Science.gov

Sample records for airborne sar images

  1. Urban area structuring mapping using an airborne polarimetric SAR image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonetto, Elisabeth; Malak, Charbel

    2009-09-01

    For several years, image classification and pattern recognition algorithms have been developed for the land coverage mapping using radar and multispectral imagery with medium to large pixel size. As several satellites now distribute submetric-pixel and metric-pixel images (for example QUICKBIRD,TERRASAR-X), the research turns to the study of the structure of cities: building structuring, grassy areas, road networks, etc, and the physical description of the urban surfaces. In that context, we propose to underline new potentialities of submetric-pixel polarimetric SAR images. We deal with the characterization of roofs and the mapping of trees. For that purpose, a first analysis based on photo-interpretation and the assessement of several polarimetric descriptors is carried out. Then, an image classification scheme is built using the polarimetric H/alpha-Wishart algorithm, followed by a decision tree. This one is based on the most pertinent polarimetric descriptors and aims at reducing the classification errors. The result proves the potential of such data. Our work relies on an image of a suburban area, acquired by the airborne RAMSES SAR sensor of ONERA.

  2. Image quality specification and maintenance for airborne SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinard, Mark S.

    2004-08-01

    Specification, verification, and maintenance of image quality over the lifecycle of an operational airborne SAR begin with the specification for the system itself. Verification of image quality-oriented specification compliance can be enhanced by including a specification requirement that a vendor provide appropriate imagery at the various phases of the system life cycle. The nature and content of the imagery appropriate for each stage of the process depends on the nature of the test, the economics of collection, and the availability of techniques to extract the desired information from the data. At the earliest lifecycle stages, Concept and Technology Development (CTD) and System Development and Demonstration (SDD), the test set could include simulated imagery to demonstrate the mathematical and engineering concepts being implemented thus allowing demonstration of compliance, in part, through simulation. For Initial Operational Test and Evaluation (IOT&E), imagery collected from precisely instrumented test ranges and targets of opportunity consisting of a priori or a posteriori ground-truthed cultural and natural features are of value to the analysis of product quality compliance. Regular monitoring of image quality is possible using operational imagery and automated metrics; more precise measurements can be performed with imagery of instrumented scenes, when available. A survey of image quality measurement techniques is presented along with a discussion of the challenges of managing an airborne SAR program with the scarce resources of time, money, and ground-truthed data. Recommendations are provided that should allow an improvement in the product quality specification and maintenance process with a minimal increase in resource demands on the customer, the vendor, the operational personnel, and the asset itself.

  3. Method of airborne SAR image match integrating multi-information for block adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. C.; Huang, G. M.; Zhao, Z.; Lu, L. J.

    2015-06-01

    For the automation of SAR image Block Adjustment, this paper proposed a method of SAR image matching integrating multiinformation. It takes full advantage of SAR image geometric information, feature information, gray-related information and external auxiliary terrain information for SAR image matching. And then Image Tie Points (ITPs) of Block Adjustment can be achieved automatically. The main parts of extracting ITPs automatically include: First, SAR images were rectified geometrically based on the geometric information and external auxiliary terrain information (existed DEM) before match. Second, ground grid points with a certain interval can be get in the block area and approximate ITPs were acquired based on external auxiliary terrain information. Then match reference point was extracted for homologous image blocks with Harris feature detection operator and ITPs were obtained with pyramid matching based on gray-related information. At last, ITPs were transferred from rectified images to original SAR images and used in block adjustment. In the experiment, X band airborne SAR images acquired by Chinese airborne SAR system - CASMSAR system were used to make up the block. The result had showed that the method is effective for block adjustment of SAR data.

  4. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  5. A Refined Algorithm On The Estimation Of Residual Motion Errors In Airborne SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xuelian; Xiang, Maosheng; Yue, Huanyin; Guo, Huadong

    2010-10-01

    Due to the lack of accuracy in the navigation system, residual motion errors (RMEs) frequently appear in the airborne SAR image. For very high resolution SAR imaging and repeat-pass SAR interferometry, the residual motion errors must be estimated and compensated. We have proposed a new algorithm before to estimate the residual motion errors for an individual SAR image. It exploits point-like targets distributed along the azimuth direction, and not only corrects the phase, but also improves the azimuth focusing. But the required point targets are selected by hand, which is time- and labor-consuming. In addition, the algorithm is sensitive to noises. In this paper, a refined algorithm is proposed aiming at these two shortcomings. With real X-band airborne SAR data, the feasibility and accuracy of the refined algorithm are demonstrated.

  6. Calibration of airborne SAR interferograms using multisquint-processed image pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prats, Pau; Mallorqui, Jordi J.; Reigber, Andreas; Broquetas, Antoni

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents two different approaches to detect and correct phase errors appearing in interferometric airborne SAR sensors due to the lack of precision in the navigation system. The first one is intended for interferometric pairs with high coherence, and the second one for low coherent ones. Both techniques are based on a multisquint processing approach, i.e., by processing the same image pairs with different squint angles we can combine the information of different interferograms to obtain the desired phase correction. Airborne single- and repeat-pass interferometric data from the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) Experimental airborne SAR is used to validate the method.

  7. Lineaments from airborne SAR images and the 1988 Saguenay earthquake, Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.W.; Schmitt, L.; Woussen, G.; Duberger, R. )

    1993-08-01

    Airborne SAR images provided essential clues to the tectonic setting of (1) the MbLg 6.5 Saguenay earthquake of 25 November 1988, (2) the Charlevoix-Kamouraska seismic source zone, and (3) some of the low *eve* seismic activity in the Eastern seismic background zone of Canada. The event occurred in the southeastern part of the Canadian Shield in an area where the boundary between the Saguenay graben and the Jacques Cartier horst is not well defined. These two tectonic blocks are both associated with the Iapetan St-Lawrence rift. These blocks exhibit several important structural breaks and distinct domains defined by the lineament orientations, densities, and habits. Outcrop observations confirm that several lineament sets correspond to Precambrian ductile shear zones reactivated as brittle faults during the Phanerozoic. In addition, the northeast and southwest limits of recent seismic activity in the Charlevoix-Kamouraska zone correspond to major elements of the fracture pattern identified on the SAR images. These fractures appear to be related to the interaction of the Charlevoix astrobleme with the tectonic features of the area. 20 refs.

  8. MAPSAR Image Simulation Based on L-band Polarimetric Data from the SAR-R99B Airborne Sensor (SIVAM System)

    PubMed Central

    Mura, José Claudio; Paradella, Waldir Renato; Dutra, Luciano Vieira; dos Santos, João Roberto; Rudorff, Bernardo Friedrich Theodor; de Miranda, Fernando Pellon; da Silva, Mario Marcos Quintino; da Silva, Wagner Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology applied to generate simulated multipolarized L-band SAR images of the MAPSAR (Multi-Application Purpose SAR) satellite from the airborne SAR R99B sensor (SIVAM System). MAPSAR is a feasibility study conducted by INPE (National Institute for Space Research) and DLR (German Aerospace Center) targeting a satellite L-band SAR innovative mission for assessment, management and monitoring of natural resources. Examples of simulated products and their applications are briefly discussed. PMID:22389590

  9. Imaging fault slip variation along the central San Andreas fault from satellite, airborne InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Lundgren, P.; Fielding, E. J.; Hensley, S.

    2011-12-01

    The improved spatiotemporal resolution of surface deformation from recent satellite and airborne InSAR measurements provides great potential to improve our understanding of faulting processes and earthquake hazard for a given fault system. A major plate boundary fault in central California, the central San Andreas fault (CSAF) displays a spectrum of complex fault slip behaviors with creeping in its central segment that decreases towards its northwest and southeast ends where the fault transitions to being locked. In the north the CSAF branches into two sub-parallel faults that are both actively accommodating plate motion. To the south, near the Parkfield transition, large earthquakes have occurred with at least six Mw ~6.0 events since 1857, most recently in 2004. To understand the complexity and variety of fault slip behaviors and fault mechanics, we integrate satellite and airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) repeat pass interferometry (RPI) observations, with GPS measurements from the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and regional campaign networks to estimate fault slip and shallow slip deficits along the CSAF. Existing C-band ERS-1/2, Envisat and Radarsat SAR data provide long archives of SAR data over the region but are subject to severe decorrelation. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's ALOS satellite has made less frequent acquisitions (5-6/yr per track) since 2006 but its PALSAR L-band sensor provides much improved coherence compared to shorter wavelength radar data. More recently, the NASA UAVSAR airborne SAR has repeated fault perpendicular adjacent swaths imaged from opposing look directions and fault parallel swath flights over the CSAF over the past three years and provides an improved imaging of fault slip related deformation at finer spatial resolution than previous platforms (~6m at 12 azimuth x 3 range looks). Compared to C-band instruments, the UAVSAR provides nearly complete spatial coverage. Compared to the ALOS mission, the UAVSAR

  10. ISRO's dual frequency airborne SAR pre-cursor to NISAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, V. Manavala; Suneela, T. J. V. D.; Bhan, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have jointly embarked on NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) operating in L-band and S-band, which will map Earth's surface every 12 days. As a pre-cursor to the NISAR mission, ISRO is planning an airborne SAR (L&S band) which will deliver NISAR analogue data products to the science community. ISRO will develop all the hardware with the aim of adhering to system design aspects of NISAR to the maximum extent possible. It is a fully polarimetric stripmap SAR and can be operated in single, dual, compact, quasi-quad and full polarimetry modes. It has wide incidence angle coverage from 24°-77° with swath coverage from 5.5km to 15 km. Apart from simultaneous imaging operations, this system can also operate in standalone L/S SAR modes. This system is planned to operate from an aircraft platform with nominal altitude of 8000meters. Antenna for this SAR will be rigidly mounted to the aircraft, whereas, motion compensation will be implemented in the software processor to generate data products. Data products for this airborne SAR will be generated in slant & ground range azimuth dimension and geocoded in HDF5/Geotiff formats. This airborne SAR will help to prepare the Indian scientific community for optimum utilization of NISAR data. In-order to collect useful science data, airborne campaigns are planned from end of 2016 onwards.

  11. CARABAS - an airborne VHF SAR system

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, B.; Frolined, P.O.; Gustavsson, A.

    1996-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in imaging radar systems operating at low frequencies, Examples of civilian and military applications are detection of stealth-designed man-made objects, targets hidden under foliage, biomass estimation, and penetration into glaciers or ground. CARABAS (Coherent All Radio Band Sensing) is a new airborne SAR system developed by FOA. It is designed for operation in the lowest part of the VHF band (20-90 NHz), using horizontal polarisation. This frequency region gives the system a good ability to penetrate vegetation and to some extent ground. CARABAS is the first known SAR sensor with a capability of diffraction limited imaging, i.e. a resolution in magnitude of the adopted wavelengths. A Sabreliner business jet aircraft is used as the airborne platform. Critical parts in the development have been the antenna system, the receiver and the processing algorithms. Based upon the experiences gained with CARABAS I a major system upgrade is now taking place. The new CARABAS II system is scheduled to fly in May 1996. This system is designed to give operational performance while CARABAS I was used to verify the feasibility. The first major field campaigns are planned for the second half of 1996. CARABAS II is jointly developed by FOA and Ericsson Microwave Systems AB in Sweden. This paper will give an overview of the system design and data collected with the current radar system, including some results for forested regions. The achieved system performance will be discussed, with a presentation of the major modifications made in the new CARABAS 11 system. 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Vegetation canopy discrimination and biomass assessment using multipolarized airborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Held, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    Multipolarized airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data were acquired over a largely agricultural test site near Macomb, Illinois, in conjunction with the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B) experiment in October 1984. The NASA/JPL L-band SAR operating at 1.225 GHz made a series of daily overflights with azimuth view angles both parallel and orthogonal to those of SIR-B. The SAR data was digitally recorded in the quadpolarization configuration. An extensive set of ground measurements were obtained throughout the test site and include biophysical and soil measurements of approximately 400 agricultural fields. Preliminary evaluation of some of the airborne SAR imagery indicates a great potential for crop discrimination and assessment of canopy condition. False color composites constructed from the combination of three linear polarizations (HH, VV, and HV) were found to be clearly superior to any single polarization for purposes of crop classification. In addition, an image constructed using the HH return to modulate intensity and the phase difference between HH and VV returns to modulate chroma indicates a clear capability for assessment of canopy height and/or biomass. In particular, corn fields heavily damaged by infestations of corn borer are readily distinguished from noninfested fields.

  13. Similarity measures of full polarimetric SAR images fusion for improved SAR image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, H.

    2015-06-01

    China's first airborne SAR mapping system (CASMSAR) developed by Chinese Academy of Surveying and Mapping can acquire high-resolution and full polarimetric (HH, HV, VH and VV) Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. It has the ability to acquire X-band full polarimetric SAR data at a resolution of 0.5m. However, the existence of speckles which is inherent in SAR imagery affects visual interpretation and image processing badly, and challenges the assumption that conjugate points appear similar to each other in matching processing. In addition, researches show that speckles are multiplicative speckles, and most similarity measures of SAR image matching are sensitive to them. Thus, matching outcomes of SAR images acquired by most similarity measures are not reliable and with bad accuracy. Meanwhile, every polarimetric SAR image has different backscattering information of objects from each other and four polarimetric SAR data contain most basic and a large amount of redundancy information to improve matching. Therefore, we introduced logarithmically transformation and a stereo matching similarity measure into airborne full polarimetric SAR imagery. Firstly, in order to transform the multiplicative speckles into additivity ones and weaken speckles' influence on similarity measure, logarithmically transformation have to be taken to all images. Secondly, to prevent performance degradation of similarity measure caused by speckles, measure must be free or insensitive of additivity speckles. Thus, we introduced a stereo matching similarity measure, called Normalized Cross-Correlation (NCC), into full polarimetric SAR image matching. Thirdly, to take advantage of multi-polarimetric data and preserve the best similarity measure value, four measure values calculated between left and right single polarimetric SAR images are fused as final measure value for matching. The method was tested for matching under CASMSAR data. The results showed that the method delivered an effective

  14. BioSAR Airborne Biomass Sensing System

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.L.; Johnson, P.

    2007-05-24

    This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist American Electronics, Inc. test a new technology--BioSAR. BioSAR is a an airborne, low frequency (80-120 MHz {approx} FM radio frequencies) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology which was designed and built for NASA by ZAI-Amelex under Patrick Johnson's direction. At these frequencies, leaves and small branches are nearly transparent and the majority of the energy reflected from the forest and returned to the radar is from the tree trunks. By measuring the magnitude of the back scatter, the volume of the tree trunk and therefore the biomass of the trunks can be inferred. The instrument was successfully tested on tropical rain forests in Panama. Patrick Johnson, with American Electronics, Inc received a Phase II SBIR grant from DOE Office of Climate Change to further test and refine the instrument. Mr Johnson sought ORNL expertise in measuring forest biomass in order for him to further validate his instrument. ORNL provided ground truth measurements of forest biomass at three locations--the Oak Ridge Reservation, Weyerhaeuser Co. commercial pine plantations in North Carolina, and American Energy and Power (AEP) Co. hardwood forests in southern Ohio, and facilitated flights over these forests. After Mr. Johnson processed the signal data from BioSAR instrument, the processed data were given to ORNL and we attempted to derive empirical relationships between the radar signals and the ground truth forest biomass measurements using standard statistical techniques. We were unsuccessful in deriving such relationships. Shortly before the CRADA ended, Mr Johnson discovered that FM signal from local radio station broadcasts had interfered with the back scatter measurements such that the bulk of the signal received by the BioSAR instrument was not backscatter from the radar but rather was local radio station signals.

  15. Temporal multiparameter airborne DLR E-SAR images for crop monitoring: summary of the CLEOPATRA campaign 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmullius, Christiane C.; Nithack, Juergen

    1997-01-01

    From May 11 to July 31, 1992 the Cloud Experiment OberPfaffenhofen And Transports took place as a field experimental contribution to the global energy and water cycle experiment. The DLR Institute of Radio Frequency Technology participated with its experimental SAR system E- SAR. Multitemporal X-, C- and L-band data from 8 dates and three ERS-1 images between May 20 and July 30, 1992 are analyzed in regard to the influence of changing plant backscatter constituents and to investigate the impact of increasing ground cover in the different wavelength on soil moisture mapping. Backscatter curves of four crops are shown, which indicate the possibility for crop monitoring and preferred times for crop classification. Detection of soil moisture changes is only possible with L-band and only under grain crops. Maximum likelihood and isocluster classifications were applied on several single- and multifrequency, mono- and multitemporal channel combinations. The overall classification accuracies were higher than with supervised methods. Maximum likelihood classification allowed identification of ten crop types with accuracies of up to 84 percent, when a temporal multifrequency data set was used.

  16. Airborne SAR/IFSAR for mapping in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayakula, Thongthit

    There are many problems in topographic mapping in an urban area. Traditional land survey is a very time consuming technique and can be very expensive. Photogrammetry is a popular choice but there are some problems such as clouds and limited operational time. Since Synthetic Aperture Radar, (SAR), is an active remote sensing system and its signal can penetrate through clouds, it can be operated at any time of day and is a independent of the weather. SAR could be a good solution for topographic mapping in an urban area. Combining SAR data and Interferometric radar technology can provide enough information for topographic mapping. Information can be extracted from SAR intensity Image. This thesis focuses on feature extraction and classification for topographic mapping in an urban area from airborne interferometric SAR data. A new algorithm is described which is simple and practical but yet very efficient for feature extraction and for object-based feature classification. An adapted Canny-Petrou-Kittler algorithm is applied for edge detection. Since the algorithm provides good detection, good localization and only one response to a single edge, it is an ideal edge detection for dense urban areas. Since the SAR image is noisy by its nature, small weak edges are expected. The modified non-maximal technique is also proposed to reduce unwanted edge. The technique of generation of bald earth DEM is proposed to obtain a normalised DEM for feature extraction. Region growing from edge detection is then applied to extract a more accurate shape of the feature and generate feature surface by using topographic parameters. The extracted feature is then classified by object-oriented classification technique, in which the classification is performed at object level not pixel level. And at the end of the process 3D city model can be produced.

  17. Mapping Slumgullion Landslide in Colorado, USA Using Airborne Repeat-Pass InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Wang, G.; Lu, Z.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.; Cao, N.; Zaugg, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) uses two or more SAR images over the same area to determine landscape topography or ground deformation. An interferogram, generated by the phase components of two coherent SAR images, depicts range changes between the radar and the ground resolution elements, and can be used to derive both landscape topography and subtle changes in surface elevation. However, spaceborne repeat-pass interferometry has two main drawbacks: effects due to differences in atmospheric temperature, pressure, and water vapour at two observation times, and loss of coherence due to long spatial and temporal baselines between observations. Airborne repeat-pass interferometry does not suffer from these drawbacks. The atmospheric effect in case of airborne DInSAR becomes negligible due to smaller swath coverage, and the coherence can be maintained by using smaller spatial and temporal baselines. However, the main technical limitation concerning airborne DInSAR is the need of precise motion compensation with an accurate navigation system to correct for the significant phase errors due to typical flight instability from air turbulence. Here, we present results from a pilot study conducted on July 2015 using both X-band and L-band SlimSAR airborne system over the Slumgullion landslide in Colorado in order to (1) acquire the differential interferograms from the airborne platform, (2) understand their source of errors, and (3) pave a way to improve the precision of the derived surface deformation. The landslide movement estimated from airborne DInSAR is also compared with coincident GPS, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), airborne LiDAR, and spaceborne DInSAR measurements using COSMO-SkyMed images. The airborne DInSAR system has a potential to provide time-transient variability in land surface topography with high-precision and high-resolution, and provide researchers with greater flexibility in selecting the temporal and spatial baselines of the data

  18. Calibration of a polarimetric imaging SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Pierce, L. E.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1991-01-01

    Calibration of polarimetric imaging Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR's) using point calibration targets is discussed. The four-port network calibration technique is used to describe the radar error model. The polarimetric ambiguity function of the SAR is then found using a single point target, namely a trihedral corner reflector. Based on this, an estimate for the backscattering coefficient of the terrain is found by a deconvolution process. A radar image taken by the JPL Airborne SAR (AIRSAR) is used for verification of the deconvolution calibration method. The calibrated responses of point targets in the image are compared both with theory and the POLCAL technique. Also, response of a distributed target are compared using the deconvolution and POLCAL techniques.

  19. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  20. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  1. Cross-calibration between airborne SAR sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Manfred; Olivier, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    As Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system performance and experience in SAR signature evaluation increase, quantitative analysis becomes more and more important. Such analyses require an absolute radiometric calibration of the complete SAR system. To keep the expenditure on calibration of future multichannel and multisensor remote sensing systems (e.g., X-SAR/SIR-C) within a tolerable level, data from different tracks and different sensors (channels) must be cross calibrated. The 1989 joint E-SAR/DC-8 SAR calibration campaign gave a first opportunity for such an experiment, including cross sensor and cross track calibration. A basic requirement for successful cross calibration is the stability of the SAR systems. The calibration parameters derived from different tracks and the polarimetric properties of the uncalibrated data are used to describe this stability. Quality criteria for a successful cross calibration are the agreement of alpha degree values and the consistency of radar cross sections of equally sized corner reflectors. Channel imbalance and cross talk provide additional quality in case of the polarimetric DC-8 SAR.

  2. First Results from an Airborne Ka-band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed SweepSAR technique that breaks typical Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) trade space using time-dependent multi-beam DBF on receive. Developing SweepSAR implementation using array-fed reflector for proposed DESDynI Earth Radar Mission concept. Performed first-of-a-kind airborne demonstration of the SweepSAR concept at Ka-band (35.6 GHz). Validated calibration and antenna pattern data sufficient for beam forming in elevation. (1) Provides validation evidence that the proposed Deformation Ecosystem Structure Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) SAR architecture is sound. (2) Functions well even with large variations in receiver gain / phase. Future plans include using prototype DESDynI SAR digital flight hardware to do the beam forming in real-time onboard the aircraft.

  3. Classification of fully polarimetric F-SAR ( X / S ) airborne radar images using decomposition methods. (Polish Title: Klasyfikacja treści polarymetrycznych obrazów radarowych z wykorzystaniem metod dekompozycji na przykładzie systemu F-SAR ( X / S ))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mleczko, M.

    2014-12-01

    Polarimetric SAR data is not widely used in practice, because it is not yet available operationally from the satellites. Currently we can distinguish two approaches in POL - In - SAR technology: alternating polarization imaging (Alt - POL) and fully polarimetric (QuadPol). The first represents a subset of another and is more operational, while the second is experimental because classification of this data requires polarimetric decomposition of scattering matrix in the first stage. In the literature decomposition process is divided in two types: the coherent and incoherent decomposition. In this paper the decomposition methods have been tested using data from the high resolution airborne F - SAR system. Results of classification have been interpreted in the context of the land cover mapping capabilities

  4. Ground truth measurement for the analysis of airborne SAR data recorded over Oberpfaffenhofen, FRG, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayer, T.; Wieneke, F.; Winter, R.

    1990-01-01

    As a preliminary investigation to the joint multiparameter SIR-C/X-SAR shuttle experiment of NASA/JPL (USA), DLR (FRG), and PSN (Italy) which is scheduled for the year 1992 an airborne SAR campaign was conducted over Oberpfaffenhofen, FRG, in August 1989. Primarily this campaign was planned to test and verify equipment and algorithms developed at the DLR to calibrate multifrequency polarimetric SAR data. Oberpfaffenhofen is designated as one of the super test sites for the SIR-C/X-SAR experiment which will be imaged under all circumstances except severe mission errors. A super test site drives radar parameters and look directions and the recorded SAR data will be calibrated. In addition ancillary data will be available for the site. During the airborne STAR campaign conducted in the week of August 14th 1989 various sensor types were used to record remote sensing data over the calibration test site and its vicinity: the polarimetric DC-8 JPL-SAR (P-, L-, C-band), the DLR airborne SAR (C-, X-band), color infrared aerial photography (DLR), and the truck-mounted scatterometer (C- and X-band) of the Institute for Navigation, University of Stuttgart (INS). Because of this variety of different sensor types used and out of the fact that sufficiently large forested and agriculturally used areas were planned to be covered by these sensors, the interest of several German research groups involved in investigations concerning SAR land applications arose. The following groups carried out different ground-truth measurements: University of Bonn, Institute for plant cultivation (plant morphology and moisture content); University of Braunschweig, Institute for Geography (soil moisture and surface roughness); University of Freiburg, Institute for Geography (dielectric soil properties, landuse); and University of Munich, Institute for Geography (landuse inventory, plant, surface, and soil parameters). This paper presents the joint ground truth activities of the Institute for Geography

  5. First Demonstration of Agriculture Height Retrieval with PolInSAR Airborne Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Juan M.; Ballester-Berman, J. David; Hajnsek, Irena

    2011-03-01

    A set of three quad-pol images acquired at L-band in interferometric repeat-pass mode by DLR with the E-SAR system, in parallel with the AgriSAR2006 campaign, have been used to provide a first demonstration with airborne data of the retrieval of vegetation height from agricultural crops by means of PolInSAR based techniques.We have obtained accurate estimates of vegetation height over winter rape and maize fields, when compared with the availabe ground measurements. The same procedure yields a clear overestimation and larger variance over wheat fields.Results demonstrate that, although the frequency band is low, the model employed for the inversion is very simple, and the backscattered signal contains an important contribution from the ground, the volume information provided by interferometry is present and enables the application of PolInSAR-based retrieval approaches for agriculture monitoring practices.

  6. Synthetic aperture radar speckle reduction for circle mode SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrove, Cameron

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images contain a grainy pattern, called speckle, that is a consequence of a coherent imaging system. For fine resolution SAR images speckle can obscure subtle features and reduce visual appeal. Many speckle reduction methods result in a loss of image resolution and reduce visual appeal which can obscure subtle features. Another approach to maintain resolution while reducing speckle is to register and combine multiple images. For persistent surveillance applications it is more efficient for an airborne platform to fly circles around the particular area of interest. In these cases, it would be beneficial to combine multiple circle mode SAR images, however the image registration process is not so straightforward because the layover angle changes in each image. This paper develops a SAR image registration process for combining multiple circle mode SAR images to reduce speckle while preserving resolution. The registration first uses a feature matching algorithm for a coarse rotation and alignment, and then uses a fine registration and warp. Ku band SAR data from a circle mode SAR collection is used to show the effectiveness of the registration and enhanced visual appeal from multi-looking.

  7. Registration of interferometric SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is a new way of performing topography mapping. Among the factors critical to mapping accuracy is the registration of the complex SAR images from repeated orbits. A new algorithm for registering interferometric SAR images is presented. A new figure of merit, the average fluctuation function of the phase difference image, is proposed to evaluate the fringe pattern quality. The process of adjusting the registration parameters according to the fringe pattern quality is optimized through a downhill simplex minimization algorithm. The results of applying the proposed algorithm to register two pairs of Seasat SAR images with a short baseline (75 m) and a long baseline (500 m) are shown. It is found that the average fluctuation function is a very stable measure of fringe pattern quality allowing very accurate registration.

  8. Airborne precursor missions in support of SIR-C/X-SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Oettl, H.; Pampaloni, P.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA DC-8 and DLR E-SAR airborne imaging radars have been deployed over several sites in Europe and the U.S. in support of SIR-C/X-SAR (Shuttle Imaging Radar-C/X-Synthetic Aperture Radar) science team investigations. To date, data have been acquired in support of studies of alpine glaciers, forests, geology, oceanography, and calibration. An experimental campaign with airborne sensors will take place in Europe in June to July 1991 which will allow multitemporal surveys of several Europeans sites. Current plans are for calibration and ecology experiments to be undertaken in Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, France, and the United Kingdom. Coordinated multitemporal aircraft and ground campaigns are planned in support of hydrology experiments in Italy, the United Kingdom, and Austria. Data will also be acquired in support of oceanogrqhy in the Gulf of Genova, North Atlantic, Straits of Messina and the North Sea. Geology sites will include Campi Flegrei and Vesuvio, Italy.

  9. Method for removing RFI from SAR images

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2003-08-19

    A method of removing RFI from a SAR by comparing two SAR images on a pixel by pixel basis and selecting the pixel with the lower magnitude to form a composite image. One SAR image is the conventional image produced by the SAR. The other image is created from phase-history data which has been filtered to have the frequency bands containing the RFI removed.

  10. Polar format algorithm for SAR imaging with Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Ross; Best, Matthew; Farrell, Sean

    2014-06-01

    Due to its computational efficiency, the polar format algorithm (PFA) is considered by many to be the workhorse for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. PFA is implemented in spatial Fourier space, also known as "K-space", which is a convenient domain for understanding SAR performance metrics, sampling requirements, etc. In this paper the mathematics behind PFA are explained and computed examples are presented, both using simulated data, and experimental airborne radar data from the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Gotcha Challenge collect. In addition, a simple graphical method is described that can be used to model and predict wavefront curvature artifacts in PFA imagery, which are due to the limited validity of the underlying far-field approximation. The appendix includes Matlab code for computing SAR images using PFA.

  11. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  12. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940s. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analysts understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  13. Sea bottom topography imaging with SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderkooij, M. W. A.; Wensink, G. J.; Vogelzang, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that under favorable meteorological and hydrodynamical conditions the bottom topography of shallow seas can be mapped with airborne or spaceborne imaging radar. This phenomenon was observed for the first time in 1969 by de Loor and co-workers in Q-band Side Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) imagery of sandwaves in the North Sea. It is now generally accepted that the imaging mechanism consists of three steps: (1) interaction between (tidal) current and bottom topography causes spatial modulations in the surface current velocity; (2) modulations in the surface current velocity give rise to variations in the spectrum of wind-generated waves, as described by the action balance equation; and (3) variations in the wave spectrum show up as intensity modulations in radar imagery. In order to predict radar backscatter modulations caused by sandwaves, an imaging model, covering the three steps, was developed by the Dutch Sea Bottom Topography Group. This model and some model results will be shown. On 16 Aug. 1989 an experiment was performed with the polarimetric P-, L-, and C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) of NASA/JPL. One scene was recorded in SAR mode. On 12 Jul. 1991 another three scenes were recorded, of which one was in the ATI-mode (Along-Track Interferometer). These experiments took place in the test area of the Sea Bottom Topography Group, 30 km off the Dutch coast, where the bottom topography is dominated by sand waves. In-situ data were gathered by a ship in the test area and on 'Measuring Platform Noordwijk', 20 km from the center of the test area. The radar images made during the experiment were compared with digitized maps of the bottom. Furthermore, the profiles of radar backscatter modulation were compared with the results of the model. During the workshop some preliminary results of the ATI measurements will be shown.

  14. Preliminary results of the LLNL airborne experimental test-bed SAR system

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G.; Mullenhoff, C.J.; Kiefer, R.D.; Brase, J.M.; Wieting, M.G.; Berry, G.L.; Jones, H.E.

    1996-01-16

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within Laser Programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in cooperation with the Hughes Aircraft Company has developed a versatile, high performance, airborne experimental test-bed (AETB) capability. The test-bed has been developed for a wide range of research and development experimental applications including radar and radiometry plus, with additional aircraft modifications, optical systems. The airborne test-bed capability has been developed within a Douglas EA-3B Skywarrior jet aircraft provided and flown by Hughes Aircraft Company. The current test-bed payload consists of an X-band radar system, a high-speed data acquisition, and a real-time processing capability. The medium power radar system is configured to operate in a high resolution, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mode and is highly configurable in terms of waveforrns, PRF, bandwidth, etc. Antennas are mounted on a 2-axis gimbal in the belly radome of the aircraft which provides pointing and stabilization. Aircraft position and antenna attitude are derived from a dedicated navigational system and provided to the real-time SAR image processor for instant image reconstruction and analysis. This paper presents a further description of the test-bed and payload subsystems plus preliminary results of SAR imagery.

  15. Representing SAR complex image pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are often complex-valued to facilitate specific exploitation modes. Furthermore, these pixel values are typically represented with either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values, with constituent components comprised of integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  16. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  17. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Jianping; Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Shun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR) research and application. PMID:26871446

  18. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Jianping; Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Shun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR) research and application.

  19. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Jianping; Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Shun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR) research and application. PMID:26871446

  20. Lithologic mapping in a sedimentary environment using multipolarization SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L.; Schenck, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    Multipolarization Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data from the NASA/JPL aircraft SAR were used in conjunction with LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM), Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data as part of a three-year research program to evaluate the utility of remote sensing measurements for analysis of sedimentary basins. The purpose of this research effort is to construct stratigraphic columns, map variations in the lithology, geometry, and structure of sedimentary rocks in the Wind River/Bighorn Basin area, Wyoming, and to integrate remote sensing data with conventional rain models of basin formation and evolution.

  1. Design criteria and comparison between conventional and subaperture SAR processing in airborne systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prats, Pau; Bara, Marc; Broquetas, Antoni

    2002-02-01

    This paper compares two different approaches for designing airborne SAR systems. The first one is the most common where conventional processing is employed, and therefore wide antenna beams are to be used in order to avoid ambiguities in the final image due to attitude variations. A second approach is proposed to lower the requirements such system imposes based on subaperture processing. The idea is to follow the azimuth variations of the Doppler centroid, without increasing the hardware requirements of the system. As it is shown in this paper, this processing procedure must be complemented with precise radiometric corrections, because the platform may experience small attitude variations, which could increase/decrease the target observation time, inducing a significant azimuth modulation in the final image. This leads to the definition of a new criterion concerning maximum attitude deviations for an airborne platform.

  2. Extracting DEM from airborne X-band data based on PolInSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, X. X.; Huang, G. M.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-06-01

    Polarimetric Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolInSAR) is a new trend of SAR remote sensing technology which combined polarized multichannel information and Interferometric information. It is of great significance for extracting DEM in some regions with low precision of DEM such as vegetation coverage area and building concentrated area. In this paper we describe our experiments with high-resolution X-band full Polarimetric SAR data acquired by a dual-baseline interferometric airborne SAR system over an area of Danling in southern China. Pauli algorithm is used to generate the double polarimetric interferometry data, Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Numerical Radius (NR) and Phase diversity (PD) methods are used to generate the full polarimetric interferometry data. Then we can make use of the polarimetric interferometric information to extract DEM with processing of pre filtering , image registration, image resampling, coherence optimization, multilook processing, flat-earth removal, interferogram filtering, phase unwrapping, parameter calibration, height derivation and geo-coding. The processing system named SARPlore has been exploited based on VC++ led by Chinese Academy of Surveying and Mapping. Finally compared optimization results with the single polarimetric interferometry, it has been observed that optimization ways can reduce the interferometric noise and the phase unwrapping residuals, and improve the precision of DEM. The result of full polarimetric interferometry is better than double polarimetric interferometry. Meanwhile, in different terrain, the result of full polarimetric interferometry will have a different degree of increase.

  3. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  4. Integrated Data Processing Methodology for Airborne Repeat-pass Differential SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, C.; Guo, H.; Han, C.; Yue, X.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Short temporal baseline and multiple ground deformation information can be derived from the airborne differential synthetic aperture radar Interforemetry (D-InSAR). However, affected by the turbulence of the air, the aircraft would deviate from the designed flight path with high frequent vibrations and changes both in the flight trajectory and attitude. Restricted by the accuracy of the position and orientation system (POS), these high frequent deviations can not be accurately reported, which would pose great challenges in motion compensation and interferometric process. Thus, these challenges constrain its wider applications. The objective of this paper is to investigate the accurate estimation and compensation of the residual motion errors in the airborne SAR imagery and time-varying baseline errors between the diffirent data acquirations, furthermore, to explore the integration data processing theory for the airborne D-InSAR system, and thus help to accomplish the correct derivation of the ground deformation by using the airborne D-InSAR measurements.

  5. EcoSAR: NASA's P-band fully polarimetric single pass interferometric airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanoglu, B.; Rincon, R. F.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Lee, S. K.; Sun, G.; Daniyan, O.; Harcum, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    EcoSAR is a new airborne synthetic aperture radar imaging system, developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It is a P-band sensor that employs a non-conventional and innovative design. The EcoSAR system was designed as a multi-disciplinary instrument to image the 3-dimensional surface of the earth from a single pass platform with two antennas. EcoSAR's principal mission is to penetrate the forest canopy to return vital information about the canopy structure and estimate biomass. With a maximum bandwidth of 200 MHz in H and 120 MHz in V polarizations it can provide sub-meter resolution imagery of the study area. EcoSAR's dual antenna, 32 transmit and receive channel architecture provides a test-bed for developing new algorithms in InSAR data processing such as single pass interferometry, full polarimetry, post-processing synthesis of multiple beams, simultaneous measurement over both sides of the flight track, selectable resolution and variable incidence angle. The flexible architecture of EcoSAR will create new opportunities in radar remote sensing of forest biomass, permafrost active layer thickness, and topography mapping. EcoSAR's first test flight occurred between March 27th and April 1st, 2014 over the Andros Island in Bahamas and Corcovado and La Selva National Parks in Costa Rica. The 32 channel radar system collected about 6 TB of radar data in about 12 hours of data collection. Due to the existence of radio and TV communications in the operational frequency band, acquired data contains strong radar frequency interference, which had to be removed prior to beamforming and focusing. Precise locations of the antennas are tracked using high-rate GPS and inertial navigation units, which provide necessary information for accurate processing of the imagery. In this presentation we will present preliminary imagery collected during the test campaign, show examples of simultaneous dual track imaging, as well as a single pass interferogram. The

  6. SAR image formation toolbox for MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, LeRoy A.; Moore, Linda J.

    2010-04-01

    While many synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation techniques exist, two of the most intuitive methods for implementation by SAR novices are the matched filter and backprojection algorithms. The matched filter and (non-optimized) backprojection algorithms are undeniably computationally complex. However, the backprojection algorithm may be successfully employed for many SAR research endeavors not involving considerably large data sets and not requiring time-critical image formation. Execution of both image reconstruction algorithms in MATLAB is explicitly addressed. In particular, a manipulation of the backprojection imaging equations is supplied to show how common MATLAB functions, ifft and interp1, may be used for straight-forward SAR image formation. In addition, limits for scene size and pixel spacing are derived to aid in the selection of an appropriate imaging grid to avoid aliasing. Example SAR images generated though use of the backprojection algorithm are provided given four publicly available SAR datasets. Finally, MATLAB code for SAR image reconstruction using the matched filter and backprojection algorithms is provided.

  7. Controlling Data Collection to Support SAR Image Rotation

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Cordaro, J. Thomas; Burns, Bryan L.

    2008-10-14

    A desired rotation of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image can be facilitated by adjusting a SAR data collection operation based on the desired rotation. The SAR data collected by the adjusted SAR data collection operation can be efficiently exploited to form therefrom a SAR image having the desired rotational orientation.

  8. TELAER: a multi-mode/multi-antenna interferometric airborne SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, Stefano; Amaral, Tiago; Berardino, Paolo; Esposito, Carmen; Jackson, Giuseppe; Pauciullo, Antonio; Vaz Junior, Eurico; Wimmer, Christian; Lanari, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    The present contribution is aimed at showing the capabilities of the TELAER airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system recently upgraded to the interferometric mode [1]. TELAER is an Italian airborne X-Band SAR system, mounted onboard a LearJet 35A aircraft. Originally equipped with a single TX/RX antenna, it now operates in single-pass interferometric mode thanks to a system upgrading [1] funded by the Italian National Research Council (CNR), via the Italian Ministry of Education, Universities and Research (MIUR), in the framework of a cooperation between CNR and the Italian Agency for Agriculture Subsidy Payments (AGEA). In the frame of such cooperation, CNR has entrusted the Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA) for managing all the activities, included the final flight tests, related to the system upgrading. According to such an upgrading, two additional receiving X-band antennas have been installed in order to allow, simultaneously, single-pass Across-Track and Along-Track interferometry [1]. More specifically, the three antennas are now installed in such a way to produce three different across-track baselines and two different along-track baselines. Moreover, in the frame of the same system upgrading, it has been mounted onboard the Learjet an accurate embedded Global Navigation Satellite System and Inertial Measurement Unit equipment. This allows precise measurement of the tracks described by the SAR antennas during the flight, in order to accurately implement Motion Compensation (MOCO) algorithms [2] during the image formation (focusing) step. It is worth remarking that the TELAER system upgraded to the interferometric mode is very flexible, since the user can set different operational modes characterized by different geometric resolutions and range swaths. In particular, it is possible to reach up to 0.5 m of resolution with a range swath of 2km; conversely, it is possible to enlarge the range swath up to 10 km at expenses of

  9. Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Cooper, Moogega; Adler, John; Jacobson, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a hyperspectral imaging instrument package designed to be carried aboard a helicopter. It was developed to map the depths of Greenland's supraglacial lakes. The instrument is capable of telescoping to twice its original length, allowing it to be retracted with the door closed during takeoff and landing, and manually extended in mid-flight. While extended, the instrument platform provides the attached hyperspectral imager a nadir-centered and unobstructed view of the ground. Before flight, the instrument mount is retracted and securely strapped down to existing anchor points on the floor of the helicopter. When the helicopter reaches the destination lake, the door is opened and the instrument mount is manually extended. Power to the instrument package is turned on, and the data acquisition computer is commanded via a serial cable from an onboard user-operated laptop to begin data collection. After data collection is complete, the instrument package is powered down and the mount retracted, allowing the door to be closed in preparation for landing. The present design for the instrument mount consists of a three-segment telescoping cantilever to allow for a sufficient extended length to see around the landing struts and provide a nadir-centered and unobstructed field of view for the hyperspectral imager. This instrument works on the premise that water preferentially absorbs light with longer wavelengths on the red side of the visible spectrum. This property can be exploited in order to remotely determine the depths of bodies of pure freshwater. An imager flying over such a lake receives light scattered from the surface, the bulk of the water column, and from the lake bottom. The strength of absorption of longer-wavelength light depends on the depth of the water column. Through calibration with in situ measurements of the water depths, a depth-determining algorithm may be developed to determine lake depth from these spectral properties of the

  10. A comparison of airborne GEMS/SAR with satellite-borne Seasat/SAR radar imagery - The value of archived multiple data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Bradford C.; Dellwig, Louis F.

    1988-01-01

    In a study concerning the value of using radar imagery from systems with diverse parameters, X-band images of the Northern Louisiana Salt dome area generated by the airborne Goodyear electronic mapping system (GEMS) are analyzed in conjunction with imagery generated by the satelliteborne Seasat/SAR. The GEMS operated with an incidence angle of 75 to 85 deg and a resolution of 12 m, whereas the Seasat/SAR operated with an incidence angle of 23 deg and a resolution of 25 m. It is found that otherwise unattainable data on land management activities, improved delineation of the drainage net, better definition of surface roughness in cleared areas, and swamp identification, became accessible when adjustments for the time lapse between the two missions were made and supporting ground data concerning the physical and vegetative characteristics of the terrain were acquired.

  11. CCD architecture for spacecraft SAR image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    A real-time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image processing architecture amenable to future on-board spacecraft applications is currently under development. Using state-of-the-art charge-coupled device (CCD) technology, low cost and power are inherent features. Other characteristics include the ability to reprogram correlation reference functions, correct for range migration, and compensate for antenna beam pointing errors on the spacecraft in real time. The first spaceborne demonstration is scheduled to be flown as an experiment on a 1982 Shuttle imaging radar mission (SIR-B). This paper describes the architecture and implementation characteristics of this initial spaceborne CCD SAR image processor.

  12. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  13. SAR/LANDSAT image registration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphrey, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Temporal registration of synthetic aperture radar data with LANDSAT-MSS data is both feasible (from a technical standpoint) and useful (from an information-content viewpoint). The greatest difficulty in registering aircraft SAR data to corrected LANDSAT-MSS data is control-point location. The differences in SAR and MSS data impact the selection of features that will serve as a good control points. The SAR and MSS data are unsuitable for automatic computer correlation of digital control-point data. The gray-level data can not be compared by the computer because of the different response characteristics of the MSS and SAR images.

  14. Three-frequency, polarimetric, airborne SAR observations of the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, E.; Vanzyl, J. J.; Jezek, K.

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Greenland ice sheet collected by an airborne system clearly reveal the four melting facies of this sheet defined 30 years ago from snow stratigraphy studies by glaciologists. In particular, the radar echoes from the percolation facies have radiometric and polarimetric characteristics that are unique among terrestrial surfaces, but that resemble the exotic radar echoes recorded from the icy Galilean satellites. There, the radar signals interact with subsurface, massive ice features created in the cold, dry snow by seasonal melting and refreezing events. The subsurface features act as efficient reflectors of the incident radiation most likely via internal reflections. In the soaked-snow facies, the radar reflectivity is much lower because radar signals are attenuated by the wetter snow before they can interact with subsurface structures. Inversion algorithms to derive geophysical information from the SAR data are developed in both cases to estimate snow wetness in the soaked-snow facies and the mass of ice water retained in the percolation facies.

  15. Interferometric SAR imaging by transmitting stepped frequency chaotic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Gu, Xiang; Zhai, Wenshuai; Dong, Xiao; Shi, Xiaojin; Kang, Xueyan

    2015-10-01

    Noise radar has been applied in many fields since it was proposed more than 50 years ago. However, it has not been applied to interferometric SAR imaging yet as far as we know. This paper introduces our recent work on interferometric noise radar. An interferometric SAR system was developed which can transmit both chirp signal and chaotic noise signal (CNS) at multiple carrier frequencies. An airborne experiment with this system by transmitting both signals was carried out, and the data were processed to show the capability of interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The results shows that although the interferometric phase quality of CNS is degraded due to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is lower compared with that of chirp signal, we still can get satisfied DEM after multi-looking processing. Another work of this paper is to apply compressed sensing (CS) theory to the interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The CS theory states that if a signal is sparse, then it can be accurately reconstructed with much less sampled data than that regularly required according to Nyquist Sampling Theory. To form a structured random matrix, if the transmitted signal is of fixed waveform, then random subsampling is needed. However, if the transmitted signal is of random waveform, then only uniform subsampling is needed. This is another advantage of noise signal. Both the interferometric phase images and the DEMs by regular method and by CS method are processed with results compared. It is shown that the degradation of interferometric phases due to subsampling is larger than that of amplitude image.

  16. SAR Image Despeckling Via Structural Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ting; Li, Shutao; Fang, Leyuan; Benediktsson, Jón Atli

    2016-12-01

    A novel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image despeckling method based on structural sparse representation is introduced. The proposed method utilizes the fact that different regions in SAR images correspond to varying terrain reflectivity. Therefore, SAR images can be split into a heterogeneous class (with a varied terrain reflectivity) and a homogeneous class (with a constant terrain reflectivity). In the proposed method, different sparse representation based despeckling schemes are designed by combining the different region characteristics in SAR images. For heterogeneous regions with rich structure and texture information, structural dictionaries are learned to appropriately represent varied structural characteristics. Specifically, each patch in these regions is sparsely coded with the best fitted structural dictionary, thus good structure preservation can be obtained. For homogenous regions without rich structure and texture information, the highly redundant photometric self-similarity is exploited to suppress speckle noise without introducing artifacts. That is achieved by firstly learning the sub-dictionary, then simultaneously sparsely coding for each group of photometrically similar image patches. Visual and objective experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over the-state-of-the-art methods.

  17. Detecting slow moving targets in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnehan, Robert; Perlovsky, Leonid; Mutz, Chris W.; Schindler, John

    2004-08-01

    Ground moving target indication (GMTI) radars can detect slow-moving targets if their velocities are high enough to produce distinguishable Doppler frequencies. However, no reliable technique is currently available to detect targets that fall below the minimum detectable velocity (MDV) of GMTI radars. In synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, detection of moving targets is difficult because of target smear due to motion, which could make low-RCS targets fall below stationary ground clutter. Several techniques for SAR imaging of moving targets have been discussed in the literature. These techniques require sufficient signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) and adequate MDV for pre-detection. Other techniques require complex changes in hardware. Extracting the maximum information from SAR image data is possible using adaptive, model-based approaches. However, these approaches lead to computational complexity, which exceeds current processing power for more than a single object in an image. This combinatorial complexity is due to the need for having to consider a large number of combinations between multiple target models and the data, while estimating unknown parameters of the target models. We are developing a technique for detecting slow-moving targets in SAR images with low signal-to-clutter ratio, without minimal velocity requirements, and without combinatorial complexity. This paper briefly summarizes the difficulties related to current model-based detection algorithms. A new concept, dynamic logic, is introduced along with an algorithm suitable for the detection of very slow-moving targets in SAR images. This new mathematical technique is inspired by the analysis of biological systems, like the human brain, which combines conceptual understanding with emotional evaluation and overcomes the combinatorial complexity of model-based techniques.

  18. Analysis of Multipath Pixels in SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Wu, J. C.; Ding, X. L.; Zhang, L.; Hu, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    As the received radar signal is the sum of signal contributions overlaid in one single pixel regardless of the travel path, the multipath effect should be seriously tackled as the multiple bounce returns are added to direct scatter echoes which leads to ghost scatters. Most of the existing solution towards the multipath is to recover the signal propagation path. To facilitate the signal propagation simulation process, plenty of aspects such as sensor parameters, the geometry of the objects (shape, location, orientation, mutual position between adjacent buildings) and the physical parameters of the surface (roughness, correlation length, permittivity)which determine the strength of radar signal backscattered to the SAR sensor should be given in previous. However, it's not practical to obtain the highly detailed object model in unfamiliar area by field survey as it's a laborious work and time-consuming. In this paper, SAR imaging simulation based on RaySAR is conducted at first aiming at basic understanding of multipath effects and for further comparison. Besides of the pre-imaging simulation, the product of the after-imaging, which refers to radar images is also taken into consideration. Both Cosmo-SkyMed ascending and descending SAR images of Lupu Bridge in Shanghai are used for the experiment. As a result, the reflectivity map and signal distribution map of different bounce level are simulated and validated by 3D real model. The statistic indexes such as the phase stability, mean amplitude, amplitude dispersion, coherence and mean-sigma ratio in case of layover are analyzed with combination of the RaySAR output.

  19. An Open Source Software and Web-GIS Based Platform for Airborne SAR Remote Sensing Data Management, Distribution and Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changyong, Dou; Huadong, Guo; Chunming, Han; Ming, Liu

    2014-03-01

    With more and more Earth observation data available to the community, how to manage and sharing these valuable remote sensing datasets is becoming an urgent issue to be solved. The web based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) technology provides a convenient way for the users in different locations to share and make use of the same dataset. In order to efficiently use the airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remote sensing data acquired in the Airborne Remote Sensing Center of the Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (RADI), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), a Web-GIS based platform for airborne SAR data management, distribution and sharing was designed and developed. The major features of the system include map based navigation search interface, full resolution imagery shown overlaid the map, and all the software adopted in the platform are Open Source Software (OSS). The functions of the platform include browsing the imagery on the map navigation based interface, ordering and downloading data online, image dataset and user management, etc. At present, the system is under testing in RADI and will come to regular operation soon.

  20. InSAR Forensics: Tracing InSAR Scatterers in High Resolution Optical Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, XiaoXiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a step towards a better interpretation of the scattering mechanism of different objects and their deformation histories in SAR interferometry (InSAR). The proposed technique traces individual SAR scatterer in high resolution optical images where their geometries, materials, and other properties can be better analyzed and classified. And hence scatterers of a same object can be analyzed in group, which brings us to a new level of InSAR deformation monitoring.

  1. Non-parametric partitioning of SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyon, G.; Galland, F.; Réfrégier, Ph.

    2006-09-01

    We describe and analyse a generalization of a parametric segmentation technique adapted to Gamma distributed SAR images to a simple non parametric noise model. The partition is obtained by minimizing the stochastic complexity of a quantized version on Q levels of the SAR image and lead to a criterion without parameters to be tuned by the user. We analyse the reliability of the proposed approach on synthetic images. The quality of the obtained partition will be studied for different possible strategies. In particular, one will discuss the reliability of the proposed optimization procedure. Finally, we will precisely study the performance of the proposed approach in comparison with the statistical parametric technique adapted to Gamma noise. These studies will be led by analyzing the number of misclassified pixels, the standard Hausdorff distance and the number of estimated regions.

  2. Quantification of L-band InSAR decorrelation in volcanic terrains using airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedze, M.; Heggy, E.; Jacquemoud, S.; Bretar, F.

    2011-12-01

    Repeat-pass InSAR LOS measurements of the Piton de La Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France) suffer from substantial phase decorrelation due to the occurrence of vegetation and ash deposits on the caldera and slopes of the edifice. To correct this deficiency, we combine normalized airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) intensity data with spaceborne InSAR coherence images from ALOS PALSAR L-band acquired over the volcano in 2008 and 2009, following the 2007 major eruption. The fusion of the two data sets improves the calculation of coherence and the textural classification of different volcanic surfaces. For future missions considering both InSAR and/or LiDAR such as DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice), such data fusion studies can provide a better analysis of the spatiotemporal variations in InSAR coherence in order to enhance the monitoring of pre-eruptive ground displacements. The airborne surveys conducted in 2008 and 2009, cover different types of vegetation and terrain roughness on the central and western parts of the volcano. The topographic data are first processed to generate a high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM) of the volcanic edifice with elevation accuracy better than 1 m. For our purposes, the phase variations caused by the surface relief can be eliminated using the LiDAR-derived DTM. Then normalized LiDAR intensities are correlated to the L-band polarimetric coherence for different zones of the volcano to assess the LiDAR-InSAR statistical behavior of different lava flows, pyroclastics, and vegetated surfaces. Results suggest that each volcanic terrain type is characterized by a unique LiDAR-InSAR histogram pattern. We identified four LiDAR-InSAR distinguished relations: (1) pahoehoe lava flow surfaces show an agglomerate histogram pattern which may be explained by low surface scattering and low wave penetration into the geological medium; (2) eroded a'a lava surfaces is characterized by high standard deviation

  3. Using APES for interferometric SAR imaging.

    PubMed

    Palsetia, M R; Li, J

    1998-01-01

    We present an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR) filtering approach, which is referred to as the Amplitude and Phase EStimation (APES) algorithm, for interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. We compare the APES algorithm with other FIR filtering approaches including the Capon and fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods. We show via both numerical and experimental examples that the adaptive FIR filtering approaches such as Capon and APES can yield more accurate spectral estimates with much lower sidelobes and narrower spectral peaks than the FFT method. We show that although the APES algorithm yields somewhat wider spectral peaks than the Capon method, the former gives more accurate overall spectral estimates and SAR images than the latter and the FFT method.

  4. Processing of polarametric SAR images. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Warrick, A.L.; Delaney, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a systematic method of combining multifrequency polarized SAR images. It is shown that the traditional methods of correlation, hard targets, and template matching fail to produce acceptable results. Hence, a new algorithm was developed and tested. The new approach combines the three traditional methods and an interpolation method. An example is shown that demonstrates the new algorithms performance. The results are summarized suggestions for future research are presented.

  5. Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-12-01

    Proper waveform parameter selection allows collecting Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) phase history data on a rotated grid in the Fourier Space of the scene being imaged. Subsequent image formation preserves the rotated geometry to allow SAR images to be formed at arbitrary rotation angles without the use of computationally expensive interpolation or resampling operations. This should be useful where control of image orientation is desired such as generating squinted stripmaps and VideoSAR applications, among others.

  6. SAR Image despeckling via sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongmei; Yang, Xiaomei; Zheng, Liang

    2014-11-01

    SAR image despeckling is an active research area in image processing due to its importance in improving the quality of image for object detection and classification.In this paper, a new approach is proposed for multiplicative noise in SAR image removal based on nonlocal sparse representation by dictionary learning and collaborative filtering. First, a image is divided into many patches, and then a cluster is formed by clustering log-similar image patches using Fuzzy C-means (FCM). For each cluster, an over-complete dictionary is computed using the K-SVD method that iteratively updates the dictionary and the sparse coefficients. The patches belonging to the same cluster are then reconstructed by a sparse combination of the corresponding dictionary atoms. The reconstructed patches are finally collaboratively aggregated to build the denoised image. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves much better results than many state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of both objective evaluation index (PSNR and ENL) and subjective visual perception.

  7. Merging Airborne LIDAR Data and Satellite SAR Data for Building Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Nakagawa, M.

    2015-05-01

    A frequent map revision is required in GIS applications, such as disaster prevention and urban planning. In general, airborne photogrammetry and LIDAR measurements are applied to geometrical data acquisition for automated map generation and revision. However, attribute data acquisition and classification depend on manual editing works including ground surveys. In general, airborne photogrammetry and LiDAR measurements are applied to geometrical data acquisition for automated map generation and revision. However, these approaches classify geometrical attributes. Moreover, ground survey and manual editing works are finally required in attribute data classification. On the other hand, although geometrical data extraction is difficult, SAR data have a possibility to automate the attribute data acquisition and classification. The SAR data represent microwave reflections on various surfaces of ground and buildings. There are many researches related to monitoring activities of disaster, vegetation, and urban. Moreover, we have an opportunity to acquire higher resolution data in urban areas with new sensors, such as ALOS2 PALSAR2. Therefore, in this study, we focus on an integration of airborne LIDAR data and satellite SAR data for building extraction and classification.

  8. Using APES for interferometric SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Palsetia, Marzban

    1996-06-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive FIR filtering approach, which is referred to as the APES (amplitude and phase estimation of a sinusoid) algorithm, for interferometric SAR imaging. We apply the APES algorithm on the data obtained from two vertically displaced apertures of a SAR system to obtain the complex amplitude and the phase difference estimates, which are proportional to the radar cross section and the height of the scatterer, respectively, at the frequencies of interest. We also demonstrate how the APES algorithm can be applied to data matrices with large dimensions without incurring high computational overheads. We compare the APES algorithm with other FIR filtering approaches including the Capon and FFT methods. We show via both numerical and experimental examples that the adaptive FIR filtering approaches such as Capon and APES can yield more accurate spectral estimates with much lower sidelobes and narrower spectral peaks than the FFT method. We show that although the APES algorithm yields somewhat wider spectral peaks than the Capon method, the former gives more accurate overall spectral estimates and SAR images than the latter and the FFT method.

  9. P-3 SAR motion compensation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Debra S.; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Roth, Duane; Rais, Houra

    2000-08-01

    The potential of airborne SAR to support the search and rescue mission needs to be investigated. Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) is to process P-3 airborne SAR data to evaluate products such as Coherent Change Detection (CCD) and Digital Elevation Models (DEM). The most crucial step in this process is the precise registration of the two SAR images obtained from separate passes. This paper presents a new technique for this registration step.

  10. Airborne & SAR Synergy Reveals the 3D Structure of Air Bubble Entrainment in Internal Waves and Frontal Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, J. C. B.; Magalhaes, J. M.; Batista, M.; Gostiaux, L.; Gerkema, T.; New, A. L.

    2013-03-01

    Internal waves are now recognised as an important mixing mechanism in the ocean. Mixing at the base of the mixed layer and in the seasonal thermocline affects the properties of those water masses which define the exchange of heat and freshwater between the atmosphere and ocean. The breaking of Internal Solitary Waves (ISWs) contributes significantly to turbulent mixing in the near-surface layers, through the continual triggering of instabilities as they propagate and shoal towards the coast or shallow topography. Here we report some results of the EU funded project A.NEW (Airborne observations of Nonlinear Evolution of internal Waves generated by internal tidal beams). The airborne capabilities to observe small scale structure of breaking internal waves in the near-shore zone has been demonstrated in recent studies (e.g. Marmorino et al., 2008). In particular, sea surface thermal signatures of shoaling ISWs have revealed the turbulent character of these structures in the form of surface “boil” features. On the other hand, some in situ measurements of internal waves and theoretical work suggest subsurface entrainment of air bubbles in the convergence zones of ISWs (Serebryany and Galybin, 2009; Grimshaw et al., 2010). We conducted airborne remote sensing observations in the coastal zone off the west Iberian Peninsula (off Lisbon, Portugal) using high resolution imaging sensors: LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging), hyperspectral cameras (Eagle and Hawk) and thermal infrared imaging (TABI-320). These measurements were planned based on previous SAR observations in the region, which included also near-real time SAR overpasses (ESA project AOPT-2423 and TerraSAR-X project OCE-0056). The airborne measurements were conducted from board the NERC (Natural Environmental Research Centre) Do 228 aircraft in the summer of 2010. The TABI-320 thermal airborne broadband imager can distinguish temperature differences as small as one-twentieth of a degree and operates in the

  11. A Novel Azimuth Super-Resolution Method by Synthesizing Azimuth Bandwidth of Multiple Tracks of Airborne Stripmap SAR Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jingwen; Sun, Bing; Yang, Jian

    2016-06-13

    Azimuth resolution of airborne stripmap synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is restricted by the azimuth antenna size. Conventionally, a higher azimuth resolution should be achieved by employing alternate modes that steer the beam in azimuth to enlarge the synthetic antenna aperture. However, if a data set of a certain region, consisting of multiple tracks of airborne stripmap SAR data, is available, the azimuth resolution of specific small region of interest (ROI) can be conveniently improved by a novel azimuth super-resolution method as introduced by this paper. The proposed azimuth super-resolution method synthesize the azimuth bandwidth of the data selected from multiple discontinuous tracks and contributes to a magnifier-like function with which the ROI can be further zoomed in with a higher azimuth resolution than that of the original stripmap images. Detailed derivation of the azimuth super-resolution method, including the steps of two-dimensional dechirping, residual video phase (RVP) removal, data stitching and data correction, is provided. The restrictions of the proposed method are also discussed. Lastly, the presented approach is evaluated via both the single- and multi-target computer simulations.

  12. A Novel Azimuth Super-Resolution Method by Synthesizing Azimuth Bandwidth of Multiple Tracks of Airborne Stripmap SAR Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jingwen; Sun, Bing; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Azimuth resolution of airborne stripmap synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is restricted by the azimuth antenna size. Conventionally, a higher azimuth resolution should be achieved by employing alternate modes that steer the beam in azimuth to enlarge the synthetic antenna aperture. However, if a data set of a certain region, consisting of multiple tracks of airborne stripmap SAR data, is available, the azimuth resolution of specific small region of interest (ROI) can be conveniently improved by a novel azimuth super-resolution method as introduced by this paper. The proposed azimuth super-resolution method synthesize the azimuth bandwidth of the data selected from multiple discontinuous tracks and contributes to a magnifier-like function with which the ROI can be further zoomed in with a higher azimuth resolution than that of the original stripmap images. Detailed derivation of the azimuth super-resolution method, including the steps of two-dimensional dechirping, residual video phase (RVP) removal, data stitching and data correction, is provided. The restrictions of the proposed method are also discussed. Lastly, the presented approach is evaluated via both the single- and multi-target computer simulations. PMID:27304959

  13. A Novel Azimuth Super-Resolution Method by Synthesizing Azimuth Bandwidth of Multiple Tracks of Airborne Stripmap SAR Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jingwen; Sun, Bing; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Azimuth resolution of airborne stripmap synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is restricted by the azimuth antenna size. Conventionally, a higher azimuth resolution should be achieved by employing alternate modes that steer the beam in azimuth to enlarge the synthetic antenna aperture. However, if a data set of a certain region, consisting of multiple tracks of airborne stripmap SAR data, is available, the azimuth resolution of specific small region of interest (ROI) can be conveniently improved by a novel azimuth super-resolution method as introduced by this paper. The proposed azimuth super-resolution method synthesize the azimuth bandwidth of the data selected from multiple discontinuous tracks and contributes to a magnifier-like function with which the ROI can be further zoomed in with a higher azimuth resolution than that of the original stripmap images. Detailed derivation of the azimuth super-resolution method, including the steps of two-dimensional dechirping, residual video phase (RVP) removal, data stitching and data correction, is provided. The restrictions of the proposed method are also discussed. Lastly, the presented approach is evaluated via both the single- and multi-target computer simulations. PMID:27304959

  14. Estimation of bare soil evaporation using multifrequency airborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soares, Joao V.; Shi, Jiancheng; Van Zyl, Jakob; Engman, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that for homogeneous areas soil moisture can be derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements, so that the use of microwave remote sensing can given realistic estimates of energy fluxes if coupled to a simple two-layer model repesenting the soil. The model simulates volumetric water content (Wg) using classical meterological data, provided that some of the soil thermal and hydraulic properties are known. Only four parameters are necessary: mean water content, thermal conductivity and diffusitivity, and soil resistance to evaporation. They may be derived if a minimal number of measured values of Wg and surface layer temperature (Tg) are available together with independent measurements of energy flux to compare with the estimated values. The estimated evaporation is shown to be realistic and in good agreement with drying stage theory in which the transfer of water in the soil is in vapor form.

  15. Multiscale MAP filtering of SAR images.

    PubMed

    Foucher, S; Bénié, G B; Boucher, J M

    2001-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images are disturbed by a multiplicative noise depending on the signal (the ground reflectivity) due to the radar wave coherence. Images have a strong variability from one pixel to another reducing essentially the efficiency of the algorithms of detection and classification. We propose to filter this noise with a multiresolution analysis of the image. The wavelet coefficient of the reflectivity is estimated with a Bayesian model, maximizing the a posteriori probability density function. The different probability density function are modeled with the Pearson system of distributions. The resulting filter combines the classical adaptive approach with wavelet decomposition where the local variance of high-frequency images is used in order to segment and filter wavelet coefficients.

  16. Mitigating illumination gradients in a SAR image based on the image data and antenna beam pattern

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2013-04-30

    Illumination gradients in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of a target can be mitigated by determining a correction for pixel values associated with the SAR image. This correction is determined based on information indicative of a beam pattern used by a SAR antenna apparatus to illuminate the target, and also based on the pixel values associated with the SAR image. The correction is applied to the pixel values associated with the SAR image to produce corrected pixel values that define a corrected SAR image.

  17. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P.; Thompson, Douglas G.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  18. Interferometric SAR to EO image registration problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, George W.; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Rais, Houra

    2000-08-01

    Historically, SAR to EO registration accuracy has been at the multiple pixel level compared to sub-pixel EO to EO registration accuracies. This is due to a variety of factors including the different scattering characteristics of the ground for EO and SAR, SAR speckle, and terrain induced geometric distortion. One approach to improving the SAR to EO registration accuracy is to utilize the full information from multiple SAR surveys using interferometric techniques. In this paper we will examine this problem in detail with an example using ERS SAR imagery. Estimates of the resulting accuracy based on ERS are included.

  19. A beamforming algorithm for bistatic SAR image formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David Alan; Wahl, Daniel Eugene; Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    Beamforming is a methodology for collection-mode-independent SAR image formation. It is essentially equivalent to backprojection. The authors have in previous papers developed this idea and discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the approach to monostatic SAR image formation vis--vis the more standard and time-tested polar formatting algorithm (PFA). In this paper we show that beamforming for bistatic SAR imaging leads again to a very simple image formation algorithm that requires a minimal number of lines of code and that allows the image to be directly formed onto a three-dimensional surface model, thus automatically creating an orthorectified image. The same disadvantage of beamforming applied to monostatic SAR imaging applies to the bistatic case, however, in that the execution time for the beamforming algorithm is quite long compared to that of PFA. Fast versions of beamforming do exist to help alleviate this issue. Results of image reconstructions from phase history data are presented.

  20. The Accuratre Signal Model and Imaging Processing in Geosynchronous SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) application, the disadvantage of low earth orbit (LEO) SAR becomes more and more apparent. The increase of orbit altitude can shorten the revisit time and enlarge the coverage area in single look, and then satisfy the application requirement. The concept of geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) SAR system is firstly presented and deeply discussed by K.Tomiyasi and other researchers. A GEO SAR, with its fine temporal resolution, would overcome the limitations of current imaging systems, allowing dense interpretation of transient phenomena as GPS time-series analysis with a spatial density several orders of magnitude finer. Until now, the related literatures about GEO SAR are mainly focused in the system parameter design and application requirement. As for the signal characteristic, resolution calculation and imaging algorithms, it is nearly blank in the related literatures of GEO SAR. In the LEO SAR, the signal model analysis adopts the `Stop-and-Go' assumption in general, and this assumption can satisfy the imaging requirement in present advanced SAR system, such as TerraSAR, Radarsat2 and so on. However because of long propagation distance and non-negligible earth rotation, the `Stop-and-Go' assumption does not exist and will cause large propagation distance error, and then affect the image formation. Furthermore the long propagation distance will result in the long synthetic aperture time such as hundreds of seconds, therefore the linear trajectory model in LEO SAR imaging will fail in GEO imaging, and the new imaging model needs to be proposed for the GEO SAR imaging processing. In this paper, considering the relative motion between satellite and earth during signal propagation time, the accurate analysis method for propagation slant range is firstly presented. Furthermore, the difference between accurate analysis method and `Stop-and-Go' assumption is analytically obtained. Meanwhile based on the derived

  1. Extraction of Coastlines with Fuzzy Approach Using SENTINEL-1 SAR Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, N.; Kaynarca, M.; Oy, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coastlines are important features for water resources, sea products, energy resources etc. Coastlines are changed dynamically, thus automated methods are necessary for analysing and detecting the changes along the coastlines. In this study, Sentinel-1 C band SAR image has been used to extract the coastline with fuzzy logic approach. The used SAR image has VH polarisation and 10x10m. spatial resolution, covers 57 sqkm area from the south-east of Puerto-Rico. Additionally, radiometric calibration is applied to reduce atmospheric and orbit error, and speckle filter is used to reduce the noise. Then the image is terrain-corrected using SRTM digital surface model. Classification of SAR image is a challenging task since SAR and optical sensors have very different properties. Even between different bands of the SAR sensors, the images look very different. So, the classification of SAR image is difficult with the traditional unsupervised methods. In this study, a fuzzy approach has been applied to distinguish the coastal pixels than the land surface pixels. The standard deviation and the mean, median values are calculated to use as parameters in fuzzy approach. The Mean-standard-deviation (MS) Large membership function is used because the large amounts of land and ocean pixels dominate the SAR image with large mean and standard deviation values. The pixel values are multiplied with 1000 to easify the calculations. The mean is calculated as 23 and the standard deviation is calculated as 12 for the whole image. The multiplier parameters are selected as a: 0.58, b: 0.05 to maximize the land surface membership. The result is evaluated using airborne LIDAR data, only for the areas where LIDAR dataset is available and secondly manually digitized coastline. The laser points which are below 0,5 m are classified as the ocean points. The 3D alpha-shapes algorithm is used to detect the coastline points from LIDAR data. Minimum distances are calculated between the LIDAR points of

  2. Internal wave parameters retrieval from space-borne SAR image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kaiguo; Fu, Bin; Gu, Yanzhen; Yu, Xingxiu; Liu, Tingting; Shi, Aiqin; Xu, Ke; Gan, Xilin

    2015-12-01

    Based on oceanic internal wave SAR imaging mechanism and the microwave scattering imaging model for oceanic surface features, we developed a new method to extract internal wave parameters from SAR imagery. Firstly, the initial wind fields are derived from NCEP reanalysis data, the sea water density and oceanic internal wave pycnocline depth are estimated from the Levites data, the surface currents induced by the internal wave are calculated according to the KDV equation. The NRCS profile is then simulated by solving the action balance equation and using the sea surface radar backscatter model. Both the winds and internal wave pycnocline depth are adjusted by using the dichotomy method step by step to make the simulated data approach the SAR image. Then, the wind speed, pycnocline depth, the phase speed, the group velocity and the amplitude of internal wave can be retrieved from SAR imagery when a best fit between simulated signals and the SAR image appears. The method is tested on one scene SAR image near Dongsha Island, in the South China Sea, results show that the simulated oceanic internal wave NRCS profile is in good agreement with that on the SAR image with the correlation coefficient as high as 90%, and the amplitude of oceanic internal wave retrieved from the SAR imagery is comparable with the SODA data. Besides, the phase speeds retrieved from other 16 scene SAR images in the South China Sea are in good agreement with the empirical formula which describes the relations between internal wave phase speed and water depths, both the root mean square and relative error are less than 0.11 m•s-1 and 7%, respectively, indicating that SAR images are useful for internal wave parameters retrieval and the method developed in this paper is convergent and applicable.

  3. SAR Product Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, P. J.; Hounam, D.; Rye, A. J.; Rosich, B.; Börner, T.; Closa, J.; Schättler, B.; Smith, P. J.; Zink, M.

    2003-03-01

    As SAR instruments and their operating modes become more complex, as new applications place more and more demands on image quality and as our understanding of their imperfections becomes more sophisticated, there is increasing recognition that SAR data quality has to be controlled more completely to keep pace. The SAR product CONtrol software (SARCON) is a comprehensive SAR product control software suite tailored to the latest generation of SAR sensors. SARCON profits from the most up-to-date thinking on SAR image performance derived from other spaceborne and airborne SAR projects and is based on the newest applications. This paper gives an overview of the structure and the features of this new software tool, which is a product of a co-operation between teams at BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technology Centre and DLR under contract to ESA (ESRIN). Work on SARCON began in 1999 and is continuing.

  4. MITAS: multisensor imaging technology for airborne surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John D.

    1991-08-01

    MITAS, a unique and low-cost solution to the problem of collecting and processing multisensor imaging data for airborne surveillance operations has been developed, MITAS results from integrating the established and proven real-time video processing, target tracking, and sensor management software of TAU with commercially available image exploitation and map processing software. The MITAS image analysis station (IAS) supports airborne day/night reconnaissance and surveillance missions involving low-altitude collection platforms employing a suite of sensors to perform reconnaissance functions against a variety of ground and sea targets. The system will detect, locate, and recognize threats likely to be encountered in support of counternarcotic operations and in low-intensity conflict areas. The IAS is capable of autonomous, near real-time target exploitation and has the appropriate communication links to remotely located IAS systems for more extended analysis of sensor data. The IAS supports the collection, fusion, and processing of three main imaging sensors: daylight imagery (DIS), forward looking infrared (FLIR), and infrared line scan (IRLS). The MITAS IAS provides support to all aspects of the airborne surveillance mission, including sensor control, real-time image enhancement, automatic target tracking, sensor fusion, freeze-frame capture, image exploitation, target data-base management, map processing, remote image transmission, and report generation.

  5. SAR imaging via modern 2-D spectral estimation methods.

    PubMed

    DeGraaf, S R

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of modern 2D spectral estimation algorithms for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. The motivation for applying power spectrum estimation methods to SAR imaging is to improve resolution, remove sidelobe artifacts, and reduce speckle compared to what is possible with conventional Fourier transform SAR imaging techniques. This paper makes two principal contributions to the field of adaptive SAR imaging. First, it is a comprehensive comparison of 2D spectral estimation methods for SAR imaging. It provides a synopsis of the algorithms available, discusses their relative merits for SAR imaging, and illustrates their performance on simulated and collected SAR imagery. Some of the algorithms presented or their derivations are new, as are some of the insights into or analyses of the algorithms. Second, this work develops multichannel variants of four related algorithms, minimum variance method (MVM), reduced-rank MVM (RRMVM), adaptive sidelobe reduction (ASR) and space variant apodization (SVA) to estimate both reflectivity intensity and interferometric height from polarimetric displaced-aperture interferometric data. All of these interferometric variants are new. In the interferometric contest, adaptive spectral estimation can improve the height estimates through a combination of adaptive nulling and averaging. Examples illustrate that MVM, ASR, and SVA offer significant advantages over Fourier methods for estimating both scattering intensity and interferometric height, and allow empirical comparison of the accuracies of Fourier, MVM, ASR, and SVA interferometric height estimates.

  6. SAR image effects on coherence and coherence estimation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Radar coherence is an important concept for imaging radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This document quantifies some of the effects in SAR which modify the coherence. Although these effects can disrupt the coherence within a single SAR image, this report will focus on the coherence between separate images, such as for coherent change detection (CCD) processing. There have been other presentations on aspects of this material in the past. The intent of this report is to bring various issues that affect the coherence together in a single report to support radar engineers in making decisions about these matters.

  7. Land-cover classification in SAR images using dictionary learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktaş, Gizem; Bak, Çaǧdaş; Nar, Fatih; Şen, Nigar

    2015-10-01

    Land-cover classification in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images has significance in both civil and military remote sensing applications. Accurate classification is a challenging problem due to variety of natural and man-made objects, seasonal changes at acquisition time, and diversity of image reconstruction algorithms.. In this study, Feature Preserving Despeckling (FPD), which is an edge preserving total variation based speckle reduction method, is applied as a preprocessing step. To handle the mentioned challenges, a novel feature extraction schema combined with a super-pixel segmentation and dictionary learning based classification is proposed. Computational complexity is another issue to handle in processing of high dimensional SAR images. Computational complexity of the proposed method is linearly proportional to the size of the image since it does not require a sliding window that accesses the pixels multiple times. Accuracy of the proposed method is validated on the dataset composed of TerraSAR-X high resolutions spot mode SAR images.

  8. Performance metrics for an airborne imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, David C.; Gonglewski, John D.

    2004-11-01

    A series of airborne imaging experiments have been conducted on the island of Maui and at North Oscura Peak in New Mexico. Two platform altitudes were considered 3000 meters and 600 meters, both with a slant range to the target up to 10000 meters. The airborne imaging platform was a Twin Otter aircraft, which circled ground target sites. The second was a fixed platform on a mountain peak overlooking a valley 600 meters below. The experiments were performed during the day using solar illuminated target buildings. Imaging system performance predictions were calculated using standard atmospheric turbulence models, and aircraft boundary layer models. Several different measurement approaches were then used to estimate the actual system performance, and make comparisons with the calculations.

  9. Nonuniform FFTs (NUFFT) algorithms applied to SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subiza, Begona; Gimeno-Nieves, Encarna; Lopez-Sanchez, Juan M.; Fortuny-Guasch, Joaquim

    2004-01-01

    Some recently developed algorithms known as Non-Uniform FFT's (NUFFT), which enable the computation of efficient FFT's with unequally spaced data in the time or frequency domain, have been applied to SAR imaging in this study. The main objective has been to analyze the potential improvement of the computational efficiency and/or image accuracy of seismic migration SAR processing techniques, like the ω-k algorithm. Our approach consists in substituting both the Stolt interpolation and the final range inverse FFT by a single NUFFT. Numerical simulations illustrate the performance of the new method and the influence of the selection of NUFFT parameters in the precision and computation time of the SAR imaging algorithm. The new method is especially suited for near-field wide-band configurations, such as inverse SAR (ISAR) and ground-based systems, where a very precise imaging algorithm is required.

  10. Aircraft Detection in High-Resolution SAR Images Based on a Gradient Textural Saliency Map.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yihua; Li, Qingyun; Li, Yansheng; Tian, Jinwen

    2015-09-11

    This paper proposes a new automatic and adaptive aircraft target detection algorithm in high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of airport. The proposed method is based on gradient textural saliency map under the contextual cues of apron area. Firstly, the candidate regions with the possible existence of airport are detected from the apron area. Secondly, directional local gradient distribution detector is used to obtain a gradient textural saliency map in the favor of the candidate regions. In addition, the final targets will be detected by segmenting the saliency map using CFAR-type algorithm. The real high-resolution airborne SAR image data is used to verify the proposed algorithm. The results demonstrate that this algorithm can detect aircraft targets quickly and accurately, and decrease the false alarm rate.

  11. Aircraft Detection in High-Resolution SAR Images Based on a Gradient Textural Saliency Map

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yihua; Li, Qingyun; Li, Yansheng; Tian, Jinwen

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new automatic and adaptive aircraft target detection algorithm in high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of airport. The proposed method is based on gradient textural saliency map under the contextual cues of apron area. Firstly, the candidate regions with the possible existence of airport are detected from the apron area. Secondly, directional local gradient distribution detector is used to obtain a gradient textural saliency map in the favor of the candidate regions. In addition, the final targets will be detected by segmenting the saliency map using CFAR-type algorithm. The real high-resolution airborne SAR image data is used to verify the proposed algorithm. The results demonstrate that this algorithm can detect aircraft targets quickly and accurately, and decrease the false alarm rate. PMID:26378543

  12. Aircraft Detection in High-Resolution SAR Images Based on a Gradient Textural Saliency Map.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yihua; Li, Qingyun; Li, Yansheng; Tian, Jinwen

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new automatic and adaptive aircraft target detection algorithm in high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of airport. The proposed method is based on gradient textural saliency map under the contextual cues of apron area. Firstly, the candidate regions with the possible existence of airport are detected from the apron area. Secondly, directional local gradient distribution detector is used to obtain a gradient textural saliency map in the favor of the candidate regions. In addition, the final targets will be detected by segmenting the saliency map using CFAR-type algorithm. The real high-resolution airborne SAR image data is used to verify the proposed algorithm. The results demonstrate that this algorithm can detect aircraft targets quickly and accurately, and decrease the false alarm rate. PMID:26378543

  13. Regional reconnaissance of seasonal landslide activity in the Eel River catchment, northern California, using InSAR and airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handwerger, A. L.; Schmidt, D. A.; Roering, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Remote sensing techniques have greatly improved our ability to quantify deformation of the Earth’s surface and provide reconnaissance information with high temporal and spatial resolution. We use InSAR and airborne LiDAR to examine the spatial and temporal behavior of 15 landslides located in the Eel River catchment, northern California. The Eel River catchment is well known for its large, deep seated, slow-moving landslides. This region is ideal for landslide studies using InSAR because the landslides are continuously moving at a rate fast enough to observe deformation in a short time span, yet slow enough to avoid a loss in radar coherence (Roering et al., 2009). 10 of the 15 landslides presented here have not been previously identified using InSAR and were identified using statistical analysis to discriminate consistent small-scale deformation from artifacts. We produced 30 differential interferograms between February 2007 and May 2010 using ALOS PALSAR data from tracks 223 and 224 with the ROI_PAC processing package. The 15 identified landslides move at line-of sight rates ranging from 0.1 m yr -1 to 0.45 m yr -1, and have dimensions ranging from 0.5 to 5 km long and 0.27 to 3 km wide. To explore seasonal variations in landslide velocity, we construct InSAR time series from the inversion of small-baseline interferograms. Preliminary results show that slide acceleration lags the onset of rainfall events by weeks to months. Combining InSAR and a shaded relief LiDAR image, we identify distinct kinematic zones (e.g. source, transport, toe) within most landslides. This study demonstrates the capabilities of InSAR and airborne LiDAR to explore the spatial and temporal behavior of large, slow-moving landslides in a regional context. Although InSAR analyses of landslides is successful at this field site, there exists a bias toward optimally oriented landslides in our regional reconnaissance. InSAR is blind to surface displacement that is parallel to the satellite

  14. Ship Detection and Sea Clutter Characterisation Using X&L-Band Full-Folarimetric Airborne SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelliaume, S.; Martineau, Ph.; Durand, Ph.; Cussac, T.

    2013-03-01

    The interest for maritime surveillance and ship detection in particular has been growing during the last years. In this context, space borne SAR systems may contribute to the improvement of security and safety at sea. In order to allow observation of non-cooperative boats, the revisit times of such systems must be compatible with the objectives of reactivity of maritime surveillance. Under CNES (French Space Agency) initiative, an airborne campaign using the ONERA Airborne SAR SETHI took place over the Atlantic Ocean. The main objective of this dedicated campaign of acquisition was to perform very precise measurements of sea clutter and ship Radar Cross Sections (RCS) at low grazing angle. This paper intend to present this airborne campaign of acquisition dedicated to maritime surveillance, analysis and first results at X band about sea clutter and ship RCS experimental measurements.

  15. From Maxwell's Equations to Polarimetric SAR Images: A Simulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Sidnei J. S.; da S. Lacava, J. C.; Fernandes, David

    2008-01-01

    A new electromagnetic approach for the simulation of polarimetric SAR images is proposed. It starts from Maxwell's equations, employs the spectral domain full-wave technique, the moment method, and the stationary phase method to compute the far electromagnetic fields scattered by multilayer structures. A multilayer structure is located at each selected position of a regular rectangular grid of coordinates, which defines the scene area under imaging. The grid is determined taking into account the elementary scatter size and SAR operational parameters, such as spatial resolution, pixel spacing, look angle and platform altitude. A two-dimensional separable “sinc” function to represent the SAR spread point function is also considered. Multifrequency sets of single-look polarimetric SAR images are generated, in L-, C- and X-bands and the images are evaluated using several measurements commonly employed in SAR data analysis. The evaluation shows that the proposed simulation process is working properly, since the obtained results are in accordance with those presented in the literature. Therefore, this new approach becomes suitable for carrying out theoretical and practical studies using polarimetric SAR images.

  16. High-Accuracy Elevation Data at Large Scales from Airborne Single-Pass SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Guy; Moller, Delwyn; Mentgen, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) are essential data sets for disaster risk management and humanitarian relief services as well as many environmental process models. At present, on the hand, globally available DEMs only meet the basic requirements and for many services and modeling studies are not of high enough spatial resolution and lack accuracy in the vertical. On the other hand, LiDAR-DEMs are of very high spatial resolution and great vertical accuracy but acquisition operations can be very costly for spatial scales larger than a couple of hundred square km and also have severe limitations in wetland areas and under cloudy and rainy conditions. The ideal situation would thus be to have a DEM technology that allows larger spatial coverage than LiDAR but without compromising resolution and vertical accuracy and still performing under some adverse weather conditions and at a reasonable cost. In this paper, we present a novel single pass In-SAR technology for airborne vehicles that is cost-effective and can generate DEMs with a vertical error of around 0.3 m for an average spatial resolution of 3 m. To demonstrate this capability, we compare a sample single-pass In-SAR Ka-band DEM of the California Central Valley from the NASA/JPL airborne GLISTIN-A to a high-resolution LiDAR DEM. We also perform a simple sensitivity analysis to floodplain inundation. Based on the findings of our analysis, we argue that this type of technology can and should be used to replace large regions of globally available lower resolution DEMs, particularly in coastal, delta and floodplain areas where a high number of assets, habitats and lives are at risk from natural disasters. We conclude with a discussion on requirements, advantages and caveats in terms of instrument and data processing.

  17. Final Report (O1-ERD-051) Dynamic InSAR: Imaging Seismic Waves Remotely from Space

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P; Rodgers, A; Dodge, D; Zucca, J; Schultz, C; Walter, B; Portnoff, M

    2003-02-07

    The purpose of this LDRD project was to determine the feasibility of using InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar) to image seismic waves remotely from space. If shown to be feasible, the long-term goal of this project would be to influence future SAR satellite missions and airborne SAR platforms to include a this new capability. This final report summarizes the accomplishments of the originally-planned 2-year project that was cut short to 1 year plus 2 months due to a funding priority change that occurred in the aftermath of the September 11th tragedy. The LDRD-ER project ''Dynamic InSAR: Imaging Seismic Waves from Space'' (01-ERD-051) began in October, (FY01) and ended in December (FY02). Consequently, most of the results and conclusions for this project are represented in the FY0l Annual Report. Nonetheless, additional conclusions and insights regarding the progress of this work are included in this report. In should be noted that this work was restarted and received additional funding under the NA-22 DOE Nonproliferation Program in FY03.

  18. 3-D Target Location from Stereoscopic SAR Images

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.

    1999-10-01

    SAR range-Doppler images are inherently 2-dimensional. Targets with a height offset lay over onto offset range and azimuth locations. Just which image locations are laid upon depends on the imaging geometry, including depression angle, squint angle, and target bearing. This is the well known layover phenomenon. Images formed with different aperture geometries will exhibit different layover characteristics. These differences can be exploited to ascertain target height information, in a stereoscopic manner. Depending on the imaging geometries, height accuracy can be on the order of horizontal position accuracies, thereby rivaling the best IFSAR capabilities in fine resolution SAR images. All that is required for this to work are two distinct passes with suitably different geometries from any plain old SAR.

  19. The U.S. Geological Survey side-looking airborne radar database: an aid to the interpretation of space images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kover, Allan N.; Schoonmaker, James W.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a database of side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) images of a significant part of the continental United States. These images provide a regional view of terrains and should be an aid to better understanding image data of satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and other systems. The USGS has been systematically collecting SLAR since 1980, initially in analog form, then in both analog and digital format since 1984.

  20. GeoEarthScope Airborne LiDAR and Satellite InSAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. A.; Jackson, M. E.; Meertens, C.

    2008-12-01

    UNAVCO has successfully acquired a significant volume of aerial and satellite geodetic imagery as part of GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility project funded by the National Science Foundation. All GeoEarthScope acquisition activities are now complete. Airborne LiDAR data acquisitions took place in 2007 and 2008 and cover a total area of more than 5000 square kilometers. The primary LiDAR survey regions cover features in Northern California, Southern/Eastern California, the Pacific Northwest, the Intermountain Seismic Belt (including the Wasatch and Teton faults and Yellowstone), and Alaska. We have ordered and archived more than 28,000 scenes (more than 81,000 frames) of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data suitable for interferometric analyses covering most of the western U.S. and parts of Alaska and Hawaii from several satellite platforms, including ERS-1/2, ENVISAT and RADARSAT. In addition to ordering data from existing archives, we also tasked the ESA ENVISAT satellite to acquire new SAR data in 2007 and 2008. GeoEarthScope activities were led by UNAVCO, guided by the community and conducted in partnership with the USGS and NASA. Processed imagery products, in addition to formats intended for use in standard research software, can also be viewed using general purpose tools such as Google Earth. We present a summary of these vast geodetic imagery datasets, totaling tens of terabytes, which are freely available to the community.

  1. UAVSAR: A New NASA Airborne SAR System for Science and Technology Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Sadowy, Greg; Miller, Tim; Shaffer, Scott; Muellerschoen, Ron; Jones, Cathleen; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently building a reconfigurable, polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track SAR data for differential interferometric measurements. Differentian interferometry can provide key deformation measurements, important for studies of earthquakes, volcanoes and other dynamically changing phenomena. Using precision real-time GPS and a sensor controlled flight management system, the system will be able to fly predefined paths with great precision. The expected performance of the flight control system will constrain the flight path to be within a 10 m diameter tube about the desired flight track. The radar will be designed to be operable on a UAV (Unpiloted Aria1 Vehicle) but will initially be demonstrated on a NASA Gulfstream III. The radar will be fully polarimetric, with a range bandwidth of 80 MHz (2 m range resolution), and will support a 16 km range swath. The antenna will be electronically steered along track to assure that the antenna beam can be directed independently, regardless of the wind direction and speed. Other features supported by the antenna include elevation monopulse and pulse-to-pulse re-steering capabilities that will enable some novel modes of operation. The system will nominally operate at 45,000 ft (13800 m). The program began as an Instrument Incubator Project (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science and Technology Office (ESTO).

  2. Fault and anthropogenic processes in central California constrained by satellite and airborne InSAR and in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Lundgren, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) system is the primary plate boundary in California, with the central SAF (CSAF) lying adjacent to the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), a vast structural trough that accounts for about one-sixth of the United Sates' irrigated land and one-fifth of its extracted groundwater. The CSAF displays a range of fault slip behavior with creeping in its central segment that decreases towards its northwest and southeast ends, where the fault transitions to being fully locked. At least six Mw ~6.0 events since 1857 have occurred near the Parkfield transition, most recently in 2004. Large earthquakes also occurred on secondary faults parallel to the SAF, the result of distributed deformation across the plate boundary zone. Recent studies have revealed the complex interaction between anthropogenic related groundwater depletion and the seismic activity on adjacent faults through stress interaction. Despite recent progress, many questions regarding fault and anthropogenic processes in the region still remain. For example, how is the relative plate motion accommodated between the CSAF and off-fault deformation? What is the distribution of fault creep and slip deficit at shallow depths? What are the spatiotemporal variations of fault slip? What are the spatiotemporal characteristics of anthropogenic and lithospheric processes and how do they interact with each other? To address these, we combine satellite InSAR and NASA airborne UAVSAR data to image on and off-fault deformation. The UAVSAR data cover fault perpendicular swaths imaged from opposing look directions and fault parallel swaths since 2009. The much finer spatial resolution and optimized viewing geometry provide important constraints on near fault deformation and fault slip at very shallow depth. We performed a synoptic InSAR time series analysis using ERS-1/2, Envisat, ALOS and UAVSAR interferograms. The combined C-band ERS-1/2 and Envisat data provide a long time interval of SAR data over the region

  3. Flood disaster monitoring in Thailand by using a airborne L-band SAR: Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band(Pi-SAR-L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, N.; Sobue, S.; Shimada, M.; Ohyoshi, K.

    2012-04-01

    It was heavy rainfall around the northern region of Thailand from July to September 2011, which caused flood disaster to quite wide region of Thailand, it finally reached to the Bangkok central in the end of October 2011. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) conducted an emergency observation by using a airborne L-band SAR: Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band(Pi-SAR-L) from 5th to 27th November to monitor flood area. Pi-SAR-L has a center frequency of 1271.5 MHz, a band width of 50 MHz, a slant range resolution of 3 m, and an acquisition swath of 15 km on the ground. Pi-SAR-L is boarded on an aircraft of the Gulfstream-II operated by the Diamond Air Service(DAS), Japan, and the Gulfstream-II was ferried to the Chieng-Mai airport in the North Thailand, from Japan. In our presentation, we will show flood area around Bangkok and its variations detected by Pi-SAR-L

  4. Nonlocal means SAR image despeckling using Principle Neighborhood Dictionaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hua; Yang, Chen; Jiao, L. C.

    2011-11-01

    The Principle Neighborhood Dictionary (PND) filter projects the image patches onto a lower dimensional subspace using Principle Component analysis (PCA), based on which the similarity measure of image patch can be computed with a higher accuracy for the nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm. In this paper, a new PND filter for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image despeckling is presented, in which a new distance that adapts to the multiplicative speckle noise is derived. Compared with the commonly used Euclidean distance in NLM, the new distance measure improves the accuracy of the similarity measure of speckled patches in SAR images. The proposed method is validated on simulated and real SAR images through comparisons with other classical despeckling methods.

  5. SAR image formation with azimuth interpolation after azimuth transform

    DOEpatents

    Doerry; Armin W. , Martin; Grant D. , Holzrichter; Michael W.

    2008-07-08

    Two-dimensional SAR data can be processed into a rectangular grid format by subjecting the SAR data to a Fourier transform operation, and thereafter to a corresponding interpolation operation. Because the interpolation operation follows the Fourier transform operation, the interpolation operation can be simplified, and the effect of interpolation errors can be diminished. This provides for the possibility of both reducing the re-grid processing time, and improving the image quality.

  6. Extracting Tree Height from Repeat-Pass PolInSAR Data : Experiments with JPL and ESA Airborne Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavalle, Marco; Ahmed, Razi; Neumann, Maxim; Hensley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our latest developments and experiments with the random-motion-over-ground (RMoG) model used to extract canopy height and other important forest parameters from repeat-pass polarimetricinterferometric SAR (Pol-InSAR) data. More specifically, we summarize the key features of the RMoG model in contrast with the random-volume-over-ground (RVoG) model, describe in detail a possible inversion scheme for the RMoG model and illustrate the results of the RMoG inversion using airborne data collected by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  7. Unsupervised Change Detection in SAR Images Using Gaussian Mixture Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiana, E.; Homayouni, S.; Sharifi, M. A.; Farid-Rohani, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for unsupervised change detection in Remote Sensing Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. This method is based on the mixture modelling of the histogram of difference image. In this process, the difference image is classified into three classes; negative change class, positive change class and no change class. However the SAR images suffer from speckle noise, the proposed method is able to map the changes without speckle filtering. To evaluate the performance of this method, two dates of SAR data acquired by Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic from an agriculture area are used. Change detection results show better efficiency when compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

  8. GPU-accelerated MRF segmentation algorithm for SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Haigang; Peng, Feifei; Xu, Chuan; Sun, Kaimin; Gong, Jianya

    2012-06-01

    Markov Random Field (MRF) approaches have been widely studied for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image segmentation, but they have a large computational cost and hence are not widely used in practice. Fortunately parallel algorithms have been documented to enjoy significant speedups when ported to run on a graphics processing units (GPUs) instead of a standard CPU. Presented here is an implementation of graphics processing units in General Purpose Computation (GPGPU) for SAR image segmentation based on the MRF method, using the C-oriented Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) developed by NVIDIA. This experiment with GPGPU shows that the speed of segmentation can be increased by a factor of 10 for large images.

  9. [Simulation of polarization SAR imaging of ocean surface].

    PubMed

    Guo, Ding; Gu, Xing-Fa; Yu, Tao; Fernado, N; Li, Juan; Chen, Xing-Feng

    2011-10-01

    The polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging simulation is of great significance to ocean surface scattering. According to the theory of wind-wave spectrum, rough ocean surface was modeled in the present paper using the two-scale-model. This treatment takes both the large scale and small scale surface into account. By using the velocity bunching (VB) theory, Bragg scattering model and the small perturbation model (SPM), the polarization SAR system can simulate the ocean surface with various parameters and ocean states. The effects of the parameters of ocean waves and the parameters of SAR system were analyzed. Finally, some useful conclusions were drawn, which are helpful for extracting the information of ocean surface. The method is an effective way in the ocean SAR design and the ocean surface research.

  10. [Simulation of polarization SAR imaging of ocean surface].

    PubMed

    Guo, Ding; Gu, Xing-Fa; Yu, Tao; Fernado, N; Li, Juan; Chen, Xing-Feng

    2011-10-01

    The polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging simulation is of great significance to ocean surface scattering. According to the theory of wind-wave spectrum, rough ocean surface was modeled in the present paper using the two-scale-model. This treatment takes both the large scale and small scale surface into account. By using the velocity bunching (VB) theory, Bragg scattering model and the small perturbation model (SPM), the polarization SAR system can simulate the ocean surface with various parameters and ocean states. The effects of the parameters of ocean waves and the parameters of SAR system were analyzed. Finally, some useful conclusions were drawn, which are helpful for extracting the information of ocean surface. The method is an effective way in the ocean SAR design and the ocean surface research. PMID:22250525

  11. SAR imaging for a forward-looking GPR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoqing; Wang, Yanwei; Li, Jian; Bradley, Marshall R.

    2003-09-01

    We investigate both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging techniques for a forward-looking ground penetrating radar (FLGPR) system. In particular, we consider SAR imaging using the delay-and-sum (DAS), phase-shift migration, and spectral estimation (joint APES (Amplitude and Phase EStimation) and RCB (Robust Capon Beamforming)) approaches with the PSI (Planning Systems Inc.) FLGPR Phase II system. For the DAS and phase-shift migration approaches, we use shading in both frequency and cross-track aperture dimensions to reduce sidelobe leakages and clutter. We perform both coherent and non-coherent multi-look processing as well as smoothing to improve the SAR imaging quality and landmine detection capability of the system. The effectiveness of the approaches are demonstrated with an experimental data set collected by the PSI FLGPR Phase II system.

  12. Ensemble polarimetric SAR image classification based on contextual sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lamei; Wang, Xiao; Zou, Bin; Qiao, Zhijun

    2016-05-01

    Polarimetric SAR image interpretation has become one of the most interesting topics, in which the construction of the reasonable and effective technique of image classification is of key importance. Sparse representation represents the data using the most succinct sparse atoms of the over-complete dictionary and the advantages of sparse representation also have been confirmed in the field of PolSAR classification. However, it is not perfect, like the ordinary classifier, at different aspects. So ensemble learning is introduced to improve the issue, which makes a plurality of different learners training and obtained the integrated results by combining the individual learner to get more accurate and ideal learning results. Therefore, this paper presents a polarimetric SAR image classification method based on the ensemble learning of sparse representation to achieve the optimal classification.

  13. Modelling Iteration Convergence Condition for Single SAR Image Geocoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yuting; Liao, Minghsheng; Zhang, Lu; Shi, Xuguo

    2014-11-01

    Single SAR image geocoding is to determine the ground coordinate for each pixel in the SAR image assisted with an external DEM. Due to the uncertainty of the elevation of each pixel in SAR image, an iterative procedure is needed, which suffers from the problem of divergence in some difficult areas such as shaded and serious layover areas. This paper aims at theoretically analysing the convergence conditions that has not been intensively studied till now. To make the discussion easier, the Range-Doppler (RD) model is simplified and then the general surface is simplified into a planar surface. Mathematical deduction is carried out to derive the convergence conditions and the impact factors for the convergence speed are analysed. The theoretical findings are validated by experiments for both simulated and real surfaces.

  14. Compressive SAR imaging with joint sparsity and local similarity exploitation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fangfang; Zhao, Guanghui; Shi, Guangming; Dong, Weisheng; Wang, Chenglong; Niu, Yi

    2015-02-12

    Compressive sensing-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging has shown its superior capability in high-resolution image formation. However, most of those works focus on the scenes that can be sparsely represented in fixed spaces. When dealing with complicated scenes, these fixed spaces lack adaptivity in characterizing varied image contents. To solve this problem, a new compressive sensing-based radar imaging approach with adaptive sparse representation is proposed. Specifically, an autoregressive model is introduced to adaptively exploit the structural sparsity of an image. In addition, similarity among pixels is integrated into the autoregressive model to further promote the capability and thus an adaptive sparse representation facilitated by a weighted autoregressive model is derived. Since the weighted autoregressive model is inherently determined by the unknown image, we propose a joint optimization scheme by iterative SAR imaging and updating of the weighted autoregressive model to solve this problem. Eventually, experimental results demonstrated the validity and generality of the proposed approach.

  15. An automatic coastline detector for use with SAR images

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, Ireena A.

    1998-09-01

    SAR imagery for coastline detection has many potential advantages over conventional optical stereoscopic techniques. For example, SAR does not have restrictions on being collected during daylight or when there is no cloud cover. In addition, the techniques for coastline detection witth SAR images can be automated. In this paper, we present the algorithmic development of an automatic coastline detector for use with SAR imagery. Three main algorithms comprise the automatic coastline detection algorithm, The first algorithm considers the image pre-processing steps that must occur on the original image in order to accentuate the land/water boundary. The second algorithm automatically follows along the accentuated land/water boundary and produces a single-pixel-wide coastline. The third algorithm identifies islands and marks them. This report describes in detail the development of these three algorithms. Examples of imagery are used throughout the paper to illustrate the various steps in algorithms. Actual code is included in appendices. The algorithms presented are preliminary versions that can be applied to automatic coastline detection in SAR imagery. There are many variations and additions to the algorithms that can be made to improve robustness and automation, as required by a particular application.

  16. Camouflage effectiveness of static nets in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jersblad, Johan; Larsson, Christer

    2015-10-01

    We present a methodology to determine the camouflage effectiveness of static nets in a SAR image. There is currently no common recognized methodology within the signature management community in this research topic. One step towards establishing a common methodology is to use a standardized target to be camouflaged. We use the STANdard Decoy for CAmouflage Materials (STANDCAM) target developed by the German Army, WTD 52, Oberjettenberg. An ISAR measurement of the STANDCAM with a camouflage configuration is acquired as the first step of the method. The ISAR data is then blended with SAR data acquired in field trials. In the final SAR image a contrast metric between the target and background is extracted. The contrast measure is then the measure of the camouflage effectiveness. As an example of result we present ISAR measurements and determine the camouflage effectiveness in a SAR image using SAR blending for static nets with different electrical conductivity and design. This methodology presents a measure to determine the effectiveness of a static net on the STANDCAM target.

  17. Space Radar Image of West Texas - SAR scan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This radar image of the Midland/Odessa region of West Texas, demonstrates an experimental technique, called ScanSAR, that allows scientists to rapidly image large areas of the Earth's surface. The large image covers an area 245 kilometers by 225 kilometers (152 miles by 139 miles). It was obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 5, 1994. The smaller inset image is a standard SIR-C image showing a portion of the same area, 100 kilometers by 57 kilometers (62 miles by 35 miles) and was taken during the first flight of SIR-C on April 14, 1994. The bright spots on the right side of the image are the cities of Odessa (left) and Midland (right), Texas. The Pecos River runs from the top center to the bottom center of the image. Along the left side of the image are, from top to bottom, parts of the Guadalupe, Davis and Santiago Mountains. North is toward the upper right. Unlike conventional radar imaging, in which a radar continuously illuminates a single ground swath as the space shuttle passes over the terrain, a Scansar radar illuminates several adjacent ground swaths almost simultaneously, by 'scanning' the radar beam across a large area in a rapid sequence. The adjacent swaths, typically about 50 km (31 miles) wide, are then merged during ground processing to produce a single large scene. Illumination for this L-band scene is from the top of the image. The beams were scanned from the top of the scene to the bottom, as the shuttle flew from left to right. This scene was acquired in about 30 seconds. A normal SIR-C image is acquired in about 13 seconds. The ScanSAR mode will likely be used on future radar sensors to construct regional and possibly global radar images and topographic maps. The ScanSAR processor is being designed for 1996 implementation at NASA's Alaska SAR Facility, located at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and will produce digital images from the

  18. Multitemporal observations of sugarcane by TerraSAR-X images.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Nicolas; Cresson, Rémi; Todoroff, Pierre; Moinet, Soizic

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the potential of TerraSAR-X (X-band) in monitoring sugarcane growth on Reunion Island (located in the Indian Ocean). Multi-temporal TerraSAR data acquired at various incidence angles (17°, 31°, 37°, 47°, 58°) and polarizations (HH, HV, VV) were analyzed in order to study the behaviour of SAR (synthetic aperture radar) signal as a function of sugarcane height and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index). The potential of TerraSAR for mapping the sugarcane harvest was also studied. Radar signal increased quickly with crop height until a threshold height, which depended on polarization and incidence angle. Beyond this threshold, the signal increased only slightly, remained constant, or even decreased. The threshold height is slightly higher with cross polarization and higher incidence angles (47° in comparison with 17° and 31°). Results also showed that the co-polarizations channels (HH and VV) were well correlated. High correlation between SAR signal and NDVI calculated from SPOT-4/5 images was observed. TerraSAR data showed that after strong rains the soil contribution to the backscattering of sugarcane fields can be important for canes with heights of terminal visible dewlap (htvd) less than 50 cm (total cane heights around 155 cm). This increase in radar signal after strong rains could involve an ambiguity between young and mature canes. Indeed, the radar signal on TerraSAR images acquired in wet soil conditions could be of the same order for fields recently harvested and mature sugarcane fields, making difficult the detection of cuts. Finally, TerraSAR data at high spatial resolution were shown to be useful for monitoring sugarcane harvest when the fields are of small size or when the cut is spread out in time. The comparison between incidence angles of 17°, 37° and 58° shows that 37° is more suitable to monitor the sugarcane harvest. The cut is easily detectable on TerraSAR images for data acquired

  19. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiuhong

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, some remote-sensing applications require advanced airborne multi-sensor systems to provide high performance reflective and emissive spectral imaging measurement rapidly over large areas. The key or unique problem of characteristics is associated with a black box back-end system that operates a suite of cutting-edge imaging sensors to collect simultaneously the high throughput reflective and emissive spectral imaging data with precision georeference. This back-end system needs to be portable, easy-to-use, and reliable with advanced onboard processing. The innovation of the black box backend is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS integrates a complex embedded system of systems with dedicated power and signal electronic circuits inside to serve a suite of configurable cutting-edge electro- optical (EO), long-wave infrared (LWIR), and medium-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras, a hyperspectral imaging scanner, and a GPS and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for atmospheric and surface remote sensing. Its compatible sensor packages include NASA s 1,024 1,024 pixel LWIR quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) imager; a 60.5 megapixel BuckEye EO camera; and a fast (e.g. 200+ scanlines/s) and wide swath-width (e.g., 1,920+ pixels) CCD/InGaAs imager-based visible/near infrared reflectance (VNIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometer. MAICSS records continuous precision georeferenced and time-tagged multisensor throughputs to mass storage devices at a high aggregate rate, typically 60 MB/s for its LWIR/EO payload. MAICSS is a complete stand-alone imaging server instrument with an easy-to-use software package for either autonomous data collection or interactive airborne operation. Advanced multisensor data acquisition and onboard processing software features have been implemented for MAICSS. With the onboard processing for real time image development, correction, histogram-equalization, compression, georeference, and

  20. SAR image change detection using watershed and spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ruican; Jiao, L. C.; Wang, Guiting; Feng, Jie

    2011-12-01

    A new method of change detection in SAR images based on spectral clustering is presented in this paper. Spectral clustering is employed to extract change information from a pair images acquired on the same geographical area at different time. Watershed transform is applied to initially segment the big image into non-overlapped local regions, leading to reduce the complexity. Experiments results and system analysis confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Detection of surface and buried mines with an UHF airborne SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosch, Theodore O.; Lee, Check F.; Adams, Eileen M.; Tran, Chi; Koening, Francois; Tom, Kwok; Vickers, Roger S.

    1995-06-01

    A small minefield was deployed in the desert near Yuma, Arizona in June of 1993. Radar data of this minefield was collected by ground-based and airborne radar sensors. The minefield consists of M-20 metal and M-80 plastic anti-armor mines and Valmara-69 antipersonnel mines. The mines were deployed on the surface and buried at three different depths. Images and analysis of the minefield, which are derived from data collected by the SRI FOLPEN II synthetic aperture radar, are presented here. The minefield was imaged over three bands from 100 to 500 MHz and at various depression angles with this radar sensor. The image analysis is compared to the modeling results of surface and buried mine-like objects. We also show the results of a new radio frequency interference (RFI) rejection algorithm and the image quality improvement we achieved.

  2. SAR image construction from periodically gapped phase-history data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Erik G.; Li, Jianwei J.

    2002-08-01

    It is known that high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging can be cast as a spectral analysis problem, and consequently a number of sophisticated spectral estimation methods have been applied to SAR imaging. These method include the classical Capon method and the closely related Amplitude and Phase Estimation (APES) algorithm. In this paper, we show how Capon and APES can be extended to deal with spectral analysis of periodically gapped (PG) data, i.e. data where samples are missing in a periodic fashion. This problem is highly relevant for SAR imaging with angular diversity since in that case the measured phase-history data matrix contains missing columns. Our extension of Capon and APES is based on a transform that maps a one-dimensional (1D) periodically gapped time-series into a uniformly sampled two-dimensional (2D) data set. We show that the stationarity properties of the 1D signal are left unchanged by the transformation, and as a result the conventional 2D Capon and APES methods can be applied to the transformed data. An associated inverse transform is used to extract the 1D spectral estimate from the 2D one. The new method is computationally and conceptually non-intricate and it does not involve any interpolation of the missing data. Despite its striking simplicity, numerical results indicate that the new method can be a promising tool for SAR imaging with angular diversity as well as for time-series analysis. In SAR applications, the new method may be particularly suitable for accurate imaging of a small region of interest.

  3. Theory and measure of certain image norms in SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The principal properties of synthetic aperture radar SAR imagery of point and distributed objects are summarized. Against this background, the response of a SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) to the moving surface of the sea is considered. Certain conclusions are drawn as to the mechanism of interaction between microwaves and the sea surface. Focus and speckle spectral tests may be used on selected SAR imagery for areas of the ocean. The fine structure of the sea imagery is sensitive to processor focus and adjustment. The ocean reflectivity mechanism must include point like scatterers of sufficient radar cross section to dominate the return from certain individual resolution elements. Both specular and diffuse scattering mechanisms are observed together, to varying degree. The effect is sea state dependent. Several experiments are proposed based on imaging theory that could assist in the investigation of reflectivity mechanisms.

  4. SAR image registration in absolute coordinates using GPS carrier phase position and velocity information

    SciTech Connect

    Burgett, S.; Meindl, M.

    1994-09-01

    It is useful in a variety of military and commercial application to accurately register the position of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery in absolute coordinates. The two basic SAR measurements, range and doppler, can be used to solve for the position of the SAR image. Imprecise knowledge of the SAR collection platform`s position and velocity vectors introduce errors in the range and doppler measurements and can cause the apparent location of the SAR image on the ground to be in error by tens of meters. Recent advances in carrier phase GPS techniques can provide an accurate description of the collection vehicle`s trajectory during the image formation process. In this paper, highly accurate carrier phase GPS trajectory information is used in conjunction with SAR imagery to demonstrate a technique for accurate registration of SAR images in WGS-84 coordinates. Flight test data will be presented that demonstrates SAR image registration errors of less than 4 meters.

  5. SAR imaging and hydrodynamic analysis of ocean bottom topographic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Quanan; Li, Li; Guo, Xiaogang; Ge, Yong; Zhu, Dayong; Li, Chunyan

    2006-09-01

    The satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images display wave-like patterns of the ocean bottom topographic features at the south outlet of Taiwan Strait (TS). Field measurements indicate that the most TS water body is vertically stratified. However, SAR imaging models available were developed for homogeneous waters. Hence explaining SAR imaging mechanisms of bottom features in a stratified ocean is beyond the scope of those models. In order to explore these mechanisms and to determine the quantitative relations between the SAR imagery and the bottom features, a two-dimensional, three-layer ocean model with sinusoidal bottom topographic features is developed. Analytical solutions and inferences of the momentum equations of the ocean model lead to the following conditions. (1) In the lower layer, the topography-induced waves (topographic waves hereafter) exist in the form of stationary waves, which satisfy a lower boundary resonance condition σ = kC0, here σ is an angular frequency of the stationary waves, k is a wavenumber of bottom topographic corrugation, and C0 is a background current speed. (2) As internal waves, the topographic waves may propagate vertically to the upper layer with an unchanged wavenumber k, if a frequency relation N3 < σ < N2 is satisfied, here N2 and N3 are the Brunt-Wäisälä frequencies of middle layer and upper layer, respectively. (3) The topographic waves are extremely amplified if an upper layer resonance condition is satisfied. The SAR image of topographic waves is derived on the basis of current-modulated small wave spectra. The results indicate that the topographic waves on SAR images have the same wavelength of bottom topographic corrugation, and the imagery brightness peaks are either inphase or antiphase with respect to the topographic corrugation, depending on a sign of a coupling factor. These theoretical predictions are verified by field observations. The results of this study provide a physical basis for quantitative

  6. Automated extraction of pressure ridges from SAR images of sea ice - Comparison with surface truth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Smith, M. P.; Samadani, R.; Daida, J. M.; Comiso, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors estimate the characteristics of ridges and leads in sea ice from SAR (synthetic aperture radar) images. Such estimates are based on the hypothesis that bright filamentary features in SAR sea ice images correspond with pressure ridges. A data set collected in the Greenland Sea in 1987 allows this hypothesis to be evaluated for X-band SAR images. A preliminary analysis of data collected from SAR images and ice elevation (from a laser altimeter) is presented. It is found that SAR image brightness and ice elevation are clearly related. However, the correlation, using the data and techniques applied, is not strong.

  7. Multiscale Segmentation of Polarimetric SAR Image Based on Srm Superpixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, F.; Yang, J.; Wu, L.; Li, D.

    2016-06-01

    Multi-scale segmentation of remote sensing image is more systematic and more convenient for the object-oriented image analysis compared to single-scale segmentation. However, the existing pixel-based polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) image multi-scale segmentation algorithms are usually inefficient and impractical. In this paper, we proposed a superpixel-based binary partition tree (BPT) segmentation algorithm by combining the generalized statistical region merging (GSRM) algorithm and the BPT algorithm. First, superpixels are obtained by setting a maximum region number threshold to GSRM. Then, the region merging process of the BPT algorithm is implemented based on superpixels but not pixels. The proposed algorithm inherits the advantages of both GSRM and BPT. The operation efficiency is obviously improved compared to the pixel-based BPT segmentation. Experiments using the Lband ESAR image over the Oberpfaffenhofen test site proved the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Potential of Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy at Czechglobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuš, J.; Fabiánek, T.; Fajmon, L.

    2016-06-01

    Ecosystems, their services, structures and functions are affected by complex environmental processes, which are both natural and human-induced and globally changing. In order to understand how ecosystems behave in globally changing environment, it is important to monitor the current status of ecosystems and their structural and functional changes in time and space. An essential tool allowing monitoring of ecosystems is remote sensing (RS). Many ecosystems variables are being translated into a spectral response recorded by RS instruments. It is however important to understand the complexity and synergies of the key ecosystem variables influencing the reflected signal. This can be achieved by analysing high resolution RS data from multiple sources acquired simultaneously from the same platform. Such a system has been recently built at CzechGlobe - Global Change Research Institute (The Czech Academy of Sciences). CzechGlobe has been significantly extending its research infrastructure in the last years, which allows advanced monitoring of ecosystem changes at hierarchical levels spanning from molecules to entire ecosystems. One of the CzechGlobe components is a laboratory of imaging spectroscopy. The laboratory is now operating a new platform for advanced remote sensing observations called FLIS (Flying Laboratory of Imaging Spectroscopy). FLIS consists of an airborne carrier equipped with passive RS systems. The core instrument of FLIS is a hyperspectral imaging system provided by Itres Ltd. The hyperspectral system consists of three spectroradiometers (CASI 1500, SASI 600 and TASI 600) that cover the reflective spectral range from 380 to 2450 nm, as well as the thermal range from 8 to 11.5 μm. The airborne platform is prepared for mounting of full-waveform laser scanner Riegl-Q780 as well, however a laser scanner is not a permanent part of FLIS. In 2014 the installation of the hyperspectral scanners was completed and the first flights were carried out with all

  9. Comparison of JPL-AIRSAR and DLR E-SAR images from the MAC Europe 1991 campaign over testsite Oberpfaffenhofen: Frequency and polarization dependent backscatter variations from agricultural fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmullius, C.; Nithack, J.

    1992-01-01

    On July 12, the MAC Europe '91 (Multi-Sensor Airborne Campaign) took place over test site Oberpfaffenhofen. The DLR Institute of Radio-Frequency Technology participated with its C-VV, X-VV, and X-HH Experimental Synthetic Aperture Radar (E-SAR). The high resolution E-SAR images with a pixel size between 1 and 2 m and the polarimetric AIRSAR images were analyzed. Using both sensors in combination is a unique opportunity to evaluate SAR images in a frequency range from P- to X-band and to investigate polarimetric information.

  10. A novel SAR fusion image segmentation method based on triplet Markov field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiajing; Jiao, Shuhong; Sun, Zhenyu

    2015-03-01

    Markov random field (MRF) has been widely used in SAR image segmentation because of the advantage of directly modeling the posterior distribution and suppresses the speckle on the influence of the segmentation result. However, when the real SAR images are nonstationary images, the unsupervised segmentation results by MRF can be poor. The recent proposed triplet Markov field (TMF) model is well appropriate for nonstationary SAR image processing due to the introduction of an auxiliary field which reflects the nonstationarity. In addition, on account of the texture features of SAR image, a fusion image segmentation method is proposed by fusing the gray level image and texture feature image. The effectiveness of the proposed method in this paper is demonstrated by a synthesis SAR image and the real SAR images segmentation experiments, and it is better than the state-of-art methods.

  11. The Ecosystems SAR (EcoSAR) an Airborne P-band Polarimetric InSAR for the Measurement of Vegetation Structure, Biomass and Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Ranson, K. Jon; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sun, Guoqing; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Perrine, Martin L.; Du Toit, Cornelis F.; Bonds, Quenton; Beck, Jaclyn; Lu, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    EcoSAR is a new synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument being developed at the NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the polarimetric and interferometric measurements of ecosystem structure and biomass. The instrument uses a phased-array beamforming architecture and supports full polarimetric measurements and single pass interferometry. This Instrument development is part of NASA's Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program (ESTO IIP).

  12. Combined Use of Airborne Lidar and DBInSAR Data to Estimate LAI in Temperate Mixed Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peduzzi, Alicia; Wynne, Randolph Hamilton; Thomas, Valerie A.; Nelson, Ross F.; Reis, James J.; Sanford, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether leaf area index (LAI) in temperate mixed forests is best estimated using multiple-return airborne laser scanning (lidar) data or dual-band, single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar data (from GeoSAR) alone, or both in combination. In situ measurements of LAI were made using the LiCor LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer on 61 plots (21 hardwood, 36 pine, 4 mixed pine hardwood; stand age ranging from 12-164 years; mean height ranging from 0.4 to 41.2 m) in the Appomattox-Buckingham State Forest, Virginia, USA. Lidar distributional metrics were calculated for all returns and for ten one meter deep crown density slices (a new metric), five above and five below the mode of the vegetation returns for each plot. GeoSAR metrics were calculated from the X-band backscatter coefficients (four looks) as well as both X- and P-band interferometric heights and magnitudes for each plot. Lidar metrics alone explained 69% of the variability in LAI, while GeoSAR metrics alone explained 52%. However, combining the lidar and GeoSAR metrics increased the R2 to 0.77 with a CV-RMSE of 0.42. This study indicates the clear potential for X-band backscatter and interferometric height (both now available from spaceborne sensors), when combined with small-footprint lidar data, to improve LAI estimation in temperate mixed forests.

  13. Dynamic and data-driven classification for polarimetric SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, S.; Kiranyaz, S.; Ince, T.; Gabbouj, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we introduce dynamic and scalable Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) terrain classification based on the Collective Network of Binary Classifiers (CNBC). The CNBC framework is primarily adapted to maximize the SAR classification accuracy on dynamically varying databases where variations do occur in any time in terms of (new) images, classes, features and users' relevance feedback. Whenever a "change" occurs, the CNBC dynamically and "optimally" adapts itself to the change by means of its topology and the underlying evolutionary method MD PSO. Thanks to its "Divide and Conquer" type approach, the CNBC can also support varying and large set of (PolSAR) features among which it optimally selects, weighs and fuses the most discriminative ones for a particular class. Each SAR terrain class is discriminated by a dedicated Network of Binary Classifiers (NBC), which encapsulates a set of evolutionary Binary Classifiers (BCs) discriminating the class with a distinctive feature set. Moreover, with each incremental evolution session, new classes/features can be introduced which signals the CNBC to create new corresponding NBCs and BCs within to adapt and scale dynamically to the change. This can in turn be a significant advantage when the current CNBC is used to classify multiple SAR images with similar terrain classes since no or only minimal (incremental) evolution sessions are needed to adapt it to a new classification problem while using the previously acquired knowledge. We demonstrate our proposed classification approach over several medium and highresolution NASA/JPL AIRSAR images applying various polarimetric decompositions. We evaluate and compare the computational complexity and classification accuracy against static Neural Network classifiers. As CNBC classification accuracy can compete and even surpass them, the computational complexity of CNBC is significantly lower as the CNBC body supports high parallelization making it applicable to grid

  14. Using TerraSAR-X and hyperspectral airborne data to monitor surface deformation and physical properties of the Barrow permafrost landscape, Alask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenas-Haghighi, M.; Motagh, M.; Heim, B.; Sachs, T.; Kohnert, K.; Streletskiy, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we assess seasonal subsidence/heaving due to thawing/freezing of the permafrost in Barrow (71.3 N, 156.5 W) at the northernmost point of Alaska. The topographic relief in this area is low. Thick Permafrost underlies the entire area, with large ice volumes in its upper layer. With a large collection of field measurements during the past decades at the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), it is an ideal site for permafrost investigation. There are long term systematic geocryological investigations within the Global Terrestrial Network (GTN-P) of the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) programme. We use 28 TerraSAR-X images, acquired between December 2012 and December 2013 and analyze them using the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique to extract time-series of ground surface deformation. We also analyze hyperspectral images acquired by the airborne AISA sensor over Barrow area, within the AIRMETH2013 programme, to assess physical characteristics such as vegetation biomass and density, surface moisture, and water bodies. Finally, we combine the information derived from both InSAR and hyperspectral analysis, with field measurements to investigate the link between physical characteristics of the permafrost and surface displacement.

  15. Chirp Scaling Algorithms for SAR Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, M.; Cheng, T.; Chen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The chirp scaling SAR processing algorithm is both accurate and efficient. Successful implementation requires proper selection of the interval of output samples, which is a function of the chirp interval, signal sampling rate, and signal bandwidth. Analysis indicates that for both airborne and spaceborne SAR applications in the slant range domain a linear chirp scaling is sufficient. To perform nonlinear interpolation process such as to output ground range SAR images, one can use a nonlinear chirp scaling interpolator presented in this paper.

  16. Imaging of ocean waves on both sides of an atmospheric front by the SIR-C/X-SAR multifrequency synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsheimer, Christian; Bao, Mingquan; Alpers, Werner

    1998-08-01

    Radar images of an ocean scene containing an atmospheric front and almost range-propagating ocean waves which were acquired by the multifrequency/multipolarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour during the spaceborne imaging radar-C/X-band synthetic aperture radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) mission over the North Atlantic in 1994 are analyzed. The L-band SAR image spectra calculated from two areas located on opposite sides of the atmospheric front are quite similar, whereas the corresponding X- and C-band SAR image spectra differ significantly. It is shown that this is a consequence of the SAR imaging mechanism; at L band the SAR imaging mechanism depends weakly on the local wind field, and at X and C band it depends strongly on the local wind field. This is in agreement with earlier results obtained from the analysis of airborne multifrequency/multipolarization SAR images acquired over the North Sea during the SAR and X-Band Ocean Nonlinearities - Forschungsplattform Nordsee (SAXON-FPN) experiment. In this investigation it was found that at X and C band the phase of the real aperture radar modulation transfer function (RAR MTF) changes by almost 90°, when in the reference system moving with the group velocity of the dominant wave, the component of the wind velocity in the direction of the wave propagation changes sign. However, at L band such a change in local wind direction affects the phase of the RAR MTF only slightly. Using this phase behavior of the RAR MTF in simulations of the SIR-C/X-SAR image spectra, we show that the observed differences of the X- and C-band SAR image spectra measured on both sides of the atmospheric front are consistent with a change in wind speed and direction across the front. From this we conclude that for inverting X- or C-band SAR image spectra into ocean wave spectra that contain ocean waves propagating near the range direction, it is quite important to have a good knowledge of the local wind field, whereas

  17. Advanced InSAR imaging for dune mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; August, Yitzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.; Rotman, Stanley R.

    2015-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970's, remote sensing imagery both optical and radar, are used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of Aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two images or more. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This research aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation, or, coherence change detection, can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the Nitzanim coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of varying levels of stability and vegetation cover and have been monitored meteorologically, geomorphologically and

  18. Monitoring of precursor landslide surface deformation using InSAR image in Kuchi-Sakamoto, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H. P.; Nakajima, H.; Nakano, T.; Daimaru, H.

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is the technique to obtain ground surface images using microwave that is emitted from and received on the antenna. The Kuchi-Sakamoto area, 2.2 km2 in precipitous mountains, central Japan, has suffered from frequent landslides, and slow landslide surface deformation has been monitored by on-site extensometer; however, such the monitoring method cannot detect the deformation in the whole area. Because satellite InSAR is effective tool to monitor slow landslide suface deformation, it is a promising tool for detecting precursor deformation and preparing effective measures against serious landslide disasters. In this study Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) / Phased Array type L-band SAR (PALSAR) data were used, and InSAR images were produced from the PALSAR data that were observed between 5 Sep 2008 and 21 Oct 2008 (from descending orbit) and between 20 Jul 2008 and 7 Sep 2009 (from ascending orbit). InSAR image from descending orbit was found to detect clear precursor landslide surface deformation on a slope; however, InSAR image on ascending orbit did not always detect clear precursor deformation. It is thought to be related with atmospheric moisture condition, length of observation baseline and so on. Furthermore, after phase unwrapping on InSAR images, 2.5-dimensional deformation was analized. This analysis needed both ascending and descending InSAR images and culculated quasi east-west deformation component (Figs. (a) and (b)) and quasi up-down deformation component (Figs. (c) and (d)). The resulting 2.5D calculation gave westward deformation and mixture of upward and downward deformations on the precursor landslide surface deformation slope (blue circles in Figs. (c) and (d)), where remarkable disrupted deep landslide occurred during Nov 2012 and 25 Jun 2013, judging from result of airborne LiDAR survey and field survey; the occurrence date is not precisely identified. The figure remains the issue that eliminating "real

  19. A Novel Fusion-Based Ship Detection Method from Pol-SAR Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenguang; Ji, Yu; Lin, Xiaoxia

    2015-09-29

    A novel fusion-based ship detection method from polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (Pol-SAR) images is proposed in this paper. After feature extraction and constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detection, the detection results of HH channel, diplane scattering by Pauli decomposition and helical factor by Barnes decomposition are fused together. The confirmed targets and potential target pixels can be obtained after the fusion process. Using the difference degree of the target, potential target pixels can be classified. The fusion-based ship detection method works accurately by utilizing three different features comprehensively. The result of applying the technique to measured Airborne Synthetic Radar (AIRSAR) data shows that the novel detection method can achieve better performance in both ship's detection and ship's shape preservation compared to the result of K-means clustering method and the Notch Filter method.

  20. A Novel Fusion-Based Ship Detection Method from Pol-SAR Images

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenguang; Ji, Yu; Lin, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    A novel fusion-based ship detection method from polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (Pol-SAR) images is proposed in this paper. After feature extraction and constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detection, the detection results of HH channel, diplane scattering by Pauli decomposition and helical factor by Barnes decomposition are fused together. The confirmed targets and potential target pixels can be obtained after the fusion process. Using the difference degree of the target, potential target pixels can be classified. The fusion-based ship detection method works accurately by utilizing three different features comprehensively. The result of applying the technique to measured Airborne Synthetic Radar (AIRSAR) data shows that the novel detection method can achieve better performance in both ship’s detection and ship’s shape preservation compared to the result of K-means clustering method and the Notch Filter method. PMID:26426021

  1. Decreasing range resolution of a SAR image to permit correction of motion measurement errors beyond the SAR range resolution

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Heard, Freddie E.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    2010-07-20

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  2. Radar image preprocessing. [of SEASAT-A SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.; Stiles, J. A.; Holtzman, J. C.; Held, D. N.

    1980-01-01

    Standard image processing techniques are not applicable to radar images because of the coherent nature of the sensor. Therefore there is a need to develop preprocessing techniques for radar images which will then allow these standard methods to be applied. A random field model for radar image data is developed. This model describes the image data as the result of a multiplicative-convolved process. Standard techniques, those based on additive noise and homomorphic processing are not directly applicable to this class of sensor data. Therefore, a minimum mean square error (MMSE) filter was designed to treat this class of sensor data. The resulting filter was implemented in an adaptive format to account for changes in local statistics and edges. A radar image processing technique which provides the MMSE estimate inside homogeneous areas and tends to preserve edge structure was the result of this study. Digitally correlated Seasat-A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery was used to test the technique.

  3. Wavelet Analysis of SAR Images for Coastal Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Wu, Sunny Y.; Tseng, William Y.; Pichel, William G.

    1998-01-01

    The mapping of mesoscale ocean features in the coastal zone is a major potential application for satellite data. The evolution of mesoscale features such as oil slicks, fronts, eddies, and ice edge can be tracked by the wavelet analysis using satellite data from repeating paths. The wavelet transform has been applied to satellite images, such as those from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), and ocean color sensor for feature extraction. In this paper, algorithms and techniques for automated detection and tracking of mesoscale features from satellite SAR imagery employing wavelet analysis have been developed. Case studies on two major coastal oil spills have been investigated using wavelet analysis for tracking along the coast of Uruguay (February 1997), and near Point Barrow, Alaska (November 1997). Comparison of SAR images with SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor) data for coccolithophore bloom in the East Bering Sea during the fall of 1997 shows a good match on bloom boundary. This paper demonstrates that this technique is a useful and promising tool for monitoring of coastal waters.

  4. A high-resolution, four-band SAR testbed with real-time image formation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.; Sander, G.; Thompson, M.; Burns, B.; Fellerhoff, R.; Dubbert, D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the Twin-Otter SAR Testbed developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This SAR is a flexible, adaptable testbed capable of operation on four frequency bands: Ka, Ku, X, and VHF/UHF bands. The SAR features real-time image formation at fine resolution in spotlight and stripmap modes. High-quality images are formed in real time using the overlapped subaperture (OSA) image-formation and phase gradient autofocus (PGA) algorithms.

  5. Digital Intermediate Frequency Receiver Module For Use In Airborne Sar Applications

    DOEpatents

    Tise, Bertice L.; Dubbert, Dale F.

    2005-03-08

    A digital IF receiver (DRX) module directly compatible with advanced radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. The DRX can combine a 1 G-Sample/sec 8-bit ADC with high-speed digital signal processor, such as high gate-count FPGA technology or ASICs to realize a wideband IF receiver. DSP operations implemented in the DRX can include quadrature demodulation and multi-rate, variable-bandwidth IF filtering. Pulse-to-pulse (Doppler domain) filtering can also be implemented in the form of a presummer (accumulator) and an azimuth prefilter. An out of band noise source can be employed to provide a dither signal to the ADC, and later be removed by digital signal processing. Both the range and Doppler domain filtering operations can be implemented using a unique pane architecture which allows on-the-fly selection of the filter decimation factor, and hence, the filter bandwidth. The DRX module can include a standard VME-64 interface for control, status, and programming. An interface can provide phase history data to the real-time image formation processors. A third front-panel data port (FPDP) interface can send wide bandwidth, raw phase histories to a real-time phase history recorder for ground processing.

  6. New observations of Bolivian wind streaks by JPL Airborne SAR: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, Dan G.; Greeley, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    In 1993 NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar system (AIRSAR) was deployed to South America to collect multi-parameter radar data over pre-selected targets. Among the sites targeted was a series of wind streaks located in the Altiplano of Bolivia. The objective of this investigation is to study the effect of wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle on the visibility of wind streaks in radar data. Because this is a preliminary evaluation of the recently acquired data we will focus on one scene and, thus, only on the effects of wavelength and polarization. Wind streaks provide information on the near-surface prevailing winds and on the abundance of winderodible material, such as sand. The potential for a free-flyer radar system that could provide global radar images in multiple wavelengths, polarizations, and incidence angles requires definition of system parameters for mission planning. Furthermore, thousands of wind streaks were mapped from Magellan radar images of Venus; their interpretation requires an understanding of the interaction of radar with wind streaks and the surrounding terrain. Our experiment was conducted on wind streaks in the Altiplano of Bolivia to address these issues.

  7. Autofocus correction of SAR images exhibiting excessive residual migration.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-03-01

    Relatively small motion measurement errors manifest themselves principally as a phase error in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) complex data samples, and if large enough become observable as a smearing, blurring, or other degradation in the image. The phase error function can be measured and then deconvolved from the original data to compensate for the presumed motion error, ultimately resulting in a well-focused image. Techniques that do this are termed 'autofocus' algorithms. A very popular autofocus algorithm is the Phase Gradient Autofocus (PGA) algorithm. The nearly universal, and typically reasonable, assumption is that the motion errors are less than the range resolution of the radar, allowing solely a phase correction to suffice. Very large relative motion measurement errors manifest themselves as an unexpected additional shifting or migration of target locations beyond any deterministic migration during the course of the synthetic aperture. Degradation in images from data exhibiting errors of this magnitude are substantial, often rendering the image completely useless. When residual range migration due to either real or apparent motion errors exceeds the range resolution, conventional autofocus algorithms fail. Excessive residual migration is increasingly encountered as resolutions become finer, less expensive inertial sensors are used, and operating ranges become longer (due to atmospheric phenomena). A new migration-correction autofocus algorithm has been developed that estimates the excessive residual migration and applies phase and frequency corrections to properly focus the image. This overcomes the conventional constraint that motion errors not exceed the SAR range resolution.

  8. Study on airborne multispectral imaging fusion detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Na; Gao, Jiaobo; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Juan; Gao, Meng; Gao, Fei; Fan, Zhe; Sun, Kefeng; Wu, Jun; Li, Junna; Gao, Zedong; Cheng, Gang

    2014-11-01

    The airborne multispectral imaging fusion detection technology is proposed in this paper. In this design scheme, the airborne multispectral imaging system consists of the multispectral camera, the image processing unit, and the stabilized platform. The multispectral camera can operate in the spectral region from visible to near infrared waveband (0.4-1.0um), it has four same and independent imaging channels, and sixteen different typical wavelengths to be selected based on the different typical targets and background. The related experiments were tested by the airborne multispectral imaging system. In particularly, the camouflage targets were fused and detected in the different complex environment, such as the land vegetation background, the desert hot background and underwater. In the spectral region from 0.4 um to 1.0um, the three different characteristic wave from sixteen typical spectral are selected and combined according to different backgrounds and targets. The spectral image corresponding to the three characteristic wavelengths is resisted and fused by the image processing technology in real time, and the fusion video with typical target property is outputted. In these fusion images, the contrast of target and background is greatly increased. Experimental results confirm that the airborne multispectral imaging fusion detection technology can acquire multispectral fusion image with high contrast in real time, and has the ability of detecting and identification camouflage objects from complex background to targets underwater.

  9. Support plane method applied to ground objects recognition using modelled SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherdev, Denis A.; Fursov, Vladimir A.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the object recognition problem was solved using support plane method. The modelled SAR images were used as features vectors in the recognition algorithm. Radar signal backscattering of objects in different observing poses is presented in SAR images. For real time simulation, we used simple mixture model of Lambertian-specular reflectivity. To this end, an algorithm of ray tracing is extended for simulating SAR images of 3D man-made models. The suggested algorithm of support plane is very effective in objects recognition using SAR images and RCS diagrams.

  10. Effects of different soil types on strip-map GPR SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazlı, Hakkı; Sezgin, Mehmet

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we present generation of Strip-map Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images using impulse GPR system, and investigate effects of different soil types on SAR images. The SAR images of buried objects have been interpreted via 2D inverse Fourier transformation. GPR buried target data have been collected from three soil pools having different dielectric constants and B-scan images have been reconstructed from the received data using mean A-scan signal subtraction method. In order to reconstruct SAR images, the time domain data collected from multiple observation points have been transformed to 2D spectral domain. Non-uniform data have been interpolated over spatial Cartesian grid by using uniform interval. Thus, the SAR images have been reconstructed via 2D inverse FFT of interpolated data on ky-kz plane. When examined mathematical background of SAR algorithm, the values of different dielectric constants change the wave number of k. This can lead to deterioration of the SAR imagery. In this study, we investigate the Effect of the dielectric constant of different soils has been examined on SAR images. Finally, resolution difference between background removed B-Scan data and SAR images is considered.

  11. The Airborne Ocean Color Imager - System description and image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, Robert C.; Slye, Robert E.; Klooster, Steven A.; Freedman, Richard S.; Carle, Mark; Mcgregor, Lloyd F.

    1992-01-01

    The Airborne Ocean Color Imager was developed as an aircraft instrument to simulate the spectral and radiometric characteristics of the next generation of satellite ocean color instrumentation. Data processing programs have been developed as extensions of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner algorithms for atmospheric correction and bio-optical output products. The latter include several bio-optical algorithms for estimating phytoplankton pigment concentration, as well as one for the diffuse attenuation coefficient of the water. Additional programs have been developed to geolocate these products and remap them into a georeferenced data base, using data from the aircraft's inertial navigation system. Examples illustrate the sequential data products generated by the processing system, using data from flightlines near the mouth of the Mississippi River: from raw data to atmospherically corrected data, to bio-optical data, to geolocated data, and, finally, to georeferenced data.

  12. A robust channel-calibration algorithm for multi-channel in azimuth HRWS SAR imaging based on local maximum-likelihood weighted minimum entropy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang-Xi; Xing, Meng-Dao; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Liu, Yan-Yang; Guo, Rui; Bao, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution and wide-swath (HRWS) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an essential tool for modern remote sensing. To effectively deal with the contradiction problem between high-resolution and low pulse repetition frequency and obtain an HRWS SAR image, a multi-channel in azimuth SAR system has been adopted in the literature. However, the performance of the Doppler ambiguity suppression via digital beam forming processing suffers the losses from the channel mismatch. In this paper, a robust channel-calibration algorithm based on weighted minimum entropy is proposed for the multi-channel in azimuth HRWS SAR imaging. The proposed algorithm is implemented by a two-step process. 1) The timing uncertainty in each channel and most of the range-invariant channel mismatches in amplitude and phase have been corrected in the pre-processing of the coarse-compensation. 2) After the pre-processing, there is only residual range-dependent channel mismatch in phase. Then, the retrieval of the range-dependent channel mismatch in phase is achieved by a local maximum-likelihood weighted minimum entropy algorithm. The simulated multi-channel in azimuth HRWS SAR data experiment is adopted to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm. Then, some real measured airborne multi-channel in azimuth HRWS Scan-SAR data is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:23893723

  13. Modified Multilook Cross Correlation technique for Doppler centroid estimation in SAR image signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bee Cheng, Sew

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the widely used remote sensing sensors which produces high resolution image by using advance signal processing technique. SAR managed to operate in all sorts of weather and cover wide range of area. To produce a high-quality image, accurate parameters such as Doppler centroid are required for precise SAR signal processing. In the azimuth matched filtering of SAR signal processing, Doppler centroid is an important azimuth parameter that helps to focus the image pixels. Doppler centroid has always been overlooked during SAR signal processing. It is due to the fact that estimation of Doppler centroid involved complicated calculation and increased computational load. Therefore, researcher used to apply only the approximate Doppler value which is not precise and cause defocus effort in the generated SAR image. In this study, several conventional Doppler centroid estimation algorithms are reviewed and developed using Matlab software program to extract the Doppler parameter from received SAR data, namely Spectrum Fit Algorithm, Wavelength Diversity Algorithm (WDA), Multilook Cross Correlation Algorithm (MLCC), and Multilook Beat Frequency Algorithm (MLBF). Two sets of SAR data are employed to evaluate the performance of each estimator, i.e. simulated point target data and RADARSAT-1 Vancouver scene raw data. These experiments gave a sense of accuracy for the estimated results together with computational time consumption. Point target is simulated to generate ideal case SAR data with pre-defined SAR system parameters.

  14. Airborne Microwave Imaging of River Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project was to determine whether airborne microwave remote sensing systems can measure river surface currents with sufficient accuracy to make them prospective instruments with which to monitor river flow from space. The approach was to fly a coherent airborne microwave Doppler radar, developed by APL/UW, on a light airplane along several rivers in western Washington state over an extended period of time. The fundamental quantity obtained by this system to measure river currents is the mean offset of the Doppler spectrum. Since this scatter can be obtained from interferometric synthetic aperture radars (INSARs), which can be flown in space, this project provided a cost effective means for determining the suitability of spaceborne INSAR for measuring river flow.

  15. Flight path-driven mitigation of wavefront curvature effects in SAR images

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2009-06-23

    A wavefront curvature effect associated with a complex image produced by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be mitigated based on which of a plurality of possible flight paths is taken by the SAR when capturing the image. The mitigation can be performed differently for different ones of the flight paths.

  16. Illicit vessel identification in inland waters using SAR image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengli; Wu, Bingfang; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Huiping; Tian, Yichen

    2006-10-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar remote sensing has been effectively used in water compliance and enforcement, especially in ship detection, but it is still very difficult to classify or identify vessels in inland water only using existing SAR image. Nevertheless some experience knowledge can help, for example waterway channel is of great significance for water traffic management and illegal activity monitoring. It can be used for judging a vessel complying with traffic rules or not, and also can be used to indicate illicit fishing vessels which are usually far away from navigable waterway channel. For illicit vessel identification speed and efficiency are very important, so it will be significant if we can extract waterway channel directly from SAR images and use it to identify illicit vessels. The paper first introduces the modified two-parameter CFAR algorithm used to detect ship targets in inland waters, and then uses principal curves and neural networks to extract waterway channel. Through comparing the detection results and the extracted waterway channel those vessels not complying with water traffic rules or potential illicit fishing vessels can be easily identified.

  17. Single-pass Airborne InSAR for Wide-swath, High-Resolution Cryospheric Surface Topography Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Muellerschoen, R.

    2014-12-01

    In May 2009 a mm-wave single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) for the first time demonstrated ice surface topography swath-mapping in Greenland. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A). Ka-band (35.6GHz) was chosen for high-precision topographic mapping from a compact sensor with minimal surface penetration. In recent years, the system was comprehensively upgraded for improved performance, stability and calibration. In April 2013, after completing the upgrades, GLISTIN-A flew a brief campaign to Alaska. The primary purpose was to demonstrate the InSAR's ability to generate high-precision, high resolution maps of ice surface topography with swaths in excess of 10km. Comparison of GLISTIN-A's elevations over glacial ice with lidar verified the precision requirements and established elevation accuracies to within 2 m without tie points. Feature tracking of crevasses on Columbia Glacier using data acquired with a 3-day separation exhibit an impressive velocity mapping capability. Furthermore, GLISTIN-A flew over the Beaufort sea to determine if we could not only map sea ice, but also measure freeboard. Initial analysis has established we can measure sea-ice freeboard using height differences from the top of the sea-ice and the sea surface in open leads. In the future, a campaign with lidar is desired for a quantitative validation. Another proof-of-concept collection mapped snow-basins for hydrology. Snow depth measurements using summer and winter collections in the Sierras were compared with lidar measurements. Unsurprisingly when present, trees complicate the interpretation, but additional filtering and processing is in work. For each application, knowledge of the interferometric penetration is important for scientific interpretation. We present analytical predictions and experimental data to upper bound the elevation bias of the InSAR measurements over snow and snow-covered ice.

  18. A Likelihood-Based SLIC Superpixel Algorithm for SAR Images Using Generalized Gamma Distribution.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huanxin; Qin, Xianxiang; Zhou, Shilin; Ji, Kefeng

    2016-01-01

    The simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC) method is a recently proposed popular superpixel algorithm. However, this method may generate bad superpixels for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images due to effects of speckle and the large dynamic range of pixel intensity. In this paper, an improved SLIC algorithm for SAR images is proposed. This algorithm exploits the likelihood information of SAR image pixel clusters. Specifically, a local clustering scheme combining intensity similarity with spatial proximity is proposed. Additionally, for post-processing, a local edge-evolving scheme that combines spatial context and likelihood information is introduced as an alternative to the connected components algorithm. To estimate the likelihood information of SAR image clusters, we incorporated a generalized gamma distribution (GГD). Finally, the superiority of the proposed algorithm was validated using both simulated and real-world SAR images. PMID:27438840

  19. A Likelihood-Based SLIC Superpixel Algorithm for SAR Images Using Generalized Gamma Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Huanxin; Qin, Xianxiang; Zhou, Shilin; Ji, Kefeng

    2016-01-01

    The simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC) method is a recently proposed popular superpixel algorithm. However, this method may generate bad superpixels for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images due to effects of speckle and the large dynamic range of pixel intensity. In this paper, an improved SLIC algorithm for SAR images is proposed. This algorithm exploits the likelihood information of SAR image pixel clusters. Specifically, a local clustering scheme combining intensity similarity with spatial proximity is proposed. Additionally, for post-processing, a local edge-evolving scheme that combines spatial context and likelihood information is introduced as an alternative to the connected components algorithm. To estimate the likelihood information of SAR image clusters, we incorporated a generalized gamma distribution (GГD). Finally, the superiority of the proposed algorithm was validated using both simulated and real-world SAR images. PMID:27438840

  20. A Likelihood-Based SLIC Superpixel Algorithm for SAR Images Using Generalized Gamma Distribution.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huanxin; Qin, Xianxiang; Zhou, Shilin; Ji, Kefeng

    2016-01-01

    The simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC) method is a recently proposed popular superpixel algorithm. However, this method may generate bad superpixels for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images due to effects of speckle and the large dynamic range of pixel intensity. In this paper, an improved SLIC algorithm for SAR images is proposed. This algorithm exploits the likelihood information of SAR image pixel clusters. Specifically, a local clustering scheme combining intensity similarity with spatial proximity is proposed. Additionally, for post-processing, a local edge-evolving scheme that combines spatial context and likelihood information is introduced as an alternative to the connected components algorithm. To estimate the likelihood information of SAR image clusters, we incorporated a generalized gamma distribution (GГD). Finally, the superiority of the proposed algorithm was validated using both simulated and real-world SAR images.

  1. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  2. Segmentation of Polarimetric SAR Images Usig Wavelet Transformation and Texture Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeian, A.; Homayouni, S.; Safari, A.

    2015-12-01

    Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) sensors can collect useful observations from earth's surfaces and phenomena for various remote sensing applications, such as land cover mapping, change and target detection. These data can be acquired without the limitations of weather conditions, sun illumination and dust particles. As result, SAR images, and in particular Polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) are powerful tools for various environmental applications. Unlike the optical images, SAR images suffer from the unavoidable speckle, which causes the segmentation of this data difficult. In this paper, we use the wavelet transformation for segmentation of PolSAR images. Our proposed method is based on the multi-resolution analysis of texture features is based on wavelet transformation. Here, we use the information of gray level value and the information of texture. First, we produce coherency or covariance matrices and then generate span image from them. In the next step of proposed method is texture feature extraction from sub-bands is generated from discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Finally, PolSAR image are segmented using clustering methods as fuzzy c-means (FCM) and k-means clustering. We have applied the proposed methodology to full polarimetric SAR images acquired by the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) L-band system, during July, in 2012 over an agricultural area in Winnipeg, Canada.

  3. On the use of L-band multipolarization airborne SAR for surveys of crops, vineyards, and orchards in a California irrigated agricultural region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The airborne L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) collected multipolarization calibrated image data over an irrigated agricultural test site near Fresno, CA, on March 6, 1984. The conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) the effects of incidence angle on the measured backscattering coefficients could be removed by using a correction factor equal to the secant of the angle raised to the 1.4 power, (2) for this scene and time of year, the various polarization channels were highly correlated such that the use of more than one polarization added little to the ability of the radar to discriminate vegetation type or condition; the exception was barley which separated from vineyards only when a combination of like and cross polarization data were used (polarization was very useful for corn identification in fall crops), (3) an excellent separation between herbaceous vegetation (alfalfa, barley, and oats) or bare fields and trees in orchards existed in brightness was well correlated to alfalfa height or biomass, especially for the HH polarization combination, (5) vineyards exhibited a narrow range of brightnesses with no systematic effects of type or number of stakes nor of number of wires in the trellises nor of the size of the vines, (6) within the orchard classes, areal biomass characterized by basal area differences caused radar image brightness differences for small to medium trees but not for medium to large trees.

  4. Calibration Of Airborne Visible/IR Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, G. A.; Chrien, T. G.; Miller, E. A.; Reimer, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    Paper describes laboratory spectral and radiometric calibration of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) applied to all AVIRIS science data collected in 1987. Describes instrumentation and procedures used and demonstrates that calibration accuracy achieved exceeds design requirements. Developed for use in remote-sensing studies in such disciplines as botany, geology, hydrology, and oceanography.

  5. SAR Image Coregistration Based on Topography and Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.; Kim, S.; Rosen, P.

    2008-12-01

    L-band repeat-pass InSAR has been getting scientists' attention for its penetration depth through dense vegetation, revealing the ground deformation under the canopy of forest. This makes it possible to achieve a good coverage of volcanic activities in tropical areas such as Hawaii, Galapagos, and Indonesia. Another advantage of L-band InSAR is its tolerance to a large baseline. The critical baseline scales with the wavelength, and practically a baseline of over 1 km often produces interferograms. However, the large baseline causes parallax in the presence of topography, which appears as pixel shift between master and slave images that sometimes leads to a severe decorrelation. Using ALOS PALSAR data of Java Island, Indonesia, and intermediate files produced by ROI_PAC, we correct this parallax before forming an interferogram to improve the interferometric coherence. We also test an automatic implementation of the 'rubber sheeting" coregistration (e.g. Yun et al., GRL, 2007) for localized large deformation that cannot be explained by polynomial fitting.

  6. Extended adaptive filtering for wide-angle SAR image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanwei; Roberts, William; Li, Jian

    2005-05-01

    For two-dimensional (2-D) spectral analysis, the adaptive filtering based technologies, such as CAPON and APES (Amplitude and Phase EStimation), are developed under the implicit assumption that the data sets are rectangular. However, in real SAR applications, especially for the wide-angle cases, the collected data sets are always non-rectangular. This raises the problem of how to extend the original adaptive filtering based algorithms for such kind of scenarios. In this paper, we propose an extended adaptive filtering (EAF) approach, which includes Extended APES (E-APES) and Extended CAPON (E-CAPON), for arbitrarily shaped 2-D data. The EAF algorithms adopt a missing-data approach where the unavailable data samples close to the collected data set are assumed missing. Using a group of filter-banks with varying sizes, these algorithms are non-iterative and do not require the estimation of the unavailable samples. The improved imaging results of the proposed algorithms are demonstrated by applying them to two different SAR data sets.

  7. Comparison of Filters Dedicated to Speckle Suppression in SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupidura, P.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of research on the effectiveness of different filtering methods dedicated to speckle suppression in SAR images. The tests were performed on RadarSat-2 images and on an artificial image treated with simulated speckle noise. The research analysed the performance of particular filters related to the effectiveness of speckle suppression and to the ability to preserve image details and edges. Speckle is a phenomenon inherent to radar images - a deterministic noise connected with land cover type, but also causing significant changes in digital numbers of pixels. As a result, it may affect interpretation, classification and other processes concerning radar images. Speckle, resembling "salt and pepper" noise, has the form of a set of relatively small groups of pixels of values markedly different from values of other pixels representing the same type of land cover. Suppression of this noise may also cause suppression of small image details, therefore the ability to preserve the important parts of an image, was analysed as well. In the present study, selected filters were tested, and methods dedicated particularly to speckle noise suppression: Frost, Gamma-MAP, Lee, Lee-Sigma, Local Region, general filtering methods which might be effective in this respect: Mean, Median, in addition to morphological filters (alternate sequential filters with multiple structuring element and by reconstruction). The analysis presented in this paper compared the effectiveness of different filtering methods. It proved that some of the dedicated radar filters are efficient tools for speckle suppression, but also demonstrated a significant efficiency of the morphological approach, especially its ability to preserve image details.

  8. Target recognition using HRR profile-based incoherent SAR (InSAR) image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoughue, Nicholas A.; Kuklinski, Walter S.; Arabadjis, Constantine

    2008-04-01

    Feature-aided target verification is a challenging field of research, with the potential to yield significant increases in the confidence of re-established target tracks after kinematic confusion events. Using appropriate control algorithms airborne multi-mode radars can acquire a library of HRR (High Range Resolution) profiles for targets as they are tracked. When a kinematic confusion event occurs, such as a vehicle dropping below MDV (Minimum Detectable Velocity) for some period of time, or two target tracks crossing, it is necessary to utilize feature-aided tracking methods to correctly associate post-confusion tracks with pre-confusion tracks. Many current HRR profile target recognition methods focus on statistical characteristics of either individual profiles or sets of profiles taken over limited viewing angles. These methods have not proven to be very effective when the pre- and post- confusion libraries do not overlap in azimuth angle. To address this issue we propose a new approach to target recognition from HRR profiles. We present an algorithm that generates 2-D imagery of targets from the pre- and post-confusion libraries. These images are subsequently used as the input to a target recognition/classifier process. Since, center-aligned HRR Profiles, while ideal for processing, are not easily computed in field systems, as they require the airborne platform's center of rotation to line up with the geometric center of the moving target (this is impossible when multiple targets are being tracked), our algorithm is designed to work with HRR profiles that are aligned to the leading edge (the first detection above a threshold, commonly referred to as Edge-Aligned HRR profiles). Our simulated results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method for classifying target vehicles based on simulations using both overlapping and non-overlapping HRR profile sets. The algorithm was tested on several test cases using an input set of .28 m resolution XPATCH generated HRR

  9. Analysis of ROC on chest direct digital radiography (DR) after image processing in diagnosis of SARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Guozheng; Lan, Rihui; Zeng, Qingsi; Zheng, Zhong

    2004-05-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS, also called Infectious Atypical Pneumonia), which initially broke out in late 2002, has threatened the public"s health seriously. How to confirm the patients contracting SARS becomes an urgent issue in diagnosis. This paper intends to evaluate the importance of Image Processing in the diagnosis on SARS at the early stage. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis has been employed in this study to compare the value of DR images in the diagnosis of SARS patients before and after image processing by Symphony Software supplied by E-Com Technology Ltd., and DR image study of 72 confirmed or suspected SARS patients were reviewed respectively. All the images taken from the studied patients were processed by Symphony. Both the original and processed images were taken into ROC analysis, based on which the ROC graph for each group of images has been produced as described below: For processed images: a = 1.9745, b = 1.4275, SA = 0.8714; For original images: a = 0.9066, b = 0.8310, SA = 0.7572; (a - intercept, b - slop, SA - Area below the curve). The result shows significant difference between the original images and processed images (P<0.01). In summary, the images processed by Symphony are superior to the original ones in detecting the opacity lesion, and increases the accuracy of SARS diagnosis.

  10. Efficient Geolocation of InSAR Images from Motion Compensation Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortham, C.; Zebker, H. A.

    2010-12-01

    We present an efficient and closed-form algorithm for the geolocation of InSAR images resulting from data processors using motion compensation methods in which the known orbits are corrected and processed to a circular arc reference track. We outline here a derivation utilizing the SCH coordinate system, although our approach may be readily applied to any such processor with suitable changes in coordinate definitions. Motion compensation has been traditionally employed in airborne systems, where the instability of the aircraft trajectories presents issues in the accuracy of the processed phase. However, we have found that motion compensation techniques allowing precise output pixel location are useful in both airborne and spaceborne systems; thus, we present an approach that exploits the simplicity of a properly chosen motion compensation reference geometry. Assuming a circular reference track, we develop a closed form set of equations relating the position of a given DEM pixel to that of the radar. Once position and slant-range are known along the reference arc, we interpolate into the uniformly spaced radar image, avoiding the use of computationally intensive irregular interpolation algorithms. Hence, the resulting equations are simple and lead to a solution that is remarkably fast without sacrificing precision. We demonstrate results from the ALOS platform, validated against the set of corner reflectors deployed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the Rosamond Calibration Array outside of Palmdale, California. Here we see ground projection errors with accuracy on the order of less than a pixel (< 15 m). In addition, we present an extension to our algorithm where the processed Doppler centroid has known range-dependence but with no simple functional form. To accommodate this most general case, we must replace the closed-form equations with an iterative solution. We illustrate these results using data from the NASA/JPL UAVSAR sensor, where we see fast convergence

  11. Robust tie points selection for InSAR image coregistration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skanderi, Takieddine; Chabira, Boulerbah; Afifa, Belkacem; Belhadj Aissa, Aichouche

    2013-10-01

    Image coregistration is an important step in SAR interferometry which is a well known method for DEM generation and surface displacement monitoring. A practical and widely used automatic coregistration algorithm is based on selecting a number of tie points in the master image and looking for the correspondence of each point in the slave image using correlation technique. The characteristics of these points, their number and their distribution have a great impact on the reliability of the estimated transformation. In this work, we present a method for automatic selection of suitable tie points that are well distributed over the common area without decreasing the desired tie points' number. First we select candidate points using Harris operator. Then from these points we select tie points depending on their cornerness measure (the highest first). Once a tie point is selected, its correspondence is searched for in the slave image, if the similarity measure maximum is less than a given threshold or it is at the border of the search window, this point is discarded and we proceed to the next Harris point, else, the cornerness of the remaining candidates Harris points are multiplied by a spatially radially increasing function centered at the selected point to disadvantage the points in a neighborhood of a radius determined from the size of the common area and the desired number of points. This is repeated until the desired number of points is selected. Results of an ERS1/2 tandem pair are presented and discussed.

  12. Field of view selection for optimal airborne imaging sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Tristan M.; Barnard, P. Werner; Fildis, Halidun; Erbudak, Mustafa; Senger, Tolga; Alpman, Mehmet E.

    2014-05-01

    The choice of the Field of View (FOV) of imaging sensors used in airborne targeting applications has major impact on the overall performance of the system. Conducting a market survey from published data on sensors used in stabilized airborne targeting systems shows a trend of ever narrowing FOVs housed in smaller and lighter volumes. This approach promotes the ever increasing geometric resolution provided by narrower FOVs, while it seemingly ignores the influences the FOV selection has on the sensor's sensitivity, the effects of diffraction, the influences of sight line jitter and collectively the overall system performance. This paper presents a trade-off methodology to select the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor that is limited in aperture diameter by mechanical constraints (such as space/volume available and window size) by balancing the influences FOV has on sensitivity and resolution and thereby optimizing the system's performance. The methodology may be applied to staring array based imaging sensors across all wavebands from visible/day cameras through to long wave infrared thermal imagers. Some examples of sensor analysis applying the trade-off methodology are given that highlights the performance advantages that can be gained by maximizing the aperture diameters and choosing the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor used in airborne targeting applications.

  13. Airborne electromagnetic imaging of discontinuous permafrost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minsley, B.J.; Abraham, J.D.; Smith, B.D.; Cannia, J.C.; Voss, C.I.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Walvoord, M.A.; Wylie, B.K.; Anderson, L.; Ball, L.B.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Wellman, T.P.; Ager, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of permafrost in cold regions is inextricably connected to hydrogeologic processes, climate, and ecosystems. Permafrost thawing has been linked to changes in wetland and lake areas, alteration of the groundwater contribution to streamflow, carbon release, and increased fire frequency. But detailed knowledge about the dynamic state of permafrost in relation to surface and groundwater systems remains an enigma. Here, we present the results of a pioneering ???1,800 line-kilometer airborne electromagnetic survey that shows sediments deposited over the past ???4 million years and the configuration of permafrost to depths of ???100 meters in the Yukon Flats area near Fort Yukon, Alaska. The Yukon Flats is near the boundary between continuous permafrost to the north and discontinuous permafrost to the south, making it an important location for examining permafrost dynamics. Our results not only provide a detailed snapshot of the present-day configuration of permafrost, but they also expose previously unseen details about potential surface-groundwater connections and the thermal legacy of surface water features that has been recorded in the permafrost over the past ???1,000 years. This work will be a critical baseline for future permafrost studies aimed at exploring the connections between hydrogeologic, climatic, and ecological processes, and has significant implications for the stewardship of Arctic environments. ?? 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Landsat radiometric continuity using airborne imaging spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkel, J.; Angal, A.; Thome, K.; Cook, B.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Goddard's Lidar, Hyperspectral and Thermal Imager (G-LiHT) includes a scanning lidar, an imaging spectrometer and a thermal camera. The Visible Near-Infrared (VNIR) Imaging Spectrometer acquires high resolution spectral measurements (1.5 nm resolution) from 0.4 to 1.0 µm. The SIRCUS-based calibration facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center was used to measure the absolute spectral response (ASR) of the G-LiHT's imaging spectrometer. Continuously tunable lasers coupled to an integrating sphere facilitated a radiance-based calibration for the detectors in the reflective solar bands. The transfer of the SIRCUS-based laboratory calibration of G-LiHT's Imaging Spectrometer to the Landsat sensors (Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 8 OLI) is demonstrated using simultaneous overpasses over the Red Lake Playa and McClaw's Playa sites during the commissioning phase of Landsat 8 in March 2013. Solar Lunar Absolute Imaging Spectrometer (SOLARIS) is the calibration demonstration system for the reflected solar instrument of CLARREO. A portable version of SOLARIS, known as Suitcase SOLARIS, also calibrated using a SIRCUS-based setup, was deployed for ground measurements as a part of both the field campaigns. Simultaneous measurements of SOLARIS allow cross-comparison with G-LiHT and Landsat sensors. The transfer of the lab-based calibration of G-LiHT to Landsat sensors show that the sensors agree within 5% with a 1-3% calibration uncertainty of G-LiHT's Imaging Spectrometer.

  15. Web Service Infrastructure for Correcting InSAR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Allmen, P. A.; Fielding, E. J.; Xing, Z.; Pan, L.; Fishbein, E.

    2011-12-01

    InSAR images can be obtained from satellite radar data by combining signals acquired at two different times along the spacecraft's orbit, at geospatial locations nearly identical. Changes in the propagation of the radar signal from the first acquisition to the second, caused for example by changes in the tropospheric water vapor content, can lead to a deterioration of the quality of the interferometric data analysis. Other extraneous effects such as ocean tidal loading can also lead to errors that reduce the potential science return of InSAR missions. Data from Global Positioning Systems and infrared radiometers are current used on an ad hoc basis for the tropospheric corrections when available, and operational weather forecast was demonstrated to be able to fill in the remaining spatial and temporal gaps. We have developed a set of web services named OSCAR (Online Services for Correcting Atmosphere in Radar) that transparently to the user retrieves remote sensing and weather forecast data and delivers atmospheric radar delays on a latitude longitude grid that can be directly integrated with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data processing software. We will describe the common web service architecture, relying on RESTful, that we developed to streamline the development of OSCAR's capabilities. We will also discuss the Bayesian averaging process that we use for merging the radiometric data with numerical weather forecast results. Correcting for biases and estimating the error model will be discussed in detail and validation results will be presented. The success of the correction procedure will be demonstrated by using MODIS data and ECMWF model output. We will also outline the extension of our online correction system to include GPS data to automatically correct for biases in the radiometric data, and a model of ocean tidal loading to correct for long wavelength errors near coastal regions.

  16. Real-time airborne hyperspectral imaging of land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanco, Tyler; Achal, Steve; McFee, John E.; Anger, Cliff; Young, Jane

    2007-04-01

    DRDC Suffeld and Itres Research have jointly investigated the use of visible and infrared hyperspectral imaging (HSI) for surface and buried land mine detection since 1989. These studies have demonstrated reliable passive HSI detection of surface-laid mines, based on their reflectance spectra, from airborne and ground-based platforms. Commercial HSI instruments collect and store image data at aircraft speeds, but the data are analysed off- line. This is useful for humanitarian demining, but unacceptable for military countermine operations. We have developed a hardware and software system with algorithms that can process the raw hyperspectral data in real time to detect mines. The custom algorithms perform radiometric correction of the raw data, then classify pixels of the corrected data, referencing a spectral signature library. The classification results are stored and displayed in real time, that is, within a few frame times of the data acquisition. Such real-time mine detection was demonstrated for the first time from a slowly moving land vehicle in March 2000. This paper describes an improved system which can achieve real-time detection of mines from an airborne platform, with its commensurately higher data rates. The system is presently compatible with the Itres family of visible/near infrared, short wave infrared and thermal infrared pushbroom hyperspectral imagers and its broadband thermal infrared pushbroom imager. Experiments to detect mines from an airborne platform in real time were conducted at DRDC Suffield in November 2006. Surface-laid land mines were detected in real time from a slowly moving helicopter with generally good detection rates and low false alarm rates. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that land mines have been detected from an airborne platform in real time using hyperspectral imaging.

  17. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS USING AIRBORNE LWIR HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne longwave infrared LWIR) hyperspectral imagery was utilized to detect and identify gaseous chemical release plumes at sites in sourthern Texzas. The Airborne Hysperspectral Imager (AHI), developed by the University of Hawaii was flown over a petrochemical facility and a ...

  18. Accelerating Spaceborne SAR Imaging Using Multiple CPU/GPU Deep Collaborative Computing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Guojun; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei; Hu, Yuxin

    2016-04-07

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technologies in recent years, the huge amount of remote sensing data brings challenges for real-time imaging processing. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC) methods have been presented to accelerate SAR imaging, especially the GPU based methods. In the classical GPU based imaging algorithm, GPU is employed to accelerate image processing by massive parallel computing, and CPU is only used to perform the auxiliary work such as data input/output (IO). However, the computing capability of CPU is ignored and underestimated. In this work, a new deep collaborative SAR imaging method based on multiple CPU/GPU is proposed to achieve real-time SAR imaging. Through the proposed tasks partitioning and scheduling strategy, the whole image can be generated with deep collaborative multiple CPU/GPU computing. In the part of CPU parallel imaging, the advanced vector extension (AVX) method is firstly introduced into the multi-core CPU parallel method for higher efficiency. As for the GPU parallel imaging, not only the bottlenecks of memory limitation and frequent data transferring are broken, but also kinds of optimized strategies are applied, such as streaming, parallel pipeline and so on. Experimental results demonstrate that the deep CPU/GPU collaborative imaging method enhances the efficiency of SAR imaging on single-core CPU by 270 times and realizes the real-time imaging in that the imaging rate outperforms the raw data generation rate.

  19. Accelerating Spaceborne SAR Imaging Using Multiple CPU/GPU Deep Collaborative Computing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Guojun; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei; Hu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technologies in recent years, the huge amount of remote sensing data brings challenges for real-time imaging processing. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC) methods have been presented to accelerate SAR imaging, especially the GPU based methods. In the classical GPU based imaging algorithm, GPU is employed to accelerate image processing by massive parallel computing, and CPU is only used to perform the auxiliary work such as data input/output (IO). However, the computing capability of CPU is ignored and underestimated. In this work, a new deep collaborative SAR imaging method based on multiple CPU/GPU is proposed to achieve real-time SAR imaging. Through the proposed tasks partitioning and scheduling strategy, the whole image can be generated with deep collaborative multiple CPU/GPU computing. In the part of CPU parallel imaging, the advanced vector extension (AVX) method is firstly introduced into the multi-core CPU parallel method for higher efficiency. As for the GPU parallel imaging, not only the bottlenecks of memory limitation and frequent data transferring are broken, but also kinds of optimized strategies are applied, such as streaming, parallel pipeline and so on. Experimental results demonstrate that the deep CPU/GPU collaborative imaging method enhances the efficiency of SAR imaging on single-core CPU by 270 times and realizes the real-time imaging in that the imaging rate outperforms the raw data generation rate. PMID:27070606

  20. Accelerating Spaceborne SAR Imaging Using Multiple CPU/GPU Deep Collaborative Computing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Guojun; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei; Hu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technologies in recent years, the huge amount of remote sensing data brings challenges for real-time imaging processing. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC) methods have been presented to accelerate SAR imaging, especially the GPU based methods. In the classical GPU based imaging algorithm, GPU is employed to accelerate image processing by massive parallel computing, and CPU is only used to perform the auxiliary work such as data input/output (IO). However, the computing capability of CPU is ignored and underestimated. In this work, a new deep collaborative SAR imaging method based on multiple CPU/GPU is proposed to achieve real-time SAR imaging. Through the proposed tasks partitioning and scheduling strategy, the whole image can be generated with deep collaborative multiple CPU/GPU computing. In the part of CPU parallel imaging, the advanced vector extension (AVX) method is firstly introduced into the multi-core CPU parallel method for higher efficiency. As for the GPU parallel imaging, not only the bottlenecks of memory limitation and frequent data transferring are broken, but also kinds of optimized strategies are applied, such as streaming, parallel pipeline and so on. Experimental results demonstrate that the deep CPU/GPU collaborative imaging method enhances the efficiency of SAR imaging on single-core CPU by 270 times and realizes the real-time imaging in that the imaging rate outperforms the raw data generation rate. PMID:27070606

  1. Fast SAR image change detection using Bayesian approach based difference image and modified statistical region merging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Ni, Weiping; Yan, Weidong; Bian, Hui; Wu, Junzheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel fast SAR image change detection method is presented in this paper. Based on a Bayesian approach, the prior information that speckles follow the Nakagami distribution is incorporated into the difference image (DI) generation process. The new DI performs much better than the familiar log ratio (LR) DI as well as the cumulant based Kullback-Leibler divergence (CKLD) DI. The statistical region merging (SRM) approach is first introduced to change detection context. A new clustering procedure with the region variance as the statistical inference variable is exhibited to tailor SAR image change detection purposes, with only two classes in the final map, the unchanged and changed classes. The most prominent advantages of the proposed modified SRM (MSRM) method are the ability to cope with noise corruption and the quick implementation. Experimental results show that the proposed method is superior in both the change detection accuracy and the operation efficiency.

  2. Fast SAR Image Change Detection Using Bayesian Approach Based Difference Image and Modified Statistical Region Merging

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Weiping; Yan, Weidong; Bian, Hui; Wu, Junzheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel fast SAR image change detection method is presented in this paper. Based on a Bayesian approach, the prior information that speckles follow the Nakagami distribution is incorporated into the difference image (DI) generation process. The new DI performs much better than the familiar log ratio (LR) DI as well as the cumulant based Kullback-Leibler divergence (CKLD) DI. The statistical region merging (SRM) approach is first introduced to change detection context. A new clustering procedure with the region variance as the statistical inference variable is exhibited to tailor SAR image change detection purposes, with only two classes in the final map, the unchanged and changed classes. The most prominent advantages of the proposed modified SRM (MSRM) method are the ability to cope with noise corruption and the quick implementation. Experimental results show that the proposed method is superior in both the change detection accuracy and the operation efficiency. PMID:25258740

  3. Entropy-Alpha Classification Alternative for Polarimetric SAR Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praks, J.; Hallikainen, M.

    2003-04-01

    In this work we discuss SAR target entropy and alpha angle relations to other scattering covariance matrix characteristics and similarity invariants. It is shown that the sum of squared elements of the coherency matrix, normalized by its trace and determinant, has many common features with target entropy parameter. The first element of the matrix is very similar to alpha angle parameter describing scattering mechanism. Possibilities to use the sum of squared elements, determinant and first element of normalized coherency matrix for classification are studied. It appears that classification schemes very similar to entropy-alpha can be established. However, classification results differ slightly from those of entropy-alpha classification as here discussed two-parameter classifications depend on three variables, although parameters are in all cases the same. As an example, NASA/JPL AIRSAR L-Band image of the San Francisco Bay was classified with both proposed schemes and original entropy-alpha classification. The size of the used image was 224 x 256 pixels. The new algorithms classified 97% and 96%, respectively, of pixels to the same classes as entropy-alpha classification. The discussed similarity invariants are straightforward to calculate and they have been used to describe covariance matrix properties in statistics. Virtually are proposed classification algorithms equivalent with entropy-alpha classification because all three use the same amount of information from covariance matrix. However, proposed parameter pairs are much easier to calculate, as they do not require the computation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

  4. Sea ice motion measurements from Seasat SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, F.; Raggam, J.; Elachi, C.; Campbell, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) experiment are analyzed in order to determine the accuracy of this information for mapping the distribution of sea ice and its motion. Data from observations of sea ice in the Beaufort Sea from seven sequential orbits of the satellite were selected to study the capabilities and limitations of spaceborne radar application to sea-ice mapping. Results show that there is no difficulty in identifying homologue ice features on sequential radar images and the accuracy is entirely controlled by the accuracy of the orbit data and the geometric calibration of the sensor. Conventional radargrammetric methods are found to serve well for satellite radar ice mapping, while ground control points can be used to calibrate the ice location and motion measurements in the cases where orbit data and sensor calibration are lacking. The ice motion was determined to be approximately 6.4 + or - 0.5 km/day. In addition, the accuracy of pixel location was found over land areas. The use of one control point in 10,000 sq km produced an accuracy of about + or 150 m, while with a higher density of control points (7 in 1000 sq km) the location accuracy improves to the image resolution of + or - 25 m. This is found to be applicable for both optical and digital data.

  5. Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging of Seagrass and Coral Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, J.; Pan, Z.; Mewes, T.; Herwitz, S.

    2013-12-01

    This talk presents the process of project preparation, airborne data collection, data pre-processing and comparative analysis of a series of airborne hyperspectral projects focused on the mapping of seagrass and coral reef communities in the Florida Keys. As part of a series of large collaborative projects funded by the NASA ROSES program and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and administered by the NASA UAV Collaborative, a series of airborne hyperspectral datasets were collected over six sites in the Florida Keys in May 2012, October 2012 and May 2013 by Galileo Group, Inc. using a manned Cessna 172 and NASA's SIERRA Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. Precise solar and tidal data were used to calculate airborne collection parameters and develop flight plans designed to optimize data quality. Two independent Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging systems covering 400-100nm were used to collect imagery over six Areas of Interest (AOIs). Multiple collections were performed over all sites across strict solar windows in the mornings and afternoons. Independently developed pre-processing algorithms were employed to radiometrically correct, synchronize and georectify individual flight lines which were then combined into color balanced mosaics for each Area of Interest. The use of two different hyperspectral sensor as well as environmental variations between each collection allow for the comparative analysis of data quality as well as the iterative refinement of flight planning and collection parameters.

  6. High spectral resolution airborne short wave infrared hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Liqing; Yuan, Liyin; Wang, Yueming; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong

    2016-05-01

    Short Wave InfraRed(SWIR) spectral imager is good at detecting difference between materials and penetrating fog and mist. High spectral resolution SWIR hyperspectral imager plays a key role in developing earth observing technology. Hyperspectral data cube can help band selections that is very important for multispectral imager design. Up to now, the spectral resolution of many SWIR hyperspectral imagers is about 10nm. A high sensitivity airborne SWIR hyperspectral imager with narrower spectral band will be presented. The system consists of TMA telescope, slit, spectrometer with planar blazed grating and high sensitivity MCT FPA. The spectral sampling interval is about 3nm. The IFOV is 0.5mrad. To eliminate the influence of the thermal background, a cold shield is designed in the dewar. The pixel number of spatial dimension is 640. Performance measurement in laboratory and image analysis for flight test will also be presented.

  7. Direct Geolocation of TerraSAR-X Spotlight Mode Image and Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiao; Zeng, Qiming; Jiao, Jian; Zhang, Jingfa; Gong, Lixia

    2013-01-01

    The research dealt with direct geolocation of spaceborne high-resolution SAR image. The TerraSAR-X spotlight mode image was chosen as the study object. The mathematical model of SAR geolocation is Range-Doppler (RD) model. Its resolving algorithms had been studied and the ASF algorithm was chosen because of its high accuracy. The focus of this research laid on the error sources and their correction method which could affect the geolocation accuracy, such as the orbit errors, azimuth timing errors and range timing errors. At last, the accuracy of this method was verified by the experiment results.

  8. Inter-Tidal Flats Segmentation Of SAR Images Using A Waterfall Hierarchical Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, F.; Catalao, J.; Nico, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we describe a scheme to identify 1D structures in SAR images and applied it to a dataset consisting of two TerraSAR-X images acquired over the region of Lisbon with a temporal baseline of 22 days. The aim of this application it to identify the inter-tidal flats along the south bank of the Tagus river. First results show that a proper recognition of the inter-tidal zone is achieved.

  9. Automatic compensation of antenna beam roll-off in SAR images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-04-01

    The effects of a non-uniform antenna beam are sometimes visible in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. This might be due to near-range operation, wide scenes, or inadequate antenna pointing accuracy. The effects can be mitigated in the SAR image by fitting very a simple model to the illumination profile and compensating the pixel brightness accordingly, in an automated fashion. This is accomplished without a detailed antenna pattern calibration, and allows for drift in the antenna beam alignments.

  10. Using ERS-2 SAR images for routine observation of marine pollution in European coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Gade, M; Alpers, W

    1999-09-30

    More than 660 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired over the southern Baltic Sea, the North Sea, and the Gulf of Lion in the Mediterranean Sea by the Second European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-2) have been analyzed since December 1996 with respect to radar signatures of marine pollution and other phenomena causing similar signatures. First results of our analysis reveal that the seas are most polluted along the main shipping routes. The sizes of the detected oil spills vary between < 0.1 km2 and > 56 km2. SAR images acquired during descending (morning) and ascending (evening) satellite passes show different percentages of oil pollution, because most of this pollution occurs during night time and is still visible on the SAR images acquired in the morning time. Moreover, we found a higher amount of oil spills on SAR images acquired during summer (April-September) than on SAR images acquired during winter (October-March). We attribute this finding to the higher mean wind speed encountered in all three test areas during winter. By using an ERS-2 SAR image of the North Sea test area we show how the reduction of the normalized radar backscattering cross section (NRCS) by an oil spill depends on wind speed.

  11. Technology progresses in microelectronics promote on-board imaging of spaceborne SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinfeng

    2007-11-01

    The realization of spaceborne SAR imaging on-board is a necessary trend for digital avionics in speedily advancing SAR remote sensors. Powerful and efficient application-specific instruction-set processors (ASIPs) play a leading role in this solution to keep data processing system functioning real-time. A few improving methodologies, technologies and advanced EDA tools in microelectronics make it possible to design such a SAR imaging processor easier and faster. Some evident and important delegates of them, including system-level modeling and simulation for SAR imaging algorithm, available IP library designed by experts, ideas of designing domain-specific SoC with multiple processors and the microelectronic ways to ruggedize avionics applied in space radiation-active environment, are presented heuristically in this paper.

  12. Detection in urban scenario using combined airborne imaging sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renhorn, Ingmar; Axelsson, Maria; Benoist, Koen; Bourghys, Dirk; Boucher, Yannick; Briottet, Xavier; De Ceglie, Sergio; Dekker, Rob; Dimmeler, Alwin; Dost, Remco; Friman, Ola; Kåsen, Ingebjørg; Maerker, Jochen; van Persie, Mark; Resta, Salvatore; Schwering, Piet; Shimoni, Michal; Haavardsholm, Trym Vegard

    2012-06-01

    The EDA project "Detection in Urban scenario using Combined Airborne imaging Sensors" (DUCAS) is in progress. The aim of the project is to investigate the potential benefit of combined high spatial and spectral resolution airborne imagery for several defense applications in the urban area. The project is taking advantage of the combined resources from 7 contributing nations within the EDA framework. An extensive field trial has been carried out in the city of Zeebrugge at the Belgian coast in June 2011. The Belgian armed forces contributed with platforms, weapons, personnel (soldiers) and logistics for the trial. Ground truth measurements with respect to geometrical characteristics, optical material properties and weather conditions were obtained in addition to hyperspectral, multispectral and high resolution spatial imagery. High spectral/spatial resolution sensor data are used for detection, classification, identification and tracking.

  13. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  14. A portfolio of fine resolution Ka-band SAR images : part l.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Martin; Gutierrez, Vivian Dee; Dubbert, Dale Francis; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories designs and builds Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems capable of forming high-quality exceptionally fine resolution images. During the spring of 2004 a series of test flights were completed with a Ka-band testbed SAR on Sandia's DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft. A large data set was collected including real-time fine-resolution images of a variety of target scenes. This paper offers a sampling of high quality images representative of the output of Sandia's Ka-band testbed radar with resolutions as fine as 4 inches. Images will be annotated with descriptions of collection geometries and other relevant image parameters.

  15. SAR image simulation in the time domain for moving ocean surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takero; Rheem, Chang-Kyu

    2013-04-02

    This paper presents a fundamental simulation method to generate synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images for moving ocean surfaces. We have designed the simulation based on motion induced modulations and Bragg scattering, which are important features of ocean SAR images. The time domain simulation is able to obtain time series of microwave backscattering modulated by the orbital motions of ocean waves. Physical optics approximation is applied to calculate microwave backscattering. The computational grids are smaller than transmit microwave to demonstrate accurate interaction between electromagnetic waves and ocean surface waves. In this paper, as foundations for SAR image simulation of moving ocean surfaces, the simulation is carried out for some targets and ocean waves. The SAR images of stationary and moving targets are simulated to confirm SAR signal processing and motion induced modulation. Furthermore, the azimuth signals from the regular wave traveling to the azimuth direction also show the azimuthal shifts due to the orbital motions. In addition, incident angle dependence is simulated for irregular wind waves to compare with Bragg scattering theory. The simulation results are in good agreement with the theory. These results show that the simulation is applicable for generating numerical SAR images of moving ocean surfaces.

  16. Correcting Spatial Variance of RCM for GEO SAR Imaging Based on Time-Frequency Scaling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ze; Lin, Peng; Xiao, Peng; Kang, Lihong; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-07-14

    Compared with low-Earth orbit synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a geosynchronous (GEO) SAR can have a shorter revisit period and vaster coverage. However, relative motion between this SAR and targets is more complicated, which makes range cell migration (RCM) spatially variant along both range and azimuth. As a result, efficient and precise imaging becomes difficult. This paper analyzes and models spatial variance for GEO SAR in the time and frequency domains. A novel algorithm for GEO SAR imaging with a resolution of 2 m in both the ground cross-range and range directions is proposed, which is composed of five steps. The first is to eliminate linear azimuth variance through the first azimuth time scaling. The second is to achieve RCM correction and range compression. The third is to correct residual azimuth variance by the second azimuth time-frequency scaling. The fourth and final steps are to accomplish azimuth focusing and correct geometric distortion. The most important innovation of this algorithm is implementation of the time-frequency scaling to correct high-order azimuth variance. As demonstrated by simulation results, this algorithm can accomplish GEO SAR imaging with good and uniform imaging quality over the entire swath.

  17. Correcting Spatial Variance of RCM for GEO SAR Imaging Based on Time-Frequency Scaling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ze; Lin, Peng; Xiao, Peng; Kang, Lihong; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Compared with low-Earth orbit synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a geosynchronous (GEO) SAR can have a shorter revisit period and vaster coverage. However, relative motion between this SAR and targets is more complicated, which makes range cell migration (RCM) spatially variant along both range and azimuth. As a result, efficient and precise imaging becomes difficult. This paper analyzes and models spatial variance for GEO SAR in the time and frequency domains. A novel algorithm for GEO SAR imaging with a resolution of 2 m in both the ground cross-range and range directions is proposed, which is composed of five steps. The first is to eliminate linear azimuth variance through the first azimuth time scaling. The second is to achieve RCM correction and range compression. The third is to correct residual azimuth variance by the second azimuth time-frequency scaling. The fourth and final steps are to accomplish azimuth focusing and correct geometric distortion. The most important innovation of this algorithm is implementation of the time-frequency scaling to correct high-order azimuth variance. As demonstrated by simulation results, this algorithm can accomplish GEO SAR imaging with good and uniform imaging quality over the entire swath. PMID:27428974

  18. Correcting Spatial Variance of RCM for GEO SAR Imaging Based on Time-Frequency Scaling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ze; Lin, Peng; Xiao, Peng; Kang, Lihong; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Compared with low-Earth orbit synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a geosynchronous (GEO) SAR can have a shorter revisit period and vaster coverage. However, relative motion between this SAR and targets is more complicated, which makes range cell migration (RCM) spatially variant along both range and azimuth. As a result, efficient and precise imaging becomes difficult. This paper analyzes and models spatial variance for GEO SAR in the time and frequency domains. A novel algorithm for GEO SAR imaging with a resolution of 2 m in both the ground cross-range and range directions is proposed, which is composed of five steps. The first is to eliminate linear azimuth variance through the first azimuth time scaling. The second is to achieve RCM correction and range compression. The third is to correct residual azimuth variance by the second azimuth time-frequency scaling. The fourth and final steps are to accomplish azimuth focusing and correct geometric distortion. The most important innovation of this algorithm is implementation of the time-frequency scaling to correct high-order azimuth variance. As demonstrated by simulation results, this algorithm can accomplish GEO SAR imaging with good and uniform imaging quality over the entire swath. PMID:27428974

  19. Advanced Algorithms and High-Performance Testbed for Large-Scale Site Characterization and Subsurface Target Detecting Using Airborne Ground Penetrating SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Collier, James B.; Citak, Ari

    1997-01-01

    A team of US Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District and Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville, let Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and Montgomery Watson is currently in the process of planning and conducting the largest ever survey at the Former Buckley Field (60,000 acres), in Colorado, by using SRI airborne, ground penetrating, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The purpose of this survey is the detection of surface and subsurface Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) and in a broader sense the site characterization for identification of contaminated as well as clear areas. In preparation for such a large-scale survey, JPL has been developing advanced algorithms and a high-performance restbed for processing of massive amount of expected SAR data from this site. Two key requirements of this project are the accuracy (in terms of UXO detection) and speed of SAR data processing. The first key feature of this testbed is a large degree of automation and a minimum degree of the need for human perception in the processing to achieve an acceptable processing rate of several hundred acres per day. For accurate UXO detection, novel algorithms have been developed and implemented. These algorithms analyze dual polarized (HH and VV) SAR data. They are based on the correlation of HH and VV SAR data and involve a rather large set of parameters for accurate detection of UXO. For each specific site, this set of parameters can be optimized by using ground truth data (i.e., known surface and subsurface UXOs). In this paper, we discuss these algorithms and their successful application for detection of surface and subsurface anti-tank mines by using a data set from Yuma proving Ground, A7, acquired by SRI SAR.

  20. Advanced algorithms and high-performance testbed for large-scale site characterization and subsurface target detection using airborne ground-penetrating SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fijany, Amir; Collier, James B.; Citak, Ari

    1999-08-01

    A team of US Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District and Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville, JPL, Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and Montgomery Watson is currently in the process of planning and conducting the largest ever survey at the Former Buckley Field, in Colorado, by using SRI airborne, ground penetrating, SAR. The purpose of this survey is the detection of surface and subsurface Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) and in a broader sense the site characterization for identification of contaminated as well as clear areas. In preparation for such a large-scale survey, JPL has been developing advanced algorithms and a high-performance testbed for processing of massive amount of expected SAR data from this site. Two key requirements of this project are the accuracy and speed of SAR data processing. The first key feature of this testbed is a large degree of automation and maximum degree of the need for human perception in the processing to achieve an acceptable processing rate of several hundred acres per day. For accuracy UXO detection, novel algorithms have been developed and implemented. These algorithms analyze dual polarized SAR data. They are based on the correlation of HH and VV SAR data and involve a rather large set of parameters for accurate detection of UXO. For each specific site, this set of parameters can be optimized by using ground truth data. In this paper, we discuss these algorithms and their successful application for detection of surface and subsurface anti-tank mines by using a data set from Yuma Proving Ground, AZ, acquired by SRI SAR.

  1. Foliage problem in interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, George W.; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Roth, Duane; Poehler, Paul L.; Rais, Houra

    1999-08-01

    Interferometric SAR exploits the coherent nature of multiple synthetic aperture radar images to recover phase (range difference) information and thence terrain evaluation data as well as other phase derivative products such as Coherent Change Detection (CCD). Of the numerous factors that can degrade the coherency of multiple SAR collections, foliage constitutes one of the most challenging. The foliage problem in IFSAR is discussed and an airborne multiple pass collection is used to illustrate some facets of the problem. Resolution as a variable in the tradeoff between the bias and variance of the interferogram is discussed in the context of the example.

  2. Geodetic imaging of tectonic deformation with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, Heresh

    Precise measurements of ground deformation across the plate boundaries are crucial observations to evaluate the location of strain localization and to understand the pattern of strain accumulation at depth. Such information can be used to evaluate the possible location and magnitude of future earthquakes. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) potentially can deliver small-scale (few mm/yr) ground displacement over long distances (hundreds of kilometers) across the plate boundaries and over continents. However, Given the ground displacement as our signal of interest, the InSAR observations of ground deformation are usually affected by several sources of systematic and random noises. In this dissertation I identify several sources of systematic and random noise, develop new methods to model and mitigate the systematic noise and to evaluate the uncertainty of the ground displacement measured with InSAR. I use the developed approach to characterize the tectonic deformation and evaluate the rate of strain accumulation along the Chaman fault system, the western boundary of the India with Eurasia tectonic plates. I evaluate the bias due to the topographic residuals in the InSAR range-change time-series and develope a new method to estimate the topographic residuals and mitigate the effect from the InSAR range-change time-series (Chapter 2). I develop a new method to evaluate the uncertainty of the InSAR velocity field due to the uncertainty of the satellite orbits (Chapter 3) and a new algorithm to automatically detect and correct the phase unwrapping errors in a dense network of interferograms (Chapter 4). I develop a new approach to evaluate the impact of systematic and stochastic components of the tropospheric delay on the InSAR displacement time-series and its uncertainty (Chapter 5). Using the new InSAR time-series approach developed in the previous chapters, I study the tectonic deformation across the western boundary of the India plate with Eurasia and

  3. Repetition time and flip angle variation in SPRITE imaging for acquisition time and SAR reduction.

    PubMed

    Shah, N Jon; Kaffanke, Joachim B; Romanzetti, Sandro

    2009-08-01

    Single point imaging methods such as SPRITE are often the technique of choice for imaging fast-relaxing nuclei in solids. Single point imaging sequences based on SPRITE in their conventional form are ill-suited for in vivo applications since the acquisition time is long and the SAR is high. A new sequence design is presented employing variable repetition times and variable flip angles in order to improve the characteristics of SPRITE for in vivo applications. The achievable acquisition time savings as well as SAR reductions and/or SNR increases afforded by this approach were investigated using a resolution phantom as well as PSF simulations. Imaging results in phantoms indicate that acquisition times may be reduced by up to 70% and the SAR may be reduced by 40% without an appreciable loss of image quality. PMID:19447652

  4. High rate data systems. [for High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard B.; Nichols, David A.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of the high resolution imaging spectrometer (HIRIS) and the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are described with consideration given to the source of their high data rates. A functional-level description of the end-to-end data flow for HIRIS and SAR is provided. Attention is also given to major technological challenges that must be met in achieving an implementation of the system. Management issues associated with high rate, high volume data are also discussed.

  5. Chemical detection using the airborne thermal infrared imaging spectrometer (TIRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, N.; Subramanian, S.; Sheffield, M.; Erives, H.; Barhen, J.

    1997-04-01

    A methodology is described for an airborne, downlooking, longwave infrared imaging spectrometer based technique for the detection and tracking of plumes of toxic gases. Plumes can be observed in emission or absorption, depending on the thermal contrast between the vapor and the background terrain. While the sensor is currently undergoing laboratory calibration and characterization, a radiative exchange phenomenology model has been developed to predict sensor response and to facilitate the sensor design. An inverse problem model has also been developed to obtain plume parameters based on sensor measurements. These models, the sensors, and ongoing activities are described.

  6. On the Implementation of a Land Cover Classification System for SAR Images Using Khoros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina Revera, Edwin J.; Espinosa, Ramon Vasquez

    1997-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensor is widely used to record data about the ground under all atmospheric conditions. The SAR acquired images have very good resolution which necessitates the development of a classification system that process the SAR images to extract useful information for different applications. In this work, a complete system for the land cover classification was designed and programmed using the Khoros, a data flow visual language environment, taking full advantages of the polymorphic data services that it provides. Image analysis was applied to SAR images to improve and automate the processes of recognition and classification of the different regions like mountains and lakes. Both unsupervised and supervised classification utilities were used. The unsupervised classification routines included the use of several Classification/Clustering algorithms like the K-means, ISO2, Weighted Minimum Distance, and the Localized Receptive Field (LRF) training/classifier. Different texture analysis approaches such as Invariant Moments, Fractal Dimension and Second Order statistics were implemented for supervised classification of the images. The results and conclusions for SAR image classification using the various unsupervised and supervised procedures are presented based on their accuracy and performance.

  7. Sea state monitoring over Socotra Rock (Ieodo) by dual polarization SAR image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Kim, J.; Yun, H.; yun, H.

    2013-12-01

    The application SAR in sea state monitoring have been conducted in the large number of fields such as the vessel tracing using the wake in SAR amplitude, the measurement of sea wave height and the oil spill detection. The true merit of SAR application in sea state monitoring is the full independence from the climate conditions. Hence, it is highly useful to secure safety of the anthropogenic activities in ocean and the understanding of the marine environment. Especially the dual and full polarization modes of new L band and X band SAR such as Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR)'s Fine Beam double Polarization (FDB) and Polarimetry mode (PLR) and terraSAR-X polarization mode provided innovative means to extract sea state information exploiting the different amplitude and phase angle responses by electromagnetic and sea wave interactions. Thus a sample projects for mining the maximum possible sea state information from the ALOS PLASAR FDB SAR/InSAR pairs compared with the in-suit observation of sea state is being conducted. Test site was established over Socotra Rock (Ieodo in Korean), which is located at the Western Sea of Korea. At first, it aimed the measurement of sea waves using ALOS PLASAR multi-polarization images and its doppler-shift analysis. Together with sea state monitoring, auxiliary data analyses to combine the sea state outputs with the other in-orbital sensing image and non image information to trace the influence of sea states in the marine environment are actively undergoing. For instance, MERIS chlorophyll-a products are under investigation to identify the correlation with sea state. However, an significant obstacles to apply SAR interpretation scheme for mining sea state is the temporal gap between SAR image acquisitions in spite of the improved revising time of contemporary in-orbital SAR sensors. To tackle this problem, we are also introducing the multi view angle optical sensor

  8. Analysis of airborne MAIS imaging spectrometric data for mineral exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jinnian; Zheng Lanfen; Tong Qingxi

    1996-11-01

    The high spectral resolution imaging spectrometric system made quantitative analysis and mapping of surface composition possible. The key issue will be the quantitative approach for analysis of surface parameters for imaging spectrometer data. This paper describes the methods and the stages of quantitative analysis. (1) Extracting surface reflectance from imaging spectrometer image. Lab. and inflight field measurements are conducted for calibration of imaging spectrometer data, and the atmospheric correction has also been used to obtain ground reflectance by using empirical line method and radiation transfer modeling. (2) Determining quantitative relationship between absorption band parameters from the imaging spectrometer data and chemical composition of minerals. (3) Spectral comparison between the spectra of spectral library and the spectra derived from the imagery. The wavelet analysis-based spectrum-matching techniques for quantitative analysis of imaging spectrometer data has beer, developed. Airborne MAIS imaging spectrometer data were used for analysis and the analysis results have been applied to the mineral and petroleum exploration in Tarim Basin area china. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  9. First Image Products from EcoSAR - Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, SeungKuk; Rincon, Rafael; Fatuyinbo, Lola; Bollian, Tobias; Ranson, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Designed especially for forest ecosystem studies, EcoSAR employs state-of-the-art digital beamforming technology to generate wide-swath, high-resolution imagery. EcoSARs dual antenna single-pass imaging capability eliminates temporal decorrelation from polarimetric and interferometric analysis, increasing the signal strength and simplifying models used to invert forest structure parameters. Antennae are physically separated by 25 meters providing single pass interferometry. In this mode the radar is most sensitive to topography. With 32 active transmit and receive channels, EcoSARs digital beamforming is an order of magnitude more versatile than the digital beamforming employed on the upcoming NISAR mission. EcoSARs long wavelength (P-band, 435 MHz, 69 cm) measurements can be used to simulate data products for ESAs future BIOMASS mission, allowing scientists to develop algorithms before the launch of the satellite. EcoSAR can also be deployed to collect much needed data where BIOMASS satellite wont be allowed to collect data (North America, Europe and Arctic), filling in the gaps to keep a watchful eye on the global carbon cycle. EcoSAR can play a vital role in monitoring, reporting and verification schemes of internationals programs such as UN-REDD (United Nations Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) benefiting global society. EcoSAR was developed and flown with support from NASA Earth Sciences Technology Offices Instrument Incubator Program.

  10. The Design and First Airborne Experiment of China Imaging Altimeter (CIALT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Xu, Ke; Jiang, Jingshan

    average sea level, the significant wave height, and the backscattering coefficient of ocean surface. Sometimes it can also be used for the monitoring and measurment of sea ice. Usually the nadir looking antenna is used for TRA, and in this case it can just obtain one-dimensional height variation along the track. In this paper, we introduce a new-concept imaging radar altimeter, CIALT, which has been proposed more than two years ago. This imaging radar altimeter is aimed for providing three-dimensional surface information of both earth and ocean with high ground and height resolution. This imaging radar altimeter is off-nadir looking operated and in this manner, a wider swath and a higher space resolution in range direction can be obtained. Three techniques are integrated in this imaging radar altimeter, the first one is a robust onboard height tracker, which are based on the off-set center of gravity (OCOG) algorithm and it can work adaptively both for land and ocean surface; The second one is the synthetic processing in the azimuthal direction, in our design both unfocus and focus algorithms are involved in; The third one is the interferometric technique by which pixel-height information can be obtained. In the case of ocean observtion, a more precise ground height tracker is used. It is the height tracker makes our imaging radar altimeter different from the InSAR systems. The average height information output by height tracker is very useful for retrieving the pixel height information in the course of phase unwrapping. system. Some key issues have been addressed. Finally the first airborne experiment campain of CIALT has been introduced. After extensive processing of the experimental raw data, height tracking curves, high space resolution images, and interferometric information have been successfully obtained. They are also presented in this paper.

  11. Data correction techniques for the airborne large-aperture static image spectrometer based on image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Geng; Shi, Dalian; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Tao; Hu, Bingliang

    2015-01-01

    We propose an approach to correct the data of the airborne large-aperture static image spectrometer (LASIS). LASIS is a kind of stationary interferometer which compromises flux output and device stability. It acquires a series of interferograms to reconstruct the hyperspectral image cube. Reconstruction precision of the airborne LASIS data suffers from the instability of the plane platform. Usually, changes of plane attitudes, such as yaws, pitches, and rolls, can be precisely measured by the inertial measurement unit. However, the along-track and across-track translation errors are difficult to measure precisely. To solve this problem, we propose a co-optimization approach to compute the translation errors between the interferograms using an image registration technique which helps to correct the interferograms with subpixel precision. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, experiments are run on real airborne LASIS data and our results are compared with those of the state-of-the-art approaches.

  12. Validation of an active transponder for KOMPSAT-5 SAR image calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Durk Jong; Yeom, Kyung Whan; Ahn, Sang Il; Lim, Hyo Suk

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a transportable active transponder designed for the image calibration of Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-5 (KOMPSAT-5) with a synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Ground targets are essential in SAR image calibration. The environment for the deployment of ground targets for SAR image calibration should provide uniformity and minimum interference. The Amazon or deserts are regarded as desirable environments. However, such environments for SAR image calibration are difficult to find in Korea. Thus, it will be advantageous to have an active transponder whose performance will not be severely limited by the absence of such uniform environment. We have therefore developed an active transponder which has an adjustable internal delay and into which the orbit data of an arbitrary satellite can be loaded. The stored obit data with the aid of an internal global positioning system (GPS) receiver and gyroscope enables the active transponder to point to a selected satellite. In addition, a virtual deployment of the active transponder is possible due to its adjustable internal delay. Thus, the developed active transponder can be deployed at any place without environmental constraint. The performance of the developed active transponder is validated using the satellite TerraSAR-X, which is already in operation. The test results show that the active transponder is successfully compliant with the requirements for KOMPSAT-5 image calibration.

  13. Target Detection in SAR Images Based on a Level Set Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Regis C.P.; Medeiros, Fatima N.S.; Ushizima, Daniela M.

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces a new framework for point target detection in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. We focus on the task of locating reflective small regions using alevel set based algorithm. Unlike most of the approaches in image segmentation, we address an algorithm which incorporates speckle statistics instead of empirical parameters and also discards speckle filtering. The curve evolves according to speckle statistics, initially propagating with a maximum upward velocity in homogeneous areas. Our approach is validated by a series of tests on synthetic and real SAR images and compared with three other segmentation algorithms, demonstrating that it configures a novel and efficient method for target detection purpose.

  14. Acousto-optic techniques for real SAR imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, M.; Psaltis, D.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advancements in the development of the Real Time Acousto-optic SAR Processor are presented. In particular, the technique for introducing the azimuth reference function into the processor via an acousto-optic Bragg cell is discussed. This approach permits the reference function to be stored in electronic memory, thus giving the processor the flexibility needed to adapt rapidly to changes in the radar/target geometry. The architecture is described and results are presented which show the applicability of the technique to both spot-light and strip-map SAR.

  15. Thermal Infrared Spectral Imager for Airborne Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2009-01-01

    An airborne thermal hyperspectral imager is under development which utilizes the compact Dyson optical configuration and quantum well infrared photo detector (QWIP) focal plane array. The Dyson configuration uses a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows for a high throughput instrument (F/1.6) with minimal ghosting, stray-light and large swath width. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal imaging spectroscopy solution for lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The planned instrument specifications are discussed as well as design trade-offs. Calibration testing results (noise equivalent temperature difference, spectral linearity and spectral bandwidth) and laboratory emissivity plots from samples are shown using an operational testbed unit which has similar specifications as the final airborne system. Field testing of the testbed unit was performed to acquire plots of apparent emissivity for various known standard minerals (such as quartz). A comparison is made using data from the ASTER spectral library.

  16. Airborne infrared hyperspectral imager for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagueux, Philippe; Puckrin, Eldon; Turcotte, Caroline S.; Gagnon, Marc-André; Bastedo, John; Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Persistent surveillance and collection of airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance information is critical in today's warfare against terrorism. High resolution imagery in visible and infrared bands provides valuable detection capabilities based on target shapes and temperatures. However, the spectral resolution provided by a hyperspectral imager adds a spectral dimension to the measurements, leading to additional tools for detection and identification of targets, based on their spectral signature. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an interferometer-based imaging system that enables the spatial and spectral analysis of targets using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at spectral resolutions as fine as 0.25 cm-1. The LWIR version covers the 8.0 to 11.8 μm spectral range. The Hyper-Cam has been recently used for the first time in two compact airborne platforms: a bellymounted gyro-stabilized platform and a gyro-stabilized gimbal ball. Both platforms are described in this paper, and successful results of high-altitude detection and identification of targets, including industrial plumes, and chemical spills are presented.

  17. Airborne infrared hyperspectral imager for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckrin, Eldon; Turcotte, Caroline S.; Gagnon, Marc-André; Bastedo, John; Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Persistent surveillance and collection of airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance information is critical in today's warfare against terrorism. High resolution imagery in visible and infrared bands provides valuable detection capabilities based on target shapes and temperatures. However, the spectral resolution provided by a hyperspectral imager adds a spectral dimension to the measurements, leading to additional tools for detection and identification of targets, based on their spectral signature. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an interferometer-based imaging system that enables the spatial and spectral analysis of targets using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at spectral resolutions as fine as 0.25 cm-1. The LWIR version covers the 8.0 to 11.8 μm spectral range. The Hyper-Cam has been recently used for the first time in two compact airborne platforms: a belly-mounted gyro-stabilized platform and a gyro-stabilized gimbal ball. Both platforms are described in this paper, and successful results of high-altitude detection and identification of targets, including industrial plumes, and chemical spills are presented.

  18. SAR Computation inside Fetus by RF Coil during MR Imaging Employing Realistic Numerical Pregnant Woman Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo

    This paper presents the computational electromagnetic dosimetry inside an anatomically based pregnant woman models exposed to electromagnetic wave during magnetic resonance imaging. The two types of pregnant woman models corresponding to early gestation and 26 weeks gestation were used for this study. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in and around a fetus were calculated by radiated electromagnetic wave from highpass and lowpass birdcage coil. Numerical calculation results showed that high SAR region is observed at the body in the vicinity of gaps of the coil, and is related to concentrated electric field in the gaps of human body such as armpit and thigh. Moreover, it has confirmed that the SAR in the fetus is less than International Electrotechnical Commission limit of 10W/kg, when whole-body average SARs are 2W/kg and 4W/kg, which are the normal operating mode and first level controlled operating mode, respectively.

  19. Ice-volcano interactions during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, as revealed by airborne imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnússon, E.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Roberts, M. J.; Sigurã°Sson, G.; HöSkuldsson, F.; Oddsson, B.

    2012-07-01

    During the eruption of the ice-covered Eyjafjallajökull volcano, a series of images from an airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) were obtained by the Icelandic Coast Guard. Cloud obscured the summit from view during the first three days of the eruption, making the weather-independent SAR a valuable monitoring resource. Radar images revealed the development of ice cauldrons in a 200 m thick ice cover within the summit caldera, as well as the formation of cauldrons to the immediate south of the caldera. Additionally, radar images were used to document the subglacial and supraglacial passage of floodwater to the north and south of the eruption site. The eruption breached the ice surface about four hours after its onset at about 01:30 UTC on 14 April 2010. The first SAR images, obtained between 08:55 and 10:42 UTC, show signs of limited supraglacial drainage from the eruption site. Floodwater began to drain from the ice cap almost 5.5 h after the beginning of the eruption, implying storage of meltwater at the eruption site due to initially constricted subglacial drainage from the caldera. Heat transfer rates from magma to ice during early stages of cauldron formation were about 1 MW m-2 in the radial direction and about 4 MW m-2 vertically. Meltwater release was characterized by accumulation and drainage with most of the volcanic material in the ice cauldrons being drained in hyperconcentrated floods. After the third day of the eruption, meltwater generation at the eruption site diminished due to an insulating lag of tephra.

  20. Building detection and building parameter retrieval in InSAR phase images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Clémence; Thiele, Antje; Hinz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The high resolution provided by the current satellite SAR missions makes them an attractive solution for the detailed analysis of urban areas. Especially due to their weather and daylight independency, they can be employed when optical sensors come to their limits. Due to the specific oblique side-looking configuration of such SAR sensors, phenomena such as layover, double bounce and shadow appear at building location, which can be better understood with very high resolution (VHR) SAR data. The detection of those areas, as well as the retrieval of building parameters through a detailed analysis of the extracted structures, is a challenging task. Indeed, depending on the acquisition configuration, on building material and surroundings, those patterns are not always consistent in amplitude SAR images. They can be difficult to recognize and distinguish automatically. Considering InSAR phase images instead of amplitude images is very helpful for this task, as InSAR is more depending on the geometry. Therefore, in this paper, we focus on the detection and extraction of building layover in InSAR phase images. Two complementing detectors are proposed, and their results are combined, in order to provide reliable building hypotheses. Based on the extracted segments, further analysis is conducted. Especially, the number of connected facades is analyzed. Characteristically geometrical shapes are finally fitted for each facade to permit the determination of the final building parameters as length, width, and height. Results of this approach are shown for three different datasets, first in terms of correctness and completeness of the extraction, and second in terms of accuracy of the extracted building parameters. For the considered datasets, the completeness and correctness are of about 70% and 90%, respectively. Eliminating clear outliers, the determined parameters present an accuracy up to 4 m (length), 2 m (height) and 3 ° (orientation). In this article isolated, middle to

  1. Fast building damage mapping using a single post-earthquake PolSAR image: a case study of the 2010 Yushu earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wei; Huang, Chunlin

    2016-05-01

    Earthquakes are one of the most destructive natural disasters. Efficiently and quickly acquiring building earthquake damage information can help to reduce the casualties after an earthquake. In this paper, for convenience, speed, and precision, building damage information is extracted using a single post-earthquake PolSAR image. In PolSAR images, the undamaged parallel buildings characterized by double-bounce scattering are different from the collapsed buildings characterized by volume scattering, but the undamaged oriented buildings are very similar to collapsed buildings because of their scattering mechanism ambiguity in the early traditional model-based decomposition. Therefore, the collapsed buildings are difficult to extract accurately. In this paper, the scheme of polarization orientation angle (POA) compensation is employed to enhance the double-bounce scattering power of the oriented buildings, and the difference in the relative contribution change rate of scattering components before and after POA compensation is proposed to further enhance the difference between collapsed buildings and oriented buildings, in order that the collapsed buildings can be extracted more accurately. The "4.14" Yushu earthquake, which occurred in Yushu County, Qinghai province of China, is used as the case study to test the proposed method, and an airborne high-resolution PolSAR image of the urban region of Yushu County is used in the experiment. The experimental results show that the accuracy of building damage information extraction can be improved by the use of the proposed method, compared with the traditional polarimetric classification.

  2. Focusing, imaging, and ATR for the Gotcha 2008 wide angle SAR collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianelli, Christopher D.; Xu, Luzhou

    2013-05-01

    The following work discusses IAA's approach to tackling the wide angle, circular spotlight, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) problem from the 2008 Gotcha wide angle SAR data set, which is publicly released, with unlimited distribution. This data set comes with a MATLAB image formation routine and attendant graphical user inter- face (GUI). We begin by introducing a simple approach to focusing the collected phase history data that utilizes point targets (quadrahedral targets) present in the scene. Two SAR imaging algorithms are then presented, namely, the data-independent backprojection (BP) algorithm and the data-adaptive sparse learning via itera- tive minimization (SLIM) algorithm. These imaging approaches are compared using the 2008 Gotcha wide angle SAR data to perform both a clutter discrimination experiment, as well as an automatic target recognition (ATR) experiment. The ATR system is composed of a target pose and target center estimation preprocessing system, and includes a novel target feature for the final classification stage. Empirical results obtained by applying the focusing approach and imaging algorithms to the 2008 Gotcha wide angle SAR data set are presented and described. The results presented highlight the benefit of applying the SLIM algorithm over its data-independent counterpart, as well as the utility of the novel target feature.

  3. Benchmarking High Density Image Matching for Oblique Airborne Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavegn, S.; Haala, N.; Nebiker, S.; Rothermel, M.; Tutzauer, P.

    2014-08-01

    Both, improvements in camera technology and new pixel-wise matching approaches triggered the further development of software tools for image based 3D reconstruction. Meanwhile research groups as well as commercial vendors provide photogrammetric software to generate dense, reliable and accurate 3D point clouds and Digital Surface Models (DSM) from highly overlapping aerial images. In order to evaluate the potential of these algorithms in view of the ongoing software developments, a suitable test bed is provided by the ISPRS/EuroSDR initiative Benchmark on High Density Image Matching for DSM Computation. This paper discusses the proposed test scenario to investigate the potential of dense matching approaches for 3D data capture from oblique airborne imagery. For this purpose, an oblique aerial image block captured at a GSD of 6 cm in the west of Zürich by a Leica RCD30 Oblique Penta camera is used. Within this paper, the potential test scenario is demonstrated using matching results from two software packages, Agisoft PhotoScan and SURE from University of Stuttgart. As oblique images are frequently used for data capture at building facades, 3D point clouds are mainly investigated at such areas. Reference data from terrestrial laser scanning is used to evaluate data quality from dense image matching for several facade patches with respect to accuracy, density and reliability.

  4. Proceedings of the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, G. (Editor); Goetz, A. F. H. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) Data Analysis Workshop was held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on April 8 to 10, 1985. It was attended by 92 people who heard reports on 30 investigations currently under way using AIS data that have been collected over the past two years. Written summaries of 27 of the presentations are in these Proceedings. Many of the results presented at the Workshop are preliminary because most investigators have been working with this fundamentally new type of data for only a relatively short time. Nevertheless, several conclusions can be drawn from the Workshop presentations concerning the value of imaging spectrometry to Earth remote sensing. First, work with AIS has shown that direct identification of minerals through high spectral resolution imaging is a reality for a wide range of materials and geological settings. Second, there are strong indications that high spectral resolution remote sensing will enhance the ability to map vegetation species. There are also good indications that imaging spectrometry will be useful for biochemical studies of vegetation. Finally, there are a number of new data analysis techniques under development which should lead to more efficient and complete information extraction from imaging spectrometer data. The results of the Workshop indicate that as experience is gained with this new class of data, and as new analysis methodologies are developed and applied, the value of imaging spectrometry should increase.

  5. Airborne Laser Scanning and Image Processing Techniques for Archaeological Prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltýnová, M.; Nový, P.

    2014-06-01

    Aerial photography was, for decades, an invaluable tool for archaeological prospection, in spite of the limitation of this method to deforested areas. The airborne laser scanning (ALS) method can be nowadays used to map complex areas and suitable complement earlier findings. This article describes visualization and image processing methods that can be applied on digital terrain models (DTMs) to highlight objects hidden in the landscape. Thanks to the analysis of visualized DTM it is possible to understand the landscape evolution including the differentiation between natural processes and human interventions. Different visualization methods were applied on a case study area. A system of parallel tracks hidden in a forest and its surroundings - part of old route called "Devil's Furrow" near the town of Sázava was chosen. The whole area around well known part of Devil's Furrow has not been prospected systematically yet. The data from the airborne laser scanning acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre was used. The average density of the point cloud was approximately 1 point/m2 The goal of the project was to visualize the utmost smallest terrain discontinuities, e.g. tracks and erosion furrows, which some were not wholly preserved. Generally we were interested in objects that are clearly not visible in DTMs displayed in the form of shaded relief. Some of the typical visualization methods were tested (shaded relief, aspect and slope image). To get better results we applied image-processing methods that were successfully used on aerial photographs or hyperspectral images in the past. The usage of different visualization techniques on one site allowed us to verify the natural character of the southern part of Devil's Furrow and find formations up to now hidden in the forests.

  6. Classification of agricultural fields using time series of dual polarimetry TerraSAR-X images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaee, S.; Motagh, M.; Arefi, H.; Nooryazdan, M.

    2014-10-01

    Due to its special imaging characteristics, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has become an important source of information for a variety of remote sensing applications dealing with environmental changes. SAR images contain information about both phase and intensity in different polarization modes, making them sensitive to geometrical structure and physical properties of the targets such as dielectric and plant water content. In this study we investigate multi temporal changes occurring to different crop types due to phenological changes using high-resolution TerraSAR-X imagers. The dataset includes 17 dual-polarimetry TSX data acquired from June 2012 to August 2013 in Lorestan province, Iran. Several features are extracted from polarized data and classified using support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Training samples and different features employed in classification are also assessed in the study. Results show a satisfactory accuracy for classification which is about 0.91 in kappa coefficient.

  7. Calibration of the National Ecological Observatory Network's Airborne Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisso, N.; Kampe, T. U.; Karpowicz, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is currently under construction by the National Science Foundation. NEON is designed to collect data on the causes and responses to change in the observed ecosystem. The observatory will combine site data collected by terrestrial, instrumental, and aquatic observation systems with airborne remote sensing data. The Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) is designed to collect high-resolution aerial imagery, waveform and discrete LiDAR, and high-fidelity imaging spectroscopic data over the NEON sites annually at or near peak-greenness. Three individual airborne sensor packages will be installed in leased Twin Otter aircraft and used to the collect the NEON sites as NEON enters operations. A key driver to the derived remote sensing data products is the calibration of the imaging spectrometers. This is essential to the overall NEON mission to detect changes in the collected ecosystems over the 30-year expected lifetime. The NEON Imaging Spectrometer (NIS) is a Visible and Shortwave Infrared (VSWIR) grating spectrometer designed by NASA JPL. Spectroscopic data is collected at 5-nm intervals from 380-2500-nm. A single 480 by 640 pixel HgCdTe Focal Plane Array collects dispersed light from a grating tuned for efficiency across the solar-reflective utilized in a push-broom configuration. Primary calibration of the NIS consists of the characterizing the FPA behavior, spectral calibration, and radiometric calibration. To this end, NEON is constructing a Sensor Test Facility to calibrate the NEON sensors. This work discusses the initial NIS laboratory calibration and verification using vicarious calibration techniques during operations. Laboratory spectral calibration is based on well-defined emission lines in conjunction with a scanning monochromator to define the individual spectral response functions. A NIST traceable FEL bulb is used to radiometrically calibrate the imaging spectrometer. An On-board Calibration (OBC) system

  8. Random Forest and Rotation Forest for fully polarized SAR image classification using polarimetric and spatial features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Peijun; Samat, Alim; Waske, Björn; Liu, Sicong; Li, Zhenhong

    2015-07-01

    Fully Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) has the advantages of all-weather, day and night observation and high resolution capabilities. The collected data are usually sorted in Sinclair matrix, coherence or covariance matrices which are directly related to physical properties of natural media and backscattering mechanism. Additional information related to the nature of scattering medium can be exploited through polarimetric decomposition theorems. Accordingly, PolSAR image classification gains increasing attentions from remote sensing communities in recent years. However, the above polarimetric measurements or parameters cannot provide sufficient information for accurate PolSAR image classification in some scenarios, e.g. in complex urban areas where different scattering mediums may exhibit similar PolSAR response due to couples of unavoidable reasons. Inspired by the complementarity between spectral and spatial features bringing remarkable improvements in optical image classification, the complementary information between polarimetric and spatial features may also contribute to PolSAR image classification. Therefore, the roles of textural features such as contrast, dissimilarity, homogeneity and local range, morphological profiles (MPs) in PolSAR image classification are investigated using two advanced ensemble learning (EL) classifiers: Random Forest and Rotation Forest. Supervised Wishart classifier and support vector machines (SVMs) are used as benchmark classifiers for the evaluation and comparison purposes. Experimental results with three Radarsat-2 images in quad polarization mode indicate that classification accuracies could be significantly increased by integrating spatial and polarimetric features using ensemble learning strategies. Rotation Forest can get better accuracy than SVM and Random Forest, in the meantime, Random Forest is much faster than Rotation Forest.

  9. Design of airborne imaging spectrometer based on curved prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yunfeng; Xiangli, Bin; Zhou, Jinsong; Wei, Xiaoxiao

    2011-11-01

    A novel moderate-resolution imaging spectrometer spreading from visible wavelength to near infrared wavelength range with a spectral resolution of 10 nm, which combines curved prisms with the Offner configuration, is introduced. Compared to conventional imaging spectrometers based on dispersive prism or diffractive grating, this design possesses characteristics of small size, compact structure, low mass as well as little spectral line curve (smile) and spectral band curve (keystone or frown). Besides, the usage of compound curved prisms with two or more different materials can greatly reduce the nonlinearity inevitably brought by prismatic dispersion. The utilization ratio of light radiation is much higher than imaging spectrometer of the same type based on combination of diffractive grating and concentric optics. In this paper, the Seidel aberration theory of curved prism and the optical principles of Offner configuration are illuminated firstly. Then the optical design layout of the spectrometer is presented, and the performance evaluation of this design, including spot diagram and MTF, is analyzed. To step further, several types of telescope matching this system are provided. This work provides an innovational perspective upon optical system design of airborne spectral imagers; therefore, it can offer theoretic guide for imaging spectrometer of the same kind.

  10. Spectral estimation of gapped data and SAR imaging with angular diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Erik G.; Li, Jian; Stoica, Peter; Liu, Guoqing; Williams, Robert L.

    2001-08-01

    The Amplitude and Phase EStimation (APES) approach to amplitude spectrum estimation has been receiving considerably attention recently. We develop an extension of APES for the spectral estimation of gapped (incomplete) data and apply it to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging with angular diversity. It has recently been shown that APES minimizes a certain least-squares criterion with respect to the estimate of the spectrum. Our new algorithm is called gapped-data APES and is based on minimizing this criterion with respect to the missing data as well. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and its applicability to SAR imaging with angular diversity.

  11. Airborne measurements of NO2 shipping emissions using imaging DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Andreas C.; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Seyler, André; Ruhtz, Thomas; Lindemann, Carsten; Wittrock, Folkard; Burrows, John P.

    2014-05-01

    NOx (NO and NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry and affect human health and the environment. Shipping emissions contribute substantially to the global emissions of anthropogenic NOx. Due to globalization and increased trade volume, the relative importance emissions from ships gain even more importance. The Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution (AirMAP), developed at IUP Bremen, has been used to perform measurements of NO2 in the visible spectral range. The observations allow the determination of spatial distributions of column densities of NO2 below the aircraft. Airborne measurements were performed over Northern Germany and adjacent coastal waters during the NOSE (NO2 from Shipping Emissions) campaign in August 2013. The focus of the campaign activities was on shipping emissions, but NO2 over cities and power plants has been measured as well. The measurements have a spatial resolution below the order of 100 × 30 m2, and they reveal the large spatial variability of NO2 and the evolution of NO2 plumes behind point sources. Shipping lanes as well as plumes of individual ships are detected by the AirMAP instrument. In this study, first results from the NOSE campaign are presented for selected measurement areas.

  12. Change detection of polarimetric SAR images based on the KummerU Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Quan; Zou, Pengfei; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Ping

    2014-11-01

    In the society of PolSAR image segmentation, change detection and classification, the classical Wishart distribution has been used for a long time, but it especially suit to low-resolution SAR image, because in traditional sensors, only a small number of scatterers are present in each resolution cell. With the improving of SAR systems these years, the classical statistical models can therefore be reconsidered for high resolution and polarimetric information contained in the images acquired by these advanced systems. In this study, SAR image segmentation algorithm based on level-set method, added with distance regularized level-set evolution (DRLSE) is performed using Envisat/ASAR single-polarization data and Radarsat-2 polarimetric images, respectively. KummerU heterogeneous clutter model is used in the later to overcome the homogeneous hypothesis at high resolution cell. An enhanced distance regularized level-set evolution (DRLSE-E) is also applied in the later, to ensure accurate computation and stable level-set evolution. Finally, change detection based on four polarimetric Radarsat-2 time series images is carried out at Genhe area of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, NorthEastern of China, where a heavy flood disaster occurred during the summer of 2013, result shows the recommend segmentation method can detect the change of watershed effectively.

  13. A despeckle filter for the Cassini SAR images of Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Solomonidou, Anezina; Bampasidis, Georgios; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Sotin, Christophe; Coustenis, Athena; Moussas, Xenophon; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-05-01

    Cassini carries a multimode Ku-band (13.78 GHz) radar instrument designed to probe the surface of Titan and that of other targets in the Saturn system in four operating modes: imaging, altimetry, scatterometry, and radiometry. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode is used at altitudes under ~4000 km, resulting in spatial resolution ranging from ~350 m to >1 km. Images are acquired either left or right of nadir using 2-7 looks. A swath 120-450 km wide is created from 5 antenna beams. SAR coverage is dependent on spacecraft range and orbital geometry. Radar backscatter variations in SAR images can be interpreted in terms of variations of surface slope, near-surface roughness, or near-surface dielectric properties. The images obtained using SAR revealed that Titan has very complex surface (Elachi et al. 2005). A filtering technique is applied to obtain the restored image. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays "real" structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. Our method is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images. The TSPR (Total Sum Preserving Regularization) filter used here is based on a membrane model Markov random field approximation with a Gaussian conditional probability density function optimized by a synchronous local iterative method. The final form of despeckling gives a sum-preserving regularization for the pixel values of the image. The TSPR method preserves the mean values of local homogeneous regions and decreases the standard deviation up to six times (Bratsolis and Sigelle, 2003). The despeckle filter can be used as intermediate stage for the extraction of meaningful regions that correspond to structural units in the scene or distinguish objects of interest (Bratsolis, 2009). References E. Bratsolis, and M. Sigelle, "Fast SAR Image

  14. Determination of pasture quality using airborne hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullanagari, R. R.; Kereszturi, G.; Yule, Ian J.; Irwin, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Pasture quality is a critical determinant which influences animal performance (live weight gain, milk and meat production) and animal health. Assessment of pasture quality is therefore required to assist farmers with grazing planning and management, benchmarking between seasons and years. Traditionally, pasture quality is determined by field sampling which is laborious, expensive and time consuming, and the information is not available in real-time. Hyperspectral remote sensing has potential to accurately quantify biochemical composition of pasture over wide areas in great spatial detail. In this study an airborne imaging spectrometer (AisaFENIX, Specim) was used with a spectral range of 380-2500 nm with 448 spectral bands. A case study of a 600 ha hill country farm in New Zealand is used to illustrate the use of the system. Radiometric and atmospheric corrections, along with automatized georectification of the imagery using Digital Elevation Model (DEM), were applied to the raw images to convert into geocoded reflectance images. Then a multivariate statistical method, partial least squares (PLS), was applied to estimate pasture quality such as crude protein (CP) and metabolisable energy (ME) from canopy reflectance. The results from this study revealed that estimates of CP and ME had a R2 of 0.77 and 0.79, and RMSECV of 2.97 and 0.81 respectively. By utilizing these regression models, spatial maps were created over the imaged area. These pasture quality maps can be used for adopting precision agriculture practices which improves farm profitability and environmental sustainability.

  15. Heat equation inversion framework for average SAR calculation from magnetic resonance thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K; Deniz, Cem M

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of radiofrequency (RF) energy can be quantified via electric field or temperature change measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used as a tool to measure three dimensional small temperature changes associated with RF radiation exposure. When duration of RF exposure is long, conversion from temperature change to specific absorption rate (SAR) is nontrivial due to prominent heat-diffusion and conduction effects. In this work, we demonstrated a method for calculation of SAR via an inversion of the heat equation including heat-diffusion and conduction effects. This method utilizes high-resolution three dimensional magnetic resonance temperature images and measured thermal properties of the phantom to achieve accurate calculation of SAR. Accuracy of the proposed method was analyzed with respect to operating frequency of a dipole antenna and parameters used in heat equation inversion. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:493-503, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27490064

  16. Coupling Regular Tessellation with Rjmcmc Algorithm to Segment SAR Image with Unknown Number of Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Li, Y.; Zhao, Q. H.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image segmentation approach with unknown number of classes, which is based on regular tessellation and Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC') algorithm. First of all, an image domain is portioned into a set of blocks by regular tessellation. The image is modeled on the assumption that intensities of its pixels in each homogeneous region satisfy an identical and independent Gamma distribution. By Bayesian paradigm, the posterior distribution is obtained to build the region-based image segmentation model. Then, a RJMCMC algorithm is designed to simulate from the segmentation model to determine the number of homogeneous regions and segment the image. In order to further improve the segmentation accuracy, a refined operation is performed. To illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach, two real SAR image is tested.

  17. Improvement of the Accuracy of InSAR Image Co-Registration Based On Tie Points - A Review.

    PubMed

    Zou, Weibao; Li, Yan; Li, Zhilin; Ding, Xiaoli

    2009-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a new measurement technology, making use of the phase information contained in the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. InSAR has been recognized as a potential tool for the generation of digital elevation models (DEMs) and the measurement of ground surface deformations. However, many critical factors affect the quality of InSAR data and limit its applications. One of the factors is InSAR data processing, which consists of image co-registration, interferogram generation, phase unwrapping and geocoding. The co-registration of InSAR images is the first step and dramatically influences the accuracy of InSAR products. In this paper, the principle and processing procedures of InSAR techniques are reviewed. One of important factors, tie points, to be considered in the improvement of the accuracy of InSAR image co-registration are emphatically reviewed, such as interval of tie points, extraction of feature points, window size for tie point matching and the measurement for the quality of an interferogram. PMID:22399966

  18. Improvement of the Accuracy of InSAR Image Co-Registration Based On Tie Points – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Weibao; Li, Yan; Li, Zhilin; Ding, Xiaoli

    2009-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a new measurement technology, making use of the phase information contained in the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. InSAR has been recognized as a potential tool for the generation of digital elevation models (DEMs) and the measurement of ground surface deformations. However, many critical factors affect the quality of InSAR data and limit its applications. One of the factors is InSAR data processing, which consists of image co-registration, interferogram generation, phase unwrapping and geocoding. The co-registration of InSAR images is the first step and dramatically influences the accuracy of InSAR products. In this paper, the principle and processing procedures of InSAR techniques are reviewed. One of important factors, tie points, to be considered in the improvement of the accuracy of InSAR image co-registration are emphatically reviewed, such as interval of tie points, extraction of feature points, window size for tie point matching and the measurement for the quality of an interferogram. PMID:22399966

  19. Analysis of Scattering Components from Fully Polarimetric SAR Images for Improving Accuracies of Urban Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susaki, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze probability density functions (PDFs) of scatterings derived from fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images for improving the accuracies of estimated urban density. We have reported a method for estimating urban density that uses an index Tv+c obtained by normalizing the sum of volume and helix scatterings Pv+c. Validation results showed that estimated urban densities have a high correlation with building-to-land ratios (Kajimoto and Susaki, 2013b; Susaki et al., 2014). While the method is found to be effective for estimating urban density, it is not clear why Tv+c is more effective than indices derived from other scatterings, such as surface or double-bounce scatterings, observed in urban areas. In this research, we focus on PDFs of scatterings derived from fully polarimetric SAR images in terms of scattering normalization. First, we introduce a theoretical PDF that assumes that image pixels have scatterers showing random backscattering. We then generate PDFs of scatterings derived from observations of concrete blocks with different orientation angles, and from a satellite-based fully polarimetric SAR image. The analysis of the PDFs and the derived statistics reveals that the curves of the PDFs of Pv+c are the most similar to the normal distribution among all the scatterings derived from fully polarimetric SAR images. It was found that Tv+c works most effectively because of its similarity to the normal distribution.

  20. Detection of single graves by airborne hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, G; Kalacska, M; Soffer, R

    2014-12-01

    Airborne hyperspectral imaging (HSI) was assessed as a potential tool to locate single grave sites. While airborne HSI has shown to be useful to locate mass graves, it is expected the location of single graves would be an order of magnitude more difficult due to the smaller size and reduced mass of the targets. Two clearings were evaluated (through a blind test) as potential sites for containing at least one set of buried remains. At no time prior to submitting the locations of the potential burial sites from the HSI were the actual locations of the sites released or shared with anyone from the analysis team. The two HSI sensors onboard the aircraft span the range of 408-2524nm. A range of indicators that exploit the narrow spectral and spatial resolutions of the two complimentary HSI sensors onboard the aircraft were calculated. Based on the co-occurrence of anomalous pixels within the expected range of the indicators three potential areas conforming to our underlying assumptions of the expected spectral responses (and spatial area) were determined. After submission of the predicted burial locations it was revealed that two of the targets were located within GPS error (10m) of the true burial locations. Furthermore, due to the history of the TPOF site for burial work, investigation of the third target is being considered in the near future. The results clearly demonstrate promise for hyperspectral imaging to aid in the detection of buried remains, however further work is required before these results can justifiably be used in routine scenarios. PMID:25447169

  1. Detection of single graves by airborne hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, G; Kalacska, M; Soffer, R

    2014-12-01

    Airborne hyperspectral imaging (HSI) was assessed as a potential tool to locate single grave sites. While airborne HSI has shown to be useful to locate mass graves, it is expected the location of single graves would be an order of magnitude more difficult due to the smaller size and reduced mass of the targets. Two clearings were evaluated (through a blind test) as potential sites for containing at least one set of buried remains. At no time prior to submitting the locations of the potential burial sites from the HSI were the actual locations of the sites released or shared with anyone from the analysis team. The two HSI sensors onboard the aircraft span the range of 408-2524nm. A range of indicators that exploit the narrow spectral and spatial resolutions of the two complimentary HSI sensors onboard the aircraft were calculated. Based on the co-occurrence of anomalous pixels within the expected range of the indicators three potential areas conforming to our underlying assumptions of the expected spectral responses (and spatial area) were determined. After submission of the predicted burial locations it was revealed that two of the targets were located within GPS error (10m) of the true burial locations. Furthermore, due to the history of the TPOF site for burial work, investigation of the third target is being considered in the near future. The results clearly demonstrate promise for hyperspectral imaging to aid in the detection of buried remains, however further work is required before these results can justifiably be used in routine scenarios.

  2. Comparing The Results Of Terrasar-X And Envisat Sar Images With Ps-InSAR Methods On Slow Motion Landslides: Koyulhisar, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Mehmet; Poyraz, Fatih; Özgür Hastaoğlu, Kemal; Türk, Tarık; Tatar, Orhan; Birdal, Anıl Can

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, PS-InSAR method has been used widely on monitoring slow motion landslides. The motion amounts obtained by PS-InSAR method is avaliable only in LOS(line of sight) and it can't provide information about three dimensional motions. Nevertheless, motions caused by landslides are usually 3 dimensional and also they are not homogeneous. This is one of the biggest handicaps of monitoring landslides with SAR method. In this study, annual motion rates of the PS points that are located in Koyulhisar landslide region are obtained from differently resolutioned sar images of Envisat and Terrasar-x satellite's frames through PS-InSAR method and by using StaMPS software. Throughout the landslide region a profile has been established in North-South line, and the correlation of the results obtained from the sar images lining on this profile. All results are observed to have %80 correlation with each other. By means of these results a subsidence area has been found in the northern region and an uplifting area has been found in the southern region. Through this study, general information about the landslide mechanism has been obtained.

  3. Sparse multipass 3D SAR imaging: applications to the GOTCHA data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Christian D.; Ertin, Emre; Moses, Randolph L.

    2009-05-01

    Typically in SAR imaging, there is insufficient data to form well-resolved three-dimensional (3D) images using traditional Fourier image reconstruction; furthermore, scattering centers do not persist over wide-angles. In this work, we examine 3D non-coherent wide-angle imaging on the GOTCHA Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) data set; this data set consists of multipass complete circular aperture radar data from a scene at AFRL, with each pass varying in elevation as a result of aircraft flight dynamics . We compare two algorithms capable of forming well-resolved 3D images over this data set: regularized lp least-squares inversion, and non-uniform multipass interferometric SAR (IFSAR).

  4. Mini-SAR: An Imaging Radar for the Chandrayaan-1 Mission to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, Paul D.; Bussey, Ben; Lichtenberg, Chris; Marinelli, Bill; Nozette, Stewart

    2005-01-01

    The debate on the presence of ice at the poles of the Moon continues. We will fly a small imaging radar on the Indian Chandrayaan mission to the Moon, to be launched in September, 2007. Mini-SAR will map the scattering properties of the lunar poles, determining the presence and extent of polar ice.

  5. DBSCAN-based ROI extracted from SAR images and the discrimination of multi-feature ROI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin Yi; Zhao, Bo; Tan, Shu Run; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Jiang, Zhong Jin; Cui, Tie Jun

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of the paper is to extract the region of interest (ROI) from the coarse detected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and discriminate if the ROI contains a target or not, so as to eliminate the false alarm, and prepare for the target recognition. The automatic target clustering is one of the most difficult tasks in the SAR-image automatic target recognition system. The density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN) relies on a density-based notion of clusters which is designed to discover clusters of arbitrary shape. DBSCAN was first used in the SAR image processing, which has many excellent features: only two insensitivity parameters (radius of neighborhood and minimum number of points) are needed; clusters of arbitrary shapes which fit in with the coarse detected SAR images can be discovered; and the calculation time and memory can be reduced. In the multi-feature ROI discrimination scheme, we extract several target features which contain the geometry features such as the area discriminator and Radon-transform based target profile discriminator, the distribution characteristics such as the EFF discriminator, and the EM scattering property such as the PPR discriminator. The synthesized judgment effectively eliminates the false alarms.

  6. Pre-processing SAR image stream to facilitate compression for transport on bandwidth-limited-link

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, Bobby G.; Riley, Robert

    2015-09-29

    Pre-processing is applied to a raw VideoSAR (or similar near-video rate) product to transform the image frame sequence into a product that resembles more closely the type of product for which conventional video codecs are designed, while sufficiently maintaining utility and visual quality of the product delivered by the codec.

  7. Three-dimensional SAR imaging using cross-track coherent stereo collections

    SciTech Connect

    Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Wahl, D.E.; Thompson, P.A.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper we describe a new method for creating three-dimensional images using pairs of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images obtained from a unique collection geometry. This collection mode involves synthetic apertures that have a common center. In this sense the illumination directions for the two SAR images are the same, while the slant planes are at different spatial orientations. The slant plane orientations give rise to cross-range layover (fore-shortening) components in the two images that are of equal magnitude but opposite directions. This differential cross-range layover is therefore proportional to the elevation of a given target, which is completely analogous to the situation in stereo optical imaging, wherein two film planes (corresponding to the two slant planes) result in elevation-dependent parallax. Because the two SAR collections are coherent in this particular collection mode, the images have the same speckle patterns throughout. As a result, the images may be placed into stereo correspondence via calculation of correlations between micro-patches of the complex image data. The resulting computed digital stereo elevation map can be quite accurate. Alternatively, an analog anaglyph can be displayed for 3-D viewing, avoiding the necessity of the stereo correspondence calculation.

  8. ERS-1 Investigations of Southern Ocean Sea Ice Geophysics Using Combined Scatterometer and SAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M.; Early, D.; Long, D.

    1994-01-01

    Coregistered ERS-1 SAR and Scatterometer data are presented for the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Calibrated image backscatter statistics are extracted from data acquired in regions where surface measurements were made during two extensive international Weddell Sea experiments in 1992. Changes in summer ice-surface conditions, due to temperature and wind, are shown to have a large impact on observed microwave backscatter values. Winter calibrated backscatter distributions are also investigated as a way of describing ice thickness conditions in different location during winter. Coregistered SAR and EScat data over a manned drifting ice station are used to illustrate the seasonal signature changes occurring during the fall freeze-up transition.

  9. Urban-area extraction from polarimetric SAR image using combination of target decomposition and orientation angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Bin; Lu, Da; Wu, Zhilu; Qiao, Zhijun G.

    2016-05-01

    The results of model-based target decomposition are the main features used to discriminate urban and non-urban area in polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) application. Traditional urban-area extraction methods based on modelbased target decomposition usually misclassified ground-trunk structure as urban-area or misclassified rotated urbanarea as forest. This paper introduces another feature named orientation angle to improve urban-area extraction scheme for the accurate mapping in urban by PolSAR image. The proposed method takes randomness of orientation angle into account for restriction of urban area first and, subsequently, implements rotation angle to improve results that oriented urban areas are recognized as double-bounce objects from volume scattering. ESAR L-band PolSAR data of the Oberpfaffenhofen Test Site Area was used to validate the proposed algorithm.

  10. A new method for speckle reduction in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images using optimal window size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, S.; Salehi, B.; Moloney, C.; Huang, W.; Brisco, B.

    2016-04-01

    Speckle degrades the radiometric quality of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image and makes its visual interpretation difficult. The approaches proposed previously for speckle filtering of SAR images exploit a window of fixed size for this purpose. But a fixed size window is not sufficient as the size of objects may vary throughout the image. In this paper, a method is introduced by which each pixel in the image is filtered using a window size which is optimal for that pixel. Real and imaginary parts of a single-channel SAR image are used for the selection of the best window size for each pixel, and then intensity image is filtered by applying that window size. The Average and Minimum Mean Square Error (MMSE) filters are modified using the Adaptive Window Size method. This approach is implemented on the HH-channel of a RADARSAT-2 image acquired over the Avalon Peninsula near St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. This filter can supress speckle effectively while retaining the details reasonably.

  11. Novel radon transform-based method for linear feature detection in open water SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Sun, Jiyin; Xu, Suqin; Chen, Biao

    2007-11-01

    Open water SAR images frequently exhibit long dark or bright linear features, some of which are ship wakes, internal wave or internal wave wakes of under water moving objects. The detection of these line features is very impotent in both civil and military fields. Considering to the drawbacks of conventional Radon transform, this paper proposed a novel liner feature detection method. It use the gliding window and firstly apply a Radon transform to the aim image, use a "mean matrix" to normalize the aim image in the Radon domain, and then search for the peaks or troughs in an ellipse region instead of the whole region. This algorithm is tested on a set of simulated SAR images of ship wakes. The results demonstrate that this algorithm's robustness in the presence of noise, as well as its ability to detect and localize linear features that are somewhat not so straight.

  12. An efficient two-objective automatic SAR image segmentation framework using artificial immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongdong; Niu, Ruican; Fei, Rong; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye; Cao, Zijian

    2015-12-01

    Here, an efficient multi-objective automatic segmentation framework (MASF) is formulated and applied to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image unsupervised classification. In the framework, three important issues are presented: 1) two reasonable image preprocessing techniques, including spatial filtering and watershed operator, are discussed at the initial stage of the framework; 2)then, an efficient immune multi-objective optimization algorithm with uniform clone, adaptive selection by online nondominated solutions, and dynamic deletion in diversity maintenance is proposed; 3 two very simple, but very efficient conflicting clustering validity indices are incorporated into the framework and simultaneously optimized. Two simulated SAR data and two complicated real images are used to quantitatively validate its effectiveness. In addition, four other state-of-the-art image segmentation methods are employed for comparison.

  13. Bayesian classification of polarimetric SAR images using adaptive a priori probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, J. J.; Burnette, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of classifying earth terrain by observed polarimetric scattering properties is tackled with an iterative Bayesian scheme using a priori probabilities adaptively. The first classification is based on the use of fixed and not necessarily equal a priori probabilities, and successive iterations change the a priori probabilities adaptively. The approach is applied to an SAR image in which a single water body covers 10 percent of the image area. The classification accuracy for ocean, urban, vegetated, and total area increase, and the percentage of reclassified pixels decreases greatly as the iteration number increases. The iterative scheme is found to improve the a posteriori classification accuracy of maximum likelihood classifiers by iteratively using the local homogeneity in polarimetric SAR images. A few iterations can improve the classification accuracy significantly without sacrificing key high-frequency detail or edges in the image.

  14. Automatic Ship Detection in Single-Pol SAR Images Using Texture Features in Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khesali, E.; Enayati, H.; Modiri, M.; Mohseni Aref, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method for detecting ships from high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. This method categorizes ship targets from single-pol SAR images using texture features in artificial neural networks. As such, the method tries to overcome the lack of an operational solution that is able to reliably detect ships with one SAR channel. The method has the following three main stages: 1) feature extraction; 2) feature selection; and 3) ship detection. The first part extracts different texture features from SAR image. These textures include occurrence and co occurrence measures with different window sizes. Then, best features are selected. Finally, the artificial neural network is used to extract ship pixels from sea ones. In post processing stage some morphological filters are used to improve the result. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified using Sentinel-1 data in VV polarization. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm can be implemented with time-saving, high precision ship extraction, feature analysis, and detection. The results also show that using texture features the algorithm properly discriminates speckle noise from ships.

  15. Estimating Sea Ice Parameters from Multi-Look SAR Images Using - and Second-Order Variograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojian; Li, Yu; Zhao, Quanhua

    2016-06-01

    The spatial structures revealed in SAR intensity imagery provide essential information characterizing the natural variation processes of sea ice. This paper proposes a new method to extract the spatial structures of sea ice based on two spatial stochastic models. One is a multi-Gamma model, which characterizes continuous variations corresponding to ice-free area or the background. The other is a Poisson line mosaic model, which characterizes the regional variations of sea ice with different types. The linear combination of the two models builds the mixture model to represent spatial structures of sea ice within SAR intensity imagery. To estimate different sea ice parameters, such as its concentration, scale etc. We define two kinds of geostatistic metrics, theoretical first- and second-order variograms. Their experimental alternatives can be calculated from the SAR intensity imagery directly, then the parameters of the mixture model are estimated through fitting the theoretical variograms to the experimental ones, and by comparing the estimated parameters to the egg code, it is verified that the estimated parameters can indicate sea ice structure information showing in the egg code. The proposed method is applied to simulated images and Radarsat-1 images. The results of the experiments show that the proposed method can estimate the sea ice concentration and floe size accurately and stably within SAR testing images.

  16. Titan Topography: A Comparison Between Cassini Altimeter and SAR Imaging from Two Titan Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Y.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P. S.; Johnson, W. T.; Hensley, S.; Hamilton, G.; West, R.; Alberti, G.; Flamini, E.; Lorenz, R. D.; Zebker, H. A.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2007-12-01

    The Cassini RADAR has collected twelve altimeter data sets of Titan since the beginning of the Saturn Tour in 2004. Most of the altimeter measurements were made at high altitudes, from 4,000 km to 15,000 km, resulting in low spatial resolutions due to beam footprint sizes larger than 20 km, as well as short ground tracks less than 600 km. One flyby (T30) was dedicated to altimeter data collection from 15,000 km to the closest approach altitude of 950 km. This produced a beam footprint size of 6 km at the lowest altitude and an altimeter ground track of about 3,500 km covering Titan's surface from near the equator to high latitude areas near Titan's north pole. More importantly, the ground track is located inside the SAR swath viewed from an earlier Titan flyby (T28). This provides a rare opportunity to investigate Titan topography with a relatively high spatial resolution and compare nadir-looking altimeter data with side-looking SAR imaging. From altimeter data, we have measured the mean Titan radius of 2575.1 km +/- 0.1 km and observed rather complex topographical variations over a short distance. By comparing altimeter data and SAR images at altitudes below 2,000 km, we have found that there is a strong correlation between SAR brightness and altimeter waveform; SAR dark areas correspond to strong and sharp altimeter waveforms while SAR bright areas correspond to weak and diffused altimeter waveforms. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Multiresolution MAP despeckling of SAR images based on locally adaptive generalized Gaussian pdf modeling.

    PubMed

    Argenti, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Tiziano; Alparone, Luciano

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, a new despeckling method based on undecimated wavelet decomposition and maximum a posteriori MIAP) estimation is proposed. Such a method relies on the assumption that the probability density function (pdf) of each wavelet coefficient is generalized Gaussian (GG). The major novelty of the proposed approach is that the parameters of the GG pdf are taken to be space-varying within each wavelet frame. Thus, they may be adjusted to spatial image context, not only to scale and orientation. Since the MAP equation to be solved is a function of the parameters of the assumed pdf model, the variance and shape factor of the GG function are derived from the theoretical moments, which depend on the moments and joint moments of the observed noisy signal and on the statistics of speckle. The solution of the MAP equation yields the MAP estimate of the wavelet coefficients of the noise-free image. The restored SAR image is synthesized from such coefficients. Experimental results, carried out on both synthetic speckled images and true SAR images, demonstrate that MAP filtering can be successfully applied to SAR images represented in the shift-invariant wavelet domain, without resorting to a logarithmic transformation.

  18. A system-level simulator for indoor mmW SAR imaging and its applications.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feng; Ocket, Ilja; Schreurs, Dominique; Nauwelaers, Bart

    2012-10-01

    Recently, the research interest in indoor active millimeter wave (mmW) imaging by applying the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technique is increasing. However, there is a lack of proper computer-aided design (CAD) tools at the system level, and almost all the R&D activities rely on experiments solely. The high cost of such a system stops many researchers from investigating such a fascinating research topic. Moreover, the experiment-oriented studies may blind the researchers to some details during the imaging process, since in most cases they are only interested in the readout from the receivers and do not know how the waves perform in reality. To bridge such a gap, we propose a modeling approach at mmW frequencies, which is able to simulate the physical process during SAR imaging. We are not going to discuss about advanced image reconstruction algorithms, since they have already been investigated intensively for decades. To distinguish from previous work, for the first time, we model the data acquisition process in a SAR imaging system successfully at mmW frequencies. We show how to perform some system-level studies based on such a simulator via a common PC, including the influence of reflectivity contrast between object and background, sampling step, and antenna's directivity on image quality. The simulator can serve system design purposes and it can be easily extended to THz frequencies.

  19. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann Y.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quad-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well- managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. Prior to its application for soil moisture inversion, a good agreement was found between the single-scattering IEM simulations and the L band measurements of SIR-C and AIRSAR over a wide range of soil moisture and surface roughness conditions. The sensitivity of soil moisture variation to the co-polarized signals were then examined under the consideration of the calibration accuracy of various components of SAR measurements. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  20. Comparison of mosaicking techniques for airborne images from consumer-grade cameras

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Images captured from airborne imaging systems have the advantages of relatively low cost, high spatial resolution, and real/near-real-time availability. Multiple images taken from one or more flight lines could be used to generate a high-resolution mosaic image, which could be useful for diverse rem...

  1. Compressed Sensing for Millimeter-wave Ground Based SAR/ISAR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiğit, Enes

    2014-11-01

    Millimeter-wave (MMW) ground based (GB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and inverse SAR (ISAR) imaging are the powerful tools for the detection of foreign object debris (FOD) and concealed objects that requires wide bandwidths and highly frequent samplings in both slow-time and fast-time domains according to Shannon/Nyquist sampling theorem. However, thanks to the compressive sensing (CS) theory GB-SAR/ISAR data can be reconstructed by much fewer random samples than the Nyquist rate. In this paper, the impact of both random frequency sampling and random spatial domain data collection of a SAR/ISAR sensor on reconstruction quality of a scene of interest was studied. To investigate the feasibility of using proposed CS framework, different experiments for various FOD-like and concealed object-like targets were carried out at the Ka and W band frequencies of the MMW. The robustness and effectiveness of the recommend CS-based reconstruction configurations were verified through a comparison among each other by using integrated side lobe ratios (ISLR) of the images.

  2. Extracting hurricane eye morphology from spaceborne SAR images using morphological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Isabella K.; Shamsoddini, Ali; Li, Xiaofeng; Trinder, John C.; Li, Zeyu

    2016-07-01

    Hurricanes are among the most destructive global natural disasters. Thus recognizing and extracting their morphology is important for understanding their dynamics. Conventional optical sensors, due to cloud cover associated with hurricanes, cannot reveal the intense air-sea interaction occurring at the sea surface. In contrast, the unique capabilities of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for cloud penetration, and its backscattering signal characteristics enable the extraction of the sea surface roughness. Therefore, SAR images enable the measurement of the size and shape of hurricane eyes, which reveal their evolution and strength. In this study, using six SAR hurricane images, we have developed a mathematical morphology method for automatically extracting the hurricane eyes from C-band SAR data. Skeleton pruning based on discrete skeleton evolution (DSE) was used to ensure global and local preservation of the hurricane eye shape. This distance weighted algorithm applied in a hierarchical structure for extraction of the edges of the hurricane eyes, can effectively avoid segmentation errors by reducing redundant skeletons attributed to speckle noise along the edges of the hurricane eye. As a consequence, the skeleton pruning has been accomplished without deficiencies in the key hurricane eye skeletons. A morphology-based analyses of the subsequent reconstructions of the hurricane eyes shows a high degree of agreement with the hurricane eye areas derived from reference data based on NOAA manual work.

  3. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2013-08-01

    MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

  4. Design of a monopulse SAR system to determine elevation angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oettl, H.; Zink, M.; Zeller, K. H.; Freeman, A.

    1992-01-01

    Terrain height variations in mountainous areas cause problems in radiometric corrections of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. To determine the elevation angle and the height at the different parts of an image, an application of the monopulse principle is proposed. From the ratios of images radiometrically modulated by the difference and sum antenna pattern in range it is possible to calculate the appropriate elevation angle at any point in the image. Design considerations for a corresponding airborne SAR-system are presented, and some estimates of error influences (e.g., ambiguities), expected performance and precision in topographic mapping are given.

  5. Oil Spill Detection by SAR Images: Dark Formation Detection, Feature Extraction and Classification Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Topouzelis, Konstantinos N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive review of the use of Synthetic Aperture Radar images (SAR) for detection of illegal discharges from ships. It summarizes the current state of the art, covering operational and research aspects of the application. Oil spills are seriously affecting the marine ecosystem and cause political and scientific concern since they seriously effect fragile marine and coastal ecosystem. The amount of pollutant discharges and associated effects on the marine environment are important parameters in evaluating sea water quality. Satellite images can improve the possibilities for the detection of oil spills as they cover large areas and offer an economical and easier way of continuous coast areas patrolling. SAR images have been widely used for oil spill detection. The present paper gives an overview of the methodologies used to detect oil spills on the radar images. In particular we concentrate on the use of the manual and automatic approaches to distinguish oil spills from other natural phenomena. We discuss the most common techniques to detect dark formations on the SAR images, the features which are extracted from the detected dark formations and the most used classifiers. Finally we conclude with discussion of suggestions for further research. The references throughout the review can serve as starting point for more intensive studies on the subject.

  6. Synthetic aperture integration (SAI) algorithm for SAR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Paglieroni, David W; Beer, N. Reginald

    2013-07-09

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  7. Application of the airborne ocean color imager for commercial fishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was to develop a commercial remote sensing system for providing near-real-time data (within one day) in support of commercial fishing operations. The Airborne Ocean Color Imager (AOCI) had been built for NASA by Daedalus Enterprises, Inc., but it needed certain improvements, data processing software, and a delivery system to make it into a commercial system for fisheries. Two products were developed to support this effort: the AOCI with its associated processing system and an information service for both commercial and recreational fisheries to be created by Spectro Scan, Inc. The investigation achieved all technical objectives: improving the AOCI, creating software for atmospheric correction and bio-optical output products, georeferencing the output products, and creating a delivery system to get those products into the hands of commercial and recreational fishermen in near-real-time. The first set of business objectives involved Daedalus Enterprises and also were achieved: they have an improved AOCI and new data processing software with a set of example data products for fisheries applications to show their customers. Daedalus' marketing activities showed the need for simplification of the product for fisheries, but they successfully marketed the current version to an Italian consortium. The second set of business objectives tasked Spectro Scan to provide an information service and they could not be achieved because Spectro Scan was unable to obtain necessary venture capital to start up operations.

  8. Optimal structural design of the Airborne Infrared Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Keith B.; Cerrati, Vincent J.; Forman, Steven E.; Sultana, John A.

    1995-09-01

    The airborne infrared imager (AIRI) is a dual-band IR sensor designed to study air defense issues while wing mounted in a pod. The sensor consists of an optical bench attached to a two- axis inertially stabilized gimbal structure in elevation and azimuth. The gimbal assembly operates within an 18-inch diameter globe while meeting strict pointing and tracking requirements. Design conditions for the assembly include operational and nonoperational inertial, thermal, and dynamic loads. Primary design efforts centered on limiting the line-of- sight jitter of the optical system to 50 (mu) rad under the operating environment. An MSC/NASTRAN finite element model was developed for structural response predictions and correlated to experimental data. Design changes were aided by MSC/NASTRAN's optimization routine with the goal of maximizing the fundamental frequency of the gimbal assembly. The final structural design resultsed in a first natural frequency of 79 Hz using a titanium azimuthal gimbal, a stainless steel elevation gimbal, and an aluminum optical bench which met the design and performance requirements.

  9. Patch diameter limits for tiered subaperture SAR image formation algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-12-31

    Synthetic Aperture Radar image formation algorithms typically use transform techniques that often requires trading between image resolution, algorithm efficiency, and focussed image scene size limits. This is due to assumptions for the data such as simplified (often straight-line) flight paths, simplified imaging geometry, and simplified models for phase functions. Many errors in such assumptions are typically untreatable due to their dependence on both data domain positions and image domain positions. The result is that large scenes often require inefficient multiple image formation iterations, followed by a mosaicking operation of the focussed image patches. One class of image formation algorithms that performs favorably divides the spatial and frequency apertures into subapertures, and perhaps those subapertures into sub-subapertures, and so on, in a tiered subaperture fashion. This allows a gradual shift from data domain into image domain that allows correcting many types of errors that limit other image formation algorithms, even in a dynamic motion environment, thereby allowing larger focussed image patches without mosaicking. This paper presents and compares focussed patch diameter limits for tiered subaperture (TSA) image formation algorithms, for various numbers of tiers of subapertures. Examples are given that show orders-of-magnitude improvement in non-mosaicked focussed image patch size over traditional polar format processing, and that patch size limits increase with the number of tiers of subapertures, although with diminishing returns.

  10. Airborne test results for smart pushbroom imaging system with optoelectronic image correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernykh, Valerij; Dyblenko, Serguei; Janschek, Klaus; Seifart, Klaus; Harnisch, Bernd

    2004-02-01

    Smart pushbroom imaging system (SMARTSCAN) solves the problem of image correction for satellite pushbroom cameras which are disturbed by satellite attitude instability effects. Satellite cameras with linear sensors are particularly sensitive to attitude errors, which cause considerable image distortions. A novel solution of distortions correction is presented, which is based on the real-time recording of the image motion in the focal plane of the satellite camera. This allows using such smart pushbroom cameras (multi-/hyperspectral) even on moderately stabilised satellites, e.g. small sat's, LEO comsat's. The SMARTSCAN concept uses in-situ measurements of the image motion with additional CCD-sensors in the focal plane and real-time image processing of these measurements by an onboard Joint Transform Optical Correlator. SMARTSCAN has been successfully demonstrated with breadboard models for the Optical Correlator and a Smart Pushbroom Camera at laboratory level (satellite motion simulator on base of a 5 DOF industrial robot) and by an airborne flight demonstration in July 2002. The paper describes briefly the principle of operation of the system and gives a description of the hardware model are provided. Detailed results of the airborne tests and performance analysis are given as well as detailed tests description.

  11. SAR Image Segmentation with Unknown Number of Classes Combined Voronoi Tessellation and Rjmcmc Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q. H.; Li, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a novel segmentation method for automatically determining the number of classes in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images by combining Voronoi tessellation and Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) strategy. Instead of giving the number of classes a priori, it is considered as a random variable and subject to a Poisson distribution. Based on Voronoi tessellation, the image is divided into homogeneous polygons. By Bayesian paradigm, a posterior distribution which characterizes the segmentation and model parameters conditional on a given SAR image can be obtained up to a normalizing constant; Then, a Revisable Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo(RJMCMC) algorithm involving six move types is designed to simulate the posterior distribution, the move types including: splitting or merging real classes, updating parameter vector, updating label field, moving positions of generating points, birth or death of generating points and birth or death of an empty class. Experimental results with real and simulated SAR images demonstrate that the proposed method can determine the number of classes automatically and segment homogeneous regions well.

  12. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann; ONeill, Peggy; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quasi-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well-managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  13. Breast tumor detection using UWB circular-SAR tomographic microwave imaging.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, Daniel; Boulanger, Pierre; Kordzadeh, Atefeh; Rambabu, Karumudi

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the possibility of detecting tumors in human breast using ultra-wideband (UWB) circular synthetic aperture radar (CSAR). CSAR is a subset of SAR which is a radar imaging technique using a circular data acquisition pattern. Tomographic image reconstruction is done using a time domain global back projection technique adapted to CSAR. Experiments are conducted on a breast phantoms made of pork fat emulating normal and cancerous conditions. Preliminary experimental results show that microwave imaging of a breast phantom using UWB-CSAR is a simple and low-cost method, efficiently capable of detecting the presence of tumors.

  14. A survey of SAR image-formation processing for earth resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayma, R. W.; Jordan, R. L.; Manning, B. N.

    1977-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in active microwave sensors for earth resources applications. A particular example is the Seasat-A radar. However, to obtain spatial resolutions comparable to optical sensors at radar frequencies, sophisticated image formation processing techniques must be applied to the raw data. This paper briefly compares processing requirements for non-coherent optical and coherent radar imaging systems, and then discusses the image formation processing requirements for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. Both optical and digital techniques are addressed, and examples of hardware and imagery for each processing technique are presented.

  15. A survey of SAR image-formation processing for earth resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayma, R. W.; Jordan, R. L.; Manning, B. N.

    1977-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in active microwave sensors for earth resources applications, such as the SEASAT-A radar. However, to obtain spatial resolutions comparable to optical sensors at radar frequencies, sophisticated image formation processing techniques must be applied to the raw data. Processing requirements for non-coherent optical and coherent radar imaging systems are compared. The image formation processing requirements for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are discussed. Both optical and digital techniques are addressed, and examples of hardware and imagery for each processing technique are presented.

  16. Calibration of a flood inundation model using a SAR image: influence of acquisition time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wesemael, Alexandra; Gobeyn, Sacha; Neal, Jeffrey; Lievens, Hans; Van Eerdenbrugh, Katrien; De Vleeschouwer, Niels; Schumann, Guy; Vernieuwe, Hilde; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; De Baets, Bernard; Bates, Paul; Verhoest, Niko

    2016-04-01

    Flood risk management has always been in a search for effective prediction approaches. As such, the calibration of flood inundation models is continuously improved. In practice, this calibration process consists of finding the optimal roughness parameters, both channel and floodplain Manning coefficients, since these values considerably influence the flood extent in a catchment. In addition, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images have been proven to be a very useful tool in calibrating the flood extent. These images can distinguish between wet (flooded) and dry (non-flooded) pixels through the intensity of backscattered radio waves. To this date, however, satellite overpass often occurs only once during a flood event. Therefore, this study is specifically concerned with the effect of the timing of the SAR data acquisition on calibration results. In order to model the flood extent, the raster-based inundation model, LISFLOOD-FP, is used together with a high resolution synthetic aperture radar image (ERS-2 SAR) of a flood event of the river Dee, Wales, in December 2006. As only one satellite image of the considered case study is available, a synthetic framework is implemented in order to generate a time series of SAR observations. These synthetic observations are then used to calibrate the model at different time instants. In doing so, the sensitivity of the model output to the channel and floodplain Manning coefficients is studied through time. As results are examined, these suggest that there is a clear difference in the spatial variability to which water is held within the floodplain. Furthermore, these differences seem to be variable through time. Calibration by means of satellite flood observations obtained from the rising or receding limb, would generally lead to more reliable results rather than near peak flow observations.

  17. Locations and types of ruptures involved in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake revealed by SAR image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Takada, Y.; Furuya, M.; Murakami, M.

    2009-12-01

    Introduction: A catastrophic earthquake with a moment magnitude of 7.9 struck China’s Sichuan area on 12 May 2008. The rupture was thought to proceed northeastward along the Longmen Shan fault zone (LMSFZ), but it remained uncertain where and how the faults were involved in the seismic event. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) analysis has an advantage of detecting ground deformation in a vast region with high precision. However, for the Sichuan event, the standard InSAR approach was not helpful in knowing the faults directly related to the seismic rupture, due to a wide coherent loss area in the proximity of the fault zone. Thus, in order to reveal the unknown surface displacements, we conducted a SAR image matching procedure that enables us to robustly detect large ground deformation even in an incoherent area. Although similar approaches can be taken with optical images to detect surface displacements, SAR images are advantageous because of the radar’s all-weather detection capability. In this presentation we will show a strong advantage of SAR data for inland large earthquakes. Analysis Method: We use ALOS/PALSAR data on the ascending orbital paths. We process the SAR data from a level-1.0 product using a software package Gamma. After conducting coregistration between two images acquired before and after the mainshock, we divide the single-look SAR amplitude images into patches and calculate an offset between the corresponding patches by an intensity tracking method. This method is performed by cross-correlating samples of backscatter intensity of a master image with those of a slave image. To reduce the artificial offsets in range component, we apply an elevation dependent correction incorporating SRTM3 DEM data. Results: We have successfully obtained the surface deformation in range component: A sharp displacement discontinuity with a relative motion of 1-2 m appears over a length of 200 km along the LMSFZ, which demonstrates that the main rupture has proceeded

  18. Retrieval of the thickness of undeformed sea ice from C-band compact polarimetric SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Dierking, W.; Zhang, J.; Meng, J. M.; Lang, H. T.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we introduce a parameter for the retrieval of the thickness of undeformed first-year sea ice that is specifically adapted to compact polarimetric SAR images. The parameter is denoted as "CP-Ratio". In model simulations we investigated the sensitivity of CP-Ratio to the dielectric constant, thickness, surface roughness, and incidence angle. From the results of the simulations we deduced optimal conditions for the thickness retrieval. On the basis of C-band CTLR SAR data, which were generated from Radarsat-2 quad-polarization images acquired jointly with helicopter-borne sea ice thickness measurements in the region of the Sea of Labrador, we tested empirical equations for thickness retrieval. An exponential fit between CP-Ratio and ice thickness provides the most reliable results. Based on a validation using other compact polarimetric SAR images from the same region we found a root mean square (rms) error of 8 cm and a maximum correlation coefficient of 0.92 for the retrieval procedure when applying it on level ice of 0.9 m mean thickness.

  19. Land cover detection with SAR images of Delta del Llobregat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, R.; Borges, P. A. V.; Calado, H.; Broquetas, A.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents a study of a multitemporal set of C-band images collected by ERS-2, aiming to understand the differentiations of the backscatter intensity and the phase coherence of different land covers to find possible synergies that could improve land cover detection. The land cover analysis allowed to observe the perfect differentiation of urban areas from intensity images. The observation of multitemporal RGB compositions combining key dates of the different points of crops growth make possible to differentiate this land cover and also to observe fluctuations inside the class itself. This fluctuations present a pattern that correspond to the crop field structure, which suggests that more information can be obtained. The shrubs are difficult to detect from the intensity images, but once the observation is combined with coherence images the detection is possible. However, the coherence image must be generated from pairs of images with a temporal interval lower than three months, independently from the year of registration of each image due to the general decrease of coherence when larger intervals are used. The analysis allowed to observe the potential of this data to perfect distinguish urban, crops and shrubs. The study of the seasonal fluctuations of intensity for the crops land cover with precise ground truth for crops type and points of growth is proposed as a future line of research.

  20. Generalized interpretation scheme for arbitrary HR InSAR image pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, Markus; Thiele, Antje; Schulz, Karsten

    2013-10-01

    Land cover classification of remote sensing imagery is an important topic of research. For example, different applications require precise and fast information about the land cover of the imaged scenery (e.g., disaster management and change detection). Focusing on high resolution (HR) spaceborne remote sensing imagery, the user has the choice between passive and active sensor systems. Passive systems, such as multispectral sensors, have the disadvantage of being dependent from weather influences (fog, dust, clouds, etc.) and time of day, since they work in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, active systems like Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provide improved capabilities. As an interactive method analyzing HR InSAR image pairs, the CovAmCohTM method was introduced in former studies. CovAmCoh represents the joint analysis of locality (coefficient of variation - Cov), backscatter (amplitude - Am) and temporal stability (coherence - Coh). It delivers information on physical backscatter characteristics of imaged scene objects or structures and provides the opportunity to detect different classes of land cover (e.g., urban, rural, infrastructure and activity areas). As example, railway tracks are easily distinguishable from other infrastructure due to their characteristic bluish coloring caused by the gravel between the sleepers. In consequence, imaged objects or structures have a characteristic appearance in CovAmCoh images which allows the development of classification rules. In this paper, a generalized interpretation scheme for arbitrary InSAR image pairs using the CovAmCoh method is proposed. This scheme bases on analyzing the information content of typical CovAmCoh imagery using the semisupervised k-means clustering. It is shown that eight classes model the main local information content of CovAmCoh images sufficiently and can be used as basis for a classification scheme.

  1. Large Oil Spill Classification Using SAR Images Based on Spatial Histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schvartzman, I.; Havivi, S.; Maman, S.; Rotman, S. R.; Blumberg, D. G.

    2016-06-01

    Among the different types of marine pollution, oil spill is a major threat to the sea ecosystems. Remote sensing is used in oil spill response. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an active microwave sensor that operates under all weather conditions and provides information about the surface roughness and covers large areas at a high spatial resolution. SAR is widely used to identify and track pollutants in the sea, which may be due to a secondary effect of a large natural disaster or by a man-made one . The detection of oil spill in SAR imagery relies on the decrease of the backscattering from the sea surface, due to the increased viscosity, resulting in a dark formation that contrasts with the brightness of the surrounding area. Most of the use of SAR images for oil spill detection is done by visual interpretation. Trained interpreters scan the image, and mark areas of low backscatter and where shape is a-symmetrical. It is very difficult to apply this method for a wide area. In contrast to visual interpretation, automatic detection algorithms were suggested and are mainly based on scanning dark formations, extracting features, and applying big data analysis. We propose a new algorithm that applies a nonlinear spatial filter that detects dark formations and is not susceptible to noises, such as internal or speckle. The advantages of this algorithm are both in run time and the results retrieved. The algorithm was tested in genesimulations as well as on COSMO-SkyMed images, detecting the Deep Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (occurred on 20/4/2010). The simulation results show that even in a noisy environment, oil spill is detected. Applying the algorithm to the Deep Horizon oil spill, the algorithm classified the oil spill better than focusing on dark formation algorithm. Furthermore, the results were validated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data.

  2. SAR Satellite Images and Terrestrial Laser Scanning in Forest Damages Mapping in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjalainen, Mika; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Hyyppa, Juha; Holopainen, Markus; Lyytikainen-Saarenmaa, Paivi; Krooks, Anssi; Jaakkola, Anttoni

    2010-12-01

    Forests are of high importance for the Finnish economy and environment. Forests inventories should not only provide information about the volume of growing stock, but also about the health status of forests, which is an indicator of the annual growth of forests and Carbon balance. One of the forest damage types is defoliation, which causes forest growth reduction and consequently potentially economical losses to the forest owners, but can be seen as an environmental indicator also. For example, in the past ten years, extensive and persistent needle defoliation caused by insects has been observed in the areas of Palokangas and Outokumpu in Eastern Finland. It is expected that the insect outbreaks are becoming more common and new species of insects may be spreading out in Finland due to the climate warming. Traditionally the intensity of needle defoliation has been estimated using visual observations, which are prone to errors and their areal extent is limited. Therefore, remote sensing can be seen as a potential tool for mapping defoliation. In this study, both Terrestrial Laser Scanning data and SAR satellite images have been exploited. On the one hand, Terrestrial Laser Scanning provides means to rapidly and objectively measure critical forest related information. On the other hand, SAR satellite images enable wide-area mapping and constant monitoring, which would be impossible in Finland using optical satellite images due to the cloudiness. The fusion of Laser scanning and SAR information could make a difference in forest health mapping. In this paper, preliminary results of the estimation of the needle defoliation intensity based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning and ERS and Envisat SAR (non-interferometric) satellite data are presented.

  3. Prediction of water quality parameters from SAR images by using multivariate and texture analysis models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shareef, Muntadher A.; Toumi, Abdelmalek; Khenchaf, Ali

    2014-10-01

    Remote sensing is one of the most important tools for monitoring and assisting to estimate and predict Water Quality parameters (WQPs). The traditional methods used for monitoring pollutants are generally relied on optical images. In this paper, we present a new approach based on the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images which we used to map the region of interest and to estimate the WQPs. To achieve this estimation quality, the texture analysis is exploited to improve the regression models. These models are established and developed to estimate six common concerned water quality parameters from texture parameters extracted from Terra SAR-X data. In this purpose, the Gray Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) is used to estimate several regression models using six texture parameters such as contrast, correlation, energy, homogeneity, entropy and variance. For each predicted model, an accuracy value is computed from the probability value given by the regression analysis model of each parameter. In order to validate our approach, we have used tow dataset of water region for training and test process. To evaluate and validate the proposed model, we applied it on the training set. In the last stage, we used the fuzzy K-means clustering to generalize the water quality estimation on the whole of water region extracted from segmented Terra SAR-X image. Also, the obtained results showed that there are a good statistical correlation between the in situ water quality and Terra SAR-X data, and also demonstrated that the characteristics obtained by texture analysis are able to monitor and predicate the distribution of WQPs in large rivers with high accuracy.

  4. A novel polar format algorithm for SAR images utilizing post azimuth transform interpolation.

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, Michael Warren; Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-09-01

    SAR phase history data represents a polar array in the Fourier space of a scene being imaged. Polar Format processing is about reformatting the collected SAR data to a Cartesian data location array for efficient processing and image formation. In a real-time system, this reformatting or ''re-gridding'' operation is the most processing intensive, consuming the majority of the processing time; it also is a source of error in the final image. Therefore, any effort to reduce processing time while not degrading image quality is valued. What is proposed in this document is a new way of implementing real-time polar-format processing through a variation on the traditional interpolation/2-D Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm. The proposed change is based upon the frequency scaling property of the Fourier Transform, which allows a post azimuth FFT interpolation. A post azimuth processing interpolation provides overall benefits to image quality and potentially more efficient implementation of the polar format image formation process.

  5. Automatic SAR and optical images registration method based on improved SIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Chunyu; Jiang, Wanshou

    2014-10-01

    An automatic SAR and optical images registration method based on improved SIFT is proposed in this paper, which is a two-step strategy, from rough to accuracy. The geometry relation of images is first constructed by the geographic information, and images are arranged based on the elevation datum plane to eliminate rotation and resolution differences. Then SIFT features extracted by the dominant direction improved SIFT from two images are matched by SSIM as similar measure according to structure information of the SIFT feature. As rotation difference is eliminated in images of flat area after rough registration, the number of correct matches and correct matching rate can be increased by altering the feature orientation assignment. And then, parallax and angle restrictions are introduced to improve the matching performance by clustering analysis in the angle and parallax domains. Mapping the original matches to the parallax feature space and rotation feature space in sequence, which are established by the custom defined parallax parameters and rotation parameters respectively. Cluster analysis is applied in the parallax feature space and rotation feature space, and the relationship between cluster parameters and matching result is analysed. Owing to the clustering feature, correct matches are retained. Finally, the perspective transform parameters for the registration are obtained by RANSAC algorithm with removing the false matches simultaneously. Experiments show that the algorithm proposed in this paper is effective in the registration of SAR and optical images with large differences.

  6. Advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Imaging Radar (InSAR) for Dune Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; Amir, Doron; Schvartzman, Ilan; August, Yitzhak; Mamman, Shimrit; Rotman, Stanely R.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available lose particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970s, remote sensing imagery, both optical and radar, have been used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two or more images. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR methods. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This work aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the coherence change detection method was used, in order to identify dune stability or instability and the dune activity level. The Nitzanim-Ashdod coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of

  7. First Experiment of IECAS P-Band Quad-Pol SAR System in Circular Imaging Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wen; Li, Yang; Yin, Qiang; Lin, Yun; Chen, Erxue; Pottier, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the DRAGON2 project, the Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) continuously had a tight collaboration with the European and the Chinese partners. Our contribution to the joint research, separated by 4 working packages: land cover analysis, earth surface deformation monitoring and DEM extraction, forest vertical structure parameters extraction, and PolSARpro software continued development, is reviewed in the beginning. Furthermore, a joint study between IECAS - NKLMIT and University of Rennes-1 -Institute of Electronics and Telecommunications, about DEM based soil moisture inversion using POLSAR data is reviewed. Besides, a compact-pol calibration algorithm for a wide-band ground-based SAR system and a supervised land cover classification method are proposed here. Finally, the first experiment of IECAS P-band quad-pol SAR system in circular imaging mode is introduced.

  8. A Novel General Imaging Formation Algorithm for GNSS-Based Bistatic SAR.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong-Cheng; Wang, Peng-Bo; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Ge, LinLin; Yang, Wei

    2016-02-26

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)-based bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) recently plays a more and more significant role in remote sensing applications for its low-cost and real-time global coverage capability. In this paper, a general imaging formation algorithm was proposed for accurately and efficiently focusing GNSS-based bistatic SAR data, which avoids the interpolation processing in traditional back projection algorithms (BPAs). A two-dimensional point target spectrum model was firstly presented, and the bulk range cell migration correction (RCMC) was consequently derived for reducing range cell migration (RCM) and coarse focusing. As the bulk RCMC seriously changes the range history of the radar signal, a modified and much more efficient hybrid correlation operation was introduced for compensating residual phase errors. Simulation results were presented based on a general geometric topology with non-parallel trajectories and unequal velocities for both transmitter and receiver platforms, showing a satisfactory performance by the proposed method.

  9. A Novel General Imaging Formation Algorithm for GNSS-Based Bistatic SAR

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hong-Cheng; Wang, Peng-Bo; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Ge, LinLin; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)-based bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) recently plays a more and more significant role in remote sensing applications for its low-cost and real-time global coverage capability. In this paper, a general imaging formation algorithm was proposed for accurately and efficiently focusing GNSS-based bistatic SAR data, which avoids the interpolation processing in traditional back projection algorithms (BPAs). A two-dimensional point target spectrum model was firstly presented, and the bulk range cell migration correction (RCMC) was consequently derived for reducing range cell migration (RCM) and coarse focusing. As the bulk RCMC seriously changes the range history of the radar signal, a modified and much more efficient hybrid correlation operation was introduced for compensating residual phase errors. Simulation results were presented based on a general geometric topology with non-parallel trajectories and unequal velocities for both transmitter and receiver platforms, showing a satisfactory performance by the proposed method. PMID:26927117

  10. A Novel General Imaging Formation Algorithm for GNSS-Based Bistatic SAR.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong-Cheng; Wang, Peng-Bo; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Ge, LinLin; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)-based bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) recently plays a more and more significant role in remote sensing applications for its low-cost and real-time global coverage capability. In this paper, a general imaging formation algorithm was proposed for accurately and efficiently focusing GNSS-based bistatic SAR data, which avoids the interpolation processing in traditional back projection algorithms (BPAs). A two-dimensional point target spectrum model was firstly presented, and the bulk range cell migration correction (RCMC) was consequently derived for reducing range cell migration (RCM) and coarse focusing. As the bulk RCMC seriously changes the range history of the radar signal, a modified and much more efficient hybrid correlation operation was introduced for compensating residual phase errors. Simulation results were presented based on a general geometric topology with non-parallel trajectories and unequal velocities for both transmitter and receiver platforms, showing a satisfactory performance by the proposed method. PMID:26927117

  11. Using dynamic interferometric synthetic aperature radar (InSAR) to image fast-moving surface waves

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Paul

    2005-06-28

    A new differential technique and system for imaging dynamic (fast moving) surface waves using Dynamic Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is introduced. This differential technique and system can sample the fast-moving surface displacement waves from a plurality of moving platform positions in either a repeat-pass single-antenna or a single-pass mode having a single-antenna dual-phase receiver or having dual physically separate antennas, and reconstruct a plurality of phase differentials from a plurality of platform positions to produce a series of desired interferometric images of the fast moving waves.

  12. Development of a satellite SAR image spectra and altimeter wave height data assimilation system for ERS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselmann, Klaus; Hasselmann, Susanne; Bauer, Eva; Bruening, Claus; Lehner, Susanne; Graber, Hans; Lionello, Piero

    1988-01-01

    The applicability of ERS-1 wind and wave data for wave models was studied using the WAM third generation wave model and SEASAT altimeter, scatterometer and SAR data. A series of global wave hindcasts is made for the surface stress and surface wind fields by assimilation of scatterometer data for the full 96-day SEASAT and also for two wind field analyses for shorter periods by assimilation with the higher resolution ECMWF T63 model and by subjective analysis methods. It is found that wave models respond very sensitively to inconsistencies in wind field analyses and therefore provide a valuable data validation tool. Comparisons between SEASAT SAR image spectra and theoretical SAR spectra derived from the hindcast wave spectra by Monte Carlo simulations yield good overall agreement for 32 cases representing a wide variety of wave conditions. It is concluded that SAR wave imaging is sufficiently well understood to apply SAR image spectra with confidence for wave studies if supported by realistic wave models and theoretical computations of the strongly nonlinear mapping of the wave spectrum into the SAR image spectrum. A closed nonlinear integral expression for this spectral mapping relation is derived which avoids the inherent statistical errors of Monte Carlo computations and may prove to be more efficient numerically.

  13. ANALYZING WATER QUALITY WITH IMAGES ACQUIRED FROM AIRBORNE SENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring different parameters of water quality can be a time consuming and expensive activity. However, the use of airborne light-sensitive (optical) instruments may enhance the abilities of resource managers to monitor water quality in rivers in a timely and cost-effective ma...

  14. An Automatic Optical and SAR Image Registration Method Using Iterative Multi-Level and Refinement Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Sui, H. G.; Li, D. R.; Sun, K. M.; Liu, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Automatic image registration is a vital yet challenging task, particularly for multi-sensor remote sensing images. Given the diversity of the data, it is unlikely that a single registration algorithm or a single image feature will work satisfactorily for all applications. Focusing on this issue, the mainly contribution of this paper is to propose an automatic optical-to-SAR image registration method using -level and refinement model: Firstly, a multi-level strategy of coarse-to-fine registration is presented, the visual saliency features is used to acquire coarse registration, and then specific area and line features are used to refine the registration result, after that, sub-pixel matching is applied using KNN Graph. Secondly, an iterative strategy that involves adaptive parameter adjustment for re-extracting and re-matching features is presented. Considering the fact that almost all feature-based registration methods rely on feature extraction results, the iterative strategy improve the robustness of feature matching. And all parameters can be automatically and adaptively adjusted in the iterative procedure. Thirdly, a uniform level set segmentation model for optical and SAR images is presented to segment conjugate features, and Voronoi diagram is introduced into Spectral Point Matching (VSPM) to further enhance the matching accuracy between two sets of matching points. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively and robustly generate sufficient, reliable point pairs and provide accurate registration.

  15. Analysis of backscattering behaviors for partially damaged buildings in VHR SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrone, Davide; Bovolo, Francesca; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    In the recent years, new satellite SAR data with very-high spatial resolution are available for scientific studies. In the urban scenario, these data are of high interest. Because, they allow the detection of changes at fine resolution, such those affecting buildings. Thus, they represent a precious information for rescue activities. Here, we study and design a geometrical model for representing possible kinds of damages in buildings. Among the different kinds of damages, we focus the attention on the one associated to the façades visible from the SAR sensor. According to the model and by using a ray-tracing method (i.e., the electromagnetic propagation is approximated with optical rays), we develop an analytical model for the backscattering of partially damaged buildings and investigate their behaviors in multi-temporal VHR SAR images. Both surface and multiple-bounce contributions are considered and analyzed by varying geometrical parameters. The resulting single date and multi-temporal patterns are validated on Cosmo-SkyMed data acquired over L'Aquila before and after the seismic event that hit the city in March 2009.

  16. Decomposition of Polarimetric SAR Images Based on Second- and Third-order Statics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, S.; Hensley, S.

    2012-12-01

    There are many papers concerning the research of the decomposition of polerimetric SAR imagery. Most of them are based on second-order statics analysis that Freeman and Durden [1] suggested for the reflection symmetry condition that implies that the co-polarization and cross-polarization correlations are close to zero. Since then a number of improvements and enhancements have been proposed to better understand the underlying backscattering mechanisms present in polarimetric SAR images. For example, Yamaguchi et al. [2] added the helix component into Freeman's model and developed a 4 component scattering model for the non-reflection symmetry condition. In addition, Arii et al. [3] developed an adaptive model-based decomposition method that could estimate both the mean orientation angle and a degree of randomness for the canopy scattering for each pixel in a SAR image without the reflection symmetry condition. This purpose of this research is to develop a new decomposition method based on second- and third-order statics analysis to estimate the surface, dihedral, volume and helix scattering components from polarimetric SAR images without the specific assumptions concerning the model for the volume scattering. In addition, we evaluate this method by using both simulation and real UAVSAR data and compare this method with other methods. We express the volume scattering component using the wire formula and formulate the relationship equation between backscattering echo and each component such as the surface, dihedral, volume and helix via linearization based on second- and third-order statics. In third-order statics, we calculate the correlation of the correlation coefficients for each polerimetric data and get one new relationship equation to estimate each polarization component such as HH, VV and VH for the volume. As a result, the equation for the helix component in this method is the same formula as one in Yamaguchi's method. However, the equation for the volume

  17. A comparative evaluation of SAR and SLAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mastin, G.A.; Manson, J.J.; Bradley, J.D.; Axline, R.M.; Hover, G.L.

    1993-11-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was evaluated as a potential technological improvement over the Coast Guard`s existing side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for oil-spill surveillance applications. The US Coast Guard Research and Development Center (R&D Center), Environmental Branch, sponsored a joint experiment including the US Coast Guard, Sandia National Laboratories, and the Naval Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hazardous Materials Division. Radar imaging missions were flown on six days over the coastal waters off Santa Barbara, CA, where there are constant natural seeps of oil. Both the Coast Guard SLAR and the Sandia National Laboratories SAR were employed to acquire simultaneous images of oil slicks and other natural sea surface features that impact oil-spill interpretation. Surface truth and other environmental data were also recorded during the experiment. The experiment data were processed at Sandia National Laboratories and delivered to the R&D Center on a computer workstation for analysis by experiment participants. Issues such as optimal spatial resolution, single-look vs. multi-look SAR imaging, and the utility of SAR for oil-spill analysis were addressed. Finally, conceptual design requirements for a possible future Coast Guard SAR were outlined and evaluated.

  18. Absolute radiometric calibration of the CCRS SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulander, Lars M. H.; Hawkins, Robert K.; Livingstone, Charles E.; Lukowski, Tom I.

    1991-11-01

    Determining the radar scattering coefficients from SAR (synthetic aperture radar) image data requires absolute radiometric calibration of the SAR system. The authors describe an internal calibration methodology for the airborne Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) SAR system, based on radar theory, a detailed model of the radar system, and measurements of system parameters. The methodology is verified by analyzing external calibration data acquired over a 6-month period in 1988 by the C-band radar using HH polarization. The results indicate that the overall error is +/- 0.8 dB (1-sigma) for incidence angles +/- 20 deg from antenna boresight. The dominant error contributions are due to the antenna radome and uncertainties in the elevation angle relative to the antenna boresight.

  19. Performance of several imaging methodologies in extraction of secondary SAR slow-time signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    In Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) the resultant image gives not only the complex reflectivity of image points but also their interdependency with respect to time and observation angle. In range or fast-time changes in reflectivity are expectedly slight, however, in observation azimuth or slow-time the reflectivity pattern, movement or vibration of strong scatterers is revealed. These azimuth signals can subsequently reveal pass to pass changes over inter-pass time or observation elevation. Key to extracting the slow-time signals is the imaging method involved. If imaging preserves the phase function across azimuth then the time or aspect phenomenon riding on top of the phase can be extracted. In other cases the phase is distorted or overridden by imaging artifacts. The choice of imaging method is fundamental in determining not only image resolution but also the fidelity with which secondary signals along the aperture can be determined. The achievable envelope of secondary signal amplitude, bandwidth and resolution are determined here for several imaging methods including the fraction Fourier transform, deramping, range Doppler, chirp scaling, wave-front and matched filtering. Method of extracting these secondary azimuth dependent signals are developed and results are presented for an orbital scenario. Naturally sampling speed, pulse spacing and the flight path in slow-time enclose the largest potential envelope of measurable secondary signals while the selection of imaging method restricts the potential measurable signals to a smaller envelope. Sampling restrictions and bounds on range migration curvature for different imaging methods are also found.

  20. Scattering Properties of Greenland Ice Sheets Inferred from ALOS L-band InSAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. C.; Zebker, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet is 2000 kilometers long and has a maximum thickness of over 3000 meters. It contains around ten percent of the fresh water on Earth. As both a reservoir of water and a heat sink for the Gulf Stream, it plays an important role in the Earth's climate and sea level. Therefore accurate assessments of the Greenland ice sheet's mass balance are essential for understanding global climate change and sea level. Measurements of ice scattering properties in the dry snow zone can contribute to our understanding of accumulation rates, which tend to be harder to measure than loss rates. In this study we examine data acquired by the PALSAR L-band (23.61 centimeter carrier wavelength) InSAR instrument aboard the ALOS satellite. We generate polarimetric InSAR images of two long strips of the Greenland ice sheet extending from the inner dry snow zone through the percolation and wet snow zones to the northern coastline, a total distance of about 700 kilometers. The single-look resolution is around 10 meters, and there is a temporal baseline of 46 days, and spatial baselines range from about 150 to 350 meters. We have demonstrated that the resulting geocoded differential interferograms can have high coherence (0.5 up to 0.9) in large regions of the dry snow zone, and that corrections can be made to recover coherence that is lost due to ionospheric inhomogeneity. We have also estimated radar penetration depths of 50 to 90 meters in the dry snow zone, though estimated penetration depth also depends on polarization. We apply phase and radiometric calibration to the data products generated by our SAR processor, incorporating calibration results published by JAXA. This allows us to estimate radar backscatter brightness (sigma0) and to make an estimated correction for ionospheric Faraday rotation effects in order to accurately measure polarimetric parameters. In general, the backscatter brightness in co-polarized SLC images is about 5 dB higher than in cross

  1. Dynamic experiment design regularization approach to adaptive imaging with array radar/SAR sensor systems.

    PubMed

    Shkvarko, Yuriy; Tuxpan, José; Santos, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    We consider a problem of high-resolution array radar/SAR imaging formalized in terms of a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem of nonparametric estimation of the power spatial spectrum pattern (SSP) of the random wavefield scattered from a remotely sensed scene observed through a kernel signal formation operator and contaminated with random Gaussian noise. First, the Sobolev-type solution space is constructed to specify the class of consistent kernel SSP estimators with the reproducing kernel structures adapted to the metrics in such the solution space. Next, the "model-free" variational analysis (VA)-based image enhancement approach and the "model-based" descriptive experiment design (DEED) regularization paradigm are unified into a new dynamic experiment design (DYED) regularization framework. Application of the proposed DYED framework to the adaptive array radar/SAR imaging problem leads to a class of two-level (DEED-VA) regularized SSP reconstruction techniques that aggregate the kernel adaptive anisotropic windowing with the projections onto convex sets to enforce the consistency and robustness of the overall iterative SSP estimators. We also show how the proposed DYED regularization method may be considered as a generalization of the MVDR, APES and other high-resolution nonparametric adaptive radar sensing techniques. A family of the DYED-related algorithms is constructed and their effectiveness is finally illustrated via numerical simulations.

  2. GOTCHA experience report: three-dimensional SAR imaging with complete circular apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertin, Emre; Austin, Christian D.; Sharma, Samir; Moses, Randolph L.; Potter, Lee C.

    2007-04-01

    We study circular synthetic aperture radar (CSAR) systems collecting radar backscatter measurements over a complete circular aperture of 360 degrees. This study is motivated by the GOTCHA CSAR data collection experiment conducted by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Circular SAR provides wide-angle information about the anisotropic reflectivity of the scattering centers in the scene, and also provides three dimensional information about the location of the scattering centers due to a non planar collection geometry. Three dimensional imaging results with single pass circular SAR data reveals that the 3D resolution of the system is poor due to the limited persistence of the reflectors in the scene. We present results on polarimetric processing of CSAR data and illustrate reasoning of three dimensional shape from multi-view layover using prior information about target scattering mechanisms. Next, we discuss processing of multipass (CSAR) data and present volumetric imaging results with IFSAR and three dimensional backprojection techniques on the GOTCHA data set. We observe that the volumetric imaging with GOTCHA data is degraded by aliasing and high sidelobes due to nonlinear flightpaths and sparse and unequal sampling in elevation. We conclude with a model based technique that resolves target features and enhances the volumetric imagery by extrapolating the phase history data using the estimated model.

  3. Two-dimensional wavelet variance estimation with application to sea ice SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilhufe, M.; Percival, D. B.; Stern, H. L.

    2013-04-01

    The surface of Arctic sea ice presents complex patterns of cracks and ridges that change with the seasons according to the external forces acting on the ice and the internal stresses within the ice. We propose a new statistical tool for analysis of these patterns based on a two-dimensional Maximal Overlap Discrete Wavelet Transform (MODWT) of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, which can be used to track how ice conditions change over the course of the year. Here we give details on an extended pyramid algorithm that efficiently computes the MODWT coefficients for all combinations of vertical and horizontal scales. We show how to use these coefficients to form mean- and median-based wavelet variance estimates along with confidence intervals for the true unknown variances. We demonstrate the usefulness of the statistical tool on images acquired by the SAR sensor onboard RADARSAT, but the tool is of potential use in other geoscience applications and in other areas (e.g. medical imaging). We provide a Matlab implementation of this tool but also give sufficient details so that it can be encoded in other languages.

  4. Dynamic Experiment Design Regularization Approach to Adaptive Imaging with Array Radar/SAR Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shkvarko, Yuriy; Tuxpan, José; Santos, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    We consider a problem of high-resolution array radar/SAR imaging formalized in terms of a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem of nonparametric estimation of the power spatial spectrum pattern (SSP) of the random wavefield scattered from a remotely sensed scene observed through a kernel signal formation operator and contaminated with random Gaussian noise. First, the Sobolev-type solution space is constructed to specify the class of consistent kernel SSP estimators with the reproducing kernel structures adapted to the metrics in such the solution space. Next, the “model-free” variational analysis (VA)-based image enhancement approach and the “model-based” descriptive experiment design (DEED) regularization paradigm are unified into a new dynamic experiment design (DYED) regularization framework. Application of the proposed DYED framework to the adaptive array radar/SAR imaging problem leads to a class of two-level (DEED-VA) regularized SSP reconstruction techniques that aggregate the kernel adaptive anisotropic windowing with the projections onto convex sets to enforce the consistency and robustness of the overall iterative SSP estimators. We also show how the proposed DYED regularization method may be considered as a generalization of the MVDR, APES and other high-resolution nonparametric adaptive radar sensing techniques. A family of the DYED-related algorithms is constructed and their effectiveness is finally illustrated via numerical simulations. PMID:22163859

  5. Orientation of airborne laser scanning point clouds with multi-view, multi-scale image blocks.

    PubMed

    Rönnholm, Petri; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Haggrén, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive 3D modeling of our environment requires integration of terrestrial and airborne data, which is collected, preferably, using laser scanning and photogrammetric methods. However, integration of these multi-source data requires accurate relative orientations. In this article, two methods for solving relative orientation problems are presented. The first method includes registration by minimizing the distances between of an airborne laser point cloud and a 3D model. The 3D model was derived from photogrammetric measurements and terrestrial laser scanning points. The first method was used as a reference and for validation. Having completed registration in the object space, the relative orientation between images and laser point cloud is known. The second method utilizes an interactive orientation method between a multi-scale image block and a laser point cloud. The multi-scale image block includes both aerial and terrestrial images. Experiments with the multi-scale image block revealed that the accuracy of a relative orientation increased when more images were included in the block. The orientations of the first and second methods were compared. The comparison showed that correct rotations were the most difficult to detect accurately by using the interactive method. Because the interactive method forces laser scanning data to fit with the images, inaccurate rotations cause corresponding shifts to image positions. However, in a test case, in which the orientation differences included only shifts, the interactive method could solve the relative orientation of an aerial image and airborne laser scanning data repeatedly within a couple of centimeters.

  6. Adaptive target detection in foliage-penetrating SAR images using alpha-stable models.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, A; Burlina, P; Chellappa, R

    1999-01-01

    Detecting targets occluded by foliage in foliage-penetrating (FOPEN) ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar (UWB SAR) images is an important and challenging problem. Given the different nature of target returns in foliage and nonfoliage regions and very low signal-to-clutter ratio in UWB imagery, conventional detection algorithms fail to yield robust target detection results. A new target detection algorithm is proposed that (1) incorporates symmetric alpha-stable (SalphaS) distributions for accurate clutter modeling, (2) constructs a two-dimensional (2-D) site model for deriving local context, and (3) exploits the site model for region-adaptive target detection. Theoretical and empirical evidence is given to support the use of the SalphaS model for image segmentation and constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detection. Results of our algorithm on real FOPEN images collected by the Army Research Laboratory are provided.

  7. Airborne measurements in the longwave infrared using an imaging hyperspectral sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Jean-Pierre; Chamberland, Martin; Farley, Vincent; Marcotte, Frédérick; Rolland, Matthias; Vallières, Alexandre; Villemaire, André

    2008-07-01

    Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state is one important application. Analysis of the surface emissivity as a means to classify ground properties and usage is another one. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the requirements of these applications. Telops has developed the FIRST, a LWIR hyperspectral imager. The FIRST is based on the Fourier Transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. The FIRST, a man portable sensor, provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at 0.35mrad spatial resolution over the 8-12 μm spectral range at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25cm-1. The FIRST has been used in several field campaigns, including the demonstration of standoff chemical agent detection [http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.788027.1]. More recently, an airborne system integrating the FIRST has been developed to provide airborne hyperspectral measurement capabilities. The airborne system and its capabilities are presented in this paper. The FIRST sensor modularity enables operation in various configurations such as tripod-mounted and airborne. In the airborne configuration, the FIRST can be operated in push-broom mode, or in staring mode with image motion compensation. This paper focuses on the airborne operation of the FIRST sensor.

  8. SYSIPHE system: a state of the art airborne hyperspectral imaging system: initial results from the first airborne campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset-Rouviere, Laurent; Coudrain, Christophe; Fabre, Sophie; Poutier, Laurent; Løke, Trond; Fridman, Andrei; Blaaberg, Søren; Baarstad, Ivar; Skauli, Torbjorn; Mocoeur, Isabelle

    2014-10-01

    SYSIPHE is an airborne hyperspectral imaging system, result of a cooperation between France (Onera and DGA) and Norway (NEO and FFI). It is a unique system by its spatial sampling -0.5m with a 500m swath at a ground height of 2000m- combined with its wide spectral coverage -from 0.4μm to 11.5μm in the atmospheric transmission bands. Its infrared component, named SIELETERS, consists in two high étendue imaging static Fourier transform spectrometers, one for the midwave infrared and one for the longwave infrared. These two imaging spectrometers are closely similar in design, since both are made of a Michelson interferometer, a refractive imaging system, and a large IRFPA (1016x440 pixels). Moreover, both are cryogenically cooled and mounted on their own stabilization platform which allows the line of sight to be controlled and recorded. These data are useful to reconstruct and to georeference the spectral image from the raw interferometric images. The visible and shortwave infrared component, named Hyspex ODIN-1024, consists of two spectrographs for VNIR and SWIR based on transmissive gratings. These share a common fore-optics and a common slit, to ensure perfect registration between the VNIR and the SWIR images. The spectral resolution varies from 5nm in the visible to 6nm in the shortwave infrared. In addition, the STAD, the post processing and archiving system, is developed to provide spectral reflectance and temperature products (SRT products) from calibrated georeferenced and inter-band registered spectral images at the sensor level acquired and pre-processed by SIELETERS and Hyspex ODIN-1024 systems.

  9. Observation of a Large Landslide on La Reunion Island Using Differential Sar Interferometry (JERS and Radarsat) and Correlation of Optical (Spot5 and Aerial) Images.

    PubMed

    Delacourt, Christophe; Raucoules, Daniel; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Carnec, Claudie; Feurer, Denis; Allemand, Pascal; Cruchet, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Slope instabilities are one of the most important geo-hazards in terms of socio-economic costs. The island of La Réunion (Indian Ocean) is affected by constant slope movements and huge landslides due to a combination of rough topography, wet tropical climate and its specific geological context. We show that remote sensing techniques (Differential SAR Interferometry and correlation of optical images) provide complementary means to characterize landslides on a regional scale. The vegetation cover generally hampers the analysis of C-band interferograms. We used JERS-1 images to show that the L-band can be used to overcome the loss of coherence observed in Radarsat C-band interferograms. Image correlation was applied to optical airborne and SPOT 5 sensors images. The two techniques were applied to a landslide near the town of Hellbourg in order to assess their performance for detecting and quantifying the ground motion associated to this landslide. They allowed the mapping of the unstable areas. Ground displacement of about 0.5 m yr(-1) was measured.

  10. Observation of a Large Landslide on La Reunion Island Using Differential Sar Interferometry (JERS and Radarsat) and Correlation of Optical (Spot5 and Aerial) Images

    PubMed Central

    Delacourt, Christophe; Raucoules, Daniel; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Carnec, Claudie; Feurer, Denis; Allemand, Pascal; Cruchet, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Slope instabilities are one of the most important geo-hazards in terms of socio-economic costs. The island of La Réunion (Indian Ocean) is affected by constant slope movements and huge landslides due to a combination of rough topography, wet tropical climate and its specific geological context. We show that remote sensing techniques (Differential SAR Interferometry and correlation of optical images) provide complementary means to characterize landslides on a regional scale. The vegetation cover generally hampers the analysis of C–band interferograms. We used JERS-1 images to show that the L-band can be used to overcome the loss of coherence observed in Radarsat C-band interferograms. Image correlation was applied to optical airborne and SPOT 5 sensors images. The two techniques were applied to a landslide near the town of Hellbourg in order to assess their performance for detecting and quantifying the ground motion associated to this landslide. They allowed the mapping of the unstable areas. Ground displacement of about 0.5 m yr-1 was measured. PMID:22389620

  11. Observation of a Large Landslide on La Reunion Island Using Differential Sar Interferometry (JERS and Radarsat) and Correlation of Optical (Spot5 and Aerial) Images.

    PubMed

    Delacourt, Christophe; Raucoules, Daniel; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Carnec, Claudie; Feurer, Denis; Allemand, Pascal; Cruchet, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Slope instabilities are one of the most important geo-hazards in terms of socio-economic costs. The island of La Réunion (Indian Ocean) is affected by constant slope movements and huge landslides due to a combination of rough topography, wet tropical climate and its specific geological context. We show that remote sensing techniques (Differential SAR Interferometry and correlation of optical images) provide complementary means to characterize landslides on a regional scale. The vegetation cover generally hampers the analysis of C-band interferograms. We used JERS-1 images to show that the L-band can be used to overcome the loss of coherence observed in Radarsat C-band interferograms. Image correlation was applied to optical airborne and SPOT 5 sensors images. The two techniques were applied to a landslide near the town of Hellbourg in order to assess their performance for detecting and quantifying the ground motion associated to this landslide. They allowed the mapping of the unstable areas. Ground displacement of about 0.5 m yr(-1) was measured. PMID:22389620

  12. Validation of Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer Data at Ray Mine, AZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, H.; Baloga, S.

    1999-01-01

    We validate 1997 Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) reflectance spectra covering 0.4 meu - 2.4 meu from a stable, flat mineralogically characterized man-made target at Ray Mine, AZ, the site for an EPA/NASA assessment of the utility of remote sensing for monitoring acid drainage from an active open pit mine.

  13. An airborne multispectral imaging system based on two consumer-grade cameras for agricultural remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of an airborne multispectral imaging system based on two identical consumer-grade cameras for agricultural remote sensing. The cameras are equipped with a full-frame complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor with 5616 × 3744 pixels. One came...

  14. SAR image filtering based on the heavy-tailed Rayleigh model.

    PubMed

    Achim, Alin; Kuruoğlu, Ercan E; Zerubia, Josiane

    2006-09-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images are inherently affected by a signal dependent noise known as speckle, which is due to the radar wave coherence. In this paper, we propose a novel adaptive despeckling filter and derive a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator for the radar cross section (RCS). We first employ a logarithmic transformation to change the multiplicative speckle into additive noise. We model the RCS using the recently introduced heavy-tailed Rayleigh density function, which was derived based on the assumption that the real and imaginary parts of the received complex signal are best described using the alpha-stable family of distribution. We estimate model parameters from noisy observations by means of second-kind statistics theory, which relies on the Mellin transform. Finally, we compare the proposed algorithm with several classical speckle filters applied on actual SAR images. Experimental results show that the homomorphic MAP filter based on the heavy-tailed Rayleigh prior for the RCS is among the best for speckle removal.

  15. Ship heading and velocity analysis by wake detection in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Maria Daniela; D'Errico, Marco; Rufino, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of ship-route estimation, a wake detection method is developed and applied to COSMO/SkyMed and TerraSAR-X Stripmap SAR images over the Gulf of Naples, Italy. In order to mitigate the intrinsic limitations of the threshold logic, the algorithm identifies the wake features according to the hydrodynamic theory. A post-detection validation phase is performed to classify the features as real wake structures by means of merit indexes defined in the intensity domain. After wake reconstruction, ship heading is evaluated on the basis of turbulent wake direction and ship velocity is estimated by both techniques of azimuth shift and Kelvin pattern wavelength. The method is tested over 34 ship wakes identified by visual inspection in both HH and VV images at different incidence angles. For all wakes, no missed detections are reported and at least the turbulent and one narrow-V wakes are correctly identified, with ship heading successfully estimated. Also, the azimuth shift method is applied to estimate velocity for the 10 ships having route with sufficient angular separation from the satellite ground track. In one case ship velocity is successfully estimated with both methods, showing agreement within 14%.

  16. Tracking of Ice Edges and Ice Floes by Wavelet Analysis of SAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Martin, Seelye; Kwok, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of wavelet transforms in the tracking of sequential ice features in the ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, especially in situations where feature correlation techniques fail to yield reasonable results. Examples include the evolution of the St. Lawrence polynya and summer sea ice change in the Beaufort Sea. For the polynya, the evolution of the region of young ice growth surrounding a polynya can be easily tracked by wavelet analysis due to the large backscatter difference between the young and old ice. Also within the polynya, a 2D fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used to identify the extent of the Langmuir circulation region, which is coincident with the wave-agitated frazil ice growth region, where the sea ice experiences its fastest growth. Therefore, the combination of wavelet and FFT analysis of SAR images provides for the large-scale monitoring of different polynya features. For summer ice, previous work shows that this is the most difficult period for ice trackers due to the lack of features on the sea ice cover. The multiscale wavelet analysis shows that this method delineates the detailed floe shapes during this period, so that between consecutive images, the floe translation and rotation can be estimated.

  17. Mapping diverse vegetation with multichannel radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Wickland, D. E.; Ocampo, A.; Sharitz, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne-SAR, SIR-A, Seasat SAR, and Landsat TM images of the Savannah River Plant, a gently sloping area of South Carolina covered with diverse vegetation, are presented and briefly characterized. Preliminary results indicate that multiple-polarization images constructed from the airborne-SAR data give some indication of forest density and understory growth but do not permit discrimination between evergreen and deciduous forests. Heat-tolerant vegetation growing on sand bars in streams bearing thermal effluents from nuclear reactors on the site is found to have a distinguishing polarization signature.

  18. Spaceborne radar applications in geology. An introduction to imaging radar and application examples of ERS SAR in geology and geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Karen

    2005-12-01

    This document is intended for geologists who are interested in broadening their knowledge of interpretation of imaging radar data, but also addresses the general public for reference and information. It introduces imaging radar as it may be used by technicians and image interpreters, stressing the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for Earth observation in general and for geology in particular. Interferometric SAR is briefly treated, with some basic and practical hints. An illustrated application study on land subsidence is included. SAR/optical data fusion is explained, with examples of the different methods suggested. The main part of the document, part II, consists of 14 case studies that demonstrate the potential of SAR imagery for geology. These studies cover themes such as the detection and mapping of neotectonic activity, tectonic mapping, and recognition of karst structures, as well as analysis of active lahars and other volcanic events. They look into drainage systems in desert areas, consider lithofacies changes and morphostructure texture analysis, and they demonstrate the geological mapping of active tectonic compression. Finally, the document mentions the key points of the ESA SAR missions. Contacts for further information are also provided.

  19. SAR Reduction in 7T C-Spine Imaging Using a “Dark Modes” Transmit Array Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Eryaman, Yigitcan; Guerin, Bastien; Keil, Boris; Mareyam, Azma; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Kosior, Robert K.; Martin, Adrian; Torrado-Carvajal, Angel; Malpica, Norberto; Hernandez-Tamames, Juan A.; Schiavi, Emanuele; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local specific absorption rate (SAR) limits many applications of parallel transmit (pTx) in ultra high-field imaging. In this Note, we introduce the use of an array element, which is intentionally inefficient at generating spin excitation (a “dark mode”) to attempt a partial cancellation of the electric field from those elements that do generate excitation. We show that adding dipole elements oriented orthogonal to their conventional orientation to a linear array of conventional loop elements can lower the local SAR hotspot in a C-spine array at 7 T. Methods We model electromagnetic fields in a head/torso model to calculate SAR and excitation B1+ patterns generated by conventional loop arrays and loop arrays with added electric dipole elements. We utilize the dark modes that are generated by the intentional and inefficient orientation of dipole elements in order to reduce peak 10g local SAR while maintaining excitation fidelity. Results For B1+ shimming in the spine, the addition of dipole elements did not significantly alter the B1+ spatial pattern but reduced local SAR by 36%. Conclusion The dipole elements provide a sufficiently complimentary B1+ and electric field pattern to the loop array that can be exploited by the radiofrequency shimming algorithm to reduce local SAR. PMID:24753012

  20. A Combined Use of Decomposition and Texture for Terrain Classification of Fully Polarimetric SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, N. V.

    2007-03-01

    This p aper presents two-stag e unsupervised terrain classification of fully polarimetr ic SA R data using Freeman and Durden decomposition based on three simp le scattering mechanisms: surface, volume and double bounce (first step), and textur al features (uncorrelated uniformity , contr ast, inv erse mo men t and entropy) obtained from grey lev el co-occurrence matr ices (GLCM) (second step). Textural f eatures ar e defined in moving w indow 5x5 pixels w ith N=32 (N - number of grey lev els) . This algorith m preserves th e purity of domin ant polarimetric scattering properties and defines textural features in each scatter ing category. It is shown better object discrimin ation after app lying textur e w ith in fix ed scattering category. Speckle r eduction is one of th e main mo ments in imag e interpr etation improvement because of its great influen ce on textur e. Results from unfiltered and Lee filtered polar imetr ic SAR imag es show that the v alues of contrast and en tropy decr ease and th e values of uniformity and inverse moment increase with speckle reduction, that's tru e for all polarizations (HH, VV, HV). Th e d iscr imination b etw een objects increases after speckle f ilter ing. Polar ization influen ce on textur e features is def ined by calculating th e features in SAR images w ith HH , VV and HV polarizations before and after speck le filter ing, and then creating RG B images. It is shown mor e polarization inf luence on textur e features (uniformity , inverse mo ment and entropy) before filtering and less influen ce - after speck le f iltering. I t's not true for contrast wher e polar ization influen ce is not ch anged practically w ith filtering. SIR-C/X-SA R SLC L-band imag es of Moscow r egion are used for illustr ation.

  1. Airborne radar imaging of subaqueous channel evolution in Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John B.; Ayoub, Francois; Jones, Cathleen E.; Lamb, Michael P.; Holt, Benjamin; Wagner, R. Wayne; Coffey, Thomas S.; Chadwick, J. Austin; Mohrig, David

    2016-05-01

    Shallow coastal regions are among the fastest evolving landscapes but are notoriously difficult to measure with high spatiotemporal resolution. Using Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data, we demonstrate that high signal-to-noise L band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can reveal subaqueous channel networks at the distal ends of river deltas. Using 27 UAVSAR images collected between 2009 and 2015 from the Wax Lake Delta in coastal Louisiana, USA, we show that under normal tidal conditions, planform geometry of the distributary channel network is frequently resolved in the UAVSAR images, including ~700 m of seaward network extension over 5 years for one channel. UAVSAR also reveals regions of subaerial and subaqueous vegetation, streaklines of biogenic surfactants, and what appear to be small distributary channels aliased by the survey grid, all illustrating the value of fine resolution, low noise, L band SAR for mapping the nearshore subaqueous delta channel network.

  2. Fusion of LADAR with SAR for precision strike

    SciTech Connect

    Cress, D.H.; Muguira, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a concept for fusing 3-dimensional image reconnaissance data with LADAR imagery for aim point refinement. The approach is applicable to fixed or quasi-fixed targets. Quasi-fixed targets are targets that are not expected to be moved between the time of reconnaissance and the time of target engagement. The 3-dimensional image data is presumed to come from standoff reconnaissance assets tens to hundreds of kilometers from the target area or acquisitions prior to hostilities. Examples are synthetic aperture radar (SAR) or stereoprocessed satellite imagery. SAR can be used to generate a 3-dimensional map of the surface through processing of data acquired with conventional SAR acquired using two closely spaced, parallel reconnaissance paths, either airborne or satellite based. Alternatively, a specialized airborne SAR having two receiving antennas may be used for data acquisition. The data sets used in this analysis are: (1) LADAR data acquired using a Hughes-Danbury system flown over a portion of Kirtland AFB during the period September 15--16, 1993; (2) two pass interferometric SAR data flown over a terrain-dominated area of Kirtland AFB; (3) 3-dimensional mapping of an urban-dominated area of the Sandia National Laboratories and adjacent cultural area extracted from aerial photography by Vexcel Corporation; (4) LADAR data acquired at Eglin AFB under Wright Laboratory`s Advanced Technology Ladar System (ATLAS) program using a 60 {mu}J, 75 KHz Co{sub 2} laser; and (5) two pass interferometric SAR data generated by Sandia`s STRIP DCS (Data Collection System) radar corresponding to the ATLAS LADAR data. The cultural data set was used in the urban area rather than SAR because high quality interferometric SAR data were not available for the urban-type area.

  3. Pseudo-thermal bar in poorly salted autumnal waters of the Gulf of Finland from satellite-airborne SAR/ASAR/ALSAR survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melentyev, Vladimir; Bobylev, Leonid; Tsepelev, Valery; Melentyev, Konstantin; Bednov, Petr

    2010-05-01

    The thermal bar (TB) was disclosed at the end of XIX century by F.A. Forel - world-famed founder of limnology, who studied different processes in Lake Leman from point of view ecology and hydrobiology. Forel supposed that TB arises in temperate large lakes for short period in spring in presence windless calm weather. Well-directed investigations of TB were recommenced in the beginning 1950-s at the Institute of Lake Research Russian Academy of Sciences by Dr A.I. Tikhomirov who had described also specific features of this phenomenon in fall. At the end of 1960-s we began examination thermal and ice regime of fresh and saltish inland water bodies with using remote sensing including multi-spectral airborne-satellite SLR/SAR/ASAR/ALSAR survey. And as result the possibility revealing TB parameters in fall season by low-frequency radar (ALSAR) installed onboard research aircraft was fixed documentally in the Lake Ladoga [Melentyev et. al., 2002]. According to [Tikhomirov, 1959] TB represents convergence zone around temperature of maximum density of fresh water + 4 °C (3, 98 °C, really). This narrow vertical "curtain" appears in littoral in spring owing to heating coastal waters, in fall - due to its cooling. TB divides large lakes and artificial reservoirs on two unequal thermic zones - heat-active (HAZ) and heat-inert (HIZ) that has different stratification of water temperature. Possible existence of TB in poorly salted sea waters was predicted by outstanding Russian oceanographer professor N. Zubov. Obviously firstly it was disclosed but without explanation the physics by [Bychkova, 1987]. Our own sub-satellite studies onboard nuclear icebreaker "Jamal" in western Arctic in fall 1996 allows reveal the TB on saltish waters in north-eastern "corner" of the Yenisei Gulf in mixing zone of marine and river waters. Long-lived converged zone that we call as pseudo-thermal bar (PTB) was marked by stationary banding narrow continuous rough strip that could be destroyed by

  4. An Unsupervised Change Detection Based on Test Statistic and KI from Multi-Temporal and Full Polarimetric SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. Q.; Yang, J.; Li, P. X.; Liu, M. Y.; Shi, Y. M.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate and timely change detection of Earth's surface features is extremely important for understanding relationships and interactions between people and natural phenomena. Many traditional methods of change detection only use a part of polarization information and the supervised threshold selection. Those methods are insufficiency and time-costing. In this paper, we present a novel unsupervised change-detection method based on quad-polarimetric SAR data and automatic threshold selection to solve the problem of change detection. First, speckle noise is removed for the two registered SAR images. Second, the similarity measure is calculated by the test statistic, and automatic threshold selection of KI is introduced to obtain the change map. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated by the quad-pol SAR images acquired by Radarsat-2 over Wuhan of China.

  5. Visual analytics for semantic queries of TerraSAR-X image content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza-Molina, Daniela; Alonso, Kevin; Datcu, Mihai

    2015-10-01

    With the continuous image product acquisition of satellite missions, the size of the image archives is considerably increasing every day as well as the variety and complexity of their content, surpassing the end-user capacity to analyse and exploit them. Advances in the image retrieval field have contributed to the development of tools for interactive exploration and extraction of the images from huge archives using different parameters like metadata, key-words, and basic image descriptors. Even though we count on more powerful tools for automated image retrieval and data analysis, we still face the problem of understanding and analyzing the results. Thus, a systematic computational analysis of these results is required in order to provide to the end-user a summary of the archive content in comprehensible terms. In this context, visual analytics combines automated analysis with interactive visualizations analysis techniques for an effective understanding, reasoning and decision making on the basis of very large and complex datasets. Moreover, currently several researches are focused on associating the content of the images with semantic definitions for describing the data in a format to be easily understood by the end-user. In this paper, we present our approach for computing visual analytics and semantically querying the TerraSAR-X archive. Our approach is mainly composed of four steps: 1) the generation of a data model that explains the information contained in a TerraSAR-X product. The model is formed by primitive descriptors and metadata entries, 2) the storage of this model in a database system, 3) the semantic definition of the image content based on machine learning algorithms and relevance feedback, and 4) querying the image archive using semantic descriptors as query parameters and computing the statistical analysis of the query results. The experimental results shows that with the help of visual analytics and semantic definitions we are able to explain

  6. Charge-coupled device data processor for an airborne imaging radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, W. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Processing of raw analog echo data from synthetic aperture radar receiver into images on board an airborne radar platform is discussed. Processing is made feasible by utilizing charge-coupled devices (CCD). CCD circuits are utilized to perform input sampling, presumming, range correlation and azimuth correlation in the analog domain. These radar data processing functions are implemented for single-look or multiple-look imaging radar systems.

  7. The Airborne Conical Scanning Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, J. R.; Manning, W.; Wang, J. R.; Racette, P.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Results of the first science flight of the airborne Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) for high-altitude observations from the NASA ER-2 is discussed. Imagery collected from the flight demonstrates CoSMIR's unique conical/cross-track imaging mode and provides comparison of CoSMIR measurements to those of the Special Sensor Microwave/Temperature-2 (SSM/T-2) satellite radiometer.

  8. Application of pixel segmentation to the low rate compression of complex SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Eichel, P.; Magotra, N.

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes a technique to identify pixels within a subregion (chip) of a complex or detected SAR image which are to be losslessly compressed while the remainder of the image is subjected to a high compression ratio. This multi-modal compression is required for the intelligent low rate compression of SAR imagery, which addresses the problem of transmitting massive amounts of high resolution complex SAR data from a remote airborne sensor to a ground station for exploitation by an automatic target recognition (ATR) system, in a real time environment, over a narrow bandwidth. The ATR system results might then be presented to an image analyst who, using the contextual information from the SAR image, makes final target determination.

  9. Characterization of spatial statistics of distributed targets in SAR data. [applied to sea-ice data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, E.; Kwok, R.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical approach to the analysis of spatial statistics in polarimetric multifrequency SAR data, which is aimed at extracting the intrinsic variability of the target by removing variability from other sources, is presented. An image model, which takes into account three sources of spatial variability, namely, image speckle, system noise, and the intrinsic spatial variability of the target or texture, is described. It is shown that the presence of texture increases the image variance-to-mean square ratio and introduces deviations of the image autocovariance function from the expected SAR system response. The approach is exemplified by sea-ice SAR imagery acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory three-frequency polarimetric airborne SAR. Data obtained indicate that, for different sea-ice types, the spatial statistics seem to vary more across frequency than across polarization and the observed differences increase in magnitude with decreasing frequency.

  10. Comparison of multispectral airborne scanner reflectance images with ground surface reflectance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kollewe, M.; Bienlein, J.; Kollewe, T.; Spitzer, H.

    1996-11-01

    Simultaneously with an airborne data taking campaign near the city of Nurnberg (FRG), performed with an imaging 11-channel scanner of type Daedalus AADS 1268, ground reference measurements of reflectance spectra were conducted with a spectrally high resolving spectroradiometer of type IRIS at selected test sites. Based on a method developed reflectance images are calculated from the aerial raw data. Thus, physical quantities of the surfaces are generated, which are independent of illumination and registration conditions. The airborne scanner reflectance images are compared with ground reference reflectance measurements. The comparison yields deviations up to 35%. They can partially be explained by an inaccurate calibration of the airborne scanner. In addition, errors appear during calculation of the reflectances due to simplifying model assumptions and an inexact knowledge of the values of the model input parameters. It is shown that calibration of the airborne scanner data with the ground reference measurements improves the results, as compared to calibration based on laboratory testbench measurements. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Use of Radarsat-2 Polarimetric SAR Images for Fuel Moisture Mapping in Alaska Boreal Forests and South Africa Savannahs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblon, B.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L. L.; Kong, M.; Buckley, J. R.; Mathieu, R. M.; Charbonneau, F.; Gross, C. P.; Naidoo, L.

    2014-12-01

    The study reported a comparison between two Radarsat-2 polarimetric SAR (polSAR) images from extreme dry versus wet conditions are compared in an effort to determine the value of using polarimetric SAR data for estimating fuel moisture over South Africa savannahs and Alaska boreal forests. The savannahs study area is located into the Kruger National Park area and has 36 sites of lowveld savannas from bare overgrazed sites to medium-dense savannahs. The boreal forest study area has a chronosequence of black spruce ecosystems (recent burns, shrub-dominated regenerating forests , open canopied forests, moderately dense forest cover). Both study areas have a fairly level topography suitable for radar studies. The polSAR images were acquired using the same beam mode (FQ5 (23-25° incidence angle over the boreal sites, FQ15 (34.47-36.05° incidence angle) over the savannahs sites). Over each study area, soil moisture and vegetation structural data were measured in situ concurrently to the acquisition of the SAR imagery. The polSAR images were filtered for speckle noise using a Lee sigma filter and several polarimetric products were computed, such as those directly derived from the images (single linear and polairzed backscatters, polarimetric discriminators) and from target decompositions (Freeman-Durden, new van Zyl, Cloude-Pottier). Because most of these variables have a different unit, a normalized difference (in %) for each variable was calculated using the median values of the dry and wet dates for easier comparison of variable changes between the dates. Over both study areas, the normalized difference between wet and dry conditions was lower when higher tree canopy occurs. Results show utility of C-HH and C-RR polarized backscatters. Several polarimetric discriminators (dmin, Pr max, Pr min, Smax, Smin) were also significantly affected by the soil wetness. The Freeman Durden and van Zyl decomposition parameters outperformed the Cloude-Pottier decomposition

  12. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Leifer, I.; Bovensmann, H.; Eastwood, M.; Fladeland, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Gerilowski, K.; Green, R. O.; Kratwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Luna, B.; Thorpe, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of the NASA/ESA CO2 and Methane Experiment (COMEX) campaign in California during June and August/September 2014. COMEX was a multi-platform campaign to measure CH4 plumes released from anthropogenic sources including oil and gas infrastructure. We discuss principles for real-time spectral signature detection and measurement, and report performance on the NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG). AVIRIS-NG successfully detected CH4 plumes in real-time at Gb s-1 data rates, characterizing fugitive releases in concert with other in situ and remote instruments. The teams used these real-time CH4 detections to coordinate measurements across multiple platforms, including airborne in situ, airborne non-imaging remote sensing, and ground-based in situ instruments. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of real-time trace gas signature detection in an airborne science campaign, and presages many future applications.

  13. Synthetic aperture radar images of ocean waves, theories of imaging physics and experimental tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Durden, S. L.; Smith, M. P.; Napolitano, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical mechanism for the synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging of ocean waves is investigated through the use of analytical models. The models are tested by comparison with data sets from the SEASAT mission and airborne SAR's. Dominant ocean wavelengths from SAR estimates are biased towards longer wavelengths. The quasispecular scattering mechanism agrees with experimental data. The Doppler shift for ship wakes is that of the mean sea surface.

  14. SAR change detection MTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven; Lemanski, Christopher; Nichols, Howard; Owirka, Gregory; Minardi, Michael; Hale, Todd

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines the theory, application, and results of using single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with Moving Reference Processing (MRP) to focus and geolocate moving targets. Moving targets within a standard SAR imaging scene are defocused, displaced, or completely missing in the final image. Building on previous research at AFRL, the SAR-MRP method focuses and geolocates moving targets by reprocessing the SAR data to focus the movers rather than the stationary clutter. SAR change detection is used so that target detection and focusing is performed more robustly. In the cases where moving target returns possess the same range versus slow-time histories, a geolocation ambiguity results. This ambiguity can be resolved in a number of ways. This paper concludes by applying the SAR-MRP method to high-frequency radar measurements from persistent continuous-dwell SAR observations of a moving target.

  15. Global registration and moving objects detection in noisy airborne image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazi, Nader M.; Scharpf, William J.; Obermark, Jerome; Caron, James N.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a method for registration of noisy airborne images for the purpose of the detection of moving objects. A new iterative algorithm is developed and presented for the correction of geometrical distortion caused by global motion in a scene. A binary hypotheses test is subsequently established using a likelihood ratio test (LRT) to classify the pixels in the corrected image as either locally moving (object motion) or not moving (stationary). The paper also incorporates the use of the Expectation-Maximization method for estimation of statistical image features needed by the LRT. We use and present experiments with real image sequences to validate the analytical developments.

  16. Imaging of downward-looking linear array SAR using three-dimensional spatial smoothing MUSIC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Siqian; Kuang, Gangyao

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a novel three-dimensional imaging algorithm of downward-looking linear array SAR is presented. To improve the resolution, multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm has been used. However, since the scattering centers are always correlated in real SAR system, the estimated covariance matrix becomes singular. To address the problem, a three-dimensional spatial smoothing method is proposed in this paper to restore the singular covariance matrix to a full-rank one. The three-dimensional signal matrix can be divided into a set of orthogonal three-dimensional subspaces. The main idea of the method is based on extracting the array correlation matrix as the average of all correlation matrices from the subspaces. In addition, the spectral height of the peaks contains no information with regard to the scattering intensity of the different scattering centers, thus it is difficulty to reconstruct the backscattering information. The least square strategy is used to estimate the amplitude of the scattering center in this paper. The above results of the theoretical analysis are verified by 3-D scene simulations and experiments on real data.

  17. Approximation and bounding of distortion errors in polar format SAR imaging for squinted geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Matt S.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2012-05-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging is a powerful tool that can be utilized where other conventional surveillance methods fail. It has a variety of applications including reconnaissance and surveillance for defense purposes, natural resource exploration, and environmental monitoring, among others. SAR systems generally create large datasets that need to be processed to form a final image. Processing this data can be computationally intensive, and applications may demand algorithms that can form images quickly. The goal and motivation of this research is to analyze algorithms that permit a large SAR dataset to be efficiently processed into a high-resolution image of a large scene. The backprojection algorithm (BPA)1 can serve as a baseline for performance relative to other SAR imaging algorithms. It results in accurately formed images for a vast variety of imaging scenarios. The tradeoff comes in its computational complexity which is O(N3) for an N × N pixel image. The polar format algorithm (PFA)2 is a long-standing and popular alternative to the BPA. The PFA allows the use of fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs), leading to a computational complexity of O(N2 logN) for an N × N pixel image. However, the PFA relies on a far-field approximation, wherein the curved wavefront of the transmitted pulses is approximated as a planar wavefront, thereby introducing spatially variant phase errors and hence distortion and defocus in the PFA formed image. The defocus and distortion errors can be corrected, but this is a non-trivial process.3 It can be shown that first-order Taylor expansion of a differential range expression yields the assumed received signal phase used to generate images from SAR phase history data with the PFA.4 This work focuses on error terms introduced by the PFA assumption that introduce geometric distortion in the resulting image. This distortion causes a point scatterer located at a true (x, y) coordinate to appear at some (x, y) in the formed image, i

  18. Sparsity-driven autofocus for multipass SAR tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, F.; Mulgrew, B.; Woodhouse, I. H.; Greig, D.

    2015-10-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems produce high resolution, two dimensional imaging of areas of environmental interest. SAR interferometry and tomography enables these techniques to extend to three dimensional imaging by exploiting multiple SAR images with diversity in space and time. These techniques require accurate phase information over multiple images as the data is extremely sensitive to deviations from the reference track, therefore to enable interferometry and tomography an accurate autofocus solution is required. This paper investigates phase errors resulting from navigational uncertainties in multipass spotlight SAR imaging and uses techniques from the field of compressive sensing to achieve an autofocus solution. The proposed algorithm builds on previous autofocus work by expanding it to the multipass case and jointly recovers phase errors for all images simultaneously, making it extremely useful for interferometry and tomography techniques. The algorithm described uses pixels that are stable in all SAR images to gain an autofocus solution as these are the pixels that are the focus for analysis using tomography. This is unlike conventional autofocus, which just works on an image-by-image basis. The tools of compressive sensing can be used to concurrently select pixels for bright image elements that are stable and coherent over all images, as these pixels are sparse in the image domain, and calculate the phase errors present in each pass. Using the multipass data after autofocus, height distributions for scatterers in single pixels are determined for simulated forest scenes at X-band. The performance of the autofocus algorithm is examined through numerical simulations and is also applied to real data collected from Selex ES's airborne, X-band, experimental SAR system. The experimental results demonstrate that the algorithm effectively achieves an autofocus solution. By finding the vertical distribution of two scatterers in a single pixel over

  19. Comparison of mosaicking techniques for airborne images from consumer-grade cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huaibo; Yang, Chenghai; Zhang, Jian; Hoffmann, Wesley Clint; He, Dongjian; Thomasson, J. Alex

    2016-01-01

    Images captured from airborne imaging systems can be mosaicked for diverse remote sensing applications. The objective of this study was to identify appropriate mosaicking techniques and software to generate mosaicked images for use by aerial applicators and other users. Three software packages-Photoshop CC, Autostitch, and Pix4Dmapper-were selected for mosaicking airborne images acquired from a large cropping area. Ground control points were collected for georeferencing the mosaicked images and for evaluating the accuracy of eight mosaicking techniques. Analysis and accuracy assessment showed that Pix4Dmapper can be the first choice if georeferenced imagery with high accuracy is required. The spherical method in Photoshop CC can be an alternative for cost considerations, and Autostitch can be used to quickly mosaic images with reduced spatial resolution. The results also showed that the accuracy of image mosaicking techniques could be greatly affected by the size of the imaging area or the number of the images and that the accuracy would be higher for a small area than for a large area. The results from this study will provide useful information for the selection of image mosaicking software and techniques for aerial applicators and other users.

  20. Retrieval of Both Soil Moisture and Texture Using one configuration TerraSAR-X radar Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zribi, M., Sr.; Gorrab, A.; Baghdadi, N.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to propose a methodology combing multi-temporal X-band SAR images (TerraSAR-X) with continuous ground thetaprobe measurements, for the retrieval of surface soil moisture and texture at a high spatial resolution. Our analysis is based on seven radar images acquired at a 36° incidence angle in the HH polarization, over a semi-arid site in Tunisia (North Africa). All ground measurements of surface soil parameters were carried out over several bare soil reference fields located at the Kairouan site. Between November 2013 and January 2014 (three months), ground campaigns were carried out at the same time as the seven satellite acquisitions. The soil moisture estimations are based on an empirical change detection approach using TerraSAR-X data and ground auxiliary thetaprobe network measurements. Two assumptions were tested: (1) roughness variations during the three-month radar acquisition campaigns were not accounted for; (2) a simple correction for temporal variations in roughness was included. For the two considered approaches, the soil moisture estimations were validated using ground measurements acquired over fifteen test fields, under different moisture conditions. These comparisons lead to a volumetric moisture RMSE equal to 3.8% and 3.3%, and a bias equal to 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively. By considering the estimated temporal dynamics of soil moisture, a methodology is proposed for the retrieval of clay and sand content (expressed as percentages) in soil. Two empirical relationships were established between the mean moisture values retrieved from the seven acquired radar images and the two soil texture components over 36 test fields. Validation of the proposed approach was carried out over a second set of 34 fields, showing that highly accurate clay estimations can be achieved. For clay and sand, we retrieve an rms error equal to 10.8% (equivalent to 108 g/kg) and 18.6% (equivalent to 186 g/kg), respectively. Maps of soil moisture, clay

  1. Integrating Smartphone Images and Airborne LIDAR Data for Complete Urban Building Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shenman; Shan, Jie; Zhang, Zhichao; Yan, Jixing; Hou, Yaolin

    2016-06-01

    A complete building model reconstruction needs data collected from both air and ground. The former often has sparse coverage on building façades, while the latter usually is unable to observe the building rooftops. Attempting to solve the missing data issues in building reconstruction from single data source, we describe an approach for complete building reconstruction that integrates airborne LiDAR data and ground smartphone imagery. First, by taking advantages of GPS and digital compass information embedded in the image metadata of smartphones, we are able to find airborne LiDAR point clouds for the corresponding buildings in the images. In the next step, Structure-from-Motion and dense multi-view stereo algorithms are applied to generate building point cloud from multiple ground images. The third step extracts building outlines respectively from the LiDAR point cloud and the ground image point cloud. An automated correspondence between these two sets of building outlines allows us to achieve a precise registration and combination of the two point clouds, which ultimately results in a complete and full resolution building model. The developed approach overcomes the problem of sparse points on building façades in airborne LiDAR and the deficiency of rooftops in ground images such that the merits of both datasets are utilized.

  2. The Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C, X-Band Synthetic Aperture radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L.; Stofan, E. R.; Farr, T.; Plaut, J.; vanZyl, J.; Kobrick, M.; Holt, B.; Way, J. B.; Ottl, H.; Schmullius, C.; Nithack, J.; Calamia, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C, X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) was launched on space shuttle Endeavour at 7:05 AM EDT, Saturday, April 9, 1994. Soon after launch, the radars were activated and began around the clock operations which lasted for the next 10 days.

  3. Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy of Forest Canopy Chemistry in the Andes-Amazon Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Anderson, C.; Knapp, D. E.; Asner, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Andes-Amazon corridor is one of the most biologically diverse regions on Earth. Elevation gradients provide opportunities to explore the underlying sources and environmental controls on functional diversity of the forest canopy, however plot-based studies have proven highly variable. We used airborne imaging spectroscopy from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Airborne Taxonomic Mapping System (AToMS) to quantify changes canopy functional traits in a series of eleven 25-ha landscapes distributed along a 3300 m elevation gradient from lowland Amazonia to treeline in the Peruvian Andes. Each landscape encompassed a 1 ha field plot in which all trees reaching the canopy were climbed and leaves were sampled for 20 chemical traits. We used partial least squares regression to relate plot-level chemical values with airborne spectroscopy from the 1 ha area. Sixteen chemical traits produced predictable relationships with the spectra and were used to generate maps of the 25 ha landscape. Ten chemical traits were significantly related to elevation at the 25 ha scale. These ten traits displayed 35% greater accuracy (R2) and precision (rmse) when evaluated at the 25 ha scale compared to values derived from tree climbing alone. The results indicate that high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy can be used as surrogate for laborious tree climbing and chemical assays to understand chemical diversity in Amazonian forests. Understanding how these chemicals vary among forest communities throughout the Andes-Amazon corridor will facilitate mapping of functional diversity and the response of canopies to climate change.

  4. Real time SAR processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premkumar, A. B.; Purviance, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified model for the SAR imaging problem is presented. The model is based on the geometry of the SAR system. Using this model an expression for the entire phase history of the received SAR signal is formulated. From the phase history, it is shown that the range and the azimuth coordinates for a point target image can be obtained by processing the phase information during the intrapulse and interpulse periods respectively. An architecture for a VLSI implementation for the SAR signal processor is presented which generates images in real time. The architecture uses a small number of chips, a new correlation processor, and an efficient azimuth correlation process.

  5. Two-dimensional Co-Seismic Surface Displacements Field of the Chi-Chi Earthquake Inferred from SAR Image Matching

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Li, Zhi-Wei; Ding, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Jian-Jun

    2008-01-01

    The Mw=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan occurred in 1999 over the Chelungpu fault and caused a great surface rupture and severe damage. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) has been applied previously to study the co-seismic ground displacements. There have however been significant limitations in the studies. First, only one-dimensional displacements along the Line-of-Sight (LOS) direction have been measured. The large horizontal displacements along the Chelungpu fault are largely missing from the measurements as the fault is nearly perpendicular to the LOS direction. Second, due to severe signal decorrelation on the hangling wall of the fault, the displacements in that area are un-measurable by differential InSAR method. We estimate the co-seismic displacements in both the azimuth and range directions with the method of SAR amplitude image matching. GPS observations at the 10 GPS stations are used to correct for the orbital ramp in the amplitude matching and to create the two-dimensional (2D) co-seismic surface displacements field using the descending ERS-2 SAR image pair. The results show that the co-seismic displacements range from about -2.0 m to 0.7 m in the azimuth direction (with the positive direction pointing to the flight direction), with the footwall side of the fault moving mainly southwards and the hanging wall side northwards. The displacements in the LOS direction range from about -0.5 m to 1.0 m, with the largest displacement occuring in the northeastern part of the hanging wall (the positive direction points to the satellite from ground). Comparing the results from amplitude matching with those from DInSAR, we can see that while only a very small fraction of the LOS displacement has been recovered by the DInSAR mehtod, the azimuth displacements cannot be well detected with the DInSAR measurements as they are almost perpendicular to the LOS. Therefore, the amplitude matching method is obviously more advantageous than the DInSAR

  6. Origins and features of oil slicks in the Bohai Sea detected from satellite SAR images.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Cao, Conghua; Huang, Juan; Song, Yan; Liu, Guiyan; Wu, Lingjuan; Wan, Zhenwen

    2016-05-15

    Oil slicks were detected using satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images in 2011. We investigated potential origins and regional and seasonal features of oil slick in the Bohai Sea. Distance between oil slicks and potential origins (ships, seaports, and oil exploitation platforms) and the angle at which oil slicks move relative to potential driving forces were evaluated. Most oil slicks were detected along main ship routes rather than around seaports and oil exploitation platforms. Few oil slicks were detected within 20km of seaports. Directions of oil slicks movement were much more strongly correlated with directions of ship routes than with directions of winds and currents. These findings support the premise that oil slicks in the Bohai Sea most likely originate from illegal disposal of oil-polluted wastes from ships. Seasonal variation of oil slicks followed an annual cycle, with a peak in August and a trough in December.

  7. Origins and features of oil slicks in the Bohai Sea detected from satellite SAR images.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Cao, Conghua; Huang, Juan; Song, Yan; Liu, Guiyan; Wu, Lingjuan; Wan, Zhenwen

    2016-05-15

    Oil slicks were detected using satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images in 2011. We investigated potential origins and regional and seasonal features of oil slick in the Bohai Sea. Distance between oil slicks and potential origins (ships, seaports, and oil exploitation platforms) and the angle at which oil slicks move relative to potential driving forces were evaluated. Most oil slicks were detected along main ship routes rather than around seaports and oil exploitation platforms. Few oil slicks were detected within 20km of seaports. Directions of oil slicks movement were much more strongly correlated with directions of ship routes than with directions of winds and currents. These findings support the premise that oil slicks in the Bohai Sea most likely originate from illegal disposal of oil-polluted wastes from ships. Seasonal variation of oil slicks followed an annual cycle, with a peak in August and a trough in December. PMID:26988390

  8. Classification on the monogenic scale space: application to target recognition in SAR image.

    PubMed

    Ganggang Dong; Gangyao Kuang

    2015-08-01

    This paper introduces a novel classification strategy based on the monogenic scale space for target recognition in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image. The proposed method exploits monogenic signal theory, a multidimensional generalization of the analytic signal, to capture the characteristics of SAR image, e.g., broad spectral information and simultaneous spatial localization. The components derived from the monogenic signal at different scales are then applied into a recently developed framework, sparse representation-based classification (SRC). Moreover, to deal with the data set, whose target classes are not linearly separable, the classification via kernel combination is proposed, where the multiple components of the monogenic signal are jointly considered into a unifying framework for target recognition. The novelty of this paper comes from: the development of monogenic feature via uniformly downsampling, normalization, and concatenation of the components at various scales; the development of score-level fusion for SRCs; and the development of composite kernel learning for classification. In particular, the comparative experimental studies under nonliteral operating conditions, e.g., structural modifications, random noise corruption, and variations in depression angle, are performed. The comparative experimental studies of various algorithms, including the linear support vector machine and the kernel version, the SRC and the variants, kernel SRC, kernel linear representation, and sparse representation of monogenic signal, are performed too. The feasibility of the proposed method has been successfully verified using Moving and Stationary Target Acquiration and Recognition database. The experimental results demonstrate that significant improvement for recognition accuracy can be achieved by the proposed method in comparison with the baseline algorithms.

  9. Novel Airborne Imaging Polarimeter Undergoes High-Altitude Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J.; Pingree, Paula J.; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    Optical and signal processing technologies for high-accuracy polarimetric imaging, aimed at studying the impact of atmospheric haze and clouds on Earth's climate, have been demonstrated on checkout flights aboard NASA's ER-2 aircraft.

  10. Prediction and performance measures of atmospheric disturbances on an airborne imaging platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, David C.; Gonglewski, John D.; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Kovacs, Mark A.; Cardani, Joseph C.; Maia, Francisco; Aflalo, Tyson; Shilko, Michael L., Sr.

    2004-02-01

    A series of airborne imaging experiments have been conducted on the island of Maui. The imaging platform was a Twin Otter aircraft, which circled ground target sites. The typical platform altitude was 3000 meters, with a slant range to the target of 9000 meters. This experiment was performed during the day using solar illuminated target buildings, and at night with spotlights used to simulate point sources. Imaging system performance predictions were calculated using standard atmospheric turbulence models, and aircraft boundary layer models. Several different measurement approaches were then used to estimate the actual system performance, and make comparisons with the calculations.

  11. Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimeteric Imager (AirMSPI): Calibration and Comparison with Collocated Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F. C.; Diner, D. J.; Bruegge, C. J.; Rheingans, B. E.; Garay, M. J.; Daugherty, B. J.; Chipman, R. A.; Davis, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) is a pushbroom multiangle spectropolarimetric camera with spectral bands near 355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, 865, and 935 nm. Flying on NASAs's high-altitude ER-2 aircraft since 2010, AirMSPI uses dual photoelastic modulator (PEM)-based technology to provide accurate measurements of the Stokes linear polarization parameters Q and U in the 470, 660, and 865 nm bands, providing unique observing capabilities for aerosol, cloud, and surface studies. We describe the methodologies used for radiometric and polarimetric calibration and characterization of the AirMSPI instrument, which make use of a combination of laboratory and vicarious techniques. A 1.65 m integrating sphere and overflights of Ivanpah Playa, NV are used for radiometric calibration. Radiometric cross-comparisons with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), also flying on the ER-2, are used to validate the radiometric scale. For polarimetric calibration, a well-calibrated Polarization State Generator is used to provide known polarimetric inputs. A high-extinction rotating wiregrid polarizer is used to derive polarimetric calibration coefficients for each pixel, and the results are then validated using partially polarized light generated using tilted glass plates. Examples of collocated multiangular, polarimetric imagery from AirMSPI and hyperspectral imagery from AVIRIS will be shown, presenting new opportunities for atmosphere and surface remote sensing.

  12. Unsupervised SAR images change detection with hidden Markov chains on a sliding window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyahia, Zied; Benyoussef, Lamia; Derrode, Stéphane

    2007-10-01

    This work deals with unsupervised change detection in bi-date Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. Whatever the indicator of change used, e.g. log-ratio or Kullback-Leibler divergence, we have observed poor quality change maps for some events when using the Hidden Markov Chain (HMC) model we focus on in this work. The main reason comes from the stationary assumption involved in this model - and in most Markovian models such as Hidden Markov Random Fields-, which can not be justified in most observed scenes: changed areas are not necessarily stationary in the image. Besides the few non stationary Markov models proposed in the literature, the aim of this paper is to describe a pragmatic solution to tackle stationarity by using a sliding window strategy. In this algorithm, the criterion image is scanned pixel by pixel, and a classical HMC model is applied only on neighboring pixels. By moving the window through the image, the process is able to produce a change map which can better exhibit non stationary changes than the classical HMC applied directly on the whole criterion image. Special care is devoted to the estimation of the number of classes in each window, which can vary from one (no change) to three (positive change, negative change and no change) by using the corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc) suited to small samples. The quality assessment of the proposed approach is achieved with speckle-simulated images in which simulated changes is introduced. The windowed strategy is also evaluated with a pair of RADARSAT images bracketing the Nyiragongo volcano eruption event in January 2002. The available ground truth confirms the effectiveness of the proposed approach compared to a classical HMC-based strategy.

  13. Alien Plant Monitoring with Ultralight Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Calviño-Cancela, María; Méndez-Rial, Roi; Reguera-Salgado, Javier; Martín-Herrero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of invasive plants requires a precise determination of their distribution. Remote sensing techniques constitute a promising alternative to field surveys and hyperspectral sensors (also known as imaging spectrometers, with a large number of spectral bands and high spectral resolution) are especially suitable when very similar categories are to be distinguished (e.g. plant species). A main priority in the development of this technology is to lower its cost and simplify its use, so that its demonstrated aptitude for many environmental applications can be truly realized. With this aim, we have developed a system for hyperspectral imaging (200 spectral bands in the 380–1000 nm range and circa 3 nm spectral resolution) operated on board ultralight aircraft (namely a gyrocopter), which allows a drastic reduction of the running costs and operational complexity of image acquisition, and also increases the spatial resolution of the images (circa 5–8 pixels/m2 at circa 65 km/h and 300 m height). The detection system proved useful for the species tested (Acacia melanoxylon, Oxalis pes-caprae, and Carpobrotus aff. edulis and acinaciformis), with user’s and producer’s accuracy always exceeding 90%. The detection accuracy reported corresponds to patches down to 0.125 m2 (50% of pixels 0.5×0.5 m in size), a very small size for many plant species, making it very effective for initial stages of invasive plant spread. In addition, its low operating costs, similar to those of a 4WD ground vehicle, facilitate frequent image acquisition. Acquired images constitute a permanent record of the status of the study area, with great amount of information that can be analyzed in the future for other purposes, thus greatly facilitating the monitoring of natural areas at detailed spatial and temporal scales for improved management. PMID:25010601

  14. Alien plant monitoring with ultralight airborne imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Calviño-Cancela, María; Méndez-Rial, Roi; Reguera-Salgado, Javier; Martín-Herrero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of invasive plants requires a precise determination of their distribution. Remote sensing techniques constitute a promising alternative to field surveys and hyperspectral sensors (also known as imaging spectrometers, with a large number of spectral bands and high spectral resolution) are especially suitable when very similar categories are to be distinguished (e.g. plant species). A main priority in the development of this technology is to lower its cost and simplify its use, so that its demonstrated aptitude for many environmental applications can be truly realized. With this aim, we have developed a system for hyperspectral imaging (200 spectral bands in the 380-1000 nm range and circa 3 nm spectral resolution) operated on board ultralight aircraft (namely a gyrocopter), which allows a drastic reduction of the running costs and operational complexity of image acquisition, and also increases the spatial resolution of the images (circa 5-8 pixels/m(2) at circa 65 km/h and 300 m height). The detection system proved useful for the species tested (Acacia melanoxylon, Oxalis pes-caprae, and Carpobrotus aff. edulis and acinaciformis), with user's and producer's accuracy always exceeding 90%. The detection accuracy reported corresponds to patches down to 0.125 m(2) (50% of pixels 0.5 × 0.5 m in size), a very small size for many plant species, making it very effective for initial stages of invasive plant spread. In addition, its low operating costs, similar to those of a 4WD ground vehicle, facilitate frequent image acquisition. Acquired images constitute a permanent record of the status of the study area, with great amount of information that can be analyzed in the future for other purposes, thus greatly facilitating the monitoring of natural areas at detailed spatial and temporal scales for improved management. PMID:25010601

  15. Proceedings of the Third Airborne Imaging Spectrometer Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, Gregg (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Summaries of 17 papers presented at the workshop are published. After an overview of the imaging spectrometer program, time was spent discussing AIS calibration, performance, information extraction techniques, and the application of high spectral resolution imagery to problems of geology and botany.

  16. A method to calibrate channel friction and bathymetry parameters of a Sub-Grid hydraulic model using SAR flood images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Neal, J. C.; Hostache, R.; Corato, G.; Chini, M.; Giustarini, L.; Matgen, P.; Wagener, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites are capable of all-weather day and night observations that can discriminate between land and smooth open water surfaces over large scales. Because of this there has been much interest in the use of SAR satellite data to improve our understanding of water processes, in particular for fluvial flood inundation mechanisms. Past studies prove that integrating SAR derived data with hydraulic models can improve simulations of flooding. However while much of this work focusses on improving model channel roughness values or inflows in ungauged catchments, improvement of model bathymetry is often overlooked. The provision of good bathymetric data is critical to the performance of hydraulic models but there are only a small number of ways to obtain bathymetry information where no direct measurements exist. Spatially distributed river depths are also rarely available. We present a methodology for calibration of model average channel depth and roughness parameters concurrently using SAR images of flood extent and a Sub-Grid model utilising hydraulic geometry concepts. The methodology uses real data from the European Space Agency's archive of ENVISAT[1] Wide Swath Mode images of the River Severn between Worcester and Tewkesbury during flood peaks between 2007 and 2010. Historic ENVISAT WSM images are currently free and easy to access from archive but the methodology can be applied with any available SAR data. The approach makes use of the SAR image processing algorithm of Giustarini[2] et al. (2013) to generate binary flood maps. A unique feature of the calibration methodology is to also use parameter 'identifiability' to locate the parameters with higher accuracy from a pre-assigned range (adopting the DYNIA method proposed by Wagener[3] et al., 2003). [1] https://gpod.eo.esa.int/services/ [2] Giustarini. 2013. 'A Change Detection Approach to Flood Mapping in Urban Areas Using TerraSAR-X'. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote

  17. a New Control Points Based Geometric Correction Algorithm for Airborne Push Broom Scanner Images Without On-Board Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strakhov, P.; Badasen, E.; Shurygin, B.; Kondranin, T.

    2016-06-01

    Push broom scanners, such as video spectrometers (also called hyperspectral sensors), are widely used in the present. Usage of scanned images requires accurate geometric correction, which becomes complicated when imaging platform is airborne. This work contains detailed description of a new algorithm developed for processing of such images. The algorithm requires only user provided control points and is able to correct distortions caused by yaw, flight speed and height changes. It was tested on two series of airborne images and yielded RMS error values on the order of 7 meters (3-6 source image pixels) as compared to 13 meters for polynomial-based correction.

  18. On The Spatial Homogeneity Of The Wave Spectra In Deep Water Employing ERS-2 SAR Precision Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violante-Carvalho, Nelson; Robinson, Ian; Gommenginger, Christine; Carvalho, Luiz Mariano; Goldstein, Brunno

    2010-04-01

    Using wave spectra extracted from image mode ERS-2 SAR, the spatial homogeneity of the wave field in deep water is investigated against directional buoy measurements. From the 100 x 100 km image, several small images of 6.4 x 6.4 km are selected and the wave spectra are computed. The locally disturbed wind velocity pat- tern, caused by the sheltering effect of large mountains near the coast, translates into the selected SAR image as regions of higher and lower wind speed. Assuming that a swell component is uniform over the whole image, SAR wave spectra retrieved from the sheltered and non-sheltered areas are intercompared. Any difference between them could be related to a possible interaction between wind sea and swell, since the wind sea part of the spectrum would be slightly different due to the different wind speeds. The results show that there is no significative variation, and apparently there is no clear difference in the swell spectra despite the different wind sea components.

  19. Integrated SAR Technologies for Monitoring the Stability of Mine Sites: Application Using Terrasar-X and RADARSAT-2 Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheault, M.; Bouroubi, Y.; Sarago, V.; Nguyen-Xuan, P. T.; Bugnet, P.; Gosselin, C.; Benoit, M.

    2015-04-01

    The last three decades have seen significant mining development in the northern regions of Canada, where the freeze and thaw cycle of permafrost and corresponding surface subsidence and heave represent a significant challenge at all mining stages, from the design of infrastructures to the monitoring of restored areas. Over the past ten years, SAR interferometry has been widely used to monitor ground surface deformation. With this technique, changes in phase between two SAR acquisitions are used to detect centimetre to millimetre surface displacements over a large area with high spatial resolution. This paper presents the results of a project that aims to develop a SAR solution to provide useful information for environmental monitoring and assessing the stability of mining sites. RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X images acquired during the summer of 2014 were used to measure the displacements of ground surface, infrastructures and stockpiles caused by seasonal changes in permafrost extent. The study area is an open-pit mine located in Nunavut, northern Canada, in the continuous permafrost zone. Results shown that surface displacements calculated from RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X are very similar and in agreement with scientific and terrain knowledge. Significant displacements were observed in loose soil areas while none was detected in bedrock and rock outcrop areas. The areas most affected by active layer changes showed surface subsidence during the thaw settlement period. Thus, InSAR can be used as a tool to guide the siting and design of new infrastructure as well as highlighting risks in areas of unstable terrain.

  20. Integrated imaging experiment with C-SAR and other geological image data across the Nelson Front, Northern Manitoba

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, G. S. K.; Won, J. S.; Moon, W. M.; Slaney, V. R.; Graham, D. F.; Lowman, P. D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results from the integration of geophysical and geological data sets using Bayesian statistical analysis with the purpose of mapping the Churchill-Superior Boundary zone. In the Wabowden area the contribution of each rock type to the aeromagnetic anomaly is judged by convolving the aeromagnetic anomaly value with the average magnetic susceptibility. The 'a posteriori' probabilities of significant patterns in the new data are then computed. The highest 'a posteriori' probability occurs along a narrow corridor whose trend coincides remarkably with the location of the Churchill-Superior Boundary Zone. In the Wekusko Lake area, C-SAR and TM data were integrated using an image analysis system. Here the emphasis is on mapping of geological structures.

  1. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Leifer, I.; Bovensmann, H.; Eastwood, M.; Fladeland, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Gerilowski, K.; Green, R. O.; Kratwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Luna, B.; Thorpe, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of the NASA/ESA CO2 and MEthane eXperiment (COMEX) campaign in California during June and August/September 2014. COMEX was a multi-platform campaign to measure CH4 plumes released from anthropogenic sources including oil and gas infrastructure. We discuss principles for real-time spectral signature detection and measurement, and report performance on the NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG). AVIRIS-NG successfully detected CH4 plumes in real-time at Gb s-1 data rates, characterizing fugitive releases in concert with other in situ and remote instruments. The teams used these real-time CH4 detections to coordinate measurements across multiple platforms, including airborne in situ, airborne non-imaging remote sensing, and ground-based in situ instruments. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of real-time trace-gas signature detection in an airborne science campaign, and presages many future applications. Post-analysis demonstrates matched filter methods providing noise-equivalent (1σ) detection sensitivity for 1.0 % CH4 column enhancements equal to 141 ppm m.

  2. Software For Calibration Of Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, Jakob; Zebker, Howard; Freeman, Anthony; Holt, John; Dubois, Pascale; Chapman, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    POLCAL (Polarimetric Radar Calibration) software tool intended to assist in calibration of synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) systems. In particular, calibrates Stokes-matrix-format data produced as standard product by NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne imaging synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR). Version 4.0 of POLCAL is upgrade of version 2.0. New options include automatic absolute calibration of 89/90 data, distributed-target analysis, calibration of nearby scenes with corner reflectors, altitude or roll-angle corrections, and calibration of errors introduced by known topography. Reduces crosstalk and corrects phase calibration without use of ground calibration equipment. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  3. An Airborne Conical Scanning Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, J.; Racette, P.; Wang, J.; Crites, A.; Doiron, T.; Engler, C.; Lecha, J.; Powers, M.; Simon, E.; Triesky, M.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An airborne Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) for high-altitude observations from the NASA Research Aircraft (ER-2) is discussed. The primary application of the CoSMIR is water vapor profile remote sensing. Four radiometers operating at 50 (three channels), 92, 150, and 183 (three channels) GHz provide spectral coverage identical to nine of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) high-frequency channels. Constant polarization-basis conical and cross-track scanning capabilities are achieved using an elevation-under-azimuth two-axis gimbals.

  4. Overview of Austrian Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) programme and first results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banninger, C.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data collected from eight test areas in Austria were evaluated for their usefulness in forest damage assessment, geobotany, alpine vegetation mapping, and land use classification. Difficulties encountered in installing the SPAM spectral analysis software for use on the image display system and the necessity to adapt existing programs for this task impeded and delayed the analysis of the AIS data. Spectral reflectance curves obtained from a geobotanical test site show a marked increase in reflectance across most of the measured spectrum for metal stressed spruce trees compared with nonstressed spruce trees.

  5. CNR LARA Project: Evaluation of two years of airborne imaging spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, R.; Cavalli, R.M.; Fiumi, L.; Marino, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    Since last July 1994 the Daedalus AA5000 MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer) instrument, acquired by CNR (Italian National Research Council) in the framework of its LARA (Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Studies) Project, has been intensively operative. A number of MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer) deployments have been carried out in Italy and Europe in cooperation with national and international institutions on a variety of sites, including active volcanoes, coastlines, lagoons and ocean, vegetated and cultivated areas, oil polluted surfaces, waste discharges, and archeological sites. Two years of activity have shown the high system efficiency, from the survey to data preprocessing and dissemination. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Airborne Hyperspectral Infrared Imaging Survey of the Southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, D. K.; Tratt, D. M.; Buckland, K. N.; Johnson, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) between Desert Hot Springs and Bombay Beach has been surveyed with Mako, an airborne hyperspectral imager operating across the wavelength range 7.6-13.2 μm in the thermal-infrared (TIR) spectral region. The data were acquired with a 4-km swath width centered on the SAF, and many tectonic features are recorded in the imagery. Spectral analysis using diagnostic features of minerals can identify rocks, soils and vegetation. Mako imagery can also locate rupture zones and measure slip distances. Designed and built by The Aerospace Corporation, the innovative and highly capable airborne imaging spectrometer used for this work enables low-noise performance (NEΔT ≲ 0.1 K @ 10 μm) at small pixel IFOV (0.55 mrad) and high frame rates, making possible an area-coverage rate of 20 km2 per minute with 2-m ground resolution from 12,500 ft (3.8 km) above-ground altitude. Since its commissioning in 2010, Mako has been used in numerous studies involving other earthquake fault systems (Hector Mine, S. Bristol Mts.), mapping of surface geology, geothermal sources (fumaroles near the Salton Sea), urban surveys, and the detection, quantification, and tracking of natural and anthropogenic gaseous emission plumes. Mako is available for airborne field studies and new applications are of particular interest. It can be flown at any altitude below 20,000 ft to achieve the desired GSD.

  7. Geodetic imaging with airborne LiDAR: the Earth's surface revealed.

    PubMed

    Glennie, C L; Carter, W E; Shrestha, R L; Dietrich, W E

    2013-08-01

    The past decade has seen an explosive increase in the number of peer reviewed papers reporting new scientific findings in geomorphology (including fans, channels, floodplains and landscape evolution), geologic mapping, tectonics and faulting, coastal processes, lava flows, hydrology (especially snow and runoff routing), glaciers and geo-archaeology. A common genesis of such findings is often newly available decimeter resolution 'bare Earth' geodetic images, derived from airborne laser swath mapping, a.k.a. airborne LiDAR, observations. In this paper we trace nearly a half century of advances in geodetic science made possible by space age technology, such as the invention of short-pulse-length high-pulse-rate lasers, solid state inertial measurement units, chip-based high speed electronics and the GPS satellite navigation system, that today make it possible to map hundreds of square kilometers of terrain in hours, even in areas covered with dense vegetation or shallow water. To illustrate the impact of the LiDAR observations we present examples of geodetic images that are not only stunning to the eye, but help researchers to develop quantitative models explaining how terrain evolved to its present form, and how it will likely change with time. Airborne LiDAR technology continues to develop quickly, promising ever more scientific discoveries in the years ahead. PMID:23828665

  8. Geodetic imaging with airborne LiDAR: the Earth's surface revealed.

    PubMed

    Glennie, C L; Carter, W E; Shrestha, R L; Dietrich, W E

    2013-08-01

    The past decade has seen an explosive increase in the number of peer reviewed papers reporting new scientific findings in geomorphology (including fans, channels, floodplains and landscape evolution), geologic mapping, tectonics and faulting, coastal processes, lava flows, hydrology (especially snow and runoff routing), glaciers and geo-archaeology. A common genesis of such findings is often newly available decimeter resolution 'bare Earth' geodetic images, derived from airborne laser swath mapping, a.k.a. airborne LiDAR, observations. In this paper we trace nearly a half century of advances in geodetic science made possible by space age technology, such as the invention of short-pulse-length high-pulse-rate lasers, solid state inertial measurement units, chip-based high speed electronics and the GPS satellite navigation system, that today make it possible to map hundreds of square kilometers of terrain in hours, even in areas covered with dense vegetation or shallow water. To illustrate the impact of the LiDAR observations we present examples of geodetic images that are not only stunning to the eye, but help researchers to develop quantitative models explaining how terrain evolved to its present form, and how it will likely change with time. Airborne LiDAR technology continues to develop quickly, promising ever more scientific discoveries in the years ahead.

  9. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  10. The ZpiM algorithm: a method for interferometric image reconstruction in SAR/SAS.

    PubMed

    Dias, José M B; Leitao, José M N

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an effective algorithm for absolute phase (not simply modulo-2-pi) estimation from incomplete, noisy and modulo-2pi observations in interferometric aperture radar and sonar (InSAR/InSAS). The adopted framework is also representative of other applications such as optical interferometry, magnetic resonance imaging and diffraction tomography. The Bayesian viewpoint is adopted; the observation density is 2-pi-periodic and accounts for the interferometric pair decorrelation and system noise; the a priori probability of the absolute phase is modeled by a compound Gauss-Markov random field (CGMRF) tailored to piecewise smooth absolute phase images. We propose an iterative scheme for the computation of the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) absolute phase estimate. Each iteration embodies a discrete optimization step (Z-step), implemented by network programming techniques and an iterative conditional modes (ICM) step (pi-step). Accordingly, the algorithm is termed ZpiM, where the letter M stands for maximization. An important contribution of the paper is the simultaneous implementation of phase unwrapping (inference of the 2pi-multiples) and smoothing (denoising of the observations). This improves considerably the accuracy of the absolute phase estimates compared to methods in which the data is low-pass filtered prior to unwrapping. A set of experimental results, comparing the proposed algorithm with alternative methods, illustrates the effectiveness of our approach. PMID:18244643

  11. Texture measurements from Seasat - SAR images for urban land use interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasler, F.

    1981-01-01

    Different grey tones in Seasat Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images for the same type of urban land cover considerably impair the possibilities of establishing automatic classification procedures for these types of data. Since the orientation of the main features like street patterns and buildings with respect to the azimuth angle of the radar antenna is the crucial factor for the observed differences in grey tone, prior information on these elements and special processing of the data would be required to eliminate this effect. Another approach suggested in this paper is to make use of the textural information in the image rather than of its grey tone. For different study sites within the Los Angeles urbanized area texture measures could be derived which result in characteristic values for specific types of land cover and are largely independent of the azimuth angle effect. At the same time the results for the study area indicate an improvement of the overall separability for the different land cover types included in the analysis.

  12. The ZpiM algorithm: a method for interferometric image reconstruction in SAR/SAS.

    PubMed

    Dias, José M B; Leitao, José M N

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an effective algorithm for absolute phase (not simply modulo-2-pi) estimation from incomplete, noisy and modulo-2pi observations in interferometric aperture radar and sonar (InSAR/InSAS). The adopted framework is also representative of other applications such as optical interferometry, magnetic resonance imaging and diffraction tomography. The Bayesian viewpoint is adopted; the observation density is 2-pi-periodic and accounts for the interferometric pair decorrelation and system noise; the a priori probability of the absolute phase is modeled by a compound Gauss-Markov random field (CGMRF) tailored to piecewise smooth absolute phase images. We propose an iterative scheme for the computation of the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) absolute phase estimate. Each iteration embodies a discrete optimization step (Z-step), implemented by network programming techniques and an iterative conditional modes (ICM) step (pi-step). Accordingly, the algorithm is termed ZpiM, where the letter M stands for maximization. An important contribution of the paper is the simultaneous implementation of phase unwrapping (inference of the 2pi-multiples) and smoothing (denoising of the observations). This improves considerably the accuracy of the absolute phase estimates compared to methods in which the data is low-pass filtered prior to unwrapping. A set of experimental results, comparing the proposed algorithm with alternative methods, illustrates the effectiveness of our approach.

  13. Near-coastal Antarctic Iceberg Size Distributions Determined From SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesche, Christine; Dierking, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades, the iceberg size distribution in Antarctic waters is a recurrent topic. Icebergs are moving sources of freshwater. Their drift and decay have an impact on the hydrology, circulation and biology of the ocean regions and are needed for a realistic simulation of the ocean dynamics. During the Radarsat-1 Antarctic Mapping Project (RAMP) Antarctic Mapping Mission-1 (AMM-1) a mosaic of Antarctica and the adjacent ocean zone was compiled from more than 3000 high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. The mosaic offered the unique opportunity to determine spatial distributions of icebergs sizes along the entire coastline of Antarctica. A combination of automated iceberg detection and visual control as well as a correction of false detections resulted in identifying nearly 7000 icebergs with areas between 0.3 and 4717.7 qkm. Their spatial distribution showed correlations with coastline classes. These classes are based on the spatial distribution of surface features on ice shelves close to the calving front. From the detections and assumed mean iceberg thicknesses, we can calculate the distribution of floating freshwater ice mass within the coastal zone of Antarctica at the time of image acquisitions. For models of ocean dynamics, this dataset offers the opportunity to simulate the freshwater input into the Southern Ocean on a more realistic basis.

  14. Coastal Monitoring Using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Image Data - Some Case Studies in Asian Delta Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal geomorphology is highly variable as it is affected by sea-level changes and other naturally- and human-induced fluctuations. To effectively assess and monitor geomorphological changes in various time scales is thus critical for coastal management. Asian mega deltas are vulnerable to a sea-level rise due to its low-lying delta plain, and are dynamic region given a large amount of sediment supply. However, limited data availability and accessibility in the deltas have prevented establishment of systematic coastal monitoring. A variety of remote sensing systems can be used to monitor geomorphological changes in coastal areas as it has wide spatial coverage and high temporal repeatability. Especially, analysis using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data not affected by the cloud conditions offer potential for monitoring in the monsoon Asia region. We will present some case studies of Asian coastal regions using L-band SAR data, ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band SAR) and JERS-1 (Japanese Earth Resource Satellite-1) SAR data. One example is that time-series of radar amplitude images can be used to delineate changes quantitatively of the areal extent of river-mouth bars in distributaries of the Mekong River delta. It shows that the estimated areas of river mouthbars gradually increase on an annual time scale, and seasonal variations of areas were also recognized. Another example is that differential SAR interferometry is applied to the coast of the Yellow River delta in China. It shows very high subsidence rates, likely due to groundwater pumping. A further example is that we apply a SAR interferometry time series analysis to monitor ground deformations in the lower Chao Phraya delta plain, Thailand. A single reference time series interferogram from the stacking of unwrapped phases were applied. The subsidence and uplift pattern observed using the SAR interferometry time series analysis highlights the spatial complexity

  15. Exploitation of amplitude and phase of satellite SAR images for landslide mapping: the case of Montescaglioso (South Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspini, Federico; Ciampalini, Andrea; Lombardi, Luca; Nocentini, Massimiliano; Gigli, Giovanni; Casagli, Nicola; Del Conte, Sara; Ferretti, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Pre- event and event landslide deformations have been detected and measured for the landslide that occurred on 3 December 2013 on the south-western slope of the Montescaglioso village (Basilicata Region, southern Italy). The event, triggered by prolonged rainfalls, created significant damage to buildings and local infrastructures. Ground displacements have been mapped through an integrated analysis based on a series of high resolution SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) images acquired by the Italian constellation of satellites COSMO-SkyMed. Analysis has been performed by exploiting both phase (through multi-image SAR interferometry) and amplitude information (through speckle tracking techniques) of the satellite images. SAR Interferometry, applied to images taken before the event, revealed a general pre-event movement, in the order of a few mm/yr, in the south-western slope of the Montescaglioso village. Highest pre-event velocities, ranging between 8 and 12 mm/yr, have been recorded in the sector of the slope where the first movement of the landslide took place. Speckle tracking, applied to images acquired before and after the event, allowed the retrieval of the 3D deformation field produced by the landslide. It also showed that ground displacements produced by the landslide have a dominant SSW component, with values exceeding 10 m for large sectors of the landslide area, with local peaks of 20 m in its central and deposit areas. Two minor landslides with a dominant SSE direction, which were detected in the upper parts of the slope, likely also occurred as secondary phenomena as consequence of the SSW movement of the main Montescaglioso landslide. This work demonstrates that this complementary approach, based on the synergistic exploitation of phase and amplitude SAR data, can become a powerful tool for landslide investigation, allowing the detection of slow, precursory deformation patterns as well the retrieval of full 3D surface displacement fields caused by large

  16. Detection and identification of toxic air pollutants using airborne LWIR hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David J.; Feldman, Barry L.; Williams, Tim J.; Pilant, Drew; Lucey, Paul G.; Worthy, L. D.

    2005-01-01

    Airborne longwave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imagery was utilized to detect and identify gaseous chemical release plumes at sites in southern Texas. The Airborne Hyperspectral Imager (AHI), developed by the University of Hawai"i, was flown over a petrochemical facility and a confined animal feeding operation on a modified DC-3 during April, 2004. Data collected by the AHI system was successfully used to detect and identify numerous plumes at both sites. Preliminary results indicate the presence of benzene and ammonia and several other organic compounds. Emissions were identified using regression analysis on atmospherically compensated data. Data validation was conducted using facility emission inventories. This technology has great promise for monitoring and inventorying facility emissions, and may be used as means to assist ground inspection teams to focus on actual fugitive emission points.

  17. An interactive lake survey program. [airborne multispectral sensor image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development and operation of the interactive lake survey program developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Environmental Protection Agency. The program makes it possible to locate, isolate, and store any number of water bodies on the basis of a given digital image. The stored information may be used to generate statistical analyses of each body of water including the lake surface area and the shoreline perimeter. The hardware includes a 360/65 host computer, a Ramtek G100B display controller, and a trackball cursor. The system is illustrated by the LAKELOC operation as it would be applied to a Landsat scene, noting the FARINA and STATUS programs. The water detection algorithm, which increases the accuracy with which water and land data may be separated, is discussed.

  18. Two methods for firn-area and mass-balance monitoring of Svalbard glaciers with SAR satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Max; Winther, Jan-Gunnar; Kohler, Jack; König, Florian

    This paper presents two methods for glacier monitoring on Svalbard using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite images. Both methods were developed on glaciers in the Kongsfjorden area. The first method monitors the firn area extent and the firn line over time by thresholding and filtering the SAR image. Manual detection of the threshold is preferable, but using a constant threshold for all images also gives adequate results. A retreat of the firn-line position is visible, especially on Kongsvegen, corresponding to consecutive years of negative mass balance. The second method applies a k-means classification to three clusters on the glacier surface. The areal extent of the resulting class on the upper part of the glacier correlates remarkably well with the independently measured mass balance of Kongsvegen, having a correlation coefficient of around 0.89 for the various glaciers. This is because the snow from the accumulation area influences the k-means classification. Thus, on glaciers where mass-balance values are available, new mass-balance values can be predicted solely from SAR images. For glaciers where no mass balance is available, the area change cannot be calibrated to absolute mass-balance values, but relative changes can be predicted.

  19. Special Issue on Results from Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (Sir-C/X-SAR): Foreword

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jefferey J.

    1996-01-01

    The two flights of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour represent a major advance in remote sensing technology for studies of planetary surfaces.

  20. Pointing stability and image quality of the SOFIA Airborne Telescope during initial science missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampater, Ulrich; Keas, Paul; Brewster, Rick; Herter, Terry; Wolf, Juergen; Pfueller, Enrico; Wiedemann, Manuel; Teufel, Stefan; Harms, Franziska; Jakob, Holger; Roser, Hans-Peter

    2011-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is an airborne observatory for astronomical observations at wavelengths ranging from 0.3-1600 µm. It consists of a telescope with an effective aperture of 2.5 m, which is mounted in a heavily modified Boeing 747SP. The aircraft features an open port cavity that gives the telescope an unobstructed view of the sky. Hence the optical system is subject to both aerodynamic loads from airflow entering the cavity, and to inertial loads introduced by motion of the airborne platform. A complex suspension assembly was designed to stabilize the telescope. Detailed end-to-end simulations were performed to estimate image stability based on the mechatronic design, the expected loads, and optical influence parameters. In December 2010 SOFIA entered its operational phase with a series of Early Science flights, which have relaxed image quality requirements compared to the full operations capability. At the same time, those flights are used to characterize image quality and image stability in order to validate models and to optimize systems. Optimization of systems is not based on analytical models, but on models derived from system identification measurements that are performed on the actual hardware both under controlled conditions and operational conditions. This paper discusses recent results from system identification measurements, improvements to image stability, and plans for the further enhancement of the system.

  1. Geospatial modelling of metocean and environmental ancillary data for the oil spill probability assessment in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müllenhoff, Oliver; Bulgarelli, Barbara; Ferraro, Guido; Perkovic, Marko; Topouzelis, Kostas; Sammarini, Valerio

    2008-10-01

    The confidence level of oil spill detections in satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery requires the analysis of many different factors. Unfortunately, oil slicks are not the only phenomena which can appear as a dark feature in a SAR image. These include a number of parameters like wind speed, currents, internal waves, upwelling sea areas, algae bloom, mixing water areas, et cetera. These phenomena are called look-alikes. The largest challenge in detecting oil spills in SAR images remains in the accurate discrimination between oil spills and look-alikes. This study introduces the vantages of using geospatial analysis of various metocean data (e.g. wind speed and direction, sea surface temperature, wave direction, ocean colour data) and environmental ancillary data (e.g. vessel traffic, port locations) as a supplementary information source for the oil spill probability assessment in SAR imagery. The analysed data exists in different formats with different value scales. In addition, the parameters of the metocean data analysis are not equally important for a reliability of oil spill detection. The weight of metocean parameters depends on the impact of natural phenomena on SAR systems (e.g. wind and currents have pro rata more influence on the probability than sea surface temperature and chlorophyll-a) and the area of interest (e.g. chlorophyll-a is a more important value for the Baltic Sea than for the Mediterranean Sea). The derived oil spill probability categorisation based on the weighted analysis of metocean environmental ancillary data could be a useful tool for authorities for an efficient planning of cost-intensive verification flights.

  2. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckner, F. L.; Ahr, H. A.; Ausherman, D. A.; Cutrona, L. J.; Francisco, S.; Harrison, R. E.; Heuser, J. S.; Jordan, R. L.; Justus, J.; Manning, B.

    1978-01-01

    The available and optimal methods for generating SAR imagery for NASA applications were identified. The SAR image quality and data processing requirements associated with these applications were studied. Mathematical operations and algorithms required to process sensor data into SAR imagery were defined. The architecture of SAR image formation processors was discussed, and technology necessary to implement the SAR data processors used in both general purpose and dedicated imaging systems was addressed.

  3. Airborne measurements in the infrared using FTIR-based imaging hyperspectral sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckrin, E.; Turcotte, C. S.; Lahaie, P.; Dubé, D.; Farley, V.; Lagueux, P.; Marcotte, F.; Chamberland, M.

    2009-05-01

    Hyperspectral ground mapping is being used in an ever-increasing extent for numerous applications in the military, geology and environmental fields. The different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum help produce information of differing nature. The visible, near-infrared and short-wave infrared radiation (400 nm to 2.5 μm) has been mostly used to analyze reflected solar light, while the mid-wave (3 to 5 μm) and long-wave (8 to 12 μm or thermal) infrared senses the self-emission of molecules directly, enabling the acquisition of data during night time. Push-broom dispersive sensors have been typically used for airborne hyperspectral mapping. However, extending the spectral range towards the mid-wave and long-wave infrared brings performance limitations due to the self emission of the sensor itself. The Fourier-transform spectrometer technology has been extensively used in the infrared spectral range due to its high transmittance as well as throughput and multiplex advantages, thereby reducing the sensor self-emission problem. Telops has developed the Hyper-Cam, a rugged and compact infrared hyperspectral imager. The Hyper-Cam is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides passive signature measurement capability, with up to 320x256 pixels at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25 cm-1. The Hyper-Cam has been used on the ground in several field campaigns, including the demonstration of standoff chemical agent detection. More recently, the Hyper-Cam has been integrated into an airplane to provide airborne measurement capabilities. A special pointing module was designed to compensate for airplane attitude and forward motion. To our knowledge, the Hyper-Cam is the first commercial airborne hyperspectral imaging sensor based on Fourier-transform infrared technology. The first airborne measurements and some preliminary performance criteria for the Hyper-Cam are presented in

  4. Airborne measurements in the infrared using FTIR-based imaging hyperspectral sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckrin, E.; Turcotte, C. S.; Lahaie, P.; Dubé, D.; Lagueux, P.; Farley, V.; Marcotte, F.; Chamberland, M.

    2009-09-01

    Hyperspectral ground mapping is being used in an ever-increasing extent for numerous applications in the military, geology and environmental fields. The different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum help produce information of differing nature. The visible, near-infrared and short-wave infrared radiation (400 nm to 2.5 μm) has been mostly used to analyze reflected solar light, while the mid-wave (3 to 5 μm) and long-wave (8 to 12 μm or thermal) infrared senses the self-emission of molecules directly, enabling the acquisition of data during night time. Push-broom dispersive sensors have been typically used for airborne hyperspectral mapping. However, extending the spectral range towards the mid-wave and long-wave infrared brings performance limitations due to the self emission of the sensor itself. The Fourier-transform spectrometer technology has been extensively used in the infrared spectral range due to its high transmittance as well as throughput and multiplex advantages, thereby reducing the sensor self-emission problem. Telops has developed the Hyper-Cam, a rugged and compact infrared hyperspectral imager. The Hyper-Cam is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides passive signature measurement capability, with up to 320x256 pixels at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25 cm-1. The Hyper-Cam has been used on the ground in several field campaigns, including the demonstration of standoff chemical agent detection. More recently, the Hyper-Cam has been integrated into an airplane to provide airborne measurement capabilities. A special pointing module was designed to compensate for airplane attitude and forward motion. To our knowledge, the Hyper-Cam is the first commercial airborne hyperspectral imaging sensor based on Fourier-transform infrared technology. The first airborne measurements and some preliminary performance criteria for the Hyper-Cam are presented in

  5. Calibration, Sensor Model Improvements and Uncertainty Budget of the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer APEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueni, A.

    2015-12-01

    ESA's Airborne Imaging Spectrometer APEX (Airborne Prism Experiment) was developed under the PRODEX (PROgramme de Développement d'EXpériences scientifiques) program by a Swiss-Belgian consortium and entered its operational phase at the end of 2010 (Schaepman et al., 2015). Work on the sensor model has been carried out extensively within the framework of European Metrology Research Program as part of the Metrology for Earth Observation and Climate (MetEOC and MetEOC2). The focus has been to improve laboratory calibration procedures in order to reduce uncertainties, to establish a laboratory uncertainty budget and to upgrade the sensor model to compensate for sensor specific biases. The updated sensor model relies largely on data collected during dedicated characterisation experiments in the APEX calibration home base but includes airborne data as well where the simulation of environmental conditions in the given laboratory setup was not feasible. The additions to the model deal with artefacts caused by environmental changes and electronic features, namely the impact of ambient air pressure changes on the radiometry in combination with dichroic coatings, influences of external air temperatures and consequently instrument baffle temperatures on the radiometry, and electronic anomalies causing radiometric errors in the four shortwave infrared detector readout blocks. Many of these resolved issues might be expected to be present in other imaging spectrometers to some degree or in some variation. Consequently, the work clearly shows the difficulties of extending a laboratory-based uncertainty to data collected under in-flight conditions. The results are hence not only of interest to the calibration scientist but also to the spectroscopy end user, in particular when commercial sensor systems are used for data collection and relevant sensor characteristic information tends to be sparse. Schaepman, et al, 2015. Advanced radiometry measurements and Earth science

  6. Verification of 3d Building Models Using Mutual Information in Airborne Oblique Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyaruhuma, A. P.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a method for automatic verification of 3D building models using airborne oblique images. The problem being tackled is identifying buildings that are demolished or changed since the models were constructed or identifying wrong models using the images. The models verified are of CityGML LOD2 or higher since their edges are expected to coincide with actual building edges. The verification approach is based on information theory. Corresponding variables between building models and oblique images are used for deriving mutual information for individual edges, faces or whole buildings, and combined for all perspective images available for the building. The wireframe model edges are projected to images and verified using low level image features - the image pixel gradient directions. A building part is only checked against images in which it may be visible. The method has been tested with models constructed using laser points against Pictometry images that are available for most cities of Europe and may be publically viewed in the so called Birds Eye view of the Microsoft Bing Maps. Results are that nearly all buildings are correctly categorised as existing or demolished. Because we now concentrate only on roofs we also used the method to test and compare results from nadir images. This comparison made clear that especially height errors in models can be more reliably detected in oblique images because of the tilted view. Besides overall building verification, results per individual edges can be used for improving the 3D building models.

  7. A Fast Multiple Sampling Method for Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors With Column-Parallel 12-bit SAR ADCs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Hong, Seong-Kwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a fast multiple sampling method for low-noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) applications with column-parallel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADCs). The 12-bit SAR ADC using the proposed multiple sampling method decreases the A/D conversion time by repeatedly converting a pixel output to 4-bit after the first 12-bit A/D conversion, reducing noise of the CIS by one over the square root of the number of samplings. The area of the 12-bit SAR ADC is reduced by using a 10-bit capacitor digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with four scaled reference voltages. In addition, a simple up/down counter-based digital processing logic is proposed to perform complex calculations for multiple sampling and digital correlated double sampling. To verify the proposed multiple sampling method, a 256 × 128 pixel array CIS with 12-bit SAR ADCs was fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurement results shows that the proposed multiple sampling method reduces each A/D conversion time from 1.2 μs to 0.45 μs and random noise from 848.3 μV to 270.4 μV, achieving a dynamic range of 68.1 dB and an SNR of 39.2 dB. PMID:26712765

  8. A Fast Multiple Sampling Method for Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors With Column-Parallel 12-bit SAR ADCs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Hong, Seong-Kwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2015-12-26

    This paper presents a fast multiple sampling method for low-noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) applications with column-parallel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADCs). The 12-bit SAR ADC using the proposed multiple sampling method decreases the A/D conversion time by repeatedly converting a pixel output to 4-bit after the first 12-bit A/D conversion, reducing noise of the CIS by one over the square root of the number of samplings. The area of the 12-bit SAR ADC is reduced by using a 10-bit capacitor digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with four scaled reference voltages. In addition, a simple up/down counter-based digital processing logic is proposed to perform complex calculations for multiple sampling and digital correlated double sampling. To verify the proposed multiple sampling method, a 256 × 128 pixel array CIS with 12-bit SAR ADCs was fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurement results shows that the proposed multiple sampling method reduces each A/D conversion time from 1.2 μs to 0.45 μs and random noise from 848.3 μV to 270.4 μV, achieving a dynamic range of 68.1 dB and an SNR of 39.2 dB.

  9. Ice island detection and characterization with airborne synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, M.O.; Sackinger, W.M. )

    1990-04-15

    A 1:300,000 scale airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of an area of the Arctic Ocean adjacent to the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Canadian High Arctic, is examined to determine the number and characteristics of ice islands in the image and to assess the capability of airborne and satellite SAR to detect ice islands. Twelve ice islands have been identified, and their dimensions range from as large as 5.7 km by 8.7 km to as small as 0.15 km by 0.25 km. A significant SAR characteristic of the shelf ice portions of ice islands is a return with a ribbed texture of alternating lighter and darker grey tones resulting from the indulating shelf ice surfaces of the ice islands. The appearance of the ribbed texture varies according to the ice islands' orientation relative to the illumination direction and consequently the incidence angle. Some ice islands also include extensive areas of textureless dark tone attached to the shelf ice. The weak returns correspond to (1) multiyear landfast sea ice that was attached to the front of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf at the time of calving and which has remained attached since then and (2) multiyear pack ice that has become attached and consolidated since the calving, indicating that ice islands can increase their area and mass significantly as they drift. Ice islands are easily discernible in SAR images and for the future SAR represents a promising technique to obtain a census of ice islands in the Arctic Ocean. However, any SAR-based census probably will be conservative because ice islands smaller than 300-400 m across are likely to remain undetected, particularly in areas of heavy ice ridging which produces strong SAR clutter.

  10. Estimation of the Atmospheric Refraction Effect in Airborne Images Using Radiosonde Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisl, U.; Tempelmann, U.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the atmospheric refraction on the geometric accuracy of airborne photogrammetric images was already considered in the days of analogue photography. The effect is a function of the varying refractive index on the path from the ground to the image sensor. Therefore the effect depends on the height over ground, the view zenith angle and the atmospheric constituents. It is leading to a gradual increase of the scale towards the borders of the image, i.e. a magnification takes place. Textbooks list a shift of several pixels at the borders of standard wide angle images. As it was the necessity of that time when images could only be acquired at good weather conditions, the effect was calculated using standard atmospheres for good atmospheric conditions, leading to simple empirical formulas. Often the pixel shift caused by refraction was approximated as linear with height and compensated by an adjustment of the focal length. With the advent of sensitive digital cameras, the image dynamics allows for capturing images at adverse weather conditions. So the influence of the atmospheric profiles on the geometric accuracy of the images has to be investigated and the validity of the standard correction formulas has to be checked. This paper compares the results from the standard formulas by Saastamoinen with the results calculated from a broad selection of atmospheres obtained from radiosonde profile data. The geometric deviation is calculated by numerical integration of the refractive index as a function of the height using the refractive index formula by Ciddor. It turns out that the effect of different atmospheric profiles (including inversion situations) is generally small compared to the overall effect except at low camera heights. But there the absolute deviation is small. Since the necessary atmospheric profile data are often not readily available for airborne images a formula proposed by Saastamoinen is verified that uses only camera height, the pressure

  11. Aseismic deformation of a fold-and-thrust belt imaged by SAR interferometry near Shahdad, southeast Iran

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, Eric J.; Wright, Tim J.; Muller, Jordan; Parsons, Barry E.; Walker, Richard

    2004-01-01

    At depth, many fold-and-thrust belts are composed of a gently dipping, basal thrust fault and steeply dipping, shallower splay faults that terminate beneath folds at the surface. Movement on these buried faults is difficult to observe, but synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry has imaged slip on at least 600 square kilometers of the Shahdad basal-thrust and splay-fault network in southeast Iran.

  12. Kalman Filter Based Feature Analysis for Tracking People from Airborne Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirmacek, B.; Reinartz, P.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, analysis of man events in real-time using computer vision techniques became a very important research field. Especially, understanding motion of people can be helpful to prevent unpleasant conditions. Understanding behavioral dynamics of people can also help to estimate future states of underground passages, shopping center like public entrances, or streets. In order to bring an automated solution to this problem, we propose a novel approach using airborne image sequences. Although airborne image resolutions are not enough to see each person in detail, we can still notice a change of color components in the place where a person exists. Therefore, we propose a color feature detection based probabilistic framework in order to detect people automatically. Extracted local features behave as observations of the probability density function (pdf) of the people locations to be estimated. Using an adaptive kernel density estimation method, we estimate the corresponding pdf. First, we use estimated pdf to detect boundaries of dense crowds. After that, using background information of dense crowds and previously extracted local features, we detect other people in non-crowd regions automatically for each image in the sequence. We benefit from Kalman filtering to track motion of detected people. To test our algorithm, we use a stadium entrance image data set taken from airborne camera system. Our experimental results indicate possible usage of the algorithm in real-life man events. We believe that the proposed approach can also provide crucial information to police departments and crisis management teams to achieve more detailed observations of people in large open area events to prevent possible accidents or unpleasant conditions.

  13. Airborne far-IR minefield imaging system (AFIRMIS): description and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Jean-Robert; Mathieu, Pierre; Larochelle, Vincent; Bonnier, Deni

    1998-09-01

    In minefield detection, two main types of operation can be identified. First, there is the detection of surface-laid minefield. This scenario is encountered largely in tactical operations (troop movement, beach landing) where the speed at which the minefield is deployed or the strategic barrier that they represent exceed the need to bury them. Second, there is the detection of buried minefield which is encountered mainly in peacekeeping missions or clearance operations. To address these two types of minefield detection process, we propose an airborne far-infrared minefield imaging system (AFIRMIS). This passive and active imaging system fuses the information from the emissivity, the reflectivity and the 3-dimensional profile of the target/background scene in order to improve the probability of detection and to reduce the false alarm rate. This paper describes the proposed imaging system and presents early active imaging results of surface-laid mines.

  14. Preliminary assessment of airborne imaging spectrometer and airborne thematic mapper data acquired for forest decline areas in the Federal Republic of Germany

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Karin; Ammer, Ulrich; Rock, Barrett; Paley, Helen N.

    1988-01-01

    This study evaluated the utility of data collected by the high-spectral resolution airborne imaging spectrometer (AIS-2, tree mode, spectral range 0.8-2.2 microns) and the broad-band Daedalus airborne thematic mapper (ATM, spectral range 0.42-13.0 micron) in assessing forest decline damage at a predominantly Scotch pine forest in the FRG. Analysis of spectral radiance values from the ATM and raw digital number values from AIS-2 showed that higher reflectance in the near infrared was characteristic of high damage (heavy chlorosis, limited needle loss) in Scotch pine canopies. A classification image of a portion of the AIS-2 flight line agreed very well with a damage assessment map produced by standard aerial photointerpretation techniques.

  15. Retrieval of the thickness of undeformed sea ice from simulated C-band compact polarimetric SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Dierking, Wolfgang; Zhang, Jie; Meng, Junmin; Lang, Haitao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we introduce a parameter for the retrieval of the thickness of undeformed first-year sea ice that is specifically adapted to compact polarimetric (CP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The parameter is denoted as the "CP ratio". In model simulations we investigated the sensitivity of the CP ratio to the dielectric constant, ice thickness, ice surface roughness, and radar incidence angle. From the results of the simulations we deduced optimal sea ice conditions and radar incidence angles for the ice thickness retrieval. C-band SAR data acquired over the Labrador Sea in circular transmit and linear receive (CTLR) mode were generated from RADARSAT-2 quad-polarization images. In comparison with results from helicopter-borne measurements, we tested different empirical equations for the retrieval of ice thickness. An exponential fit between the CP ratio and ice thickness provides the most reliable results. Based on a validation using other compact polarimetric SAR images from the same region, we found a root mean square (rms) error of 8 cm and a maximum correlation coefficient of 0.94 for the retrieval procedure when applying it to level ice between 0.1 and 0.8 m thick.

  16. Monitoring river morphological changes using high resolution multitemporal sar images: a case study on orco river, italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitidieri, Francesco; Nicolina Papa, Maria; Ruello, Giuseppe; Amitrano, Donato; Bizzi, Simone; Demarchi, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Improving the knowledge about river processes by applying innovative monitoring techniques is extremely needed to face the challenge of a better river management. In this paper we test the capability of satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to enrich the monitoring of river geomorphological processes. Multitemporal SAR images provide observations and measurements at high spatial (3 m), and in particular temporal resolution (15 days). This information if properly processed and classified may significantly enrich our ability to monitor the evolution of river morphological phenomena (erosion/deposition, narrowing/widening, riparian vegetation's evolution and interferences with river flow). This is expected to lead to an enhancements in the river management capabilities, in particular as regards the assessment of hydro-morphological river quality, as strongly suggested by European Commission's Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC). A case study on the Italian River Orco is here presented. The case study has used a set of 100 COSMO-SkyMed stripmap images (from October 2008 to November 2014) from Italian Space Agency. All the data were acquired with medium look angle (almost 30°) and HH polarization, also for increasing the land-water contrast. Calibration, registration and despeckling procedures were applied on the acquired dataset. In particular, the optimal weighting multitemporal De Grandi filter was adopted in order to allow an effective extraction of the water surfaces contour. This method was applied to extract water contours over the entire historical series of SAR datasets available. Thanks to the generated information we were able to monitor the lateral dynamic of the water channels and infer on the evolutions of erosion/deposition phenomena. To this aim, an RGB representation of multitemporal SAR data was implemented. The series of detected river channel morphological changes was then analyzed in the light of the series of discharge measurements in

  17. Validation of 2DH hydrodynamic and morphological mathematical models. A methodology based on SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelas, Ricardo; Heleno, Sandra; Pestana, Rita; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the present work is to devise a methodology to validate 2DH shallow-water models suitable to simulate flow hydrodynamics and channel morphology. For this purpose, a 2DH mathematical model, assembled at CEHIDRO, IST, is employed to model Tagus river floods over a 70 km reach and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are collected to retrieve planar inundation extents. The model is suited for highly unsteady discontinuous flows over complex, time-evolving geometries, employing a finite-volume discretization scheme, based on a flux-splitting technique incorporating a reviewed version of the Roe Riemann solver. Novel closure terms for the non-equilibrium sediment transport model are included. New boundary conditions are employed, based on the Riemann variables associated the outgoing characteristic fields, coping with the provided hydrographs in a mathematically coherent manner. A high resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is used and levee structures are considered as fully erodible elements. Spatially heterogeneous roughness characteristics are derived from land-use databases such as CORINE LandCover 2006. SAR satellite imagery of the floods is available and is used to validate the simulation results, with particular emphasis on the 2000/2001 flood. The delimited areas from the satellite and simulations are superimposed. The quality of the adjustment depends on the calibration of roughness coefficients and the spatial discretization of with small structures, with lengths at the order of the spatial discretization. Flow depths and registered discharges are recovered from the simulation and compared with data from a measuring station in the domain, with the comparison revealing remarkably high accuracy, both in terms of amplitudes and phase. Further inclusion of topographical detail should improve the comparison of flood extents regarding satellite data. The validated model was then employed to simulate 100-year floods in the same reach. The

  18. First results from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, Gregg

    1987-01-01

    After engineering flights aboard the NASA U-2 research aircraft in the winter of 1986 to 1987 and spring of 1987, extensive data collection across the United States was begun with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) in the summer of 1987 in support of a NASA data evaluation and technology assessment program. This paper presents some of the first results obtained from AVIRIS. Examples of spectral imagery acquired over Mountain View and Mono Lake, California, and the Cuprite Mining District in western Nevada are presented. Sensor performance and data quality are described, and in the final section of this paper, plans for the future are discussed.

  19. Design of an Airborne Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) for the Coastal Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, P.; vanGorp, B.; Green, R. O.; Cohen, D.; Wilson, D.; Randall, D.; Rodriguez, J.; Polanco, O.; Dierssen, H.; Balasubramanian, K.; Vargas, R.; Hein, R.; Sobel, H.; Eastwood, M.

    2010-01-01

    PRISM is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer currently under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, intended to address the needs of airborne coastal ocean science research. We describe here the instrument design and the technologies that enable it to achieve its distinguishing characteristics. PRISM covers the 350-1050 nm range with a 3.1 nm sampling and a 33(deg) field of view. The design provides for high signal to noise ratio, high uniformity of response, and low polarization sensitivity. The complete instrument also incorporates two additional wavelength bands at 1240 and 1610 nm in a spot radiometer configuration to aid with atmospheric correction.

  20. Radiometric Normalization of Large Airborne Image Data Sets Acquired by Different Sensor Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, S.; Beshah, B. T.

    2016-06-01

    Generating seamless mosaics of aerial images is a particularly challenging task when the mosaic comprises a large number of im-ages, collected over longer periods of time and with different sensors under varying imaging conditions. Such large mosaics typically consist of very heterogeneous image data, both spatially (different terrain types and atmosphere) and temporally (unstable atmo-spheric properties and even changes in land coverage). We present a new radiometric normalization or, respectively, radiometric aerial triangulation approach that takes advantage of our knowledge about each sensor's properties. The current implementation supports medium and large format airborne imaging sensors of the Leica Geosystems family, namely the ADS line-scanner as well as DMC and RCD frame sensors. A hierarchical modelling - with parameters for the overall mosaic, the sensor type, different flight sessions, strips and individual images - allows for adaptation to each sensor's geometric and radiometric properties. Additional parameters at different hierarchy levels can compensate radiome-tric differences of various origins to compensate for shortcomings of the preceding radiometric sensor calibration as well as BRDF and atmospheric corrections. The final, relative normalization is based on radiometric tie points in overlapping images, absolute radiometric control points and image statistics. It is computed in a global least squares adjustment for the entire mosaic by altering each image's histogram using a location-dependent mathematical model. This model involves contrast and brightness corrections at radiometric fix points with bilinear interpolation for corrections in-between. The distribution of the radiometry fixes is adaptive to each image and generally increases with image size, hence enabling optimal local adaptation even for very long image strips as typi-cally captured by a line-scanner sensor. The normalization approach is implemented in HxMap software. It has been

  1. Efficient method for the determination of image correspondence in airborne applications using inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Woods, Matthew; Katsaggelos, Aggelos

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a computationally efficient method for the measurement of a dense image correspondence vector field using supplementary data from an inertial navigation sensor (INS). The application is suited to airborne imaging systems, such as an unmanned air vehicle, where size, weight, and power restrictions limit the amount of onboard processing available. The limited processing will typically exclude the use of traditional, but computationally expensive, optical flow and block matching algorithms, such as Lucas-Kanade, Horn-Schunck, or the adaptive rood pattern search. Alternatively, the measurements obtained from an INS, on board the platform, lead to a closed-form solution to the correspondence field. Airborne platforms are well suited to this application because they already possess INSs and global positioning systems as part of their existing avionics package. We derive the closed-form solution for the image correspondence vector field based on the INS data. We then show, through both simulations and real flight data, that the closed-form inertial sensor solution outperforms traditional optical flow and block matching methods.

  2. SARS: hospital infection control and admission strategies.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Tang, Xiao-Ping; Seto, Wing-Hong

    2003-11-01

    Nosocomial clustering with transmission to health care workers, patients and visitors is a prominent feature of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Hospital outbreaks of SARS typically occurred within the first week after admission of the very first SARS cases when the disease was not recognized and before isolation measures were implemented. In the majority of nosocomial infections, there was a history of close contact with a SARS patient, and transmission occurred via large droplets, direct contact with infectious material or by contact with fomites contaminated by infectious material. In a few instances, potential airborne transmission was reported in association with endotracheal intubation, nebulised medications and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation of SARS patients. In all SARS-affected countries, nosocomial transmission of the disease was effectively halted by enforcement of routine standard, contact and droplet precautions in all clinical areas and additional airborne precautions in the high-risk areas. In Hong Kong, where there are few private rooms for patient isolation, some hospitals have obtained good outcome by having designated SARS teams and separate wards for patient triage, confirmed SARS cases and step-down of patients in whom SARS had been ruled out. In conclusion, SARS represents one of the new challenges for those who are involved in hospital infection control. As SARS might re-emerge, all hospitals should take advantage of the current SARS-free interval to review their infection control programmes, alert mechanisms, response capability and to repair any identified inadequacies.

  3. Analysis of airborne imaging spectrometer data for the Ruby Mountains, Montana, by use of absorption-band-depth images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickey, David W.; Crowley, James K.; Rowan, Lawrence C.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-1 (AIS-1) data were obtained for an area of amphibolite grade metamorphic rocks that have moderate rangeland vegetation cover. Although rock exposures are sparse and patchy at this site, soils are visible through the vegetation and typically comprise 20 to 30 percent of the surface area. Channel averaged low band depth images for diagnostic soil rock absorption bands. Sets of three such images were combined to produce color composite band depth images. This relative simple approach did not require extensive calibration efforts and was effective for discerning a number of spectrally distinctive rocks and soils, including soils having high talc concentrations. The results show that the high spectral and spatial resolution of AIS-1 and future sensors hold considerable promise for mapping mineral variations in soil, even in moderately vegetated areas.

  4. Evaluation of copper-64 labeled AmBaSar conjugated cyclic RGD peptide for improved microPET imaging of integrin alphavbeta3 expression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hancheng; Li, Zibo; Huang, Chiun-Wei; Shahinian, Anthony H; Wang, Hui; Park, Ryan; Conti, Peter S

    2010-08-18

    Recently, we have developed a new cage-like bifunctional chelator 4-((8-amino-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo [6.6.6] icosane-1-ylamino) methyl) benzoic acid (AmBaSar) for copper-64 labeling and synthesized the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer (64)Cu-AmBaSar-RGD. In this study, we further evaluate the biological property of this new AmBaSar chelator by using (64)Cu-AmBaSar-RGD as the model compound. In vitro and in vivo stability, lipophilicity, cell binding and uptake, microPET imaging, receptor blocking experiments, and biodistribution studies of (64)Cu-AmBaSar-RGD were investigated, and the results were directly compared with the established radiotracer (64)Cu-DOTA-RGD. The (64)Cu-AmBaSar-RGD was obtained with high radiochemical yield (> or =95%) and purity (> or =99%) under mild conditions (pH 5.0-5.5 and 23-37 degrees C) in less than 30 min. For in vitro studies, the radiochemical purity of (64)Cu-AmBaSar-RGD was more than 97% in PBS or FBS and 95% in mouse serum after 24 h of incubation. The log P value of (64)Cu-AmBaSar-RGD was -2.44 +/- 0.12. For in vivo studies, (64)Cu-AmBaSar-RGD and (64)Cu-DOTA-RGD have demonstrated comparable tumor uptake at selected time points on the basis of microPET imaging. The integrin alpha(v)beta(3) receptor specificity was confirmed by blocking experiments for both tracers. Compared with (64)Cu-DOTA-RGD, (64)Cu-AmBaSar-RGD demonstrated much lower liver accumulation in both microPET imaging and biodistribution studies. Metabolic studies also directly supported the observation that (64)Cu-AmBaSar-RGD was more stable in vivo than (64)Cu-DOTA-RGD. In summary, the in vitro and in vivo evaluations of the (64)Cu-AmBaSar-RGD have demonstrated its improved Cu-chelation stability compared with that of the established tracer (64)Cu-DOTA-RGD. The AmBaSar chelator will also have general applications for (64)Cu labeling of various bioactive molecules in high radiochemical yield and high in vivo stability.

  5. Image-Based Airborne Sensors: A Combined Approach for Spectral Signatures Classification through Deterministic Simulated Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo; Herrera, P. Javier

    2009-01-01

    The increasing technology of high-resolution image airborne sensors, including those on board Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, demands automatic solutions for processing, either on-line or off-line, the huge amountds of image data sensed during the flights. The classification of natural spectral signatures in images is one potential application. The actual tendency in classification is oriented towards the combination of simple classifiers. In this paper we propose a combined strategy based on the Deterministic Simulated Annealing (DSA) framework. The simple classifiers used are the well tested supervised parametric Bayesian estimator and the Fuzzy Clustering. The DSA is an optimization approach, which minimizes an energy function. The main contribution of DSA is its ability to avoid local minima during the optimization process thanks to the annealing scheme. It outperforms simple classifiers used for the combination and some combined strategies, including a scheme based on the fuzzy cognitive maps and an optimization approach based on the Hopfield neural network paradigm. PMID:22399989

  6. The use of airborne imaging spectrometer data to determine experimentally induced variation in coniferous canopy chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanberg, Nancy A.; Matson, Pamela A.

    1987-01-01

    It was experimentally determined whether induced differences in forest canopy chemical composition can be detected using data from the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS). Treatments were applied to an even-aged forest of Douglas fir trees. Work to date has stressed wet chemical analysis of foilage samples and correction of AIS data. Plot treatments were successful in providing a range of foliar N2 concentrations. Much time was spent investigating and correcting problems with the raw AIS data. Initial problems with groups of drop out lines in the AIS data were traced to the tape recorder and the tape drive. Custom adjustment of the tape drive led to recovery of most missing lines. Remaining individual drop out lines were replaced using average of adjacent lines. Application of a notch filter to the Fourier transform of the image in each band satisfactorily removed vertical striping. The aspect ratio was corrected by resampling the image in the line direction using nearest neighbor interpolation.

  7. Validation of Rain Rate Retrievals for the Airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Maria; Salemirad, Matin; Jones, W. Linwood; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    On board of the NASA's Global Hawk (AV1) aircraft there are two microwave, namely: the passive microwave Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), and the active microwave High-altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP). This paper presents results from an unplanned rain rate measurement validation opportunity that occurred in 2013, when the Global Hawk aircraft flew over an intense tropical squall-line that was simultaneously observed, by the Tampa NEXRAD meteorological radar. During this experiment, Global Hawk flying at an altitude of 18 km made 3 passes over the rapidly propagating thunderstorm, while the TAMPA NEXRAD perform volume scans on a 5-minute interval. NEXRAD 2D images of rain rate (mm/hr) were obtained at two altitudes (3 km & 6 km), which serve as surface truth for the HIRAD rain rate retrievals. In this paper, results are presented of the three-way inter-comparison of HIRAD Tb, HIWRAP dbZ and NEXRAD rain rate imagery.

  8. Using Regional GPS Network Atmospheric Models for Mitigating Errors in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Y.; Bock, Y.; Tong, X.; Moore, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements provide valuable information for obtaining Earth surface deformation and topography at high spatial resolution for crustal deformation studies. Similar to Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR phase measurements are affected by the Earth's ionospheric and tropospheric layers as the electromagnetic signals significantly refract while propagating through the different layers. While electromagnetic signals propagating through the neutral atmosphere are affected primarily by the pressure, temperature, and water vapor content of atmospheric gases, the propagation through the ionosphere is mainly affected by the number of free electrons along the signal path. Here, we present the use of dense regional GPS networks for extracting tropospheric zenith delays and ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) maps in order to reduce the noise levels in the phase measurement of the InSAR images. The results show significant reduction in the RMS values when simultaneously combining the two corrections, both at short time periods where no surface deformation is expected, and at longer periods, where imaging of crustal deformation, such as the ground subsidence and aseismic fault creep, is enhanced.

  9. An Improved InSAR Image Co-Registration Method for Pairs with Relatively Big Distortions or Large Incoherent Areas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenwei; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Guo

    2016-09-17

    Co-registration is one of the most important steps in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data processing. The standard offset-measurement method based on cross-correlating uniformly distributed patches takes no account of specific geometric transformation between images or characteristics of ground scatterers. Hence, it is inefficient and difficult to obtain satisfying co-registration results for image pairs with relatively big distortion or large incoherent areas. Given this, an improved co-registration strategy is proposed in this paper which takes both the geometric features and image content into consideration. Firstly, some geometric transformations including scale, flip, rotation, and shear between images were eliminated based on the geometrical information, and the initial co-registration polynomial was obtained. Then the registration points were automatically detected by integrating the signal-to-clutter-ratio (SCR) thresholds and the amplitude information, and a further co-registration process was performed to refine the polynomial. Several comparison experiments were carried out using 2 TerraSAR-X data from the Hong Kong airport and 21 PALSAR data from the Donghai Bridge. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method brings accuracy and efficiency improvements for co-registration and processing abilities in the cases of big distortion between images or large incoherent areas in the images. For most co-registrations, the proposed method can enhance the reliability and applicability of co-registration and thus promote the automation to a higher level.

  10. An Improved InSAR Image Co-Registration Method for Pairs with Relatively Big Distortions or Large Incoherent Areas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenwei; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Co-registration is one of the most important steps in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data processing. The standard offset-measurement method based on cross-correlating uniformly distributed patches takes no account of specific geometric transformation between images or characteristics of ground scatterers. Hence, it is inefficient and difficult to obtain satisfying co-registration results for image pairs with relatively big distortion or large incoherent areas. Given this, an improved co-registration strategy is proposed in this paper which takes both the geometric features and image content into consideration. Firstly, some geometric transformations including scale, flip, rotation, and shear between images were eliminated based on the geometrical information, and the initial co-registration polynomial was obtained. Then the registration points were automatically detected by integrating the signal-to-clutter-ratio (SCR) thresholds and the amplitude information, and a further co-registration process was performed to refine the polynomial. Several comparison experiments were carried out using 2 TerraSAR-X data from the Hong Kong airport and 21 PALSAR data from the Donghai Bridge. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method brings accuracy and efficiency improvements for co-registration and processing abilities in the cases of big distortion between images or large incoherent areas in the images. For most co-registrations, the proposed method can enhance the reliability and applicability of co-registration and thus promote the automation to a higher level. PMID:27649207

  11. An Improved InSAR Image Co-Registration Method for Pairs with Relatively Big Distortions or Large Incoherent Areas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenwei; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Co-registration is one of the most important steps in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data processing. The standard offset-measurement method based on cross-correlating uniformly distributed patches takes no account of specific geometric transformation between images or characteristics of ground scatterers. Hence, it is inefficient and difficult to obtain satisfying co-registration results for image pairs with relatively big distortion or large incoherent areas. Given this, an improved co-registration strategy is proposed in this paper which takes both the geometric features and image content into consideration. Firstly, some geometric transformations including scale, flip, rotation, and shear between images were eliminated based on the geometrical information, and the initial co-registration polynomial was obtained. Then the registration points were automatically detected by integrating the signal-to-clutter-ratio (SCR) thresholds and the amplitude information, and a further co-registration process was performed to refine the polynomial. Several comparison experiments were carried out using 2 TerraSAR-X data from the Hong Kong airport and 21 PALSAR data from the Donghai Bridge. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method brings accuracy and efficiency improvements for co-registration and processing abilities in the cases of big distortion between images or large incoherent areas in the images. For most co-registrations, the proposed method can enhance the reliability and applicability of co-registration and thus promote the automation to a higher level. PMID:27649207

  12. Software for Generating Strip Maps from SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry; Madsen, Soren; Chapin, Elaine; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2004-01-01

    Jurassicprok is a computer program that generates strip-map digital elevation models and other data products from raw data acquired by an airborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system. This software can process data from a variety of airborne SAR systems but is designed especially for the GeoSAR system, which is a dual-frequency (P- and X-band), single-pass interferometric SAR system for measuring elevation both at the bare ground surface and top of the vegetation canopy. Jurassicprok is a modified version of software developed previously for airborne-interferometric- SAR applications. The modifications were made to accommodate P-band interferometric processing, remove approximations that are not generally valid, and reduce processor-induced mapping errors to the centimeter level. Major additions and other improvements over the prior software include the following: a) A new, highly efficient multi-stage-modified wave-domain processing algorithm for accurately motion compensating ultra-wideband data; b) Adaptive regridding algorithms based on estimated noise and actual measured topography to reduce noise while maintaining spatial resolution; c) Exact expressions for height determination from interferogram data; d) Fully calibrated volumetric correlation data based on rigorous removal of geometric and signal-to-noise decorrelation terms; e) Strip range-Doppler image output in user-specified Doppler coordinates; f) An improved phase-unwrapping and absolute-phase-determination algorithm; g) A more flexible user interface with many additional processing options; h) Increased interferogram filtering options; and i) Ability to use disk space instead of random- access memory for some processing steps.

  13. Application of Polarimetric-Interferometric Phase Coherence Optimization (PIPCO) Procedure to SIR-C/X-SAR Tien-Shan Tracks 122.20(94 Oct. 08)/154.20(94 Oct. 09) Repeat-Orbit C/L-Band Pol-D-InSAR Imag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, W. M.; Mott, H.; Verdi, J.; Darizhapov, D.; Dorjiev, B.; Tsybjito, T.; Korsunov, V.; Tatchkov, G.; Bashkuyev, Y.; Cloude, S.; Papathanassiou, K.; Pottier, E.; Lee, J.; Ainsworth, T.; Schuler, D.; Grandi, G.; Rosen, P.; Peltzer, G.

    1998-01-01

    During the past decade, Radar Polarimetry has established itself as a mature science and advanced technology in high resolution POL-SAR imaging, image target characterization and selective image feature extraction.

  14. A pattern recognition system for locating small volvanoes in Magellan SAR images of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, M. C.; Fayyad, U. M.; Smyth, P.; Aubele, J. C.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    The Magellan data set constitutes an example of the large volumes of data that today's instruments can collect, providing more detail of Venus than was previously available from Pioneer Venus, Venera 15/16, or ground-based radar observations put together. However, data analysis technology has not kept pace with data collection and storage technology. Due to the sheer size of the data, complete and comprehensive scientific analysis of such large volumes of image data is no longer feasible without the use of computational aids. Our progress towards developing a pattern recognition system for aiding in the detection and cataloging of small-scale natural features in large collections of images is reported. Combining classical image processing, machine learning, and a graphical user interface, the detection of the 'small-shield' volcanoes (less than 15km in diameter) that constitute the most abundant visible geologic feature in the more that 30,000 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the surface of Venus are initially targeted. Our eventual goal is to provide a general, trainable tool for locating small-scale features where scientists specify what to look for simply by providing examples and attributes of interest to measure. This contrasts with the traditional approach of developing problem specific programs for detecting Specific patterns. The approach and initial results in the specific context of locating small volcanoes is reported. It is estimated, based on extrapolating from previous studies and knowledge of the underlying geologic processes, that there should be on the order of 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 6) of these volcanoes visible in the Magellan data. Identifying and studying these volcanoes is fundamental to a proper understanding of the geologic evolution of Venus. However, locating and parameterizing them in a manual manner is forbiddingly time-consuming. Hence, the development of techniques to partially automate this task were undertaken. The primary

  15. Millimeter wave radar system on a rotating platform for combined search and track functionality with SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulenbacher, Uwe; Rech, Klaus; Sedlmeier, Johannes; Pratisto, Hans; Wellig, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Ground based millimeter wave radar sensors offer the potential for a weather-independent automatic ground surveillance at day and night, e.g. for camp protection applications. The basic principle and the experimental verification of a radar system concept is described, which by means of an extreme off-axis positioning of the antenna(s) combines azimuthal mechanical beam steering with the formation of a circular-arc shaped synthetic aperture (SA). In automatic ground surveillance the function of search and detection of moving ground targets is performed by means of the conventional mechanical scan mode. The rotated antenna structure designed as a small array with two or more RX antenna elements with simultaneous receiver chains allows to instantaneous track multiple moving targets (monopulse principle). The simultaneously operated SAR mode yields areal images of the distribution of stationary scatterers. For ground surveillance application this SAR mode is best suited for identifying possible threats by means of change detection. The feasibility of this concept was tested by means of an experimental radar system comprising of a 94 GHz (W band) FM-CW module with 1 GHz bandwidth and two RX antennas with parallel receiver channels, placed off-axis at a rotating platform. SAR mode and search/track mode were tested during an outdoor measurement campaign. The scenery of two persons walking along a road and partially through forest served as test for the capability to track multiple moving targets. For SAR mode verification an image of the area composed of roads, grassland, woodland and several man-made objects was reconstructed from the measured data.

  16. Science Results from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR): Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L. (Editor); Plaut, Jeffrey (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is the most advanced imaging radar system to fly in Earth orbit. Carried in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour in April and October of 1994, SIR-C/X-SAR simultaneously recorded SAR data at three wavelengths (L-, C-, and X-bands; 23.5, 5.8, and 3.1 cm, respectively). The SIR-C/X-SAR Science Team consists of 53 investigator teams from more than a dozen countries. Science investigations were undertaken in the fields of ecology, hydrology, ecology, and oceanography. This report contains 44 investigator team reports and several additional reports from coinvestigators and other researchers.

  17. Airborne synthetic aperture radar observations and simulations for waves in ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, Paris W.; Olsen, Richard B.; Krogstad, Harald E.; Liu, Antony K.

    1993-01-01

    The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing CV-580 aircraft collected C-band SAR data over the marginal ice zone off the east coast of Newfoundland during the Labrador Ice Margin Experiment (LIMEX) in March 1989. One component of the LIMEX '89 program was the study of ocean waves penetrating the marginal ice zone. We consider nearly coincidental observations of waves in ice by airborne SAR and wave-induced ice motion measurements. We explain the wave patterns observed in the SAR imagery, and the corresponding SAR image spectra, in terms of SAR wave imaging models. These include the well-known tilt cross-section modulation, linear, quasi-linear, and nonlinear velocity bunching forward mapping models (FMMs), and the assertion that the concept of coherence time limitation applies differently to the cases of waves in ice and open water. We modify the concept of the scene coherence time to include two parts: first, a decorrelation time deduced from the inherent azimuth cutoff in the nonlinear velocity bunching FMM; and second, the intrinsic scene coherence time which is a measure of the time scale over which an open water Bragg scattering patch retains its phase structure. Either of these coherence time scales could dominate the SAR image formation process, depending upon the environmental conditions (the wave spectrum and the wind speed, for example). Observed SAR image spectra and forward mapped ice motion package spectra are favorably compared.

  18. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  19. The Danish SAR system - Design and initial tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Christensen, Erik L.; Skou, Niels; Dall, Jorgen

    1991-01-01

    In January 1986, the design of a high-resolution airborne C-band SAR started at the Electromagnetics Institute of the Technical University of Denmark. The initial system test flights took place in November and December 1989. The authors describe the design of the system, its implementation, and its performance. They show how digital technology has been utilized to realize a very flexible radar with variable resolution, swath-width, and imaging geometry. The motion-compensation algorithms implemented to obtain the high resolution and the special features built into the system to ensure proper internal calibration are outlined. The data processing system, developed for image generation and quality assurance, is sketched, with special emphasis on the flexibility of the system. Sample images and a preliminary performance evaluation are presented, demonstrating that the design goals have been met. The ongoing system upgrades and the planned scientific utilization of the C-band SAR are described.

  20. Design of an in-line, digital holographic imaging system for airborne measurement of clouds.

    PubMed

    Spuler, Scott M; Fugal, Jacob

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the design and performance of an airborne (underwing) in-line digital holographic imaging system developed for characterizing atmospheric cloud water droplets and ice particles in situ. The airborne environment constrained the design space to the simple optical layout that in-line non-beam-splitting holography affords. The desired measurement required the largest possible sample volume in which the smallest desired particle size (∼5 μm) could still be resolved, and consequently the magnification requirement was driven by the pixel size of the camera and this particle size. The resulting design was a seven-element, double-telecentric, high-precision optical imaging system used to relay and magnify a hologram onto a CCD surface. The system was designed to preserve performance and high resolution over a wide temperature range. Details of the optical design and construction are given. Experimental results demonstrate that the system is capable of recording holograms that can be reconstructed with resolution of better than 6.5 μm within a 15 cm(3) sample volume.

  1. Automated Data Production For A Novel Airborne Multiangle Spectropolarimetric Imager (AIRMSPI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovanovic, V .M.; Bull, M.; Diner, D. J.; Geier, S.; Rheingans, B.

    2012-01-01

    A novel polarimetric imaging technique making use of rapid retardance modulation has been developed by JPL as a part of NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. It has been built into the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) under NASA's Airborne Instrument Technology Transition Program, and is aimed primarily at remote sensing of the amounts and microphysical properties of aerosols and clouds. AirMSPI includes an 8-band (355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, 865, 935 nm) pushbroom camera that measures polarization in a subset of the bands (470, 660, and 865 nm). The camera is mounted on a gimbal and acquires imagery in a configurable set of along-track viewing angles ranging between +67 deg and -67 deg relative to nadir. As a result, near simultaneous multi-angle, multi-spectral, and polarimetric measurements of the targeted areas at a spatial resolution ranging from 7 m to 20 m (depending on the viewing angle) can be derived. An automated data production system is being built to support high data acquisition rate in concert with co-registration and orthorectified mapping requirements. To date, a number of successful engineering checkout flights were conducted in October 2010, August-September 2011, and January 2012. Data products resulting from these flights will be presented.

  2. Polarization effects and multipolarization SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Imaging radar polarimeters are usually implemented using a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) approach to give a high resolution image in two dimensions: range and azimuth. For each pixel in the image a polarimetric SAR gives sufficient information to characterize the polarimetric scattering properties of the imaged area (or target) as seen by the radar. Using a polarimetric SAR system as opposed to a single-polarization SAR system provides significantly more information about the target scattering mechanisms and allows better discrimination between different types of surfaces. In these notes a brief overview of SAR polarimetry is offered. The notes are intended as a text to accompany a lecture on SAR polarimetry as part of an AGARD-NATO course. Covered in the notes are the following: the polarization properties of electromagnetic waves; the concepts of radar scattering and measuring radar backscatter with a SAR; polarization synthesis; scattering matrix, Stokes matrix, and covariance matrix representations of polarimetric SAR data; polarization signature plots; design and calibration of polarimetric SAR systems; polarization filtering for target detection; fitting a simple model to polarimetric SAR measurements of naturally occurring features; and supervised classification of polarimetric SAR data.

  3. Airborne imaging spectrometer data of the Ruby Mountains, Montana: Mineral discrimination using relative absorption band-depth images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Brickey, D.W.; Rowan, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    Airborne imaging spectrometer data collected in the near-infrared (1.2-2.4 ??m) wavelength range were used to study the spectral expression of metamorphic minerals and rocks in the Ruby Mountains of southwestern Montana. The data were analyzed by using a new data enhancement procedure-the construction of relative absorption band-depth (RBD) images. RBD images, like bandratio images, are designed to detect diagnostic mineral absorption features, while minimizing reflectance variations related to topographic slope and albedo differences. To produce an RBD image, several data channels near an absorption band shoulder are summed and then divided by the sum of several channels located near the band minimum. RBD images are both highly specific and sensitive to the presence of particular mineral absorption features. Further, the technique does not distort or subdue spectral features as sometimes occurs when using other data normalization methods. By using RBD images, a number of rock and soil units were distinguished in the Ruby Mountains including weathered quartz - feldspar pegmatites, marbles of several compositions, and soils developed over poorly exposed mica schists. The RBD technique is especially well suited for detecting weak near-infrared spectral features produced by soils, which may permit improved mapping of subtle lithologic and structural details in semiarid terrains. The observation of soils rich in talc, an important industrial commodity in the study area, also indicates that RBD images may be useful for mineral exploration. ?? 1989.

  4. Detection of damage to building side-walls in the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake using high-resolution TerraSAR-X images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Fumio; Iwasaki, Yoji; Liu, Wen; Nonaka, Takashi; Sasagawa, Tadashi

    2013-10-01

    Building damage such as to side-walls or mid-story collapse is often overlooked in vertical optical images. Hence, in order to observe such building damage modes, high-resolution SAR images are introduced considering the side-looking nature of SAR. In the 2011 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake, a large number of buildings were collapsed or severely damaged due to repeated tsunamis. One of the important tsunami effects on buildings is that the damage is concentrated to their side-walls and lower stories. Thus this paper proposes the method to detect this kind damage from the change in layover areas in SAR intensity images. Multi-temporal TerraSAR-X images covering the Sendai-Shiogama Port were employed to detect building damage due to the tsunamis caused by the earthquake. The backscattering coefficients in layover areas of individual buildings were extracted and then, the average value in each layover area was calculated. The average value was seen to decrease in the post-event image due to the reduced backscatter from building side-walls. This example demonstrated the usefulness of high-resolution SAR intensity images to detect severe damage to building side-walls based on the changes of the backscattering coefficient in the layover areas.

  5. Validation of Rain Rate Retrievals for the Airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Maria; Salemirad, Matin; Jones, Linwood; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Global Hawk aircraft (AV1)has two microwave sensors: the passive Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), and the active High-altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler(HIWRAP). Results are presented for a rain measurement validation opportunity that occurred in 2013, when the AV1 flew over a tropical squall-line that was simultaneously observed by the Tampa NEXRAD radar. During this experiment, Global Hawk made 3 passes over the rapidly propagating thunderstorm, while the TAMPA NEXRAD performed volume scans every 5 minutes. In this poster, the three-way inter-comparison of HIRAD Tb (base temperature), HIWRAP dbZ (decibels relative to equivalent reflectivity) and NEXRAD rain rate imagery are presented. Also, observed HIRAD Tbs are compared with theoretical radiative transfer model results using HIWRAP Rain Rates.

  6. The application of airborne imaging radars (L and X-band) to earth resources problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, B.; Shuchman, R. A.; Bryan, M. L.; Larson, R. W.; Liskow, C. L.; Rendleman, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    A multiplexed synthetic aperture Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) that simultaneously images the terrain with X-band (3.2 cm) and L-band (23.0 cm) radar wavelengths was developed. The Feasibility of using multiplexed SLAR to obtain useful information for earth resources purposes. The SLAR imagery, aerial photographs, and infrared imagery are examined to determine the qualitative tone and texture of many rural land-use features imaged. The results show that: (1) Neither X- nor L-band SLAR at moderate and low depression angles can directly or indirectly detect pools of water under standing vegetation. (2) Many of the urban and rural land-use categories present in the test areas can be identified and mapped on the multiplexed SLAR imagery. (3) Water resources management can be done using multiplexed SLAR. (4) Drainage patterns can be determined on both the X- and L-band imagery.

  7. Discriminating semiarid vegetation using airborne imaging spectrometer data - A preliminary assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Randall W.; Ustin, Susan L.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary assessment was made of Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data for discriminating and characterizing vegetation in a semiarid environment. May and October AIS data sets were acquired over a large alluvial fan in eastern California, on which were found Great Basin desert shrub communities. Maximum likelihood classification of a principal components representation of the May AIS data enabled discrimination of subtle spatial detail in images relating to vegetation and soil characteristics. The spatial patterns in the May AIS classification were, however, too detailed for complete interpretation with existing ground data. A similar analysis of the October AIS data yielded poor results. Comparison of AIS results with a similar analysis of May Landsat Thematic Mapper data showed that the May AIS data contained approximately three to four times as much spectrally coherent information. When only two shortwave infrared TM bands were used, results were similar to those from AIS data acquired in October.

  8. Recent ground deformation of Taiyuan basin (China) investigated with C-, L-, and X-bands SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Zhang, Qin; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhao, Chaoying; Yang, Chengsheng; Qu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    C-, L- and X-bands Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired from November 2006 to June 2011 were processed with Small BAseline Subset DInSAR (SBAS-DInSAR) technique to investigate spatial and temporal variations in deformation over Taiyuan basin, China. The annual deformation rate, created by integrating C-, L- and X-bands interferograms, revealed severe subsidence regions in the basin, where the average subsidence exceeded 10 cm/y and the maximum subsidence reached to 24 cm/y. Meanwhile, it was found that shapes of these subsidence areas were characterized as either subsiding bowls or elongated subsiding belts, implying an intimate connection among groundwater exploration, ground subsidence and faults. Additionally, significant differences in displacement were identified near the faults. This phenomenon could be explained that faults acted as barriers to groundwater flow, impeding the horizontal propagation of fluid-pressure changes and therefore creating groundwater level difference across them. Furthermore, the time series of deformation maps presented inconspicuous nonlinear periodic variations, which might be caused by the seasonal groundwater level fluctuations. In view of the poor water resource and presented features of subsidence over the study area, we deduced that excessive pumping of groundwater was the dominant process driving land subsidence. Our results could provide scientific evidence on a sound management of ground water pumping to mitigate potential damages on infrastructures and environments.

  9. A SAR-ADC using unit bridge capacitor and with calibration for the front-end electronics of PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wei, Tingcun; Li, Bo; Yang, Lifeng; Xue, Feifei; Hu, Yongcai

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a 12-bit 1 MS/s successive approximation register-analog to digital converter (SAR-ADC) for the 32-channel front-end electronics of CZT-based PET imaging system. To reduce the capacitance mismatch, instead of the fractional capacitor, the unit capacitor is used as the bridge capacitor in the split-capacitor digital to analog converter (DAC) circuit. In addition, in order to eliminate the periodical DNL errors of -1 LSB which often exists in the SAR-ADC using the charge-redistributed DAC, a calibration algorithm is proposed and verified by the experiments. The proposed 12-bit 1 MS/s SAR-ADC is designed and implemented using a 0.35 μm CMOS technology, it occupies only an active area of 986×956 μm2. The measurement results show that, at the power supply of 3.3/5.0 V and the sampling rate of 1 MS/s, the ADC with calibration has a signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratio (SINAD) of 67.98 dB, the power dissipation of 5 mW, and a figure of merit (FOM) of 2.44 pJ/conv.-step. This ADC is with the features of high accuracy, low power and small layout area, it is especially suitable to the one-chip integration of the front-end readout electronics.

  10. 3D SAR approach to IF SAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Doug

    2000-08-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super- resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  11. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS): An Airborne Laser Altimeter for Mapping Vegetation and Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, J.; Rabine, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne laser altimeter designed to quickly and extensively map surface topography as well as the relative heights of other reflecting surfaces within the laser footprint. Since 1997, this instrument has primarily been used as the airborne simulator for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission, a spaceborne mission designed to measure tree height, vertical structure and ground topography (including sub-canopy topography). LVIS is capable of operating from 500 m to 10 km above ground level with footprint sizes from 1 to 60 m. Laser footprints can be randomly spaced within the 7 degree telescope field-of-view, constrained only by the operating frequency of the ND:YAG Q-switched laser (500 Hz). A significant innovation of the LVIS altimeter is that all ranging, waveform recording, and range gating are performed using a single digitizer, clock base, and detector. A portion of the outgoing laser pulse is fiber-optically fed into the detector used to collect the return signal and this entire time history of the outgoing and return pulses is digitized at 500 Msamp/sec. The ground return is then located using software digital signal processing, even in the presence of visibly opaque clouds. The surface height distribution of all reflecting surfaces within the laser footprint can be determined, for example, tree height and ground elevation. To date, the LVIS system has been used to monitor topographic change at Long Valley caldera, CA, as part of NASA's Topography and Surface Change program, and to map tree structure and sub-canopy topography at the La Selva Biological Research Station in Costa Rica, as part of the pre-launch calibration activities for the VCL mission. We present results that show the laser altimeter consistently and accurately maps surface topography, including sub-canopy topography, and vegetation height and structure. These results confirm the measurement concept of VCL and highlight the benefits of

  12. NASA Goddards LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) Airborne Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Bruce D.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Nelson, Ross F.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Morton, Douglas C.; McCorkel, Joel T.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Ly, Vuong; Montesano, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of LiDAR and optical remotely sensed data provides unique information about ecosystem structure and function. Here, we describe the development, validation and application of a new airborne system that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR hyperspectral and thermal components in a compact, lightweight and portable system. Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) airborne imager is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation structure, foliar spectra and surface temperatures at very high spatial resolution (approximately 1 m) on a wide range of airborne platforms. The complementary nature of LiDAR, optical and thermal data provide an analytical framework for the development of new algorithms to map plant species composition, plant functional types, biodiversity, biomass and carbon stocks, and plant growth. In addition, G-LiHT data enhance our ability to validate data from existing satellite missions and support NASA Earth Science research. G-LiHT's data processing and distribution system is designed to give scientists open access to both low- and high-level data products (http://gliht.gsfc.nasa.gov), which will stimulate the community development of synergistic data fusion algorithms. G-LiHT has been used to collect more than 6,500 km2 of data for NASA-sponsored studies across a broad range of ecoregions in the USA and Mexico. In this paper, we document G-LiHT design considerations, physical specifications, instrument performance and calibration and acquisition parameters. In addition, we describe the data processing system and higher-level data products that are freely distributed under NASA's Data and Information policy.

  13. Change detection in quad and dual pol, single- and bi-frequency SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Allan A.; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2015-10-01

    When the covariance matrix representation is used for multi-look polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, the complex Wishart distribution applies. Based on this distribution a likelihood ratio test statistic for equality of two complex variance-covariance matrices and an associated p-value are given. In a case study airborne EMISAR C- and L-band SAR images covering agricultural fields and wooded areas near Foulum, Denmark, are used in single- and bi-frequency, bi-temporal change detection with full and dual polarimetry data.

  14. Supervised and unsupervised MRF based 3D scene classification in multiple view airborne oblique images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, M.; Xiao, J.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we develop and compare two methods for scene classification in 3D object space, that is, not single image pixels get classified, but voxels which carry geometric, textural and color information collected from the airborne oblique images and derived products like point clouds from dense image matching. One method is supervised, i.e. relies on training data provided by an operator. We use Random Trees for the actual training and prediction tasks. The second method is unsupervised, thus does not ask for any user interaction. We formulate this classification task as a Markov-Random-Field problem and employ graph cuts for the actual optimization procedure. Two test areas are used to test and evaluate both techniques. In the Haiti dataset we are confronted with largely destroyed built-up areas since the images were taken after the earthquake in January 2010, while in the second case we use images taken over Enschede, a typical Central European city. For the Haiti case it is difficult to provide clear class definitions, and this is also reflected in the overall classification accuracy; it is 73% for the supervised and only 59% for the unsupervised method. If classes are defined more unambiguously like in the Enschede area, results are much better (85% vs. 78%). In conclusion the results are acceptable, also taking into account that the point cloud used for geometric features is not of good quality and no infrared channel is available to support vegetation classification.

  15. MTU-Kestrel airborne hyperspectral imaging campaigns of the Lake Superior ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafert, J. Bruce; Slough, William J.; Rohde, Charles A.; Pilant, Andrew; Otten, Leonard J.; Meigs, Andrew D.; Jones, Al; Butler, Eugene W.

    1999-10-01

    The clear waters of Lake Superior constitute the heart of one of the most significant fresh water ecosystems in the world. Lake Superior is the world's largest lake by surface area (82,100 km2) holding approximately 10% of the earth's freshwater (12,230 km3) that is not locked into glaciers or ice caps. Although Superior is arguably the most significant fresh water ecosystem on earth, questions relating to the lake and its watershed remain unanswered, including the effects of human habitation, exploitation, and economic potential of the region. There is a great diversity of scientific disciplines with a common interest in remote sensing of the Lake Superior ecosystem which have the need for data at all spatial, spectral, and temporal scales-from scales supplied by satellites, ships or aircraft at low spatial, spectral or temporal resolution, to a requirement for synoptic high resolution spatial (approximately 1 meter)/spectral (1 - 10 nm) data. During May and August of 1998, two week-long data collection campaigns were performed using the Kestrel airborne visible hyperspectral imager to acquire hyperspectral data of a broad taxonomy of ecologically significant targets, including forests, urban areas, lakeshore zones and rivers, mining industry tailing basins, and the Lake itself. We will describe the Kestrel airborne hyperspectral sensor, the collection and data reduction methodology, and flight imagery from both campaigns.

  16. Evaluation of the airborne imaging spectrometer for remote sensing of forest stand conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Charles E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Five pairs of plots were established in forest stands with one of each pair trenched and covered to prevent precipitation from reaching the tree roots. High winds and falling limbs destroyed the covers on three of the plots. The two remaining plots were in a red pine plantation and in a natural stand of sugar maple. Trees in both plots developed levels of moisture stress more than nine bars higher than control trees on the dates of overflights with the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) and the Collins' Airborne Spectroradiometer (CAS). Hemispherical reflectance from stressed and control trees was measured with a Beckman DK2A spectrophotometer. On the day of the AIS overflight, stressed maple foliage was less reflective than the control from 1000 to 1300 nm, but more reflective at wavelengths longer than 1300 nm. Pine foliage was less reflective than the control from 1000 to 1600 nm, but the difference was small at wavelengths longer than 1350 nm. AIS data collected showed brightness values for both maple and pine to be lower than for the controls from 1000 to 1300 nm. CAS data were used to determine the gain in species identification accuracy obtainable with high spectral resolution data.

  17. An easy to use ArcMap based texture analysis program for extraction of flooded areas from TerraSAR-X satellite image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet; Hagemann, Ulrike; Shafapour Tehrany, Mahyat; Prechtel, Nikolas

    2014-02-01

    Extraction of the flooded areas from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and especially TerraSAR-X data is one of the most challenging tasks in the flood management and planning. SAR data due to its high spatial resolution and its capability of all weather conditions makes a proper choice for tropical countries. Texture is considered as an effective factor in distinguishing the classes especially in SAR imagery which records the backscatters that carry information of kind, direction, heterogeneity and relationship of the features. This paper put forward a computer program for texture analysis for high resolution radar data. Texture analysis program is introduced and discussed using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). To demonstrate the ability and correctness of this program, a test subset of TerraSAR-X imagery from Terengganu area, Malaysia was analyzed and pixel-based and object-based classification were attempted. The thematic maps derived by pixel-based method could not achieve acceptable visual interpretation and for that reason no accuracy assessment was performed on them. The overall accuracy achieved by object-based method was 83.63% with kappa coefficient of 0.8. Results on image texture classification showed that the proposed program is capable for texture analysis in TerraSAR-X image and the obtained textural analysis resulted in high classification accuracy. The proposed texture analysis program can be used in many applications such as land use/cover (LULC) mapping, hazard studies and many other applications.

  18. A 12-bit, 1 MS/s SAR-ADC for a CZT-based multi-channel gamma-ray imager using a new digital calibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Wei, T.; Yang, L.; Hu, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The successive approximation register-analog to digital converter (SAR-ADC) is widely used in the CdZnTe-based gamma-ray imager because of its outstanding characteristics of low power consumption, relatively high resolution, and small die size. This study proposes a digital bit-by-bit calibration method using an input ramp signal to further improve the conversion precision and power consumption of an SAR-ADC. The proposed method is based on the sub-radix-2 redundant architecture and the perturbation technique. The proposed calibration algorithm is simpler, more stable, and faster than traditional approaches. The prototype chip of the 12-bit, 1 MS/s radiation-hardened SAR-ADC has been designed and fabricated using the TSMC 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process. This SAR-ADC consumes 3 mW power and occupies a core area of 856× 802μm2. The digital bit-by-bit calibration algorithm is implemented via MATLAB for testing flexibility. The effective number of bits for this digitally calibrated SAR-ADC reaches 11.77 bits. The converter exhibits high conversion precision, low power consumption, and radiation-hardened design. Therefore, this SAR-ADC is suitable for multi-channel gamma-ray imager applications.

  19. Classification of High Resolution C-Band PolSAR Data on Polarimetric and Texture Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Feng, Qi; Li, Lan

    2014-11-01

    PolSAR image classification is an important technique in the remote sensing area. For high resolution PolSAR image, polarimetric and texture features are equally important for the high resolution PolSAR image classification. The texture features are mainly extracted through Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) method, but this method has some deficiencies. First, GLCM method can only work on gray-scale images; Secondly, the number of texture features extracted by GLCM method is generally up dozens, or even hundreds. Too many features may exist larger redundancy and will increase the complexity of classification. Therefore, this paper introduces a new texture feature factor-RK that derived from PolSAR image non-Gaussian statistic model.Using the domestic airborne C-band PolSAR image data, we completed classification combined the polarization and texture characteristics.The results showed that this new texture feature factor-RK can overcome the above drawbacks and can achieve same performance compared with GLCM method.

  20. SAR of Cu (II) thiosemicarbazone complexes as hypoxic imaging agents: MM3 analysis and prediction of biologic properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sweta; Tiwari, Anjani K; Ojha, Himanshu; Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Bachcha; Mishra, Anil K

    2010-02-01

    Copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) are very useful for blood flow and hypoxic imaging. The aim of this study was to identify structure-activity relationships (SARs) within a series of analogues with different substitution patterns in the ligands, in order to design improved hypoxia imaging agents and elucidate hypoxia selectivity mechanisms. Genetic algorithms (GAs) were used to develop specific copper metal-ligand force field parameters for the MM3 force-field calculations. These new parameters produced results in good agreement with experiment and previously reported copper metal-ligand parameters. A successful quantitative SAR (QSAR) for predicting the several classes of Cu(II)-chelating ligands was built using a training set of 21 Cu(II) complexes. The QSAR exhibited a correlation between the predicted and experimental test set. The QSAR preformed with great accuracy; r(2) = 0.95 and q(2) = 0.90 utilizing a leave-one-out cross-validation with multiple linear regression analysis to find correlation between different calculated molecular descriptors of these complexes. The final QSAR mathematical models were found as the following: Log P = {3.01698 (+/-0.0590)} - LUMO {0.1248 (+/-0.068)} + MR {0.3219 (+/-0.086)} n = 21 |r| = 0.972 s = 0.188 F = 98.102 The resulting models could act as an efficient strategy for estimating the hypoxic conditions through imaging and provide some insights into the structural features related to the biological activity of these compounds.

  1. Unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric SAR data using the covariance matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J. M.; Chellappa, Rama; Dubois, Pascale C.

    1992-01-01

    A method for unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data into classes of homogeneous microwave polarimetric backscatter characteristics is presented. Classes of polarimetric backscatter are selected on the basis of a multidimensional fuzzy clustering of the logarithm of the parameters composing the polarimetric covariance matrix. The clustering procedure uses both polarimetric amplitude and phase information, is adapted to the presence of image speckle, and does not require an arbitrary weighting of the different polarimetric channels; it also provides a partitioning of each data sample used for clustering into multiple clusters. Given the classes of polarimetric backscatter, the entire image is classified using a maximum a posteriori polarimetric classifier. Four-look polarimetric SAR complex data of lava flows and of sea ice acquired by the NASA/JPL airborne polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) are segmented using this technique. The results are discussed and compared with those obtained using supervised techniques.

  2. GeoSAR: A Radar Terrain Mapping System for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas; vanZyl, Jakob; Hensley, Scott; Reis, James; Munjy, Riadh; Burton, John; Yoha, Robert

    2000-01-01

    GeoSAR Geographic Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a new 3 year effort to build a unique, dual-frequency, airborne Interferometric SAR for mapping of terrain. This is being pursued via a Consortium of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation. The airborne portion of this system will operate on a Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft outfitted with P- and X-band Interferometric SARs. The ground portions of this system will be a suite of Flight Planning Software, an IFSAR Processor and a Radar-GIS Workstation. The airborne P-band and X-band radars will be constructed by JPL with the goal of obtaining foliage penetration at the longer P-band wavelengths. The P-band and X-band radar will operate at frequencies of 350 Mhz and 9.71 Ghz with bandwidths of either 80 or 160 Mhz. The airborne radars will be complemented with airborne laser system for measuring antenna positions. Aircraft flight lines and radar operating instructions will be computed with the Flight Planning Software The ground processing will be a two-step step process. First, the raw radar data will be processed into radar images and interferometer derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Second, these radar images and DEMs will be processed with a Radar GIS Workstation which performs processes such as Projection Transformations, Registration, Geometric Adjustment, Mosaicking, Merging and Database Management. JPL will construct the IFSAR Processor and Calgis, Inc. will construct the Radar GIS Workstation. The GeoSAR Project was underway in November 1996 with a goal of having the radars and laser systems fully integrated onto the Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft in early 1999. Then, Engineering Checkout and Calibration-Characterization Flights will be conducted through November 1999. The system will be completed at the end of 1999 and ready for routine operations in the year 2000.

  3. Towards a Semantic Interpretation of Urban Areas with Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, O.; Guillaso, S.; Hellwich, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method to detect and reconstruct building parts from tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) airborne data. Our approach extends recent works in two ways: first, the radiometric information is used to guide the extraction of geometric primitives. Second, building facades and roofs are extracted thanks to geometric classification rules. We demonstrate our method on a 3 image L-Band airborne dataset over the city of Dresden, Germany. Experiments show how our technique allows to use the complementarity between the radiometric image and the tomographic point cloud to extract buildings parts in challenging situations.

  4. Crude oil, petroleum product, and water discrimination on terrestrial substrates with airborne imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C. Scott; Krekeler, Mark P. S.

    2011-06-01

    The Deepwater Horizon explosion and subsequent sinking produced the largest oil spill in U.S. history. One of the most prominent portions of the response is mapping the extent to which oil has reached thousands of miles of shoreline. The most common method of detecting oil remains visual spotting from airframes, supplemented by panchromatic / multispectral aerial photography and satellite imagery. While this imagery provides a synoptic view, it is often ambiguous in its ability to discriminate water from hydrocarbon materials. By employing spectral libraries for material identification and discrimination, imaging spectroscopy supplements traditional imaging techniques by providing specific criteria for more accurate petroleum detection and discrimination from water on terrestrial backgrounds. This paper applies a new hydrocarbon-substrate spectral library to SpecTIR HST-3 airborne imaging spectroscopy data from the Hurricane Katrina disaster in 2005. Using common material identification algorithms, this preliminary analysis demonstrates the applicability and limitations of hyperspectral data to petroleum/water discrimination in certain conditions. The current work is also the first application of the petroleum-substrate library to imaging spectroscopy data and shows potential for monitoring long term impacts of Deepwater Horizon.

  5. Airborne Linear Array Image Geometric Rectification Method Based on Unequal Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. M.; Li, C. R.; Zhou, M.; Hu, J.; Yang, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    As the linear array sensor such as multispectral and hyperspectral sensor has great potential in disaster monitoring and geological survey, the quality of the image geometric rectification should be guaranteed. Different from the geometric rectification of airborne planar array images or multi linear array images, exterior orientation elements need to be determined for each scan line of single linear array images. Internal distortion persists after applying GPS/IMU data directly to geometrical rectification. Straight lines may be curving and jagged. Straight line feature -based geometrical rectification algorithm was applied to solve this problem, whereby the exterior orientation elements were fitted by piecewise polynomial and evaluated with the straight line feature as constraint. However, atmospheric turbulence during the flight is unstable, equal piecewise can hardly provide good fitting, resulting in limited precision improvement of geometric rectification or, in a worse case, the iteration cannot converge. To solve this problem, drawing on dynamic programming ideas, unequal segmentation of line feature-based geometric rectification method is developed. The angle elements fitting error is minimized to determine the optimum boundary. Then the exterior orientation elements of each segment are fitted and evaluated with the straight line feature as constraint. The result indicates that the algorithm is effective in improving the precision of geometric rectification.

  6. X-SAR: The X-band synthetic aperture radar on board the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Marian U.

    1993-05-01

    The X-band synthetic aperture radar (X-SAR) is the German/Italian contribution to the NASA/JPL Shuttle Radar Lab missions as part of the preparation for the Earth Observation System (EOS) program. The Shuttle Radar Lab is a combination of several radars: an L-band (1.2 GHz) and a C-band (5.3 GHz) multipolarization SAR known as SIR-C (Shuttle Imaging Radar); and an X-band (9.6 GHz) vertically polarized SAR which will be operated synchronously over the same target areas to deliver calibrated multifrequency and multipolarization SAR data at multiple incidence angles from space. A joint German/Italian project office at DARA (German Space Agency) is responsible for the management of the X-SAR project. The space hardware has been developed and manufactured under industrial contract by Dornier and Alenia Spazio. Besides supporting all the technical and scientific tasks, DLR, in cooperation with ASI (Agencia Spaziale Italiano) is responsible for mission operation, calibration, and high precision SAR processing. In addition, DLR developed an airborne X-band SAR to support the experimenters with campaigns to prepare for the missions. The main advantage of adding a shorter wavelength (3 cm) radar to the SIR-C radars is the X-band radar's weaker penetration into vegetation and soil and its high sensitivity to surface roughness and associated phenomena. The performance of each of the three radars is comparable with respect to radiometric and geometric resolution.

  7. X-SAR: The X-band synthetic aperture radar on board the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Marian U.

    1993-01-01

    The X-band synthetic aperture radar (X-SAR) is the German/Italian contribution to the NASA/JPL Shuttle Radar Lab missions as part of the preparation for the Earth Observation System (EOS) program. The Shuttle Radar Lab is a combination of several radars: an L-band (1.2 GHz) and a C-band (5.3 GHz) multipolarization SAR known as SIR-C (Shuttle Imaging Radar); and an X-band (9.6 GHz) vertically polarized SAR which will be operated synchronously over the same target areas to deliver calibrated multifrequency and multipolarization SAR data at multiple incidence angles from space. A joint German/Italian project office at DARA (German Space Agency) is responsible for the management of the X-SAR project. The space hardware has been developed and manufactured under industrial contract by Dornier and Alenia Spazio. Besides supporting all the technical and scientific tasks, DLR, in cooperation with ASI (Agencia Spaziale Italiano) is responsible for mission operation, calibration, and high precision SAR processing. In addition, DLR developed an airborne X-band SAR to support the experimenters with campaigns to prepare for the missions. The main advantage of adding a shorter wavelength (3 cm) radar to the SIR-C radars is the X-band radar's weaker penetration into vegetation and soil and its high sensitivity to surface roughness and associated phenomena. The performance of each of the three radars is comparable with respect to radiometric and geometric resolution.

  8. Atmospheric water mapping with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), Mountain Pass, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, James E.; Green, Robert O.; Carrere, Veronique; Margolis, Jack S.; Alley, Ronald E.; Vane, Gregg; Bruegge, Carol J.; Gary, Bruce L.

    1988-01-01

    Observations are given of the spatial variation of atmospheric precipitable water using the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) over a desert area in eastern California, derived using a band ratio method and the 940 nm atmospheric water band and 870 nm continuum radiances. The ratios yield total path water from curves of growth supplied by the LOWTRAN 7 atmospheric model. An independent validation of the AVIRIS-derived column abundance at a point is supplied by a spectral hygrometer calibrated with respect to radiosonde observations. Water values conform to topography and fall off with surface elevation. The edge of the water vapor boundary layer defined by topography is thought to have been recovered. The ratio method yields column abundance estimates of good precision and high spatial resolution.

  9. Separating vegetation and soil temperature using airborne multiangular remote sensing image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Yan, Chunyan; Xiao, Qing; Yan, Guangjian; Fang, Li

    2012-07-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key parameter in land process research. Many research efforts have been devoted to increase the accuracy of LST retrieval from remote sensing. However, because natural land surface is non-isothermal, component temperature is also required in applications such as evapo-transpiration (ET) modeling. This paper proposes a new algorithm to separately retrieve vegetation temperature and soil background temperature from multiangular thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data. The algorithm is based on the localized correlation between the visible/near-infrared (VNIR) bands and the TIR band. This method was tested on the airborne image data acquired during the Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (WATER) campaign. Preliminary validation indicates that the remote sensing-retrieved results can reflect the spatial and temporal trend of component temperatures. The accuracy is within three degrees while the difference between vegetation and soil temperature can be as large as twenty degrees.

  10. A Preliminary Investigation of Systematic Noise in Data Acquired with the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, E.

    1985-01-01

    Systematic noise is present in Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data collected on October 26, 1983 and May 5, 1984 in grating position 0 (1.2 to 1.5 microns). In the October data set the noise occurs as 135 scan lines of low DN's every 270 scan lines. The noise is particularly bad in bands nine through thirty, restricting effective analysis to at best ten of the 32 bands. In the May data the regions of severe noise have been eliminated, but systematic noise is present with three frequencies (3, 106 and 200 scan lines) in all thirty two bands. The periodic nature of the noise in both data sets suggests that it could be removed as part of routine processing. This is necessary before classification routines or statistical analyses are used with these data.

  11. Discrimination of hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblages at Virginia City, Nevada, using the airborne imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsinpiller, Amy

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use airborne imaging spectrometer data to discriminate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblages associated with silver and gold mineralization at Virginia City, NV. The data is corrected for vertical striping and sample gradients, and converted to flat-field logarithmic residuals. Log residual spectra from areas known to be altered are compared to field spectra for kaolinitic, illitic, sericitic, and propylitic alteration types. The areal distributions of these alteration types are estimated using a spectral matching technique. Both visual examination of spectra and the matching techniques are effective in distinguishing kaolinitic, illitic, and propylitic alteration types from each other. However, illitic and sericitic alteration cannot be separated using these techniques because the spectra of illite and sericite are very similar. A principal components analysis of 14 channels in the 2.14-2.38 micron wavelength region is also successful in discriminating and mapping illitic, kaolinitic, and propylitic alteration types.

  12. The use of Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data to differentiate marsh vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, M. F.; Klemas, V.

    1986-01-01

    The Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) is a high spectral resolution (9.6-nm-wide bands between 0.9 and 2.4 microns) instrument. Analysis of AIS data revealed significant differences in characteristics of the spectral radiance curves of four types of wetland vegetation canopies (trees, broadleaf herbaceous, Spartina alterniflora, and S. patens/Distichlis spicata) in Delaware, enabling them to be distinguished. The single most useful spectral region was that between 1.40 and 1.90 microns. Differences in radiance values at various wavelengths between samples of the same vegetation type could potentially be used to estimate biomass. Thus, high spectral resolution spectrometry appears to have significant value for remote sensing studies of wetland vegetation.

  13. New calibration techniques for the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrien, Thomas G.; Green, Robert O.; Chovit, Chris; Eastwood, Mike; Faust, Jessica; Hajek, Pavel; Johnson, Howell; Novack, H. Ian; Sarture, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Recent laboratory calibrations of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) include new methods for the characterization of the geometric, spectral, temporal and radiometric properties of the sensor. New techniques are desired in order to: (1) increase measurement accuracy and precision, (2) minimize measurement time and expense, (3) prototype new field and inflight calibration systems, (4) resolve measurement ambiguities, and (5) add new measurement dimensions. One of the common features of these new methods is the use of the full data collection and processing power of the AVIRIS instrument and data facility. This allows the collection of large amounts of calibration data in a short period of time and is well suited to modular data analysis routines.

  14. MAPIR: An Airborne Polarmetric Imaging Radiometer in Support of Hydrologic Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, C.; Al-Hamdan, M.; Crosson, W.; Limaye, A.; McCracken, J.; Meyer, P.; Richeson, J.; Sims, W.; Srinivasan, K.; Varnevas, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this age of dwindling water resources and increasing demands, accurate estimation of water balance components at every scale is more critical to end users than ever before. Several near-term Earth science satellite missions are aimed at global hydrologic observations. The Marshall Airborne Polarimetric Imaging Radiometer (MAPIR) is a dual beam, dual angle polarimetric, scanning L band passive microwave radiometer system developed by the Observing Microwave Emissions for Geophysical Applications (OMEGA) team at MSFC to support algorithm development and validation efforts in support of these missions. MAPIR observes naturally-emitted radiation from the ground primarily for remote sensing of land surface brightness temperature from which we can retrieve soil moisture and possibly surface or water temperature and ocean salinity. MAPIR has achieved Technical Readiness Level 6 with flight heritage on two very different aircraft, the NASA P-3B, and a Piper Navajo.

  15. Analysis of Debris Flow Behavior Using Airborne LIDAR and Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G.; Yune, C. Y.; Paik, J.; Lee, S. W.

    2016-06-01

    The frequency of debris flow events caused by severe rainstorms has increased in Korea. LiDAR provides high-resolution topographical data that can represent the land surface more effectively than other methods. This study describes the analysis of geomorphologic changes using digital surface models derived from airborne LiDAR and aerial image data acquired before and after a debris flow event in the southern part of Seoul, South Korea in July 2011. During this event, 30 houses were buried, 116 houses were damaged, and 22 human casualties were reported. Longitudinal and cross-sectional profiles of the debris flow path reconstructed from digital surface models were used to analyze debris flow behaviors such as landslide initiation, transport, erosion, and deposition. LiDAR technology integrated with GIS is a very useful tool for understanding debris flow behavior.

  16. Study of SGD along the French Mediterranean coastline using airborne TIR images and in situ analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, Pieter; Stieglitz, Thomas; Souhaut, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Although submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) has been investigated in many places of the world, very few studies were conducted along the French coastline of the Mediterranean Sea. Almost no information is available on the fluxes of water and chemical elements associated with these SGD and on their potential impact on the geochemical cycling and ecosystems of the coastal zones. In this work, we combined the use of airborne thermal infrared (TIR) images with in situ analyses of salinity, temperature, radon and radium isotopes to study SGD at various sites along the French Mediterranean coastline and in coastal lagoons. These analyses allowed us to detect SGD sites and to quantify SGD fluxes (that include both the fluxes of fresh groundwater and recirculated seawater). In particular, we will show how the Ra isotopes determined in the La Palme lagoon were used to estimate i) the residence time of waters in the lagoon and ii) SGD fluxes.

  17. Visible and infrared linear detector arrays for the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Gary C.

    1987-01-01

    The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instrument uses four separate focal plane assemblies consisting of line array detectors that are multiplexed to a common J-FET preamp using a FET switch multiplexing (MUX) technique. A 32-element silicon line array covers the spectral range from 0.41 to 0.70 microns. Three additional 64-element indium antimonide (InSb) line arrays cover the spectral range from 0.68 to 2.45 microns. The spectral sampling interval per detector element is nominally 9.8 nm, giving a total of 224 spectral channels. All focal planes operate at liquid nitrogen temperature and are housed in separate dewars. Electrical performance characteristics include a read noise of less than 1000 e(-) in all channels, response and dark nonuniformity of 5 percent peak to peak, and quantum efficiency of greater than 60 percent.

  18. Determining experimentally induced variation in coniferous canopy chemistry with Airborne Imaging Spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanberg, N. A.; Matson, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental treatments in a Douglas-fir forest in NE New Mexico were carried out to determine whether differences in forest canopy chemistry could be detected using data from the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS-2). Experimental treatments consisted of nitrogen fertilizer additions, sawdust additions, and control plots. After AIS-2 data were collected, the digital number of a given pixel was extracted from each channel, yielding 128 values that were used to form a spectrum. Four spectra were extracted from each treatment plot. Multiple stepwise linear regressions between first and second difference transformations of AIS-2 spectra and the canopy characteristics of biomass, nitrogen concentration, and nitrogen content were performed. The results showed a coefficient of multiple determination of 0.71 between first-difference AIS-2 spectra and measured nitrogen concentration in foliage, indicating that it may be possible to predict nitrogen concentration in Douglas fir using AIS-2 spectra.

  19. Use of field reflectance data for crop mapping using airborne hyperspectral image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidamanuri, Rama Rao; Zbell, Bernd

    2011-09-01

    Recent developments in hyperspectral remote sensing technologies enable acquisition of image with high spectral resolution, which is typical to the laboratory or in situ reflectance measurements. There has been an increasing interest in the utilization of in situ reference reflectance spectra for rapid and repeated mapping of various surface features. Here we examined the prospect of classifying airborne hyperspectral image using field reflectance spectra as the training data for crop mapping. Canopy level field reflectance measurements of some important agricultural crops, i.e. alfalfa, winter barley, winter rape, winter rye, and winter wheat collected during four consecutive growing seasons are used for the classification of a HyMAP image acquired for a separate location by (1) mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF), (2) spectral feature fitting (SFF), and (3) spectral angle mapper (SAM) methods. In order to answer a general research question "what is the prospect of using independent reference reflectance spectra for image classification", while focussing on the crop classification, the results indicate distinct aspects. On the one hand, field reflectance spectra of winter rape and alfalfa demonstrate excellent crop discrimination and spectral matching with the image across the growing seasons. On the other hand, significant spectral confusion detected among the winter barley, winter rye, and winter wheat rule out the possibility of existence of a meaningful spectral matching between field reflectance spectra and image. While supporting the current notion of "non-existence of characteristic reflectance spectral signatures for vegetation", results indicate that there exist some crops whose spectral signatures are similar to characteristic spectral signatures with possibility of using them in image classification.

  20. Snow Water Equivalent Retrieval Using Multitemporal COSMO Skymed X-Band SAR Images To Inform Water Systems Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denaro, S.; Del Gobbo, U.; Castelletti, A.; Tebaldini, S.; Monti Guarnieri, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we explore the use of exogenous snow-related information for enhancing the operation of water facilities in snow dominated watersheds. Traditionally, such information is assimilated into short-to-medium term streamflow forecasts, which are then used to inform water systems operation. Here, we adopt an alternative model-free approach, where the policy is directly conditioned upon a small set of selected observational data able to surrogate the snow-pack dynamics. In snow-fed water systems, the Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) stored in the basin often represents the largest contribution to the future season streamflow. The SWE estimation process is challenged by the high temporal and spatial variability of snow-pack and snow properties. Traditional retrieval methods, based on few ground sensors and optical satellites, often fail at representing the spatial diversity of snow conditions over large basins and at producing continuous (gap-free) data at the high sample frequency (e.g. daily) required to optimally control water systems. Against this background, SWE estimates from remote sensed radar products stand out, being able to acquire spatial information with no dependence on cloud coverage. In this work, we propose a technique for retrieving SWE estimates from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Cosmo SkyMed X-band images: a regression model, calibrated on ground SWE measurements, is implemented on dry snow maps obtained through a multi-temporal approach. The unprecedented spatial scale of this application is novel w.r.t. state of the art radar analysis conducted on limited spatial domains. The operational value of the SAR retrieved SWE estimates is evaluated based on ISA, a recently developed information selection and assessment framework. The method is demonstrated on a snow-rain fed river basin in the Italian Alps. Preliminary results show SAR images have a good potential for monitoring snow conditions and for improving water management operations.

  1. Detection of recent faulting and evaluation of the vertical offsets from numerical analysis of SAR-ERS-1 images: the example of the Atacama fault zone in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mering, Catherine; Chorowicz, Jean; Vicente, Jean-Claude; Chalah, Cherif; Rafalli, Gaelle

    1995-11-01

    Usually the analysis of high resolution satellite images such as radar SAR ERS-1 images is undertaken by photo-interpretation techniques in order to reveal geological features. The numerical image processing is based on a filtering method designed for a better identification of geological structures on SAR images. The method leads to a mapping of recent faults on which the vertical offset is quantified. As examples, steeply dipping active faults with abrupt scarps are extracted from SAR-ERS1 images of the Central Andes (Atacama Fault zone, Northern Chile). The fault throws are then evaluated with a specific numerical image processing.

  2. Geometric and radiometric preprocessing of airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) data in rugged terrain for quantitative data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Peter; Green, Robert O.; Staenz, Karl; Itten, Klaus I.

    1994-01-01

    A geocoding procedure for remotely sensed data of airborne systems in rugged terrain is affected by several factors: buffeting of the aircraft by turbulence, variations in ground speed, changes in altitude, attitude variations, and surface topography. The current investigation was carried out with an Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) scene of central Switzerland (Rigi) from NASA's Multi Aircraft Campaign (MAC) in Europe (1991). The parametric approach reconstructs for every pixel the observation geometry based on the flight line, aircraft attitude, and surface topography. To utilize the data for analysis of materials on the surface, the AVIRIS data are corrected to apparent reflectance using algorithms based on MODTRAN (moderate resolution transfer code).

  3. Characterization of Titan surface scenarios combining Cassini SAR images and radiometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, B.; Notarnicola, C.; Casarano, D.; Janssen, M.; Posa, F.; Cassini RADAR Science Team

    2009-04-01

    A great amount of data and images was provided by the radar on Cassini probe, thus opening and suggesting new scenarios about Titan's formation and evolution. An important result was the detection, among the peculiar and heterogeneous Titan's surface features, of lakes most likely constituted by liquid hydrocarbons, thus supporting the hypothesis of a methane cycle similar to water cycle on Earth.These areas, which resemble terrestrial lakes, seem to be sprinkled all over the high latitudes surrounding Titan's pole. The abundant methane in Titan's atmosphere combined with the low temperature, 94 K, lead scientists to interpret them as lakes of liquid methane or ethane. In this work, scattering models and a Bayesian inversion algorithm are applied in order to characterize lake and land surfaces. The possibility of combining the SAR data with radiometric ones on both lakes and neighboring land areas is also presented. Radar backscattering from lakes is described in terms of a double layer model, consisting of Bragg or facets scattering for the upper liquid layer and the Integral Equation Model (IEM) model for the lower solid surface. Furthermore, by means of a gravity-capillary wave model (Donelan-Pierson), the wave spectra of liquid hydrocarbons surfaces are introduced as a function of wind speed and direction. Theoretical radar backscattering coefficient values are compared with the experimental ones collected by the radar in order to estimate physical and morphological surface parameters, and to evaluate their compatibility with the expected constituents for Titan surfaces. This electromagnetic analysis is the starting point for a statistical inversion algorithm which allows determining limits on the parameters values, especially on the optical thickness and wind speed of the lakes. The physical surface parameters inferred by using the inversion algorithm are used as input for a forward radiative transfer model calculation to obtain simulated brightness

  4. New 64Cu PET imaging agents for personalised medicine and drug development using the hexa-aza cage, SarAr.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolo, Nadine; Sargeson, Alan M; Smith, Suzanne V

    2006-09-01

    The success of positron emission tomography (PET) in personalised medicine and drug development requires radioisotopes that provide high quality images and flexible chemistry for a broad application. 64Cu is arguably one of the most suitable PET isotopes for imaging with the evolving target agents, but there are not many appropriate chelating agents for 64Cu and this has limited its wider application. The bi-functional chelator, SarAr is known to bind 64Cu2+ quantitatively (i.e. one metal per ligand present) and rapidly (<2 min) at 10(-6) M over a range of pH (4-9). In this paper the conjugation of SarAr to the whole and fragmented antibody is described. Conjugation of the SarAr to the protein does not impair its coordination of the 64Cu. It complexes the 64Cu2+ rapidly, quantitatively and essentially irreversibly at pH 5. Animal studies show that the 64Cu-SarAr-immunoconjugates maintain their specificity for the target and are stable in vivo. Also, SarAr is a platform technology, is easy to use in a kit formulation and is readily adaptable for the wider application in 64Cu PET imaging.

  5. Oil Spill Detection along the Gulf of Mexico Coastline based on Airborne Imaging Spectrometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, M. D.; Filippi, A. M.; Guneralp, I.

    2013-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico between April and July 2010 demonstrated the importance of synoptic oil-spill monitoring in coastal environments via remote-sensing methods. This study focuses on terrestrial oil-spill detection and thickness estimation based on hyperspectral images acquired along the coastline of the Gulf of Mexico. We use AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) imaging spectrometer data collected over Bay Jimmy and Wilkinson Bay within Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA during September 2010. We also employ field-based observations of the degree of oil accumulation along the coastline, as well as in situ measurements from the literature. As part of our proposed spectroscopic approach, we operate on atmospherically- and geometrically-corrected hyperspectral AVIRIS data to extract image-derived endmembers via Minimum Noise Fraction transform, Pixel Purity Index-generation, and n-dimensional visualization. Extracted endmembers are then used as input to endmember-mapping algorithms to yield fractional-abundance images and crisp classification images. We also employ Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) for oil detection and mapping in order to enable the number and types of endmembers to vary on a per-pixel basis, in contast to simple Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA). MESMA thus better allows accounting for spectral variabiltiy of oil (e.g., due to varying oil thicknesses, states of degradation, and the presence of different oil types, etc.) and other materials, including soils and salt marsh vegetation of varying types, which may or may not be affected by the oil spill. A decision-tree approach is also utilized for comparison. Classification results do indicate that MESMA provides advantageous capabilities for mapping several oil-thickness classes for affected vegetation and soils along the Gulf of Mexico coastline, relative to the conventional approaches tested. Oil thickness-mapping results from MESMA

  6. Sunglint effects on the characterization of optically active substances in high spatial resolution airborne hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streher, A. S.; Faria Barbosa, C. Clemente; Soares Galvão, L.; Goodman, J. A.; Silva, T. S.

    2013-05-01

    Sunglint, also known as the specular reflection of light from water surfaces, is a component of sensor-received radiance that represents a confounding factor on the characterization of water bodies by remote sensing. In airborne remote sensing images, the effect of sunglint can be minimized by optimizing the flight paths, directing the sensor towards or away from the Sun, and by keeping solar zenith angles between 30° and 60°. However, these guidelines cannot always be applied, often due to the irregular spatial pattern of lakes, estuaries and coastlines. The present study assessed the impact of sunglint on the relationship between the optically active substances (OAS) concentration, in optically complex waters, and the spectral information provided by an airborne high spatial resolution hyperspectral sensor (SpecTIR). The Ibitinga reservoir, located in southeastern Brazil (state of São Paulo), was selected as the study area because of its meandering shape. As a result, there is demanding constant changes in data acquisition geometry to achieve complete coverage, therefore not allowing sunglint conditions to be minimized during image acquisition. Field data collection was carried out on October 23 and 24, 2011. During these two days, 15 water stations along the reservoir were sampled, concurrently with the SpecTIR image acquisition in 357 bands (398-2455 nm) and at 3 m spatial resolution. Chlorophyll, pheophytin, total suspended solids, organic and inorganic suspended solids and colored dissolved matter were determined in laboratory. The images were corrected for the atmospheric effects using the Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH) algorithm and then geometrically corrected. In order to evaluate the sunglint effects on the OAS characterization, the images were corrected for such effects using the deglint algorithm from Goodman et al. (2008). The SpecTIR 662-nm band reflectance was selected to be correlated to the OAS due to

  7. Cascades of InSAR in the Cascades - outlook for the use of InSAR and space-based imaging catalogues in a Subduction Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has long demonstrated its utility to studies of subduction zone earthquakes, crustal events and volcanic processes, particularly in regions with very good temporal data coverage (e.g., Japan), or arid regions where the timescale of surface change is long compared to the repeat time of the available SAR imagery (e.g., portions of South America). Recently launched and future SAR missions with open data access will increase the temporal sampling rates further over many areas of the globe, resulting in a new ability to lower the detection threshold for earthquakes and, potentially, interseismic motion and transients associated with subduction zone settings. Here we describe some of the anticipated detection abilities for events ranging from earthquakes and slow slip along the subduction zone interface up to landslides, and examine the variations in land use around the circum-Pacific and how that and its changes over time will affect the use of InSAR. We will show the results of an effort to combine Landsat and other optical imagery with SAR data catalogues in the Pacific Northwest to improve the characterization of ground deformation signals, including the identification of "spurious" signals that are not related to true ground deformation. We also describe prospects for working with other communities that are interested in variations in soil moisture and vegetation structure over the same terrain.

  8. Airborne and spaceborne radar images for geologic and environmental mapping in the Amazon rain forest, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, John P.; Hurtak, James J.

    1986-01-01

    Spaceborne and airborne radar image of portions of the Middle and Upper Amazon basin in the state of Amazonas and the Territory of Roraima are compared for purposes of geological and environmental mapping. The contrasted illumination geometries and imaging parameters are related to terrain slope and surface roughness characteristics for corresponding areas that were covered by each of the radar imaging systems. Landforms range from deeply dissected mountain and plateau with relief up to 500 m in Roraima, revealing ancient layered rocks through folded residual mountains to deeply beveled pediplain in Amazonas. Geomorphic features provide distinct textural signatures that are characteristic of different rock associations. The principle drainages in the areas covered are the Rio Negro, Rio Branco, and the Rio Japura. Shadowing effects and low radar sensitivity to subtle linear fractures that are aligned parallel or nearly parallel to the direction of radar illumination illustrate the need to obtain multiple coverage with viewing directions about 90 degrees. Perception of standing water and alluvial forest in floodplains varies with incident angle and with season. Multitemporal data sets acquired over periods of years provide an ideal method of monitoring environmental changes.

  9. High Resolution Airborne Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Imaging with a Small Uav Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallay, Michal; Eck, Christoph; Zgraggen, Carlo; Kaňuk, Ján; Dvorný, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    The capabilities of unmanned airborne systems (UAS) have become diverse with the recent development of lightweight remote sensing instruments. In this paper, we demonstrate our custom integration of the state-of-the-art technologies within an unmanned aerial platform capable of high-resolution and high-accuracy laser scanning, hyperspectral imaging, and photographic imaging. The technological solution comprises the latest development of a completely autonomous, unmanned helicopter by Aeroscout, the Scout B1-100 UAV helicopter. The helicopter is powered by a gasoline two-stroke engine and it allows for integrating 18 kg of a customized payload unit. The whole system is modular providing flexibility of payload options, which comprises the main advantage of the UAS. The UAS integrates two kinds of payloads which can be altered. Both payloads integrate a GPS/IMU with a dual GPS antenna configuration provided by OXTS for accurate navigation and position measurements during the data acquisition. The first payload comprises a VUX-1 laser scanner by RIEGL and a Sony A6000 E-Mount photo camera. The second payload for hyperspectral scanning integrates a push-broom imager AISA KESTREL 10 by SPECIM. The UAS was designed for research of various aspects of landscape dynamics (landslides, erosion, flooding, or phenology) in high spectral and spatial resolution.

  10. Space Shuttle Radar Images of Terrestrial Impact Structures: SIR-C/X-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHone, J. F.; Blumberg, D. G.; Greeley, R.; Underwood, J. R., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    The Spaceborne Radar Laboratory (SRL) orbited Earth in April and October of 1994 operating two imaging radars: X-SAR, an X-band (3 cm lambda) instrument, and the polarimetric SIR-C, a combination L-band/C-band (24 cm and 5.6 cm lambda). More than 150 terrestrial meteorite craters and astroblemes are presently known. Three of these, Wolfe Creek in Australia; Roter Kamm in Namibia; and Zhamanshin in Kazakhstan, were planned targets and were imaged successfully with multiple passes and look directions. Several other impact sites were fortuitously imaged while radar data were being collected for other purposes. These sites include B.P. and Oasis structures in Libya, Aourounga multi-ring feature in Chad, Amguid crater in Algeria, and the Spider astrobleme and Henbury crater field in Australia. Wolfe Creek (19 degrees 10'S; 127 degrees 47'E; 875 m dia) Both the elevated rim and the inner floor of this crater appear as radar bright features. Strong radar returns are due to blocky rubble textures in the rim and desert vegetation within the central bowl. Associated linear sand dunes show differential penetration properties in the various radar wavelengths and polarization. Roter Kamm (27 degrees 46'S; 016 degrees 18'E; 2.5 km dia) This bowl-shaped crater is mostly buried by wind-blown sands. Comparison of differential radar penetration patterns due to changes in wavelength and look direction reveal concealed target rocks and a buried possible ejecta unit. Zhamanshin (48 degrees 24'N; 060 degrees 48'E; 14 km dia) This unusual impact structure, first detected by the presence of glassy impact melt products [1], has very little topographic relief and is nearly invisible on survey-quality radar imagery. Fully processed images, however, enhance subtle vegetation patterns which highlight regional streams. These drainage patterns are now being analyzed in detail to better delineate boundaries and internal structure of this feature. B.P. Structure (25 degrees 19'N; 024 degrees 20'E

  11. Recent Advances in Radar Polarimetry and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    2005-01-01

    and validation, stress assessment, and stress-change monitoring of the terrestrial and planetary covers. In addition, various closely related topics of (i) acquiring additional and protecting existing spectral windows of the Natural Electromagnetic Spectrum (NES) pertinent to Remote Sensing; (ii) mitigating against common "Radio Frequency Interference (RFI)" and intentional Directive Jamming of Airborne & Space borne POL-IN-SAR Imaging Platforms are appraised.

  12. Airborne imaging sensors for environmental monitoring & surveillance in support of oil spills & recovery efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Jones, James; Frystacky, Heather; Coppin, Gaelle; Leavaux, Florian; Neyt, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Collection of pushbroom sensor imagery from a mobile platform requires corrections using inertial measurement units (IMU's) and DGPS in order to create useable imagery for environmental monitoring and surveillance of shorelines in freshwater systems, coastal littoral zones and harbor areas. This paper describes a suite of imaging systems used during collection of hyperspectral imagery in northern Florida panhandle and Gulf of Mexico airborne missions to detect weathered oil in coastal littoral zones. Underlying concepts of pushbroom imagery, the needed corrections for directional changes using DGPS and corrections for platform yaw, pitch, and roll using IMU data is described as well as the development and application of optimal band and spectral regions associated with weathered oil. Pushbroom sensor and frame camera data collected in response to the recent Gulf of Mexico oil spill disaster is presented as the scenario documenting environmental monitoring and surveillance techniques using mobile sensing platforms. Data was acquired during the months of February, March, April and May of 2011. The low altitude airborne systems include a temperature stabilized hyperspectral imaging system capable of up to 1024 spectral channels and 1376 spatial across track pixels flown from 3,000 to 4,500 feet altitudes. The hyperspectral imaging system is collocated with a full resolution high definition video recorder for simultaneous HD video imagery, a 12.3 megapixel digital, a mapping camera using 9 inch film types that yields scanned aerial imagery with approximately 22,200 by 22,200 pixel multispectral imagery (~255 megapixel RGB multispectral images in order to conduct for spectral-spatial sharpening of fused multispectral, hyperspectral imagery. Two high spectral (252 channels) and radiometric sensitivity solid state spectrographs are used for collecting upwelling radiance (sub-meter pixels) with downwelling irradiance fiber optic attachment. These sensors are utilized for

  13. Analysis of Coincident HICO and Airborne Hyperspectral Images Over Lake Erie Western Basin HABs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, M., Jr.; Becker, R.; Lekki, J.; Bridgeman, T. B.; Tokars, R. P.; Anderson, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) produce waterborne toxins that pose a significant threat to people, livestock, and wildlife. 40 million people in both Canada and the U.S. depend on Great Lakes water. In the summer of 2014, in the Lake Erie Western Basin, an HAB of the cyanobacteria Microsystis was so severe that a water-use ban was in effect for the greater Toledo area, Ohio. This shut off the water supply to over 400,000 people from a single water intake. We investigated bloom intensity, composition, and spatial variability by comparing hyperspectral data from NASA's HICO, multispectral data from MODIS spaceborne imagers and NASA GRC's HSI imagers to on-lake ASD radiometer measurements using in situ water quality testing as ground reference data, all acquired on a single day during the bloom in 2014. HICO imagery acquired on Aug 15, 2014 was spatially georeferenced and atmospherically corrected using empirical line method utilizing on-lake ASD spectra. HSI imagery were processed in a similar way. Cyanobacteria Index (CI) images were created from processed images using the Wynne (2010) algorithm, previously used for MODIS and MERIS imagery. This algorithm-generated CI images provide reliable results for both ground level (R²=0.7784), and satellite imagery (R²=0.7794) for seven sampling points in Lake Erie's western basin. Spatial variability in the bloom was high, and was not completely characterized by the lower spatial resolution MODIS data. The ability to robustly atmospherically correct and generate useful CI maps from airborne and satellite sensors can provide a time- and cost-effective method for HABs analysis. Timely processing of these high spatial and spectral resolution remote sensing data can aid in management of water intake resources.

  14. Adaptive thresholding algorithm based on SAR images and wind data to segment oil spills along the northwest coast of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Mera, David; Cotos, José M; Varela-Pet, José; Garcia-Pineda, Oscar

    2012-10-01

    Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has been established as a useful tool for detecting hydrocarbon spillage on the ocean's surface. Several surveillance applications have been developed based on this technology. Environmental variables such as wind speed should be taken into account for better SAR image segmentation. This paper presents an adaptive thresholding algorithm for detecting oil spills based on SAR data and a wind field estimation as well as its implementation as a part of a functional prototype. The algorithm was adapted to an important shipping route off the Galician coast (northwest Iberian Peninsula) and was developed on the basis of confirmed oil spills. Image testing revealed 99.93% pixel labelling accuracy. By taking advantage of multi-core processor architecture, the prototype was optimized to get a nearly 30% improvement in processing time.

  15. Improved Hurricane Boundary Layer Observations with the Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Changy, P.; Carswell, J.; Contreras, R.; Chu, T.

    2006-01-01

    During the NOAA/NESDIS 2005 Hurricane Season (HS2005) and the 2006 Winter Experiment, the University of Massachusetts (UMass) installed two instruments on the NOAA N42RF WP-3D research aircraft: the Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (IWRAP) and the Simultaneous Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR). IWRAP is a dual-band (C- and Ku), dual-polarized pencil-beam airborne radar that profiles the volume backscatter and Doppler velocity from rain and that also measures the ocean backscatter response. It simultaneously profiles along four separate incidence angles while conically scanning at 60 RPM. SFMR is a C-band nadir viewing radiometer that measures the emission from the ocean surface and intervening atmosphere simultaneously at six frequencies. It is designed to obtain the surface wind speed and the column average rain rate. Both instruments have previously been flown during the 2002, 2003 and 2004 hurricane seasons. For the HS2005, the IWRAP system was modified to implement a raw data acquisition system. The importance of the raw data system arises when trying to profile the atmosphere all the way down to the surface with a non-nadir looking radar system. With this particular geometry, problems arise mainly from the fact that both rain and ocean provide a return echo coincident in time through the antenna s main lobe. This paper shows how this limitation has been removed and presents initial results demonstrating its new capabilities to derive the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind field within the inner core of hurricanes to much lower altitudes than the ones the original system was capable of, and to analyze the spectral response of the ocean backscatter and the rain under different wind and rain conditions.

  16. Coseismic displacement field and slip distribution of the 2005 Kashmir earthquake from SAR amplitude image correlation and differential interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Pinel, V.; Trouvé, E.; Pathier, E.; Perrin, J.; Bascou, P.; Jouanne, F.

    2013-04-01

    The coseismic surface displacement field and slip distribution at depth due to the Kashmir earthquake (Mw = 7.6, 2005) have been analysed by different authors using subpixel correlation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and optical images, teleseismic analysis, GPS measurements, as well as in situ field measurements. In this paper, first, we use 23 sets of measurement from subpixel correlation of SAR images and differential interferometry to retrieve the 3-D coseismic surface displacement field. The obtained horizontal and vertical components along the fault trace are then compared, respectively, to equivalent measurements obtained from subpixel correlation of two optical ASTER images and in situ field measurements. Second, the coseismic fault geometry parameters and slip distribution at depth are estimated. In addition to the one segment slip model as reported in previous work, a two segments slip model that better fits the surface fault break is proposed. The improvement of the two segments slip model in interpreting the measured displacement field is highlighted through comparison of residuals of both slip models. Taking advantage of differential interferometry measurements that provide precise and continuous information in the far field of the fault, firstly, a wedge thrust according to Bendick et al. to the Northwest of the main rupture built on our two segments model is tested. According to the obtained results, the residual of the two segments main rupture plus wedge thrust model is slightly smaller than the residual of the two segments model to the Northwest of the Balakot-Bagh fault. Secondly, we test the sensitivity of our slip model to the presence of slip along a décollement as evidenced by Jouanne et al. through post-seismic analysis. The results indicate that the estimations of the coseismic displacement field and slip distribution in this paper are not significantly biased by such post-seismic displacement and that most coseismic displacement

  17. Joint influences of aerodynamic flow field and aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of airborne optical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haosu; Zuo, Baojun; Tian, Yi; Zhang, Wang; Hao, Chenglong; Liu, Chaofeng; Li, Qi; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhigang

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the joint influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical dome and the aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT was used for flow computations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray tracing program was used to simulate optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field and the dome. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the exit pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the aero-optical disturbance of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamic heating of the dome significantly affect the imaging quality of an airborne optical system.

  18. Imager-to-Radiometer In-flight Cross Calibration: RSP Radiometric Comparison with Airborne and Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), which takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI). First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  19. SAR peculiarities, ambiguities and constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keydel, Wolfgang

    1992-08-01

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is basically a coherent scatterometer that employs a coherent real aperture radar with highly sophisticated data evaluation and image processing capabilities. Therefore, the coherence of the system is very important; furthermore, the keypoints for SAR are data storage, evaluation, and processing. These facts entail peculiarities of SAR and special ambiguities which are different from those arising with real aperture radar (RAR). The objective of this paper is to point out the special peculiarities and ambiguities of SAR in comparison to the corresponding properties of RAR. Main topics in this connection are as follows: basic peculiarities like range dependency of signal to noise ratio; azimuth resolution; influence of platform velocity; range and azimuth ambiguities; pulse repetition frequency limitations; velocity effects; and phase error influence, on SAR-image, that can cause motion compensation problems. All these effects will be explained together with different contrast-equations between the target and clutter signals of SAR and RAR.

  20. Calibration and Validation of the National Ecological Observatory Network's Airborne Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisso, N.

    2015-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is being constructed by the National Science Foundation and is slated for completion in 2017. NEON is designed to collect data to improve the understanding of changes in observed ecosystems. The observatory will produce data products on a variety of spatial and temporal scales collected from individual sites strategically located across the U.S. including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Data sources include standardized terrestrial, instrumental, and aquatic observation systems in addition to three airborne remote sensing observation systems installed into leased Twin Otter aircraft. The Airborne Observation Platforms (AOP) are designed to collect 3-band aerial imagery, waveform and discrete LiDAR, and high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy data over the NEON sites annually at or near peak-greenness. The NEON Imaging Spectrometer (NIS) is a Visible and Shortwave Infrared (VSWIR) sensor designed by NASA JPL for ecological applications. Spectroscopic data is collected at 5-nm intervals across the solar-reflective spectral region (380-nm to 2500-nm) in a 34-degree FOV swath. A key uncertainty driver to the derived remote sensing NEON data products is the calibration of the imaging spectrometers. In addition, the calibration and accuracy of the higher-level data product algorithms is essential to the overall NEON mission to detect changes in the collected ecosystems over the 30-year expected lifetime. The typical calibration workflow of the NIS consists of the characterizing the focal plane, spectral calibration, and radiometric calibration. Laboratory spectral calibration is based on well-defined emission lines in conjunction with a scanning monochromator to define the individual spectral response functions. The radiometric calibration is NIST traceable and transferred to the NIS with an integrating sphere calibrated through the use of transfer radiometers. The laboratory calibration is monitored and maintained through

  1. Fast and adaptive method for SAR superresolution imaging based on point scattering model and optimal basis selection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-ming; Wang, Wei-wei

    2009-07-01

    A novel fast and adaptive method for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) superresolution imaging is developed. Based on the point scattering model in the phase history domain, a dictionary is constructed so that the superresolution imaging process can be converted to a problem of sparse parameter estimation. The approximate orthogonality of this dictionary is exploited by theoretical derivation and experimental verification. Based on the orthogonality of the dictionary, we propose a fast algorithm for basis selection. Meanwhile, a threshold for obtaining the number and positions of the scattering centers is determined automatically from the inner product curves of the bases and observed data. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the threshold on estimation performance is analyzed. To reduce the burden of mass calculation and memory, a simplified superresolution imaging process is designed according to the characteristics of the imaging parameters. The experimental results of the simulated images and an MSTAR image illustrate the validity of this method and its robustness in the case of the high noise level. Compared with the traditional regularization method with the sparsity constraint, our proposed method suffers less computation complexity and has better adaptability.

  2. Real-time sensor mapping display for airborne imaging sensor test with the adaptive infrared imaging spectroradiometer (AIRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Megan M.; Cruger, William E.; Gittins, Christopher; Kindle, Harry; Ricks, Timothy P.

    2005-11-01

    Captive flight testing (CFT) of sensors and seekers requires accurate data collection and display for sensor performance evaluation. The U.S. Army Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC), in support of the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), has developed a data collection suite to facilitate airborne test of hyperspectral chemical/biological sensors. The data collection suite combines global positioning system (GPS) tracking, inertial measurement unit (IMU) data, accurate timing streams, and other test scenario information. This data collection suite also contains an advanced real-time display of aircraft and sensor field-of-view information. The latest evolution of this system has been used in support of the Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS), currently under development by Physical Sciences Incorporated for ECBC. For this test, images from the AIRIS sensor were overlaid on a digitized background of the test area, with latencies of 1 second or less. Detects of surrogate chemicals were displayed and geo-referenced. Video overlay was accurate and reliable. This software suite offers great versatility in the display of imaging sensor data; support of future tests with the AIRIS sensor are planned as the system evolves.

  3. Persistent Scatterer Aided Facade Lattice Extraction in Single Airborne Optical Oblique Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schack, L.; Soergel, U.; Heipke, C.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new method to extract patterns of regular facade structures from single optical oblique images. To overcome the missing three-dimensional information we incorporate structural information derived from Persistent Scatter (PS) point cloud data into our method. Single oblique images and PS point clouds have never been combined before and offer promising insights into the compatibility of remotely sensed data of different kinds. Even though the appearance of facades is significantly different, many characteristics of the prominent patterns can be seen in both types of data and can be transferred across the sensor domains. To justify the extraction based on regular facade patterns we show that regular facades appear rather often in typical airborne oblique imagery of urban scenes. The extraction of regular patterns is based on well established tools like cross correlation and is extended by incorporating a module for estimating a window lattice model using a genetic algorithm. Among others the results of our approach can be used to derive a deeper understanding of the emergence of Persistent Scatterers and their fusion with optical imagery. To demonstrate the applicability of the approach we present a concept for data fusion aiming at facade lattices extraction in PS and optical data.

  4. Novel compact airborne platform for remote sensing applications using the Hyper-Cam infrared hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, Caroline S.; Puckrin, Eldon; Aube, Françoys; Farley, Vincent; Savary, Simon; Chamberland, Martin

    2013-05-01

    High resolution broad-band imagery in the visible and infrared bands provides valuable detection capabilities based on target shapes and temperatures. However, the spectral resolution provided by a hyperspectral imager adds a spectral dimension to the measurements, which leads to an additional means of detecting and identifying targets based on their spectral signature. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an interferometer-based imaging system that enables the spatial and spectral analysis of targets using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology, which yields high spectral resolution and enables a high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at spectral resolutions as fine as 0.25 cm-1. The LWIR version covers the 8.0 to 11.8 μm spectral range. The Hyper-Cam has been recently integrated and flown on a novel airborne gyro-stabilized platform inside a fixed-wing aircraft. The new platform, more compact and more advanced than its predecessor, is described in this paper. The first results of target detection and identification are also presented.

  5. Airborne Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) luminescence imaging systems and its application to exploration problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Robert D.; Theisen, Arnold F.; Hemphill, William R.; Barringer, Anthony R.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments with an imaging airborne Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) are being conducted to establish the feasibility of delineating the areal extent of luminescent materials on the earth's surface from aircraft and spacecraft. All luminescence measurements are related to a standard set of conditions with rhodamine wt dye used as a reference standard. The FLD has a minimum detectable rhodamine wt concentration of 0.1 parts per billion (ppb) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 5.0. Luminescence, when expressed in a signal-to-noise ratio (R) is related to equivalent ppb rhodamine wt through the relationship ppb=(0.1R-0.4). Luminescent materials imaged from an aircraft altitude of approximately 2400 m above terrain include fluorite in association with molybdenum, Pinenut Mountains, Nevada (R=62.0); mineralized playas, Claunch, New Mexico (R=960.0); uranium and vanadium-bearing outcrops, Big Indian Valley, Utah (R=105.0); uranophane sandstones, Sandia Mountains, New Mexico (R=60.0); phosphate outcrops, Pine Mountain, California (R=76.0); and marine oil slicks, Santa Barbara Channel, California (R=24.0). Correlation between the amount of fluorite in the rocks and soils of the Pinenut Mountains and luminescence, measured by the FLD, is as high as 0.88 at the 95 percent confidence level.

  6. Utilization of an Airborne Plant Chlorophyll Imaging System for Detection of Septic System Malfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Bruce A.; Carter, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    Malfunctioning, or leaking, sewer systems increase the supply of water and nutrients to surface vegetation. Excess nutrients and harmful bacteria in the effluent pollute ground water and local water bodies and are dangerous to humans and the aquatic ecosystems. An airborne multispectral plant chlorophyll imaging system (PCIS) was used to identify growth patterns in the vegetation covering onsite and public sewer systems. The objective was to evaluate overall performance of the PCIS as well as to determine the best operational configuration for this application. The imaging system was flown in a light aircraft over selected locations Mobile County, Alabama. Calibration panels were used to help characterize instrument performance. Results demonstrated that the PCIS performed well and was capable of detecting septic leakage patterns from altitudes as high as 915 m. From 915 m, 6 of 18 sites were suspected to have sewage leakage. Subsequent ground inspections confirmed leakage on 3 of the 6 sites. From 610 m, 3 of 8 known leakage sites were detected. Tree cover and shadows near residential structures prevented detection of several known malfunctioning systems. Also some leakages known to occur in clear areas were not detected. False detections occurred in areas characterized by surface water drainage problems or recent excavation.

  7. Development of the NASA High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Gerald; Carswell, James; Schaubert, Dan; McLinden, Matthew; Vega, Manuel; Perrine, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the development and recent field deployments of the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), which was funded under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) [1]. HIWRAP is a dual-frequency (Ka- and Ku-band), dual-beam (300 and 400 incidence angles), conical scanning, Doppler radar system designed for operation on the NASA high-altitude (65,000 ft) Global Hawk Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). It utilizes solid state transmitters along with a novel pulse compression scheme that results in a system with compact size, light weight, less power consumption, and low cost compared to radars currently in use for precipitation and Doppler wind measurements. By combining measurements at Ku- and Ka-band, HIWRAP is able to image winds through measuring volume backscattering from clouds and precipitation. In addition, HIWRAP is also capable of measuring surface winds in an approach similar to SeaWinds on QuikScat. To this end, HIWRAP hardware and software development has been completed. It was installed on the NASA WB57 for instrument test flights in March, 2010 and then deployed on the NASA Global Hawk for supporting the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field campaign in August-September, 2010. This paper describes the scientific motivations of the development of HIWRAP as well as system hardware, aircraft integration and flight missions. Preliminary data from GRIP science flights is also presented.

  8. A building extraction approach for Airborne Laser Scanner data utilizing the Object Based Image Analysis paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomljenovic, Ivan; Tiede, Dirk; Blaschke, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In the past two decades Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) established itself as an efficient approach for the classification and extraction of information from remote sensing imagery and, increasingly, from non-image based sources such as Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) point clouds. ALS data is represented in the form of a point cloud with recorded multiple returns and intensities. In our work, we combined OBIA with ALS point cloud data in order to identify and extract buildings as 2D polygons representing roof outlines in a top down mapping approach. We performed rasterization of the ALS data into a height raster for the purpose of the generation of a Digital Surface Model (DSM) and a derived Digital Elevation Model (DEM). Further objects were generated in conjunction with point statistics from the linked point cloud. With the use of class modelling methods, we generated the final target class of objects representing buildings. The approach was developed for a test area in Biberach an der Riß (Germany). In order to point out the possibilities of the adaptation-free transferability to another data set, the algorithm has been applied "as is" to the ISPRS Benchmarking data set of Toronto (Canada). The obtained results show high accuracies for the initial study area (thematic accuracies of around 98%, geometric accuracy of above 80%). The very high performance within the ISPRS Benchmark without any modification of the algorithm and without any adaptation of parameters is particularly noteworthy.

  9. Airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over disseminated gold deposits, Osgood Mountains, Humboldt County, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krohn, M. Dennis

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquired airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over several disseminated gold deposits in northern Nevada in 1983. The aerial surveys were flown to determine whether TIMS data could depict jasperoids (siliceous replacement bodies) associated with the gold deposits. The TIMS data were collected over the Pinson and Getchell Mines in the Osgood Mountains, the Carlin, Maggie Creek, Bootstrap, and other mines in the Tuscarora Mountains, and the Jerritt Canyon Mine in the Independence Mountains. The TIMS data seem to be a useful supplement to conventional geochemical exploration for disseminated gold deposits in the western United States. Siliceous outcrops are readily separable in the TIMS image from other types of host rocks. Different forms of silicification are not readily separable, yet, due to limitations of spatial resolution and spectral dynamic range. Features associated with the disseminated gold deposits, such as the large intrusive bodies and fault structures, are also resolvable on TIMS data. Inclusion of high-resolution thermal inertia data would be a useful supplement to the TIMS da