute age determination is lacking. The sensitivity of radar to surface roughness makes it possible to develop a remotely-based relative dating technique for landforms for which surface age and roughness can be correlated. We are developing such a technique with Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) imagery of the eastern Sierra Nevada where independent evidence is available for the ages and physical characteristics of moraines. The Sierra Nevada moraines are similar in form and environmental setting to Andean moraines that we have targeted for study during the pending Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) mission. SAR imagery is used to differentiate the ages of five moraine sequences of Walker Valley in the eastern Sierra Nevada. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  6. The relationship between aboveground biomass and radar backscatter as observed on airborne SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, Eric S.; Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura L.; Christensen, Norman L., Jr.; Dobson, M. Craig

    1991-01-01

    The initial results of an experiment to examine the dependence of radar image intensity on total above-ground biomass in a southern US pine forest ecosystem are presented. Two sets of data are discussed. First, we examine two L-band (VV-polarization) data sets which were collected 5 years apart. These data sets clearly illustrate the change in backscatter resulting from the growth of a young pine stand. Second, we examine the dependence between radar backscatter and biomass as a function of radar frequency using data from the JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) and ERIM/NADC P-3 SAR systems. These results show that there is a positive correlation between above-ground biomass and radar backscatter and at C-, L-, and P-bands, but very little correlation at C-band. The biomass level for which this positive correlation holds decreases as radar frequency increases. This positive correlation is stronger at HH and HV polarizations that VV polarization at L- and P-bands, but strongest at VV polarization for C-band.

  7. Cross-calibration between airborne SAR sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Manfred; Olivier, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    As Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system performance and experience in SAR signature evaluation increase, quantitative analysis becomes more and more important. Such analyses require an absolute radiometric calibration of the complete SAR system. To keep the expenditure on calibration of future multichannel and multisensor remote sensing systems (e.g., X-SAR/SIR-C) within a tolerable level, data from different tracks and different sensors (channels) must be cross calibrated. The 1989 joint E-SAR/DC-8 SAR calibration campaign gave a first opportunity for such an experiment, including cross sensor and cross track calibration. A basic requirement for successful cross calibration is the stability of the SAR systems. The calibration parameters derived from different tracks and the polarimetric properties of the uncalibrated data are used to describe this stability. Quality criteria for a successful cross calibration are the agreement of alpha degree values and the consistency of radar cross sections of equally sized corner reflectors. Channel imbalance and cross talk provide additional quality in case of the polarimetric DC-8 SAR.

  8. AIRSAR South American deployment: Operation plan, version 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, M.

    1993-01-01

    The United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Brazilian Commission for Space Activities (COBAE) are undertaking a joint experiment involving NASA's DC-8 research aircraft and the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) system during late May and June 1993. The research areas motivating these activities are: (1) fundamental research in the role of soils, vegetation, and hydrology in the global carbon cycle; and (2) in cooperation with South American scientists, airborne remote sensing research for the upcoming NASA Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR)-C/X-SAR flights on the Space Shuttle. A flight schedule and plans for the deployment that were developed are included. Maps of the site locations and schematic indications of flight routes and dates, plots showing swath locations derived from the flight requests and generated by flight planning software, and, most importantly, a calendar showing which sites will be imaged each day are included.

  9. Forest Information Extraction from Airborne P-Band PolSAR and X-Band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Tian, Xin; Feng, Qi; Zhao, Lei; Li, Lan; Hong, Wen; Pottier, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The key research progress of forest information extraction from high resolution PolSAR/InSAR data acquired by one China airborne system were summarized. Firstly, the airborne campaign activities carried out in 2012, 2013, in China were introduced. Secondly, the key SAR/InSAR data processing steps, such as, InSAR processing, SAR image geocoding terrain correction (GTC),the methods used to derive forest height, forest above ground biomass (AGB)from LiDAR, CCD and ground plots data were described. Finally, we introduced the forest information extraction methods and preliminary validation results from P-band PolSAR data and single baseline X-band InSAR data: (1)Forest height inversion using high resolution X-band InSAR data;(2) Forest AGB estimation using P-band PolSAR data; (3) Forest land cover types classification using PolSAR data.

  10. Forest Information Extraction from Airborne P-Band PolSAR and X-Band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Tian, Xin; Feng, Qi; Zhao, Lei; Li, Lan; Hong, Wen; Pottier, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The key research progress of forest information extraction from high resolution PolSAR/InSAR data acquired by one China airborne system were summarized. Firstly, the airborne campaign activities carried out in 2012, 2013, in China were introduced. Secondly, the key SAR/InSAR data processing steps, such as, InSAR processing, SAR image geocoding terrain correction (GTC), the methods used to derive forest height, forest above ground biomass (AGB) from LiDAR, CCD and ground plots data were described. Finally, we introduced the forest information extraction methods and preliminary validation results from P-band PolSAR data and single baseline X-band InSAR data: (1) Forest height inversion using high resolution X-band InSAR data; (2) Forest AGB estimation using P-band PolSAR data; (3) Forest land cover types classification using PolSAR data.

  11. First Results from an Airborne Ka-band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed SweepSAR technique that breaks typical Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) trade space using time-dependent multi-beam DBF on receive. Developing SweepSAR implementation using array-fed reflector for proposed DESDynI Earth Radar Mission concept. Performed first-of-a-kind airborne demonstration of the SweepSAR concept at Ka-band (35.6 GHz). Validated calibration and antenna pattern data sufficient for beam forming in elevation. (1) Provides validation evidence that the proposed Deformation Ecosystem Structure Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) SAR architecture is sound. (2) Functions well even with large variations in receiver gain / phase. Future plans include using prototype DESDynI SAR digital flight hardware to do the beam forming in real-time onboard the aircraft.

  12. Monitoring environmental state of Alaskan forests with AIRSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Way, Jobea; Rignot, Eric; Williams, Cindy; Viereck, Les; Adams, Phylis

    1992-01-01

    During March 1988 and May 1991, the JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar, AIRSAR, collected sets of multi-temporal imagery of the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest near Fairbanks, Alaska. These data sets consist of series of multi-polarized images collected at P-, L-, and C-bands each over a period of a few days. The AIRSAR campaigns were complemented with extensive ground measurements that included observations of both static canopy characteristics such as forest architecture as well as properties that vary on short term time scales such as canopy dielectric conditions. Observations exist for several stands of deciduous and coniferous species including white spruce (Picea glauca), black spruce (Picea mariana), and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera). Although the duration of each campaign was fairly short, significant changes in environmental conditions caused notable variations in the physiological state of the canopies. During the 1988 campaign, environmental conditions ranged from unseasonably warm to more normal subfreezing temperatures. This permitted AIRSAR observations of frozen and thawed canopy states. During May 1991, ice jams that occurred along the river caused many stands to flood while the subsequent clearing of the river then allowed the waters to recede, leaving a snow covered ground surface. This allowed observations of several stands during both flooded and nonflooded conditions. Furthermore, the local weather varied from clear sunny days to heavy overcast days with some occurrence of rain. Measurements of leaf water potential indicated that this caused significant variations in canopy water status, allowing SAR observations of water stressed and unstressed trees. Mean backscatter from several stands is examined for the various canopy physiological states. The changes in canopy backscatter that occur as a function of environmental and physiological state are analyzed. Preliminary results of a backscatter signature modeling analysis are presented

  13. Hybrid space-airborne bistatic SAR geometric resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moccia, Antonio; Renga, Alfredo

    2009-09-01

    Performance analysis of Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) characterized by arbitrary geometric configurations is usually complex and time-consuming since system impulse response has to be evaluated by bistatic SAR processing. This approach does not allow derivation of general equations regulating the behaviour of image resolutions with varying the observation geometry. It is well known that for an arbitrary configuration of bistatic SAR there are not perpendicular range and azimuth directions, but the capability to produce an image is not prevented as it depends only on the possibility to generate image pixels from time delay and Doppler measurements. However, even if separately range and Doppler resolutions are good, bistatic SAR geometries can exist in which imaging capabilities are very poor when range and Doppler directions become locally parallel. The present paper aims to derive analytical tools for calculating the geometric resolutions of arbitrary configuration of bistatic SAR. The method has been applied to a hybrid bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar formed by a spaceborne illuminator and a receiving-only airborne forward-looking Synthetic Aperture Radar (F-SAR). It can take advantage of the spaceborne illuminator to dodge the limitations of monostatic FSAR. Basic modeling and best illumination conditions have been detailed in the paper.

  14. Using airborne and satellite SAR for wake mapping offshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Merete B.; Hasager, Charlotte B.

    2006-09-01

    Offshore wind energy is progressing rapidly around Europe. One of the latest initiatives is the installation of multiple wind farms in clusters to share cables and maintenance costs and to fully exploit premium wind resource sites. For siting of multiple nearby wind farms, the wind turbine wake effect must be considered. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an imaging remote sensing technique which offers a unique opportunity to describe spatial variations of wind speed offshore. For the first time an airborne SAR instrument was used for data acquisition over a large offshore wind farm. The aim was to identify the turbine wake effect from SAR-derived wind speed maps as a downstream region of reduced wind speed. The aircraft SAR campaign was conducted on 12 October 2003 over the wind farm at Horns Rev in the North Sea. Nearly simultaneous measurements were acquired over the area by the SAR on board the ERS-2 satellite. In addition, meteorological data were collected. Both aircraft and satellite SAR-derived wind speed maps showed significant velocity deficits downstream of the wind farm. Wind speed maps retrieved from aircraft SAR suggested deficits of up to 20% downstream of the last turbine, whereas satellite SAR-derived maps showed deficits of the order of 10%. The difference originated partly from the two different reference methods used for normalization of measured wind speeds. The detected region of reduced wind speed had the same width as the wind turbine array, indicating a low degree of horizontal wake dispersion. The downstream wake extent was approximately 10 km, which corresponds well with results from previous studies and with wake model predictions. Copyright

  15. Relating P-band AIRSAR backscatter to forest stand parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yong; Melack, John M.; Davis, Frank W.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Christensen, Norman L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    As part of research on forest ecosystems, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and collaborating research teams have conducted multi-season airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) experiments in three forest ecosystems including temperate pine forest (Duke, Forest, North Carolina), boreal forest (Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest, Alaska), and northern mixed hardwood-conifer forest (Michigan Biological Station, Michigan). The major research goals were to improve understanding of the relationships between radar backscatter and phenological variables (e.g. stand density, tree size, etc.), to improve radar backscatter models of tree canopy properties, and to develop a radar-based scheme for monitoring forest phenological changes. In September 1989, AIRSAR backscatter data were acquired over the Duke Forest. As the aboveground biomass of the loblolly pine forest stands at Duke Forest increased, the SAR backscatter at C-, L-, and P-bands increased and saturated at different biomass levels for the C-band, L-band, and P-band data. We only use the P-band backscatter data and ground measurements here to study the relationships between the backscatter and stand density, the backscatter and mean trunk dbh (diameter at breast height) of trees in the stands, and the backscatter and stand basal area.

  16. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  17. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940s. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analysts understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  18. Ground moving target indication via multi-channel airborne SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Guo, Bin; Xu, Luzhou; Li, Jian

    2011-06-01

    We consider moving target detection and velocity estimation for multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) based ground moving target indication (GMTI). Via forming velocity versus cross-range images, we show that small moving targets can be detected even in the presence of strong stationary ground clutter. Furthermore, the velocities of the moving targets can be estimated, and the misplaced moving targets can be placed back to their original locations based on the estimated velocities. An iterative adaptive approach (IAA), which is robust and user parameter free, is used to form velocity versus cross-range images for each range bin of interest. Moreover, we discuss calibration techniques to combat near-field coupling problems encountered in practical systems. Furthermore, we present a sparse signal recovery approach for stationary clutter cancellation. We conclude by demonstrating the effectiveness of our approaches by using the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) publicly-released Gotcha airborne SAR based GMTI data set.

  19. Accurate estimation of sigma(exp 0) using AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holecz, Francesco; Rignot, Eric

    1995-01-01

    During recent years signature analysis, classification, and modeling of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data as well as estimation of geophysical parameters from SAR data have received a great deal of interest. An important requirement for the quantitative use of SAR data is the accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient sigma(exp 0). In terrain with relief variations radar signals are distorted due to the projection of the scene topography into the slant range-Doppler plane. The effect of these variations is to change the physical size of the scattering area, leading to errors in the radar backscatter values and incidence angle. For this reason the local incidence angle, derived from sensor position and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data must always be considered. Especially in the airborne case, the antenna gain pattern can be an additional source of radiometric error, because the radar look angle is not known precisely as a result of the the aircraft motions and the local surface topography. Consequently, radiometric distortions due to the antenna gain pattern must also be corrected for each resolution cell, by taking into account aircraft displacements (position and attitude) and position of the backscatter element, defined by the DEM data. In this paper, a method to derive an accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient using NASA/JPL AIRSAR data is presented. The results are evaluated in terms of geometric accuracy, radiometric variations of sigma(exp 0), and precision of the estimated forest biomass.

  20. Radar backscattering from snow facies of the Greenland ice sheet: Results from the AIRSAR 1991 campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric; Jezek, K.; Vanzyl, J. J.; Drinkwater, Mark R.; Lou, Y. L.

    1993-01-01

    In June 1991, the NASA/JPL airborne SAR (AIRSAR) acquired C- (lambda = 5.6cm), L- (lambda = 24cm), and P- (lambda = 68m) band polarimetric SAR data over the Greenland ice sheet. These data are processed using version 3.55 of the AIRSAR processor which provides radiometrically and polarimetrically calibrated images. The internal calibration of the AIRSAR data is cross-checked using the radar response from corner reflectors deployed prior to flight in one of the scenes. In addition, a quantitative assessment of the noise power level at various frequencies and polarizations is made in all the scenes. Synoptic SAR data corresponding to a swath width of about 12 by 50 km in length (compared to the standard 12 x 12 km size of high-resolution scenes) are also processed and calibrated to study transitions in radar backscatter as a function of snow facies at selected frequencies and polarizations. The snow facies on the Greenland ice sheet are traditionally categorized based on differences in melting regime during the summer months. The interior of Greenland corresponds to the dry snow zone where terrain elevation is the highest and no snow melt occurs. The lowest elevation boundary of the dry snow zone is known traditionally as the dry snow line. Beneath it is the percolation zone where melting occurs in the summer and water percolates through the snow freezing at depth to form massive ice lenses and ice pipes. At the downslope margin of this zone is the wet snow line. Below it, the wet snow zone corresponds to the lowest elevations where snow remains at the end of the summer. Ablation produces enough meltwater to create areas of snow saturated with water, together with ponds and lakes. The lowest altitude zone of ablation sees enough summer melt to remove all traces of seasonal snow accumulation, such that the surface comprises bare glacier ice.

  1. AIRSAR Web-Based Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Anhua; Van Zyl, Jakob; Kim, Yunjin; Hensley, Scott; Lou, Yunling; Madsen, Soren; Chapman, Bruce; Imel, David; Durden, Stephen; Tung, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    The AIRSAR automated, Web-based data processing and distribution system is an integrated, end-to-end synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing system. Designed to function under limited resources and rigorous demands, AIRSAR eliminates operational errors and provides for paperless archiving. Also, it provides a yearly tune-up of the processor on flight missions, as well as quality assurance with new radar modes and anomalous data compensation. The software fully integrates a Web-based SAR data-user request subsystem, a data processing system to automatically generate co-registered multi-frequency images from both polarimetric and interferometric data collection modes in 80/40/20 MHz bandwidth, an automated verification quality assurance subsystem, and an automatic data distribution system for use in the remote-sensor community. Features include Survey Automation Processing in which the software can automatically generate a quick-look image from an entire 90-GB SAR raw data 32-MB/s tape overnight without operator intervention. Also, the software allows product ordering and distribution via a Web-based user request system. To make AIRSAR more user friendly, it has been designed to let users search by entering the desired mission flight line (Missions Searching), or to search for any mission flight line by entering the desired latitude and longitude (Map Searching). For precision image automation processing, the software generates the products according to each data processing request stored in the database via a Queue management system. Users are able to have automatic generation of coregistered multi-frequency images as the software generates polarimetric and/or interferometric SAR data processing in ground and/or slant projection according to user processing requests for one of the 12 radar modes.

  2. Hierarchical classifier design for airborne SAR images of ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Langis; Klepko, Robert

    1998-09-01

    We report about a hierarchical design for extracting ship features and recognizing ships from SAR images, and which will eventually feed a multisensor data fusion system for airborne surveillance. The target is segmented from the image background using directional thresholding and region merging processes. Ship end-points are then identified through a ship centerline detection performed with a Hough transform. A ship length estimate is calculated assuming that the ship heading and/or the cross-range resolution are known. A high-level ship classification identifies whether the target belongs to Line (mainly combatant military ships) or Merchant ship categories. Category discrimination is based on the radar scatterers' distribution in 9 ship sections along the ship's range profile. A 3-layer neural network has been trained on simulated scatterers distributions and supervised by a rule- based expert system to perform this task. The NN 'smoothes out' the rules and the confidence levels on the category declaration. Line ship type (Frigate, Destroyer, Cruiser, Battleship, Aircraft Carrier) is then estimated using a Bayes classifier based on the ship length. Classifier performances using simulated images are presented.

  3. Mapping Slumgullion Landslide in Colorado, USA Using Airborne Repeat-Pass InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Wang, G.; Lu, Z.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.; Cao, N.; Zaugg, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) uses two or more SAR images over the same area to determine landscape topography or ground deformation. An interferogram, generated by the phase components of two coherent SAR images, depicts range changes between the radar and the ground resolution elements, and can be used to derive both landscape topography and subtle changes in surface elevation. However, spaceborne repeat-pass interferometry has two main drawbacks: effects due to differences in atmospheric temperature, pressure, and water vapour at two observation times, and loss of coherence due to long spatial and temporal baselines between observations. Airborne repeat-pass interferometry does not suffer from these drawbacks. The atmospheric effect in case of airborne DInSAR becomes negligible due to smaller swath coverage, and the coherence can be maintained by using smaller spatial and temporal baselines. However, the main technical limitation concerning airborne DInSAR is the need of precise motion compensation with an accurate navigation system to correct for the significant phase errors due to typical flight instability from air turbulence. Here, we present results from a pilot study conducted on July 2015 using both X-band and L-band SlimSAR airborne system over the Slumgullion landslide in Colorado in order to (1) acquire the differential interferograms from the airborne platform, (2) understand their source of errors, and (3) pave a way to improve the precision of the derived surface deformation. The landslide movement estimated from airborne DInSAR is also compared with coincident GPS, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), airborne LiDAR, and spaceborne DInSAR measurements using COSMO-SkyMed images. The airborne DInSAR system has a potential to provide time-transient variability in land surface topography with high-precision and high-resolution, and provide researchers with greater flexibility in selecting the temporal and spatial baselines of the data

  4. Classification And Monitoring Of Salt Marsh Habitats With Multi-Polarimetric Airborne SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Comber, Alexis; Lamb, Alistair

    2013-12-01

    Within the Copernicus programme there is much interest in the ability of remote sensing technology to deliver operational solutions to many areas of life including environmental management. This paper describes research focused on the application of Earth Observation for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. The main topic of this research is to explore to which extent salt marsh vegetation habitats can be identified from polarimetric SAR remotely sensed data. Multi- frequency, multi-polarimetric SAR images from airborne (S- and X-Band quad-polarimetric from the Astrium airborne SAR Demonstrator) is used to examine salt marsh habitat classification potential in the Llanrhidian salt marshes in South Wales, UK. This is achieved by (1) using both supervised and unsupervised classification routines, using several polarimetric SAR data layers as backscatter intensity, band ratios and polarimetric decomposition products, and by (2) statistical analysis by regression of these different SAR data layers and botanical parameters acquired from recent ecological fieldwork.

  5. The NASA/JPL three-frequency polarimetric AIRSAR system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, J.; Carande, R.; Lou, Y.; Miller, T.; Wheeler, K.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (JPL AIRSAR) system has now completed four flight campaigns. The authors describe the current state of this system and provide insight into how flight seasons are planned for this instrument. The data processors and data products are described. A table containing relevant system parameters is provided.

  6. Estimation of Snow Thickness on Sea Ice and Lake Ice Using Airborne SnowSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veijola, Katriina; Makynen, Marko; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Praks, Jaan

    2016-08-01

    Currently, snow thickness on sea ice is operationally estimated using microwave radiometer data. However, the estimates are hampered by the inherent coarse spatial resolution of passive microwave sensors. Successful application of SAR imagery for snow thickness estimation has the potential of providing estimates of snow thickness with much finer spatial resolution.In this study, we concentrate on assessing the capability of X- and Ku-band SAR backscattering to estimate snow thickness on sea and lake ice. Co- and cross -polarized X- and Ku-band SAR backscattering data, acquired with the ESA airborne SnowSAR sensor, are applied. The SAR data acquisition and co-incident in-situ measurements were conducted in Finland in the winter of 2012 over sea ice and lake ice test sites.Our analysis shows which frequency and polarization combinations have best sensitivity to snow thickness on sea and lake ice and in deep discussion provides plausible ways to improve the results.

  7. Ka-band Digitally Beamformed Airborne Radar Using SweepSAR Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Chuang, Chung-Lun; Ghaemi, Hirad; Heavey, Brandon A.; Lin, Lung-Sheng S.; Quaddus, Momin

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes a frequency-scaled SweepSAR demonstration that operates at Ka-Band (35.6 GHz), and closely approximates the DESDynl mission antenna geometry, scaled by 28. The concept relies on the SweepSAR measurement technique. An array of digital receivers captures waveforms from a multiplicity of elements. These are combined using digital beamforming in elevation and SAR processing to produce imagery. Ka-band (35.6 GHz) airborne SweepSAR using array-fed reflector and digital beamforming features eight simultaneous receive beams generated by a 40-cm offset-fed reflector and eight-element active array feed, and eight digital receiver channels with all raw data recorded and later used for beamforming. Illumination of the swath is accomplished using a slotted-waveguide antenna radiating 250 W peak power. This experiment has been used to demonstrate digital beamforming SweepSAR systems.

  8. Ground truth measurement for the analysis of airborne SAR data recorded over Oberpfaffenhofen, FRG, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayer, T.; Wieneke, F.; Winter, R.

    1990-01-01

    As a preliminary investigation to the joint multiparameter SIR-C/X-SAR shuttle experiment of NASA/JPL (USA), DLR (FRG), and PSN (Italy) which is scheduled for the year 1992 an airborne SAR campaign was conducted over Oberpfaffenhofen, FRG, in August 1989. Primarily this campaign was planned to test and verify equipment and algorithms developed at the DLR to calibrate multifrequency polarimetric SAR data. Oberpfaffenhofen is designated as one of the super test sites for the SIR-C/X-SAR experiment which will be imaged under all circumstances except severe mission errors. A super test site drives radar parameters and look directions and the recorded SAR data will be calibrated. In addition ancillary data will be available for the site. During the airborne STAR campaign conducted in the week of August 14th 1989 various sensor types were used to record remote sensing data over the calibration test site and its vicinity: the polarimetric DC-8 JPL-SAR (P-, L-, C-band), the DLR airborne SAR (C-, X-band), color infrared aerial photography (DLR), and the truck-mounted scatterometer (C- and X-band) of the Institute for Navigation, University of Stuttgart (INS). Because of this variety of different sensor types used and out of the fact that sufficiently large forested and agriculturally used areas were planned to be covered by these sensors, the interest of several German research groups involved in investigations concerning SAR land applications arose. The following groups carried out different ground-truth measurements: University of Bonn, Institute for plant cultivation (plant morphology and moisture content); University of Braunschweig, Institute for Geography (soil moisture and surface roughness); University of Freiburg, Institute for Geography (dielectric soil properties, landuse); and University of Munich, Institute for Geography (landuse inventory, plant, surface, and soil parameters). This paper presents the joint ground truth activities of the Institute for Geography

  9. AIRSAR observations of the Gulf Stream with interpretation from sea truth and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, G. R.; Chubb, S. R.; Marmorino, G. O.; Trump, C. L.; Lee, J. S.; Cooper, A. L.; Askari, F.; Keller, W. C.; Kaiser, J. A. C.; Mied, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    On 20 Jul., JPL/DC-8 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) participated in the 17-21 Jul. 1990 NRL Gulf Stream (GS) experiment in preparation for SIR-C missions in 1993, 1994, and 1996 for calibration purposes and to check modes and techniques for operation at our experimental site off the east coast of the US. During this experiment, coordinated and near simultaneous measurements were performed from ship (R/V Cape Henlopen) and other aircraft (NADC/P-3 and NRL/P-3) to address scientific questions relating to the origin of 'slick-like' features observed by Scully-Power, the refraction and modulation of waves by variable currents, the effect of current and thermal fronts on radar imagery signatures and the modification of Kelvin ship wakes by fronts. The JPL/DC-8 and NADC/P-3 SAR's are fully polarimetric systems. Their composite frequency range varies between P- and X-band. We describe in detail the Airborne SAR (AIRSAR) participation in the Jul. 1990 GS experiment and present preliminary results of the ongoing analysis and interpretation of the radar imagery in the context of ground truth, other remote measurements, and modeling efforts.

  10. First Demonstration of Agriculture Height Retrieval with PolInSAR Airborne Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Juan M.; Ballester-Berman, J. David; Hajnsek, Irena

    2011-03-01

    A set of three quad-pol images acquired at L-band in interferometric repeat-pass mode by DLR with the E-SAR system, in parallel with the AgriSAR2006 campaign, have been used to provide a first demonstration with airborne data of the retrieval of vegetation height from agricultural crops by means of PolInSAR based techniques.We have obtained accurate estimates of vegetation height over winter rape and maize fields, when compared with the availabe ground measurements. The same procedure yields a clear overestimation and larger variance over wheat fields.Results demonstrate that, although the frequency band is low, the model employed for the inversion is very simple, and the backscattered signal contains an important contribution from the ground, the volume information provided by interferometry is present and enables the application of PolInSAR-based retrieval approaches for agriculture monitoring practices.

  11. A P-band SAR interference filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Victor B.

    1992-01-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interference filter is an adaptive filter designed to reduce the effects of interference while minimizing the introduction of undesirable side effects. The author examines the adaptive spectral filter and the improvement in processed SAR imagery using this filter for Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne SAR (JPL AIRSAR) data. The quality of these improvements is determined through several data fidelity criteria, such as point-target impulse response, equivalent number of looks, SNR, and polarization signatures. These parameters are used to characterize two data sets, both before and after filtering. The first data set consists of data with the interference present in the original signal, and the second set consists of clean data which has been coherently injected with interference acquired from another scene.

  12. New observations of Bolivian wind streaks by JPL Airborne SAR: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, Dan G.; Greeley, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    In 1993 NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar system (AIRSAR) was deployed to South America to collect multi-parameter radar data over pre-selected targets. Among the sites targeted was a series of wind streaks located in the Altiplano of Bolivia. The objective of this investigation is to study the effect of wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle on the visibility of wind streaks in radar data. Because this is a preliminary evaluation of the recently acquired data we will focus on one scene and, thus, only on the effects of wavelength and polarization. Wind streaks provide information on the near-surface prevailing winds and on the abundance of winderodible material, such as sand. The potential for a free-flyer radar system that could provide global radar images in multiple wavelengths, polarizations, and incidence angles requires definition of system parameters for mission planning. Furthermore, thousands of wind streaks were mapped from Magellan radar images of Venus; their interpretation requires an understanding of the interaction of radar with wind streaks and the surrounding terrain. Our experiment was conducted on wind streaks in the Altiplano of Bolivia to address these issues.

  13. SAR studies in the Yuma Desert, Arizona: Sand penetration, geology, and the detection of military ordnance debris

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired over part of the Yuma Desert in southwestern Arizona demonstrate the ability of C-band (5.7-cm wavelength), L-band (24.5 cm), and P-band (68 cm) AIRSAR signals to backscatter from increasingly greater depths reaching several meters in blow sand and sandy alluvium. AIRSAR images obtained within the Barry M. Goldwater Bombing and Gunnery Range near Yuma, Arizona, show a total reversal of C- and P-band backscatter contrast (image tone) for three distinct geologic units. This phenomenon results from an increasingly greater depth of radar imaging with increasing radar wavelength. In the case of sandy- and small pebble-alluvium surfaces mantled by up to several meters of blow sand, backscatter increases directly with SAR wavelength as a result of volume scattering from a calcic soil horizon at shallow depth and by volume scattering from the root mounds of healthy desert vegetation that locally stabilize blow sand. AIRSAR images obtained within the military range are also shown to be useful for detecting metallic military ordnance debris that is located either at the surface or covered by tens of centimeters to several meters of blow sand. The degree of detectability of this ordnance increases with SAR wavelength and is clearly maximized on P-band images that are processed in the cross-polarized mode (HV). This effect is attributed to maximum signal penetration at P-band and the enhanced PHV image contrast between the radar-bright ordnance debris and the radar-dark sandy desert. This article focuses on the interpretation of high resolution AIRSAR images but also Compares these airborne SAR images with those acquired from spacecraft sensors such as ERS-SAR and Space Radar Laboratory (SIR-C/X-SAR).Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired over part of the Yuma Desert in southwestern Arizona demonstrate the ability of C-band (5.7-cm wavelength), L-band (24.5 cm), and P-band (68 cm) AIRSAR signals to backscatter from

  14. Airborne precursor missions in support of SIR-C/X-SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Oettl, H.; Pampaloni, P.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA DC-8 and DLR E-SAR airborne imaging radars have been deployed over several sites in Europe and the U.S. in support of SIR-C/X-SAR (Shuttle Imaging Radar-C/X-Synthetic Aperture Radar) science team investigations. To date, data have been acquired in support of studies of alpine glaciers, forests, geology, oceanography, and calibration. An experimental campaign with airborne sensors will take place in Europe in June to July 1991 which will allow multitemporal surveys of several Europeans sites. Current plans are for calibration and ecology experiments to be undertaken in Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, France, and the United Kingdom. Coordinated multitemporal aircraft and ground campaigns are planned in support of hydrology experiments in Italy, the United Kingdom, and Austria. Data will also be acquired in support of oceanogrqhy in the Gulf of Genova, North Atlantic, Straits of Messina and the North Sea. Geology sites will include Campi Flegrei and Vesuvio, Italy.

  15. RADI's Airborne X-SAR with High Resolution: Performance, Characterization and Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, T.; Li, J.; Wang, Z. R.; Huang, L.

    2016-11-01

    X-SAR is an airborne multi-mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system with high- resolution, interferometer and full-polarization, developed by the Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (RADI), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), funded by the CAS Large Research Infrastructures. Since 2009, the first developed stage of X-SAR system was successfully implemented to an operational SAR with high resolution (up to 0.5 meter). In May 2013, the imaging verification on flights test was carried out. The data calibration on the laboratory measurements were completed at the end of 2015. Many valuable results of imaging verification and data calibration have emphasized the quantitative microwave measurement capabilities. This paper presents the results of X-SAR system performance, characterization, optimization, and verification as carried out during the flight trials and laboratory measurement. The system performance and calibration parameters are presented such as transmitter amplitude accuracy, phase noise, system gain change with temperature variation, long-term radiometric stability. The imaging verification of the key performance parameters is discussed, including target-response function, target pairs discrimination, image noise and radiometric resolution. The example imagery of radiometric enhanced products for intensity change detection is also described.

  16. Use of airborne polarimetric SAR, optical and elevation data for mapping and monitoring of salt marsh vegetation habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Comber, Alexis; Lamb, Alistair

    2014-10-01

    Within the Copernicus programme there is much interest in the ability of remote sensing technology to deliver operational solutions to many areas of life including environmental management. This paper describes research focused on the application of Earth Observation for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. The main topic of this research is to explore to which extent salt marsh vegetation habitats can be identified from polarimetric SAR remotely sensed data. Multi-frequency, multi-polarimetric SAR images from airborne (S- and X-Band quad-polarimetric from the Astrium airborne SAR Demonstrator) is used to examine salt marsh habitat classification potential in the Llanrhidian salt marshes in South Wales, UK. This is achieved by (1) using both supervised and unsupervised classification routines, using several polarimetric SAR data layers as backscatter intensity, band ratios and polarimetric decomposition products, and by (2) statistical analysis by regression of these different SAR data layers and botanical parameters acquired from recent ecological fieldwork.

  17. Mapping Vegetation Structure in Kakadu National Park: An AIRSAR and GIS Application in Conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Sisk, Thomas D.; Hampton, Haydee; Milne, Anthony K.

    1999-01-01

    Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data were used to map vegetation structure in Kakadu National Park Australia as part of the PACRIM project. SAR data were co-registered with Landsat TM, aerial photos, and map data in a geographic information system for a small test area consisting of mangrove, floodplain grasslands, lowland tropical evergreen forest and upland mixed deciduous and evergreen tropical forest near the South Alligator River. Landsat (Thematic Mapper) TM very clearly showed the floristic composition and burn scars from the previous years fires and the AIRSAR data provided a profile of vegetation structure. Extensive field data on vegetation species composition and structure were collected across a series of transects in cooperation with a survey of avifauna in an effort to link the habitat edge structure with bird species responses. A test site was found that contained two types of habitat edges: 1) A structure specific edge - characterized by the appearance of a very strong structural change in the forest canopy occurring in the absence of a substantial turnover in floristics. 2) Floristic edge - a sharp transition in vegetation genetic composition with a mixed set of structural changes. Specific polarization combinations were selected that were highly correlated to a set of desired structural parameters found in the field data. Classification routines were employed to group radar pixels into 3 structural classes based on: the Surface Area to Volume ratio (SA/V) of the stems, the SA/V of the branches, and the leaf area index of the canopy. Separate canopy structure maps were then entered into the GIS and bird responses were observed relative to the classes and their boundaries. Follow-on work will consist of extending this approach to neighboring areas, generating structure maps, predicting bird responses across the edges, and make accuracy assessments.

  18. Preliminary results of the LLNL airborne experimental test-bed SAR system

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G.; Mullenhoff, C.J.; Kiefer, R.D.; Brase, J.M.; Wieting, M.G.; Berry, G.L.; Jones, H.E.

    1996-01-16

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within Laser Programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in cooperation with the Hughes Aircraft Company has developed a versatile, high performance, airborne experimental test-bed (AETB) capability. The test-bed has been developed for a wide range of research and development experimental applications including radar and radiometry plus, with additional aircraft modifications, optical systems. The airborne test-bed capability has been developed within a Douglas EA-3B Skywarrior jet aircraft provided and flown by Hughes Aircraft Company. The current test-bed payload consists of an X-band radar system, a high-speed data acquisition, and a real-time processing capability. The medium power radar system is configured to operate in a high resolution, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mode and is highly configurable in terms of waveforrns, PRF, bandwidth, etc. Antennas are mounted on a 2-axis gimbal in the belly radome of the aircraft which provides pointing and stabilization. Aircraft position and antenna attitude are derived from a dedicated navigational system and provided to the real-time SAR image processor for instant image reconstruction and analysis. This paper presents a further description of the test-bed and payload subsystems plus preliminary results of SAR imagery.

  19. Tomographic Imaging of a Forested Area By Airborne Multi-Baseline P-Band SAR.

    PubMed

    Frey, Othmar; Morsdorf, Felix; Meier, Erich

    2008-09-24

    In recent years, various attempts have been undertaken to obtain information about the structure of forested areas from multi-baseline synthetic aperture radar data. Tomographic processing of such data has been demonstrated for airborne L-band data but the quality of the focused tomographic images is limited by several factors. In particular, the common Fourierbased focusing methods are susceptible to irregular and sparse sampling, two problems, that are unavoidable in case of multi-pass, multi-baseline SAR data acquired by an airborne system. In this paper, a tomographic focusing method based on the time-domain back-projection algorithm is proposed, which maintains the geometric relationship between the original sensor positions and the imaged target and is therefore able to cope with irregular sampling without introducing any approximations with respect to the geometry. The tomographic focusing quality is assessed by analysing the impulse response of simulated point targets and an in-scene corner reflector. And, in particular, several tomographic slices of a volume representing a forested area are given. The respective P-band tomographic data set consisting of eleven flight tracks has been acquired by the airborne E-SAR sensor of the German Aerospace Center (DLR).

  20. Tomographic Imaging of a Forested Area By Airborne Multi-Baseline P-Band SAR

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Othmar; Morsdorf, Felix; Meier, Erich

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, various attempts have been undertaken to obtain information about the structure of forested areas from multi-baseline synthetic aperture radar data. Tomographic processing of such data has been demonstrated for airborne L-band data but the quality of the focused tomographic images is limited by several factors. In particular, the common Fourier-based focusing methods are susceptible to irregular and sparse sampling, two problems, that are unavoidable in case of multi-pass, multi-baseline SAR data acquired by an airborne system. In this paper, a tomographic focusing method based on the time-domain back-projection algorithm is proposed, which maintains the geometric relationship between the original sensor positions and the imaged target and is therefore able to cope with irregular sampling without introducing any approximations with respect to the geometry. The tomographic focusing quality is assessed by analysing the impulse response of simulated point targets and an in-scene corner reflector. And, in particular, several tomographic slices of a volume representing a forested area are given. The respective P-band tomographic data set consisting of eleven flight tracks has been acquired by the airborne E-SAR sensor of the German Aerospace Center (DLR). PMID:27873847

  1. Regional mapping of forest canopy water content and biomass using AIRSAR images over BOREAS study area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan; Rignot, Eric; Vanzyl, Jakob

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, monitoring vegetation biomass over various climate zones has become the primary focus of several studies interested in assessing the role of the ecosystem responses to climate change and human activities. Airborne and spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems provide a useful tool to directly estimate biomass due to its sensitivity to structural and moisture characteristics of vegetation canopies. Even though the sensitivity of SAR data to total aboveground biomass has been successfully demonstrated in many controlled experiments over boreal forests and forest plantations, so far, no biomass estimation algorithm has been developed. This is mainly due to the fact that the SAR data, even at lowest frequency (P-band) saturates at biomass levels of about 200 tons/ha, and the structure and moisture information in the SAR signal forces the estimation algorithm to be forest type dependent. In this paper, we discuss the development of a hybrid forest biomass algorithm which uses a SAR derived land cover map in conjunction with a forest backscatter model and an inversion algorithm to estimate forest canopy water content. It is shown that unlike the direct biomass estimation from SAR data, the estimation of water content does not depend on the seasonal and/or environmental conditions. The total aboveground biomass can then be derived from canopy water content for each type of forest by incorporating other ecological information. Preliminary results from this technique over several boreal forest stands indicate that (1) the forest biomass can be estimated with reasonable accuracy, and (2) the saturation level of the SAR signal can be enhanced by separating the crown and trunk biomass in the inversion algorithm. We have used the JPL AIRSAR data over BOREAS southern study area to test the algorithm and to generate regional scale water content and biomass maps. The results are compared with ground data and the sources of errors are discussed. Several SAR

  2. Land Covering Classifications of Boreas Modeling Grid Using AIRSAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Rignot, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Mapping forest types in the boreal ecosystem in an integrated part of any modeling excercise of biogeophysical processes characterizing the interaction of forest with the atmosphere. In this paper, we report the results of the land cover classification of the SAR data acquired during the BOREAS (BOReal Ecosystem Atmospheric Study) intensive field campaigns over the modeling sub-grid of the southern study area in Saskatchewan , Canada. A Bayesian-maximum-a-posteriori classifier has been applied on the NASA/JPL AIRSAR images covering the region during the peak of the growing season in July, 1994.

  3. Mapping Near-Surface Salinization Using Long-wavelength AIRSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, Jeffery G.

    2003-01-01

    In May 1999, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory acquired airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) data over the Hatchel and Montague Test Sites in Texas. We analyzed P- and L-band polarimetric radar data from these AIRSAR missions to assess whether AIRSAR could be used as a rapid and remote platform for screening large areas at risk for near-surface soil and water salinization. Ongoing geological, geophysical, and hydrological studies at the Hatchel Test Site in Runnels County and the Montague Test Site in Montague County have demonstrated the utility of high-resolution airborne electromagnetic (EM) induction in mapping electrical conductivity changes that accompany shallow natural and oil-field related salinization at these sites in the Colorado and Red River basins. We compared AIRSAR and airborne EM data quantitatively by (1) selecting representative flight lines from airborne EM surveys of the Hatchel and Montague sites, (2) extracting measurement locations and apparent conductivities at the highest available EM frequency, (3) identifying and extracting all P- and L-band backscatter intensities for all locations within 5 m of an airborne EM measurement, and (4) examining the spatial and magnitude relationships between apparent conductivity and all radar polarization and polarization-ratio combinations. For both test sites, backscatter intensity in all individual P- and L-band polarizations was slightly negatively correlated with apparent conductivity. In most modes this was manifested as a decrease in the range and magnitude of backscatter intensity as apparent conductivity increased. Select single-band and cross-band polarization ratios exhibited somewhat higher correlation with apparent conductivity by partly diminishing the dominance of the vegetation contribution to V backscatter intensity. The highest correlation with conductivity was obtained using the L-band vertical- to cross-polarization ratio, the P-band vertical- to L-band cross-polarization ratio

  4. Forest Stand Volume Estimation Using Airborne LIDAR And Polarimetric SAR Over Hilly Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fengyun; Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Liu, Qingwang; Li, Shiming; Ling, Feilong

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the potential capability of mapping forest stand volume using the multi-sources data, ALOS PALSAR, airborne LiDAR and high resolution CCD image in forest stand level, one test site located in the warm temperate hilly forest region of Shandong Province in China was established. Airborne LiDAR and CCD campaign was carried out in the end of May, 2005. One scene of ALOS PALSAR quad-polarization image was acquired in May 19th,2007. Ground forest plot data for Black Locust and Chinese Pine dominated forest stands were collected through field work from May to June of 2008. The correlations of forest stand volume to PALSAR backscattering coefficient of HH, HV, VH,VV, their ratio and some H-Alpha polarimetric decomposition parameters were analyzed in stand level through regression analysis. Mean forest stand volume of each polygons (forest stand) was finally estimated based on the regression model established using ground measured forest volume data and the corresponding parameters (polygon mean) derived from LiDAR CHM and polarimetric SAR data. Results show that it is feasible to combine low density LiDAR data, L-band SAR data and forest polygon data from high resolution CCD image for stand level forest volume estimation in hilly regions, the RMSE is 20.064m3/ha for Black Locust and 24.730m3/ha for Chinese Pine .

  5. Forest Stand Volume Estimation Using Airborne LIDAR And Polarimetric SAR Over Hilly Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fengyun; Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Liu, Qingwang; Li, Shiming; Ling, Feilong; Pottier, Eric; Cloude, Shane

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the potential capability of mapping forest stand volume using the multi-sources data, ALOS PALSAR, airborne LiDAR and high resolution CCD image in forest stand level, one test site located in the warm temperate hilly forest region of Shandong Province in China was established. Airborne LiDAR and CCD campaign was carried out in the end of May, 2005. One scene of ALOS PALSAR quad-polarization image was acquired in May 19th,2007. Ground forest plot data for Black Locust and Chinese Pine dominated forest stands were collected through field work from May to June of 2008. The correlations of forest stand volume to PALSAR backscattering coefficient of HH, HV,VH,VV, their ratio and some H-Alpha polarimetric decomposition parameters were analyzed in stand level through regression analysis. Mean forest stand volume of each polygons (forest stand) was finally estimated based on the regression model established using ground measured forest volume data and the corresponding parameters (polygon mean) derived from LiDAR CHM and polarimetric SAR data. Results show that it is feasible to combine low density LiDAR data, L-band SAR data and forest polygon data from high resolution CCD image for stand level forest volume estimation in hilly regions, the RMSE is 20.064m3/ha for Black Locust and 24.730m3/ha for Chinese Pine .

  6. EcoSAR: NASA's P-band fully polarimetric single pass interferometric airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanoglu, B.; Rincon, R. F.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Lee, S. K.; Sun, G.; Daniyan, O.; Harcum, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    EcoSAR is a new airborne synthetic aperture radar imaging system, developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It is a P-band sensor that employs a non-conventional and innovative design. The EcoSAR system was designed as a multi-disciplinary instrument to image the 3-dimensional surface of the earth from a single pass platform with two antennas. EcoSAR's principal mission is to penetrate the forest canopy to return vital information about the canopy structure and estimate biomass. With a maximum bandwidth of 200 MHz in H and 120 MHz in V polarizations it can provide sub-meter resolution imagery of the study area. EcoSAR's dual antenna, 32 transmit and receive channel architecture provides a test-bed for developing new algorithms in InSAR data processing such as single pass interferometry, full polarimetry, post-processing synthesis of multiple beams, simultaneous measurement over both sides of the flight track, selectable resolution and variable incidence angle. The flexible architecture of EcoSAR will create new opportunities in radar remote sensing of forest biomass, permafrost active layer thickness, and topography mapping. EcoSAR's first test flight occurred between March 27th and April 1st, 2014 over the Andros Island in Bahamas and Corcovado and La Selva National Parks in Costa Rica. The 32 channel radar system collected about 6 TB of radar data in about 12 hours of data collection. Due to the existence of radio and TV communications in the operational frequency band, acquired data contains strong radar frequency interference, which had to be removed prior to beamforming and focusing. Precise locations of the antennas are tracked using high-rate GPS and inertial navigation units, which provide necessary information for accurate processing of the imagery. In this presentation we will present preliminary imagery collected during the test campaign, show examples of simultaneous dual track imaging, as well as a single pass interferogram. The

  7. TELAER: a multi-mode/multi-antenna interferometric airborne SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, Stefano; Amaral, Tiago; Berardino, Paolo; Esposito, Carmen; Jackson, Giuseppe; Pauciullo, Antonio; Vaz Junior, Eurico; Wimmer, Christian; Lanari, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    The present contribution is aimed at showing the capabilities of the TELAER airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system recently upgraded to the interferometric mode [1]. TELAER is an Italian airborne X-Band SAR system, mounted onboard a LearJet 35A aircraft. Originally equipped with a single TX/RX antenna, it now operates in single-pass interferometric mode thanks to a system upgrading [1] funded by the Italian National Research Council (CNR), via the Italian Ministry of Education, Universities and Research (MIUR), in the framework of a cooperation between CNR and the Italian Agency for Agriculture Subsidy Payments (AGEA). In the frame of such cooperation, CNR has entrusted the Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA) for managing all the activities, included the final flight tests, related to the system upgrading. According to such an upgrading, two additional receiving X-band antennas have been installed in order to allow, simultaneously, single-pass Across-Track and Along-Track interferometry [1]. More specifically, the three antennas are now installed in such a way to produce three different across-track baselines and two different along-track baselines. Moreover, in the frame of the same system upgrading, it has been mounted onboard the Learjet an accurate embedded Global Navigation Satellite System and Inertial Measurement Unit equipment. This allows precise measurement of the tracks described by the SAR antennas during the flight, in order to accurately implement Motion Compensation (MOCO) algorithms [2] during the image formation (focusing) step. It is worth remarking that the TELAER system upgraded to the interferometric mode is very flexible, since the user can set different operational modes characterized by different geometric resolutions and range swaths. In particular, it is possible to reach up to 0.5 m of resolution with a range swath of 2km; conversely, it is possible to enlarge the range swath up to 10 km at expenses of

  8. Data Integration: Airborne Data Collections Provide Opportunity for Creative Data Management at ASF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanches, R. R.; Wolf, V. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) archives and distributes processed airborne data collections, including the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), the Alaska High Altitude Photography (AHAP) Collection, the USGS Glacier Collection, and various other photo collections over Alaska. Each dataset presents different management challenges that are being solved using a variety of technological methods. The mechanism for collecting Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data differs greatly from the methods used to collect satellite-borne SAR data. As a result, metadata for airborne SAR are more complex and are have larger file size than other SAR datasets at ASF. Variations in data format require the need to manipulate the data products as they are ingested at ASF, creating zipped files to reduce the overall volume of individual products, to develop new data products, and tools to promote inter-operability. A goal of the facility is to offer all of the collections through web based interfaces, provide the opportunity for faster download speed, to download the data at several different resolutions, provide bulk download options, and allow for easy data discovery over the customer's selected area of interest. The UAVSAR and AirSAR data collections are digital and fully available online through the ASF data pool. The data are downloaded through a new web interface, designed to facilitate the discovery of online data resources. The aerial photo collections are dominantly hard copies of images, or in film format. Creating logical, systematic, minimum metadata standards for airborne data is a critical step for easy data discovery.

  9. Retrieval of pine forest biomass using JPL AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudoin, A.; Letoan, T.; Zagolski, F.; Hsu, C. C.; Han, H. C.; Kong, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data over the Landes forest in South-West France revealed strong correlation between L- and especially P-band sigma degrees and the pine forest biomass. To explain the physical link of radar backscatter to biomass, a polarimetric backscattering model was developed and validated. Then the model was used in a simulation study to predict sigma degree sensitivity to undesired canopy and environmental parameters. Main results concerning the data analysis, modeling, and simulation at P-band are reported.

  10. MAPSAR Image Simulation Based on L-band Polarimetric Data from the SAR-R99B Airborne Sensor (SIVAM System)

    PubMed Central

    Mura, José Claudio; Paradella, Waldir Renato; Dutra, Luciano Vieira; dos Santos, João Roberto; Rudorff, Bernardo Friedrich Theodor; de Miranda, Fernando Pellon; da Silva, Mario Marcos Quintino; da Silva, Wagner Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology applied to generate simulated multipolarized L-band SAR images of the MAPSAR (Multi-Application Purpose SAR) satellite from the airborne SAR R99B sensor (SIVAM System). MAPSAR is a feasibility study conducted by INPE (National Institute for Space Research) and DLR (German Aerospace Center) targeting a satellite L-band SAR innovative mission for assessment, management and monitoring of natural resources. Examples of simulated products and their applications are briefly discussed. PMID:22389590

  11. Post disaster monitoring for the Great East Japan Earthquake with a new L-band airborne SAR "Pi-SAR-L2"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Noriyuki

    2013-04-01

    A new L-band airborne SAR, Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band type-2 (Pi-SAR-L2) was developed in April 2012 by Japan Aerospace exploration Agency(JAXA). Pi-SAR-L2 employs a L-band with a band width of 85 MHz (1,215 - 1,300 MHz) with a peak power of 3.5 kW boarded on the Galfstream II. Pi-SAR-L2 conducted its first acquisitions for calibrations and validations over Tomakomai, Hokkaido, where is a test site with some corner reflectors in April 2012. The Great East Japan Earthquake with a magnitude 9.0 occurred at 14:46 on 11 Mar. 2011 and terribly big Tsunami attacked Tohoku district after the earthquake. The tsunami caused huge damage along its coast in Touhoku. Pi-SAR-L2 acquired these post disaster regions in Fukushima and Miyagi Prefectures along the coast on the way to Hokkaido in April 2012, some region still remain flooded area and debris caused by Tsumani. We will present Pi-SAR-L2 systems and specifications, and discuss monitoring these damages.

  12. BOREAS RSS-16 Level-3b DC-8 AIRSAR SY Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Saatchi, Sasan; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Strub, Richard; Irani, Fred

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-16 team used satellite and aircraft SAR data in conjunction with various ground measurements to determine the moisture regime of the boreal forest. RSS-16 assisted with the acquisition and ordering of NASA JPL AIRSAR data collected from the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The NASA JPL AIRSAR is a side-looking imaging radar system that utilizes the SAR principle to obtain high-resolution images that represent the radar backscatter of the imaged surface at different frequencies and polarizations. The information contained in each pixel of the AIRSAR data represents the radar backscatter for all possible combinations of horizontal and vertical transmit and receive polarizations (i.e., HH, HV, VH, and VV). Geographically, the data cover portions of the BOREAS SSA and NSA. Temporally, the data were acquired from 12-Aug-1993 to 31-Jul-1995. The level-3b AIRSAR SY data are the JPL synoptic product and contain 3 of the 12 total frequency and polarization combinations that are possible. The data are stored in binary image format files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  13. BOREAS RSS-16 AIRSAR CM Images: Integrated Processor Version 6.1 Level-3b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Saatchi, Susan; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Strub, Richard; Irani, Fred

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-16 team used satellite and aircraft SAR data in conjunction with various ground measurements to determine the moisture regime of the boreal forest. RSS-16 assisted with the acquisition and ordering of NASA JPL AIRSAR data collected from the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The NASA JPL AIRSAR is a side-looking imaging radar system that utilizes the SAR principle to obtain high resolution images that represent the radar backscatter of the imaged surface at different frequencies and polarizations. The information contained in each pixel of the AIRSAR data represents the radar backscatter for all possible combinations of horizontal and vertical transmit and receive polarizations (i.e., HH, HV, VH, and VV). Geographically, the data cover portions of the BOREAS SSA and NSA. Temporally, the data were acquired from 12-Aug-1993 to 31-Jul-1995. The level-3b AIRSAR CM data are in compressed Stokes matrix format, which has 10 bytes per pixel. From this data format, it is possible to synthesize a number of different radar backscatter measurements. The data are stored in binary image-format files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  14. MACSIGMA0 - MACINTOSH TOOL FOR ANALYZING JPL AIRSAR, ERS-1, JERS-1, AND MAGELLAN MIDR DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norikane, L.

    1994-01-01

    MacSigma0 is an interactive tool for the Macintosh which allows you to display and make computations from radar data collected by the following sensors: the JPL AIRSAR, ERS-1, JERS-1, and Magellan. The JPL AIRSAR system is a multi-polarimetric airborne synthetic aperture radar developed and operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It includes the single-frequency L-band sensor mounted on the NASA CV990 aircraft and its replacement, the multi-frequency P-, L-, and C-band sensors mounted on the NASA DC-8. MacSigma0 works with data in the standard JPL AIRSAR output product format, the compressed Stokes matrix format. ERS-1 and JERS-1 are single-frequency, single-polarization spaceborne synthetic aperture radars launched by the European Space Agency and NASDA respectively. To be usable by MacSigma0, The data must have been processed at the Alaska SAR Facility and must be in the "low-resolution" format. Magellan is a spacecraft mission to map the surface of Venus with imaging radar. The project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The spacecraft carries a single-frequency, single-polarization synthetic aperture radar. MacSigma0 works with framelets of the standard MIDR CD-ROM data products. MacSigma0 provides four basic functions: synthesis of images (if necessary), statistical analysis of selected areas, analysis of corner reflectors as a calibration measure (if appropriate and possible), and informative mouse tracking. For instance, the JPL AIRSAR data can be used to synthesize a variety of images such as a total power image. The total power image displays the sum of the polarized and unpolarized components of the backscatter for each pixel. Other images which can be synthesized are HH, HV, VV, RL, RR, HHVV*, HHHV*, HVVV*, HHVV* phase and correlation coefficient images. For the complex and phase images, phase is displayed using color and magnitude is displayed using intensity. MacSigma0 can also be used to compute statistics from within a selected area. The

  15. High-Accuracy Elevation Data at Large Scales from Airborne Single-Pass SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Guy; Moller, Delwyn; Mentgen, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) are essential data sets for disaster risk management and humanitarian relief services as well as many environmental process models. At present, on the hand, globally available DEMs only meet the basic requirements and for many services and modeling studies are not of high enough spatial resolution and lack accuracy in the vertical. On the other hand, LiDAR-DEMs are of very high spatial resolution and great vertical accuracy but acquisition operations can be very costly for spatial scales larger than a couple of hundred square km and also have severe limitations in wetland areas and under cloudy and rainy conditions. The ideal situation would thus be to have a DEM technology that allows larger spatial coverage than LiDAR but without compromising resolution and vertical accuracy and still performing under some adverse weather conditions and at a reasonable cost. In this paper, we present a novel single pass In-SAR technology for airborne vehicles that is cost-effective and can generate DEMs with a vertical error of around 0.3 m for an average spatial resolution of 3 m. To demonstrate this capability, we compare a sample single-pass In-SAR Ka-band DEM of the California Central Valley from the NASA/JPL airborne GLISTIN-A to a high-resolution LiDAR DEM. We also perform a simple sensitivity analysis to floodplain inundation. Based on the findings of our analysis, we argue that this type of technology can and should be used to replace large regions of globally available lower resolution DEMs, particularly in coastal, delta and floodplain areas where a high number of assets, habitats and lives are at risk from natural disasters. We conclude with a discussion on requirements, advantages and caveats in terms of instrument and data processing.

  16. Lineaments from airborne SAR images and the 1988 Saguenay earthquake, Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.W.; Schmitt, L.; Woussen, G.; Duberger, R. )

    1993-08-01

    Airborne SAR images provided essential clues to the tectonic setting of (1) the MbLg 6.5 Saguenay earthquake of 25 November 1988, (2) the Charlevoix-Kamouraska seismic source zone, and (3) some of the low *eve* seismic activity in the Eastern seismic background zone of Canada. The event occurred in the southeastern part of the Canadian Shield in an area where the boundary between the Saguenay graben and the Jacques Cartier horst is not well defined. These two tectonic blocks are both associated with the Iapetan St-Lawrence rift. These blocks exhibit several important structural breaks and distinct domains defined by the lineament orientations, densities, and habits. Outcrop observations confirm that several lineament sets correspond to Precambrian ductile shear zones reactivated as brittle faults during the Phanerozoic. In addition, the northeast and southwest limits of recent seismic activity in the Charlevoix-Kamouraska zone correspond to major elements of the fracture pattern identified on the SAR images. These fractures appear to be related to the interaction of the Charlevoix astrobleme with the tectonic features of the area. 20 refs.

  17. UAVSAR: A New NASA Airborne SAR System for Science and Technology Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Sadowy, Greg; Miller, Tim; Shaffer, Scott; Muellerschoen, Ron; Jones, Cathleen; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently building a reconfigurable, polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track SAR data for differential interferometric measurements. Differentian interferometry can provide key deformation measurements, important for studies of earthquakes, volcanoes and other dynamically changing phenomena. Using precision real-time GPS and a sensor controlled flight management system, the system will be able to fly predefined paths with great precision. The expected performance of the flight control system will constrain the flight path to be within a 10 m diameter tube about the desired flight track. The radar will be designed to be operable on a UAV (Unpiloted Aria1 Vehicle) but will initially be demonstrated on a NASA Gulfstream III. The radar will be fully polarimetric, with a range bandwidth of 80 MHz (2 m range resolution), and will support a 16 km range swath. The antenna will be electronically steered along track to assure that the antenna beam can be directed independently, regardless of the wind direction and speed. Other features supported by the antenna include elevation monopulse and pulse-to-pulse re-steering capabilities that will enable some novel modes of operation. The system will nominally operate at 45,000 ft (13800 m). The program began as an Instrument Incubator Project (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science and Technology Office (ESTO).

  18. Forest investigations by polarimetric AIRSAR data in the Harz mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, M.; Poll, D.; Raupenstrauch, J.; Tares, T.; Winter, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Harz Mountains in the North of Germany have been a study site for several remote sensing investigations since 1985, as the mountainous area is one of the forest regions in Germany heavily affected by forest decline, especially in the high altitudes above 800 m. In a research program at the University of Berlin, methods are developed for improving remote sensing assessment of forest structure and forest state by additional GIS information, using several datasets for establishing a forest information system. The Harz has been defined as a test site for the SIR-C/X-SAR mission which is going to deliver multifrequency and multipolarizational SAR data from orbit. In a pilot project let by DLR-DFD, these data are to be investigated for forestry and ecology purposes. In preparing a flight campaign to the SIR-C / X-SAR mission, 'MAC EUROPE 1991', performed by NASA/JPL, an area of about 12 km in the Northern Harz was covered with multipolarizational AIRSAR data in the C-, L- and P-band, including the Brocken, the highest mountain of the Harz, with an altitude of 1142 m. The multiparameter AIRSAR data are investigated for their information content on the forest state, regarding the following questions: (1) information on forest stand parameters like forest types, age classes and crown density, especially for the separation of deciduous and coniferous forest; (2) information on the storm damages (since 1972) and the status of regeneration; (3) information on the status of forest destruction because of forest decline; and (4) influence of topography, local incidence angle and soil moisture on the SAR data. Within the project various methods and tools have been developed for the investigation of multipolarimetric radar backscatter responses and for discrimination purposes, in order to use the multipolarization information of the compressed Stokes matrix delivered by JPL.

  19. Unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric SAR data using the covariance matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J. M.; Chellappa, Rama; Dubois, Pascale C.

    1992-01-01

    A method for unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data into classes of homogeneous microwave polarimetric backscatter characteristics is presented. Classes of polarimetric backscatter are selected on the basis of a multidimensional fuzzy clustering of the logarithm of the parameters composing the polarimetric covariance matrix. The clustering procedure uses both polarimetric amplitude and phase information, is adapted to the presence of image speckle, and does not require an arbitrary weighting of the different polarimetric channels; it also provides a partitioning of each data sample used for clustering into multiple clusters. Given the classes of polarimetric backscatter, the entire image is classified using a maximum a posteriori polarimetric classifier. Four-look polarimetric SAR complex data of lava flows and of sea ice acquired by the NASA/JPL airborne polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) are segmented using this technique. The results are discussed and compared with those obtained using supervised techniques.

  20. Flood disaster monitoring in Thailand by using a airborne L-band SAR: Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band(Pi-SAR-L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, N.; Sobue, S.; Shimada, M.; Ohyoshi, K.

    2012-04-01

    It was heavy rainfall around the northern region of Thailand from July to September 2011, which caused flood disaster to quite wide region of Thailand, it finally reached to the Bangkok central in the end of October 2011. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) conducted an emergency observation by using a airborne L-band SAR: Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band(Pi-SAR-L) from 5th to 27th November to monitor flood area. Pi-SAR-L has a center frequency of 1271.5 MHz, a band width of 50 MHz, a slant range resolution of 3 m, and an acquisition swath of 15 km on the ground. Pi-SAR-L is boarded on an aircraft of the Gulfstream-II operated by the Diamond Air Service(DAS), Japan, and the Gulfstream-II was ferried to the Chieng-Mai airport in the North Thailand, from Japan. In our presentation, we will show flood area around Bangkok and its variations detected by Pi-SAR-L

  1. Integration of AIRSAR and AVIRIS data for Trail Canyon alluvial fan, Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.

    1995-01-01

    Combining quantitative geophysical information extracted from the optical and microwave wavelengths provides complementary information about both the surface mineralogy and morphology. This study combines inversion results from two remote sensing instruments, a polarimetric synthetic aperture radar, AIRSAR, and an imaging spectrometer, AVIRIS, for Trail Canyon alluvial fan in Death Valley, California. The NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) is a quad-polarization, three frequency instrument. AIRSAR collects data at C-band = 5.66 cm, L-band = 23.98 cm, and P-band = 68.13 cm. The data are processed to four-looks and have a spatial resolution of 10 m and a swath width of 12 km. The AIRSAR data used in this study were collected as part of the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over Death Valley on 9/14/89. The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is a NASA/JPL instrument that flies in an ER-2 aircraft at an altitude of 20 km. AVIRIS uses four spectrometers to collect data in 224 spectral channels from 0.4 micrometer to 2.45 micrometer. The width of each spectral band is approximately 10 nm. AVIRIS collects data with a swath width of 11 km and a pixel size of 20 m. The AVIRIS data used in this study were collected over Death Valley on 5/31/92.

  2. Extracting Tree Height from Repeat-Pass PolInSAR Data : Experiments with JPL and ESA Airborne Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavalle, Marco; Ahmed, Razi; Neumann, Maxim; Hensley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our latest developments and experiments with the random-motion-over-ground (RMoG) model used to extract canopy height and other important forest parameters from repeat-pass polarimetricinterferometric SAR (Pol-InSAR) data. More specifically, we summarize the key features of the RMoG model in contrast with the random-volume-over-ground (RVoG) model, describe in detail a possible inversion scheme for the RMoG model and illustrate the results of the RMoG inversion using airborne data collected by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  3. Fusion of AIRSAR and TM Data for Parameter Classification and Estimation in Dense and Hilly Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, Mahta; Dungan, J. L.; Coughlan, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The expanded remotely sensed data space consisting of coincident radar backscatter and optical reflectance data provides for a more complete description of the Earth surface. This is especially useful where many parameters are needed to describe a certain scene, such as in the presence of dense and complex-structured vegetation or where there is considerable underlying topography. The goal of this paper is to use a combination of radar and optical data to develop a methodology for parameter classification for dense and hilly forests, and further, class-specific parameter estimation. The area to be used in this study is the H. J. Andrews Forest in Oregon, one of the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites in the US. This area consists of various dense old-growth conifer stands, and contains significant topographic relief. The Andrews forest has been the subject of many ecological studies over several decades, resulting in an abundance of ground measurements. Recently, biomass and leaf-area index (LAI) values for approximately 30 reference stands have also become available which span a large range of those parameters. The remote sensing data types to be used are the C-, L-, and P-band polarimetric radar data from the JPL airborne SAR (AIRSAR), the C-band single-polarization data from the JPL topographic SAR (TOPSAR), and the Thematic Mapper (TM) data from Landsat, all acquired in late April 1998. The total number of useful independent data channels from the AIRSAR is 15 (three frequencies, each with three unique polarizations and amplitude and phase of the like-polarized correlation), from the TOPSAR is 2 (amplitude and phase of the interferometric correlation), and from the TM is 6 (the thermal band is not used). The range pixel spacing of the AIRSAR is 3.3m for C- and L-bands and 6.6m for P-band. The TOPSAR pixel spacing is 10m, and the TM pixel size is 30m. To achieve parameter classification, first a number of parameters are defined which are of interest to

  4. Mapping Angkor with AIRSAR/TOPSR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Hensley, S.; Moore, E.

    1997-01-01

    During last year's AIRSAR Pacific Rim Deployment, data were collected over Angkor in Cambodia. The temples of Angkor date the city to the 9th-13th century AD, but little is known of its prehistoric habitation.

  5. Wind-wave-induced velocity in ATI SAR ocean surface currents: First experimental evidence from an airborne campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Adrien C. H.; Gommenginger, Christine; Marquez, Jose; Doody, Sam; Navarro, Victor; Buck, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Conventional and along-track interferometric (ATI) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) senses the motion of the ocean surface by measuring the Doppler shift of reflected signals. Measurements are affected by a Wind-wave-induced Artifact Surface Velocity (WASV) which was modeled theoretically in past studies and has been estimated empirically only once before with Envisat ASAR by Mouche et al. (2012). An airborne campaign in the tidally dominated Irish Sea served to evaluate this effect and the current retrieval capabilities of a dual-beam SAR interferometer known as Wavemill. A comprehensive collection of Wavemill airborne data acquired in a star pattern over a well-instrumented validation site made it possible for the first time to estimate the magnitude of the WASV, and its dependence on azimuth and incidence angle from data alone. In light wind (5.5 m/s) and moderate current (0.7 m/s) conditions, the wind-wave-induced contribution to the measured ocean surface motion reaches up to 1.6 m/s upwind, with a well-defined second-order harmonic dependence on direction to the wind. The magnitude of the WASV is found to be larger at lower incidence angles. The airborne WASV results show excellent consistency with the empirical WASV estimated from Envisat ASAR. These results confirm that SAR and ATI surface velocity estimates are strongly affected by WASV and that the WASV can be well characterized with knowledge of the wind knowledge and of the geometry. These airborne results provide the first independent validation of Mouche et al. (2012) and confirm that the empirical model they propose provides the means to correct airborne and spaceborne SAR and ATI SAR data for WASV to obtain accurate ocean surface current measurements. After removing the WASV, the airborne Wavemill-retrieved currents show very good agreement against ADCP measurements with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) typically around 0.1 m/s in velocity and 10° in direction.

  6. A comparison of airborne GEMS/SAR with satellite-borne Seasat/SAR radar imagery - The value of archived multiple data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Bradford C.; Dellwig, Louis F.

    1988-01-01

    In a study concerning the value of using radar imagery from systems with diverse parameters, X-band images of the Northern Louisiana Salt dome area generated by the airborne Goodyear electronic mapping system (GEMS) are analyzed in conjunction with imagery generated by the satelliteborne Seasat/SAR. The GEMS operated with an incidence angle of 75 to 85 deg and a resolution of 12 m, whereas the Seasat/SAR operated with an incidence angle of 23 deg and a resolution of 25 m. It is found that otherwise unattainable data on land management activities, improved delineation of the drainage net, better definition of surface roughness in cleared areas, and swamp identification, became accessible when adjustments for the time lapse between the two missions were made and supporting ground data concerning the physical and vegetative characteristics of the terrain were acquired.

  7. Polarization and wavelength diversities of Gulf Stream fronts imaged by AIRSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Jansen, R. W.; Marmorino, G. O.; Chubb, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    During the 1990 Gulf Stream Experiment, NASA/JPL AIRSAR imaged the north edge of the Gulf Stream near the coast of Virginia. Simultaneous in-situ measurements of currents, temperatures, salinities, etc. were made for several crossings of the north edge by the R/V Cape Henlopen. Measurements identified two fronts with shearing and converging flows. The polarimetric SAR images from the fronts showed two bright linear features. One of them corresponds to the temperature front, which separated the warm Gulf Stream water to the south from a cool, freshwater filament to the north. The other line, located about 8 km north of the temperature front, is believed to correspond to the velocity front between the filament and the slope water. At these fronts, wave-current interactions produced narrow bands of steep and breaking waves manifesting higher radar returns in polarimetric SAR images. In general, our AIRSAR imagery shows that the signal-to-clutter ratio of radar cross sections for the temperature front is higher than that of the velocity front. In this paper, we study the polarization and wavelength diversities of radar response of these two fronts using the P-, L-, and C-Band Polarimetric SAR data. The north-south flight path of the AIRSAR crossed the temperature front several times and provided valuable data for analysis. Three individual passes are investigated. We found that for the temperature front, the cross-pol (HV) responses are much higher than co-pol responses (VV and HH), and that P-Band HV has the highest signal to clutter ratio. For the velocity front, the ratio is the strongest in P-Band VV, and it is indistinguishable for all polarizations in C-Band. The radar cross sections for all three polarization (HH, HV, and VV) and for all three bands are modelled using an ocean wave model and a composite Bragg scattering model. In our initial investigations, the theoretical model agrees qualitatively with the AIRSAR observations.

  8. Quantification of L-band InSAR decorrelation in volcanic terrains using airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedze, M.; Heggy, E.; Jacquemoud, S.; Bretar, F.

    2011-12-01

    Repeat-pass InSAR LOS measurements of the Piton de La Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France) suffer from substantial phase decorrelation due to the occurrence of vegetation and ash deposits on the caldera and slopes of the edifice. To correct this deficiency, we combine normalized airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) intensity data with spaceborne InSAR coherence images from ALOS PALSAR L-band acquired over the volcano in 2008 and 2009, following the 2007 major eruption. The fusion of the two data sets improves the calculation of coherence and the textural classification of different volcanic surfaces. For future missions considering both InSAR and/or LiDAR such as DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice), such data fusion studies can provide a better analysis of the spatiotemporal variations in InSAR coherence in order to enhance the monitoring of pre-eruptive ground displacements. The airborne surveys conducted in 2008 and 2009, cover different types of vegetation and terrain roughness on the central and western parts of the volcano. The topographic data are first processed to generate a high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM) of the volcanic edifice with elevation accuracy better than 1 m. For our purposes, the phase variations caused by the surface relief can be eliminated using the LiDAR-derived DTM. Then normalized LiDAR intensities are correlated to the L-band polarimetric coherence for different zones of the volcano to assess the LiDAR-InSAR statistical behavior of different lava flows, pyroclastics, and vegetated surfaces. Results suggest that each volcanic terrain type is characterized by a unique LiDAR-InSAR histogram pattern. We identified four LiDAR-InSAR distinguished relations: (1) pahoehoe lava flow surfaces show an agglomerate histogram pattern which may be explained by low surface scattering and low wave penetration into the geological medium; (2) eroded a'a lava surfaces is characterized by high standard deviation

  9. Combined Use of Airborne Lidar and DBInSAR Data to Estimate LAI in Temperate Mixed Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peduzzi, Alicia; Wynne, Randolph Hamilton; Thomas, Valerie A.; Nelson, Ross F.; Reis, James J.; Sanford, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether leaf area index (LAI) in temperate mixed forests is best estimated using multiple-return airborne laser scanning (lidar) data or dual-band, single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar data (from GeoSAR) alone, or both in combination. In situ measurements of LAI were made using the LiCor LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer on 61 plots (21 hardwood, 36 pine, 4 mixed pine hardwood; stand age ranging from 12-164 years; mean height ranging from 0.4 to 41.2 m) in the Appomattox-Buckingham State Forest, Virginia, USA. Lidar distributional metrics were calculated for all returns and for ten one meter deep crown density slices (a new metric), five above and five below the mode of the vegetation returns for each plot. GeoSAR metrics were calculated from the X-band backscatter coefficients (four looks) as well as both X- and P-band interferometric heights and magnitudes for each plot. Lidar metrics alone explained 69% of the variability in LAI, while GeoSAR metrics alone explained 52%. However, combining the lidar and GeoSAR metrics increased the R2 to 0.77 with a CV-RMSE of 0.42. This study indicates the clear potential for X-band backscatter and interferometric height (both now available from spaceborne sensors), when combined with small-footprint lidar data, to improve LAI estimation in temperate mixed forests.

  10. The Ecosystems SAR (EcoSAR) an Airborne P-band Polarimetric InSAR for the Measurement of Vegetation Structure, Biomass and Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Ranson, K. Jon; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sun, Guoqing; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Perrine, Martin L.; Du Toit, Cornelis F.; Bonds, Quenton; Beck, Jaclyn; Lu, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    EcoSAR is a new synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument being developed at the NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the polarimetric and interferometric measurements of ecosystem structure and biomass. The instrument uses a phased-array beamforming architecture and supports full polarimetric measurements and single pass interferometry. This Instrument development is part of NASA's Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program (ESTO IIP).

  11. Monitoring of environmental conditions in the Alaskan forests using ERS-1 SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric; Way, Jobea; Mcdonald, Kyle; Viereck, Leslie; Adams, Phyllis

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results from an analysis of the multitemporal radar backscatter signatures of tree species acquired by European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are presented. Significant changes in radar backscatter are detected. Correlation of these differences with ground truth observations indicate that these are due to changes in soil and liquid water content as a result of freeze/thaw events. C-band observations acquired by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne SAR (JPL AIRSAR) instrument demonstrate the potential of a C-band radar instrument to monitor drought/flood events. The potential of ERS-1 for monitoring phenologic changes in the forest and for classifying tree species is less promising.

  12. Quantitative analysis of surface characteristics and morphology in Death Valley, California using AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, K. S.; Kruse, F. A.; Lefkoff, A. B.

    1992-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (JPL-AIRSAR) is used to collect full polarimetric measurements at P-, L-, and C-bands. These data are analyzed using the radar analysis and visualization environment (RAVEN). The AIRSAR data are calibrated using in-scene corner reflectors to allow for quantitative analysis of the radar backscatter. RAVEN is used to extract surface characteristics. Inversion models are used to calculate quantitative surface roughness values and fractal dimensions. These values are used to generate synthetic surface plots that represent the small-scale surface structure of areas in Death Valley. These procedures are applied to a playa, smooth salt-pan, and alluvial fan surfaces in Death Valley. Field measurements of surface roughness are used to verify the accuracy.

  13. A Novel Azimuth Super-Resolution Method by Synthesizing Azimuth Bandwidth of Multiple Tracks of Airborne Stripmap SAR Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jingwen; Sun, Bing; Yang, Jian

    2016-06-13

    Azimuth resolution of airborne stripmap synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is restricted by the azimuth antenna size. Conventionally, a higher azimuth resolution should be achieved by employing alternate modes that steer the beam in azimuth to enlarge the synthetic antenna aperture. However, if a data set of a certain region, consisting of multiple tracks of airborne stripmap SAR data, is available, the azimuth resolution of specific small region of interest (ROI) can be conveniently improved by a novel azimuth super-resolution method as introduced by this paper. The proposed azimuth super-resolution method synthesize the azimuth bandwidth of the data selected from multiple discontinuous tracks and contributes to a magnifier-like function with which the ROI can be further zoomed in with a higher azimuth resolution than that of the original stripmap images. Detailed derivation of the azimuth super-resolution method, including the steps of two-dimensional dechirping, residual video phase (RVP) removal, data stitching and data correction, is provided. The restrictions of the proposed method are also discussed. Lastly, the presented approach is evaluated via both the single- and multi-target computer simulations.

  14. A Novel Azimuth Super-Resolution Method by Synthesizing Azimuth Bandwidth of Multiple Tracks of Airborne Stripmap SAR Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jingwen; Sun, Bing; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Azimuth resolution of airborne stripmap synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is restricted by the azimuth antenna size. Conventionally, a higher azimuth resolution should be achieved by employing alternate modes that steer the beam in azimuth to enlarge the synthetic antenna aperture. However, if a data set of a certain region, consisting of multiple tracks of airborne stripmap SAR data, is available, the azimuth resolution of specific small region of interest (ROI) can be conveniently improved by a novel azimuth super-resolution method as introduced by this paper. The proposed azimuth super-resolution method synthesize the azimuth bandwidth of the data selected from multiple discontinuous tracks and contributes to a magnifier-like function with which the ROI can be further zoomed in with a higher azimuth resolution than that of the original stripmap images. Detailed derivation of the azimuth super-resolution method, including the steps of two-dimensional dechirping, residual video phase (RVP) removal, data stitching and data correction, is provided. The restrictions of the proposed method are also discussed. Lastly, the presented approach is evaluated via both the single- and multi-target computer simulations. PMID:27304959

  15. Airborne & SAR Synergy Reveals the 3D Structure of Air Bubble Entrainment in Internal Waves and Frontal Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, J. C. B.; Magalhaes, J. M.; Batista, M.; Gostiaux, L.; Gerkema, T.; New, A. L.

    2013-03-01

    Internal waves are now recognised as an important mixing mechanism in the ocean. Mixing at the base of the mixed layer and in the seasonal thermocline affects the properties of those water masses which define the exchange of heat and freshwater between the atmosphere and ocean. The breaking of Internal Solitary Waves (ISWs) contributes significantly to turbulent mixing in the near-surface layers, through the continual triggering of instabilities as they propagate and shoal towards the coast or shallow topography. Here we report some results of the EU funded project A.NEW (Airborne observations of Nonlinear Evolution of internal Waves generated by internal tidal beams). The airborne capabilities to observe small scale structure of breaking internal waves in the near-shore zone has been demonstrated in recent studies (e.g. Marmorino et al., 2008). In particular, sea surface thermal signatures of shoaling ISWs have revealed the turbulent character of these structures in the form of surface “boil” features. On the other hand, some in situ measurements of internal waves and theoretical work suggest subsurface entrainment of air bubbles in the convergence zones of ISWs (Serebryany and Galybin, 2009; Grimshaw et al., 2010). We conducted airborne remote sensing observations in the coastal zone off the west Iberian Peninsula (off Lisbon, Portugal) using high resolution imaging sensors: LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging), hyperspectral cameras (Eagle and Hawk) and thermal infrared imaging (TABI-320). These measurements were planned based on previous SAR observations in the region, which included also near-real time SAR overpasses (ESA project AOPT-2423 and TerraSAR-X project OCE-0056). The airborne measurements were conducted from board the NERC (Natural Environmental Research Centre) Do 228 aircraft in the summer of 2010. The TABI-320 thermal airborne broadband imager can distinguish temperature differences as small as one-twentieth of a degree and operates in the

  16. Full polarimetric display of NASA/JPL AIRSAR P-band data from Gilmore Creek, AK (1993), Half Moon Bay, CA (1994), and Bishop, CA (1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, Howard; Cameron, William L.

    1997-06-01

    Full polarization data gathered by the NASA/JPL AIRSAR P-band radar in Gilmore Creek, Alaska (1993), Half Moon Bay, California (1994), and Bishop, California (1995) are imaged using full polarization displays. Full polarization symbol displays of reflector signatures and of simulated small aircraft crash sites are presented. In addition, ideal polarimetric reflector responses are compared to measured reflector signatures extracted from ADTS MMW SAR scenes and AIRSAR scenes. It is demonstrated that full polarization displays can be used to quickly identify polarization calibration errors based on clutter responses alone.

  17. Extraction of quantitative surface characteristics from AIRSAR data for Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, K. S.; Kruse, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    Polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data were collected for the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over Death Valley, California, USA, in Sep. 1989. AIRSAR is a four-look, quad-polarization, three frequency instrument. It collects measurements at C-band (5.66 cm), L-band (23.98 cm), and P-band (68.13 cm), and has a GIFOV of 10 meters and a swath width of 12 kilometers. Because the radar measures at three wavelengths, different scales of surface roughness are measured. Also, dielectric constants can be calculated from the data. The AIRSAR data were calibrated using in-scene trihedral corner reflectors to remove cross-talk; and to calibrate the phase, amplitude, and co-channel gain imbalance. The calibration allows for the extraction of accurate values of rms surface roughness, dielectric constants, sigma(sub 0) backscatter, and polarization information. The radar data sets allow quantitative characterization of small scale surface structure of geologic units, providing information about the physical and chemical processes that control the surface morphology. Combining the quantitative information extracted from the radar data with other remotely sensed data sets allows discrimination, identification and mapping of geologic units that may be difficult to discern using conventional techniques.

  18. Evaluating the Synergistic Use of Low-Altitude AVIRIS and AIRSAR Data for Land Cover Mapping in Northeast Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berglund, Judith; Spruce, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Current land cover maps are needed by Yellowstone National Park (YNP) managers to assist them in protecting and preserving native flora and fauna. Synergistic use of hyperspectral and radar imagery offers great promise for mapping habitat in terms of cover type composition and structure. In response, a study was conducted to assess the utility of combining low-altitude AVIRIS and AIRSAR data for mapping land cover in a portion of northeast YNP. Land cover maps were produced from individual AVIRIS and AIRSAR data sets, as well as from a hybrid data stack of selected AVIRIS and AIRSAR data bands. The three resulting classifications were compared to field survey data and aerial photography to assess apparent benefits of hyperspectral/SAR data fusion for land cover mapping. Preliminary results will be presented.

  19. SIR-C/X-SAR: Imaging Radar Analyses for Forest Ecosystem Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. Jon; Shugart, Herman; Smith, James A.; Sun, Guoqing

    1996-01-01

    Progress, significant results and future plans are discussed relating to the following objectives: (1) Ecosystem characterization using SIR-C/X-SAR and AirSAR data; (2) Improving radar backscatter models for forest canopies; and (3) Using SAR measurements and models with forest ecosystem models to improve inferences of ecosystem attributes and processes.

  20. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  1. Seasonal Thickness Changes Revealed by Airborne Radar Interferometry, Pi-SAR2, at Two Glaciers Near Mt. Tsurugi, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, M.; Fukui, K.; Kojima, S.; Matsuoka, T.

    2015-12-01

    Based on ice radar and high-preicision GPS measurements, Fukui and Iida (2012) have reported the presence of "glaciers" near Mt. Tsurugi, central Japan, which had been previously regarded as perenial snowy gorges. While their discovery was brought out by the modern geodetic techniques, there used to be a wrong idea that the equilibrium line altitude in central Japanese Alps is about 4000 meter, causing the actual glaciers to be overlooked; the elevation of Mt Tsurugi is 2999 meter. The presence of glaciers in central Japan is due to the very high seasonal accmulation; the snow fall in the mountainous regions can reach several tens of meters or more. There are, however, few snow-depth measurement data due to the logistic problems. The equilibrium line altitude also remains uncertain. We have performed airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements near the two glaciers in August, October 2013, August 2014, and March 2015. The Pi-SAR2 system used in this study consists of X-band SAR antennas, and allows us to perform single-pass interferometry and full polarimetry with the maximum spatial resolution of 0.3 m. Taking advantage of the single-pass interferometry, we have generated digital elevation models (DEM) at each measurement epoch to derive the temporal changes in the thickness by differecing the DEMs of multiple epochs. Snow melt season starts in May at the analyzed area, and the first snow fall usually occurs in late October. As such, the minimum thickness is expected in October, when the glacier ice appears on the surface. Preliminary analyses indicate that the differences between August and October 2013 reaches ~10 to 20 meters with errors of 5-10 meters.

  2. Statistics of multi-look AIRSAR imagery: A comparison of theory with measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Hoppel, K. W.; Mango, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    The intensity and amplitude statistics of SAR images, such as L-Band HH for SEASAT and SIR-B, and C-Band VV for ERS-1 have been extensively investigated for various terrain, ground cover and ocean surfaces. Less well-known are the statistics between multiple channels of polarimetric of interferometric SAR's, especially for the multi-look processed data. In this paper, we investigate the probability density functions (PDF's) of phase differences, the magnitude of complex products and the amplitude ratios, between polarization channels (i.e. HH, HV, and VV) using 1-look and 4-look AIRSAR polarimetric data. Measured histograms are compared with theoretical PDF's which were recently derived based on a complex Gaussian model.

  3. Fault and anthropogenic processes in central California constrained by satellite and airborne InSAR and in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Lundgren, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) system is the primary plate boundary in California, with the central SAF (CSAF) lying adjacent to the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), a vast structural trough that accounts for about one-sixth of the United Sates' irrigated land and one-fifth of its extracted groundwater. The CSAF displays a range of fault slip behavior with creeping in its central segment that decreases towards its northwest and southeast ends, where the fault transitions to being fully locked. At least six Mw ~6.0 events since 1857 have occurred near the Parkfield transition, most recently in 2004. Large earthquakes also occurred on secondary faults parallel to the SAF, the result of distributed deformation across the plate boundary zone. Recent studies have revealed the complex interaction between anthropogenic related groundwater depletion and the seismic activity on adjacent faults through stress interaction. Despite recent progress, many questions regarding fault and anthropogenic processes in the region still remain. For example, how is the relative plate motion accommodated between the CSAF and off-fault deformation? What is the distribution of fault creep and slip deficit at shallow depths? What are the spatiotemporal variations of fault slip? What are the spatiotemporal characteristics of anthropogenic and lithospheric processes and how do they interact with each other? To address these, we combine satellite InSAR and NASA airborne UAVSAR data to image on and off-fault deformation. The UAVSAR data cover fault perpendicular swaths imaged from opposing look directions and fault parallel swaths since 2009. The much finer spatial resolution and optimized viewing geometry provide important constraints on near fault deformation and fault slip at very shallow depth. We performed a synoptic InSAR time series analysis using ERS-1/2, Envisat, ALOS and UAVSAR interferograms. The combined C-band ERS-1/2 and Envisat data provide a long time interval of SAR data over the region

  4. Phase Noise Investigation of Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method for Airborne Multibaseline SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnard, C.; Small, D.; Meier, E.

    2015-03-01

    The phase estimation of cross-track multibaseline synthetic aperture interferometric data is usually thought to be very efficiently achieved using the maximum likelihood (ML) method. The suitability of this method is investigated here as applied to airborne single pass multibaseline data. Experimental interferometric data acquired with a Ka-band sensor were processed using (a) a ML method that fuses the complex data from all receivers and (b) a coarse-to-fine method that only uses the intermediate baselines to unwrap the phase values from the longest baseline. The phase noise was analyzed for both methods: in most cases, a small improvement was found when the ML method was used.

  5. MAC Europe 1991 campaign: AIRSAR/AVIRIS data integration for agricultural test site classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangiovanni, S.; Buongiorno, M. F.; Ferrarini, M.; Fiumara, A.

    1993-01-01

    During summer 1991, multi-sensor data were acquired over the Italian test site 'Otrepo Pavese', an agricultural flat area in Northern Italy. This area has been the Telespazio pilot test site for experimental activities related to agriculture applications. The aim of the investigation described in the following paper is to assess the amount of information contained in the AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar) and AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) data, and to evaluate classification results obtained from each sensor data separately and from the combined dataset. All classifications are examined by means of the resulting confusion matrices and Khat coefficients. Improvements of the classification results obtained by using the integrated dataset are finally evaluated.

  6. Monitoring land use and degradation using satellite and airborne data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Farr, Thomas G.; Blom, Ronald G.; Crippen, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    In July 1990 AVIRIS and AIRSAR data were collected over the Manix Basin Area of the Mojave Desert to study land degradation in an arid area where centerpivot irrigation had been in use. The Manix Basin is located NE of Barstow, California, along Interstate-15 at 34 deg 57 min N 116 deg 35 min W. This region was covered by a series of lakes during the Late Pleistocence and Early Holocene. Beginning in the 1960's, areas were cleared of the native creosote bush-dominated plant community to be used for agricultural purposes. Starting in 1972 fields have been abandoned due to the increased cost of electricity needed to pump the irrigation water, with some fields abandoned as recently as 1988 and 1992. These circumstances provide a time series of abandoned fields which provide the possibility of studying the processes which act on agricultural fields in arid regions when they are abandoned. Ray et al. reported that polarimetric SAR (AIRSAR) could detect that the concentric circular planting furrows plowed on these fields persists for a few years after abandonment and then disappear over time and that wind ripples which form on these fields over time due to wind erosion can be detected with polarimetric radar. Ray et al. used Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) bandpasses to generate NDVI images of the Manix Basin which showed that the fields abandoned for only a few years had higher NDVI's than the undisturbed desert while the fields abandoned for a longer time had NDVI levels lower than that of the undisturbed desert. The purpose of this study is to use a fusion of a time series of satellite data with airborne data to provide a context for the airborne data. The satellite data time series will additionally help to validate the observation and analysis of time-dependent processes observed in the single AVIRIS image of fields abandoned for different periods of time.

  7. Exploring snow information content of interferometric SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeily Gazkohani, Ali

    The objective of this research is to explore the information content of repeat-pass cross-track Interferometric SAR (InSAR) with regard to snow, in particular Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) and snow depth. The study is an outgrowth of earlier snow cover modeling and radar interferometry experiments at Schefferville, Quebec, Canada and elsewhere which has shown that for reasons of loss of coherence repeat-pass InSAR is not useful for the purpose of snow cover mapping, even when used in differential InSAR mode. Repeat-pass cross-track InSAR would overcome this problem. As at radar wavelengths dry snow is transparent, the main reflection is at the snow/ground interface. The high refractive index of ice creates a phase delay which is linearly related to the water equivalent of the snow pack. When wet, the snow surface is the main reflector, and this enables measurement of snow depth. Algorithms are elaborated accordingly. Field experiments were conducted at two sites and employ two different types of digital elevation models (DEM) produced by means of cross track InSAR. One was from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model (SRTM DEM), flown in February 2000. It was compared to the photogrammetrically produced Canadian Digital Elevation Model (CDEM) to examine snow-related effects at a site near Schefferville, where snow conditions are well known from half a century of snow and permafrost research. The second type of DEM was produced by means of airborne cross track InSAR (TOPSAR). Several missions were flown for this purpose in both summer and winter conditions during NASA's Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) in Colorado, USA. Differences between these DEM's were compared to snow conditions that were well documented during the CLPX field campaigns. The results are not straightforward. As a result of automated correction routines employed in both SRTM and AIRSAR DEM extraction, the snow cover signal is contaminated. Fitting InSAR DEM's to known

  8. Digital Intermediate Frequency Receiver Module For Use In Airborne Sar Applications

    DOEpatents

    Tise, Bertice L.; Dubbert, Dale F.

    2005-03-08

    A digital IF receiver (DRX) module directly compatible with advanced radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. The DRX can combine a 1 G-Sample/sec 8-bit ADC with high-speed digital signal processor, such as high gate-count FPGA technology or ASICs to realize a wideband IF receiver. DSP operations implemented in the DRX can include quadrature demodulation and multi-rate, variable-bandwidth IF filtering. Pulse-to-pulse (Doppler domain) filtering can also be implemented in the form of a presummer (accumulator) and an azimuth prefilter. An out of band noise source can be employed to provide a dither signal to the ADC, and later be removed by digital signal processing. Both the range and Doppler domain filtering operations can be implemented using a unique pane architecture which allows on-the-fly selection of the filter decimation factor, and hence, the filter bandwidth. The DRX module can include a standard VME-64 interface for control, status, and programming. An interface can provide phase history data to the real-time image formation processors. A third front-panel data port (FPDP) interface can send wide bandwidth, raw phase histories to a real-time phase history recorder for ground processing.

  9. Airborne SAR on circular trajectories to reduce layover and shadow effects of urban scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Stephan; Sommer, Rainer; Pohl, Nils; Stilla, Uwe

    2016-10-01

    Circular synthetic aperture radar (CSAR) can provide a full aspect coverage on interesting scenes in one run. Over the city of Karlsruhe a Ka-band dataset was generated in CSAR mode. The data was focused using subapertures in a step of 1.5°, each SAR image representing the scene from a slightly different aspect. The potential of non-coherent fusion of full aspect coverage to reveal small targets was demonstrated. By a manual selection of the viewing angle, parking cars next to high buildings could be revealed and a full view on selected targets with reduced shadow and overlay effects was shown. We studied the effect of varying aspects on the focused image pixels and developed a first metric to automatically select the best viewing angle to a local scene. Areas containing ground information like grass or asphalt and which are not hidden between high objects could be identified and used to deliver a good aspect view on neighboring areas which suffer from shadowing effects.

  10. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  11. Advanced Algorithms and High-Performance Testbed for Large-Scale Site Characterization and Subsurface Target Detecting Using Airborne Ground Penetrating SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Collier, James B.; Citak, Ari

    1997-01-01

    A team of US Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District and Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville, let Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and Montgomery Watson is currently in the process of planning and conducting the largest ever survey at the Former Buckley Field (60,000 acres), in Colorado, by using SRI airborne, ground penetrating, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The purpose of this survey is the detection of surface and subsurface Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) and in a broader sense the site characterization for identification of contaminated as well as clear areas. In preparation for such a large-scale survey, JPL has been developing advanced algorithms and a high-performance restbed for processing of massive amount of expected SAR data from this site. Two key requirements of this project are the accuracy (in terms of UXO detection) and speed of SAR data processing. The first key feature of this testbed is a large degree of automation and a minimum degree of the need for human perception in the processing to achieve an acceptable processing rate of several hundred acres per day. For accurate UXO detection, novel algorithms have been developed and implemented. These algorithms analyze dual polarized (HH and VV) SAR data. They are based on the correlation of HH and VV SAR data and involve a rather large set of parameters for accurate detection of UXO. For each specific site, this set of parameters can be optimized by using ground truth data (i.e., known surface and subsurface UXOs). In this paper, we discuss these algorithms and their successful application for detection of surface and subsurface anti-tank mines by using a data set from Yuma proving Ground, A7, acquired by SRI SAR.

  12. Comparison of inversion models using AIRSAR data for Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.

    1993-01-01

    Polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data were collected for the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. AIRSAR is a four-look, quid-polarizaiton, three frequency instrument. It collects measurements at C-band (5.66 cm), L-band (23.98 cm), and P-band (68.13 cm), and has a GIFOV of 10 meters and a swath width of 12 kilometers. Because the radar measures at three wavelengths, different scales of surface roughness are measured. Also, dielectric constants can be calculated from the data. The scene used in this study is in Death Valley, California and is located over Trail Canyon alluvial fan, the valley floor, and Artists Drive alluvial fan. The fans are very different in mineralogic makeup, size, and surface roughness. Trail Canyon fan is located on the west side of the valley at the base of the Panamint Range and is a large fan with older areas of desert pavement and younger active channels. The source for the material on southern part of the fan is mostly quartzites and there is an area of carbonate source on the northern part of the fan. Artists Drive fan is located at the base of the Black Mountains on the east side of the valley and is a smaller, young fan with its source mostly from volcanic rocks. The valley floor contains playa and salt deposits that range from smooth to Devil's Golf course type salt pinnacles.

  13. Forest Height and Ground Topography at L-Band from an Experimental Single-Pass Airborne Pol-InSAR System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, B.; Zhang, Q.; Schwaebisch, M.; Denbina, M.; Cloude, S.

    2009-04-01

    Many applications require bare-earth Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) in the presence of forest canopy. L-Band is an attractive candidate, but the derived interferometric phase represents a combination of ground and volume scattering contributions from the canopy above. The use of PolInSAR techniques, and the Random Volume Over Ground (RVOG) Model has had considerable success in model inversion studies where the objective has been to extract tree height. A major problem for the robust application of this technique is the presence of temporal decorrelation, caused by the use of repeat-pass interferometry. In this paper we will present the current results of canopy height and DTM estimation in forested areas using an experimental airborne, single-pass, L-Band PolInSAR system for which temporal decorrelation is not an issue.

  14. Unsupervised polarimetric SAR urban area classification based on model-based decomposition with cross scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Deliang; Tang, Tao; Ban, Yifang; Su, Yi; Kuang, Gangyao

    2016-06-01

    Since it has been validated that cross-polarized scattering (HV) is caused not only by vegetation but also by rotated dihedrals, in this study, we use rotated dihedral corner reflectors to form a cross scattering matrix and propose an extended four-component model-based decomposition method for PolSAR data over urban areas. Unlike other urban area decomposition techniques which need to discriminate the urban and natural areas before decomposition, this proposed method is applied on PolSAR image directly. The building orientation angle is considered in this scattering matrix, making it flexible and adaptive in the decomposition. Therefore, we can separate cross scattering of urban areas from the overall HV component. Further, the cross and helix scattering components are also compared. Then, using these decomposed scattering powers, the buildings and natural areas can be easily discriminated from each other using a simple unsupervised K-means classifier. Moreover, buildings aligned and not aligned along the radar flight direction can be also distinguished clearly. Spaceborne RADARSAT-2 and airborne AIRSAR full polarimetric SAR data are used to validate the performance of our proposed method. The cross scattering power of oriented buildings is generated, leading to a better decomposition result for urban areas with respect to other state-of-the-art urban decomposition techniques. The decomposed scattering powers significantly improve the classification accuracy for urban areas.

  15. Application of modified VICAR/IBIS GIS to analysis of July 1991 Flevoland AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norikane, L.; Broek, B.; Freeman, A.

    1992-01-01

    Three overflights of the Flevoland calibration/agricultural site were made by the JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) on 3, 12, and 28 July 1991 as part of MAC-Europe '92. A polygon map was generated at TNO-FEL which overlayed the slant range projected July 3 data set. Each polygon was identified by a sequence of points and a crop label. The polygon map was composed of 452 uniquely identified polygons and 15 different crop types. Analysis of the data was done using our modified Video Image Communication and Retrieval/Image Based Information System Geographic Information System (VICAR/IBIS GIS). This GIS is an extension of the VICAR/IBIS GIS first developed by Bryant in the 1970's which is itself an extension of the VICAR image processing system also developed at JPL.

  16. Preliminary study of Kelso Dunes using AVIRIS, TM, and AIRSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Pung; Blumberg, Dan G.; Greeley, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    Remote sensing of sand dunes helps in the understanding of aeolian process and provides important information about the regional geologic history, environmental change, and desertification. Remotely sensed data combined with field studies are valuable in studying dune morphology, regional aeolian dynamics, and aeolian depositional history. In particular, active and inactive sands of the Kelso Dunes have been studied using landsat TM and AIRSAR. In this report, we describe the use of AVIRIS data to study the Kelso dunes and to compare the AVIRIS information with that from TM and AIRSAR.

  17. On the Capabilities of Using AIRSAR Data in Surface Energy/Water Balance Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Jose F.; Saatchi, Susan S.

    1996-01-01

    The capabilities of using remote sensing data, and in particular multifrequency/multipolarization SAR data, like AIRSAR, for the retrieval of surface parameters, depend considerably on the specificity of each application. The potentials, and limitations, of SAR data in ecological investigations are well known. Because the chemistry is a major component in such studies and because of the almost lacking chemical information at the wavelengths of SAR data, the capabilities of using SAR-derived information in such studies are considerably limited. However, in the case of surface energy/water balance studies, the determination of the amount of water content, both in the soil and in the plants, is a major component in all modeling approaches. As the information about water content is present in the SAR signal, then the role of SAR data in studies where water content is to be determined becomes clearly predominant. Another situation where the role of SAR data becomes dominant over other remote sensing systems is the case of dense canopies. Because of the penetration capabilities of microwave data, which is especially superior as compared to optical data, information about the canopy as a whole and even the underlying soil is contained in the SAR data, while only the top canopy provides the information content in the case of optical data. In the case of relatively dense canopies, as has been demonstrated in this study, such different penetration capabilities provide very different results in terms of the derived total canopy water content, for instance. However, although all such capabilities are well known, unfortunately there are also well known limitations. Apart from calibration-related aspects (that we will not consider in this study), and apart from other intrinsic problems (like image noise, topographic corrections, etc.) which also significantly affect the derived results, we will concentrate on the problem of extracting information from the data. Even at this

  18. A Fast Superpixel Segmentation Algorithm for PolSAR Images Based on Edge Refinement and Revised Wishart Distance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Zou, Huanxin; Luo, Tiancheng; Qin, Xianxiang; Zhou, Shilin; Ji, Kefeng

    2016-01-01

    The superpixel segmentation algorithm, as a preprocessing technique, should show good performance in fast segmentation speed, accurate boundary adherence and homogeneous regularity. A fast superpixel segmentation algorithm by iterative edge refinement (IER) works well on optical images. However, it may generate poor superpixels for Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) images due to the influence of strong speckle noise and many small-sized or slim regions. To solve these problems, we utilized a fast revised Wishart distance instead of Euclidean distance in the local relabeling of unstable pixels, and initialized unstable pixels as all the pixels substituted for the initial grid edge pixels in the initialization step. Then, postprocessing with the dissimilarity measure is employed to remove the generated small isolated regions as well as to preserve strong point targets. Finally, the superiority of the proposed algorithm is validated with extensive experiments on four simulated and two real-world PolSAR images from Experimental Synthetic Aperture Radar (ESAR) and Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AirSAR) data sets, which demonstrate that the proposed method shows better performance with respect to several commonly used evaluation measures, even with about nine times higher computational efficiency, as well as fine boundary adherence and strong point targets preservation, compared with three state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27754385

  19. AIRSAR studies of woody shrub density in semiarid rangeland: Jornada del Muerto, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musick, H.B.; Schaber, G.S.; Breed, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluates the use of polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data to assess woody shrub density in a semiarid site where the vegetation consists primarily of varied mixtures of herbaceous vegetation and shrubs. AIRSAR data and field observations of vegetation cover and growth form-composition were obtained for 59 sites in the Jornada del Muerto plain in southern New Mexico. Radar signature measures examined were C-, L- and P-band backscattering coefficients (??0) for HH, HV and W polarizations, ratios of ??0HH and ??0HV to ??0VV, and the HH-VV polarization phase difference and correlation coefficient. The most effective measure for estimation of shrub density was L-band ??0HV, which distinguished among shrub density classes with no misclassification. Sensitivity of this measure to small amounts of shrub cover was indicated by successful separation of sites with <1% shrub cover from sites with 1-5% cover. Separability of shrub density classes was generally least for C-band signature measures. A distinctive radar signature was exhibited by dense stands of Yucca elata, a semitreelike plant with uniformly thick ???10 cm diameter) fibrous stems. Yucca sites were distinguished from others by their high P-band ??0HV relative to L-band ??0HV. The results are largely explained by the greater sensitivity of lounger wavelengths to larger canopy structural elements. L-band ??0HV and other measures responsive to canopy volume scattering were more strongly related to shrub than to herbaceous plant cover because woody shrub canopies have numerous stems of the intermediate size to which L-band is most sensitive, whereas stems of this size are mostly lacking in herbaceous canopies. The uniform-diameter stems of yucca have larger dimensions to which P-band is more sensitive than L-band.This study evaluates the use of polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data to assess woody shrub density in a semiarid site where the vegetation consists

  20. AIRSAR Data for Geological and Geomorphological Mapping in the Great Sandy Desert and Pilbara Regions of Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, Ian J.

    1996-01-01

    Enhancements of AIRSAR data have demonstrated the benefits of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for revealing an additional and mich higher level of information about the composition of the terrain than enhancements f either SPOT-PAN or Landsat TM data. With appropriate image processing techniques, surface and near surface geological structures, hydrological systems (both current and ancient) and landform features, have been evidenced in a diverse range of landscapes. In the Great Sandy Desert region where spectral variability is minimal, radar's sensitivity to the micromorphology of sparse exposures of subcrop and lag gravels has provided a new insight into the region's geological framework, its landforms, and their evolution. In the Pilbara region, advanced processing of AIRSAR data to unmix the backscatter between and within the three frequencies of data has highlighted subsurface extensions of greenstone lithologies below sand cover and morphological evidence of past flow conditions under former climate regimes. On the basis of these observations, it is recommend that radar remote sensing technology involving the use of high resolution, polarimetric data be seriously considered as a viable tool for exploration in erosional and depositional environments located within Australia's mineral and oil-prospective provinces.

  1. Detecting Small-Scale Topographic Changes and Relict Geomorphic Features on Barrier Islands Using SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibeaut, James C.; Crawford, Melba M.; Gutierrez, Roberto; Slatton, K. Clint; Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Ricard, Michael R.

    1997-01-01

    The shapes and elevations of barrier islands may change dramatically over a short period of time during a storm. Coastal scientists and engineers, however, are currently unable to measure these changes occurring over an entire barrier island at once. This three-year project, which is funded by NASA and jointly conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Center for Space Research at The University of Texas at Austin, is designed to overcome this problem by developing the use of interferometry from airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) to measure coastal topography and to detect storm-induced changes in topography. Surrogate measures of topography observed in multiband, fully polarimetric AIRSAR (This type of data are now referred to as POLSAR data.) are also being investigated. Digital elevation models (DEM) of Galveston Island and Bolivar Peninsula, Texas obtained with Topographic SAR (TOPSAR) are compared with measurements by Global Positioning System (GPS) ground surveys and electronic total station surveys. In addition to topographic mapping, this project is evaluating the use of POLSAR to detect old features such as storm scarps, storm channels, former tidal inlets, and beach ridges that have been obscured by vegetation, erosion, deposition, and artificial filling. We have also expanded the work from the original proposal to include the mapping of coastal wetland vegetation and depositional environments. Methods developed during this project will provide coastal geologists with an unprecedented tool for monitoring and understanding barrier island systems. This understanding will improve overall coastal management policies and will help reduce the effects of natural and man-induced coastal hazards. This report summarizes our accomplishments during the second year of the study. Also included is a discussion of our planned activities for year 3 and a revised budget.

  2. An Integrated Navigation System using GPS Carrier Phase for Real-Time Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J. Rick; Kim, Theodore J.; Kohler, Stewart M.

    1999-06-24

    A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires accu- rate measurement of the motion of the imaging plat- form to produce well-focused images with minimal absolute position error. The motion measurement (MoMeas) system consists of a inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a P-code GPS receiver that outputs corrected ephemeris, L1 & L2 pseudoranges, and L1 & L2 carrier phase measurements. The unknown initial carrier phase biases to the GPS satellites are modeled as states in an extended Kalman filter and the resulting integrated navigation solution has po- sition errors that change slowly with time. Position error drifts less than 1- cm/sec have been measured from the SAR imagery for various length apertures.

  3. Mapping of taiga forest units using AIRSAR data and/or optical data, and retrieval of forest parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric; Williams, Cynthia; Way, Jobea; Viereck, Leslie

    1993-01-01

    A maximum a posteriori Bayesian classifier for multifrequency polarimetric SAR data is used to perform a supervised classification of forest types in the floodplains of Alaska. The image classes include white spruce, balsam poplar, black spruce, alder, non-forests, and open water. The authors investigate the effect on classification accuracy of changing environmental conditions, and of frequency and polarization of the signal. The highest classification accuracy (86 percent correctly classified forest pixels, and 91 percent overall) is obtained combining L- and C-band frequencies fully polarimetric on a date where the forest is just recovering from flooding. The forest map compares favorably with a vegetation map assembled from digitized aerial photos which took five years for completion, and address the state of the forest in 1978, ignoring subsequent fires, changes in the course of the river, clear-cutting of trees, and tree growth. HV-polarization is the most useful polarization at L- and C-band for classification. C-band VV (ERS-1 mode) and L-band HH (J-ERS-1 mode) alone or combined yield unsatisfactory classification accuracies. Additional data acquired in the winter season during thawed and frozen days yield classification accuracies respectively 20 percent and 30 percent lower due to a greater confusion between conifers and deciduous trees. Data acquired at the peak of flooding in May 1991 also yield classification accuracies 10 percent lower because of dominant trunk-ground interactions which mask out finer differences in radar backscatter between tree species. Combination of several of these dates does not improve classification accuracy. For comparison, panchromatic optical data acquired by SPOT in the summer season of 1991 are used to classify the same area. The classification accuracy (78 percent for the forest types and 90 percent if open water is included) is lower than that obtained with AIRSAR although conifers and deciduous trees are better

  4. Integration of TerraSAR-X, RapidEye and airborne lidar for remote sensing of intertidal bedforms on the upper flats of Norderney (German Wadden Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, Winny; Jung, Richard; Schmidt, Alena; Ehlers, Manfred; Heipke, Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander; Farke, Hubert

    2016-11-01

    The Wadden Sea is a large coastal transition area adjoining the southern North Sea uniting ecological key functions with an important role in coastal protection. The region is strictly protected by EU directives and national law and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, requiring frequent quality assessments and regular monitoring. In 2014 an intertidal bedform area characterised by alternating crests and water-covered troughs on the tidal flats of the island of Norderney (German Wadden Sea sector) was chosen to test different remote sensing methods for habitat mapping: airborne lidar, satellite-based radar (TerraSAR-X) and electro-optical sensors (RapidEye). The results revealed that, although sensitive to different surface qualities, all sensors were able to image the bedforms. A digital terrain model generated from the lidar data shows crests and slopes of the bedforms with high geometric accuracy in the centimetre range, but high costs limit the operation area. TerraSAR-X data enabled identifying the positions of the bedforms reflecting the residual water in the troughs also with a high resolution of up to 1.1 m, but with larger footprints and much higher temporal availability. RapidEye data are sensitive to differences in sediment moisture employed to identify crest areas, slopes and troughs, with high spatial coverage but the lowest resolution (6.5 m). Monitoring concepts may differ in their remote sensing requirements regarding areal coverage, spatial and temporal resolution, sensitivity and geometric accuracy. Also financial budgets limit the selection of sensors. Thus, combining differing assets into an integrated concept of remote sensing contributes to solving these issues.

  5. Integration of TerraSAR-X, RapidEye and airborne lidar for remote sensing of intertidal bedforms on the upper flats of Norderney (German Wadden Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, Winny; Jung, Richard; Schmidt, Alena; Ehlers, Manfred; Heipke, Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander; Farke, Hubert

    2017-04-01

    The Wadden Sea is a large coastal transition area adjoining the southern North Sea uniting ecological key functions with an important role in coastal protection. The region is strictly protected by EU directives and national law and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, requiring frequent quality assessments and regular monitoring. In 2014 an intertidal bedform area characterised by alternating crests and water-covered troughs on the tidal flats of the island of Norderney (German Wadden Sea sector) was chosen to test different remote sensing methods for habitat mapping: airborne lidar, satellite-based radar (TerraSAR-X) and electro-optical sensors (RapidEye). The results revealed that, although sensitive to different surface qualities, all sensors were able to image the bedforms. A digital terrain model generated from the lidar data shows crests and slopes of the bedforms with high geometric accuracy in the centimetre range, but high costs limit the operation area. TerraSAR-X data enabled identifying the positions of the bedforms reflecting the residual water in the troughs also with a high resolution of up to 1.1 m, but with larger footprints and much higher temporal availability. RapidEye data are sensitive to differences in sediment moisture employed to identify crest areas, slopes and troughs, with high spatial coverage but the lowest resolution (6.5 m). Monitoring concepts may differ in their remote sensing requirements regarding areal coverage, spatial and temporal resolution, sensitivity and geometric accuracy. Also financial budgets limit the selection of sensors. Thus, combining differing assets into an integrated concept of remote sensing contributes to solving these issues.

  6. Temporal multiparameter airborne DLR E-SAR images for crop monitoring: summary of the CLEOPATRA campaign 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmullius, Christiane C.; Nithack, Juergen

    1997-01-01

    From May 11 to July 31, 1992 the Cloud Experiment OberPfaffenhofen And Transports took place as a field experimental contribution to the global energy and water cycle experiment. The DLR Institute of Radio Frequency Technology participated with its experimental SAR system E- SAR. Multitemporal X-, C- and L-band data from 8 dates and three ERS-1 images between May 20 and July 30, 1992 are analyzed in regard to the influence of changing plant backscatter constituents and to investigate the impact of increasing ground cover in the different wavelength on soil moisture mapping. Backscatter curves of four crops are shown, which indicate the possibility for crop monitoring and preferred times for crop classification. Detection of soil moisture changes is only possible with L-band and only under grain crops. Maximum likelihood and isocluster classifications were applied on several single- and multifrequency, mono- and multitemporal channel combinations. The overall classification accuracies were higher than with supervised methods. Maximum likelihood classification allowed identification of ten crop types with accuracies of up to 84 percent, when a temporal multifrequency data set was used.

  7. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 1; AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  8. On the use of L-band multipolarization airborne SAR for surveys of crops, vineyards, and orchards in a California irrigated agricultural region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The airborne L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) collected multipolarization calibrated image data over an irrigated agricultural test site near Fresno, CA, on March 6, 1984. The conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) the effects of incidence angle on the measured backscattering coefficients could be removed by using a correction factor equal to the secant of the angle raised to the 1.4 power, (2) for this scene and time of year, the various polarization channels were highly correlated such that the use of more than one polarization added little to the ability of the radar to discriminate vegetation type or condition; the exception was barley which separated from vineyards only when a combination of like and cross polarization data were used (polarization was very useful for corn identification in fall crops), (3) an excellent separation between herbaceous vegetation (alfalfa, barley, and oats) or bare fields and trees in orchards existed in brightness was well correlated to alfalfa height or biomass, especially for the HH polarization combination, (5) vineyards exhibited a narrow range of brightnesses with no systematic effects of type or number of stakes nor of number of wires in the trellises nor of the size of the vines, (6) within the orchard classes, areal biomass characterized by basal area differences caused radar image brightness differences for small to medium trees but not for medium to large trees.

  9. Roads Centre-Axis Extraction in Airborne SAR Images: AN Approach Based on Active Contour Model with the Use of Semi-Automatic Seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotte, R. G.; Sant'Anna, S. J. S.; Almeida, C. M.

    2013-05-01

    Research works dealing with computational methods for roads extraction have considerably increased in the latest two decades. This procedure is usually performed on optical or microwave sensors (radar) imagery. Radar images offer advantages when compared to optical ones, for they allow the acquisition of scenes regardless of atmospheric and illumination conditions, besides the possibility of surveying regions where the terrain is hidden by the vegetation canopy, among others. The cartographic mapping based on these images is often manually accomplished, requiring considerable time and effort from the human interpreter. Maps for detecting new roads or updating the existing roads network are among the most important cartographic products to date. There are currently many studies involving the extraction of roads by means of automatic or semi-automatic approaches. Each of them presents different solutions for different problems, making this task a scientific issue still open. One of the preliminary steps for roads extraction can be the seeding of points belonging to roads, what can be done using different methods with diverse levels of automation. The identified seed points are interpolated to form the initial road network, and are hence used as an input for an extraction method properly speaking. The present work introduces an innovative hybrid method for the extraction of roads centre-axis in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) airborne image. Initially, candidate points are fully automatically seeded using Self-Organizing Maps (SOM), followed by a pruning process based on specific metrics. The centre-axis are then detected by an open-curve active contour model (snakes). The obtained results were evaluated as to their quality with respect to completeness, correctness and redundancy.

  10. Software For Tie-Point Registration Of SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric; Dubois, Pascale; Okonek, Sharon; Van Zyl, Jacob; Burnette, Fred; Borgeaud, Maurice

    1995-01-01

    SAR-REG software package registers synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) image data to common reference frame based on manual tie-pointing. Image data can be in binary, integer, floating-point, or AIRSAR compressed format. For example, with map of soil characteristics, vegetation map, digital elevation map, or SPOT multispectral image, as long as user can generate binary image to be used by tie-pointing routine and data are available in one of the previously mentioned formats. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  11. Summaries of the Seventh JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop January 12-16, 1998. Volume 1; AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Seventh JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 12-16, 1998. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops, and each workshop has a volume as follows: (1) Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Workshop; (2) Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop; and (3) Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) Workshop. This Volume 1 publication contains 58 papers taken from the AVIRIS workshop.

  12. Quantitative analysis of SMEX'02 AIRSAR data for soil moisture inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zyl, J. J. van; Njoku, E.; Jackson, T.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses in detail the characteristics of the AIRSAR data acquired, and provides an initial quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the radar inversion algorithms under these vegetated conditions.

  13. Information content of polarimetric SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Ian G.; Small, David L.; Vanzyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    The information content of the compressed Stoke's matrix data from the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) is examined in two ways - by measuring how each feature separates classes of terrain in an image, and by measuring how well a classifier performs with and without each feature. In this way, the features may then be ranked in order of information content (or in order of utility to the classifier). Suggestions are made regarding those variables that can be omitted in a data compression scheme or in a future simplified radar system.

  14. Observation of Planetary Oceans with Fully Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Wooil M.

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most cost effective and powerful all weather tools for observation of planetary surface without sun light. The SAR systems can observe planetary surfaces with the very high resolution and large spatial coverage. We have developed and improved the algorithms for extracting quantitative information on geophysical parameters using various types of SAR data available on Earth's surface, both space-borne SAR (ERS-1/2, RADARSAT, and ENVISAT ASAR) and airborne SAR (NASA(JPL) AIRSAR). SAR is the only system that can provide a synoptic view of find wind fields near the coastal area on Earth. Many SAR images including RADARSAT and ENVISAT ASAR's alternating polarization mode and wide swath mode were to investigate the ability of retrieving sea surface wind field and the results are quite accurate and operationally acceptable. We installed corner reflectors on the nearby beach to calibrate the SAR data, and we obtained in-situ measurements from the several coast-based automatic weather systems and ocean buoys. Using the simultaneously acquired polarization ENVISAT ASAR data (HH and VV), the most appropriate polarization ratio was evaluated and applied for improving the wind retrieval model. In addition, the best combinations depending on given sea states and incidence angle ranges were investigated. The characteristics of short-period and long-period (near-inertial) internal waves are also investigated with several space-borne SAR systems. The possibility of inferring characteristics of the interior ocean dynamics from the SAR image associated with internal solitary waves was tested using a hydrodynamic interaction model (action balance equation) and a radar backscattering model (two-scale tilted Bragg model). These models were used iteratively to fit the observed SAR data to the simulated SAR. The estimated results were compared with in-situ measurements. The typical scales and the spatial and temporal characteristics of internal

  15. AIRSAR Automated Web-based Data Processing and Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Anhua; vanZyl, Jakob; Kim, Yunjin; Lou, Yunling; Imel, David; Tung, Wayne; Chapman, Bruce; Durden, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present an integrated, end-to-end synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing system that accepts data processing requests, submits processing jobs, performs quality analysis, delivers and archives processed data. This fully automated SAR processing system utilizes database and internet/intranet web technologies to allow external users to browse and submit data processing requests and receive processed data. It is a cost-effective way to manage a robust SAR processing and archival system. The integration of these functions has reduced operator errors and increased processor throughput dramatically.

  16. SARS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS was first reported in Asia in February 2003. Over the next few months, ... countries in North America, South America, Europe, and Asia before the SARS global outbreak of 2003 was ...

  17. AIRSAR deployment in Australia, September 1993: Management and objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milne, A. K.; Tapley, I. J.

    1993-01-01

    Past co-operation between the NASA Earth Science and Applications Division and the CSIRO and Australian university researchers has led to a number of mutually beneficial activities. These include the deployment of the C-130 aircraft with TIMS, AIS, and NS001 sensors in Australia in 1985; collaboration between scientists from the USA and Australia in soils research which has extended for the past decade; and in the development of imaging spectroscopy where DSIRO and NASA have worked closely together and regularly exchanged visiting scientists. In May this year TIMS was flown in eastern Australia on board a CSIRO-owned aircraft together with a CSIRO-designed CO2 laser spectrometer. The Science Investigation Team for the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIRC-C) Program includes one Australian Principal Investigator and ten Australian co-investigators who will work on nine projects related to studying land and near-shore surfaces after the Shuttle flight scheduled for April 1994. This long-term continued joint collaboration was progressed further with the deployment of AIRSAR downunder in September 1993. During a five week period, the DC-8 aircraft flew in all Australian states and collected data from some 65 individual test sites.

  18. Glaciological studies in the central Andes using AIRSAR/TOPSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forster, Richard R.; Klein, Andrew G.; Blodgett, Troy A.; Isacks, Bryan L.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of climate and topography in mountainous regions is dramatically expressed in the spatial distribution of glaciers and snowcover. Monitoring existing alpine glaciers and snow extent provides insight into the present mountain climate system and how it is changing, while mapping the positions of former glaciers as recorded in landforms such as cirques and moraines provide a record of the large past climate change associated with the last glacial maximum. The Andes are an ideal mountain range in which to study the response of snow and ice to past and present climate change. Their expansive latitudinal extent offers the opportunity to study glaciers in diverse climate settings from the tropical glaciers of Peru and Bolivia to the ice caps and tide-water glaciers of sub-polar Patagonia. SAR has advantages over traditional passive remote sensing instruments for monitoring present snow and ice and differentiating moraine relative ages. The cloud penetrating ability of SAR is indispensable for perennially cloud covered mountains. Snow and ice facies can be distinguished from SAR's response to surface roughness, liquid water content and grain size distribution. The combination of SAR with a coregestered high-resolution DEM (TOPSAR) provides a promising tool for measuring glacier change in three dimensions, thus allowing ice volume change to be measured directly. The change in moraine surface roughness over time enables SAR to differentiate older from younger moraines. Polarimetric SAR data have been used to distinguish snow and ice facies and relatively date moraines. However, both algorithms are still experimental and require ground truth verification. We plan to extend the SAR classification of snow and ice facies and moraine age beyond the ground truth sites to throughout the Cordillera Real to provide a regional view of past and present snow and ice. The high resolution DEM will enhance the SAR moraine dating technique by discriminating relative ages

  19. Bird habitat mapping in the Kakadu National Park, Australia, using synthetic aperture radar (NASA/JPL AIRSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, William T.; Imhoff, Marc L.; Sisk, Thomas D.; Stutzer, David

    2003-06-01

    The seasonally flooded forest and upland sites in the Kakadu National Park, near Jabiru, Northern Territories, Australia were the site of extensive field measurements, bird community observations and airborne remote sensing during an initial NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab AIRSAR campaign in 1993, a field visit in 1994 and combined remote sensing and field activities during the PACRIM I Project in fall 1996. The overarching purpose of these studies was to use remote sensing technology as a way to extend intensive avian biodiversity and census field observations, as well as structural vegetation measurements from a limited survey area to the regional scale. During these two visits to the Kakadu area, field measurements were made within the dominant forest types in this region, primarily mixed Eucalyptus sp. woodlands, and open- and closed-forest sites dominated by Melaleuca sp. across a range of dry to perennially-flooded sites. Bird community measurements showed vegetation structure is needed to understand habitat relationships. A major vegetation difference between the two years was an increase of 2-3 times in leaf area index at comparison sites from 1994 to 1996. The greatest LAI at any site was 2.52 in the wet Melaleuca site near Munmalary in 1994.

  20. Chirp Scaling Algorithms for SAR Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, M.; Cheng, T.; Chen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The chirp scaling SAR processing algorithm is both accurate and efficient. Successful implementation requires proper selection of the interval of output samples, which is a function of the chirp interval, signal sampling rate, and signal bandwidth. Analysis indicates that for both airborne and spaceborne SAR applications in the slant range domain a linear chirp scaling is sufficient. To perform nonlinear interpolation process such as to output ground range SAR images, one can use a nonlinear chirp scaling interpolator presented in this paper.

  1. Understanding the Future Market for NovaSAR-S Flood Mapping Products Using Data Mining and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavender, Samantha; Haria, Kajal; Cooksley, Geraint; Farman, Alex; Beaton, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to understand a future market for NovaSAR-S, with a particular focus on flood mapping, through developing a simple Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) simulator that can be used in advance of NovaSAR-S data becoming available.The return signal was determined from a combination of a terrain or elevation model, Envisat S-Band Radar Altimeter (RA)-2, Landsat and CORINE land cover information; allowing for a simulation of a SAR image that's influenced by both the geometry and surface type. The test sites correspond to data from the 2014 AirSAR campaign, and validation is performed by using AirSAR together with Envisat Advanced (ASAR) and Advanced Land Observing Satellite "Daichi" (ALOS) Phased Array type L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data.It's envisaged that the resulting simulated data, and the simulator, will not only aid early understanding of NovaSAR-S, but will also aid the development of flood mapping applications.

  2. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 2: TIMS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, Vincent J. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the second volume of the summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in volume 3; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume.

  3. Summaries of the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 1: AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the preliminary agenda and summaries for the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, on 1-5 June 1992. This main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on June 1 and 2; (2) the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on June 3; and (3) the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on June 4 and 5. The summaries are contained in Volumes 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

  4. Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop. Volume 1: AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication is the first of three containing summaries for the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on January 23-26, 1995. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on January 23-24. The summaries for this workshop appear in this volume; (2) The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on January 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3; and (3) The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on January 26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  5. Summaries of the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 2: TIMS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, Vincent J. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the preliminary agenda and summaries for the Third Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, on 1-5 June 1992. This main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: (1) the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on June 1 and 2; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1; (2) the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on June 3; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2; and (3) the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on June 4 and 5; the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3.

  6. Summaries of the 4th Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 1: AVIRIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Fourth Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held in Washington, D. C. October 25-29, 1993 The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, October 25-26 (the summaries for this workshop appear in this volume, Volume 1); The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TMIS) workshop, on October 27 (the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2); and The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, October 28-29 (the summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3).

  7. Summaries of the 4th Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop. Volume 2: TIMS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, Vincent J. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This is volume 2 of a three volume set of publications that contain the summaries for the Fourth Annual JPL Airborne Geoscience Workshop, held in Washington, D.C. on October 25-29, 1993. The main workshop is divided into three smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on October 25-26. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1. The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) workshop, on October 27. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2. The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on October 28-29. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 3.

  8. Fitting a Two-Component Scattering Model to Polarimetric SAR Data from Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Two simple scattering mechanisms are fitted to polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations of forests. The mechanisms are canopy scatter from a reciprocal medium with azimuthal symmetry and a ground scatter term that can represent double-bounce scatter from a pair of orthogonal surfaces with different dielectric constants or Bragg scatter from a moderately rough surface, which is seen through a layer of vertically oriented scatterers. The model is shown to represent the behavior of polarimetric backscatter from a tropical forest and two temperate forest sites by applying it to data from the National Aeronautic and Space Agency/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Airborne SAR (AIRSAR) system. Scattering contributions from the two basic scattering mechanisms are estimated for clusters of pixels in polarimetric SAR images. The solution involves the estimation of four parameters from four separate equations. This model fit approach is justified as a simplification of more complicated scattering models, which require many inputs to solve the forward scattering problem. The model is used to develop an understanding of the ground-trunk double-bounce scattering that is present in the data, which is seen to vary considerably as a function of incidence angle. Two parameters in the model fit appear to exhibit sensitivity to vegetation canopy structure, which is worth further exploration. Results from the model fit for the ground scattering term are compared with estimates from a forward model and shown to be in good agreement. The behavior of the scattering from the ground-trunk interaction is consistent with the presence of a pseudo-Brewster angle effect for the air-trunk scattering interface. If the Brewster angle is known, it is possible to directly estimate the real part of the dielectric constant of the trunks, a key variable in forward modeling of backscatter from forests. It is also shown how, with a priori knowledge of the forest height, an estimate for the

  9. Processing pharus data with the generic SAR processor

    SciTech Connect

    Otten, M.P.G.

    1996-11-01

    The Generic SAR Processor (GSP) is a SAR processing environment created to process airborne and spaceborne SAR data with a maximum amount of flexibility, while at the same time providing a user friendly and powerful environment for handling and analyzing SAR, including polarimetric calibration. PHARUS is an airborne polarimetric C-band SAR, utilizing an active (solid state) phased array. The absence of mechanical antenna stabilization, the use of electronic beam steering, in combination with high PRF, polarimetric operation, under motion condition which can be severe, requires a very large flexibility of the SAR processor. The GSP is designed to handle this type of SAR data with a very flexible motion compensation-, azimuth compression-, and radiometric correction approach. First experiences with the processing of PHARUS data show that this is a valid approach to obtain high quality polarimetric imagery with a phased array SAR. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Improved Regolith-Landform and Geological Mapping using AIRSAR Data as an Aid to Mineral Exploration in the North-Eastern Goldfields Region, Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, Ian J.

    1996-01-01

    The distinctive contribution of AIRSAR data in characterizing the regolith-landforms in a relatively vegetation free environment are discussed. AIRSAR frame processed data were initially MAF-cleaned to enhance the signal content of the data before geocoding to AMG coordinates. Colors in a three frequency single polarization combination image C-, L- P- bands, and in an enhancement of pedestal height, relate directly to the scale of surface roughness of the various regolith units Examination of the AIRSAR enhancements reveals that in mafic terrain, and to a lesser extent, in felsic terrain, AIRSAR data provides discrimination between the principle geomorphic regimes, relict, erosional and depositional. A multivariate statistical technique called an all-possible subsets calculation was used to examine the degree of polarimetric separation between selected regolith-landforms for all combinations of the nine band AIRSAR radar. An unanticipated aspect of the research was the identification on the AIRSAR imagery of previously unmapped structural features.

  11. Application of symmetry properties to polarimetric remote sensing with JPL AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, Simon H.; Kwok, R.; Li, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    Based on symmetry properties, polarimetric remote sensing of geophysical media is studied. From the viewpoint of symmetry groups, media with reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetries are considered. The symmetries impose relations among polarimetric scattering coefficients, which are valid to all scattering mechanisms in the symmetrical configurations. Various orientation distributions of non-spherical scatterers can be identified from the scattering coefficients by a comparison with the symmetry calculations. Experimental observations are then analyzed for many geophysical scenes acquired with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne polarimetric SAR at microwave frequencies over sea ice and vegetation. Polarimetric characteristics of different ice types are compared with symmetry behaviors. The polarimetric response of a tropical rain forest reveals characteristics close to the centrical symmetry properties, which can be used as a distributed target to relatively calibrate polarimetric radars without any deployment of manmade calibration targets.

  12. Detection of land degradation with polarimetric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Farr, Tom G.; van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1992-08-01

    Land degradation is a crucial problem facing the human race. With an ever-increasing population placing increasing stress on agricultural lands, land impoverishment has the potential for adversely impacting the food supply in many regions of the world. The Manix Basin Area of the Mojave desert has been cropped using center pivot irrigation, but since 1973 many fields have been abandoned for economic reasons. Data were collected using the JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), a multi-spectral radar polarimeter. Analysis of these data revealed unusual polarization responses which we attribute to the formation of wind ripples on the surfaces of fields which had been abandoned for more than 5 years. This conjecture was confirmed through field observations, and the observed polarization responses were effectively modelled using a second-order small perturbation model. These results demonstrate the usefulness of remote sensing techniques supported by limited field work for study of land degradation at synoptic scales.

  13. Use of AIRSAR to identify woody shrub invasion and other indicators of desertification in the Jornada LTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musick, H. Brad; Schaber, Gerald G.; Breed, Carol S.

    1995-01-01

    The replacement of semidesert grassland by woody shrubland is a widespread form of desertification. This change in physiognomy and species composition tends to sharply reduce the productivity of the land for grazing by domestic livestock, increase soil erosion and reduce soil fertility, and greatly alter many other aspects of ecosystem structure and functioning. Remote sensing methods are needed to assess and monitor shrubland encroachment. Detection of woody shrubs at low density would provide a particularly useful baseline on which to access changes, because an initially low shrub density often tends to increase even after cessation of the disturbance (e.g., overgrazing, drought, or fire suppression) responsible for triggering the initial stages of the invasion (Grover and Musick, 1990). Limited success has been achieved using optical remote sensing. In contrast to other forms of desertification, biomass does not consistently decrease with a shift from grassland to shrubland. Estimation of green vegetation amount (e.g., by NDVI) is thus of limited utility, unless the shrubs and herbaceous plants differ consistently in phenology and the area can be viewed during a season when only one of these is green. The objective of this study was to determine if the potential sensitivity of active microwave remote sensing to vegetation structure could be used to assess the degree of shrub invasion of grassland. Polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data were acquired for a semiarid site containing varied mixtures of shrubs and herbaceous vegetation and compared with ground observations of vegetation type and other landsurface characteristics. In this preliminary report we examine the response of radar backscatter intensity to shrub density. The response of other multipolarization parameters will be examined in future work.

  14. Detecting Small-Scale topographic Changes and Relict Geomorphic Features on Barrier Islands using SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibeaut, James C.; Gutierrez, Roberto; Slatton, K. Clint; Crawford, Melba M.

    1996-01-01

    The shapes and elevations of barrier islands may change dramatically over a short period of time such as during a storm. Even between storms, sediment is constantly shifting to and from these islands and between different areas of the islands at varying rates and in varying amounts. Coastal scientists and engineers, however, are currently unable to measure these changes occurring over an entire barrier island at once. This three-year project, which is funded by NASA and jointly conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Center for Space Research at The University of Texas at Austin, is designed to overcome this problem by developing the use of interferometry from airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) to detect changes in coastal topography. Surrogate measures of topography observed in fully polarimetric AIRSAR are also being investigated.

  15. Simple SAR demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof; Misiurewicz, Jacek; Baranowski, Piotr; Wojdołowicz, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple SAR radar demonstrator build using commercially available (COTS) components. For the microwave analog front end, a standard police radar microwave head has been used. The Motorola DSP processor board, equipped with ADC and DAC, has been used for generating of modulating signal and for signal acquisition. The raw radar signal (I and Q components) have been recorded on 2.5" HDD. The signal processing has been performed on standard PC computer after copying the recorded data. The aim of constructing simple and relatively cheap demonstrator was to provide the students the real-life unclassified radar signals and motivate them to test and develop various kinds of SAR and ISAR algorithms, including image formation, motion compensation and autofocusing. The simple microwave frontend hardware has a lot of non-idealities, so for obtaining nice SAR image it was necessary to develop the number of correction algorithms at the calibration stage. The SAR demonstrator have been tested using car as a moving platform. The flight tests with a small airborne platform are planned for the summer.

  16. Airborne remote sensing of forest biomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne sensor data of forest biomes obtained using an SAR, a laser profiler, an IR MSS, and a TM simulator are presented and examined. The SAR was utilized to investigate forest canopy structures in Mississippi and Costa Rica; the IR MSS measured forest canopy temperatures in Oregon and Puerto Rico; the TM simulator was employed in a tropical forest in Puerto Rico; and the laser profiler studied forest canopy characteristics in Costa Rica. The advantages and disadvantages of airborne systems are discussed. It is noted that the airborne sensors provide measurements applicable to forest monitoring programs.

  17. Remote topographic sensing using polarimetric SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Dale L.; Ainsworth, Thomas L.; Lee, Jong-Sen; Grunes, Mitchell R.; de Grandi, Gianfranco D.

    1997-12-01

    A new remote sensing technique using polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data has been developed which can measure terrain slopes in the azimuthal, or along-track, direction. Terrain elevation maps can then be generated by integrating these slopes. The processing of both single- pass, and orthogonal two-pass, datasets is investigated. When single-pass SAR data is used elevation groundtruth must be available for at least one point of each profile formed in the azimuthal direction. When orthogonal two-pass slope data is employed, the elevation surface may be generated as an iterative solution of the Poisson equation and only a single elevation tie-point is required. The study presented uses orthogonal two-pass NASA/JPL AIRSAR P-band data as a test of the Poisson equation approach for an area in Death Valley National Park, California. The orthogonal two-pass results have been compared with a co-registered, conventional, U.S. Geological Survey product. Technique accuracy and potential applications are discussed.

  18. Soil moisture retrieval in the Oberpfaffenhofen testsite using MAC Europe AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wever, Tobias; Henkel, Jochen

    1993-01-01

    Soil moisture content is an important parameter in many disciplines of science like hydrology, meteorology, agriculture and others. Microwave remote sensing technique has a high potential in measuring the dielectric constant of soils, which is strongly governed by the soil moisture. Much excellent work has been done on investigating the relationship between backscattering coefficient and soil moisture. Most of these studies are measured in a laboratory or are carried out with a multitemporal data set. This means, that the variation in the backscattering coefficient is only related to the soil moisture because all other parameters influencing the backscattering like surface roughness, vegetation cover, plant geometry, phenology of plants and row direction are kept constant. In this study the sensitivity of the backscattering coefficient to soil moisture of corn fields is investigated. In the framework of the MAC-Europe Campaign in June 1991, the NASA/JPL three-frequency polarimetric AIRSAR system collected data over the test site Oberpfaffenhofen. The AIRSAR campaign in Oberpfaffenhofen was complemented with intensive ground truth measurements. The sampled corn fields are nearly in the range of the same incidence angle (approximately 20 deg) and belong to different soil types. The evaluation was carried out at a single data set. The results show that the backscattering, measured at P-band, can be described with only two parameters very well. The main parameter influencing the backscattering is the soil moisture content; the second subordinated parameter is the row direction.

  19. Advanced Antenna Design for NASA's EcoSAR Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Toit, Cornelis F.; Deshpande, Manohar; Rincon, Rafael F.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced antenna arrays were designed for NASA's EcoSAR airborne radar instrument. EcoSAR is a beamforming synthetic aperture radar instrument designed to make polarimetric and "single pass" interferometric measurements of Earth surface parameters. EcoSAR's operational requirements of a 435MHz center frequency with up to 200MHz bandwidth, dual polarization, high cross-polarization isolation (> 30 dB), +/- 45deg beam scan range and antenna form-factor constraints imposed stringent requirements on the antenna design. The EcoSAR project successfully developed, characterized, and tested two array antennas in an anechoic chamber. EcoSAR's first airborne campaign conducted in the spring of 2014 generated rich data sets of scientific and engineering value, demonstrating the successful operation of the antennas.

  20. An Integrated Data Acquisition / User Request/ Processing / Delivery System for Airborne Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, B.; Chu, A.; Tung, W.

    2003-12-01

    Airborne science data has historically played an important role in the development of the scientific underpinnings for spaceborne missions. When the science community determines the need for new types of spaceborne measurements, airborne campaigns are often crucial in risk mitigation for these future missions. However, full exploitation of the acquired data may be difficult due to its experimental and transitory nature. Externally to the project, most problematic (in particular, for those not involved in requesting the data acquisitions) may be the difficulty in searching for, requesting, and receiving the data, or even knowing the data exist. This can result in a rather small, insular community of users for these data sets. Internally, the difficulty for the project is in maintaining a robust processing and archival system during periods of changing mission priorities and evolving technologies. The NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) has acquired data for a large and varied community of scientists and engineers for 15 years. AIRSAR is presently supporting current NASA Earth Science Enterprise experiments, such as the Soil Moisture EXperiment (SMEX) and the Cold Land Processes experiment (CLPX), as well as experiments conducted as many as 10 years ago. During that time, it's processing, data ordering, and data delivery system has undergone evolutionary change as the cost and capability of resources has improved. AIRSAR now has a fully integrated data acquisition/user request/processing/delivery system through which most components of the data fulfillment process communicate via shared information within a database. The integration of these functions has reduced errors and increased throughput of processed data to customers.

  1. Classification of PolSAR image based on quotient space theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Zhihui; Yu, Jie; Liu, Xiaomeng; Liu, Limin; Jiao, Shuai; Zhu, Teng; Wang, Shaohua

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the classification accuracy, quotient space theory was applied in the classification of polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) image. Firstly, Yamaguchi decomposition method is adopted, which can get the polarimetric characteristic of the image. At the same time, Gray level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and Gabor wavelet are used to get texture feature, respectively. Secondly, combined with texture feature and polarimetric characteristic, Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier is used for initial classification to establish different granularity spaces. Finally, according to the quotient space granularity synthetic theory, we merge and reason the different quotient spaces to get the comprehensive classification result. Method proposed in this paper is tested with L-band AIRSAR of San Francisco bay. The result shows that the comprehensive classification result based on the theory of quotient space is superior to the classification result of single granularity space.

  2. Estimation of Boreal Forest Biomass Using Spaceborne SAR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sassan; Moghaddam, Mahta

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the use of a semiempirical algorithm derived from a two layer radar backscatter model for forest canopies. The model stratifies the forest canopy into crown and stem layers, separates the structural and biometric attributes of the canopy. The structural parameters are estimated by training the model with polarimetric SAR (synthetic aperture radar) data acquired over homogeneous stands with known above ground biomass. Given the structural parameters, the semi-empirical algorithm has four remaining parameters, crown biomass, stem biomass, surface soil moisture, and surface rms height that can be estimated by at least four independent SAR measurements. The algorithm has been used to generate biomass maps over the entire images acquired by JPL AIRSAR and SIR-C SAR systems. The semi-empirical algorithms are then modified to be used by single frequency radar systems such as ERS-1, JERS-1, and Radarsat. The accuracy. of biomass estimation from single channel radars is compared with the case when the channels are used together in synergism or in a polarimetric system.

  3. The importance of SAR wavelength in penetrating blow sand in Northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.; Breed, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    Multifrequency and polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) images of a sand streak in northern Arizona demonstrate the ability of C- (6-cm wavelength), L- (24 cm), and P-band (68 cm) radar signals to backscatter, respectively, from increasingly greater depths reaching 2 m or more in active blow sand. The studied sand streak, located on a salient of Ward Terrace at lat 35??48.4'N and long 111??15.0'W, is sourced in the normally dry Little Colorado River channel and migrates northeastward toward the Moenkopi Plateau Scarp. The sand streak is 'radar dark' compared to the 'radar-bright' surface of Ward Terrace on all C-band images. It is, however, penetrated completely at P-band and is invisible on these images. The sand streak is recognizable on the LHH image but is poorly defined on the LHV image. High resolution AIRSAR images constitute the primary data set analyzed; in addition, a C-band radar image acquired by the European Remote Sensing (ERS) satellite is also presented. The spaceborne image data confirms the results of the aircraft data at C-band.Multifrequency and polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) images of a sand streak in northern Arizona demonstrate the ability of C- (6-cm wavelength), L- (24 cm), and P-band (68 cm) radar signals to backscatter, respectively, from increasingly greater depths reaching 2 m or more in active blow sand. The studied sand streak, located on a salient of Ward Terrace at lat 35??48.4???N and long 111??15.0???W, is sourced in the normally dry Little Colorado River channel and migrates northeastward toward the Moenkopi Plateau Scarp. The sand streak is `radar dark' compared to the `radar-bright' surface of Ward Terrace on all C-band images. It is, however, penetrated completely at P-band and is invisible on these images. The sand streak is recognizable on the LHH image but is poorly defined on the LHV image. High resolution AIRSAR images constitute the primary data set analyzed; in addition, a C

  4. Initial observations on using SAR to monitor wildfire scars in boreal forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L. L.; French, N. H. F.; Harrell, P.; Christensen, N. L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Initial observations on the effects of wildfires in black spruce forests on radar backscatter are presented. Airborne and spaceborne SAR imagery are utilized to illustrate two distinct fire signatures. A theory is presented to explain these differences.

  5. Terrain Measurement with SAR/InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deren; Liao, Mingsheng; Balz, Timo; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Tianliang

    2016-08-01

    Terrain measurement and surface motion estimation are the most important applications for commercial and scientific SAR missions. In Dragon-3, we worked on these applications, especially regarding DEM generation, surface motion estimation with SAR time- series for urban subsidence monitoring and landslide motion estimation, as well as developing tomographic SAR processing methods in urban areas.

  6. Developing the ASF Datapool: Download on Demand SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, V. G.; Nicoll, J.

    2011-12-01

    At the direction of the US Government Research Consortium (USGRC), the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) created the USGRC datapool. The USGRC datapool held the PALSAR data purchased by and processed for the group, making the data available for download-on-demand. The USGRC datapool started the transition of ASF from process-on-demand to download-on-demand. It was a seed bed for the ASF Datapool, that now encompasses the USGRC datapool as well as download-on-demand products for every other dataset contained in the ASF archive. The ASF datapool provides ERS-1, ERS-2, RADARSAT-1, PALSAR, AirSAR and UAVSAR products for users to download as needed. The API and a new user interface have been developed to provide tools for data discovery that are intuitive and powerful for the entire range of users from novice to expert. The creation of the ASF Datapool made it possible to generate browse images for all the datasets that can be used to facilitate data discovery and data mining applications. Future plans call for using the ASF Datapool to generate a variety of derived products that will be distributed through the ASF SAR Data Center.

  7. Viral load distribution in SARS outbreak.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chung-Ming; Cheng, Vincent C C; Hung, Ivan F N; Chan, Kin-Sang; Tang, Bone S F; Tsang, Thomas H F; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2005-12-01

    An unprecedented community outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred in the Amoy Gardens, a high-rise residential complex in Hong Kong. Droplet, air, contaminated fomites, and rodent pests have been proposed to be mechanisms for transmitting SARS in a short period. We studied nasopharyngeal viral load of SARS patients on admission and their geographic distribution. Higher nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living in adjacent units of the same block inhabited by the index patient, while a lower but detectable nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living further away from the index patient. This pattern of nasopharyngeal viral load suggested that airborne transmission played an important part in this outbreak in Hong Kong. Contaminated fomites and rodent pests may have also played a role.

  8. SAR transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-06-01

    In the follow-on of the ESA contract 4122/79 it was intended to demonstrate on breadboard the feasibility of a modular EPC supplied by a multibus for a KLYSTRON power transmitter. The aim of this final report is to give details on the design and on test results of the electronics required to drive a KLYSTRON for a SAR system. The concept utilized for the DC/DC conversion is a Series Resonant type (SCHWARZ Converter). An elegant Breadboard of 2 Modules (over 4 required for the complete EPC) has been realized and the tests have demonstrated the envisaged feasibility of an active redundancy with modular EPC both for output voltage generation and for output power. Also the concept of the multibus has been implemented (2 bus over 4) and verified in the EPC breadboard.

  9. Use of SAR in Regional Methane Exchange Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, L. A.; Livingston, G. P.; Durden, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    Significant sources of uncertainty in global trace gas budgets are due to lack of knowledge concerning the areal and temporal extent of source and sink areas. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is particularly suited to studies of northern ecosystems because of its all-weather operating capability which enables the acquisition of seasonal data. As key controls on methane exchange, the ability to differentiate major vegetation communities, inundation, and leaf area index (LAI) with satellite and airborne SAR data would increase the accuracy and precision of regional and seasonal estimates of methane exchange. The utility of SAR data for monitoring key controls on methane emissions from Arctic and boreal ecosystems is examined.

  10. Fitting a Two-Component Scattering Model to Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.

    1998-01-01

    Classification, decomposition and modeling of polarimetric SAR data has received a great deal of attention in the recent literature. The objective behind these efforts is to better understand the scattering mechanisms which give rise to the polarimetric signatures seen in SAR image data. In this Paper an approach is described, which involves the fit of a combination of two simple scattering mechanisms to polarimetric SAR observations. The mechanisms am canopy scatter from a cloud of randomly oriented oblate spheroids, and a ground scatter term, which can represent double-bounce scatter from a pair of orthogonal surfaces with different dielectric constants or Bragg scatter from a moderately rough surface, seen through a layer of vertically oriented scatterers. An advantage of this model fit approach is that the scattering contributions from the two basic scattering mechanisms can be estimated for clusters of pixels in polarimetric SAR images. The solution involves the estimation of four parameters from four separate equations. The model fit can be applied to polarimetric AIRSAR data at C-, L- and P-Band.

  11. Modeling magnitude statistics of multilook SAR interferograms by generalizing G distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gui; Shi, Gongtao

    2015-06-01

    Statistical analysis of multilook interferograms is a foundational issue in sensor signal processing of multiple-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR), such as slow ground moving target indication (GMTI) in along-track interferometric (ATI) SAR. By an approximate derivation of the product of two modified Bessel functions, we propose in this paper a distribution (denoted simply as ΓIn) to model the interferometric magnitude of homogeneous clutter and analyze the capability of approximation using ΓIn according to numerical calculations. Following this, under the frame of the product model and by utilizing ΓIn, we analytically provide two distributions, KIn and Gn0, corresponding to heterogeneous and extremely heterogeneous terrain clutter, respectively. We show that the proposed ΓIn,KIn and G In0 are the multi-channel generalizations of the well-known Γ, K and G0, respectively, which belong to the special cases of G distribution for single-channel SAR images. Finally, the estimators of the proposed models are obtained by applying the Method of Log Cumulants (MoLC), which can accurately calculate the contained parameters. Experiments performed on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (NASA/JPL) AirSAR images that used the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence as a similarity measurement verified the performance of the proposed models and estimators.

  12. A comparative evaluation of SAR and SLAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mastin, G.A.; Manson, J.J.; Bradley, J.D.; Axline, R.M.; Hover, G.L.

    1993-11-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was evaluated as a potential technological improvement over the Coast Guard`s existing side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for oil-spill surveillance applications. The US Coast Guard Research and Development Center (R&D Center), Environmental Branch, sponsored a joint experiment including the US Coast Guard, Sandia National Laboratories, and the Naval Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hazardous Materials Division. Radar imaging missions were flown on six days over the coastal waters off Santa Barbara, CA, where there are constant natural seeps of oil. Both the Coast Guard SLAR and the Sandia National Laboratories SAR were employed to acquire simultaneous images of oil slicks and other natural sea surface features that impact oil-spill interpretation. Surface truth and other environmental data were also recorded during the experiment. The experiment data were processed at Sandia National Laboratories and delivered to the R&D Center on a computer workstation for analysis by experiment participants. Issues such as optimal spatial resolution, single-look vs. multi-look SAR imaging, and the utility of SAR for oil-spill analysis were addressed. Finally, conceptual design requirements for a possible future Coast Guard SAR were outlined and evaluated.

  13. Polar format algorithm for SAR imaging with Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Ross; Best, Matthew; Farrell, Sean

    2014-06-01

    Due to its computational efficiency, the polar format algorithm (PFA) is considered by many to be the workhorse for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. PFA is implemented in spatial Fourier space, also known as "K-space", which is a convenient domain for understanding SAR performance metrics, sampling requirements, etc. In this paper the mathematics behind PFA are explained and computed examples are presented, both using simulated data, and experimental airborne radar data from the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Gotcha Challenge collect. In addition, a simple graphical method is described that can be used to model and predict wavefront curvature artifacts in PFA imagery, which are due to the limited validity of the underlying far-field approximation. The appendix includes Matlab code for computing SAR images using PFA.

  14. STAP for SAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP014042 TITLE: STAP for SAR DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release...compilation report: ADP014040 thru ADP014047 UNCLASSIFIED 3-1 STAP for SAR A. Farina Technical Directorate, Radar & Technology Division Alenia...Adaptive Processing) to Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) systems. SAR is a microwave sensor that allows us to have a high resolution mapping of

  15. A real-time focused SAR algorithm on the Jetson TK1 board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radecki, K.; Samczynski, P.; Kulpa, K.; Drozdowicz, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper the authors present a solution based on a small and lightweight computing platform equipped with a graphics processing unit (GPU) which allows the possibility of performing a real-time fully focused SAR algorithm. The presented system is dedicated for airborne SAR applications including small SAR systems dedicated for medium-sized unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platforms. The proposed solution also reduces the need for a storage system. In the paper real SAR results obtained using a Frequency Modulation Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar demonstrator operating at 35 GHz carrier frequency with 1GHz bandwidth are presented. As a radar carrier an airborne platform was used. The presented SAR radar demonstrator was developed by the Warsaw University of Technology in cooperation with the Air Force Institute of Technology, Warsaw, Poland.

  16. Airborne Warning and Control System Block 40/45 Upgrade (AWACS Blk 40/45 Upgrade)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-277 Airborne Warning and Control System Block 40/45 Upgrade (AWACS Blk 40/45 Upgrade) As of...PEO - Program Executive Officer PM - Program Manager POE - Program Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected

  17. Feasibility of inter-comparing airborne and spaceborne observations of radar backscattering coefficients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using an airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to validate spaceborne SAR data. This is directed at soil moisture sensing and the recently launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite. The value of this approach is related to the fact that vicar...

  18. Enhanced resolution in Sar/ISAR imaging using iterative sidelobe apodization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojian; Narayanan, Ram M

    2005-04-01

    Resolution enhancement techniques in radar imaging have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In this work, we develop an iterative sidelobe apodization technique and investigate its applications to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and inverse SAR (ISAR) image processing. A modified noninteger Nyquist spatially variant apodization (SVA) formulation is proposed, which is applicable to direct iterative image sidelobe apodization without using computationally intensive upsampling interpolation. A refined iterative sidelobe apodization procedure is then developed for image-resolution enhancement. Examples using this technique demonstrate enhanced image resolution in various applications, including airborne SAR imaging, image processing for three-dimensional interferometric ISAR imaging, and foliage-penetration ultrawideband SAR image processing.

  19. SAR change detection MTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven; Lemanski, Christopher; Nichols, Howard; Owirka, Gregory; Minardi, Michael; Hale, Todd

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines the theory, application, and results of using single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with Moving Reference Processing (MRP) to focus and geolocate moving targets. Moving targets within a standard SAR imaging scene are defocused, displaced, or completely missing in the final image. Building on previous research at AFRL, the SAR-MRP method focuses and geolocates moving targets by reprocessing the SAR data to focus the movers rather than the stationary clutter. SAR change detection is used so that target detection and focusing is performed more robustly. In the cases where moving target returns possess the same range versus slow-time histories, a geolocation ambiguity results. This ambiguity can be resolved in a number of ways. This paper concludes by applying the SAR-MRP method to high-frequency radar measurements from persistent continuous-dwell SAR observations of a moving target.

  20. Properties of radar backscatter of forests measured with a multifrequency polarimetric SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, F.; Karam, M. A.; Fung, A. K.; De Grandi, G.; Lavalle, C.; Sieber, A.

    1992-01-01

    Fully polarimetric airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) data, collected in Germany during the MAC Europe campaign, are calibrated using software packages developed at the Joint Research Center (JRC) in Italy for both L- and C-bands. During the period of the overflight dates, extensive ground truth was collected in order to describe the physical and statistical parameters of the canopy, the understory, and the soil. These parameters are compiled and converted into electromagnetic parameters suitable for input to the new polarimetric three-layer canopy model developed at the Wave Scattering Research Center (WSRC) at the University of Texas at Arlington. Comparisons between the theoretical predictions from the model and the calibrated data are carried out. Initial results reveal that the trend of the average phase difference can be predicted by the model, and that the backscattering ratio *shh/ svv is sensitive to the distribution of the primary branches.

  1. Fusion of LADAR with SAR for precision strike

    SciTech Connect

    Cress, D.H.; Muguira, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a concept for fusing 3-dimensional image reconnaissance data with LADAR imagery for aim point refinement. The approach is applicable to fixed or quasi-fixed targets. Quasi-fixed targets are targets that are not expected to be moved between the time of reconnaissance and the time of target engagement. The 3-dimensional image data is presumed to come from standoff reconnaissance assets tens to hundreds of kilometers from the target area or acquisitions prior to hostilities. Examples are synthetic aperture radar (SAR) or stereoprocessed satellite imagery. SAR can be used to generate a 3-dimensional map of the surface through processing of data acquired with conventional SAR acquired using two closely spaced, parallel reconnaissance paths, either airborne or satellite based. Alternatively, a specialized airborne SAR having two receiving antennas may be used for data acquisition. The data sets used in this analysis are: (1) LADAR data acquired using a Hughes-Danbury system flown over a portion of Kirtland AFB during the period September 15--16, 1993; (2) two pass interferometric SAR data flown over a terrain-dominated area of Kirtland AFB; (3) 3-dimensional mapping of an urban-dominated area of the Sandia National Laboratories and adjacent cultural area extracted from aerial photography by Vexcel Corporation; (4) LADAR data acquired at Eglin AFB under Wright Laboratory`s Advanced Technology Ladar System (ATLAS) program using a 60 {mu}J, 75 KHz Co{sub 2} laser; and (5) two pass interferometric SAR data generated by Sandia`s STRIP DCS (Data Collection System) radar corresponding to the ATLAS LADAR data. The cultural data set was used in the urban area rather than SAR because high quality interferometric SAR data were not available for the urban-type area.

  2. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  3. Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    ATM (Airborne Thematic Mapper) was developed for NSTL (National Space Technology Companies) by Daedalus Company. It offers expanded capabilities for timely, accurate and cost effective identification of areas with prospecting potential. A related system is TIMS, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Originating from Landsat 4, it is also used for agricultural studies, etc.

  4. Progress report on the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Y.; Imel, D.; Chu, A.; Miller, T.; Moller, D.; Skotnicki, W.

    2001-01-01

    AIRSAR has served as a test-bed for both imaging radar techniques and radar technologies for over a decade. In fact, the polarimetric, cross-track interferometric, and along-track introferometric radar techniques were all developed using AIRSAR.

  5. Detection of land degradation with polarimetric SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Farr, Tom G.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1992-01-01

    Multispectral radar polarimeter data were collected over the Manix Basin Area of the Mojave desert using an airborne SAR. An analysis of the data reveals unusual polarization responses which are attributed to the formation of wind ripples on the surfaces of fields that have been abandoned for more than 5 years. This hypothesis has been confirmed through field observations, and a second-order perturbation model is shown to effectively model the polarization responses. The results demonstrate the usefulness of remote sensing techniques for the study of land degradation at synoptic scales.

  6. SAR in support of geological investigations of the Sudbury structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhroy, V.; Mussakowski, R.; Dressler, B. O.; Trowell, N. F.; Grieve, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Imaging radar is an important contributing source of information for a range of geological problems and environments. Airborne SAR and ERS-1 data integrated with other geoscience datasets are being used in an attempt to characterize the crustal fracturing associated with the Sudbury structure. This presentation highlights examples of integrated and composite images aimed at facilitating the interpretation of the Sudbury structure. This work is the result of an ongoing cooperative multidisciplinary SAR study of the basin carried out by the Canada Center for Remote Sensing, Ontario's provincial Remote Sensing Office, the Ontario Geological Survey, and the Geological Survey of Canada.

  7. On the Capabilities of Using AIRSAR Data in Surface Energy/Water Balance Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Jose F.; Saatchi, Sasan S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper an algorithm is described that allows derivation of three fundamental parameters from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data: soil moisture, soil roughness, and canopy water content, accounting for the effects of vegetation cover by using optical (Landsat) data as auxiliary. The capabilities and limitations of the data and algorithms are discussed, as well as possibilities to use these data in energy/water balance modeling studies. All of the data used in this study was acquired as part of the European Field Experiment in a Desertification Threatened Area.

  8. SAR Interferometry with TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eineder, M.; Runge, H.; Boerner, E.; Bamler, R.; Adam, N.; Schättler, B.; Breit, H.; Suchandt, S.

    2004-06-01

    The TerraSAR-X project is a public private partnership between Astrium GmbH and the German Aerospace Center DLR. Astrium will launch the satellite in late 2005 and holds the rights of commercial data exploitation. DLR is currently developing the ground segment and is responsible for the scientific exploitation of the data. Even if the mission goal is not primarily SAR interferometry, TerraSAR-X offers a number of new perspectives to SAR interferometry when compared to ERS and also ENVISAT: a) High resolution of 3 meters and better in stripmap and spotlight mode. b) The option for a burst synchronized ScanSAR mode. c) The high range bandwidth will allow large baselines and the option for highly precise DEM generation. d) X- Band will show new scattering properties. e) High observation frequency due to the short repeat cycle and variable incidence angles. f) An along track interferometric mode. The available products relevant for interferometry are presented and other relevant topics like orbit control and delta-k interferometry are discussed.

  9. Classification and Monitoring of Salt Marsh Habitats with Multi-Polarimetric and Multi-Frequency SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Comber, Alexis; Lamb, Alistair; Brown, Sarah

    2013-08-01

    Within GMES there is much interest in the ability of remote sensing technology to deliver operational solutions to many areas of life including environmental management. This paper describes research focused on the application for Earth Observation for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. The main topic of this research is to explore to which extent salt marsh habitats from can be identified from SAR remotely sensed data. Multi-frequency, multi-polarimetric SAR images from airborne (S- and X-Band quad-polarimetric from the Astrium airborne SAR Demonstrator) is used to examine salt marsh habitat classification potential in the Llanrhidian salt marshes in South Wales, UK. This is achieved by characterizing their botanical and structural composition, flooding regimes as well as fluctuations in soil moisture. Different SAR features as backscatter coefficient, band ratios and polarimetric decomposition are extracted.

  10. Laboratory diagnosis of SARS.

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, A; Heinen, P; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Gray, J; Appleton, H; Zambon, M C

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of new viral infections of man requires the development of robust diagnostic tests that can be applied in the differential diagnosis of acute illness, or to determine past exposure, so as to establish the true burden of disease. Since the recognition in April 2003 of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), enormous efforts have been applied to develop molecular and serological tests for SARS which can assist rapid detection of cases, accurate diagnosis of illness and the application of control measures. International progress in the laboratory diagnosis of SARS-CoV infection during acute illness has led to internationally agreed World Health Organization criteria for the confirmation of SARS. Developments in the dissection of the human immune response to SARS indicate that serological tests on convalescent sera are essential to confirm SARS infection, given the sub-optimal predictive value of molecular detection tests performed during acute SARS illness. PMID:15306394

  11. Localized Optimization and Effectiveness Analysis of Medium PRF Airborne Pulse Doppler Radars in the Turkish Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISAR Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ITU International Telecommunications Union LOS Line of...Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) • Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) • Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ( ISAR ) • Weapon control radar 18...can be detected and tracked. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar ( ISAR ) pulse Doppler designs are capable of

  12. Relating multifrequency radar backscattering to forest biomass: Modeling and AIRSAR measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guo-Qing; Ranson, K. Jon

    1992-01-01

    During the last several years, significant efforts in microwave remote sensing were devoted to relating forest parameters to radar backscattering coefficients. These and other studies showed that in most cases, the longer wavelength (i.e. P band) and cross-polarization (HV) backscattering had higher sensitivity and better correlation to forest biomass. This research examines this relationship in a northern forest area through both backscatter modeling and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data analysis. The field measurements were used to estimate stand biomass from forest weight tables. The backscatter model described by Sun et al. was modified to simulate the backscattering coefficients with respect to stand biomass. The average number of trees per square meter or radar resolution cell, and the average tree height or diameter breast height (dbh) in the forest stand are the driving parameters of the model. The rest of the soil surface, orientation, and size distributions of leaves and branches, remain unchanged in the simulations.

  13. Software for Generating Strip Maps from SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry; Madsen, Soren; Chapin, Elaine; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2004-01-01

    Jurassicprok is a computer program that generates strip-map digital elevation models and other data products from raw data acquired by an airborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system. This software can process data from a variety of airborne SAR systems but is designed especially for the GeoSAR system, which is a dual-frequency (P- and X-band), single-pass interferometric SAR system for measuring elevation both at the bare ground surface and top of the vegetation canopy. Jurassicprok is a modified version of software developed previously for airborne-interferometric- SAR applications. The modifications were made to accommodate P-band interferometric processing, remove approximations that are not generally valid, and reduce processor-induced mapping errors to the centimeter level. Major additions and other improvements over the prior software include the following: a) A new, highly efficient multi-stage-modified wave-domain processing algorithm for accurately motion compensating ultra-wideband data; b) Adaptive regridding algorithms based on estimated noise and actual measured topography to reduce noise while maintaining spatial resolution; c) Exact expressions for height determination from interferogram data; d) Fully calibrated volumetric correlation data based on rigorous removal of geometric and signal-to-noise decorrelation terms; e) Strip range-Doppler image output in user-specified Doppler coordinates; f) An improved phase-unwrapping and absolute-phase-determination algorithm; g) A more flexible user interface with many additional processing options; h) Increased interferogram filtering options; and i) Ability to use disk space instead of random- access memory for some processing steps.

  14. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  15. Estimation of comprehensive forest variable sets from multiparameter SAR data over a large area with diverse species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, M.

    2001-01-01

    Polarimetric and multifrequency data from the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) have been used in a multi-tier estimation algorithm to calculate a comprehensive set of forest canopy properties including branch layer moisture and thickness, trunk density, trunk water content and diameter, trunk height, and subcanapy soil moisture. The estimation algorithm takes advantage of species-specific allometric relations, and is applied to a 100Km x 100Km area in the Canadian boreal region containing many different vegetation species types. The results show very good agreement with ground measurements taken at several focused and auxiliary study sites. This paper expands on the results reported in [1] and applies the algorithm on the regional scale.

  16. Effect of wind turbine micro-Doppler on SAR and GMTI signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Ling, Hao

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a modeling study to examine the interference effect of microDopplers caused by offshore wind farms on airborne sensors operating in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and ground moving target indicator (GMTI) modes. The modeling is carried out by generating CAD instantiations of the dynamic wind turbine and using the high-frequency electromagnetic code Xpatch to perform the scattering calculations. Artifacts in the resulting SAR and GMTI signatures are evaluated for interference with tracking of boats in coastal waters. Results of signal filtering algorithms to reduce the dynamic turbine clutter in both SAR images and GMTI displays are presented.

  17. Aircraft on-board SAR processing using a frequency-domain fast correlation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Kuang Y.

    1988-01-01

    The design of a frequency-domain fast correlation processor for aircraft onboard synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) applications is described. The design uses the fast Fourier transform (FFT) fast correlation technique to perform both range and azimuth pulse compression functions for the NASA/JPL L-band, quad-polarization airborne SAR. The subject processor is computationally efficient and requires a simple control unit. It is capable of producing single-look, 8-m (slant range) by 10-m (azimuth) resolution, SAR images of a selected polarization over a swath width of up to 15 km in real time onboard the aircraft.

  18. Forest biophysical parameter estimation using space-borne bistatic PolInSAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khati, Unmesh; Singh, Gulab; Mohanty, Shradha

    2016-05-01

    Forest height is an important indicator of the health of the forest ecosystem and can be utilized for accurate estimation of important parameters such as forest above-ground biomass. PolInSAR techniques have been utilized for forest height estimation using airborne and space-borne platforms. However, temporal decorrelation severely limits the ability of space-borne PolInSAR observations for meaningful height inversion. With the launch of the TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X platforms, acquisition of Polarimetric SAR data in bistatic mode, without the undesired effects of temporal decorrelation, is possible. Full-PolInSAR bistatic data is acquired over Indian tropical forests and the height inversion results are presented in this research article. The inverted height shows a good correlation with field measured height, with r = 0.8. The inversion shows over-estimation over low height forests, while providing an accurate estimation for tall forested areas.

  19. Investigation of the Capability of Compact Polarimetric SAR Interferometry to Estimate Forest Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Xie, Lei; Wang, Chao; Chen, Jiehong

    2013-08-01

    The main objective of this paper is to investigate the capability of compact Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (C-PolInSAR) on forest height estimation. For this, the pseudo fully polarimetric interferomteric (F-PolInSAR) covariance matrix is firstly reconstructed, then the three- stage inversion algorithm, hybrid algorithm, Music and Capon algorithm are applied to both C-PolInSAR covariance matrix and pseudo F-PolInSAR covariance matrix. The availability of forest height estimation is demonstrated using L-band data generated by simulator PolSARProSim and X-band airborne data acquired by East China Research Institute of Electronic Engineering, China Electronics Technology Group Corporation.

  20. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  1. MAX-91: Polarimetric SAR results on Montespertoli site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baronti, S.; Luciani, S.; Moretti, S.; Paloscia, S.; Schiavon, G.; Sigismondi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a powerful sensor for high resolution ocean and land mapping and particularly for monitoring hydrological parameters in large watersheds. There is currently much research in progress to assess the SAR operational capability as well as to estimate the accuracy achievable in the measurements of geophysical parameters with the presently available airborne and spaceborne sensors. An important goal of this research is to improve our understanding of the basic mechanisms that control the interaction of electro-magnetic waves with soil and vegetation. This can be done both by developing electromagnetic models and by analyzing statistical relations between backscattering and ground truth data. A systematic investigation, which aims at a better understanding of the information obtainable from the multi-frequency polarimetric SAR to be used in agro-hydrology, is in progress by our groups within the framework of SIR-C/X-SAR Project and has achieved a most significant milestone with the NASA/JPL Aircraft Campaign named MAC-91. Indeed this experiment allowed us to collect a large and meaningful data set including multi-temporal multi-frequency polarimetric SAR measurements and ground truth. This paper presents some significant results obtained over an agricultural flat area within the Montespertoli site, where intensive ground measurements were carried out. The results are critically discussed with special regard to the information associated with polarimetric data.

  2. Ice island detection and characterization with airborne synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, M.O.; Sackinger, W.M. )

    1990-04-15

    A 1:300,000 scale airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of an area of the Arctic Ocean adjacent to the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Canadian High Arctic, is examined to determine the number and characteristics of ice islands in the image and to assess the capability of airborne and satellite SAR to detect ice islands. Twelve ice islands have been identified, and their dimensions range from as large as 5.7 km by 8.7 km to as small as 0.15 km by 0.25 km. A significant SAR characteristic of the shelf ice portions of ice islands is a return with a ribbed texture of alternating lighter and darker grey tones resulting from the indulating shelf ice surfaces of the ice islands. The appearance of the ribbed texture varies according to the ice islands' orientation relative to the illumination direction and consequently the incidence angle. Some ice islands also include extensive areas of textureless dark tone attached to the shelf ice. The weak returns correspond to (1) multiyear landfast sea ice that was attached to the front of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf at the time of calving and which has remained attached since then and (2) multiyear pack ice that has become attached and consolidated since the calving, indicating that ice islands can increase their area and mass significantly as they drift. Ice islands are easily discernible in SAR images and for the future SAR represents a promising technique to obtain a census of ice islands in the Arctic Ocean. However, any SAR-based census probably will be conservative because ice islands smaller than 300-400 m across are likely to remain undetected, particularly in areas of heavy ice ridging which produces strong SAR clutter.

  3. Impact of focusing of Ground Based SAR data on the quality of interferometric SAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonno, Mariantonietta; Mascolo, Luigi; Guccione, Pietro; Nico, Giovanni; Di Pasquale, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    A Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (GB-SAR) is nowadays employed in several applications. The processing of ground-based, space and airborne SAR data relies on the same physical principles. Nevertheless specific algorithms for the focusing of data acquired by GB-SAR system have been proposed in literature. In this work the impact of the main focusing methods on the interferometric phase dispersion and on the coherence has been studied by employing a real dataset obtained by carrying out an experiment. Several acquisitions of a scene with a corner reflector mounted on a micrometric screw have been made; before some acquisitions the micrometric screw has been displaced of few millimetres in the Line-of-Sight direction. The images have been first focused by using two different algorithms and correspondently, two different sets of interferograms have been generated. The mean and standard deviation of the phase values in correspondence of the corner reflector have been compared to those obtained by knowing the real displacement of the micrometric screw. The mean phase and its dispersion and the coherence values for each focusing algorithm have been quantified and both the precision and the accuracy of the interferometic phase measurements obtained by using the two different focusing methods have been assessed.

  4. SARS and Common Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Jill K.; Mark, Jennifer; Gavali, Shilpa S.; Yagi, Shigeo; Espinosa, Alex; Schnurr, David P.; Cossen, Cynthia K.; Isaacson, Erin R.; Glaser, Carol A.; Fischer, Marc; Reingold, Arthur L.; Vugia, Duc J.

    2004-01-01

    In California, molecular testing was useful in decreasing suspicion for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), by detecting common respiratory pathogens (influenza A/B, human metapneumovirus, picornavirus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia spp., parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in 23 (45%) of 51 patients with suspected SARS and 9 (47%) of 19 patients with probable SARS. PMID:15207072

  5. Performance of PolSAR backscatter and PolInSAR coherence for scattering characterization of forest vegetation using TerraSAR-X data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Sushil K.; Kumar, Shashi; Agrawal, Shefali

    2016-05-01

    Airborne SAR data has been successfully used for forest height inversion, however there is limited applicability in space borne scenario due to high temporal decorrelation. This study investigates the potential of high resolution fully polarimetric pair of TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X SAR data acquired over Barkot forest region of Uttarakhand state in India to analyze the backscatter and coherence and to test the height inversion algorithms. Yamaguchi decomposition was implemented onto the dataset to express total backscatter as a sum of different scattering components from a single SAR resolution cell. Coherency matrix was used to compute complex coherence for different polarization channels. Forest areas suffered from low coherence due to volume decorrelation whereas dry river bed had shown high coherence. Appropriate perpendicular baseline and hence the interferometric vertical wavenumber was selected in forest height estimation. Coherence amplitude inversion (CAI) approach overestimated the forest height and also resulted in false heights for dry river bed. This limitation was overcome by implementing three stage inversion modeling (TSI) which assumes polarization independent volume coherence and the heights in dry river bed were completely eliminated. The results were validated using ground truth data available for 49 plots, and TSI was found to be more accurate with an average accuracy of 90.15% and RMSE of 2.42 m.

  6. Signal subspace change detection in averaged multi-look SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranney, Kenneth; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2005-05-01

    Modern Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal processing algorithms could retrieve accurate and subtle information regarding a scene that is being interrogated by an airborne radar system. An important reconnaissance problem that is being studied via the use of SAR systems and their sophisticated signal processing methods involves detecting changes in an imaged scene. In these problems, the user interrogates a scene with a SAR system at two different time points (e.g. different days); the resultant two SAR databases that we refer to as reference and test data, are used to determine where targets have entered or left the imaged scene between the two data acquisitions. For instance, X band SAR systems have the potential to become a potent tool to determine whether mines have been recently placed in an area. This paper describes an algorithm for detecting changes in averaged multi-look SAR imagery. Averaged multi-look SAR images are preferable to full aperture SAR reconstructions when the imaging algorithm is approximation based (e.g. polar format processing), or motion data are not accurate over a long full aperture. We study the application of a SAR detection method, known as Signal Subspace Processing, that is based on the principles of 2D adaptive filtering. We identify the change detection problem as a binary hypothesis-testing problem, and identify an error signal and its normalized version to determine whether i) there is no change in the imaged scene; or ii) a target has been added to the imaged scene. A statistical analysis of the error signal is provided to show its properties and merits. Results are provided for data collected by an X band SAR platform and processed to form non-coherently look-averaged SAR images.

  7. UAVSAR and TerraSAR-X Based InSAR Detection of Localized Subsidence in the New Orleans Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, R. G.; An, K.; Jones, C. E.; Latini, D.

    2014-12-01

    Vulnerability of the US Gulf coast to inundation has received increased attention since hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Compounding effects of sea level rise, wetland loss, and regional and local subsidence makes flood protection a difficult challenge, and particularly for the New Orleans area. Key to flood protection is precise knowledge of elevations and elevation changes. Analysis of historical and continuing geodetic measurements show surprising complexity, including locations subsiding more rapidly than considered during planning of hurricane protection and coastal restoration projects. Combining traditional, precise geodetic data with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations can provide geographically dense constraints on surface deformation. The Gulf Coast environment is challenging for InSAR techniques, especially with systems not designed for interferometry. We use two InSAR capable systems, the L- band (24 cm wavelength) airborne JPL/NASA UAVSAR, and the DLR/EADS Astrium spaceborne TerraSAR X-band (3 cm wavelength), and compare results. First, we are applying pair-wise InSAR to the longer wavelength UAVSAR data to detect localized elevation changes potentially impacting flood protection infrastructure from 2009 - 2014. We focus on areas on and near flood protection infrastructure to identify changes indicative of subsidence, structural deformation, and/or seepage. The Spaceborne TerraSAR X-band SAR system has relatively frequent observations, and dense persistent scatterers in urban areas, enabling measurement of very small displacements. We compare L-band UAVSAR results with permanent scatterer (PS-InSAR) and Short Baseline Subsets (SBAS) interferometric analyses of a stack composed by 28 TerraSAR X-band images acquired over the same period. Thus we can evaluate results from the different radar frequencies and analyses techniques. Preliminary results indicate subsidence features potentially of a variety of causes, including ground water

  8. SARS: just another viral acronym?

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, L

    2003-08-01

    Recent observations and experimental evidence have purported that a virus causes SARS, but such viruses have been isolated in only less than half of SARS patients in some studies and virologist Vincent Plummer of Winnipeg's National Microbiology Laboratory found that indeed 1 in 5 perfectly healthy Canadians with a history of recent travel to Asia had the virus. Therefore SARS microbiologic origins remain unclear. Outbreaks of multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and the atypical mycobacteria simulate SARS on clinical, radiologic, epidemiologic, and diagnostic laboratory grounds and it is only logical then to include them in the differential to find a definitive cause and cure for SARS.

  9. Sea bottom topography imaging with SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderkooij, M. W. A.; Wensink, G. J.; Vogelzang, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that under favorable meteorological and hydrodynamical conditions the bottom topography of shallow seas can be mapped with airborne or spaceborne imaging radar. This phenomenon was observed for the first time in 1969 by de Loor and co-workers in Q-band Side Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) imagery of sandwaves in the North Sea. It is now generally accepted that the imaging mechanism consists of three steps: (1) interaction between (tidal) current and bottom topography causes spatial modulations in the surface current velocity; (2) modulations in the surface current velocity give rise to variations in the spectrum of wind-generated waves, as described by the action balance equation; and (3) variations in the wave spectrum show up as intensity modulations in radar imagery. In order to predict radar backscatter modulations caused by sandwaves, an imaging model, covering the three steps, was developed by the Dutch Sea Bottom Topography Group. This model and some model results will be shown. On 16 Aug. 1989 an experiment was performed with the polarimetric P-, L-, and C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) of NASA/JPL. One scene was recorded in SAR mode. On 12 Jul. 1991 another three scenes were recorded, of which one was in the ATI-mode (Along-Track Interferometer). These experiments took place in the test area of the Sea Bottom Topography Group, 30 km off the Dutch coast, where the bottom topography is dominated by sand waves. In-situ data were gathered by a ship in the test area and on 'Measuring Platform Noordwijk', 20 km from the center of the test area. The radar images made during the experiment were compared with digitized maps of the bottom. Furthermore, the profiles of radar backscatter modulation were compared with the results of the model. During the workshop some preliminary results of the ATI measurements will be shown.

  10. Group sparsity based airborne wide angle SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhonghao; Zhang, Bingchen; Bi, Hui; Lin, Yun; Wu, Yirong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we develop a group sparsity based wide angle synthetic aperture radar (WASAR) imaging model and propose a novel algorithm called backprojection based group complex approximate message passing (GCAMP-BP) to recover the anisotropic scene. Compare to conventional backprojection based complex approximate message passing (CAMP-BP) algorithm for the recovery of isotropic scene, the proposed method accommodates aspect dependent scattering behavior better and can produce better imagery. Simulated and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed algorithm.

  11. The NASA/JPL multifrequency, multipolarisation airborne SAR system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Held, D. N.; Brown, W. E.; Freeman, A.; Klein, J. D.; Zebker, H. A.; Sato, T.; Miller, T.; Nguyen, Q.; Lou, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radars, operating at L-, C- and P-band, were designed to replace and upgrade a system destroyed in an aircraft accident. Ground and flight tests were conducted, and the radar was flown over a calibration site in a sequence of experiments designed to calibrate the system. The radar also took part in science campaigns.

  12. Disaster phenomena of Wenchuan earthquake in high resolution airborne synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Bo; Tang, Yixian; Wu, Hongan; Wen, Xiaoyang; Yan, Dongmei

    2009-05-01

    The devastating Wenchuan Earthquake occurred in Sichuan Province, Southwestern China, with a magnitude of 8.0 on May 12, 2008. Most buildings along the seismic zone were ruined, resulting in infrastructure damage to factories, traffic facilities and power supplies. The earthquake also triggered geological disasters, such as landslides, debris flow, landslide lakes, etc. During the rescue campaign the remote sensing aircrafts of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), equipped with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and optical sensors, flew over the disaster area and acquired many high resolution airborne SAR images. We first describe the basic characteristics of SAR imagery. The SAR images of buildings are simulated, and the backscattering mechanism of the buildings is analyzed. Finally, the various disaster phenomena are described and analyzed in the high resolution airborne SAR images. It is shown that certain phenomena of ruins could be identified clearly in high resolution SAR images in proper imaging conditions, while the functional destruction is quite difficult to detect. With calibrated data, the polarmetric SAR interferometry could be used to analyze the scattering mechanism and 3D distribution of the scattering center, which are redound to earthquake damage assessment.

  13. Recursive SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Randolph L.; Ash, Joshua N.

    2008-04-01

    We investigate a recursive procedure for synthetic aperture imaging. We consider a concept in which a SAR system persistently interrogates a scene, for example as it flies along or around that scene. In traditional SAR imaging, the radar measurements are processed in blocks, by partitioning the data into a set of non-overlapping or overlapping azimuth angles, then processing each block. We consider a recursive update approach, in which the SAR image is continually updated, as a linear combination of a small number of previous images and a term containing the current radar measurement. We investigate the crossrange sidelobes realized by such an imaging approach. We show that a first-order autoregression of the image gives crossrange sidelobes similar to a rectangular azimuth window, while a third-order autoregression gives sidelobes comparable to those obtained from widely-used windows in block-processing image formation. The computational and memory requirements of the recursive imaging approach are modest - on the order of M • N2 where M is the recursion order (typically <= 3) and N2 is the image size. We compare images obtained from the recursive and block processing techniques, both for a synthetic scene and for X-band SAR measurements from the Gotcha data set.

  14. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  15. SARS in Hospital Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yee-Chun; Huang, Li-Min; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Su, Chan-Ping; Chang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Mei-Ling; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chen, Wen-Jone; Lin, Fang-Yue; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred after exposure in the emergency room at the National Taiwan University Hospital. The index patient was linked to an outbreak at a nearby municipal hospital. Three clusters were identified over a 3-week period. The first cluster (5 patients) and the second cluster (14 patients) occurred among patients, family members, and nursing aids. The third cluster (12 patients) occurred exclusively among healthcare workers. Six healthcare workers had close contact with SARS patients. Six others, with different working patterns, indicated that they did not have contact with a SARS patient. Environmental surveys found 9 of 119 samples of inanimate objects to be positive for SARS coronavirus RNA. These observations indicate that although transmission by direct contact with known SARS patients was responsible for most cases, environmental contamination with the SARS coronavirus may have lead to infection among healthcare workers without documented contact with known hospitalized SARS patients. PMID:15200809

  16. Geological applications of multipolarization SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.

    1986-01-01

    Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired by SEASAT and the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A/B) operating at L-band with HH polarization were found to be useful in conjunction with other sensors for lithologic discrimination in arid environments with limited vegetation cover. In order to assess the utility of more advanced sensors for geologic research and define the unique contributions each sensor makes, remote sensing data were collected over the Deadman Butte area of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. The Wind River Basin is an asymmetric sedimentary basin in central Wyoming created during the early Eocene Laramide orogeny. The stratigraphic section of the Deadman Butte study area, which was measured by Woodward is made up of Paleozoic and Mesozoic marine shales, siltstones, limestones, and sandstones. Sensor systems included LANDSAT 4 Thematic Mapper (TM), Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) and the Multipolarization, L-band airborne SAR, a prototype for the next Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-C). Sensor parameters are given.

  17. Forest Structure Characterization Using Jpl's UAVSAR Multi-Baseline Polarimetric SAR Interferometry and Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Maxim; Hensley, Scott; Lavalle, Marco; Ahmed, Razi

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns forest remote sensing using JPL's multi-baseline polarimetric interferometric UAVSAR data. It presents exemplary results and analyzes the possibilities and limitations of using SAR Tomography and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (PolInSAR) techniques for the estimation of forest structure. Performance and error indicators for the applicability and reliability of the used multi-baseline (MB) multi-temporal (MT) PolInSAR random volume over ground (RVoG) model are discussed. Experimental results are presented based on JPL's L-band repeat-pass polarimetric interferometric UAVSAR data over temperate and tropical forest biomes in the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, and in the La Amistad Park, Panama and Costa Rica. The results are partially compared with ground field measurements and with air-borne LVIS lidar data.

  18. Forest Structure Characterization Using JPL's UAVSAR Multi-Baseline Polarimetric SAR Interferometry and Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Maxim; Hensley, Scott; Lavalle, Marco; Ahmed, Razi

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns forest remote sensing using JPL's multi-baseline polarimetric interferometric UAVSAR data. It presents exemplary results and analyzes the possibilities and limitations of using SAR Tomography and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (PolInSAR) techniques for the estimation of forest structure. Performance and error indicators for the applicability and reliability of the used multi-baseline (MB) multi-temporal (MT) PolInSAR random volume over ground (RVoG) model are discussed. Experimental results are presented based on JPL's L-band repeat-pass polarimetric interferometric UAVSAR data over temperate and tropical forest biomes in the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, and in the La Amistad Park, Panama and Costa Rica. The results are partially compared with ground field measurements and with air-borne LVIS lidar data.

  19. Ka-Band Digital Beamforming and SweepSAR Demonstration for Ice and Solid Earth Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Heavy, Brandon; Perkovic, Dragana; Quddus, Momin; Zawadzki, Mark; Moller, Delwyn

    2010-01-01

    GLISTIN is an instrument concept for a single-pass interferometric SAR operating at 35.6 GHz. To achieve large swath widths using practical levels of transmitter power, a digitally-beamformed planar waveguide array is used. This paper describes results from a ground-based demonstration of a 16-receiver prototype. Furthermore, SweepSAR is emerging as promising technique for achieving very wide swaths for surface change detection. NASA and DLR are studying this approach for the DESDynI and Tandem-L missions. SweepSAR employs a reflector with a digitally-beamformed array feed. We will describe development of an airborne demonstration of SweepSAR using the GLISTIN receiver array and a reflector.

  20. 3D Rendering of High Resolution PolInSAR Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouve, Nicolas; Colin-Koeniguer, Elise; Cantalloube, Hubert

    2011-03-01

    In the field of urban SAR imaging and mapping, the PolInSAR information potential has not been fully exploited. Until recently available resolution of PolInSAR images were not sufficient to render 3D city landscape using the polarimetric and interferometric information. This paper presents the results of urban reconstruction using single pass full polarimetric and interferometric data using ONERA's Airborne system: RAMSES. It focus on the statistical process designed for the PolInSAR matrices estimation in high resolution urban areas. A region growing algorithm is proposed to design statistically homogeneous region while preserving spatial features of the scene through shape constraints. A companion paper [CKT11] will present the interferometry tools developed to exploit the region growth results. Validation on real data using RAMSES images at X band over Toulouse are presented through 3D colored render results.

  1. A challenge problem for SAR-based GMTI in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven M.; Casteel, Curtis H., Jr.; Gorham, LeRoy; Minardi, Michael J.; Majumder, Uttam K.; Judge, Matthew G.; Zelnio, Edmund; Bryant, Michael; Nichols, Howard; Page, Douglas

    2009-05-01

    This document describes a challenge problem whose scope is the detection, geolocation, tracking and ID of moving vehicles from a set of X-band SAR data collected in an urban environment. The purpose of releasing this Gotcha GMTI Data Set is to provide the community with X-band SAR data that supports the development of new algorithms for SAR-based GMTI. To focus research onto specific areas of interest to AFRL, a number of challenge problems are defined. The data set provided is phase history from an AFRL airborne X-band SAR sensor. Some key features of this data set are two-pass, three phase center, one-foot range resolution, and one polarization (HH). In the scene observed, multiple vehicles are driving on roads near buildings. Ground truth is provided for one of the vehicles.

  2. Very High Resolution SAR and Multichannel SAR/MTI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    single channel SAR system: • Detection outside the clutter bandwidth • Chirp slope analysis • Chirp filter bank • MTI via multilook images (change...53343 Wachtberg, Germany berens@fgan.de ABSTRACT SAR is widely used today in earth observation and is a potential means for military surveillance...However, systems only operating in the basic SAR mode will be superseded by new developments which fulfil much more user demands. Highest resolution

  3. Lightweight SAR/MTI for small UAV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, John C., Jr.

    2009-05-01

    Goleta has been developing low-cost and lite-weight MMW SAR / MTI radars for small UAS applications. Initial models of two different radars have been built, the LUAVR and the LCLPR. The current LUAVR (Lite-weight UAV radar) configuration weighs in at 18-lbs and the first LCLPR version (Low-Cost Low-Power Radar) weighs in at a little under 2-lbs. Initial testing was done from the roof of a van simulating a low flying UAV. Currently the LUAVR is flying in an ultra-lite as part of a UAS demonstration system. The system is comprised of both airborne and ground segments with a data link connecting the two. SAR and MTI Imagery have been generated.

  4. Radar cross-section estimation of SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Ian; White, Richard G.; Oliver, Christopher J.; Cook, Rod

    1995-11-01

    We present an algorithm that is able to smooth out the speckle from many SAR images and which does not suffer from the drawbacks of multilooking. The algorithm is able to preserve the detail and resolution of the original image while producing a smooth, real-valued output. In many cases the quality of the smoothed image is sufficiently high that it may be used with standard optical post-processing algorithms. We use a global optimization method (simulated annealing) and single point gamma statistics to find the MAP solution for the radar cross- section. However, this method may also be regarded as an ideal adaptive filter that is both computationally efficient and highly parallelizable. Results are presented for airborne, ERS-1 and multi-temporal SAR images.

  5. X-SAR: The X-band synthetic aperture radar on board the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Marian U.

    1993-01-01

    The X-band synthetic aperture radar (X-SAR) is the German/Italian contribution to the NASA/JPL Shuttle Radar Lab missions as part of the preparation for the Earth Observation System (EOS) program. The Shuttle Radar Lab is a combination of several radars: an L-band (1.2 GHz) and a C-band (5.3 GHz) multipolarization SAR known as SIR-C (Shuttle Imaging Radar); and an X-band (9.6 GHz) vertically polarized SAR which will be operated synchronously over the same target areas to deliver calibrated multifrequency and multipolarization SAR data at multiple incidence angles from space. A joint German/Italian project office at DARA (German Space Agency) is responsible for the management of the X-SAR project. The space hardware has been developed and manufactured under industrial contract by Dornier and Alenia Spazio. Besides supporting all the technical and scientific tasks, DLR, in cooperation with ASI (Agencia Spaziale Italiano) is responsible for mission operation, calibration, and high precision SAR processing. In addition, DLR developed an airborne X-band SAR to support the experimenters with campaigns to prepare for the missions. The main advantage of adding a shorter wavelength (3 cm) radar to the SIR-C radars is the X-band radar's weaker penetration into vegetation and soil and its high sensitivity to surface roughness and associated phenomena. The performance of each of the three radars is comparable with respect to radiometric and geometric resolution.

  6. X-SAR: The X-band synthetic aperture radar on board the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Marian U.

    1993-05-01

    The X-band synthetic aperture radar (X-SAR) is the German/Italian contribution to the NASA/JPL Shuttle Radar Lab missions as part of the preparation for the Earth Observation System (EOS) program. The Shuttle Radar Lab is a combination of several radars: an L-band (1.2 GHz) and a C-band (5.3 GHz) multipolarization SAR known as SIR-C (Shuttle Imaging Radar); and an X-band (9.6 GHz) vertically polarized SAR which will be operated synchronously over the same target areas to deliver calibrated multifrequency and multipolarization SAR data at multiple incidence angles from space. A joint German/Italian project office at DARA (German Space Agency) is responsible for the management of the X-SAR project. The space hardware has been developed and manufactured under industrial contract by Dornier and Alenia Spazio. Besides supporting all the technical and scientific tasks, DLR, in cooperation with ASI (Agencia Spaziale Italiano) is responsible for mission operation, calibration, and high precision SAR processing. In addition, DLR developed an airborne X-band SAR to support the experimenters with campaigns to prepare for the missions. The main advantage of adding a shorter wavelength (3 cm) radar to the SIR-C radars is the X-band radar's weaker penetration into vegetation and soil and its high sensitivity to surface roughness and associated phenomena. The performance of each of the three radars is comparable with respect to radiometric and geometric resolution.

  7. Experiments of Tomography-Based SAR Techniques with P-Band Polarimetric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardini, F.; Pardini, M.

    2009-04-01

    New opportunities are arising in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observation of forest scenarios, especially with decimetric and metric radio wavelengths, which possess the capability of penetrating into volumes. Given its capabilities in the three-dimensional imaging of the scattering properties of the observed scene, SAR Tomography (Tomo-SAR) constitutes a good candidate for the analysis of the vertical structure of the forest. In this work, the results are presented of the application of tomography-based SAR techniques to P-band airborne data over a boreal forest from the ESA BioSAR-1 project. Results of an adaptive tomographic analysis are presented, also with a low resolution dataset, which emulates a satellite acquisition. In order to mitigate the geometric perspective effects due to the poor range resolution, the principle is introduced of the application of a common band pre-filtering to tomography. Then, a coherent layer canceller is derived to possibly apply interferometric techniques conceived for single layer scenarios to two layer scenarios. Finally, a stabilized adaptive polarimetric Tomo-SAR (PolTomo-SAR) method is proposed for estimating the 3D polarimetric scattering mechanism of the scene with low distorsions.

  8. SAR based adaptive GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Guo, Bin; Xu, Luzhou; Li, Jian

    2010-04-01

    We consider ground moving target indication (GMTI) and target velocity estimation based on multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Via forming velocity versus cross-range images, we show that small moving targets can be detected even in the presence of strong stationary ground clutter. Moreover, the velocities of the moving targets can be estimated, and the misplaced moving targets can be placed back to their original locations based on the estimated velocities. Adaptive beamforming techniques, including Capon and generalizedlikelihood ratio test (GLRT), are used to form velocity versus cross-range images for each range bin of interest. The velocity estimation ambiguities caused by the multi-channel array geometry are analyzed. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of our approaches using the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) publicly-released Gotcha SAR based GMTI data set.

  9. Circular SAR GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Douglas; Owirka, Gregory; Nichols, Howard; Scarborough, Steven

    2014-06-01

    We describe techniques for improving ground moving target indication (GMTI) performance in multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. Our approach employs a combination of moving reference processing (MRP) to compensate for defocus of moving target SAR responses and space-time adaptive processing (STAP) to mitigate the effects of strong clutter interference. Using simulated moving target and clutter returns, we demonstrate focusing of the target return using MRP, and discuss the effect of MRP on the clutter response. We also describe formation of adaptive degrees of freedom (DOFs) for STAP filtering of MRP processed data. For the simulated moving target in clutter example, we demonstrate improvement in the signal to interference plus noise (SINR) loss compared to more standard algorithm configurations. In addition to MRP and STAP, the use of tracker feedback, false alarm mitigation, and parameter estimation techniques are also described. A change detection approach for reducing false alarms from clutter discretes is outlined, and processing of a measured data coherent processing interval (CPI) from a continuously orbiting platform is described. The results demonstrate detection and geolocation of a high-value target under track. The endoclutter target is not clearly visible in single-channel SAR chips centered on the GMTI track prediction. Detections are compared to truth data before and after geolocation using measured angle of arrival (AOA).

  10. Mixed jamming method for SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-feng; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Yong-sheng

    2007-11-01

    The mixed jamming method of synthetic aperture radar is analyzed and discussed. The methods of active noise and deception jamming and the signal model of transmitting is described. The raw echo signal of SAR and the model of jammed echo signal are expatiated, the characteristic of SAR and the evaluating method of jamming effect are established. Finally, the mixed jamming imaging of SAR is simulated.

  11. GeoSAR: A Radar Terrain Mapping System for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas; vanZyl, Jakob; Hensley, Scott; Reis, James; Munjy, Riadh; Burton, John; Yoha, Robert

    2000-01-01

    GeoSAR Geographic Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a new 3 year effort to build a unique, dual-frequency, airborne Interferometric SAR for mapping of terrain. This is being pursued via a Consortium of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation. The airborne portion of this system will operate on a Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft outfitted with P- and X-band Interferometric SARs. The ground portions of this system will be a suite of Flight Planning Software, an IFSAR Processor and a Radar-GIS Workstation. The airborne P-band and X-band radars will be constructed by JPL with the goal of obtaining foliage penetration at the longer P-band wavelengths. The P-band and X-band radar will operate at frequencies of 350 Mhz and 9.71 Ghz with bandwidths of either 80 or 160 Mhz. The airborne radars will be complemented with airborne laser system for measuring antenna positions. Aircraft flight lines and radar operating instructions will be computed with the Flight Planning Software The ground processing will be a two-step step process. First, the raw radar data will be processed into radar images and interferometer derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Second, these radar images and DEMs will be processed with a Radar GIS Workstation which performs processes such as Projection Transformations, Registration, Geometric Adjustment, Mosaicking, Merging and Database Management. JPL will construct the IFSAR Processor and Calgis, Inc. will construct the Radar GIS Workstation. The GeoSAR Project was underway in November 1996 with a goal of having the radars and laser systems fully integrated onto the Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft in early 1999. Then, Engineering Checkout and Calibration-Characterization Flights will be conducted through November 1999. The system will be completed at the end of 1999 and ready for routine operations in the year 2000.

  12. Wetland InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  13. SAR Educational Resources From ASF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gens, R.

    2006-12-01

    In parallel with developing software tools specifically for SAR data, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) has a long history of supporting users in the use of the tools and the data. Over the years a number of educational resources have been developed as well. ASF distributes a number of educational CDs (Glacier Power, Dynamic Planet, and Ends of the Earth) that cover a wide range of imagery and applications. In addition, an extensive and frequently updated SAR bibliograpy is made available to users through the ASF website. Summer courses in SAR/InSAR and its applications are offered for credit and are being well received by the user community. The summer courses allow users to get a complete overview about SAR and InSAR as well as all the relevant techniques within an intense two week time frame. In order to explain the various processing steps in a Range-Doppler SAR Processor in detail the SAR Training Processor (STP) has been developed. This enhanced debugging mode of the fully functional, regular SAR processor allows the user to save all the intermediate products and have full control over all processing steps and parameters. This way, the user can evaluate the results of omitting a processing step or changing Doppler parameters. For the future, tailor made offsite training courses and workshops are planned. Updates on these can be found at http://www.asf.alaska.edu/educational/index.html.

  14. Enhanced Feature Based Mosaicing Technique for Visually and Geometrically Degraded Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, S.; Vardhini, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    In airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR), there was a major problem encountered in the area of image mosaic in the absence of platform information and sensor information (geocoding), when SAR is applied in large-scale scene and the platform faces large changes. In order to enhance real-time performance and robustness of image mosaic, enhancement based Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) mosaic method for airborne SAR is proposed in this paper. SURF is a novel scale-invariant and rotation-invariant feature. It is perfect in its high computation, speed and robustness. In this paper, When the SAR image is acquired, initially the image is enhanced by using local statistic techniques and SURF is applied for SAR image matching accord to its characteristic, and then acquires its invariant feature for matching. In the process of image matching, the nearest neighbor rule for initial matching is used, and the wrong points of the matches are removed through RANSAC fitting algorithm. The proposed algorithm is implemented in different SAR images with difference in scale change, rotation change and noise. The proposed algorithm is compared with other existing algorithms and the quantitative and qualitative measures are calculated and tabulated. The proposed algorithm is robust to changes and the threshold is varied accordingly to increase the matching rate more than 95 %.

  15. Change Detection in a Short Time Sequence of Polarimetric C-Band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Based on an omnibus likelihood ratio test statistic for the equality of several variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution and a factorization of this test statistic with associated p-values, change analysis in a time series of multilook, polarimetric SAR data in the covariance matrix representation is carried out. The omnibus test statistic and its factorization detect if and when change(s) occur. The technique is demonstrated on airborne EMISAR C-band data but may be applied to ALOS, COSMO-SkyMed, RadarSat-2 Sentinel-1, TerraSAR-X, and Yaogan data also.

  16. Structural Biomass Estimation from L-band Interferometric SAR and Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Chapman, B. D.; Goncalves, F.; Hensley, S.; dos Santos, J. R.; Graca, P. A.; Dutra, L.

    2011-12-01

    After a review of biomass estimation from interferometric SAR (InSAR) at all bands over the last 15 years, and a brief review of lidar biomass estimation, this paper discusses structure and biomass estimation from simultaneously acquired (not repeat-track) InSAR at L-band. We will briefly discuss the history of regression of biomass to InSAR raw observations (coherence and phase) and structural parameters (height, standard deviation, Fourier component). Lidar biomass estimation from functions of the waveform will be discussed. We review our structural and biomass estimation results for C-band InSAR at vertical polarization for 12-14 baselines in La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. C-band vertical scales were between 12 and 100 m for structure estimation, but only between 50 and 100 m for biomass estimation, due to phase calibration problems at the shorter vertical wavelengths (larger baselines). Most of the talk will be spent on L-band, simultaneously acquired multibaseline InSAR, also at La Selva, acquired at vertical polarization. Because the vertical interferometric scale is proportional to the radar altitude times the wavelength over the baseline length, the AirSAR aircraft had to be flown very low (1.2 km) to realize vertical scales at L-band of 60 m and higher. Our lidar biomass estimation suggests that vertical scales of 14 m-100 m are optimal for biomass estimation. We will try three different approaches to biomass estimation with the limited high vertical scales we have available: 1) We will regress biomass to Fourier transforms as in the C-band and lidar study, but with 60 m - 100+ m vertical scales we do not expect accuracies to be as high as for the lidar demonstration (58 Mg/ha RMS scatter of estimated about field biomass for biomasses up to 450 Mg/ha), which used Fourier vertical wavelengths of 15 m-20 m. In addition to using Fourier components, 2) we will report the use of the derivative of the InSAR complex coherence with respect to Fourier

  17. Recovering Seasat SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, T. A.; Arko, S. A.; Rosen, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of orbital remote sensing for global ocean observations, NASA launched Seasat on June 27th, 1978. Being the first space borne SAR mission, Seasat produced the most detailed SAR images of Earth from space ever seen to that point in time. While much of the data collected in the USA was processed optically, a mere 150 scenes had been digitally processed by March 1980. In fact, only an estimated 3% of Seasat data was ever digitally processed. Thus, for over three decades, the majority of the SAR data from this historic mission has been dormant, virtually unavailable to scientists in the 21st century. Over the last year, researchers at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) have processed the Seasat SAR archives into imagery products. A telemetry decoding system was created and the data were filtered into readily processable signal files. Due to nearly 35 years of bit rot, the bit error rate (BER) for the ASF DAAC Seasat archives was on the order of 1 out of 100 to 1 out of 100,000. This extremely high BER initially seemed to make much of the data undecodable - because the minor frame numbers are just 7 bits and no range line numbers exist in the telemetry even the 'simple' tasks of tracking the minor frame number or locating the start of each range line proved difficult. Eventually, using 5 frame numbers in sequence and a handful of heuristics, the data were successfully decoded into full range lines. Concurrently, all metadata were stored into external files. Recovery of this metadata was also problematic, the BER making the information highly suspect and, initially at least, unusable in any sort of automated fashion. Because of the BER, all of the single bit metadata fields proved unreliable. Even fields that should be constant for a data take (e.g. receiving station, day of the year) showed high variability, each requiring a median filter to be usable. The most challenging, however, were the

  18. Sampling for Airborne Radioactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    compared to betas, gammas and neutrons. For an airborne radioactivity detection system, it is most important to be able to detect alpha particles and... Airborne radioactive particles may emit alpha, beta, gamma or neutron radiation, depending on which radioisotope is present. From a health perspective...

  19. Study of a passive companion microsatellite to the SAOCOM-1B satellite of Argentina, for bistatic and interferometric SAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Christian; Derauw, Dominique; Orban, Anne; Davidson, Malcolm W. J.

    2014-10-01

    We report the results of a preparatory study aimed at exploring candidate applications that could benefit from a passive micro-satellite accompanying the L-band SAOCOM-1B satellite of Argentina, and to carry out a limited demonstration, based on data acquired during ESA airborne campaigns, of selected applications. In a first step of the study, the potential applications were identified and prioritized based on the mission context and strategic applications, scientific need, and feasibility. The next step of the study was to carry out some demonstrations using data sets acquired during the BioSAR 2007-2009, TropiSAR 2009 and IceSAR 2007 campaigns. A P-band InSAR digital elevation model was generated from BioSAR 2007 data. Time-series of interferometric coherence maps were obtained as a tool for change detection and monitoring. PolInSAR processing was carried out on BioSAR 2007 and IceSAR data.

  20. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  1. The Alaska SAR processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carande, R. E.; Charny, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Alaska SAR processor was designed to process over 200 100 km x 100 km (Seasat like) frames per day from the raw SAR data, at a ground resolution of 30 m x 30 m from ERS-1, J-ERS-1, and Radarsat. The near real time processor is a set of custom hardware modules operating in a pipelined architecture, controlled by a general purpose computer. Input to the processor is provided from a high density digital cassette recording of the raw data stream as received by the ground station. A two pass processing is performed. During the first pass clutter-lock and auto-focus measurements are made. The second pass uses the results to accomplish final image formation which is recorded on a high density digital cassette. The processing algorithm uses fast correlation techniques for range and azimuth compression. Radiometric compensation, interpolation and deskewing is also performed by the processor. The standard product of the ASP is a high resolution four-look image, with a low resolution (100 to 200 m) many look image provided simultaneously.

  2. Detection and Monitoring of Inundation with Polarimetric L-Band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, B. D.; Celi, J. E.; Hamilton, S. K.; McDonald, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    It has been known for decades that at wavelengths L-band or longer, SAR is a sensitive indicator of inundation underneath forest canopies. The high resolution detection of below-canopy inundation is difficult to accomplish at regional to continental scales using other types of remote sensing sensors, making it a compelling SAR measurement especially useful for studying wetland inundation dynamics, particularly in difficult-to-reach access, canopy-covered tropical forest environments. Most results have utilized spaceborne SAR observations with less than fully polarimetric data. Since one of the objectives of the NISAR mission is to characterize and understand the fundamental process that drives changes to ecosystems such as wetland inundated areas, we will discuss the sensitivity of L-band SAR to inundation. We will illustrate the detection of inundation using fully polarimetric L-band SAR data from UAVSAR, NASA's airborne SAR, over a tropical forest region in Ecuador and Peru. At the same time as the data collection, measurements were made on the ground to characterize vegetation and inundation characteristics. The field data were used to validate the results of classifying the vanZyl decomposition of the polarimetric data. We compare this classification with that possible with a reduced subset of the polarimetric observations.

  3. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  4. Recent Advances in Radar Polarimetry and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    2005-01-01

    and validation, stress assessment, and stress-change monitoring of the terrestrial and planetary covers. In addition, various closely related topics of (i) acquiring additional and protecting existing spectral windows of the Natural Electromagnetic Spectrum (NES) pertinent to Remote Sensing; (ii) mitigating against common "Radio Frequency Interference (RFI)" and intentional Directive Jamming of Airborne & Space borne POL-IN-SAR Imaging Platforms are appraised.

  5. ERS-1 SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, K.; Bicknell, T.; Vines, K.

    1986-01-01

    To take full advantage of the synthetic aperature radar (SAR) to be flown on board the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) (1989) and the Canadian Radarsat (1990), the implementation of a receiving station in Alaska is being studied to gather and process SAR data pertaining in particular to regions within the station's range of reception. The current SAR data processing requirement is estimated to be on the order of 5 minutes per day. The Interim Digital Sar Processor (IDP) which was under continual development through Seasat (1978) and SIR-B (1984) can process slightly more than 2 minutes of ERS-1 data per day. On the other hand, the Advanced Digital SAR Processore (ADSP), currently under development for the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C, 1988) and the Venus Radar Mapper, (VMR, 1988), is capable of processing ERS-1 SAR data at a real time rate. To better suit the anticipated ERS-1 SAR data processing requirement, both a modified IDP and an ADSP derivative are being examined. For the modified IDP, a pipelined architecture is proposed for the mini-computer plus array processor arrangement to improve throughout. For the ADSP derivative, a simplified version is proposed to enhance ease of implementation and maintainability while maintaing real time throughput rates. These processing systems are discussed and evaluated.

  6. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  7. Motion compensation requirements for a high resolution spotlight SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepburn, J. S. A.; Haslam, G. E.; Liang, D. F.; Widnall, W. S.

    1986-07-01

    The Canadian Department of National Defence is developing a high resolution airborne spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR). To attain the high contrast, high resolution and low geometric distortion objectives of the project, it is essential that very accurate motion compensation be applied to the radar returns to minimize the effects on SAR image quality of spurious antenna phase center motion. The motion compensation system being developed for the project includes a gimballed master inertial navigation system (INS) located near the center of gravity of the host aircraft, a strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising gyroscope and accelerometer triads mounted on the radar antenna, as well as Doppler velocity and barometric altitude sensors for damping the inertial systems. The role of the master INS is to enable high accuracy alignment of the strapdown IMU. The raw sensor data are integrated using a U-D factorized Kalman filter to obtain optimal estimates of the motion of the radar antenna phase center while the SAR window is open. The data are used to adjust both the radar pulse repetition frequency and the phase and displacement of the radar returns. An analysis of the motion compensation requirements was carried out, leading to the specification of the motion compensation sensor configuration and accuracy. The performance of the motion compensation system has been evaluated by detailed computer simulation. This evaluation accounted for all major system error sources, including errors associated with sensors, transfer alignment and computation, with the system operating in a moderately turbulent environment.

  8. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckner, F. L.; Ahr, H. A.; Ausherman, D. A.; Cutrona, L. J.; Francisco, S.; Harrison, R. E.; Heuser, J. S.; Jordan, R. L.; Justus, J.; Manning, B.

    1978-01-01

    The available and optimal methods for generating SAR imagery for NASA applications were identified. The SAR image quality and data processing requirements associated with these applications were studied. Mathematical operations and algorithms required to process sensor data into SAR imagery were defined. The architecture of SAR image formation processors was discussed, and technology necessary to implement the SAR data processors used in both general purpose and dedicated imaging systems was addressed.

  9. SAR Imagery Applied to the Monitoring of Hyper-Saline Deposits: Death Valley Example (CA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasne, Yannick; Paillou, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony; Chapman, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at understanding the influence of salinity on the dielectric constant of soils and then on the backscattering coeff cients recorded by airborne/spaceborne SAR systems. Based on dielectric measurements performed over hyper-saline deposits in Death Valley (CA), as well as laboratory electromagnetic characterization of salts and water mixtures, we used the dielectric constants as input parameters of analytical IEM simulations to model both the amplitude and phase behaviors of SAR signal at C, and L-bands. Our analytical simulations allow to reproduce specif c copolar signatures recorded in SAR data, corresponding to the Cottonball Basin saltpan. We also propose the copolar backscattering ratio and phase difference as indicators of moistened and salt-affected soils. More precisely, we show that these copolar indicators should allow to monitor the seasonal variations of the dielectric properties of saline deposits.

  10. MIRANDA 35 GHz SAR Based Non-Coherent Change Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noetel, Denis; Kloeppel, Frank; Sieger, Stefan; Janssen, Daniel; Pohl, Nils

    2017-03-01

    Up to now, the high effort involved with airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems has led to the effect that SAR image processing is mostly restricted to single images of a scene. Recent developments like the MIRANDA 35 and its matching flight platform allow for frequent revisits of the same scene at very high repeatability. MIRANDA 35 has been designed as a lightweight and compact SAR sensor for altitudes of up to 1 km while providing a resolution of 15 cm. In combination with a highly flexible ultralight aircraft we have recently obtained 28 measurements of a scene within 2 h of flight time at very high repeatability. Two sets of flight courses, each with 7 flyovers of the reference scene and 7 of a modified change scene, are investigated here using statistical change detection methods like Informational Difference and Universal Image Quality Index.

  11. Tropical Forest Biomass Estimation from Vertical Fourier Transforms of Lidar and InSAR Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Goncalves, F.; Drake, J.; Hensley, S.; Chapman, B. D.; Michel, T.; Dos Santos, J. R.; Dutra, L.; Graca, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Structural forest biomass estimation from lidar or interferometric SAR (InSAR) has demonstrated better performance than radar-power-based approaches for the higher biomasses (>150 Mg/ha) found in tropical forests. Structural biomass estimation frequently regresses field biomass to some function of forest height. With airborne, 25-m footprint lidar data and fixed-baseline C-band InSAR data over tropical wet forests of La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, we compare the use of Fourier transforms of vertical profiles at a few frequencies to the intrinsically low-frequency “average height”. RMS scatters of Fourier-estimated biomass about field-measured biomass improved by 40% and 20% over estimates base on average height from lidar and fixed-baseline InSAR, respectively. Vertical wavelengths between 14 and 100 m were found to best estimate biomass. The same airborne data acquisition over La Selva was used to generate many 10’s of repeat-track L-band InSAR baselines with time delays of 1-72 hours, and vertical wavelengths of 5-100 m. We will estimate biomass from the Fourier transforms of L-band radar power profiles (InSAR complex coherence). The effects of temporal decorrelation will be modeled in the Fourier domain to try to model and reduce their impact. Using L-band polarimetric interferometry, average heights will be estimated as well and biomass regression performance compared to the Fourier transform approach. The more traditional approach of using L-band radar polarimetry will also be compared to structural biomass estimation.

  12. SAR imaging - Seeing the unseen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, M.

    1982-01-01

    The functional abilities and operations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are described. SAR employs long wavelength radio waves in bursts, imaging a target by 'listening' to the small frequency changes that result from the Doppler shift due to the relative motion of the imaging craft and the motions of the target. The time delay of the signal return allows a determination of the location of the target, leading to the build up of a two-dimensional image. The uses of both Doppler shifts and time delay enable detailed imagery which is independent of distance. The synthetic aperture part of the name of SAR derives from the beaming of multiple pulses, which result in a picture that is effectively the same as using a large antenna. Mechanisms contributing to the fineness of SAR images are outlined.

  13. TerraSAR-X mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werninghaus, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    The TerraSAR-X is a German national SAR- satellite system for scientific and commercial applications. It is the continuation of the scientifically and technologically successful radar missions X-SAR (1994) and SRTM (2000) and will bring the national technology developments DESA and TOPAS into operational use. The space segment of TerraSAR-X is an advanced high-resolution X-Band radar satellite. The system design is based on a sound market analysis performed by Infoterra. The TerraSAR-X features an advanced high-resolution X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar based on the active phased array technology which allows the operation in Spotlight-, Stripmap- and ScanSAR Mode with various polarizations. It combines the ability to acquire high resolution images for detailed analysis as well as wide swath images for overview applications. In addition, experimental modes like the Dual Receive Antenna Mode allow for full-polarimetric imaging as well as along track interferometry, i.e. moving target identification. The Ground Segment is optimized for flexible response to (scientific and commercial) User requests and fast image product turn-around times. The TerraSAR-X mission will serve two main goals. The first goal is to provide the strongly supportive scientific community with multi-mode X-Band SAR data. The broad spectrum of scientific application areas include Hydrology, Geology, Climatology, Oceanography, Environmental Monitoring and Disaster Monitoring as well as Cartography (DEM Generation) and Interferometry. The second goal is the establishment of a commercial EO-market in Europe which is driven by Infoterra. The commercial goal is the development of a sustainable EO-business so that the e.g. follow-on systems can be completely financed by industry from the profit. Due to its commercial potential, the TerraSAR-X project will be implemented based on a public-private partnership with the Astrium GmbH. This paper will describe first the mission objectives as well as the

  14. Focusing of bistatic SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bia, Pietro; Ricci, Nicola; Zonno, Mariantonietta; Nico, Giovanni; Catalao, Joao; Tesauro, Manlio

    2014-10-01

    The problems of simulation of bistatic SAR raw data and focusing are studied. A discrete target simulator is described. The simulator introduces the scene topography and compute the integration time of general bistatic configurations providing a means to derived maps of the range and azimuth spatial resolutions. The problem of focusing of bistatic SAR data acquired in a translational-invariant bistatic configuration is studied by deriving the bistatic Point Target Reference spectrum and presenting an analytical solution for its stationary points.

  15. Normal and Differential SAR Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Geudtner, B. Schättler, P. Vachon, U. Steinbrecher, J. Holzner, J. Mittermayer , H. Breit, A. Moreira. RADARSAT ScanSAR interferometry. In: Proc.IGARSS’99...IV, Ottawa, Vol. XXXIV, part 4, pp. 470-475 Krieger, G., Wendler, M., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Moreira, A., 2002. Performance analysis for...bistatic interferometric SAR configurations. In: Proc.IGARSS 2002, Toronto, Canada, vol. 1, pp. 650-652. Krieger, G., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J

  16. Normal and Differential SAR Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Geudtner, B. Schättler, P. Vachon, U. Steinbrecher, J. Holzner, J. Mittermayer , H. Breit, A. Moreira. RADARSAT ScanSAR interferometry. In: Proceedings of...part 4, pp. 470-475 Krieger, G., Wendler, M., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Moreira, A., 2002. Performance analysis for bistatic interferometric...SAR configurations. In: Proceedings of IGARSS 2002, Toronto, Canada, vol. 1, pp. 650-652. Krieger, G., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Papathanassiou, K

  17. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  18. Agricultural Land Cover from Multitemporal C-Band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skriver, H.

    2013-12-01

    Henning Skriver DTU Space, Technical University of Denmark Ørsteds Plads, Building 348, DK-2800 Lyngby e-mail: hs@space.dtu.dk Problem description This paper focuses on land cover type from SAR data using high revisit acquisitions, including single and dual polarisation and fully polarimetric data, at C-band. The data set were acquired during an ESA-supported campaign, AgriSAR09, with the Radarsat-2 system. Ground surveys to obtain detailed land cover maps were performed during the campaign. Classification methods using single- and dual-polarisation data, and fully polarimetric data are used with multitemporal data with short revisit time. Results for airborne campaigns have previously been reported in Skriver et al. (2011) and Skriver (2012). In this paper, the short revisit satellite SAR data will be used to assess the trade-off between polarimetric SAR data and data as single or dual polarisation SAR data. This is particularly important in relation to the future GMES Sentinel-1 SAR satellites, where two satellites with a relatively wide swath will ensure a short revisit time globally. Questions dealt with are: which accuracy can we expect from a mission like the Sentinel-1, what is the improvement of using polarimetric SAR compared to single or dual polarisation SAR, and what is the optimum number of acquisitions needed. Methodology The data have sufficient number of looks for the Gaussian assumption to be valid for the backscatter coefficients for the individual polarizations. The classification method used for these data is therefore the standard Bayesian classification method for multivariate Gaussian statistics. For the full-polarimetric cases two classification methods have been applied, the standard ML Wishart classifier, and a method based on a reversible transform of the covariance matrix into backscatter intensities. The following pre-processing steps were performed on both data sets: The scattering matrix data in the form of SLC products were

  19. Interferometric SAR imaging by transmitting stepped frequency chaotic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Gu, Xiang; Zhai, Wenshuai; Dong, Xiao; Shi, Xiaojin; Kang, Xueyan

    2015-10-01

    Noise radar has been applied in many fields since it was proposed more than 50 years ago. However, it has not been applied to interferometric SAR imaging yet as far as we know. This paper introduces our recent work on interferometric noise radar. An interferometric SAR system was developed which can transmit both chirp signal and chaotic noise signal (CNS) at multiple carrier frequencies. An airborne experiment with this system by transmitting both signals was carried out, and the data were processed to show the capability of interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The results shows that although the interferometric phase quality of CNS is degraded due to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is lower compared with that of chirp signal, we still can get satisfied DEM after multi-looking processing. Another work of this paper is to apply compressed sensing (CS) theory to the interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The CS theory states that if a signal is sparse, then it can be accurately reconstructed with much less sampled data than that regularly required according to Nyquist Sampling Theory. To form a structured random matrix, if the transmitted signal is of fixed waveform, then random subsampling is needed. However, if the transmitted signal is of random waveform, then only uniform subsampling is needed. This is another advantage of noise signal. Both the interferometric phase images and the DEMs by regular method and by CS method are processed with results compared. It is shown that the degradation of interferometric phases due to subsampling is larger than that of amplitude image.

  20. Canopy Vertical Spatial Scales which Constrain Biomass in a Tropical Forest at the Plot Level: Unifying Lidar and InSAR for Biomass Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Goncalves, F. G.; Drake, J. B.; Chapman, B. D.; Dos Santos, J. R.; Dutra, L. V.; Graca, P. M.; Purcell, G. H.

    2009-12-01

    Structural remote sensing of forest biomass, using lidar and/or interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), often involves regressing field measured biomass against remotely sensed characteristics of the vertical density profile. Because spaceborne lidar or InSAR sensors will estimate structural characteristics averaged at the plot level (0.04-1 hectare), and because tropical forests contain 40% of the Earth’s forested biomass, this study focuses on the scales of vertical characteristics which best correlate with tropical forest biomass. This work suggests that the structural characteristics used in both lidar and InSAR biomass estimation, such as mean height or total height or height of median energy, are based on the behavior of Fourier vertical frequency components of vegetation density near zero frequency; that is, they are very low-spatial frequency characteristics of the vertical vegetation distribution. In this work, we ask which other vertical Fourier frequencies in lidar- or InSAR-produced structure metrics can best correlate with field biomass. Using lidar (LVIS) data from La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, taken in 2005, lidar canopy observations are Fourier transformed in the vertical direction to decompose into vertical frequency components. Each baseline of an InSAR observation, the complex coherence, is this Fourier transform of the canopy, if the ground contribution can be neglected. Using the qualitative similarity in vertical profiles seen by lidar, InSAR (at C-band, from AirSAR in 2004), and field measurements in the La Selva data, we produce the equivalent many (1000’s of) InSAR baselines from the lidar data and, using the lidar-simulated InSAR, determine the optimal spatial frequencies—baselines at DESDynI orbital altitudes for InSAR—which would estimate biomass in this wet tropical forest most accurately for either technique. For biomass ranging from 39-490 Mg/ha, regressing field biomass against some function of height

  1. X-SAR as high-performance interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Marian U.; Schandl, Josef

    1995-11-01

    In April and October 1994 the X-SAR radar has been flown twice onboard the Space Shuttle, as part of the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL-1 and SRL-2). This radar payload is the first synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system of its kind in space, with three frequencies, multi- polarization, variable incidence angle and variable modes of operation. SIR-C/X-SAR, the new generation of imaging microwave remote sensing sensors from space, demonstrated successfully repeat pass interferometry in all three frequencies with a one day repeat as well as a six month repeat orbit. The major problems with the repeat orbit interferometry are the temporal target decorrelation, unsuitable baseline and different squint angles for the two passes to be processed. Therefore, for the third mission of the Space Radar Lab which shall be called SRTM (shuttle radar topographic mapper), single pass interferometry with a second receive antenna is proposed to generate a topographic map of all land surfaces between +60 degrees and -56 degrees latitude. X-SAR's 12 meter long and 40 cm wide main transmit and receive antenna is mounted directly to a tiltable part of the SIR-C antenna truss structure in the Shuttle cargo bay. The second receive antenna is 6 meters long and is mounted together with the second C-band antenna to a 31 meter long deployable boom structure perpendicular to the velocity direction to build the baseline. X-SAR is not capable of operating in a scan SAR model like SIR-C to allow continuous coverage, but will operate in a high resolution mode with a swath width of 30 - 35 km. The engineering design of the interferometric configuration for X-SAR, the requirement specifications, and the predicted performance as well as the mission operation aspects are described in this paper. SIR-C/X- SAR is a cooperative project. The SIR-C instrument was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The X-band radar (X-SAR) was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio Companies for the German

  2. Airborne Next: Rethinking Airborne Organization and Applying New Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    structures since its employment on a large scale during World War II. It is puzzling to consider how little airborne organizational structures and employment...future potential of airborne concepts by rethinking traditional airborne organizational structures and employment concepts. Using a holistic approach in... structures of airborne forces to model a “small and many” approach over a “large and few” approach, while incorporating a “swarming” concept. Utilizing

  3. Classification of High Resolution C-Band PolSAR Data on Polarimetric and Texture Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Feng, Qi; Li, Lan

    2014-11-01

    PolSAR image classification is an important technique in the remote sensing area. For high resolution PolSAR image, polarimetric and texture features are equally important for the high resolution PolSAR image classification. The texture features are mainly extracted through Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) method, but this method has some deficiencies. First, GLCM method can only work on gray-scale images; Secondly, the number of texture features extracted by GLCM method is generally up dozens, or even hundreds. Too many features may exist larger redundancy and will increase the complexity of classification. Therefore, this paper introduces a new texture feature factor-RK that derived from PolSAR image non-Gaussian statistic model.Using the domestic airborne C-band PolSAR image data, we completed classification combined the polarization and texture characteristics.The results showed that this new texture feature factor-RK can overcome the above drawbacks and can achieve same performance compared with GLCM method.

  4. SAR amplitude probability density function estimation based on a generalized Gaussian model.

    PubMed

    Moser, Gabriele; Zerubia, Josiane; Serpico, Sebastiano B

    2006-06-01

    In the context of remotely sensed data analysis, an important problem is the development of accurate models for the statistics of the pixel intensities. Focusing on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, this modeling process turns out to be a crucial task, for instance, for classification or for denoising purposes. In this paper, an innovative parametric estimation methodology for SAR amplitude data is proposed that adopts a generalized Gaussian (GG) model for the complex SAR backscattered signal. A closed-form expression for the corresponding amplitude probability density function (PDF) is derived and a specific parameter estimation algorithm is developed in order to deal with the proposed model. Specifically, the recently proposed "method-of-log-cumulants" (MoLC) is applied, which stems from the adoption of the Mellin transform (instead of the usual Fourier transform) in the computation of characteristic functions and from the corresponding generalization of the concepts of moment and cumulant. For the developed GG-based amplitude model, the resulting MoLC estimates turn out to be numerically feasible and are also analytically proved to be consistent. The proposed parametric approach was validated by using several real ERS-1, XSAR, E-SAR, and NASA/JPL airborne SAR images, and the experimental results prove that the method models the amplitude PDF better than several previously proposed parametric models for backscattering phenomena.

  5. Pol(In)SAR Soil Moisture Study by using Pi-SAR 2L and GB-SAR Data in Preparation of the upcoming ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, C.; Sato, M.

    2013-12-01

    moving along a rail to provide the scanning. This is the first time that such a study is carried out. Up to now the radar skin depth of natural terrain with varying soil water content is usually somewhat ill-defined. Moreover, super high resolution airborne fully polarimetric L-band SAR data from repeat-pass as well as from square-flight acquisitions is used to demonstrate the potentials of surface parameter retrieval from PolInSAR and multi-angular PolSAR data. The Pi-SAR 2L operated by JAXA is the same system which is used for the pre-launch Cal/Val operations for PALSAR-2. Based on recent campaign data acquired over our test sites in the Sendai area, we demonstrate the potential of the upcoming ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 for frequent global-wide soil moisture and vegetation biomass observation.

  6. On Ambiguities in SAR Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Ambiguities are an aliasing effect caused by the periodic sampling of the scene backscatter inherent to pulsed radar systems such as Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR). In this paper we take a fresh look at the relationship between SAR range and azimuth ambiguity constraints on the allowable pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the antenna length. We show that for high squint angles smaller antennas may be feasible in some cases. For some applications, the ability to form a synthetic aperture at high squint angles is desirable, but the size of the antenna causes problems in the design of systems capable of such operation. This is because the SAR system design is optimized for a side-looking geometry. In two examples design examples we take a suboptimum antenna size and examine the performance in terms of azimuth resolution and swath width as a function of squint angle. We show that for stripmap SARs, the swath width is usually worse for off-boresight squint angles, because it is severely limited by range walk, except in cases where we relax the spatial resolution. We consider the implications for the design of modest-resolution, narrow swath, scanning SAR scatterometers .

  7. Basis for optronic ScanSAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Linda; Bourqui, Pascal; Turgeon, Sandra; Harnish, Bernd; Suess, Martin; Châteauneuf, François; Bergeron, Alain

    2011-11-01

    ScanSAR is an important imaging mode of operation for SAR systems. It allows extended range coverage albeit at the expense of azimuth resolution. Compared to stripmap, ScanSAR is used more for large swath coverage for mapping and monitoring over a wide area. Applications are numerous and include boreal forest mapping, wetland mapping and soil moisture monitoring. The goal of the present work was thus to explore the possibility of processing ScanSAR data optronicaly. Tests were performed with artificially bursted ASAR stripmap data demonstrating that reconstruction of ScanSAR data using the optronic SAR processor is feasible. This paper describes specifically how the data control and handling of ScanSAR data is performed to make it compatible with the optronic processor that was otherwise specifically designed for stripmap processing. As well, the ScanSAR images generated optronicaly are presented.

  8. SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheet for SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts Format: Select one PDF [256 KB] Recommend on ... that are not now known. What does "close contact" mean? In the context of SARS, close contact ...

  9. A model for forming airborne synthetic aperture radar images of underground targets

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from an airborne platform has been proposed for imaging targets beneath the earth`s surface. The propagation of the radar`s energy within the ground, however, is much different than in the earth`s atmosphere. The result is signal refraction, echo delay, propagation losses, dispersion, and volumetric scattering. These all combine to make SAR image formation from an airborne platform much more challenging than a surface imaging counterpart. This report treats the ground as a lossy dispersive half-space, and presents a model for the radar echo based on measurable parameters. The model is then used to explore various imaging schemes, and image properties. Dynamic range is discussed, as is the impact of loss on dynamic range. Modified window functions are proposed to mitigate effects of sidelobes of shallow targets overwhelming deeper targets.

  10. Biomass mapping using biophysical forest type characterisation of SAR polarimetric images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, Marcela J.; Hoekman, Dirk H.

    2002-01-01

    Studies on the relationship between biomass and radar backscatter have relied on field data to construct empirical relationships with radar backscatter that can be used for biomass estimations and mapping. In general, inversion of radar data for biomass estimations is limited by the variations on backscatter produced by structural parameters and soil moisture and limited to a certain maximum biomass level dependent on the structural class. In this work we created biomass maps of two study sites at the Colombian Amazon (Guaviare and Araracuara) by using results from polarimetric classification algorithm that combines power, phase and correlation of C, L and P band of AirSAR data. Two different approaches were used. For the Guaviare site, (dry and flat) the biomass classes selected are related to Land Cover types and an empirical relationship between biomass and the average backscatter (LHV+PRR)/2) is used to create the biomass map. High consistency with the cover map is found. For the Araracuara site (hilly and flooded) a biomass map is created by reclassifying a biophysical forest structural map with biomass values obtained from field available data. Field data is used to validate maps and to study the behavior of radar polarimetric signatures according to different forest structures. A new approach of analysis is based on the description of the polarimetric coherence according to a physical explanation of the wave-object interactions. The same type of analysis is used to study systematically the influence of different forest structural parameters and soil moisture conditions on the polarimetric signatures. Simulated radar data from the UTARTCAN backscatter model is used.

  11. Method for removing RFI from SAR images

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2003-08-19

    A method of removing RFI from a SAR by comparing two SAR images on a pixel by pixel basis and selecting the pixel with the lower magnitude to form a composite image. One SAR image is the conventional image produced by the SAR. The other image is created from phase-history data which has been filtered to have the frequency bands containing the RFI removed.

  12. Registration of interferometric SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is a new way of performing topography mapping. Among the factors critical to mapping accuracy is the registration of the complex SAR images from repeated orbits. A new algorithm for registering interferometric SAR images is presented. A new figure of merit, the average fluctuation function of the phase difference image, is proposed to evaluate the fringe pattern quality. The process of adjusting the registration parameters according to the fringe pattern quality is optimized through a downhill simplex minimization algorithm. The results of applying the proposed algorithm to register two pairs of Seasat SAR images with a short baseline (75 m) and a long baseline (500 m) are shown. It is found that the average fluctuation function is a very stable measure of fringe pattern quality allowing very accurate registration.

  13. Monsoon '90 - Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Guerra, Abel G.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  14. Monsoon 1990: Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Dubois, Pascale; Guerra, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  15. Kronecker STAP and SAR GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenewald, Kristjan H.; Zelnio, Edmund G.; Hero, Alfred O.

    2016-05-01

    As a high resolution radar imaging modality, SAR detects and localizes non-moving targets accurately, giving it an advantage over lower resolution GMTI radars. Moving target detection is more challenging due to target smearing and masking by clutter. Space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is often used on multiantenna SAR to remove the stationary clutter and enhance the moving targets. In (Greenewald et al., 2016),1 it was shown that the performance of STAP can be improved by modeling the clutter covariance as a space vs. time Kronecker product with low rank factors, providing robustness and reducing the number of training samples required. In this work, we present a massively parallel algorithm for implementing Kronecker product STAP, enabling application to very large SAR datasets (such as the 2006 Gotcha data collection) using GPUs. Finally, we develop an extension of Kronecker STAP that uses information from multiple passes to improve moving target detection.

  16. Registration Of SAR Images With Multisensor Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.; Burnette, Charles F.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiautomated technique intended primarily to facilitate registration of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images with other images of same or partly overlapping terrain while preserving polarization information conveyed by SAR data. Technique generally applicable in sense one or both of images to be registered with each other generated by polarimetric or nonpolarimetric SAR, infrared radiometry, conventional photography, or any other applicable sensing method.

  17. System Turns SAR Images Into Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, J. C.; Kwok, Ronald; Pang, Shirley S. N.

    1988-01-01

    Postprocessing system for synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) transforms raw images from natural rotated and distorted SAR reference frame into geocoded images. Images automatically corrected to remove slant-range nonlinearities and Doppler skew. Produces multiple-frame mosaics for large-scale mapping. Does not require tedious manual registration of representative "tie" points in raw SAR imagery with known locations on Earth.

  18. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Sacco, Gian Franco; Gurrola, Eric M.; Zabker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    This computing environment is the next generation of geodetic image processing technology for repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) sensors, identified by the community as a needed capability to provide flexibility and extensibility in reducing measurements from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products. This software allows users of interferometric radar data the flexibility to process from Level 0 to Level 4 products using a variety of algorithms and for a range of available sensors. There are many radar satellites in orbit today delivering to the science community data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible large-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and the Earth's ecosystem. The proposed DESDynI mission, now under consideration by NASA for launch later in this decade, would provide time series and multiimage measurements that permit 4D models of Earth surface processes so that, for example, climate-induced changes over time would become apparent and quantifiable. This advanced data processing technology, applied to a global data set such as from the proposed DESDynI mission, enables a new class of analyses at time and spatial scales unavailable using current approaches. This software implements an accurate, extensible, and modular processing system designed to realize the full potential of InSAR data from future missions such as the proposed DESDynI, existing radar satellite data, as well as data from the NASA UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), and other airborne platforms. The processing approach has been re-thought in order to enable multi-scene analysis by adding new algorithms and data interfaces, to permit user-reconfigurable operation and extensibility, and to capitalize on codes already developed by NASA and the science community. The framework incorporates modern programming methods based on recent research, including object-oriented scripts controlling legacy and

  19. Polarization Filtering of SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of polarization filtering of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) returns provide hybrid method applied to either (1) maximize signal-to-noise ratio of return from given target or (2) enhance contrast between targets of two different types (that have different polarization properties). Method valid for both point and extended targets and for both monostatic and bistatic radars as well as SAR. Polarization information in return signals provides more complete description of radar-scattering properties of targets and used to obtain additional information about targets for use in classifying them, discriminating between them, or enhancing features of radar images.

  20. The effect of changing environmental conditions on microwave signatures of forest ecosystems - Preliminary results of the March 1988 Alaskan aircraft SAR experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Jobea; Paris, Jack; Kasischke, Eric; Slaughter, Charles; Viereck, Leslie

    1990-01-01

    In preparation for the ESA ERS-1 mission, a series of multitemporal, multifrequency, multipolarization aircraft SAR data sets were acquired near Fairbanks in March 1988. P-, L-, and C-band data were acquired with the NASA/JPL Airborne SAR on five different days over a period of two weeks. The airborne data were augmented with intensive ground calibration data as well as detailed simultaneous in situ measurements of the geometric, dielectric, and moisture properties of the snow and forest canopy. During the time period over which the SAR data were collected, the environmental conditions changed significantly; temperatures ranged from unseasonably warm (1 to 9 C) to well below freezing (-8 to -15 C), and the moisture content of the snow and trees changed from a liquid to a frozen state. The SAR data clearly indicate the radar return is sensitive to these changing environmental factors, and preliminary analysis of the L-band SAR data shows a 0.4 to 5.8 dB increase (depending on polarization and canopy type) in the radar cross section of the forest stands under the warm conditions relative to the cold. These SAR observations are consistent with predictions from a theoretical scattering model.

  1. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  2. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  3. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  4. Airborne asbestos in buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Van Orden, D R

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings nationwide is reported in this study. A total of 3978 indoor samples from 752 buildings, representing nearly 32 man-years of sampling, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result the presence of asbestos-containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all airborne asbestos structures was 0.01structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of airborne asbestos > or = 5microm long was 0.00012fibers/ml (f/ml). For all samples, 99.9% of the samples were <0.01 f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm; no building averaged above 0.004f/ml for fibers longer than 5microm. No asbestos was detected in 27% of the buildings and in 90% of the buildings no asbestos was detected that would have been seen optically (> or = 5microm long and > or = 0.25microm wide). Background outdoor concentrations have been reported at 0.0003f/ml > or = 5microm. These results indicate that in-place ACM does not result in elevated airborne asbestos in building atmospheres approaching regulatory levels and that it does not result in a significantly increased risk to building occupants.

  5. The relationship among sea surface roughness variations, oceanographic analyses, and airborne remote sensing analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oertel, G. F.; Wade, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was studied to determine whether it could image large scale estuaries and oceanic features such as fronts and to explain the electromagnetic interaction between SAR and the individual surface front features. Fronts were observed to occur at the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay. The airborne measurements consisted of data collection by SAR onboard an F-4 aircraft and real aperture side looking radar (SLAR) in Mohawk aircraft. A total of 89 transects were flown. Surface roughness and color as well as temperature and salinity were evaluated. Cross-frontal surveys were made. Frontal shear and convergence flow were obtained. Surface active organic materials, it was indicated, are present at the air-sea interface. In all, 2000 analyses were conducted to characterize the spatial and temporal variabilities associated with water mass boundaries.

  6. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  7. Soil moisture retrieval through a merging of multi-temporal L-band SAR data and hydrologic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia, F.; Satalino, G.; Pauwels, V. R. N.; Loew, A.

    2009-03-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the potential of retrieving superficial soil moisture content (mv) from multi-temporal L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data and hydrologic modelling. The study focuses on assessing the performances of an L-band SAR retrieval algorithm intended for agricultural areas and for watershed spatial scales (e.g. from 100 to 10 000 km2). The algorithm transforms temporal series of L-band SAR data into soil moisture contents by using a constrained minimization technique integrating a priori information on soil parameters. The rationale of the approach consists of exploiting soil moisture predictions, obtained at coarse spatial resolution (e.g. 15-30 km2) by point scale hydrologic models (or by simplified estimators), as a priori information for the SAR retrieval algorithm that provides soil moisture maps at high spatial resolution (e.g. 0.01 km2). In the present form, the retrieval algorithm applies to cereal fields and has been assessed on simulated and experimental data. The latter were acquired by the airborne E-SAR system during the AgriSAR campaign carried out over the Demmin site (Northern Germany) in 2006. Results indicate that the retrieval algorithm always improves the a priori information on soil moisture content though the improvement may be marginal when the accuracy of prior mv estimates is better than 5%.

  8. Soil moisture retrieval through a merging of multi-temporal L-band SAR data and hydrologic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia, F.; Satalino, G.; Pauwels, V. R. N.; Loew, A.

    2008-12-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the potential of retrieving superficial soil moisture content (mv) from multi-temporal L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data and hydrologic modelling. The study focuses on assessing the performances of an L-band SAR retrieval algorithm intended for agricultural areas and for watershed spatial scales (e.g. from 100 to 10 000 km2). The algorithm transforms temporal series of L-band SAR data into soil moisture contents by using a constrained minimization technique integrating a priori information on soil parameters. The rationale of the approach consists of exploiting soil moisture predictions, obtained at coarse spatial resolution (e.g. 15-30 km2) by point scale hydrologic models (or by simplified estimators), as a priori information for the SAR retrieval algorithm that provides soil moisture maps at high spatial resolution (e.g. 0.01 km2). In the present form, the retrieval algorithm applies to cereal fields and has been assessed on simulated and experimental data. The latter were acquired by the airborne E-SAR system during the AgriSAR campaign carried out over the Demmin site (Northern Germany) in 2006. Results indicate that the retrieval algorithm always improves the a priori information on soil moisture content though the improvement may be marginal when the accuracy of prior mv estimates is better than 5%.

  9. Imaging of buried and foliage-obscured objects with an ultrawide-bandwidth polarimetric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Dan R.; Lewis, Terry B.; Wei, Susan C.; Kletzli, D. W., Jr.

    1993-11-01

    The Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) has developed a unique ground- based, portable, synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This SAR images targets in their natural backgrounds without the expense of an airborne sensor and with higher performance (bandwidth, resolution) than existing airborne systems. A horizontal 36-foot long aluminum truss supports a rail and an antenna cartridge, which is moved along the rail to allow synthetic aperture focusing. The system is fully-polarimetric and has collected data over the frequency band of 400 - 1300 MHz resulting in a nominal resolution of 0.17 m in range and 0.5 m in cross-range. The low frequency range of the system allows for penetration of soil (to shallow depths) as well as foliage and the system has been used to collect images of buried and foliage- obscured targets. The ground imagery collected to date includes steel oil drums buried at depths of up to one-meter. Both the drums as well as the disturbances due to digging the holes are visible in the imagery. Foliage imagery includes portions of a Lear jet under a mature hardwood forest. Due to the low frequency and wide bandwidth of the sensor (400 - 1300 MHz), obscured objects are clearly visible in the SAR imagery. Other responses in the foliage imagery are due to the dihedral-like ground-trunk reflections.

  10. Computerized ionospheric tomography based on geosynchronous SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng; Tian, Ye; Dong, Xichao; Wang, Rui; Long, Teng

    2017-02-01

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) based on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an emerging technique to construct the three-dimensional (3-D) image of ionosphere. The current studies are all based on the Low Earth Orbit synthetic aperture radar (LEO SAR) which is limited by long repeat period and small coverage. In this paper, a novel ionospheric 3-D CIT technique based on geosynchronous SAR (GEO SAR) is put forward. First, several influences of complex atmospheric environment on GEO SAR focusing are detailedly analyzed, including background ionosphere and multiple scattering effects (induced by turbulent ionosphere), tropospheric effects, and random noises. Then the corresponding GEO SAR signal model is constructed with consideration of the temporal-variant background ionosphere within the GEO SAR long integration time (typically 100 s to 1000 s level). Concurrently, an accurate total electron content (TEC) retrieval method based on GEO SAR data is put forward through subband division in range and subaperture division in azimuth, obtaining variant TEC value with respect to the azimuth time. The processing steps of GEO SAR CIT are given and discussed. Owing to the short repeat period and large coverage area, GEO SAR CIT has potentials of covering the specific space continuously and completely and resultantly has excellent real-time performance. Finally, the TEC retrieval and GEO SAR CIT construction are performed by employing a numerical study based on the meteorological data. The feasibility and correctness of the proposed methods are verified.

  11. [Medical history from SARS to pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Zhen, Cheng

    2003-05-31

    SARS is a new kind of pneumonia. From the end of 2002 to the beginning of 2003, SARS broke in Guangdong province, Hong Kong and Beijing, and then gradually spread to the world. SARS is extremely contagious. The symptoms of SARS progress very quickly. SARS smashes the people's tranquil life and many people live in horror, worry and anxiety. But if we review the medical history of pneumonia, we would have a better understanding of SARS. This article focuses the history of people's understanding of pneumonia on the historical documents, diagnosis, etiology and treatment. Through the epidemic of SARS, the author hopes to express that contagion will live with us for a long time, but it is not a deadly disease. It is preventable and good care is essential for contagious patients. As Chinese people, we should have the best use of TCM in our combat with contagion.

  12. Spacecraft on-board SAR processing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.; Arens, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment of the on-board SAR processing technology for Eos-type missions. The proposed Eos SAR sensor and flight data system are introduced, and the SAR processing requirements are described. The SAR on-board SAR processor architecture selection is discussed, and a baseline processor architecture using a frequency-domain processor for range correlation and a modular fault-tolerant VLSI time-domain parallel array for azimuth correlation are described. The mass storage and VLSI technologies needed for implementing the proposed SAR processing are assessed. It is shown that acceptable processor power and mass characteristics should be feasible for Eos-type applications. A proposed development strategy for the on-board SAR processor is presented.

  13. Bioelectromagnetic effects measurements - SAR and induced current.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses several theoretical and practical aspects of the application of currents flowing through the body of a radiotelephone operator and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR is known as the physical quantity which is a perfect solution for biological experiments. Unfortunately, SAR cannot be measured directly. Contrary to SAR, which is limited to the penetration depth, a current induced in a point of a body is measurable in any other point of the body. The main objective of this paper is to show that the current induced in a human body when using a radiotelephone or mobile phone is significant and should be analyzed as widely as SAR is. Computer simulations of a human's hand with a radiotelephone were made. Experiments were also conducted. The results of the experiments show that induced current is also as important as SAR and it cannot be omitted in bioelectromagnetic experiments. In biomedical studies both parameters: induced current and SAR play a major role.

  14. Further SEASAT SAR coastal ocean wave analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.; Meadows, G. A.; Jackson, P. L.; Tseng, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis techniques used to exploit SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data of gravity waves are discussed and the SEASAT SAR's ability to monitor large scale variations in gravity wave fields in both deep and shallow water is evaluated. The SAR analysis techniques investigated included motion compensation adjustments and the semicausal model for spectral analysis of SAR wave data. It was determined that spectra generated from fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT) of SAR wave data were not significantly altered when either range telerotation adjustments or azimuth focus shifts were used during processing of the SAR signal histories, indicating that SEASAT imagery of gravity waves is not significantly improved or degraded by motion compensation adjustments. Evaluation of the semicausal (SC) model using SEASAT SAR data from Rev. 974 indicates that the SC spectral estimates were not significantly better than the FFT results.

  15. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  16. Advanced SAR simulator with multi-beam interferometric capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppucci, Antonio; Márquez, José; Cazcarra, Victor; Ruffini, Giulio

    2014-10-01

    State of the art simulations are of great interest when designing a new instrument, studying the imaging mechanisms due to a given scenario or for inversion algorithm design as they allow to analyze and understand the effects of different instrument configurations and targets compositions. In the framework of the studies about a new instruments devoted to the estimation of the ocean surface movements using Synthetic Aperture Radar along-track interferometry (SAR-ATI) an End-to-End simulator has been developed. The simulator, built in a high modular way to allow easy integration of different processing-features, deals with all the basic operations involved in an end to end scenario. This includes the computation of the position and velocity of the platform (airborne/spaceborne) and the geometric parameters defining the SAR scene, the surface definition, the backscattering computation, the atmospheric attenuation, the instrument configuration, and the simulation of the transmission/reception chains and the raw data. In addition, the simulator provides a inSAR processing suit and a sea surface movement retrieval module. Up to four beams (each one composed by a monostatic and a bistatic channel) can be activated. Each channel provides raw data and SLC images with the possibility of choosing between Strip-map and Scansar modes. Moreover, the software offers the possibility of radiometric sensitivity analysis and error analysis due atmospheric disturbances, instrument-noise, interferogram phase-noise, platform velocity and attitude variations. In this paper, the architecture and the capabilities of this simulator will be presented. Meaningful simulation examples will be shown.

  17. Preliminary analysis results of the Sea Surface Observation by a High Resolution Along-Track Interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, S.

    2013-12-01

    There are many requirements to detect the moving targets such as cars and ships in SAR images as well as to measure their speed. In particular, there are strongly requirements to detect ships and measure the ocean waves and the sea surface currents regardless of the time or the weather in the case of the ship accidents or the oil spill accidents because the rescue operation should be operated at the anytime. To satisfy these requirements, NICT developed the airborne along-track interferometric SAR (AT-InSAR) system in 2011. Kojima[1][2] carried out the preliminary experiments using a truck and ship to check its function and clarify its capability for the detection of the moving targets, and confirmed that its performance was satisfied with its specifications. The purpose of this study is to make clear the relationship between the phenomena on the sea surface such as the ocean waves and the velocity estimated from the AT-InSAR data, and the capability of the sea surface measurement by the AT-InSAR. In addition, the method to estimate wave directional spectra from AT-InSAR data is developed. The sea surface observation was carried out 3 km off the coast of Ooarai, the northeast of Tokyo, JAPAN on the 23th of August 2011. I observed the sea surface in the fine special resolution (0.3 m) and took a special average (1 m) to reduce noise. First of all, I estimated the wave velocity from the AT-InSAR images and calculated the 2D wave number spectra from it. And then, I estimated the directional wave spectra using the dispersion relation. As a result, it was clarified that the ocean waves could be measured by the AT-InSAR. In addition, it made clear that the bow waves and stern waves generated by a running ship could be detected by AT-InSAR. References [1] S. Kojima, T. Umehara, J. Uemoto, T. Kobayashi, M. Satake and S. Uratsuka, 'Development of Pi-SAR2 Along-Track Interferometric SAR System', IGARSS 2013, pp. 3159-3162, Aug. 2013. [2] S. Kojima, 'Evaluation of the Ship

  18. Airborne Intercept Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Primary mirror of Zerodur with Pilkington 747 coating • FOV = 0.104 degrees Airborne Intercept Monitoring RTO-MP-SET-105 16 - 3 UNCLASSIFIED...Pointing System (SPS). The STS is a 0.75 meter aperture Mersenne Cassegrain telescope and the SAT is a 0.34 meter aperture 3- mirror anastigmat telescope...UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED • Air Flow to Mitigate Thermal “Seeing” Effects • Light weighted primary mirror to reduce mass The SAT

  19. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  20. Airborne Infrared Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.

    2017-01-01

    A unique program of infrared astronomical observations from aircraft evolved at NASA’s Ames Research Center, beginning in the 1960s. Telescopes were flown on a Convair 990, a Lear Jet, and a Lockheed C-141 - the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) - leading to the planning and development of SOFIA: a 2.7 m telescope now flying on a Boeing 747SP. The poster describes these telescopes and highlights of some of the scientific results obtained from them.

  1. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D [Menan, ID; Schmitt, Michael J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Warren F [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  2. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  3. Extraction of Coastlines with Fuzzy Approach Using SENTINEL-1 SAR Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, N.; Kaynarca, M.; Oy, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coastlines are important features for water resources, sea products, energy resources etc. Coastlines are changed dynamically, thus automated methods are necessary for analysing and detecting the changes along the coastlines. In this study, Sentinel-1 C band SAR image has been used to extract the coastline with fuzzy logic approach. The used SAR image has VH polarisation and 10x10m. spatial resolution, covers 57 sqkm area from the south-east of Puerto-Rico. Additionally, radiometric calibration is applied to reduce atmospheric and orbit error, and speckle filter is used to reduce the noise. Then the image is terrain-corrected using SRTM digital surface model. Classification of SAR image is a challenging task since SAR and optical sensors have very different properties. Even between different bands of the SAR sensors, the images look very different. So, the classification of SAR image is difficult with the traditional unsupervised methods. In this study, a fuzzy approach has been applied to distinguish the coastal pixels than the land surface pixels. The standard deviation and the mean, median values are calculated to use as parameters in fuzzy approach. The Mean-standard-deviation (MS) Large membership function is used because the large amounts of land and ocean pixels dominate the SAR image with large mean and standard deviation values. The pixel values are multiplied with 1000 to easify the calculations. The mean is calculated as 23 and the standard deviation is calculated as 12 for the whole image. The multiplier parameters are selected as a: 0.58, b: 0.05 to maximize the land surface membership. The result is evaluated using airborne LIDAR data, only for the areas where LIDAR dataset is available and secondly manually digitized coastline. The laser points which are below 0,5 m are classified as the ocean points. The 3D alpha-shapes algorithm is used to detect the coastline points from LIDAR data. Minimum distances are calculated between the LIDAR points of

  4. Controlling Data Collection to Support SAR Image Rotation

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Cordaro, J. Thomas; Burns, Bryan L.

    2008-10-14

    A desired rotation of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image can be facilitated by adjusting a SAR data collection operation based on the desired rotation. The SAR data collected by the adjusted SAR data collection operation can be efficiently exploited to form therefrom a SAR image having the desired rotational orientation.

  5. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  6. Final Report (O1-ERD-051) Dynamic InSAR: Imaging Seismic Waves Remotely from Space

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P; Rodgers, A; Dodge, D; Zucca, J; Schultz, C; Walter, B; Portnoff, M

    2003-02-07

    The purpose of this LDRD project was to determine the feasibility of using InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar) to image seismic waves remotely from space. If shown to be feasible, the long-term goal of this project would be to influence future SAR satellite missions and airborne SAR platforms to include a this new capability. This final report summarizes the accomplishments of the originally-planned 2-year project that was cut short to 1 year plus 2 months due to a funding priority change that occurred in the aftermath of the September 11th tragedy. The LDRD-ER project ''Dynamic InSAR: Imaging Seismic Waves from Space'' (01-ERD-051) began in October, (FY01) and ended in December (FY02). Consequently, most of the results and conclusions for this project are represented in the FY0l Annual Report. Nonetheless, additional conclusions and insights regarding the progress of this work are included in this report. In should be noted that this work was restarted and received additional funding under the NA-22 DOE Nonproliferation Program in FY03.

  7. ARBRES: Light-Weight CW/FM SAR Sensors for Small UAVs

    PubMed Central

    Aguasca, Albert; Acevo-Herrera, Rene; Broquetas, Antoni; Mallorqui, Jordi J.; Fabregas, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a pair of compact CW/FM airborne SAR systems for small UAV-based operation (wingspan of 3.5 m) for low-cost testing of innovative SAR concepts. Two different SAR instruments, using the C and X bands, have been developed in the context of the ARBRES project, each of them achieving a payload weight below 5 Kg and a volume of 13.5 dm3 (sensor and controller). Every system has a dual receiving channel which allows operation in interferometric or polarimetric modes. Planar printed array antennas are used in both sensors for easy system integration and better isolation between transmitter and receiver subsystems. First experimental tests on board a 3.2 m wingspan commercial radio-controlled aircraft are presented. The SAR images of a field close to an urban area have been focused using a back-projection algorithm. Using the dual channel capability, a single pass interferogram and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) has been obtained which agrees with the scene topography. A simple Motion Compensation (MoCo) module, based on the information from an Inertial+GPS unit, has been included to compensate platform motion errors with respect to the nominal straight trajectory. PMID:23467032

  8. ARBRES: light-weight CW/FM SAR sensors for small UAVs.

    PubMed

    Aguasca, Albert; Acevo-Herrera, Rene; Broquetas, Antoni; Mallorqui, Jordi J; Fabregas, Xavier

    2013-03-06

    This paper describes a pair of compact CW/FM airborne SAR systems for small UAV-based operation (wingspan of 3.5 m) for low-cost testing of innovative SAR concepts. Two different SAR instruments, using the C and X bands, have been developed in the context of the ARBRES project, each of them achieving a payload weight below 5 Kg and a volume of 13.5 dm3 (sensor and controller). Every system has a dual receiving channel which allows operation in interferometric or polarimetric modes. Planar printed array antennas are used in both sensors for easy system integration and better isolation between transmitter and receiver subsystems. First experimental tests on board a 3.2 m wingspan commercial radio-controlled aircraft are presented. The SAR images of a field close to an urban area have been focused using a back-projection algorithm. Using the dual channel capability, a single pass interferogram and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) has been obtained which agrees with the scene topography. A simple Motion Compensation (MoCo) module, based on the information from an Inertial+GPS unit, has been included to compensate platform motion errors with respect to the nominal straight trajectory.

  9. Aircraft Detection in High-Resolution SAR Images Based on a Gradient Textural Saliency Map

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yihua; Li, Qingyun; Li, Yansheng; Tian, Jinwen

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new automatic and adaptive aircraft target detection algorithm in high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of airport. The proposed method is based on gradient textural saliency map under the contextual cues of apron area. Firstly, the candidate regions with the possible existence of airport are detected from the apron area. Secondly, directional local gradient distribution detector is used to obtain a gradient textural saliency map in the favor of the candidate regions. In addition, the final targets will be detected by segmenting the saliency map using CFAR-type algorithm. The real high-resolution airborne SAR image data is used to verify the proposed algorithm. The results demonstrate that this algorithm can detect aircraft targets quickly and accurately, and decrease the false alarm rate. PMID:26378543

  10. Antarctica X-band MiniSAR crevasse detection radar : final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, Grant J.; Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2007-09-01

    This document is the final report for the Antarctica Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Project. The project involved the modification of a Sandia National Laboratories MiniSAR system to operate at X-band in order to assess the feasibility of an airborne radar to detect crevasses in Antarctica. This radar successfully detected known crevasses at various geometries. The best results were obtained for synthetic aperture radar resolutions of at most one foot and finer. In addition to the main goal of detecting crevasses, the radar was used to assess conops for a future operational radar. The radar scanned large areas to identify potential safe landing zones. In addition, the radar was used to investigate looking at objects on the surface and below the surface of the ice. This document includes discussion of the hardware development, system capabilities, and results from data collections in Antarctica.

  11. Advanced digital SAR processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, L. W.; Gaffney, B. P.; Liu, B.; Perry, R. P.; Ruvin, A.

    1982-01-01

    A highly programmable, land based, real time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor requiring a processed pixel rate of 2.75 MHz or more in a four look system was designed. Variations in range and azimuth compression, number of looks, range swath, range migration and SR mode were specified. Alternative range and azimuth processing algorithms were examined in conjunction with projected integrated circuit, digital architecture, and software technologies. The advaced digital SAR processor (ADSP) employs an FFT convolver algorithm for both range and azimuth processing in a parallel architecture configuration. Algorithm performace comparisons, design system design, implementation tradeoffs and the results of a supporting survey of integrated circuit and digital architecture technologies are reported. Cost tradeoffs and projections with alternate implementation plans are presented.

  12. 5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. #2 TRANSMISSION LINES, MARCH 7, 1916. SCE drawing no. 4932. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  14. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  15. SAR Object Change Detection Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    based techniques when applied to Synthetic Aperature Radar (SAR imagery. DOUGLA 3. PRASKA, 2LT, USAF Project Engineer viii Section 1 INTRODUCTION AND...to assess the applicability of three region-based change-detection methods to synthetic aperture radar imagery. I/ Ac .0ion For K:CTAB [ ft i . i...Section 2, the algorithms developed were applied to synthetic -aperture radar image data furnished by RADC. Some preprocessing of all images was required

  16. Parallel strategies for SAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segoviano, Jesus A.

    2004-12-01

    This article proposes a series of strategies for improving the computer process of the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal treatment, following the three usual lines of action to speed up the execution of any computer program. On the one hand, it is studied the optimization of both, the data structures and the application architecture used on it. On the other hand it is considered a hardware improvement. For the former, they are studied both, the usually employed SAR process data structures, proposing the use of parallel ones and the way the parallelization of the algorithms employed on the process is implemented. Besides, the parallel application architecture classifies processes between fine/coarse grain. These are assigned to individual processors or separated in a division among processors, all of them in their corresponding architectures. For the latter, it is studied the hardware employed on the computer parallel process used in the SAR handling. The improvement here refers to several kinds of platforms in which the SAR process is implemented, shared memory multicomputers, and distributed memory multiprocessors. A comparison between them gives us some guidelines to follow in order to get a maximum throughput with a minimum latency and a maximum effectiveness with a minimum cost, all together with a limited complexness. It is concluded and described, that the approach consisting of the processing of the algorithms in a GNU/Linux environment, together with a Beowulf cluster platform offers, under certain conditions, the best compromise between performance and cost, and promises the major development in the future for the Synthetic Aperture Radar computer power thirsty applications in the next years.

  17. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Jianping; Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Shun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR) research and application. PMID:26871446

  18. SAR image registration based on Susan algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-bo; Fu, Shao-hua; Wei, Zhong-yi

    2011-10-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an active remote sensing system which can be installed on aircraft, satellite and other carriers with the advantages of all day and night and all-weather ability. It is the important problem that how to deal with SAR and extract information reasonably and efficiently. Particularly SAR image geometric correction is the bottleneck to impede the application of SAR. In this paper we introduces image registration and the Susan algorithm knowledge firstly, then introduces the process of SAR image registration based on Susan algorithm and finally presents experimental results of SAR image registration. The Experiment shows that this method is effective and applicable, no matter from calculating the time or from the calculation accuracy.

  19. Building Detection in SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew; Koch, Mark William; Moya, Mary M; Goold, Jeremy

    2014-08-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. The desire is to present a technique that is effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed technique assumes that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint. Where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. Constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results are provided showing the outcome of the technique.

  20. Building detection in SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. I present two techniques that are effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed techniques assume that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint, where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. For the first technique, constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. The second technique calculates weights for the connections and then performs a series of increasingly relaxed hard and soft thresholds. This results in groups of various levels on their validity. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results demonstrate the outcome of the two techniques. The two techniques are compared and discussed.

  1. Assessing Natural Disaster Impacts and Recovery Using Multifrequency, Fully-Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuchlewski, K. R.; Kim, Y.; Weissel, J. K.

    2003-04-01

    Many natural disasters involving landslides, volcanic eruptions, fires, or flo o ds entail terrain resurfacing, followed by subsequent recovery. Mo dern satellite and airborne remote sensing technologies, which combine broad spatial coverage and high spatial resolution with time-sequential site revisit capability, can provide important information on the extent and duration of ma jor landscape disturbance. In humid climate settings, these hazards temporarily remove or replace a natural vegetation cover and in doing so, mo dify the physical properties of the land surface. In optical remote sensing, removal of vegetation alters surface albedo in the visible - near infrared (V-NIR) waveband, particularly the high reflectance from vegetation in the NIR. For SAR remote sensing, removal of vegetation cover causes a change in dominant microwave scattering mechanism for the areas affected. SAR has operational advantages over optical sensors for rapid disaster assessment because of its day/night acquisition capability, the ability to "see through" smoke, clouds and dust, and the side-lo oking viewing geometry, which is an advantage whenever data collection directly above the site would prove dangerous. We show how multifrequency, fully-polarimetric airborne SAR data can be "inverted" for parameters that reflect scattering mechanism signatures diagnostic of different surface cover types. We apply a uniform approach to map landslides resulting from the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan and volcanic flows from the ma jor 1996 eruption of Manam volcano in Papua New Guinea. In addition, earlier work has shown that multifrequency SAR polarimetric backscatter is sensitive to total above-ground biomass. This attribute can be exploited to calculate vegetation loss during a disaster and for assessment of regrowth during the recovery phase.

  2. InSAR Forensics: Tracing InSAR Scatterers in High Resolution Optical Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, XiaoXiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a step towards a better interpretation of the scattering mechanism of different objects and their deformation histories in SAR interferometry (InSAR). The proposed technique traces individual SAR scatterer in high resolution optical images where their geometries, materials, and other properties can be better analyzed and classified. And hence scatterers of a same object can be analyzed in group, which brings us to a new level of InSAR deformation monitoring.

  3. Satellite SAR geocoding with refined RPC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Balz, Timo; Liao, Mingsheng

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have proved that the Rational Polynomial Camera (RPC) model is able to act as a reliable replacement of the rigorous Range-Doppler (RD) model for the geometric processing of satellite SAR datasets. But its capability in absolute geolocation of SAR images has not been evaluated quantitatively. Therefore, in this article the problems of error analysis and refinement of SAR RPC model are primarily investigated to improve the absolute accuracy of SAR geolocation. Range propagation delay and azimuth timing error are identified as two major error sources for SAR geolocation. An approach based on SAR image simulation and real-to-simulated image matching is developed to estimate and correct these two errors. Afterwards a refined RPC model can be built from the error-corrected RD model and then used in satellite SAR geocoding. Three experiments with different settings are designed and conducted to comprehensively evaluate the accuracies of SAR geolocation with both ordinary and refined RPC models. All the experimental results demonstrate that with RPC model refinement the absolute location accuracies of geocoded SAR images can be improved significantly, particularly in Easting direction. In another experiment the computation efficiencies of SAR geocoding with both RD and RPC models are compared quantitatively. The results show that by using the RPC model such efficiency can be remarkably improved by at least 16 times. In addition the problem of DEM data selection for SAR image simulation in RPC model refinement is studied by a comparative experiment. The results reveal that the best choice should be using the proper DEM datasets of spatial resolution comparable to that of the SAR images.

  4. SAR measurements of mines and minefields at 35 GHz and 94 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, Hartmuf; Puehl, M.; Biegel, Gregor

    1997-07-01

    Different types of anti-tank surface mines were measured on a turntable in a n anechoic chamber, and modelled with the German SIMPRASS model. In addition, several flights over a realistic minefield were performed with a 35 GHz and a 94 GHz radar operated in parallel in a SAR configuration. It is found that typical RCS values of AT mines at mmW frequencies are in the region between -18dBsm and -30dBsm. Therefore, they are detectable by airborne mmW radar only for a resolution cell size comparable to the physical size of the mine itself depending on the background clutter type.

  5. A Modular and Configurable Instrument Electronics Architecture for "MiniSAR"- An Advanced Smallsat SAR Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Jaime; Pastena, Max; Bierens, Laurens

    2013-08-01

    MiniSAR is a Dutch program focused on the development of a commercial smallsat featuring a SAR instrument, led by SSBV as prime contractor. In this paper an Instrument Electronics (IEL) system concept to meet the MiniSAR demands is presented. This system has several specificities wrt similar initiatives in the European space industry, driven by our main requirement: keep it small.

  6. SIR-C/X-SAR free flyer concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, R.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SAR) - C/X- Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Free Flyer concept are presented. An overview, science objectives, science rationale, geophysical parameters from SAR, programmatic goals, concept description, and a candidate mission description are included.

  7. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  8. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  9. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  10. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  11. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction from multistatic SAR images.

    PubMed

    Rigling, Brian D; Moses, Randolph L

    2005-08-01

    This paper discusses reconstruction of three-dimensional surfaces from multiple bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Techniques for surface reconstruction from multiple monostatic SAR images already exist, including interferometric processing and stereo SAR. We generalize these methods to obtain algorithms for bistatic interferometric SAR and bistatic stereo SAR. We also propose a framework for predicting the performance of our multistatic stereo SAR algorithm, and, from this framework, we suggest a metric for use in planning strategic deployment of multistatic assets.

  12. Multi-Frequency and Multi-Polarization SAR Use at the Canadian Ice Service- An Operational Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkett, Matt; De Abreu, Roger; Zagon, Tom; Flett, Dean; Dekorte, Jessica

    2010-12-01

    The Canadian Ice Service (CIS) has used both airborne and spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data extensively for almost three decades in their daily ice monitoring operations. The prohibitive cost of operating aircraft has seen CIS become increasingly reliant on spaceborne data in recent years. In particular, single-polarization (HH) C-band SAR from the ERS series and RADARSAT-1 sateliites formed the backbone of all CIS' operational programs through the 1990s. A limitation of these earlier C-Band sensors was their inability to acquire data in more than one polarization. Envisat-ASAR provided CIS with its first look at dual-polarization SAR from space and an opportunity to prepare for the upcoming launch of RADARSAT-2. After a short post-launch evaluation, CIS adopted the routine use of dual-polarization RADARSAT-2 ScanSAR (HH+HV) in its ice operations in June 2009. The January 2006 launch of the JAXA ALOS satellite gave CIS its first opportunity to incorporate L-band SAR into its daily operations. As a partner in the North American Ice Service (NAIS), CIS began to receive ALOS-PALSAR data through the National Ice Centre (NIC) in the United States via the Alaska Satellite Facility node. CIS currently receives approximately 70 scenes/week covering the Western Arctic, Beaufort and Chukchi Sea areas.

  13. Biomass estimation in a tropical wet forest using Fourier transforms of profiles from lidar or interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Gonçalves, F. G.; Drake, J. B.; Chapman, B. D.; dos Santos, J. R.; Dutra, L. V.; Graça, P. M. L. A.; Purcell, G. H.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical forest biomass estimation based on the structure of the canopy is a burgeoning and crucial remote sensing capability for balancing terrestrial carbon budgets. This paper introduces a new approach to structural biomass estimation based on the Fourier transform of vertical profiles from lidar or interferometric SAR (InSAR). Airborne and field data were used from 28 tropical wet forest stands at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, with average biomass of 229 Mg-ha-1. RMS scatters of remote sensing biomass estimates about field measurements were 58.3 Mg-ha-1, 21%, and 76.1 Mg-ha-1, 26%, for lidar and InSAR, respectively. Using mean forest height, the RMS scatter was 97 Mg-ha-1, ≈34% for both lidar and InSAR. The confidence that Fourier transforms are a significant improvement over height was >99% for lidar and ≈90% for InSAR. Lidar Fourier transforms determined the useful range of vertical wavelengths to be 14 m to 100 m.

  14. Classification of High Resolution C-Band PolSAR Data Based on Polarimetric and Texture Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Feng, Qi; Li, Lan

    2014-11-01

    PolSAR image classification is an important technique in the remote sensing area. For high resolution PolSAR image, polarimetric and texture features are equally important for the high resolution PolSAR image classification. The texture features are mainly extracted through Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) method, but this method has some deficiencies. First, GLCM method can only work on gray-scale images; Secondly, the number of texture features extracted by GLCM method is generally up dozens, or even hundreds. Too many features may exist larger redundancy and will increase the complexity of classification. Therefore, this paper introduces a new texture feature factor-RK that derived from PolSAR image non-Gaussian statistic model. Using the domestic airborne C-band PolSAR image data, we completed classification combined the polarization and texture characteristics. The results showed that this new texture feature factor-RK can overcome the above drawbacks and can achieve same performance compared with GLCM method.

  15. The New Airborne Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Community air pollution is the new airborne disease of our generation's communities. It is caused by the increasing use of fuel, associated with both affluence and careless waste. Photochemical air pollution of the California type involves newly defined atmospheric reactions, is due mostly to motor vehicle exhaust, is oxidizing, and produces ozone, plant damage, impairment of visibility and eye and respiratory symptoms. Aggravation of asthma, impairment of lung function among persons with chronic respiratory disease and a possible causal role, along with cigarette smoking in emphysema and chronic bronchitis, are some of the effects of photochemical pollution. More subtle effects of pollution include impairment of oxygen transport by the blood due to carbon monoxide and interference with porphyrin metabolism due to lead. Carbon monoxide exposures may affect survival of patients who are in hospitals because of myocardial infarction. While many uncertainties in pollution-health reactions need to be resolved, a large number of people in California have health impairment due to airborne disease of this new type. PMID:5485227

  16. InfoTerra/TerraSAR initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Manfred W.

    2004-01-01

    The overarching goal of the InfoTerra/TerraSAR Initiative is to establish a self-sustaining operational/commercial business built on Europe"s know-how and experience in space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, in SAR data processing as well as in SAR applications. InfoTerra stands for a new business concept based on supplying innovative geo-information products and services. TerraSAR is a space and ground system conceived to consist of an initial deployment and operation of 2 Radar satellites (one in X- and one in L-band) flying in a tandem configuration in the same orbit. The design of TerraSAR is driven by the market and is user-oriented. TerraSAR is key to capturing a significant proportion of the existing market and to opening new market opportunities, when it becomes operational. The InfoTerra/TerraSAR Initiative has evolved gradually. It started in 1997 as a joint venture between German (DSS) and British (MMS-UK) space industry, strongly supported by both space agencies, DLR and BNSC. In early 2001, DLR and BNSC submitted to ESA the Formal Programme Proposal for InfoTerra/TerraSAR to become an essential element of ESA"s Earth Watch Programme. In summer 2001, when it became evident that there was not yet sufficient support from the ESA Member States to allow immediate start entering into TerraSAR Phase C/D, it has been decided to implement first a TerraSAR consolidation phase. In early 2002, in order to avoid further delays, a contract was signed between DLR and Astrium GmbH on the development of one component of TerraSAR, the TerraSAR-X, in the frame of a national programme, governed by a Public Private Partnership Agreement. Even if now the different launch dates for TerraSAR-X and TerraSAR-L are narrowing down the window of common data acquisition, it is a reasonable starting point, but it should always be kept in mind that the utmost goal for the longterm is to achieve self sustainability by supplying geo-information products and services

  17. Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Jerome; Lucas, Bruno; DInardo, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    The prime objective of the SEOM (Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions) element is to federate, support and expand the large international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have build up over the last 20 years for the future European operational Earth Observation missions, the Sentinels. Sentinel-3 builds directly on a proven heritage of ERS-2 and Envisat, and CryoSat-2, with a dual-frequency (Ku and C band) advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Altimeter (SRAL) that provides measurements at a resolution of ~300m in SAR mode along track. Sentinel-3 will provide exact measurements of sea-surface height along with accurate topography measurements over sea ice, ice sheets, rivers and lakes. The first of the two Sentinels is expected to be launched in early 2015. The current universal altimetry toolbox is BRAT (Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry mission's data, but it does not have the capabilities to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA will endeavour to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats, the BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with Matlab/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as netCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth

  18. A Simple Model for a SARS Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Keng Cheng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the use of an ordinary differential equation in modelling the SARS outbreak in Singapore. The model provides an excellent example of using mathematics in a real life situation. The mathematical concepts involved are accessible to students with A level Mathematics backgrounds. Data for the SARS epidemic in Singapore are…

  19. Joint Offshore Wind Field Monitoring with Spaceborne SAR and Platform-Based Doppler LIDAR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, S.; Lehner, S.; Hieronimus, J.; Schneemann, J.; Kuhn, M.

    2015-04-01

    The increasing demand for renewable energy resources has promoted the construction of offshore wind farms e.g. in the North Sea. While the wind farm layout consists of an array of large turbines, the interrelation of wind turbine wakes with the remaining array is of substantial interest. The downstream spatial evolution of turbulent wind turbine wakes is very complex and depends on manifold parameters such as wind speed, wind direction and ambient atmospheric stability conditions. To complement and validate existing numerical models, corresponding observations are needed. While in-situ measurements with e.g. anemometers provide a time-series at the given location, the merits of ground-based and space- or airborne remote sensing techniques are indisputable in terms of spatial coverage. Active microwave devices, such as Scatterometer and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), have proven their capabilities of providing sea surface wind measurements and particularly SAR images reveal wind variations at a high spatial resolution while retaining the large coverage area. Platform-based Doppler LiDAR can resolve wind fields with a high spatial coverage and repetition rates of seconds to minutes. In order to study the capabilities of both methods for the investigation of small scale wind field structures, we present a direct comparison of observations obtained by high resolution TerraSAR-X (TS-X) X-band SAR data and platform-based LiDAR devices at the North Sea wind farm alpha ventus. We furthermore compare the results with meteorological data from the COSMO-DE model run by the German Weather Service DWD. Our study indicates that the overall agreement between SAR and LiDAR wind fields is good and that under appropriate conditions small scale wind field variations compare significantly well.

  20. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  1. SAR processing using SHARC signal processing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huxtable, Barton D.; Jackson, Christopher R.; Skaron, Steve A.

    1998-09-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is uniquely suited to help solve the Search and Rescue problem since it can be utilized either day or night and through both dense fog or thick cloud cover. Other papers in this session, and in this session in 1997, describe the various SAR image processing algorithms that are being developed and evaluated within the Search and Rescue Program. All of these approaches to using SAR data require substantial amounts of digital signal processing: for the SAR image formation, and possibly for the subsequent image processing. In recognition of the demanding processing that will be required for an operational Search and Rescue Data Processing System (SARDPS), NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and NASA/Stennis Space Center are conducting a technology demonstration utilizing SHARC multi-chip modules from Boeing to perform SAR image formation processing.

  2. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  3. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  4. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  5. Validation of burst overlapping for ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 ScanSAR-ScanSAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsuaki, Ryo; Motohka, Takeshi; Ohki, Masato; Watanabe, Manabu; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2016-10-01

    The Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) aboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite- 2 (ALOS-2, "DAICHI-2") is the latest L-band spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). PALSAR-2 observes the world mainly with 10 m resolution / 70 km swath Stripmap mode and 25 m resolution / 350 km swath ScanSAR mode. The 3-m resolution Stripmap mode is mainly used upon Japan. 350 km ScanSAR observation could detect large scale deformation e.g., the Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake and its aftershocks in 2015. ALOS-2 ScanSAR is the first one that supports ScanSAR-ScanSAR interferometry in L-band spaceborne SAR. However, because of the parameter setting error for the orbit estimation, ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 ScanSAR could achieve little number of interferometric pair until the software modification on February 8, 2015. That is, the burst overlap timing required for the interferometric analysis was insufficient and it depends on the observation date. In this paper, we report the investigation results of this case and discuss the current status of the ALOS-2 ScanSAR InSAR. Some archives achieved before February 8, 2015 can be used for interferometric analysis with after Feb. 8. However, most of them have no interferometric pair. We also report that the archives acquired after February 8, have enough burst overlapping.

  6. Updated progress in theories and applications of spaceborne SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Ling; Huang, Cheng; Ding, Xiao-Li; Li, Zhi-Wei

    2006-12-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) and D-InSAR (Differential InSAR) are rapidly developed new technologies of space geodesy during the late 20th century, and now obviously become hot research topics in the field of microwave remote sensing. Compared with the other sensors, InSAR possesses many incomparable advantages such as the capability to work at all-time and under all weather, very high spatial resolution and strong penetrability through the ground surface. This paper introduces general status of SAR, InSAR, D-InSAR technology, and the principles of InSAR and D-InSAR. New theories and the potential problems of (D-)InSAR technology are largely discussed, including multi-baseline interferometry, Pol-InSAR technique, the correction of atmospheric effects, permanent Scatterers method, the synthesization technique between InSAR and GPS, LIDAR etc., and the InSAR parallel algorithm. Then the new applications of InSAR and D-InSAR are described in detail including 3D topographic mapping, deformation monitoring (including surface subsidence, landside monitoring and ITRF's foundation and maintenance, etc.), thematic mapping (including agriculture and forestry, oceanic surveying and flood monitoring, etc.) and meteorology etc.. Finally, the prospect and future trends in InSAR development are summarized.

  7. Antenna motion errors in bistatic SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Yazıcı, Birsen; Cagri Yanik, H.

    2015-06-01

    Antenna trajectory or motion errors are pervasive in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. Motion errors typically result in smearing and positioning errors in SAR images. Understanding the relationship between the trajectory errors and position errors in reconstructed images is essential in forming focused SAR images. Existing studies on the effect of antenna motion errors are limited to certain geometries, trajectory error models or monostatic SAR configuration. In this paper, we present an analysis of position errors in bistatic SAR imagery due to antenna motion errors. Bistatic SAR imagery is becoming increasingly important in the context of passive imaging and multi-sensor imaging. Our analysis provides an explicit quantitative relationship between the trajectory errors and the positioning errors in bistatic SAR images. The analysis is applicable to arbitrary trajectory errors and arbitrary imaging geometries including wide apertures and large scenes. We present extensive numerical simulations to validate the analysis and to illustrate the results in commonly used bistatic configurations and certain trajectory error models.

  8. Graph mining for SAR transfer series.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Wawer, Mathias; Wassermann, Anne Mai; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2012-04-23

    The transfer of SAR information from one analog series to another is a difficult, yet highly attractive task in medicinal chemistry. At present, the evaluation of SAR transfer potential from a data mining perspective is still in its infancy. Only recently, a first computational approach has been introduced to evaluate SAR transfer events. Here, a substructure relationship-based molecular network representation has been used as a starting point to systematically identify SAR transfer series in large compound data sets. For this purpose, a methodology is introduced that consists of two stages. For graph mining, an algorithm has been designed that extracts all parallel series from compound data sets. A parallel series is formed by two series of analogs with different core structures but pairwise corresponding substitution patterns. The SAR transfer potential of identified parallel series is then evaluated using a scoring function that emphasizes corresponding potency progression over many analog pairs and large potency ranges. The substructure relationship-based molecular network in combination with the graph mining algorithm currently represents the only generally applicable approach to systematically detect SAR transfer events in large compound data sets. The combined approach has been evaluated on a large number of compound data sets and shown to systematically identify SAR transfer series.

  9. The Alaska SAR processor - Operations and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carande, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    The Alaska SAR (synthetic-aperture radar) Facility (ASF) will be capable of receiving, processing, archiving, and producing a variety of SAR image products from three satellite-borne SARs: E-ERS-1 (ESA), J-ERS-1 (NASDA) and Radarsat (Canada). Crucial to the success of the ASF is the Alaska SAR processor (ASP), which will be capable of processing over 200 100-km x 100-km (Seasat-like) frames per day from the raw SAR data, at a ground resolution of about 30 m x 30 m. The processed imagery is of high geometric and radiometric accuracy, and is geolocated to within 500 m. Special-purpose hardware has been designed to execute a SAR processing algorithm to achieve this performance. This hardware is currently undergoing acceptance testing for delivery to the University of Alaska. Particular attention has been devoted to making the operations semi-automated and to providing a friendly operator interface via a computer workstation. The operations and control of the Alaska SAR processor are described.

  10. SAR and LIDAR fusion: experiments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew C.; Zaugg, Evan C.; Bradley, Joshua P.; Bowden, Ryan D.

    2013-05-01

    In recent years ARTEMIS, Inc. has developed a series of compact, versatile Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems which have been operated on a variety of small manned and unmanned aircraft. The multi-frequency-band SlimSAR has demonstrated a variety of capabilities including maritime and littoral target detection, ground moving target indication, polarimetry, interferometry, change detection, and foliage penetration. ARTEMIS also continues to build upon the radar's capabilities through fusion with other sensors, such as electro-optical and infrared camera gimbals and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) devices. In this paper we focus on experiments and applications employing SAR and LIDAR fusion. LIDAR is similar to radar in that it transmits a signal which, after being reflected or scattered by a target area, is recorded by the sensor. The differences are that a LIDAR uses a laser as a transmitter and optical sensors as a receiver, and the wavelengths used exhibit a very different scattering phenomenology than the microwaves used in radar, making SAR and LIDAR good complementary technologies. LIDAR is used in many applications including agriculture, archeology, geo-science, and surveying. Some typical data products include digital elevation maps of a target area and features and shapes extracted from the data. A set of experiments conducted to demonstrate the fusion of SAR and LIDAR data include a LIDAR DEM used in accurately processing the SAR data of a high relief area (mountainous, urban). Also, feature extraction is used in improving geolocation accuracy of the SAR and LIDAR data.

  11. Polarization differences in airborne ground penetrating radar performance for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogaru, Traian; Le, Calvin

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has investigated the ultra-wideband (UWB) radar technology for detection of landmines, improvised explosive devices and unexploded ordnance, for over two decades. This paper presents a phenomenological study of the radar signature of buried landmines in realistic environments and the performance of airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in detecting these targets as a function of multiple parameters: polarization, depression angle, soil type and burial depth. The investigation is based on advanced computer models developed at ARL. The analysis includes both the signature of the targets of interest and the clutter produced by rough surface ground. Based on our numerical simulations, we conclude that low depression angles and H-H polarization offer the highest target-to-clutter ratio in the SAR images and therefore the best radar performance of all the scenarios investigated.

  12. Low cost realization of space-borne synthectic aperture radar - MicroSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, D.; Hall, C.

    Spaceborne Earth Observation data has been used for decades in the areas of meteorology and optical imaging. The systems and satellites have, in the main, been owned and operated by a few government institutions and agencies. More recently industrial organizations in North America have joined the list. Few of these, however, include Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)., although the additional utility in terms of all weather, 24 hour measurement capability over the Earth's surface is well recognized. Three major factors explain this:1) Relationships between the SAR measurements of radar backscatter and images to the specific information needs have not been seen as sufficiently well understood or robust2) Availability of suitable sources, at the relevant performance and data quality have been inadequate to provide service assurance that is necessary to sustain commercial businesses3) Costs associated with building, launching and operating spaceborne SAR have not been low enough as to achieve an acceptable return of investment. A significant amount of research and development has been undertaken throughout the World to establish reliable and robust algorithms for information extraction from SAR data. Much of this work has been carried out utilizing airborne systems over localized and carefully controlled regions. In addition, an increasing number of pilot services have been offered by geo-information providers. This has allowed customer confidence to grow. With the status of spaceborne SAR being effectively in the development phase, commercial funding has been scarce, and there has been need to rely on government and institutional budgets. Today the increasing maturity of the technology of SAR and its applications is beginning to attract the commercial sector. This is the funding necessary to realize sufficient assets to be able to provide a robust supply of SAR data to the geo-information providers and subsequently a reliable service to customers. Reducing the costs

  13. Land Subsidence Monitoring Using PS-InSAR Technique for L-Band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, S.; Chatterjee, R. S.; Singh, K. B.; Kumar, D.

    2016-10-01

    Differential SAR-Interferometry (D-InSAR) is one of the potential source to measure land surface motion induced due to underground coal mining. However, this technique has many limitation such as atmospheric in homogeneities, spatial de-correlation, and temporal decorrelation. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry synthetic aperture radar (PS-InSAR) belongs to a family of time series InSAR technique, which utilizes the properties of some of the stable natural and anthropogenic targets which remain coherent over long time period. In this study PS-InSAR technique has been used to monitor land subsidence over selected location of Jharia Coal field which has been correlated with the ground levelling measurement. This time series deformation observed using PS InSAR helped us to understand the nature of the ground surface deformation due to underground mining activity.

  14. Primary studies of Chinese spaceborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhen-Song; Wu, Guo-Xiang; Guo, Hua-Dong; Wei, Zhong-Quan; Zhu, Min-Hui

    1993-01-01

    The primary studies on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in China are discussed. The SAR will be launched aboard a Chinese satellite and operated at L-band with HH polarization. The purpose of the mission in consideration is dedicated to resources and environment uses, especially to natural disaster monitoring. The ground resolution is designed as 25 m x 25 m for detailed mode and 100 m x 100 m for wide scan-SAR mode. The off-nadir angle can be varied from 20 to 40 deg. The key system concepts are introduced.

  15. NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, N. (Editor); Evans, D. L. (Editor); Held, D. N. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Speaker-supplied summaries of the talks given at the NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop on February 4 and 5, 1985, are provided. These talks dealt mostly with composite quadpolarization imagery from a geologic or ecologic prespective. An overview and summary of the system characteristics of the L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) flown on the NASA CV-990 aircraft are included as supplementary information. Other topics ranging from phase imagery and interferometric techniques classifications of specific areas, and the potentials and limitations of SAR imagery in various applications are discussed.

  16. SAR observations of coastal zone conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, G. A.; Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology to the observation of coastal zones phenomena are detailed. The conditions observed include gravity wave detection, surf zone location, surface currents, and long-period 'surf beats'. Algorithms have been developed and successfully tested that determine significant wave and current parameters from the sea surface backscatter of microwave energy. Doppler information from the SAR optical correlator allows a rough estimation of near shore surface flow velocities that has been found in agreement with both theory and in situ observations as well. Seasat SAR data of the Scotland and North Carolina coasts are considered, as well as the results of bathymetric updating of coastal area charts.

  17. Imaging of Ocean Waves by SAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    SAR o Contract N00014-87-C-0687N TDTIC R.L. Schult iZ L E C T E F.S. Henyey -JAN 2 4 1989 J.A. Wright Center for Studies of Nonlinear Dynamics La...Waves by SAR R.L. Schult F.S. Henyey J.A. Wright Center for Studies of Nonlinear Dynamics La Jolla Institute 7855 Fay Avenue, Suite 320 La Jolla...TOWARD data. 467.abstract 7-13-󈨜 Imaging of Ocean Waves by SAR 1. Introduction Synthetic Aperture Radar images of long-wavelength features on the

  18. Segmentation Of Multifrequency, Multilook SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Kwok, Ronald; Chellappa, Rama

    1993-01-01

    Segmentation of multifrequency, multilook synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) image intensity data into regions, within each of which backscattering characteristics of target scene considered homogeneous, enhanced by use of two statistical models. One represents statistics of multifrequency, multilook speckled intensities of SAR picture elements; other represents statistics of labels applied to regions into which picture elements grouped. Each region represents different type of terrain, terrain cover, or other surface; e.g., forest, agricultural land, sea ice, or water. Segmentation of image into regions of neighboring picture elements accomplished by method similar to that described in "Algorithms For Segmentation Of Complex-Amplitude SAR Data" (NPO-18524).

  19. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  20. AlpSAR 2012-13, A Field Experiment On Snow Observations And Parameter Retrievals With KU- And X-Band Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rott, Helmut; Nagler, Thomas; Prinz, Rainer; Voglmeier, Karl; Fromm, Reinhard; Adams, Marc S.; Yueh, Simon; Elder, Kelly; Marshall, Hans-Peter; Coccia, Alex; Imbembo, Ernesto; Schuttemeyer, Dirk; Kern, Michael

    2013-12-01

    In winter 2012-13 the AlpSAR field experiment was performed in the Austrian Alps, with the objective to acquire an experimental data base on Ku- and X-band radar backscatter of snow by means of airborne SAR, together with detailed co-located field measurements. Comprehensive data sets on physical properties of snow were acquired in three different alpine snow zones during campaigns spanning from early to late winter season. The data sets include detailed measurements of stratigraphy and physical properties of snow, and measurements of snow depth along transects in order to obtain spatially detailed patterns of snow accumulation, using conventional techniques and portable radar sounders. These data sets, together with the acquired SnowSAR backscatter images, offer excellent possibilities for development and validation of forward and inversion models on radar interaction with snow.

  1. Atmosphere Observations by Geosynchronous SARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti guarnieri, Andrea; Rocca, Fabio; Wadge, Geoff; Schulz, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    We analyze different geosynchronous Synthetic Aperture RADAR concepts aimed to get both tropospheric and ionospheric delay maps with a revisit time of minutes and sub-continental coverage. Such products could be used either to compensate the delay in LEO-SAR missions and GNSS, or to generate integrated water-vapor maps to be used for Numerical Weather Forecast. The system exploits the principle of RADAR location, by transmitting a pulse with a suitable bandwidth, and the residual non-zero eccentricity of COMmunication SATellites. Different concepts are proposed as payload in COMSAT, or constellations of small satellites, that is monostatic or bistatic/multistatic RADARS. The selection of the best frequency, from L to Ku, and the analysis of performances is presented.

  2. Combined DEM Extration Method from StereoSAR and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Zhang, J. X.; Duan, M. Y.; Huang, G. M.; Yang, S. C.

    2015-06-01

    A pair of SAR images acquired from different positions can be used to generate digital elevation model (DEM). Two techniques exploiting this characteristic have been introduced: stereo SAR and interferometric SAR. They permit to recover the third dimension (topography) and, at the same time, to identify the absolute position (geolocation) of pixels included in the imaged area, thus allowing the generation of DEMs. In this paper, StereoSAR and InSAR combined adjustment model are constructed, and unify DEM extraction from InSAR and StereoSAR into the same coordinate system, and then improve three dimensional positioning accuracy of the target. We assume that there are four images 1, 2, 3 and 4. One pair of SAR images 1,2 meet the required conditions for InSAR technology, while the other pair of SAR images 3,4 can form stereo image pairs. The phase model is based on InSAR rigorous imaging geometric model. The master image 1 and the slave image 2 will be used in InSAR processing, but the slave image 2 is only used in the course of establishment, and the pixels of the slave image 2 are relevant to the corresponding pixels of the master image 1 through image coregistration coefficient, and it calculates the corresponding phase. It doesn't require the slave image in the construction of the phase model. In Range-Doppler (RD) model, the range equation and Doppler equation are a function of target geolocation, while in the phase equation, the phase is also a function of target geolocation. We exploit combined adjustment model to deviation of target geolocation, thus the problem of target solution is changed to solve three unkonwns through seven equations. The model was tested for DEM extraction under spaceborne InSAR and StereoSAR data and compared with InSAR and StereoSAR methods respectively. The results showed that the model delivered a better performance on experimental imagery and can be used for DEM extraction applications.

  3. Airborne rescue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The airborne rescue system includes a boom with telescoping members for extending a line and collar to a rescue victim. The boom extends beyond the tip of the helicopter rotor so that the victim may avoid the rotor downwash. The rescue line is played out and reeled in by winch. The line is temporarily retained under the boom. When the boom is extended, the rescue line passes through clips. When the victim dons the collar and the tension in the line reaches a predetermined level, the clips open and release the line from the boom. Then the rescue line can form a straight line between the victim and the winch, and the victim can be lifted to the helicopter. A translator is utilized to push out or pull in the telescoping members. The translator comprises a tape and a rope. Inside the telescoping members the tape is curled around the rope and the tape has a tube-like configuration. The tape and rope are provided from supply spools.

  4. A History of U.S. Navy Airborne and Shipboard Periscope Detection Radar Design and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    JH U/ AP L, NR L, TI SH AR EM 12 5 a nd ot he r t es ts in Me dit er ra ne an 19 99 Fle et de mo – air (fir st air te st on N RL...transmitter and a more sensitive receiver, which enabled improved detection ranges against surfaced U-boats.6 By far the most notable and exciting ...the ONR investigations into using SAR for periscope detection were discontinued. Airborne ARPDD By far the most exciting and technically challenging

  5. Predictive models of control strategies involved in containing indoor airborne infections.

    PubMed

    Chen, S-C; Chang, C-F; Liao, C-M

    2006-12-01

    Recently developed control measure modeling approaches for containing airborne infections, including engineering controls with respiratory protection and public health interventions, are readily amenable to an integrated-scale analysis. Here we show that such models can be derived from an integrated-scale analysis generated from three different types of functional relationship: Wells-Riley mathematical model, competing-risks model, and Von Foerster equation, both of the key epidemiological determinants involved and of the functional connections between them. We examine mathematically the impact of engineering control measures such as enhanced air exchange and air filtration rates with personal masking combined with public health interventions such as vaccination, isolation, and contact tracing in containing the spread of indoor airborne infections including influenza, chickenpox, measles, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). If enhanced engineering controls could reduce the basic reproductive number (R0) below 1.60 for chickenpox and 3 for measles, our simulations show that in such a prepared response with public health interventions would have a high probability of containing the indoor airborne infections. Combinations of engineering control measures and public health interventions could moderately contain influenza strains with an R0 as high as 4. Our analysis indicates that effective isolation of symptomatic patients with low-efficacy contact tracing is sufficient to control a SARS outbreak. We suggest that a valuable added dimension to public health inventions could be provided by systematically quantifying transmissibility and proportion of asymptomatic infection of indoor airborne infection. Practical Implications We have developed a flexible mathematical model that can help determine the best intervention strategies for containing indoor airborne infections. The approach presented here is scalable and can be extended to include additional control

  6. Statistical modeling of SAR images: a survey.

    PubMed

    Gao, Gui

    2010-01-01

    Statistical modeling is essential to SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) image interpretation. It aims to describe SAR images through statistical methods and reveal the characteristics of these images. Moreover, statistical modeling can provide a technical support for a comprehensive understanding of terrain scattering mechanism, which helps to develop algorithms for effective image interpretation and creditable image simulation. Numerous statistical models have been developed to describe SAR image data, and the purpose of this paper is to categorize and evaluate these models. We first summarize the development history and the current researching state of statistical modeling, then different SAR image models developed from the product model are mainly discussed in detail. Relevant issues are also discussed. Several promising directions for future research are concluded at last.

  7. Enhanced SAR Data Compressor for Sentinel-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algra, T.; Bierens, L.

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents a new on-board SAR data compressor which outperforms the conventionally used Block Adaptive Quantization (BAQ) compressor. The system applies improved entropy-constrained block adaptive quantization of raw Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data in the frequency domain. For advanced multi-mode satellite SAR instruments, such as the one to be implemented on-board of Sentinel- , the average compression ratio can be doubled as compared to BAQ. Space borne implementation with a high-speed data throughput is feasible due to the advent of advanced space FPGA's and ASIC's including the powerFFT, a fast FFT-oriented DSP. The complete compressor module can be implemented on a 6U Eurocard that fits in the SAR Electronics System crate of Sentinel-1.

  8. Tracking ocean wave spectrum from SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A. D.; Beal, R. C.; Monaldo, F. M.; Tilley, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    An end to end algorithm for recovery of ocean wave spectral peaks from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is described. Current approaches allow precisions of 1 percent in wave number, and 0.6 deg in direction.

  9. Formation Flying for Distributed InSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel P.; Murray, Emmanuell A.; Ploen, Scott R.; Gromov, Konstantin G.; Chen, Curtis W.

    2006-01-01

    We consider two spacecraft flying in formation to create interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Several candidate orbits for such in InSar formation have been previously determined based on radar performance and Keplerian orbital dynamics. However, with out active control, disturbance-induced drift can degrade radar performance and (in the worst case) cause a collision. This study evaluates the feasibility of operating the InSAR spacecraft as a formation, that is, with inner-spacecraft sensing and control. We describe the candidate InSAR orbits, design formation guidance and control architectures and algorithms, and report the (Delta)(nu) and control acceleration requirements for the candidate orbits for several tracking performance levels. As part of determining formation requirements, a formation guidance algorithm called Command Virtual Structure is introduced that can reduce the (Delta)(nu) requirements compared to standard Leader/Follower formation approaches.

  10. Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Evaluation in Mangroves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung-Kuk; Fatoyinbo,Temilola; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sun, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    TanDEM-X (TDX) enables to generate an interferometric coherence without temporal decorrelation effect that is the most critical factor for a successful Pol-InSAR inversion, as have recently been used for forest parameter retrieval. This paper presents mangrove forest height estimation only using single-pass/single-baseline/dual-polarization TDX data by means of new dual-Pol-InSAR inversion technique. To overcome a lack of one polarization in a conventional Pol- InSAR inversion (i.e. an underdetermined problem), the ground phase in the Pol-InSAR model is directly estimated from TDX interferograms assuming flat underlying topography in mangrove forest. The inversion result is validated against lidar measurement data (NASA's G-LiHT data).

  11. SAR/LANDSAT image registration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphrey, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Temporal registration of synthetic aperture radar data with LANDSAT-MSS data is both feasible (from a technical standpoint) and useful (from an information-content viewpoint). The greatest difficulty in registering aircraft SAR data to corrected LANDSAT-MSS data is control-point location. The differences in SAR and MSS data impact the selection of features that will serve as a good control points. The SAR and MSS data are unsuitable for automatic computer correlation of digital control-point data. The gray-level data can not be compared by the computer because of the different response characteristics of the MSS and SAR images.

  12. SAR Ambiguity Study for the Cassini Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Im, Eastwood; Johnson, William T. K.

    1993-01-01

    The Cassini Radar's synthetic aperture radar (SAR) ambiguity analysis is unique with respect to other spaceborne SAR ambiguity analyses owing to the non-orbiting spacecraft trajectory, asymmetric antenna pattern, and burst mode of data collection. By properly varying the pointing, burst mode timing, and radar parameters along the trajectory this study shows that the signal-to-ambiguity ratio of better than 15 dB can be achieved for all images obtained by the Cassini Radar.

  13. SARS: Down But Still a Threat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    economic and political impact. • Although SARS has killed far fewer people than die each year from more common maladies such as pneumonia, influenza...is not necessarily authoritative. DI Cartography Center/MPG 764135AI 8-03 All of these diseases, except cholera , dengue, and diphtheria, are... Cholera O1 Dengue/Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Cholera O139 Dengue 9 Discussion SARS: Down But Still a Threat The Global Health Challenge

  14. Introduction to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Lynx 1999 10 cm × 10 cm Ku MISAR 2003 0.5 m × 0.5 m Ka RAMSES 1994 10 cm × 10 cm P,L,S,C,X,Ku,Ka,W MEMPHIS 1997 20 cm × 20 cm Ka,W E-SAR 1994 1.5...Bamler, I. G. Cumming and F. H. Wong , Precision SAR processing using chirp scaling, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 32, No. 4

  15. Classification Of Terrain In Polarimetric SAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Kong, Jin A.; Shin, Robert T.; Lim, Harold; Swartz, Albert; Yueh, Simon H.

    1993-01-01

    Two algorithms processing polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar data found effective in assigning various parts of SAR images to classes representing different types of terrain. Partially automate interpretation of SAR imagery, reducing amount of photointerpretation needed and putting whole interpretation process on more quantitative and systematic basis. First algorithm implements Bayesian classification scheme "supervised" by use of training data. Second algorithm implements classification procedure unsupervised.

  16. Bacteriorhodopsin Film For Processing SAR Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jeffrey W.; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Margalit, Ruth; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1992-01-01

    "Instant" photographic film based on semisynthetic retinal pigment bacteriorhodopsin proposed for optical processing of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) signals. Input image recorded on film by laser operating at writing wavelength of bacteriorhodopsin, and output image recorded on computer by standard frame-grabber. Because it requires no chemical development, enables processing in nearly real time. Fast response and high resolution well suited for application. Film reusable, with concomitant reduction in cost of SAR processing.

  17. Automatic polar ice thickness estimation from SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnemoonfar, Maryam; Yari, Masoud; Fox, Geoffrey C.

    2016-05-01

    Global warming has caused serious damage to our environment in recent years. Accelerated loss of ice from Greenland and Antarctica has been observed in recent decades. The melting of polar ice sheets and mountain glaciers has a considerable influence on sea level rise and altering ocean currents, potentially leading to the flooding of the coastal regions and putting millions of people around the world at risk. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are able to provide relevant information about subsurface structure of polar ice sheets. Manual layer identification is prohibitively tedious and expensive and is not practical for regular, longterm ice-sheet monitoring. Automatic layer finding in noisy radar images is quite challenging due to huge amount of noise, limited resolution and variations in ice layers and bedrock. Here we propose an approach which automatically detects ice surface and bedrock boundaries using distance regularized level set evolution. In this approach the complex topology of ice and bedrock boundary layers can be detected simultaneously by evolving an initial curve in radar imagery. Using a distance regularized term, the regularity of the level set function is intrinsically maintained that solves the reinitialization issues arising from conventional level set approaches. The results are evaluated on a large dataset of airborne radar imagery collected during IceBridge mission over Antarctica and Greenland and show promising results in respect to hand-labeled ground truth.

  18. ESA airborne campaigns in support of Earth Explorers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, Tania; Davidson, Malcolm; Schuettemeyer, Dirk; Perrera, Andrea; Bianchi, Remo

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of its Earth Observation Programmes the European Space Agency (ESA) carries out ground based and airborne campaigns to support geophysical algorithm development, calibration/validation, simulation of future spaceborne earth observation missions, and applications development related to land, oceans and atmosphere. ESA has been conducting airborne and ground measurements campaigns since 1981 by deploying a broad range of active and passive instrumentation in both the optical and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum such as lidars, limb/nadir sounding interferometers/spectrometers, high-resolution spectral imagers, advanced synthetic aperture radars, altimeters and radiometers. These campaigns take place inside and outside Europe in collaboration with national research organisations in the ESA member states as well as with international organisations harmonising European campaign activities. ESA campaigns address all phases of a spaceborne missions, from the very beginning of the design phase during which exploratory or proof-of-concept campaigns are carried out to the post-launch exploitation phase for calibration and validation. We present four recent campaigns illustrating the objectives and implementation of such campaigns. Wavemill Proof Of Concept, an exploratory campaign to demonstrate feasibility of a future Earth Explorer (EE) mission, took place in October 2011 in the Liverpool Bay area in the UK. The main objectives, successfully achieved, were to test Astrium UKs new airborne X-band SAR instrument capability to obtain high resolution ocean current and topology retrievals. Results showed that new airborne instrument is able to retrieve ocean currents to an accuracy of ± 10 cms-1. The IceSAR2012 campaign was set up to support of ESA's EE Candidate 7,BIOMASS. Its main objective was to document P-band radiometric signatures over ice-sheets, by upgrading ESA's airborne POLARIS P-band radar ice sounder with SAR capability. Campaign

  19. Optimization of a DNA vaccine against SARS.

    PubMed

    Zakhartchouk, Alexander N; Viswanathan, Sathiyanarayanan; Moshynskyy, Igor; Petric, Martin; Babiuk, Lorne A

    2007-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) first appeared in Southern China in November 2002, and then quickly spread to 33 countries on five continents along international air travel routes. Although the SARS epidemic has been contained, there is a clear need for a safe and effective vaccine should an outbreak of a SARS-CoV infection reappear in human population. In this study, we tested four DNA-vaccine constructs: (1) pLL70, containing cDNA for the SARS-CoV spike (S) gene; (2) pcDNA-SS, containing codon-optimized S gene for SARS-CoV S protein (residues 12-1255) fused with a leader sequence derived from the human CD5 gene; (3) pcDNA-St, containing the gene encoding the N-portion of the codon-optimized S gene (residues 12-532) with the CD5 leader sequence; (4) pcDNA-St-VP22C, containing the gene encoding the N-portion of the codon-optimized S protein with the CD5 leader sequence fused with the C-terminal 138 amino acids of the bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) major tegument protein VP22. Each of these plasmids was intradermally administered to C57BL/6 mice in three separate immunizations. Analysis of humoral and cellular immune responses in immunized mice demonstrated that pcDNA-SS and pcDNA-St-VP22C are the most immunogenic SARS vaccine candidates.

  20. SARS: Key factors in crisis management.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsin-Chao; Chen, Thai-Form; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted at a single hospital selected in Taipei during the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak from March to July, 2003 in Taiwan. During this period of time, 104 SARS patients were admitted to the hospital. There were no negative reports related to the selected hospital despite its being located right in the center of an area struck by the epidemic. The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors enabling the hospital to survive SARS unscathed. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with the nursing directors and nursing managers of the SARS units, along with a review of relevant hospital documents. The five key elements identified as survival factors during this SARS crisis are as follows: 1. good control of timing for crisis management, 2. careful decision-making, 3. thorough implementation, 4. effective communication, and 5. trust between management and employees. The results of this study reconfirmed the selected hospital as a model for good crisis management during the SARS epidemic.

  1. Ionospheric Specifications for SAR Interferometry (ISSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Chapman, Bruce D; Freeman, Anthony; Szeliga, Walter; Buckley, Sean M.; Rosen, Paul A.; Lavalle, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The ISSI software package is designed to image the ionosphere from space by calibrating and processing polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data collected from low Earth orbit satellites. Signals transmitted and received by a PolSAR are subject to the Faraday rotation effect as they traverse the magnetized ionosphere. The ISSI algorithms combine the horizontally and vertically polarized (with respect to the radar system) SAR signals to estimate Faraday rotation and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) with spatial resolutions of sub-kilometers to kilometers, and to derive radar system calibration parameters. The ISSI software package has been designed and developed to integrate the algorithms, process PolSAR data, and image as well as visualize the ionospheric measurements. A number of tests have been conducted using ISSI with PolSAR data collected from various latitude regions using the phase array-type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) onboard Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Advanced Land Observing Satellite mission, and also with Global Positioning System data. These tests have demonstrated and validated SAR-derived ionospheric images and data correction algorithms.

  2. Curved PVDF airborne transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Toda, M

    1999-01-01

    In the application of airborne ultrasonic ranging measurement, a partially cylindrical (curved) PVDF transducer can effectively couple ultrasound into the air and generate strong sound pressure. Because of its geometrical features, the ultrasound beam angles of a curved PVDF transducer can be unsymmetrical (i.e., broad horizontally and narrow vertically). This feature is desired in some applications. In this work, a curved PVDF air transducer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Two resonances were observed in this transducer. They are length extensional mode and flexural bending mode. Surface vibration profiles of these two modes were measured by a laser vibrometer. It was found from the experiment that the surface vibration was not uniform along the curvature direction for both vibration modes. Theoretical calculations based on a model developed in this work confirmed the experimental results. Two displacement peaks were found in the piezoelectric active direction of PVDF film for the length extensional mode; three peaks were found for the flexural bending mode. The observed peak positions were in good agreement with the calculation results. Transient surface displacement measurements revealed that vibration peaks were in phase for the length extensional mode and out of phase for the flexural bending mode. Therefore, the length extensional mode can generate a stronger ultrasound wave than the flexural bending mode. The resonance frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the two modes strongly depend on the structure parameters as well as the material properties. For the transducer design, the theoretical model developed in this work can be used to optimize the ultrasound performance.

  3. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  4. Role of mechanical ventilation in the airborne transmission of infectious agents in buildings.

    PubMed

    Luongo, J C; Fennelly, K P; Keen, J A; Zhai, Z J; Jones, B W; Miller, S L

    2016-10-01

    Infectious disease outbreaks and epidemics such as those due to SARS, influenza, measles, tuberculosis, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus have raised concern about the airborne transmission of pathogens in indoor environments. Significant gaps in knowledge still exist regarding the role of mechanical ventilation in airborne pathogen transmission. This review, prepared by a multidisciplinary group of researchers, focuses on summarizing the strengths and limitations of epidemiologic studies that specifically addressed the association of at least one heating, ventilating and/or air-conditioning (HVAC) system-related parameter with airborne disease transmission in buildings. The purpose of this literature review was to assess the quality and quantity of available data and to identify research needs. This review suggests that there is a need for well-designed observational and intervention studies in buildings with better HVAC system characterization and measurements of both airborne exposures and disease outcomes. Studies should also be designed so that they may be used in future quantitative meta-analyses.

  5. High Resolution Digital Surface Model For Production Of Airport Obstruction Charts Using Spaceborne SAR Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Henrique; Rodrigues, Marco; Radius, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Airport Obstruction Charts (AOCs) are graphical representations of natural or man-made obstructions (its locations and heights) around airfields, according to International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Annexes 4, 14 and 15. One of the most important types of data used in AOCs production/update tasks is a Digital Surface Model (first reflective surface) of the surveyed area. The development of advanced remote sensing technologies provide the available tools for obstruction data acquisition, while Geographic Information Systems (GIS) present the perfect platform for storing and analyzing this type of data, enabling the production of digital ACOs, greatly contributing to the increase of the situational awareness of pilots and enhancing the air navigation safety level [1]. Data acquisition corresponding to the first reflective surface can be obtained through the use of Airborne Laser-Scanning and Light Detection and Ranging (ALS/LIDAR) or Spaceborne SAR Systems. The need of surveying broad areas, like the entire territory of a state, shows that Spaceborne SAR systems are the most adequate in economic and feasibility terms of the process, to perform the monitoring and producing a high resolution Digital Surface Model (DSM). The high resolution DSM generation depends on many factors: the available data set, the used technique and the setting parameters. To increase the precision and obtain high resolution products, two techniques are available using a stack of data: the PS (Permanent Scatterers) technique [2], that uses large stack of data to identify many stable and coherent targets through multi- temporal analysis, removing the atmospheric contribution and to minimize the estimation errors, and the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique ([3],[4]), that relies on the use of small baseline SAR interferograms and on the application of the so called singular value decomposition (SVD) method, in order to link independent SAR acquisition data sets, separated by large

  6. Curvelet-based compressive sensing for InSAR raw data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Marcello G.; da Silva Pinho, Marcelo; Fernandes, David

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the compression performance of SAR raw data for interferometry applications collected by airborne from BRADAR (Brazilian SAR System operating in X and P bands) using the new approach based on compressive sensing (CS) to achieve an effective recovery with a good phase preserving. For this framework is desirable a real-time capability, where the collected data can be compressed to reduce onboard storage and bandwidth required for transmission. In the CS theory, a sparse unknown signals can be recovered from a small number of random or pseudo-random measurements by sparsity-promoting nonlinear recovery algorithms. Therefore, the original signal can be significantly reduced. To achieve the sparse representation of SAR signal, was done a curvelet transform. The curvelets constitute a directional frame, which allows an optimal sparse representation of objects with discontinuities along smooth curves as observed in raw data and provides an advanced denoising optimization. For the tests were made available a scene of 8192 x 2048 samples in range and azimuth in X-band with 2 m of resolution. The sparse representation was compressed using low dimension measurements matrices in each curvelet subband. Thus, an iterative CS reconstruction method based on IST (iterative soft/shrinkage threshold) was adjusted to recover the curvelets coefficients and then the original signal. To evaluate the compression performance were computed the compression ratio (CR), signal to noise ratio (SNR), and because the interferometry applications require more reconstruction accuracy the phase parameters like the standard deviation of the phase (PSD) and the mean phase error (MPE) were also computed. Moreover, in the image domain, a single-look complex image was generated to evaluate the compression effects. All results were computed in terms of sparsity analysis to provides an efficient compression and quality recovering appropriated for inSAR applications

  7. UAVSAR: InSAR and PolSAR Test Bed for the Proposed NI-SAR Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Hensley, S.; Lou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    UAVSAR, which first became operational in 2009, has served as an operational testbed for the NI-SAR L-band radar concept and a unique instrument in its own right. UAVSAR supports a broad array of basic and applied geoscience, covering on smaller scale all the disciplines NI-SAR would be able to address on a global scale. Although designed specifically to provide high accuracy repeated flight tracks and precise imaging geometry for InSAR-based solid earth studies, its fully polarimetric operation, low noise, and consistent calibration accuracy has made it a premier instrument for PolSAR-based studies also. Since 2009 it has successfully imaged more than 16 million km2 and >4300 quad-polarimetric data products are now publicly available online. Upgrades made in the last year to automate the repeat track processing serve as a model for generating large volumes of InSAR products: Since January 2014 more than 700 interferometric products have been released, exceeding the output of all previous years combined. Standardly available products now include browse images of all InSAR acquisitions and coregistered single-look complex image stacks suitable for standard time series analysis. Here we present an overview of the wide range of studies utilizing UAVSAR data including those based on polarimetry and pair-wise and times series interferometry, highlighting both the unique capabilities of UAVSAR and the ways in which NI-SAR would be able to dramatically extend the capabilities. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. WESTERN AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ASSESSMENT PROJECT RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) is to assess the deposition of airborne contaminants in Western National Parks, providing regional and local information on exposure, accumulation, impacts, and probable sources. This project is being desig...

  9. Assessing Natural Disaster Impacts and Recovery Using Multifrequency, Fully-Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Optical Remote Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissel, J. K.; Czuchlewski, K. R.; Kim, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Many natural disasters involving landslides, volcanic eruptions, fires, or floods entail terrain resurfacing, followed by subsequent recovery. Modern satellite and airborne remote sensing technologies, which combine broad spatial coverage and high spatial resolution with time-sequential site revisit capability, can provide important information on the extent and duration of major landscape disturbance. In humid climate settings, these hazards temporarily remove or replace a natural vegetation cover and in doing so, modify the physical properties of the land surface. In optical remote sensing, removal of vegetation alters surface albedo in the visible -- near infrared (V-NIR) waveband, particularly the high reflectance from vegetation in the NIR. For SAR remote sensing, removal of vegetation cover causes a change in dominant microwave scattering mechanism for the areas affected. SAR has operational advantages over optical sensors for rapid disaster assessment because of its day/night acquisition capability, the ability to ``see through'' smoke, clouds and dust, and the side-looking viewing geometry, which is an advantage whenever data collection directly above the site would prove dangerous. We show how multifrequency, fully-polarimetric airborne SAR data can be ``inverted'' for parameters that reflect scattering mechanism signatures diagnostic of different surface cover types. We apply a uniform approach to map landslides resulting from the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan, volcanic flows from the major 1996 eruption of Manam volcano in Papua New Guinea, and the extent of damage from the summer 2002 Rodeo -- Chediski wildfire in Arizona. In addition, earlier work has shown that multifrequency SAR polarimetric backscatter is sensitive to total above-ground biomass. This attribute can be exploited to calculate vegetation loss during a disaster and for assessment of regrowth during the recovery phase.

  10. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  11. Online Health Education on SARS to University Students during the SARS Outbreak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Mee Lian; Koh, David; Iyer, Prasad; Seow, Adeline; Goh, Lee Gan; Chia, Sin Eng; Lim, Meng Kin; Ng, Daniel; Ong, Choon Nam; Phua, Kai Hong; Tambyah, Paul; Chow, Vincent T K; Chew, Suok Kai; Chandran, Ravi; Lee, Hin Peng

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how online learning may be used to disseminate health information rapidly and widely to large university populations if there is an infectious disease outbreak. During the SARS outbreak in Singapore in 2003, a six-lesson elearning module on SARS was developed for a large university population of 32,000 students. The module…

  12. 20. OVERVIEW OF SAR3 COMPLEX, SHOWING FORMER RESIDENTIAL AREA, SAR3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. OVERVIEW OF SAR-3 COMPLEX, SHOWING FORMER RESIDENTIAL AREA, SAR-3 SWITCH RACK, MAINTENANCE YARD, AND GREENSPOT BRIDGE. NOTE ALSO LARGE PIPE CONDUCTING TAILRACE WATER INTO IRRIGATION SYSTEM. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. 23. OVERVIEW OF SAR3 AREA, SHOWING CORNER OF SAR3 WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. OVERVIEW OF SAR-3 AREA, SHOWING CORNER OF SAR-3 WITH TAILRACE, ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, TOILET SHED, AND RETAINING WALLS AT FORMER EMPLOYEE HOUSING SITE. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. PANORAMA 1/2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. Airborne transmission of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Jason M; Beren, Joel; Merkel, Tod J

    2012-09-15

    Pertussis is a contagious, acute respiratory illness caused by the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Although it is widely believed that transmission of B. pertussis occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets, no controlled study has ever documented airborne transmission of pertussis. We set out to determine if airborne transmission occurs between infected and naive animals, utilizing the baboon model of pertussis. Our results showed that 100% of exposed naive animals became infected even when physical contact was prevented, demonstrating that pertussis transmission occurs via aerosolized respiratory droplets.

  15. Performance evaluation of SAR/GMTI algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, Wendy; Pierson, William; Mcginnis, Ryan; Majumder, Uttam; Minardi, Michael; Sobota, David

    2016-05-01

    There is a history and understanding of exploiting moving targets within ground moving target indicator (GMTI) data, including methods for modeling performance. However, many assumptions valid for GMTI processing are invalid for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. For example, traditional GMTI processing assumes targets are exo-clutter and a system that uses a GMTI waveform, i.e. low bandwidth (BW) and low pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Conversely, SAR imagery is typically formed to focus data at zero Doppler and requires high BW and high PRF. Therefore, many of the techniques used in performance estimation of GMTI systems are not valid for SAR data. However, as demonstrated by papers in the recent literature,1-11 there is interest in exploiting moving targets within SAR data. The techniques employed vary widely, including filter banks to form images at multiple Dopplers, performing smear detection, and attempting to address the issue through waveform design. The above work validates the need for moving target exploitation in SAR data, but it does not represent a theory allowing for the prediction or bounding of performance. This work develops an approach to estimate and/or bound performance for moving target exploitation specific to SAR data. Synthetic SAR data is generated across a range of sensor, environment, and target parameters to test the exploitation algorithms under specific conditions. This provides a design tool allowing radar systems to be tuned for specific moving target exploitation applications. In summary, we derive a set of rules that bound the performance of specific moving target exploitation algorithms under variable operating conditions.

  16. Investigation of ionospheric effects on SAR Interferometry (InSAR): A case study of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Ding, Xiao-Li; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Bo-Chen; Qu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has demonstrated its potential for high-density spatial mapping of ground displacement associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic processes. However, this technique may be affected by the ionosphere, which can result in the distortions of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, phases, and polarization. Moreover, ionospheric effect has become and is becoming further significant with the increasing interest in low-frequency SAR systems, limiting the further development of InSAR technique. Although some research has been carried out, thorough analysis of ionospheric influence on true SAR imagery is still limited. Based on this background, this study performs a thorough investigation of ionospheric effect on InSAR through processing L-band ALOS-1/PALSAR-1 images and dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) data over Hong Kong, where the phenomenon of ionospheric irregularities often occurs. The result shows that the small-scale ionospheric irregularities can cause the azimuth pixel shifts and phase advance errors on interferograms. Meanwhile, it is found that these two effects result in the stripe-shaped features in InSAR images. The direction of the stripe-shaped effects keep approximately constant in space for our InSAR dataset. Moreover, the GPS-derived rate of total electron content change index (ROTI), an index to reflect the level of ionospheric disturbances, may be a useful indicator for predicting the ionospheric effect for SAR images. This finding can help us evaluate the quality of SAR images when considering the ionospheric effect.

  17. Integrated Airborne and In-Situ Measurements Over Land-Fast Ice Near Barrow, AK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. M.; Brozena, J. M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Abelev, A.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Claffey, K. J.; Hebert, D. A.; Jones, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has collected two field seasons of integrated airborne and in-situ measurements over multiple sites of floating, but land-fast ice north of Barrow, AK. During the first season in March of 2014 the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory led the on-ice group including NRL personnel and Naval Academy midshipmen. The second season (March 2015) included only NRL scientists and midshipmen. The in-situ data provided ground-truth for airborne measurements from a scanning LiDAR (Riegl Q 560i), digital photogrammetry (Applanix DSS-439), a low-frequency SAR (P-band in 2014 and P and L bands in 2015) and a snow/Ku radar procured from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of the University of Kansas. The CReSIS radar was updated in 2015 to integrate the snow and Ku radars into a single continuous chirp, thus improving resolution. The objective of the survey was to aid our understanding of the use of the airborne data to calibrate/validate Cryosat-2 data. Sampling size or "footprint" plays a critical role in the attempt to compare in-situ measurements with airborne (or satellite) measurements. Thus the in-situ data were arranged to minimize aliasing. Ground measurements were collected along transects a sites generally consisting of a 2 km long profile of Magnaprobe and EM31 measurements with periodic boreholes. A 60 m x 400 m swath of Magnaprobe measurements was centered on this profile. Airborne data were collected on multiple overflights of the transect areas. The LiDAR measured total freeboard (ice + snow) referenced to leads in the ice, and produced swaths 200-300 m wide. The SAR imaged the ice beneath the snow and the snow/Ku radar measured snow thickness. The freeboard measurements and snow thickness are used to estimate ice thickness via isostasy and density estimates. Comparisons and processing methodology will be shown. The results of this ground-truth experiment will inform our analysis of grids of airborne data collected

  18. Representations of SARS in the British newspapers.

    PubMed

    Washer, Peter

    2004-12-01

    In the Spring of 2003, there was a huge interest in the global news media following the emergence of a new infectious disease: severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This study examines how this novel disease threat was depicted in the UK newspapers, using social representations theory and in particular existing work on social representations of HIV/AIDS and Ebola to analyse the meanings of the epidemic. It investigates the way that SARS was presented as a dangerous threat to the UK public, whilst almost immediately the threat was said to be 'contained' using the mechanism of 'othering': SARS was said to be unlikely to personally affect the UK reader because the Chinese were so different to 'us'; so 'other'. In this sense, the SARS scare, despite the remarkable speed with which it was played out in the modern global news media, resonates with the meanings attributed to other epidemics of infectious diseases throughout history. Yet this study also highlights a number of differences in the social representations of SARS compared with earlier epidemics. In particular, this study examines the phenomena of 'emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases' over the past 30 or so years and suggests that these have impacted on the faith once widely held that Western biomedicine could 'conquer' infectious disease.

  19. Automated rectification and geocoding of SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.; Curlander, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    An automated post-processing system has been developed for rectification and geocoding of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery. The system uses as input a raw uncorrected image from the operational SAR correlator, and produces as a standard output a rectified and geocoded product. The accurate geolocation of SAR image pixels is provided by a spatial transformation model which maps the slant range-azimuth SAR image pixels into their location on a prespecified map grid. This model predicts the geodetic location of each pixel by utilizing: the sensor platform position; a geoid model; the parameters of the data collection system and the processing parameters used in the SAR correlator. Based on their geodetic locations, the pixels are mapped by using the desired cartographic projection equations. This rectification and geocoding technique has been tested with Seasat and SIR-B images. The test results demonstrate absolute location uncertainty of less than 50 m and relative distortion (scale factor and skew) of less than 0.1 percent relative to local variations from the assumed geoid.

  20. ICAO's anti-SARS airport activities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Silvio; Curdt-Christiansen, Claus M

    2003-11-01

    To prevent SARS from spreading through air travel and in order to rebuild the confidence of the traveling public in the safety of air travel, ICAO has set up an "Anti-SARS Airport Evaluation Project." The first phase of this project was to develop a set of protective measures for international airports in affected areas to adopt and implement and then to send out, on the request of Contracting States, a team of inspectors to evaluate and assess airports and issue a "statement of evaluation" that the airport inspected complies with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. In cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO), the first part of phase 1 was completed in early June this year, and the second part of phase 1 followed soon after. By mid-July, five international airports in Southeast Asia had been inspected and found to be in full compliance with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. The success of this ICAO project is believed to have contributed significantly to the recovery of international air travel and related industries now taking place. Phase 2 of the project is now being developed. It is aimed at preventing a resurgence of SARS, but it also contains elements to make the methodology developed applicable to future outbreaks of any other communicable disease in which the mode of transmission could involve aviation and/or the need to prevent the spread of the disease by air travel.

  1. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  2. Airborne asbestos in public buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.; Schultz, B.; Dutrow, E.; Blake, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampled air in 49 government-owned buildings (six buildings with no asbestos-containing material, six buildings with asbestos-containing material in generally good condition, and 37 buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material). This is the most comprehensive study to date of airborne asbestos levels in U.S. public buildings during normal building activities. The air outside each building was also sampled. Air samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using a direct transfer preparation technique. The results show an increasing trend in average airborne asbestos levels; outdoor levels are lowest and levels in buildings with damaged asbestos-containing material are highest. However, the measured levels and the differences between indoors and outdoors and between building categories are small in absolute magnitude. Comparable studies from Canada and the UK, although differing in their estimated concentrations, also conclude that while airborne asbestos levels may be elevated in buildings that contain asbestos, levels are generally low. This conclusion does not eliminate the possibility of higher airborne asbestos levels during maintenance or renovation that disturbs the asbestos-containing material.

  3. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  4. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  5. AARD - Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewers, Dick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration program, and NASA Dryden's work in the program. The primary goal of the program is to make one fully automatic probe-to-drogue engagement using the AARD system. There are pictures of the aircraft approaching to the docking.

  6. Second International Airborne Remote Sensing Conference and Exhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The conference provided four days of displays and scientific presentations on applications, technology, a science of sub-orbital data gathering and analysis. The twelve displayed aircraft equipped with sophisticated instrumentation represented a wide range of environmental and reconnaissance missions,including marine pollution control, fire detection, Open Skies Treaty verification, thermal mapping, hydrographical measurements, military research, ecological and agricultural observations, geophysical research, atmospheric and meterological observations, and aerial photography. The U.S. Air Force and the On-Site Inspection Agency displayed the new Open Skies Treaty verification Boeing OC 135B that promotes international monitoring of military forces and activities. SRl's Jetstream uses foliage and ground penetrating SAR for forest inventories, toxic waste delineation, and concealed target and buried unexploded ordnance detection. Earth Search Sciences's Gulfstream 1 with prototype miniaturized airborne hyperspectral imaging equipment specializes in accurate mineral differentiation, low-cost hydrocarbon exploration, and nonproliferation applications. John E. Chance and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers displayed the Bell 2 helicopter with SHOALS that performs hydrographic surveying of navigation projects, coastal environment assessment, and nautical charting surveys. Bechtel Nevada and U.S. DOE displayed both the Beech King AIR B-200 platform equipped to provide first response to nuclear accidents and routine environmental surveillance, and the MBB BO-105 helicopter used in spectral analysis for environmental assessment and military appraisal. NASA Ames Research Center's high-altitude Lockheed ER-2 assists in earth resources monitoring research in atmospheric chemistry, oceanography, and electronic sensors; ozone and greenhouse studies and satellite calibration and data validation. Ames also showcased the Learjet 24 Airborne Observatory that completed missions in Venus

  7. Space-borne polarimetric SAR sensors or the golden age of radar polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottier, E.

    2010-06-01

    . In order to promote the exploitation of Polarimetric Spaceborne data, as it is starting today to proliferate with the launch of these Polarimetric SAR sensors, the PolSARpro Software, developed under contract to ESA and that is a toolbox for the scientific exploitation of Polarimetric SAR and Polarimetric-Interferometric data and a tool for high-level education in radar polarimetry, has been expanded and refined to include all elements necessary for the demonstration of a number of key applications. The PolSARpro Software, that already was supporting an important range of airborne and spaceborne polarimetric data sources, supports now the following additional data sources: ALOS-PALSAR (Dual-Pol fine mode and Quad-Pol mode), TerraSAR-X (Dual-pol mode) and Radarsat-2 (Dual-Pol fine mode and Quad-Pol fine and standard modes), by offering a platform dedicated interface for E.O Scientific Investigator. A number of illustrations of key applications has been developed for the demonstration and the promotion of the Polarimetric Spaceborne missions, that are consistent with the activities incorporated in the GMES Services Element (GSE). The aim of this communication is to present the current state of the art in SAR Polarimetry ranging from theory to applications, with special emphasis in the analysis of data provided by the new Polarimetric Spaceborne SAR sensors, and samples of real polarimetric data will be presented for use in real-life examples of key applications.

  8. An improved MIMO-SAR simulator strategy with ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingyu; Mo, Zijian; Wang, Zhonghai; Chen, Genshe; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    High resolution and wide-swath imaging can be obtained by Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) with the state of the art technologies. The time division multiple access (TDMA) MIMO SAR mimics the motion of the antenna of SAR systems by switching the array channels to transmit the radar signals at different time slots. In this paper, we develop a simulation tool with ray tracing techniques to retrieve high resolution and accurate SAR images for development of MIMO SAR imaging methods. Without loss of generality, in the proposed simulator, we apply a TDMA MIMO SAR system with 13 transmitting antennas and 8 receiving antennas, where all transmitting antennas share a single transmitter and the receiving antennas share a single receiver. By comparing with the normal simulation MIMO SAR strategies, the simulation image using ray tracing results validate that the proposed method provides more accurate and higher resolution SAR images.

  9. Orchitis: a complication of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Qi, Lihua; Chi, Xiaochun; Yang, Jingjing; Wei, Xiaohong; Gong, Encong; Peh, Suatcheng; Gu, Jiang

    2006-02-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus has been known to damage multiple organs; however, little is known about its impact on the reproductive system. In the present study, we analyzed the pathological changes of testes from six patients who died of SARS. Results suggested that SARS caused orchitis. All SARS testes displayed widespread germ cell destruction, few or no spermatozoon in the seminiferous tubule, thickened basement membrane, and leukocyte infiltration. The numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes and CD68+ macrophages increased significantly in the interstitial tissue compared with the control group (P < 0.05). SARS viral genomic sequences were not detected in the testes by in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated abundant IgG precipitation in the seminiferous epithelium of SARS testes, indicating possible immune response as the cause for the damage. Our findings indicated that orchitis is a complication of SARS. It further suggests that the reproductive functions should be followed and evaluated in recovered male SARS patients.

  10. Routing architecture and security for airborne networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei; Xie, Peng; Li, Jason; Xu, Roger; Levy, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Airborne networks are envisioned to provide interconnectivity for terrestial and space networks by interconnecting highly mobile airborne platforms. A number of military applications are expected to be used by the operator, and all these applications require proper routing security support to establish correct route between communicating platforms in a timely manner. As airborne networks somewhat different from traditional wired and wireless networks (e.g., Internet, LAN, WLAN, MANET, etc), security aspects valid in these networks are not fully applicable to airborne networks. Designing an efficient security scheme to protect airborne networks is confronted with new requirements. In this paper, we first identify a candidate routing architecture, which works as an underlying structure for our proposed security scheme. And then we investigate the vulnerabilities and attack models against routing protocols in airborne networks. Based on these studies, we propose an integrated security solution to address routing security issues in airborne networks.

  11. Characterizing hydrologic changes of Great Dismal Swamp using SAR/InSAR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Great Dismal Swamp is one of the largest, northernmost peatlands on the Atlantic Coastal Plain, and the swamp is underlain by a thick water-logged organic soil layer (peat) made up of dead and decaying plant material. The peatlands play a role as the sink of large amount of soil organic carbon and methane. However, the disturbance of the peatland negatively impacted the ecosystem and contributed to the climate change caused by the released greenhouse gas. Our SAR/InSAR methods observed the hydrologic changes in the peatlands, which is a key factor to conserve the wetland, through several methods. First, we compared averaged SAR intensity from C- and L-band SAR sensors with groundwater level changes, and deduced a linear relationship between the SAR backscattering intensity and the groundwater level change. Second, we extracted the inundated area during wet season from InSAR coherence. Third, we measured the relative water level changes in the inundated area using the interferometric phases. Finally, we estimated the groundwater level changes corresponding to the soil moisture changes from time-series InSAR method. Our results can provide the unique opportunity to understand the occurring hydrologic and vegetation changes in the Great Dismal Swamp.

  12. PRF Ambiguity Detrmination for Radarsat ScanSAR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael Y.

    1998-01-01

    PRF ambiguity is a potential problem for a spaceborne SAR operated at high frequencies. For a strip mode SAR, there were several approaches to solve this problem. This paper, however, addresses PRF ambiguity determination algorithms suitable for a burst mode SAR system such as the Radarsat ScanSAR. The candidate algorithms include the wavelength diversity algorithm, range look cross correlation algorithm, and multi-PRF algorithm.

  13. Development of InSAR technology on deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Ming-lian; Jiang, Ting-chen; Zong, Yu-yu

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, application of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture, Radar) to deformation monitoring has become a hotspot in research of geological hazards. This paper introduces the basic principles and data processing procedures of InSAR and summarizes main progresses made in InSAR technology and its application to deformation monitoring. Through actual examples of application and research at home and abroad, the article figures out existing problems and the future of application of InSAR.

  14. Segmentation of Multilook, Multifrequency, and Multipolarimetric SAR Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-20

    1995 Final Technical 02/01/92-07/31/95 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Segmentation of Multilook , Multifrequency, and Multipolarimetric SAR Data...Maximum 200 worth) This final report summarizes the findings of the research, "Segmentation of Multi-look, Multi-frequency and Multi- polarimetric SAR ...segmentation of high resolution SAR images, b) detection of man-made features in SAR images and c) labeling, as well as, grouping algorithms. These

  15. Classification of Targets in SAR Images Using ISAR Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Classification of Targets in SAR Images Using ISAR Data J. J. M. de Wit, R. J. Dekker, and A. C. van den Broek TNO Defence, Security, and Safety...classification of targets in SAR images by using ISAR measurements was studied, based on polarimetric SAR and ISAR data acquired with the MEMPHIS...interest in synthetic aperture radar ( SAR ) systems is increasing as well, mainly due to their all-weather capability. A study for the Dutch Ministry of

  16. Coastal Sea Level From CRYOSAT-2 SAR and SAR-In Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, O. B.; Abulaitijiang, A.; Knudsen, P.; Stenseng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Cryosat-2 offers the first ever possibility to perform coastal altimetric studies using bor SAR-altimetry and SAR-In altimetry. With this technological leap forward Cryosat-2 is now able to observe sea level in very small water bodies and also to provide coastal sea level very close to the shore. We perform an investigation into the retrieval of sea surface height around Denmark and Greenland. These regions have been chosen as the coastal regions around Denmark falls within the SAR mask and the coastal regions of Greenland falls in under the SAR-in mask employed on Cryosat-2. SAR-in was mainly used in coastal regions of Greenland because of its huge topographic changes as Cryosat-2 is designed to map the margins of the ice-sheet. The coastal region around Denmark is a test region of the EU FP7 sponsored project LOTUS esablishing SAR altimetry product in preparation for Sentinel-3. With the increased spatial resolution of Cryosat-2 SAR we provide valuable sea level observations within the Straits around Denmark which are crucial to constrain the waterflow in and out of the Baltic Sea. The investigation of SAR-in data in Greenland adds an entire new dimension to coastal altimetry. An amazing result of the investigation is the ability of Cryosat-2 to detect and recover sea level even though the coast (sealevel) is up to 15 km away from the nadir location of the satellite. This ability of capture and use returns from outside the main (-3Db) loop in theory enables Cryosat-2 SAR-in to map sea level height of fjords more frequently than the 369 days repeat.

  17. Verification of L-band SAR calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Jackson, P. L.; Kasischke, E.

    1985-01-01

    Absolute calibration of a digital L-band SAR system to an accuracy of better than 3 dB has been verified. This was accomplished with a calibration signal generator that produces the phase history of a point target. This signal relates calibration values to various SAR data sets. Values of radar cross-section (RCS) of reference reflectors were obtained using a derived calibration relationship for the L-band channel on the ERIM/CCRS X-C-L SAR system. Calibrated RCS values were compared to known RCS values of each reference reflector for verification and to obtain an error estimate. The calibration was based on the radar response to 21 calibrated reference reflectors.

  18. Stop outbreak of SARS with infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yigang M.

    2004-04-01

    SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, commonly known as Atypical Pneumonia in mainland China) caused 8422 people affected and resulting in 918 deaths worldwide in half year. This disease can be transmitted by respiratory droplets or by contact with a patient's respiratory secretions. This means it can be spread out very rapidly through the public transportations by the travelers with the syndrome. The challenge was to stop the SARS carriers traveling around by trains, airplanes, coaches and etc. It is impractical with traditional oral thermometers or spot infrared thermometers to screen the tens of travelers with elevated body temperature from thousands of normal travelers in hours. The thermal imager with temperature measurement function is a logical choice for this special application although there are some limitations and drawbacks. This paper discusses the real SARS applications of industrial infrared cameras in China from April to July 2003.

  19. The Utility and Validity of Kinematic GPS Positioning for the Geosar Airborne Terrain Mapping Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam; Hensley, Scott; Chapin, Elaine; Kroger, Peter; Hussain, Mushtaq; Allred, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    GeoSAR is an airborne, interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) system for terrain mapping, currently under development by a consortium including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., a California mapping sciences company, and the California Department of Conservation (CaIDOC), with funding provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Topographic Engineering Center (TEC) and the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). IFSAR data processing requires high-accuracy platform position and attitude knowledge. On 9 GeoSAR, these are provided by one or two Honeywell Embedded GPS Inertial Navigation Units (EGI) and an Ashtech Z12 GPS receiver. The EGIs provide real-time high-accuracy attitude and moderate-accuracy position data, while the Ashtech data, post-processed differentially with data from a nearby ground station using Ashtech PNAV software, provide high-accuracy differential GPS positions. These data are optimally combined using a Kalman filter within the GeoSAR motion measurement software, and the resultant position and orientation information are used to process the dual frequency (X-band and P-band) radar data to generate high-accuracy, high -resolution terrain imagery and digital elevation models (DEMs). GeoSAR requirements specify sub-meter level planimetric and vertical accuracies for the resultant DEMS. To achieve this, platform positioning errors well below one meter are needed. The goal of GeoSAR is to obtain 25 cm or better 3-D positions from the GPS systems on board the aircraft. By imaging a set of known point target corner-cube reflectors, the GeoSAR system can be calibrated. This calibration process yields the true position of the aircraft with an uncertainty of 20- 50 cm. This process thus allows an independent assessment of the accuracy of our GPS-based positioning systems. We will present an overview of the GeoSAR motion measurement system, focusing on the use of GPS and the blending of position data from the

  20. Efficacy of various disinfectants against SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Rabenau, H F; Kampf, G; Cinatl, J; Doerr, H W

    2005-10-01

    The recent severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in Asia and Northern America led to broad use of various types of disinfectant in order to control the public spread of the highly contagious virus. However, only limited data were available to demonstrate their efficacy against SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We therefore investigated eight disinfectants for their activity against SARS-CoV according to prEN 14476. Four hand rubs were tested at 30s (Sterillium, based on 45% iso-propanol, 30% n-propanol and 0.2% mecetronium etilsulphate; Sterillium Rub, based on 80% ethanol; Sterillium Gel, based on 85% ethanol; Sterillium Virugard, based on 95% ethanol). Three surface disinfectants were investigated at 0.5% for 30 min and 60 min (Mikrobac forte, based on benzalkonium chloride and laurylamine; Kohrsolin FF, based on benzalkonium chloride, glutaraldehyde and didecyldimonium chloride; Dismozon pur, based on magnesium monoperphthalate), and one instrument disinfectant was investigated at 4% for 15 min, 3% for 30 min and 2% for 60 min [Korsolex basic, based on glutaraldehyde and (ethylenedioxy)dimethanol]. Three types of organic load were used: 0.3% albumin, 10% fetal calf serum, and 0.3% albumin with 0.3% sheep erythrocytes. Virus titres were determined by a quantitative test (endpoint titration) in 96-well microtitre plates. With all tested preparations, SARS-CoV was inactivated to below the limit of detection (reduction factor mostly > or =4), regardless of the type of organic load. In summary, SARS-CoV can be inactivated quite easily with many commonly used disinfectants.

  1. Calibration of dual-frequency SAR ocean imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Larson, R. W.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    A calibration procedure for digital aircraft SAR imagery is presented. Techniques to utilize internal and external calibration references are discussed. Examples of calibrated intensity scans from an oceanographic test site are presented. The relationship of the aircraft SAR calibration procedure to future spaceborne SAR systems is discussed.

  2. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  3. SAR imagery using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaojian; Feng, Xiangzhi

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are getting more and more applications in both civilian and military remote sensing missions. With the increasing deployment of electronic countermeasures (ECM) on modern battlefields, SAR encounters more and more interference jamming signals. The ECM jamming signals cause the SAR system to receive and process erroneous information which results in severe degradations in the output SAR images and/or formation of phony images of nonexistent targets. As a consequence, development of the electronic counter-countermeasures (ECCM) capability becomes one of the key problems in SAR system design. This paper develops radar signaling strategies and algorithms that enhance the ability of synthetic aperture radar to image targets under conditions of electronic jamming. The concept of SAR using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses (CCFAP-SAR) is first proposed. Then the imaging procedure for CCFAP-SAR is discussed in detail. The ECCM performance of CCFAP-SAR for both depressive noise jamming and deceptive repeat jamming is analyzed. The impact of the carrier frequency agility range on the image quality of CCFAP-SAR is also studied. Simulation results demonstrate that, with adequate agility range of the carrier frequency, the proposed CCFAP-SAR performs as well as conventional radar with linear frequency modulation (LFM) waveform in image quality and slightly better in anti-noise depressive jamming; while performs very well in anti-deception jamming which cannot be rejected by LFM-SAR.

  4. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  5. Unsupervised Segmentation Of Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Dubois, Pascale; Van Zyl, Jakob; Kwok, Ronald; Chellappa, Rama

    1994-01-01

    Method of unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) image data into classes involves selection of classes on basis of multidimensional fuzzy clustering of logarithms of parameters of polarimetric covariance matrix. Data in each class represent parts of image wherein polarimetric SAR backscattering characteristics of terrain regarded as homogeneous. Desirable to have each class represent type of terrain, sea ice, or ocean surface distinguishable from other types via backscattering characteristics. Unsupervised classification does not require training areas, is nearly automated computerized process, and provides nonsubjective selection of image classes naturally well separated by radar.

  6. Quantum-SAR extension of the spectral-SAR algorithm: application to polyphenolic anticancer bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Putz, Ana-Maria; Lazea, Marius; Ienciu, Luciana; Chiriac, Adrian

    2009-03-01

    Aiming to assess the role of individual molecular structures in the molecular mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction correlation analysis, the recent Spectral-SAR approach is employed to introduce the Quantum-SAR (QuaSAR) "wave" and "conversion factor" in terms of difference between inter-endpoint inter-molecular activities for a given set of compounds; this may account for inter-conversion (metabolization) of molecular (concentration) effects while indicating the structural (quantum) based influential/detrimental role on bio-/eco- effect in a causal manner rather than by simple inspection of measured values; the introduced QuaSAR method is then illustrated for a study of the activity of a series of flavonoids on breast cancer resistance protein.

  7. Quantum-SAR Extension of the Spectral-SAR Algorithm. Application to Polyphenolic Anticancer Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Putz, Ana-Maria; Lazea, Marius; Ienciu, Luciana; Chiriac, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Aiming to assess the role of individual molecular structures in the molecular mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction correlation analysis, the recent Spectral-SAR approach is employed to introduce the Quantum-SAR (QuaSAR) “wave” and “conversion factor” in terms of difference between inter-endpoint inter-molecular activities for a given set of compounds; this may account for inter-conversion (metabolization) of molecular (concentration) effects while indicating the structural (quantum) based influential/detrimental role on bio-/eco- effect in a causal manner rather than by simple inspection of measured values; the introduced QuaSAR method is then illustrated for a study of the activity of a series of flavonoids on breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:19399244

  8. Design and realization of an active SAR calibrator for TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dummer, Georg; Lenz, Rainer; Lutz, Benjamin; Kühl, Markus; Müller-Glaser, Klaus D.; Wiesbeck, Werner

    2005-10-01

    TerraSAR-X is a new earth observing satellite which will be launched in spring 2006. It carries a high resolution X-band SAR sensor. For high image data quality, accurate ground calibration targets are necessary. This paper describes a novel system concept for an active and highly integrated, digitally controlled SAR system calibrator. A total of 16 active transponder and receiver systems and 17 receiver only systems will be fabricated for a calibration campaign. The calibration units serve for absolute radiometric calibration of the SAR image data. Additionally, they are equipped with an extra receiver path for two dimensional satellite antenna pattern recognition. The calibrator is controlled by a dedicated digital Electronic Control Unit (ECU). The different voltages needed by the calibrator and the ECU are provided by the third main unit called Power Management Unit (PMU).

  9. An Optical Flow Method Applied to Co-Registration of Remote Sensing Images: Example for SAR/SAR, SAR/LIDAR, SAR/Optical Images of BIOSAR 2010 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin-Koeniguer, Elise

    2016-08-01

    This article proposes an optical flow type method for coregistration of forest remote sensing images. The principle of the algorithm called GeFolki is first explained. Results are shown on the images of the BioSAR 3 campaign, for the production of SAR interferograms, the coregistration a SAR and LIDAR image, and the coregistration an optical image and SAR image.The advantages of such an algorithm over conventional algorithms are explained. Finally, we propose various applications within the operating data for future BIOMASS mission: massive interferometry, ground truth production, upscaling by fusion of LIDAR and SAR data, and image mining.

  10. Cryosat-2 SAR and SAR-In Altimetry for Coastal Sea Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Knudsen, Per; Abulaitijiang, Adil; Stenseng, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Cryosat-2 offers the first ever possibility to perform coastal altimetric studies using SAR-Interferometry as well as SAR altimetry. With this technological leap forward Cryosat-2 is now able to observe sea level in very small water bodies and also to provide coastal sea level very close to the shore. We perform an investigation into the retrieval of sea surface height around Denmark and Greenland. These regions have been chosen as the coastal regions around Denmark falls within the SAR mask and the coastal regions of Greenland falls in under the SAR-in mask employed on Cryosat-2. SAR-in was mainly used in coastal regions of Greenland because of its huge topographic changes as Cryosat-2 is designed to map the margins of the ice-sheet. The coastal region around Denmark is a test region of the EU sponsored project LOTUS in which With the increased spatial resolution of Cryosat-2 SAR we provide valuable sea level observations within the Straits around Denmark which are crucial to constrain the waterflow in and out of the Baltic Sea. The investigation of SAR-in data in Greenland adds an entire new dimension to coastal altimetry. An amazing result of the investigation is the ability of Cryosat-2 to detect and recover sea level even though the coast (sealevel) is up to 15 km away from the nadir location of the satellite. This ability of capture and use returns from outside the main (-3Db) loop in theory enables Cryosat-2 SAR-in to map sea level height of fjords more frequently than the 369 days repeat.

  11. Detection of airborne polyoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGarrity, G. J.; Dion, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Polyoma virus was recovered from the air of an animal laboratory housing mice infected with the virus. Air samples were obtained by means of a high volume air sampler and further concentrated by high speed centrifugation. Total concentration of the air samples was 7.5 x 10(7). Assay for polyoma virus was by mouse antibody production tests. Airborne polyoma virus was detected in four of six samples. PMID:211163

  12. The Future of Airborne Reconnaissance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    biplanes to the worldwide Cold War missions of the U - 2 and SR-71, airborne reconnaissance has become an indispensable tool to the intelligence community...Reconnaissance Operations (SRO) procedures, such as the U - 2 , RC- 135, and the EP-3, and traditional theater/fleet tactical reconnaissance systems like...upgraded sensor package on the U -2.14 The Army Staffs argument centers around command and control of the asset. The Army agreed that the U - 2 ’s

  13. Ambiguity noise analysis of a SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Haishan; Chang, Wenge; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-12-01

    The presence of range and azimuth (or Doppler) ambiguities in synthetic aperture radars (SARs) is well known. The ambiguity noise is related to the antenna pattern and the value of pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Because a new frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) SAR has the characters of low cost and small size, and the capacity of real-time signal processing, the antenna will likely vibrate or deform due to a lack of the stabilized platform. And the value of PRF cannot be much high because of the high computation burden for the real-time processing. The aim of this study is to access and improve the performance of a new FMCW SAR system based on the ambiguity noise. First, the quantitative analysis of the system's ambiguity noise level is performed; an antenna with low sidelobes is designed. The conclusion is that the range ambiguity noise is small; the azimuth ambiguity noise is somewhat increased, however, it is sufficiently small to have marginal influence on the image quality. Finally, the ambiguity noise level is measured using the imaging data from a Ku-band FMCW SAR. The results of this study show that the measured noise level coincides with the theoretical noise level.

  14. SAR Image Texture Analysis of Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Long; Li, Ying; Liu, Yu

    Oil spills are seriously affecting the marine ecosystem and cause political and scientific concern since they have serious affect on fragile marine and coastal ecosystem. In order to implement an emergency in case of oil spills, it is necessary to monitor oil spill using remote sensing. Spaceborne SAR is considered a promising method to monitor oil spill, which causes attention from many researchers. However, research in SAR image texture analysis of oil spill is rarely reported. On 7 December 2007, a crane-carrying barge hit the Hong Kong-registered tanker "Hebei Spirit", which released an estimated 10,500 metric tons of crude oil into the sea. The texture features on this oil spill were acquired based on extracted GLCM (Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix) by using SAR as data source. The affected area was extracted successfully after evaluating capabilities of different texture features to monitor the oil spill. The results revealed that the texture is an important feature for oil spill monitoring. Key words: oil spill, texture analysis, SAR

  15. SAR observations of waves in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carolis, Giacomo

    2003-03-01

    Ocean waves properties propagating in grease ice composed of frazil and pancakes as observed by SAR images are discussed. An ERS-2 SAR scene relevant to the Greenland Sea in an area where the Odden ice tongue developed in 1997 is considered as case study. The scene includes open sea and ice covered waters where a wave field is traveling from the open sea region. Wind induced features known as "wind rolls" can be distinguished, allowing the estimation of the wind vector. Hence the related wind generated ocean waves can be retrieved using a SAR spectral inversion procedure. The wave field is tracked while it propagates inside the ice field, thus allowing the estimation of the wave changes. Under the assumption of continuum medium, physical ice properties are then retrieved using a special SAR inversion procedure in conjunction with a recently developed wave propagation model in sea ice. The model assumes both the ice layer and the water beneath it as a system of viscous fluids. As a result, the changes suffered by the ocean wave spectrum in terms of wave dispersion and energy attenuation are related to sea ice properties such as concentration and thickness. Although the free parameters to be inverted are the ice thickness and viscosity and the water viscosity, the ice thickness is the only parameter of geophysical interest. Results are finally compared with external ice parameters information.

  16. Epidemic Models for SARS and Measles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozema, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Recent events have led to an increased interest in emerging infectious diseases. This article applies various deterministic models to the SARS epidemic of 2003 and a measles outbreak in the Netherlands in 1999-2000. We take a historical approach beginning with the well-known logistic curve and a lesser-known extension popularized by Pearl and Reed…

  17. SAR Image Despeckling Via Structural Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ting; Li, Shutao; Fang, Leyuan; Benediktsson, Jón Atli

    2016-12-01

    A novel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image despeckling method based on structural sparse representation is introduced. The proposed method utilizes the fact that different regions in SAR images correspond to varying terrain reflectivity. Therefore, SAR images can be split into a heterogeneous class (with a varied terrain reflectivity) and a homogeneous class (with a constant terrain reflectivity). In the proposed method, different sparse representation based despeckling schemes are designed by combining the different region characteristics in SAR images. For heterogeneous regions with rich structure and texture information, structural dictionaries are learned to appropriately represent varied structural characteristics. Specifically, each patch in these regions is sparsely coded with the best fitted structural dictionary, thus good structure preservation can be obtained. For homogenous regions without rich structure and texture information, the highly redundant photometric self-similarity is exploited to suppress speckle noise without introducing artifacts. That is achieved by firstly learning the sub-dictionary, then simultaneously sparsely coding for each group of photometrically similar image patches. Visual and objective experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over the-state-of-the-art methods.

  18. JERS SAR interferometry for land subsidence monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Tazio; Wegmüller, Urs; Werner, Charles; Wiesmann, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the potential of L-Band repeat-pass differential SAR interferometry for land subsidence monitoring is evaluated using JERS SAR data. Bologna, Mexico City and the Ruhrgebiet were selected as application sites representing slow to fast deformation velocities. The investigation includes feasibility aspects as the data availability, the temporal decorrelation over different landcover classes and the range of useful spatial baselines, an analysis of the achieved deformation accuracy and considerations on the complementarity to ERS SAR interferometry and levelling surveys. In spite of the rather limited data availability, land subsidence maps could be generated for the three selected application sites. Unlike with ERS C-Band SAR data, JERS L-Band interferometry permitted to retrieve subsidence values also over vegetated areas and forest when using interferograms of less than one year acquisition time interval and short baseline. In addition, the longer L-Band wavelength was found to be superior in the case of large deformation gradients that lead to phase unwrapping problems in C-Band interferometry.

  19. Herc SAR Task 106: AIMS Feature Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    of the recommendations should be implemented, and discuss with Greenley & Associates any other features or capabilities needed. Herc-SAR Task 106...2001-029; Greenley & Associates, Ottawa, Ontario. 2. Schoenborn, O. (2006). AIMSsim User Manual. DRDC Toronto CR 2001-030; Greenley & Associates

  20. Model-based 3D SAR reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chad; Gunther, Jake; Moon, Todd

    2014-06-01

    Three dimensional scene reconstruction with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is desirable for target recognition and improved scene interpretability. The vertical aperture, which is critical to reconstruct 3D SAR scenes, is almost always sparsely sampled due to practical limitations, which creates an underdetermined problem. This papers explores 3D scene reconstruction using a convex model-based approach. The approach developed is demonstrated on 3D scenes, but can be extended to SAR reconstruction of sparsely sampled signals in the spatial and, or, frequency domains. The model-based approach enables knowledge-aided image formation (KAIF) by incorporating spatial, aspect, and sparsity magnitude terms into the image reconstruction. The incorporation of these terms, which are based on prior scene knowledge, will demonstrate improved results compared to traditional image formation algorithms. The SAR image formation problem is formulated as a second order cone program (SOCP) and the results are demonstrated on 3D scenes using simulated data and data from the GOTCHA data collect.1 The model-based results are contrasted against traditional backprojected images.

  1. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  2. Impact of large sidelobe discretes in SAR image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, John E.; Lynch, E. Douglas; Schneible, Richard; Wicks, Michael C.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, the U.S. Air Force's Research Laboratory Space-Time Adaptive Processing (RLSTAP) tool is used to demonstrate the impact of large sidelobe discretes on modern Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal and image processing. Sidelobe discretes ay mask or even completely obscure weak target returns of interest in the immediate vicinity of these strong returns. Adaptive processing offers the potential to mitigate the effects of strong sidelobe discretes on image formation. In this paper, we characterize the severity of the problems caused by these discretes. RLSTAP can simulate high-fidelity airborne, spaceborne, or ground based multi-channel radar data in jamming and clutter environments, develop and evaluate new signal and image processing algorithms, and assess the performance of advanced radar systems. RLSTAP is a time domain simulation, updating object positions for every radar pulse and allowing modeling of realistic effects such as returns 'walking' across range bins and Doppler filters. The site-specific clutter model uses terrain elevation and cover data to derive the line-of-site visibility, grazing angle, and clutter type for each range-angle cell. Spatial and temporal clutter statistics are applied to each cell and the signal strength at the receiver is calculated as a function of the backscatter coefficient, range, atmospheric attenuation, antenna gain, and system gains/losses. The scene generation capability in RLSTAP is unique in that it exploits Defense Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) and Land Use Land Cover Data (LULC) to create realistic clutter scenes (data cubes) for any given geographic location. As such, the application of adaptive multi-channel/multi-pulse processing to radar data that is characteristic of the area being imaged is now possible. Furthermore, the selection of waveform parameters, signal and image processing techniques, and associated radar parameters may be improved upon.

  3. Present and Future Airborne and Space-Borne Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Riegger, I. Hajnsek, D. Hounam, G. Krieger, A. Moreira,M. Werner: Single-Pass SAR Interferometry with a Tandem TerraSAR-X Configuration Mittermayer ...September 2002. Mittermayer J., Lord R., Boerner E., “Sliding Spotlight SAR Processing for TerraSAR-X Using a New Formulation of the Extended Chirp...Scaling Algorithm”, proc. IGARSS 2003, Toulouse, 2003, in press. Mittermayer J., Runge H., “Conceptual Studies for Exploiting the TerraSAR-X Dual

  4. UAV-Based L-Band SAR with Precision Flight Path Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Sadowy, Greg; Miller, Tim; Muellerschoen, Ron; Lou, Yunling; Rosen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently implementing a reconfigurable polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track interferometric (RTI) SAR data, also know as differential interferometric measurements. Differential interferometry can provide key displacement measurements, important for the scientific studies of Earthquakes and volcanoes. Using precision real-time GPS and a sensor controlled flight management system, the system will be able to fly predefined paths with great precision. The radar will be designed to operate on a UAV (Unmanned Arial Vehicle) but will initially be demonstrated on a minimally piloted vehicle (MPV), such as the Proteus build by Scaled Composites. The application requires control of the flight path to within a 10 meter tube to support repeat track and formation flying measurements. The design is fully polarimetric with an 80 MHz bandwidth (2 meter range resolution) and 16 kilometer range swath. The antenna is an electronically steered array to assure that the actual antenna pointing can be controlled independent of the wind direction and speed. The system will nominally operate at 45,000 ft. The program started out as a Instrument Incubator Project (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science and Technology Office (ESTO).

  5. Wavemill Product Assessment - Defining potential products from a novel spaceborne interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, Jose; Gommenginger, Christine; Burbidge, Geoff; Quilfen, Yves; Cotton, David; Buck, Christopher; Donlon, Craig

    2013-04-01

    The Wavemill is a new radar instrument concept that offers the possibility of generating two-dimensional wide swath, high resolution, high precision maps of surface current vectors and ocean topography. Based on a single spacecraft, it avoids the difficulties of synchronisation and baseline estimation associated with other interferometric SAR systems based on two or more satellites. WaPA, the Wavemill Product Assessment project, is supported by ESA under the General Studies Programme (GSP) to define the scientific capabilities and limitations of a spaceborne Wavemill instrument. The Wavemill concept has developed steadily since its first inception in 2005. A number of Wavemill studies in recent years have gradually put together facts and figures to support the case for Wavemill as a possible spaceborne mission. The WaPA project builds on past studies to address some key aspects relating to the expected performances and limitations of a spaceborne Wavemill instrument. This study is a critical step on the path towards establishing Wavemill as a convincing candidate instrument for a future ocean current mission. In this paper we present the technical concept of the Wavemill instrument, provide an overview of current capability in terms of measuring surface currents from spaceborne SAR, present results from an airborne proof-of-concept campaign and then discuss some early findings from the project in terms of the potential products and their expected performance.

  6. Lynx multi-mode SAR in support of NATO Unified Vision 2012 trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, R.; Verge, T.; Linnehan, R.; Doerry, A.

    2013-05-01

    In June 2012, General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Reconnaissance Systems Group participated in the NATO Unified Vision 2012 (UV12) Joint ISR (JISR) Trial at Orland Main Air Station in Brekstad, Norway. GA-ASI supplied a modified King Air 200 as a Predator B/MQ-9 Reaper Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) surrogate outfitted with a Lynx Block 30 Multi-mode Synthetic Aperture Radar/Ground Moving Target Indicator (SAR/GMTI), a FLIR Star SAFIRE 3800HD Electro-optical/Infrared (EO/IR) sensor, and a L-3 Tactical Common Data Link. This airborne platform was combined with GA-ASI's new System for Tactical Archival, Retrieval, and Exploitation (STARE) for full integration into the NATO ISR exploitation community. UV12 was an event sponsored by the NATO Joint Capability Group on Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) to focus on the interoperability of national ISR assets and improving JISR concept of operations. The Predator B RPA surrogate flew alongside multiple NATO ISR assets in nine missions that showcased the platform's all-weather ISR capabilities focusing on the Lynx SAR/GMTI and Maritime Wide Area Search (MWAS) modes. The inclusion of the STARE technology allowed GA-ASI's radar and Full Motion Video (FMV) data to be seamlessly processed and passed to joint networks where the data was fused with other NATO ISR products, resulting in a full battlefield reconnaissance picture.

  7. Flood detection from multi-temporal SAR data using harmonic analysis and change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaffer, Stefan; Matgen, Patrick; Hollaus, Markus; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Flood mapping from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Most available algorithms typically focus on single-image techniques which do not take into account the backscatter signature of a land surface under non-flooded conditions. In this study, harmonic analysis of a multi-temporal time series of >500 ENVISAT Advanced SAR (ASAR) scenes with a spatial resolution of 150 m was used to characterise the seasonality in backscatter under non-flooded conditions. Pixels which were inundated during a large-scale flood event during the summer 2007 floods of the River Severn (United Kingdom) showed strong deviations from normal seasonal behaviour as inferred from the harmonic model. The residuals were classified by means of an automatic threshold optimisation algorithm after masking out areas which are unlikely to be flooded using a topography-derived index. The results were validated against a reference dataset derived from high-resolution airborne imagery. For the water class, accuracies > 80% were found for non-urban land uses. A slight underestimation of the reference flood extent can be seen, mostly due to the lower spatial resolution of the ASAR imagery. Finally, an outlook for the proposed algorithm is given in the light of the Sentinel-1 mission.

  8. Analysis of Multipath Pixels in SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Wu, J. C.; Ding, X. L.; Zhang, L.; Hu, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    As the received radar signal is the sum of signal contributions overlaid in one single pixel regardless of the travel path, the multipath effect should be seriously tackled as the multiple bounce returns are added to direct scatter echoes which leads to ghost scatters. Most of the existing solution towards the multipath is to recover the signal propagation path. To facilitate the signal propagation simulation process, plenty of aspects such as sensor parameters, the geometry of the objects (shape, location, orientation, mutual position between adjacent buildings) and the physical parameters of the surface (roughness, correlation length, permittivity)which determine the strength of radar signal backscattered to the SAR sensor should be given in previous. However, it's not practical to obtain the highly detailed object model in unfamiliar area by field survey as it's a laborious work and time-consuming. In this paper, SAR imaging simulation based on RaySAR is conducted at first aiming at basic understanding of multipath effects and for further comparison. Besides of the pre-imaging simulation, the product of the after-imaging, which refers to radar images is also taken into consideration. Both Cosmo-SkyMed ascending and descending SAR images of Lupu Bridge in Shanghai are used for the experiment. As a result, the reflectivity map and signal distribution map of different bounce level are simulated and validated by 3D real model. The statistic indexes such as the phase stability, mean amplitude, amplitude dispersion, coherence and mean-sigma ratio in case of layover are analyzed with combination of the RaySAR output.

  9. Change detection in a time series of polarimetric SAR data by an omnibus test statistic and its factorization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Allan A.; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2016-10-01

    Test statistics for comparison of real (as opposed to complex) variance-covariance matrices exist in the statistics literature [1]. In earlier publications we have described a test statistic for the equality of two variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution with an associated p-value [2]. We showed their application to bitemporal change detection and to edge detection [3] in multilook, polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in the covariance matrix representation [4]. The test statistic and the associated p-value is described in [5] also. In [6] we focussed on the block-diagonal case, we elaborated on some computer implementation issues, and we gave examples on the application to change detection in both full and dual polarization bitemporal, bifrequency, multilook SAR data. In [7] we described an omnibus test statistic Q for the equality of k variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution. We also described a factorization of Q = R2 R3 … Rk where Q and Rj determine if and when a difference occurs. Additionally, we gave p-values for Q and Rj. Finally, we demonstrated the use of Q and Rj and the p-values to change detection in truly multitemporal, full polarization SAR data. Here we illustrate the methods by means of airborne L-band SAR data (EMISAR) [8,9]. The methods may be applied to other polarimetric SAR data also such as data from Sentinel-1, COSMO-SkyMed, TerraSAR-X, ALOS, and RadarSat-2 and also to single-pol data. The account given here closely follows that given our recent IEEE TGRS paper [7]. Selected References [1] Anderson, T. W., An Introduction to Multivariate Statistical Analysis, John Wiley, New York, third ed. (2003). [2] Conradsen, K., Nielsen, A. A., Schou, J., and Skriver, H., "A test statistic in the complex Wishart distribution and its application to change detection in polarimetric SAR data," IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 41(1): 4-19, 2003. [3] Schou, J

  10. Relating the temporal change observed by AIRSAR to surface and canopy properties of mixed conifer and hardwood forests of northern Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, M. Craig; Mcdonald, Kyle; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.; Sharik, Terry

    1991-01-01

    The mixed hardwood and conifer forests of northern Michigan were overflown by a 3-frequency airborne imaging radar in Apr. and Jul. 1990. A set of 10 x 10 km test sites near the University of Michigan Biological Station at Douglas Lake and within the Hiawatha National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan contained training stands representing the various forest species typical of forest communities across the ecotone between the coniferous boreal forest and mid-latitude hardwood and coniferous forests. The polarimetric radar data were externally calibrated to allow interdate comparisons. The Apr. flight was prior to bud-break of deciduous species and patchy snowcover was present. The Jul. flights occurred during and 2 days after heavy rain showers, and provide a unique opportunity to examine the differences in radar backscatter attributable to intercepted precipitation. Analyses show that there are significant changes in backscattering between biophysically dissimilar forest stands on any given date and also between dates for a given forest stand. These differences in backscattering can be related to moisture properties of the forest floor and the overlying canopy and also to the quantity and organizational structure of the above-ground biomass.

  11. Retrieving Vegetation Parameters and Soil Reflection Coefficients with P-band SAR Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemohammad, S. H.; Konings, A. G.; Jagdhuber, T.; Entekhabi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic activity of plants is highly dependent on the water available to the plant through its roots. Therefore, measuring the root-zone-soil-moisture across large spatial scales is of great importance for crop monitoring and yield estimation as well as hydrological and ecological modeling. Unlike L-band instruments, which are sensitive to only a few centimeters of the top soil layer, P-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments have a penetration depth that can be used to retrieve soil moisture profiles in depths of several tens of centimeters (depending on soil texture and moisture content). NASA's Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS) mission is designed to study the application of P-band SAR measurements for monitoring root-zone-soil-moisture. In this study, we introduce a new framework to retrieve vegetation parameters and smooth-surface soil reflection coefficients using SAR polarimetry and the fully polarimetric covariance matrix of the backscattering signal from AirMOSS observations. The retrieved soil reflectivities (both horizontally and vertically -polarized) can then be used to estimate the soil moisture profile. The retrieval model takes into account contributions from surface, dihedral and volume scattering coming from the vegetation and soil components, and does not require prior vegetation parameters. This approach reduces the dependency of the retrieval on allometry-based vegetation models with large numbers of uncertain parameters. The performance of this method will be validated using observations from AirMOSS field campaigns in July 2013 over Harvard Forest in Massachusetts, USA. This will enable a quality assessment of the polarimetry-based retrieval of the soil reflectivities and the estimated root-zone-soil-moisture profiles.

  12. Building damage assessment using a single post-earthquake PolSAR image: a case of the 2010 Yushu earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wei; Zeng, Wenhao

    2017-02-01

    Earthquakes are one of the most destructive natural disasters. Efficiently and quickly acquiring building earthquake damage information can help to reduce the casualties after an earthquake. In this paper, building damage information is extracted using a single post-earthquake PolSAR image. In PolSAR images, since the undamaged oriented buildings characterized by volume scattering with weaker scattering power are very similar to collapsed buildings, the collapsed buildings are difficult to extract accurately. In this paper, the difference in the relative contribution change rate of scattering components before and after polarization orientation angle (POA) compensation is proposed to enhance the difference between collapsed buildings and oriented buildings, in order that the collapsed buildings can be extracted more accurately. The “4.14” Yushu earthquake, which occurred in Yushu County, Qinghai province of China, is used as the case study to test the proposed method, and an airborne high-resolution PolSAR image of the urban region of Yushu County is used in the experiment. The experimental results show that the accuracy of building damage information extraction can be improved by the use of the proposed method, compared with the traditional polarimetric classification.

  13. Ground deformation monitoring using RADARSAT-2 DInSAR-MSBAS at the Aquistore CO2 storage site in Saskatchewan (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnogorska, M.; Samsonov, S.; White, D.

    2014-11-01

    The research objectives of the Aquistore CO2 storage project are to design, adapt, and test non-seismic monitoring methods for measurement, and verification of CO2 storage, and to integrate data to determine subsurface fluid distributions, pressure changes and associated surface deformation. Aquistore site is located near Estevan in Southern Saskatchewan on the South flank of the Souris River and west of the Boundary Dam Power Station and the historical part of Estevan coal mine in southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada. Several monitoring techniques were employed in the study area including advanced satellite Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) technique, GPS, tiltmeters and piezometers. The targeted CO2 injection zones are within the Winnipeg and Deadwood formations located at > 3000 m depth. An array of monitoring techniques was employed in the study area including advanced satellite Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) with established corner reflectors, GPS, tiltmeters and piezometers stations. We used airborne LIDAR data for topographic phase estimation, and DInSAR product geocoding. Ground deformation maps have been calculated using Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS) methodology from 134 RADARSAT-2 images, from five different beams, acquired during 20120612-20140706. We computed and interpreted nine time series for selected places. MSBAS results indicate slow ground deformation up to 1 cm/year not related to CO2 injection but caused by various natural and anthropogenic causes.

  14. Development of an empirical model to aid in designing airborne infection isolation rooms.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Charles S; Earnest, G Scott; Jensen, Paul A

    2007-03-01

    Airborne infection isolation rooms (AIIRs) house patients with tuberculosis, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and many other airborne infectious diseases. Currently, facility engineers and designers of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems have few analytical tools to estimate a room's leakage area and establish an appropriate flow differential (DeltaQ) in hospitals, shelters, and other facilities where communicable diseases are present. An accurate estimate of leakage area and selection of DeltaQ is essential for ensuring that there is negative pressure (i.e., pressure differential [DeltaP]) between an AIIR and adjoining areas. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers evaluated the relationship between DeltaQ and DeltaP in 67 AIIRs across the United States and in simulated AIIR. Data gathered in the simulated AIIR was used to develop an empirical model describing the relationship between DeltaQ, DeltaP, and leakage area. Data collected in health care facilities showed that the model accurately predicted the leakage area 44 of 48 times. Statistical analysis of the model and experimental validation showed that the model effectively estimated the actual leakage area from -39% to +22% with 90% confidence. The NIOSH model is an effective, cost-cutting tool that can be used by HVAC engineers and designers to estimate leakage area and select an appropriate DeltaQ in AIIRs to reduce the airborne transmission of disease.

  15. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): knowledge, attitudes, practices and sources of information among physicians answering a SARS fever hotline service.

    PubMed

    Deng, J-F; Olowokure, B; Kaydos-Daniels, S C; Chang, H-J; Barwick, R S; Lee, M-L; Deng, C-Y; Factor, S H; Chiang, C-E; Maloney, S A

    2006-01-01

    In June 2003, Taiwan introduced a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) telephone hotline service to provide concerned callers with rapid access to information, advice and appropriate referral where necessary. This paper reports an evaluation of the knowledge, attitude, practices and sources of information relating to SARS among physicians who staffed the SARS fever hotline service. A retrospective survey was conducted using a self-administered postal questionnaire. Participants were physicians who staffed a SARS hotline during the SARS epidemic in Taipei, Taiwan from June 1 to 10, 2003. A response rate of 83% was obtained. All respondents knew the causative agent of SARS, and knowledge regarding SARS features and preventive practices was good. However, only 54% of respondents knew the incubation period of SARS. Hospital guidelines and news media were the major information sources. In responding to two case scenarios most physicians were likely to triage callers at high risk of SARS appropriately, but not callers at low risk. Less than half of all respondents answered both scenarios correctly. The results obtained suggest that knowledge of SARS was generally good although obtained from both medical and non-medical sources. Specific knowledge was however lacking in certain areas and this affected the ability to appropriately triage callers. Standardized education and assessment of prior knowledge of SARS could improve the ability of physicians to triage callers in future outbreaks.

  16. Target vibration estimation in SAR based on phase-analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Weijie; Huang, Linlin

    2016-12-01

    An efficient vibration estimation method for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems based on phase-analysis method is presented. Small vibrations, which consist of multiple frequency components and are usually rather weak, introduce phase modulation in radar echoes. They contain important signatures of objects. Extracting and analyzing the phase from radar echoes is one of the significant approaches to acquire vibration characteristics. In order to separate different targets in different range cells, the proposed method acts the range compression and range migration correction on the radar echoes, followed by extracting the phase history of each target's radar echoes. Since the phase history contains the time-varying ranges from the targets to airborne radar besides the vibration signal, we apply wavelet transform to the phase history to extract the vibration signal. Then the vibration signatures would be estimated quantitatively. The method is a more efficient and convenient approach to estimate the vibration amplitudes and frequencies of one or more targets, whose vibration signal is a single-frequency or multi-frequency signal. Moreover, it can be applied in the case where the airborne radar moves along the desirable or undesirable trajectory. Simulation results indicate that this method provides a larger range of estimable vibration frequency, higher estimation precision, and lower computation complexity.

  17. Characterizing and estimating noise in InSAR and InSAR time series with MODIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhart, William D.; Lohman, Rowena B.

    2013-01-01

    InSAR time series analysis is increasingly used to image subcentimeter displacement rates of the ground surface. The precision of InSAR observations is often affected by several noise sources, including spatially correlated noise from the turbulent atmosphere. Under ideal scenarios, InSAR time series techniques can substantially mitigate these effects; however, in practice the temporal distribution of InSAR acquisitions over much of the world exhibit seasonal biases, long temporal gaps, and insufficient acquisitions to confidently obtain the precisions desired for tectonic research. Here, we introduce a technique for constraining the magnitude of errors expected from atmospheric phase delays on the ground displacement rates inferred from an InSAR time series using independent observations of precipitable water vapor from MODIS. We implement a Monte Carlo error estimation technique based on multiple (100+) MODIS-based time series that sample date ranges close to the acquisitions times of the available SAR imagery. This stochastic approach allows evaluation of the significance of signals present in the final time series product, in particular their correlation with topography and seasonality. We find that topographically correlated noise in individual interferograms is not spatially stationary, even over short-spatial scales (<10 km). Overall, MODIS-inferred displacements and velocities exhibit errors of similar magnitude to the variability within an InSAR time series. We examine the MODIS-based confidence bounds in regions with a range of inferred displacement rates, and find we are capable of resolving velocities as low as 1.5 mm/yr with uncertainties increasing to ∼6 mm/yr in regions with higher topographic relief.

  18. Simulation of SAR backscatter for forest vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Richa; Kumar, Shashi; Agrawal, Shefali

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most recent imaging technology to study the forest parameters. The invincible characteristics of microwave acquisition in cloudy regions and night imaging makes it a powerful tool to study dense forest regions. A coherent combination of radar polarimetry and interferometry (PolInSAR) enhances the accuracy of retrieved biophysical parameters. This paper attempts to address the issue of estimation of forest structural information caused due to instability of radar platforms through simulation of SAR image. The Terai Central Forest region situated at Haldwani area in Uttarakhand state of India was chosen as the study area. The system characteristics of PolInSAR dataset of Radarsat-2 SAR sensor was used for simulation process. Geometric and system specifications like platform altitude, center frequency, mean incidence angle, azimuth and range resolution were taken from metadata. From the field data it was observed that average tree height and forest stand density were 25 m and 300 stems/ha respectively. The obtained simulated results were compared with the sensor acquired master and slave intensity images. It was analyzed that for co-polarized horizontal component (HH), the mean values of simulated and real master image had a difference of 0.3645 with standard deviation of 0.63. Cross-polarized (HV) channel showed better results with mean difference of 0.06 and standard deviation of 0.1 while co-polarized vertical component (VV) did not show similar values. In case of HV polarization, mean variation between simulated and real slave images was found to be the least. Since cross-polarized channel is more sensitive to vegetation feature therefore better simulated results were obtained for this channel. Further the simulated images were processed using PolInSAR inversion modelling approach using three different techniques DEM differencing, Coherence Amplitude Inversion and Random Volume over Ground Inversion. DEM differencing

  19. Airborne infrared remote sensing characterization of submesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey; Marmorino, George; Miller, W. David; North, Ryan; Angel-Benavides, Ingrid; Baschek, Burckard

    2016-11-01

    Airborne remote sensing surveys off Santa Catalina Island, CA (33°30' N118°31' W) were conducted as part of a larger study of the occurrence and behavior of submesoscale phenomena. This builds upon previous work by DiGiacomo and Holt, who utilized SAR imagery to characterize the size and distribution of predominately cyclonic 'spiral eddies' in the Southern California Bight. In the present work the thermal surface expression of a single cyclonic eddy captured in February 2013 will be investigated. Advances made in methods to estimate eddy circulation and vorticity directly from the thermal imagery will be discussed and compared with in situ measurements. Inferences about localized mixing and flow instabilities can also be drawn from the imagery, and these too will be discussed in the context of in situ data. A simple model will be offered describing the three dimensional flow in the core of the eddy and how that can be used to explain the surface imagery. Connections between the signatures surrounding the eddy and the core itself will also be discussed in the context of the model.

  20. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  1. Requirements for airborne vector gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Colombo, O.; Hein, G.; Knickmeyer, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

  2. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  3. Cyberinfrastructure for Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004 the NASA Airborne Science Program has been prototyping and using infrastructure that enables researchers to interact with each other and with their instruments via network communications. This infrastructure uses satellite links and an evolving suite of applications and services that leverage open-source software. The use of these tools has increased near-real-time situational awareness during field operations, resulting in productivity improvements and the collection of better data. This paper describes the high-level system architecture and major components, with example highlights from the use of the infrastructure. The paper concludes with a discussion of ongoing efforts to transition to operational status.

  4. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  5. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

  6. Observation of pressure ridges in SAR images of sea ice: Scattering theory and comparison with observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Daida, J. M.; Shuchman, R. A.; Onstott, R. H.; Camiso, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Ridges and keels (hummocks and bummocks) in sea ice flows are important in sea ice research for both scientific and practical reasons. Sea ice movement and deformation is driven by internal and external stresses on the ice. Ridges and keels play important roles in both cases because they determine the external wind and current stresses via drag coefficients. For example, the drag coefficient over sea ice can vary by a factor of several depending on the fluid mechanical roughness length of the surface. This roughness length is thought to be strongly dependent on the ridge structures present. Thus, variations in ridge and keel structure can cause gradients in external stresses which must be balanced by internal stresses and possibly fracture of the ice. Ridging in sea ice is also a sign of fracture. In a practical sense, large ridges form the biggest impediment to surface travel over the ice or penetration through sea ice by ice-strengthened ships. Ridges also play an important role in the damage caused by sea ice to off-shore structures. Hence, observation and measurement of sea ice ridges is an important component of sea ice remote sensing. The research reported here builds on previous work, estimating the characteristics of ridges and leads in sea ice from SAR images. Our objective is to develop methods for quantitative measurement of sea ice ridges from SAR images. To make further progress, in particular, to estimate ridge height, a scattering model for ridges is needed. Our research approach for a ridge scattering model begins with a survey of the geometrical properties of ridges and a comparison with the characteristics of the surrounding ice. For this purpose we have used airborne optical laser (AOL) data collected during the 1987 Greenland Sea Experiment. These data were used to generate a spatial wavenumber spectrum for height variance for a typical ridge - the typical ridge is the average over 10 large ridges. Our first-order model radar scattering includes

  7. Animal models for SARS and MERS coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gretebeck, Lisa M; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), two strains of animal coronaviruses that crossed the species barrier to infect and cause severe respiratory infections in humans within the last 12 years, have taught us that coronaviruses represent a global threat that does not recognize international borders. We can expect to see other novel coronaviruses emerge in the future. An ideal animal model should reflect the clinical signs, viral replication and pathology seen in humans. In this review, we present factors to consider in establishing an animal model for the study of novel coronaviruses and compare the different animal models that have been employed to study SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. PMID:26184451

  8. International collaboration in SAR ground data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, John C.

    1993-01-01

    A set of considerations that are pertinent to future international cooperation in the area of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) ground data systems are presented. The considerations are as follows: (1) success of future spaceborne SAR missions will require multi-agency and/or multi-national collaboration; (2) ground processing is typically performed by each agency for their user base; (3) international standards are required to achieve a uniform data product independent of the processing center; (4) to reduce the aggregate cost of the ground data systems, collaboration is required in design and development; (5) effective utilization of the data by an international user community; (6) commercialization of data products; and (7) security of data systems.

  9. Neuromusculoskeletal disorders following SARS: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Stainsby, Brynne; Howitt, Scott; Porr, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To detail the presentation of three health care workers diagnosed with sudden acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) who later presented to a CMCC teaching clinic with neuromusculoskeletal sequelae and underwent conservative treatments. This case series aims to inform practitioners of the potential pathogenesis of these neuromuscular complaints and describes their treatment in a chiropractic practice. Clinical Features: Three patients presented with a variety of neurological, muscular and joint findings. Conservative treatment was aimed at decreasing hypertonic muscles, increasing joint mobility, and improving ability to perform activities of daily living. Intervention and Outcome: The conservative treatment approach utilized in these cases involved spinal manipulative therapy, soft tissue therapy, modalities, and rehabilitation. Outcome measures included subjective pain ratings, disability indices, and return to work. Conclusion: Three patients previously diagnosed with SARS presented with neuromusculoskeletal complaints and subjectively experienced intermittent relief of pain and improvement in disability status after conservative treatments. PMID:21403780

  10. Animal models for SARS and MERS coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Gretebeck, Lisa M; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-08-01

    The emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), two strains of animal coronaviruses that crossed the species barrier to infect and cause severe respiratory infections in humans within the last 12 years, have taught us that coronaviruses represent a global threat that does not recognize international borders. We can expect to see other novel coronaviruses emerge in the future. An ideal animal model should reflect the clinical signs, viral replication and pathology seen in humans. In this review, we present factors to consider in establishing an animal model for the study of novel coronaviruses and compare the different animal models that have been employed to study SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV.

  11. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  12. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  13. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  14. A Simple Method for Collecting Airborne Pollen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Peter G.; DiGiovanni, Franco; Ho, Rong H.; Taki, Hisatomo; Ferguson, Kristyn A.; Pawlowski, Agata K.

    2006-01-01

    Pollination is a broad area of study within biology. For many plants, pollen carried by wind is required for successful seed set. Airborne pollen also affects human health. To foster studies of airborne pollen, we introduce a simple device--the "megastigma"--for collecting pollen from the air. This device is flexible, yielding easily obtained data…

  15. Global Test Range: Toward Airborne Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Freudinger, Larry; DelFrate John H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planned global sensor network that will monitor the Earth's climate, and resources using airborne sensor systems. The vision is an intelligent, affordable Earth Observation System. Global Test Range is a lab developing trustworthy services for airborne instruments - a specialized Internet Service Provider. There is discussion of several current and planned missions.

  16. Meeting Review: Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Huebert, Barry; Wilson, Chuck

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings from the Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop are presented. The two central topics of discussion were the role of aerosols in atmospheric processes and the difficulties in characterizing aerosols. The following topics were discussed during the working sessions: airborne observations to date; identification of inlet design issues; inlet modeling needs and directions; objectives for aircraft experiments; and future laboratory and wind tunnel studies.

  17. Airborne Relay-Based Regional Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuman; Noh, Hongjun; Lim, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based pseudolite systems have some limitations, such as low vertical accuracy, multipath effects and near-far problems. These problems are not significant in airborne-based pseudolite systems. However, the monitoring of pseudolite positions is required because of the mobility of the platforms on which the pseudolites are mounted, and this causes performance degradation. To address these pseudolite system limitations, we propose an airborne relay-based regional positioning system that consists of a master station, reference stations, airborne relays and a user. In the proposed system, navigation signals are generated from the reference stations located on the ground and are relayed via the airborne relays. Unlike in conventional airborne-based systems, the user in the proposed system sequentially estimates both the locations of airborne relays and his/her own position. Therefore, a delay due to monitoring does not occur, and the accuracy is not affected by the movement of airborne relays. We conducted several simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. Based on the simulation results, we demonstrated that the proposed system guarantees a higher accuracy than airborne-based pseudolite systems, and it is feasible despite the existence of clock offsets among reference stations. PMID:26029953

  18. Airborne Global Positioning System Antenna System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-14

    GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ANTENNA SYSTEM DISTRIBUTION: SMC/ GP (3 cys); AFFSA...standard that airborne Global Positioning System ( GPS ) antenna system must meet to be identified with the applicable MSO marking. The similarity of...UNCLASSIFIED DOCUMENT NO. DATE NO. MSO-C144 14 Oct 04 Initial Release REV: REV: SHEET 1 OF 16 TITLE: AIRBORNE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM

  19. RISAT: first planned SAR mission of ISRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Tapan; Rana, S. S.; Tyagi, R. N.; Thyagarajan, K.

    2006-12-01

    SAR Payload of RISAT (Radar Imaging Satellite), the first SAR satellite from ISRO, is currently under development. This payload is based on active antenna technology, and it supports variety of resolution and swath requirements in C-band. Both conventional stripmap and scanSAR modes are supported with dual polarization operation. Additionally a quad polarization stripmap mode is provided for availing additional resource classification. In all these modes resolutions from 3m-50 m can be achieved with swath ranging 30 km -240 km. On experimental basis, a sliding spotlight mode is also available. The payload hardware is organized in such a way that that co and cross polarization images are available for any operating modes. Additionally, a quad polarization mode is also supported. Active array configuration of this payload called for development of many new technologies ranging from MMICS, TR modules, miniaturised power supplies, high speed digitisers, dual polarized printed antenna and distributed control systems. A completely new bus is being designed for aiding the payload operation. The RISAT spacecraft is configured around the payload to minimize the spacecraft weight, suitable for launching by ISRO's PSLV launcher. RISAT will be placed on dawn to dusk sunsynchronous polar orbit to ensure maximum solar power availability. All the basic building blocks have already crossed design stage and have undergone rigorous space qualification program. Presently a complete SAR with one tile has been integrated as design verification model and is under rigorous testing. This development ensured demonstration of end to end hardware, on-board control software and beam control behavior.

  20. Alaska SAR Facility mass storage, current system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddy, David; Chu, Eugene; Bicknell, Tom

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the mass storage systems that are currently in place at the Alaska SAR Facility (SAF). The architecture of the facility will be presented including specifications of the mass storage media that are currently used and the performances that we have realized from the various media. The distribution formats and media are also discussed. Because the facility is expected to service future sensors, the new requirements and possible solutions to these requirements are also discussed.

  1. Processing of polarametric SAR images. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Warrick, A.L.; Delaney, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a systematic method of combining multifrequency polarized SAR images. It is shown that the traditional methods of correlation, hard targets, and template matching fail to produce acceptable results. Hence, a new algorithm was developed and tested. The new approach combines the three traditional methods and an interpolation method. An example is shown that demonstrates the new algorithms performance. The results are summarized suggestions for future research are presented.

  2. Second Order Bragg Scattering in a SAR,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    accept the notion that the short- wave components of the ship wake are slightly distorted versions of the Kelvin wake, then there is the possibility of...scattering, at a given place, from a spectrum of waves . The Dabob Bay data indicates that there is little energy in the wake having wave numbers capable...observations do show considerable enhancement of waves of twice the Bragg wavelength at the angle where a SAR wake is observed.. Second order Bragg

  3. Transmission of SARS and MERS coronaviruses and influenza virus in healthcare settings: the possible role of dry surface contamination.

    PubMed

    Otter, J A; Donskey, C; Yezli, S; Douthwaite, S; Goldenberg, S D; Weber, D J

    2016-03-01

    Viruses with pandemic potential including H1N1, H5N1, and H5N7 influenza viruses, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)/Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses (CoV) have emerged in recent years. SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and influenza virus can survive on surfaces for extended periods, sometimes up to months. Factors influencing the survival of these viruses on surfaces include: strain variation, titre, surface type, suspending medium, mode of deposition, temperature and relative humidity, and the method used to determine the viability of the virus. Environmental sampling has identified contamination in field-settings with SARS-CoV and influenza virus, although the frequent use of molecular detection methods may not necessarily represent the presence of viable virus. The importance of indirect contact transmission (involving contamination of inanimate surfaces) is uncertain compared with other transmission routes, principally direct contact transmission (independent of surface contamination), droplet, and airborne routes. However, influenza virus and SARS-CoV may be shed into the environment and be transferred from environmental surfaces to hands of patients and healthcare providers. Emerging data suggest that MERS-CoV also shares these properties. Once contaminated from the environment, hands can then initiate self-inoculation of mucous membranes of the nose, eyes or mouth. Mathematical and animal models, and intervention studies suggest that contact transmission is the most important route in some scenarios. Infection prevention and control implications include the need for hand hygiene and personal protective equipment to minimize self-contamination and to protect against inoculation of mucosal surfaces and the respiratory tract, and enhanced surface cleaning and disinfection in healthcare settings.

  4. A 3-D SAR approach to IFSAR processing

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.; BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-03-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super-resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  5. Low-SAR metamaterial-inspired printed monopole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. I.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. T.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a low-SAR metamaterial-embedded planar monopole antenna is introduced for a wireless communication system. A printed monopole antenna is designed for modern mobile, which operates in GSM, UMTS, LTE, WLAN, and Bluetooth frequency bands. A metamaterial structure is designed to use in the mobile handset with a multi-band printed monopole antenna. The finite integration technique of the CST microwave studio is used in this study. The measurement of antenna performances is taken in an anechoic chamber, and the SAR values are measured using COMOSAR system. The results indicate that metamaterial structure leads to reduce SAR without affecting antenna performance significantly. According to the measured results, the metamaterial attachment leads to reduce 87.7% peak SAR, 68.2% 1-g SAR, and 46.78% 10-g SAR compared to antenna without metamaterial.

  6. SAR image simulation and verification for urban structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijie, Xia; Xiaojie, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The application of high-resolution space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) becomes more and more popular because of its all-weather and all-time data acquisition capability. However, the interpretation of SAR image can be rather difficult since there are tremendous differences between SAR images and optical images. SAR image simulation is helpful for interpreting SAR images. In this article, a practical approach of SAR image simulation is proposed for urban structures based on Incremental Length Diffraction Coefficients and Shooting and Bouncing Rays (SBR). SBR adopts both GO (Geometrical Optics) and PO (Physical Optics) to calculate the scattered field of targets. Models of buildings with slope roof and flat roof are simulated and inversed. Inversion results coincide well with models and verify the high precision of our approach.

  7. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Gurrola, Eric; Sacco, Gian Franco; Zebker, Howard

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a flexible and extensible Interferometric SAR (InSAR) Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) for geodetic image processing. ISCE was designed from the ground up as a geophysics community tool for generating stacks of interferograms that lend themselves to various forms of time-series analysis, with attention paid to accuracy, extensibility, and modularity. The framework is python-based, with code elements rigorously componentized by separating input/output operations from the processing engines. This allows greater flexibility and extensibility in the data models, and creates algorithmic code that is less susceptible to unnecessary modification when new data types and sensors are available. In addition, the components support provenance and checkpointing to facilitate reprocessing and algorithm exploration. The algorithms, based on legacy processing codes, have been adapted to assume a common reference track approach for all images acquired from nearby orbits, simplifying and systematizing the geometry for time-series analysis. The framework is designed to easily allow user contributions, and is distributed for free use by researchers. ISCE can process data from the ALOS, ERS, EnviSAT, Cosmo-SkyMed, RadarSAT-1, RadarSAT-2, and TerraSAR-X platforms, starting from Level-0 or Level 1 as provided from the data source, and going as far as Level 3 geocoded deformation products. With its flexible design, it can be extended with raw/meta data parsers to enable it to work with radar data from other platforms

  8. Extraction of linear features on SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyi; Li, Deren; Mei, Xin

    2006-10-01

    Linear features are usually extracted from SAR imagery by a few edge detectors derived from the contrast ratio edge detector with a constant probability of false alarm. On the other hand, the Hough Transform is an elegant way of extracting global features like curve segments from binary edge images. Randomized Hough Transform can reduce the computation time and memory usage of the HT drastically. While Randomized Hough Transform will bring about a great deal of cells invalid during the randomized sample. In this paper, we propose a new approach to extract linear features on SAR imagery, which is an almost automatic algorithm based on edge detection and Randomized Hough Transform. The presented improved method makes full use of the directional information of each edge candidate points so as to solve invalid cumulate problems. Applied result is in good agreement with the theoretical study, and the main linear features on SAR imagery have been extracted automatically. The method saves storage space and computational time, which shows its effectiveness and applicability.

  9. Formation geometries for multistatic SAR tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, Giancarmine; Renga, Alfredo; D'Errico, Marco

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyzes relative orbit design for multi-satellite radar missions aimed at multistatic SAR tomography. To this end, formation requirements and performance parameters are derived by adapting existing models for SAR tomography to single pass techniques. Then, relative trajectory design is carried out on the basis of an analytical relative motion model including secular J2 effects. By properly scaling the differences in orbital parameters, different formation geometries enable uniform sampling of the effective baseline along the whole orbit. The difference among the possible choices lies in latitude coverage, formation stability, and collision avoidance aspects. A numerical example of relative trajectory design is discussed considering L-band as operating frequency. In particular, achievable height resolution and unambiguous height along the orbit are pointed out for a multi-cartwheel, a multi-pendulum, and a multi-helix formation. In view of future implementation of a multi-satellite SAR tomography mission, new concepts aimed at the reduction of required satellites, and long term evolution of designed formations, are also discussed.

  10. SAR Image Segmentation Using Morphological Attribute Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, M.; Thiele, A.; Schulz, K.; Hinz, S.

    2014-08-01

    In the last years, the spatial resolution of remote sensing sensors and imagery has continuously improved. Focusing on spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, the satellites of the current generation (TerraSAR-X, COSMO-SykMed) are able to acquire images with sub-meter resolution. Indeed, high resolution imagery is visually much better interpretable, but most of the established pixel-based analysis methods have become more or less impracticable since, in high resolution images, self-sufficient objects (vehicle, building) are represented by a large number of pixels. Methods dealing with Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) provide help. Objects (segments) are groupings of pixels resulting from image segmentation algorithms based on homogeneity criteria. The image set is represented by image segments, which allows the development of rule-based analysis schemes. For example, segments can be described or categorized by their local neighborhood in a context-based manner. In this paper, a novel method for the segmentation of high resolution SAR images is presented. It is based on the calculation of morphological differential attribute profiles (DAP) which are analyzed pixel-wise in a region growing procedure. The method distinguishes between heterogeneous and homogeneous image content and delivers a precise segmentation result.

  11. Airborne synthetic aperture radar observations of “spiral eddy” slick patterns in the Southern California Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorino, George O.; Holt, Benjamin; Molemaker, M. Jeroen; Digiacomo, Paul M.; Sletten, Mark A.

    2010-05-01

    Repeat sampling on hourly time scales using an airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is used to investigate the occurrence and evolving characteristics of spiral-shaped slick patterns, commonly presumed to be indicators of submesoscale ocean eddies, in the area around Santa Catalina Island, California (˜33.4°N, 118.4°W). Simultaneous SAR imagery and boat survey data are examined over two ˜5 h long periods spaced 3 days apart in April 2003. The SAR imagery reveals several spiral-like patterns, roughly 5 km in diameter, occurring downstream of the western end of Catalina. We believe that the most likely formation mechanism for these patterns is current-wake instability related to the flow of the Southern California Countercurrent along the north shore of Catalina. In one case, there is an observed cold-core eddy and vortex sheet attached to the tip of the island, similar to island-wake simulations done by Dong and McWilliams (2007). In another case, the SAR imagery shows a series of slick patterns that, at least initially, resemble spiral eddies, but the data show no clear evidence of actual ocean eddies being present either at depth or through a rotating surface expression. A speculation is that such features signify island-wake eddies that are relatively weak and dissipate quickly. An unexpected finding was how quickly a spiral slick pattern could deteriorate, suggesting a time scale for the surface feature of the order of only several hours. An implication of this result is that care is needed when interpreting a single satellite SAR imagery for evidence of active submesoscale eddies. Recommendations are made for future field studies.

  12. SAR Assimilation for Near-Shore Spectral Wave Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    completed during the six months since the inception of the program includes development of the mathematical framework for the assimilation procedure and...improvements in the convergence properties of the basic SAR assimilation procedure . RESULTS The expression for the predicted SAR-image spectrum...and hydrodynamic effects. The above SAR model along with the SWAN model form the basis for the assimilation procedure used in this study. The

  13. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus SarA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Sterba, Kristen M; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Blevins, Jon S; Hurlburt, Barry K; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2003-08-01

    The staphylococcal accessory regulator locus (sarA) encodes a DNA-binding protein (SarA) that modulates expression of over 100 genes. Whether this occurs via a direct interaction between SarA and cis elements associated with its target genes is unclear, partly because the definitive characteristics of a SarA binding site have not been identified. In this work, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) were used to identify a SarA binding site(s) upstream of the SarA-regulated gene cna. The results suggest the existence of multiple high-affinity binding sites within the cna promoter region. Using a SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) procedure and purified, recombinant SarA, we also selected DNA targets that contain a high-affinity SarA binding site from a random pool of DNA fragments. These fragments were subsequently cloned and sequenced. Randomly chosen clones were also examined by EMSA. These DNA fragments bound SarA with affinities comparable to those of recognized SarA-regulated genes, including cna, fnbA, and sspA. The composition of SarA-selected DNAs was AT rich, which is consistent with the nucleotide composition of the Staphylococcus aureus genome. Alignment of selected DNAs revealed a 7-bp consensus (ATTTTAT) that was present with no more than one mismatch in 46 of 56 sequenced clones. By using the same criteria, consensus binding sites were also identified upstream of the S. aureus genes spa, fnbA, sspA, agr, hla, and cna. With the exception of cna, which has not been previously examined, this 7-bp motif was within the putative SarA binding site previously associated with each gene.

  14. Processing of TerraSAR-X payload data: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breit, H.; Balss, U.; Bamler, R.; Fritz, T.; Eineder, M.

    2007-10-01

    TerraSAR-X is Germany's new radar remote sensing flagship. It carries an advanced high-resolution X-band SAR instrument. The key element of the system is the active phased array antenna nominally operated with a bandwidth of 100 MHz or 150 MHz and an experimental 300 MHz capability. The instrument's flexibility with respect to electronic beam steering and pulse-to-pulse polarization switching allows the acquisition of SAR data in Stripmap, Spotlight and ScanSAR imaging configurations in different polarization modes for a wide range of incidence angles. The mission is implemented in the framework of a public-private partnership between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and EADS Astrium GmbH Germany and will provide high resolution SAR data products for commercial use and scientific exploitation. Processing of the payload data will be performed at DLR's Payload Ground Segment (PGS) for TerraSAR-X. The central part of PGS is the TerraSAR Multi-Mode SAR Processor (TMSP) focusing the SAR data in a unified way for the different imaging configurations. A wide range of processing options spanning from phase preserving complex products in slant range geometry to orthorectified terrain corrected intensity images lead to a comprehensive collection of SAR product types and variants. During the 5 months lasting commissioning phase the complete processing chain will be properly tuned and adjusted. The TMSP algorithms have to be configured, e.g. thresholds for calibration pulse analysis, estimation window sizes for SAR data analysis, parameterization of estimation algorithms. Also the configuration of product variants with respect to resolution and radiometric quality will be checked and refined. This paper shortly reviews the different imaging configurations and product variants and gives a report on the SAR processor checkout activities and presents the first results.

  15. Monitoring Building Deformation with InSAR: Experiments and Validation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kui; Yan, Li; Huang, Guoman; Chen, Chu; Wu, Zhengpeng

    2016-12-20

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) techniques are increasingly applied for monitoring land subsidence. The advantages of InSAR include high accuracy and the ability to cover large areas; nevertheless, research validating the use of InSAR on building deformation is limited. In this paper, we test the monitoring capability of the InSAR in experiments using two landmark buildings; the Bohai Building and the China Theater, located in Tianjin, China. They were selected as real examples to compare InSAR and leveling approaches for building deformation. Ten TerraSAR-X images spanning half a year were used in Permanent Scatterer InSAR processing. These extracted InSAR results were processed considering the diversity in both direction and spatial distribution, and were compared with true leveling values in both Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and measurement of error analyses. The detailed experimental results for the Bohai Building and the China Theater showed a high correlation between InSAR results and the leveling values. At the same time, the two Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) indexes had values of approximately 1 mm. These analyses show that a millimeter level of accuracy can be achieved by means of InSAR technique when measuring building deformation. We discuss the differences in accuracy between OLS regression and measurement of error analyses, and compare the accuracy index of leveling in order to propose InSAR accuracy levels appropriate for monitoring buildings deformation. After assessing the advantages and limitations of InSAR techniques in monitoring buildings, further applications are evaluated.

  16. Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to UXO Delineation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) to UXO Delineation May 2004 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) to UXO Delineation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 39 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified

  17. A Generalizable Hierarchical Bayesian Model for Persistent SAR Change Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    6] K. Ranney and M. Soumekh, “Signal subspace change detection in averaged multilook sar imagery,” Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on...A Generalizable Hierarchical Bayesian Model for Persistent SAR Change Detection Gregory E. Newstadta, Edmund G. Zelniob, and Alfred O. Hero IIIa...Base, OH, 45433, USA ABSTRACT This paper proposes a hierarchical Bayesian model for multiple-pass, multiple antenna synthetic aperture radar ( SAR

  18. Monitoring Building Deformation with InSAR: Experiments and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kui; Yan, Li; Huang, Guoman; Chen, Chu; Wu, Zhengpeng

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) techniques are increasingly applied for monitoring land subsidence. The advantages of InSAR include high accuracy and the ability to cover large areas; nevertheless, research validating the use of InSAR on building deformation is limited. In this paper, we test the monitoring capability of the InSAR in experiments using two landmark buildings; the Bohai Building and the China Theater, located in Tianjin, China. They were selected as real examples to compare InSAR and leveling approaches for building deformation. Ten TerraSAR-X images spanning half a year were used in Permanent Scatterer InSAR processing. These extracted InSAR results were processed considering the diversity in both direction and spatial distribution, and were compared with true leveling values in both Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and measurement of error analyses. The detailed experimental results for the Bohai Building and the China Theater showed a high correlation between InSAR results and the leveling values. At the same time, the two Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) indexes had values of approximately 1 mm. These analyses show that a millimeter level of accuracy can be achieved by means of InSAR technique when measuring building deformation. We discuss the differences in accuracy between OLS regression and measurement of error analyses, and compare the accuracy index of leveling in order to propose InSAR accuracy levels appropriate for monitoring buildings deformation. After assessing the advantages and limitations of InSAR techniques in monitoring buildings, further applications are evaluated. PMID:27999403

  19. Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-12-01

    Proper waveform parameter selection allows collecting Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) phase history data on a rotated grid in the Fourier Space of the scene being imaged. Subsequent image formation preserves the rotated geometry to allow SAR images to be formed at arbitrary rotation angles without the use of computationally expensive interpolation or resampling operations. This should be useful where control of image orientation is desired such as generating squinted stripmaps and VideoSAR applications, among others.

  20. ISMAR: an airborne submillimetre radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Stuart; Lee, Clare; Moyna, Brian; Philipp, Martin; Rule, Ian; Rogers, Stuart; King, Robert; Oldfield, Matthew; Rea, Simon; Henry, Manju; Wang, Hui; Chawn Harlow, R.

    2017-02-01

    The International Submillimetre Airborne Radiometer (ISMAR) has been developed as an airborne demonstrator for the Ice Cloud Imager (ICI) that will be launched on board the next generation of European polar-orbiting weather satellites in the 2020s. It currently has 15 channels at frequencies between 118 and 664 GHz which are sensitive to scattering by cloud ice, and additional channels at 874 GHz are being developed. This paper presents an overview of ISMAR and describes the algorithms used for calibration. The main sources of bias in the measurements are evaluated, as well as the radiometric sensitivity in different measurement scenarios. It is shown that for downward views from high altitude, representative of a satellite viewing geometry, the bias in most channels is less than ±1 K and the NEΔT is less than 2 K, with many channels having an NEΔT less than 1 K. In-flight calibration accuracy is also evaluated by comparison of high-altitude zenith views with radiative-transfer simulations.